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1

Combined effects of electrostatic and pi-pi stacking interactions: selective binding of nucleotides and aromatic carboxylates by platinum(II)-aromatic ligand complexes.  

PubMed

Adduct formations of Pt(II) complexes containing an aromatic diimine (DA) and an L-amino acid (A) with an aromatic carboxylate (AR) or a mononucleotide (NMP) has been studied by synthetic, structural, spectroscopic, and calorimetric methods. Several adducts between Pt(II) complexes, [Pt(DA)(L-A)] (charges are omitted; DA=2,2'-bipyrimidine (bpm); A=L-arginine (L-Arg), L-alaninate (L-Ala), and AR (=indole-3-acetate (IA), gentisate (GA)) or GMP were isolated as crystals and structurally characterized by the X-ray diffraction method. GMP in [Pt(bpm)(Arg)](GMP).5 H(2)O was revealed to be bound through the pi-pi stacking and guanidinium-phosphate hydrogen bonds. The [Pt(DA)(A)]-AR and -NMP systems in aqueous solution exhibited NMR upfield shifts of the aromatic ring proton signals due to stacking. The stability constants (K) for the adducts were determined by absorption and NMR spectra and calorimetric titrations. The log K values were found to be in the range 1.40-2.29 for AR and 1.8-3.3 for NMP, the order for NMP being GMP>AMP>CMP>UMP. The DeltaH degrees values were negative for all the systems studied, and the values for AR (=IA and GA) were more negative than those for NMP, indicating that ARs are stronger electron donors than NMPs. Comparison of the log K values for [Pt(bpm)(L-Arg)] and [Pt(bpm)(L-Ala)] (Ala=alaninate) indicated that the Arg moiety further stabilized the adducts by the guanidinium-carboxylate or -phosphate hydrogen bonds. The combined effects of weak interactions on the stability of the adducts in solution are discussed on the basis of the thermodynamic parameters and solid state structures. PMID:12866078

Yajima, Tatsuo; Maccarrone, Giuseppe; Takani, Masako; Contino, Annalinda; Arena, Giuseppe; Takamido, Reiko; Hanaki, Mieko; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Odani, Akira; Yamauchi, Osamu

2003-07-21

2

Charmless Final State Interaction in B-> pi pi decays  

E-print Network

We estimate effects of the final state interactions in B -> pi pi decays coming from rescattering of pi pi via exchange of rho, sigma, f_0 mesons. Then we include the rho rho rescattering via exchange of pi, omega, a_1 mesons and finally we consider contributions of the a_1 pi rescattering via exchange of rho. The absorptive parts of amplitudes for these processes are determined. In the case of pi^+ pi^- decay mode, due to model uncertainties, the calculated contribution is |M_A| = pi pi amplitudes consistent with the result of a recent phenomenological analysis based on the BaBar and Belle results for the B -> pi pi branching ratios and CP asymmetries.

Svjetlana Fajfer; Anita Prapotnik Brdnik; Tri-Nang Pham

2005-09-09

3

{pi}-{pi} Interactions and magnetic properties in a series of hybrid inorganic-organic crystals  

SciTech Connect

The series of hybrid inorganic-organic solids T(Im){sub 2}[Ni(CN){sub 4}] with T=Fe, Co, Ni and Im=imidazole were prepared by soft chemical routes from aqueous solutions of the involved building units: imidazole, T{sup 2+} metal and the [Ni(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} anionic block. The obtained samples were characterized from infrared and UV-vis spectroscopies, and thermogravimetric, X-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements. Anhydrous solids which crystallize with a monoclinic unit cell, in the I2/a space group with four formula units per cell (Z=4) were obtained. Their crystal structure was solved ab initio from the recorded X-ray powder patterns and then refined by the Rietveld method. The metal T is found with octahedral coordination to four N ends of CN groups and two imidazole molecules while the inner Ni atom preserves its planar coordination. The system of layers remains stacked in an ordered 3D structure through dipole-dipole and {pi}-{pi} interactions between imidazole rings from neighboring layers. In this way, a pillared structure is achieved without requiring the coordination of both nitrogen atoms from imidazole ring. The recorded magnetic data indicate the occurrence of a predominant ferromagnetic interaction at low temperature for Co and Ni but not for Fe. Such magnetic ordering is more favorable for Ni with transition temperature of 14.67 K, which was ascribed to the relatively high polarizing power for this metal. Within the considered T metals, to nickel the highest electron-withdrawing ability corresponds and this leads to an increase for the metal-ligand electron clouds overlapping and to a stronger {pi}-{pi} attractive interaction, two factors that result into a higher magnetic ordering temperature. - Graphical Abstract: Magnetic ordering through the {pi}-{pi} interaction between the imidazole rings. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid inorganic-organic solids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid inorganic-organic molecular based magnets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferromagnetic interaction through {pi}-{pi} stacking of imidazole rings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic pillars formed through {pi}-{pi} stacking.

Gonzalez, M.; Lemus-Santana, A.A. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Rodriguez-Hernandez, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales, Universidad de La Habana (Cuba); Knobel, M. [Instituto de Fisica 'Gleb Wataghin', Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Reguera, E., E-mail: edilso.reguera@gmail.com [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

2013-01-15

4

Offset pi-pi interaction in crystal structure of (-)-gallocatechin-3-O-gallate.  

PubMed

The single crystal of (-)-gallocatechin-3-O-gallate (GCg) was prepared using a solution containing an equimolecular amount of GCg and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCg) in water. The crystal structure of GCg determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis was monoclinic with the space group P2(1) at 223 K. Offset pi-pi interactions formed between the A and A rings, B and B rings, and gallate and gallate rings of GCg, and five intermolecular hydrogen bonds formed between GCgs, GCg and water. The B ring of GCg bonded to C2 was in the axial position and the gallate ring of GCg bonded to C3 was in the pseudoaxial position with respect to the C ring of GCg. PMID:20410646

Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Sato, Takashi; Ishizu, Takashi

2010-04-01

5

Test of charge conjugation invariance in the decay of the eta meson into pi(+)pi(-)pi(0)  

E-print Network

In this work we present the preliminary results of the analysis of the pp->pp eta(->pp pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) reaction aiming to test the charge conjugation symmetry C in strong interactions. Based on approximately $10^5$ identified eta->pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) decay events we have extracted asymmetry parameters sensitive to C symmetry violation for different isospin values of the final state and we have established that all are consistent with zero within the obtained accuracy.

M. Zielinski; P. Moskal

2012-10-05

6

Observation of eta_c(1S) and eta_c(2S) decays to K K-pi pi-pi0 in two-photon interactions  

SciTech Connect

We study the processes {gamma}{gamma} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and {gamma}{gamma} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} using a data sample of 519.2 fb{sup -1} recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at center-of-mass energies near the {Upsilon}(nS) (n = 2, 3, 4) resonances. We observe the {eta}{sub c}(1S), {chi}{sub c0}(1P), {chi}{sub c2}(1P), and {eta}{sub c}(2S) resonances produced in two-photon interactions and decaying to K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, with significances of 18.1, 5.7, 5.2, and 5.3 standard deviations (including systematic errors), respectively. We measure the {eta}{sub c}(2S) mass and width in K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decays, m({eta}{sub c}(2S)) = 3638.5 {+-} 1.5 {+-} 0.8 MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}({eta}{sub c}(2S)) = 13.4 {+-} 4.6 {+-} 3.2 MeV, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We search for the Z(3930) resonance and find no significant signal. We also provide the two-photon width times branching fraction values for the observed resonances.

Sanchez, P.del Amo

2011-05-20

7

Unsymmetrical diimine chelation to M(II) (M=Zn, Cd, Pd): atropisomerism, pi-pi stacking and photoluminescence.  

PubMed

Three types of atropisomeric unsymmetrical diimine complexes, tetrahedral (L(R)(?))MX(2) (M = Zn, Cd; X = Cl, Br; R = Me, CMe(3), OH, OMe, Cl; 1a-k, type-I), tetrahedral (L(Me2)(?))ZnBr(2) (2, type-II) and square planar (L(OH)(?))PdCl(2) (3, type-III) with different photoluminescence properties, have been reported (L(R)(?) = (E)-4-R-N-(pyridine-2-ylmethylene)aniline; ? = dihedral angle between the diimine unit including the pyridine ring and the phenyl ring planes). In crystals, ? = 0° for type-I, 90° for type-II and 63° for type-III atropisomers have been confirmed by single crystal X-ray structure determinations of 1c, 1e, 2 and 3·H(2)O isomers. Optimizations of geometries in methanol have established ? = 28-32° for type-I, 90.83° for type-II and 43.44° for type-III isomers. In solids, type-I atropisomers with ? = 0, behave as conjugated 14?e systems facilitating ?-? stacking and are brightly luminescent at room temperature while type-II and type-III isomers in solid and type-I isomers in solutions are more like non-conjugated 8?e + 6?e systems and non-emissive. Frozen glasses of acetonitrile, methanol and dichloromethane-toluene mixture at 77 K of type-I isomers are emissive and display structured excitation and emission spectra for R = Me, CMe(3), OMe species. Excitation and emission maxima of frozen glasses (?(ex) = 320-380 nm; ?(em) = 440-485 nm) are red shifted in the solid (?(ex) = 390-455 nm; ?(em) = 470-550 nm). TD-DFT calculations on 1b, 1d, 1f and stacked (1b)(2) isomers and luminescence lifetime measurements have elucidated that an excited (1)ILCT state has been the origin of emission of the type-I isomers and delocalizations of the photoactive ?(diimine) and ?(diimine)(*) orbitals of the L(R)(?) over the stacked layers shift the ?(ext) and ?(em) of solids to lower energies than those in frozen glasses. The trends of diimine ligand based electron transfer events of the complexes in DMF have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry at 298 K. PMID:21681332

Saha Roy, Amit; Saha, Pinaki; Mitra, Partha; Maity, Shyam Sundar; Ghosh, Sanjib; Ghosh, Prasanta

2011-07-28

8

Potential energy surface for the benzene dimer and perturbational analysis of pi-pi interactions.  

PubMed

We present a complete 6-dimensional potential energy surface for the benzene dimer obtained using symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) of intermolecular interactions based on Kohn-Sham's description of monomers. Ab initio calculations were performed for 491 dimer geometries in a triple-zeta-quality basis set supplemented by bond functions. An accurate analytic fit to the ab initio results has been developed and low-energy stationary points on the potential energy surface have been found. We have determined that there are three minima on the surface. Two of them, the tilted T-shape and the parallel-displaced, are nearly isoenergetic with interaction energies of -2.77 and -2.74 kcal/mol, respectively. The third minimum, a twisted edge-to-edge conformation, is significantly less attractive, with the interaction energy equal to -1.82 kcal/mol. Both the T-shape and sandwich geometries, sometimes assumed to be minima, are shown to be only saddle points. The potential energy surface is extremely flat between the two lowest minima, the barrier being only 0.10 kcal/mol above the global minimum. The second-virial coefficient obtained with the new potential agrees well with experimental results over a wide range of temperatures. The SAPT approach rigorously decomposes the interaction energy into physical components. The relative importance of these components has been analyzed. PMID:16928128

Podeszwa, Rafa?; Bukowski, Robert; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

2006-08-31

9

A quark model calculation of {gamma}{gamma}{yields}{pi}{pi} including final-state interactions  

SciTech Connect

A quark model calculation of the processes {gamma}{gamma}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is performed. At tree level, only charged pions couple to the initial state photons and neutral pions are not expected in the final state. However, a small but significant {gamma}{gamma}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} cross section is observed. We demonstrate that this may be accounted for by a rotation in isospin space induced by final-state interactions. The resulting {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} cross section is in good agreement with experiment, while the {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} cross section is in qualitative agreement with the data. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

Blundell, H. G. [Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada K1S 5B6 (Canada)] [Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada K1S 5B6 (Canada); Godfrey, S. [Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada K1S 5B6 (Canada)] [Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada K1S 5B6 (Canada); Hay, G. [Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada K1S 5B6 (Canada)] [Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada K1S 5B6 (Canada); Swanson, E. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 and Jefferson Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 and Jefferson Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

2000-02-01

10

The pp -> pp pi pi pi reaction channels in the threshold region  

E-print Network

The cross section for prompt neutral and charged three pion production in pp interactions was measured at excess energies in the range 160 - 217 MeV. That comprises the first measurement of the pp->pp pi0pi0pi0 reaction and the comparison with the pp->pp pi+pi-pi0 reaction, in a very direct way. The experiment was performed above the eta meson production threshold and the cross section normalization was obtained from a concurrent measurement of the reaction pp->pp eta with the eta decaying into 3 pions. Since the same final states are selected, the measurement has a low systematical error. The measured cross section ratio sigma(pp->pp pi+pi-pi0)/sigma(pp->pp pi0\\pi0\\pi0) is compared to predictions of dominance of different isobars in the intermediate state.

CELSIUS-WASA Collaboration; :; C. Pauly; M. Jacewicz; I. Koch; M. Bashkanov; D. Bogoslawsky; H. Calén; F. Capellaro; H. Clement; L. Demirörs; C. Ekström; K. Fransson; L. Gustafsson; B. Höistad; G. Ivanov; E. Jiganov; T. Johansson; S. Keleta; S. Kullander; A. Kup??; A. Kuznetsov; P. Marciniewski; R. Meier; B. Morosov; W. Oelert; H. Pettersson; Y. Petukhov; A. Povtorejko; R. J. M. Y. Ruber; W. Scobel; K. Schönning; T. Skorodko; B. Shwartz; V. Sopov; J. Stepaniak; V. Tchernyshev; P. Thörngren Engblom; V. Tikhomirov; A. Turowiecki; G. J. Wagner; U. Wiedner; M. Wolke; A. Yamamoto; J. Zabierowski; J. Z?oma?czuk

2007-01-15

11

Diffractive Pion Dissociation into {pi}{sup -{pi}+{pi}-{pi}+{pi}-} at COMPASS  

SciTech Connect

At the COMPASS experiment a sample of {approx}380000 exclusive events of diffractive pion dissociation on a lead target into a {pi}{sup -{pi}+{pi}-{pi}+{pi}-} final state has been recorded in 2004. The 5{pi} invariant mass spectrum shows a momentum transfer dependent structure peaking around 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}. In the (4{pi}){sup 0} subsystem there is a clear signal for the f{sub 1}(1285) resonance decaying into 4 pions. In this note we describe the data sample and explore the physics potential of this final state.

Neubert, S. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str., D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2010-08-05

12

X(3872) --> J/psi pi pi pi as a Three-Step Decay  

E-print Network

Rate for the X(3872) --> J/psi pi pi pi decay is studied by assuming that it proceeds as X(3872) --> J/psi omega --> J/psi pi rho --> J/psi pi pi pi. The result is compared with the X(3872) --> J/psi pi pi decay.

Kunihiko Terasaki

2014-11-27

13

The e+e--->2(pi+pi-)pi0, 2(pi+pi-)eta, K+K-pi+pi-pi0 and K+K-pi+pi-eta cross sections measured with initial-state radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the processes e+e--->2(pi+pi-)pi0gamma, 2(pi+pi-)etagamma, K+K-pi+pi-pi0gamma and K+K-pi+pi-etagamma with the hard photon radiated from the initial state. About 20 000, 4300, 5500, and 375 fully reconstructed events, respectively, are selected from 232fb-1 of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e+e- center-of-mass energy, so that the obtained cross sections from the threshold to

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; D. Bailey; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; Y. Zheng; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini

2007-01-01

14

Initial-State Radiation Measurement of the e+e- -> pi+pi-pi+pi- Cross Section  

E-print Network

We study the process e+e- -> pi+pi-pi+pi-gamma, with a photon emitted from the initial-state electron or positron, using 454.3 fb^-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at SLAC, corresponding to approximately 260,000 signal events. We use these data to extract the non-radiative sigma(e+e- ->pi+pi-pi+pi-) cross section in the energy range from 0.6 to 4.5 Gev. The total uncertainty of the cross section measurement in the peak region is less than 3%, higher in precision than the corresponding results obtained from energy scan data.

Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Milanes, D A; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Dubrovin, M S; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Kobel, M J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Nicolaci, M; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Vetere, M Lo; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Edwards, A J; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Ebert, M; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Diberder, F Le; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Vasseur, G; Y\\`, Ch; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Sevilla, M Franco; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Benitez, J F; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

2012-01-01

15

Observation of pi+pi-pi+pi- photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at [sqrt]sNN=200 GeV at the STAR detector  

E-print Network

We present a measurement of pi+pi-pi+pi-photonuclear production in ultraperipheral Au-Au collisions at [sqrt]sNN=200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The pi+pi-pi+pi- final states are observed at low transverse momentum and ...

Surrow, Bernd

16

Finite volume corrections to pi pi scattering  

SciTech Connect

Lattice QCD studies of hadron-hadron interactions are performed by computing the energy levels of the system in a finite box. The shifts in energy levels proportional to inverse powers of the volume are related to scattering parameters in a model independent way. In addition, there are non-universal exponentially suppressed corrections that distort this relation. These terms are proportional to e-m{sub pi} L and become relevant as the chiral limit is approached. In this paper we report on a one-loop chiral perturbation theory calculation of the leading exponential corrections in the case of I=2 pi pi scattering near threshold.

Sato, Ikuro; Bedaque, Paulo F.; Walker-Loud, Andre

2006-01-13

17

The pi -> pi pi process in nuclei and the restoration of chiral symmetry  

E-print Network

The results of an extensive campaign of measurements of the pi -> pi pi process in the nucleon and nuclei at intermediate energies are presented. The measurements were motivated by the study of strong pi pi correlations in nuclei. The analysis relies on the composite ratio C_{pi pi}^A, which accounts for the clear effect of the nuclear medium on the (pi pi) system. The comparison of the C_{pi pi}^A distributions for the (pi pi)_{I=J=0} and (pi pi)_{I=0,J=2} systems to the model predictions indicates that the C_{pi pi}^A behavior in proximity of the 2m_pi threshold is explainable through the partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclei.

N. Grion; M. Bregant; P. Camerini; E. Fragiacomo; S. Piano; R. Rui; E. F. Gibson; G. Hofman; E. L. Mathie; R. Meier; M. E. Sevior; G. R. Smith; R. Tacik; for the CHAOS Collaboration

2005-08-24

18

Study of the decay phi-->pi+pi-pi0 with the KLOE detector  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a study of the reaction e+e--->pi+pi-pi0 at the \\/phi peak, \\/W=M(phi)=1019.4 MeV, observed with the KLOE detector at DA\\/PhiNE. The reaction is dominated by \\/phi production and decay, e+e--->phi-->pi+pi-pi0. From a fit to the Dalitz plot density distribution we obtain the \\/rho-meson parameters for its three charge states. We also find the relative amplitudes for \\/phi-->rhopi and phi-->pi+pi-pi0

A. Aloisio; F. Ambrosino; A. Antonelli; M. Antonelli; C. Bacci; F. Bellini; G. Bencivenni; S. Bertolucci; C. Bini; C. Bloise; V. Bocci; F. Bossi; P. Branchini; S. A. Bulychjov; G. Cabibbo; R. Caloi; P. Campana; G. Capon; T. Capussela; G. Carboni; M. Casarsa; V. Casavola; G. Cataldi; F. Ceradini; F. Cervelli; F. Cevenini; G. Chiefari; P. Ciambrone; S. Conetti; E. de Lucia; G. de Robertis; P. de Simone; G. de Zorzi; S. dell'Agnello; A. Denig; A. di Domenico; C. di Donato; S. di Falco; B. di Micco; A. Doria; M. Dreucci; O. Erriquez; A. Farilla; G. Felici; A. Ferrari; M. L. Ferrer; G. Finocchiaro; C. Forti; A. Franceschi; P. Franzini; C. Gatti; P. Gauzzi; S. Giovannella; E. Gorini; F. Grancagnolo; E. Graziani; S. W. Han; M. Incagli; L. Ingrosso; W. Kluge; C. Kuo; V. Kulikov; F. Lacava; G. Lanfranchi; J. Lee-Franzini; D. Leone; F. Lu; M. Martemianov; M. Matsyuk; W. Mei; L. Merola; R. Messi; S. Miscetti; M. Moulson; S. Müller; F. Murtas; M. Napolitano; A. Nedosekin; F. Nguyen; M. Palutan; E. Pasqualucci; L. Passalacqua; A. Passeri; V. Patera; F. Perfetto; E. Petrolo; G. Pirozzi; L. Pontecorvo; M. Primavera; F. Ruggieri; P. Santangelo; E. Santovetti; G. Saracino; R. D. Schamberger; B. Sciascia; A. Sciubba; F. Scuri; I. Sfiligoi; A. Sibidanov; P. Silano; T. Spadaro; E. Spiriti; G. L. Tong; L. Tortora; E. Valente; P. Valente; B. Valeriani; G. Venanzoni; S. Veneziano; A. Ventura; S. Ventura; R. Versaci; Y. Xu; G. W. Yu

2003-01-01

19

Erratum to: ``Study of the decay varphi-->pi+pi-pi0 with the KLOE detector''  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a study of the reaction e+e- --> pi+pi-pi0 at the phi peak W=M(phi)=1019.4 MeV observed with the KLOE detector at Dafne. The reaction is dominated by phi production and decay, e+e- --> phi --> pi+pi-pi0. From a fit to the Dalitz plot density distribution we obtain the rho-meson parameters for its three charge states. We also find the

A. Aloisio; F. Ambrosino; A. Antonelli; M. Antonelli; C. Bacci; F. Bellini; G. Bencivenni; S. Bertolucci; C. Bini; C. Bloise; V. Bocci; F. Bossi; P. Branchini; S. A. Bulychjov; G. Cabibbo; R. Caloi; P. Campana; G. Capon; T. Capussela; G. Carboni; M. Casarsa; V. Casavola; G. Cataldi; F. Ceradini; F. Cervelli; F. Cevenini; G. Chiefari; P. Ciambrone; S. Conetti; E. De Lucia; G. De Robertis; P. De Simone; G. De Zorzi; S. DellAgnello; A. Denig; A. Di Domenico; C. Di Donato; S. Di Falco; B. Di Micco; A. Doria; M. Dreucci; O. Erriquez; A. Farilla; G. Felici; A. Ferrari; M. L. Ferrer; G. Finocchiaro; C. Forti; A. Franceschi; P. Franzini; C. Gatti; P. Gauzzi; S. Giovannella; E. Gorini; F. Grancagnolo; E. Graziani; S. W. Han; M. Incagli; L. Ingrosso; W. Kluge; C. Kuo; V. Kulikov; F. Lacava; G. Lanfranchi; J. Lee-Franzini; D. Leone; F. Lu; M. Martemianov; M. Matsyuk; W. Mei; L. Merola; R. Messi; S. Miscetti; M. Moulson; S. Muller; F. Murtas; M. Napolitano; A. Nedosekin; F. Nguyen; M. Palutan; E. Pasqualucci; L. Passalacqua; A. Passeri; V. Patera; F. Perfetto; E. Petrolo; G. Pirozzi; L. Pontecorvo; M. Primavera; F. Ruggieri; P. Santangelo; E. Santovetti; G. Saracino; R. D. Schamberger; B. Sciascia; A. Sciubba; F. Scuri; I. Sfiligoi; A. Sibidanov; P. Silano; T. Spadaro; E. Spiriti; G. L. Tong; L. Tortora; E. Valente; P. Valente; B. Valeriani; G. Venanzoni; S. Veneziano; A. Ventura; S. Ventura; R. Versaci; Y. Xu; G. W. Yu

2005-01-01

20

Dispersion relations with crossing symmetry for {pi}{pi} D- and F-wave amplitudes  

SciTech Connect

A set of once subtracted dispersion relations with imposed crossing symmetry condition for the {pi}{pi} D- and F-wave amplitudes is derived and analyzed. An example of numerical calculations in the effective two-pion mass range from the threshold to 1.1 GeV is presented. It is shown that these new dispersion relations impose quite strong constraints on the analyzed {pi}{pi} interactions and are very useful tools to test the {pi}{pi} amplitudes. One of the goals of this work is to provide a complete set of equations required for easy use. Full analytical expressions are presented. Along with the well-known dispersion relations successful in testing the {pi}{pi} S- and P-wave amplitudes, those presented here for the D and F waves give a complete set of tools for analyses of the {pi}{pi} interactions.

Kaminski, R. [Department of Theoretical Physics Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 31-342, Krakow (Poland)

2011-04-01

21

Dynamical coupled-channels study of {pi}N {right arrow} {pi pi}N reactions.  

SciTech Connect

As a step toward performing a complete coupled-channels analysis of the world data of {pi}N,{gamma}*N {yields} {pi}N,{eta}N,{pi}{pi}N reactions, the {pi}N {yields} {pi}{pi}N reactions are investigated starting with the dynamical coupled-channels model developed in Phys. Rev. C 76, 065201 (2007). The channels included are {pi}N,{eta}N, and {pi}{pi}N which has {pi}{Delta},{rho}N, and {sigma}N resonant components. The nonresonant amplitudes are generated from solving a set of coupled-channels equations with the meson-baryon potentials defined by effective Lagrangians. The resonant amplitudes are generated from 16 bare excited nucleon (N*) states that are dressed by the nonresonant interactions as constrained by the unitarity condition. The data of total cross sections and {pi}N and {pi}{pi} invariant mass distributions of {pi} + p {yields} {pi} + {pi} + n, {pi} + {pi}0p and {pi} - p {yields} {pi} + {pi} - n, {pi} - {pi}0p,{pi}0{pi}0n reactions from threshold to the invariant mass W = 2 GeV can be described to a very large extent. We show the importance of the coupled-channels effects and the strong interference among the contributions from the {pi}{Delta},{sigma}N, and {rho}N channels. The large interference between the resonant and nonresonant amplitudes is also demonstrated. Possible future developments are discussed.

Kamano, H.; Julia-Diaz, B.; Lee, T.-S. H.; Matsuyama, A.; Sato, T.; Physics; Jefferson Lab.; Univ. of Barcelona; Shizuoka Univ.; Osaka Univ.

2009-02-24

22

Measurement of the decay tau(-) -> pi(-) pi(+) pi(-) 2pi(0)nu-tau  

E-print Network

The decay tau- --> pi-pi+pi-2pi0nu(tau) has been observed in e+e- annihilation using the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. In a data sample collected at square-root s is similar to 10.6 GeV, 668 +/- ...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

1993-09-01

23

A search for J^{PC}=1^{-+} exotic mesons in the pi- pi- pi+ and pi- pi0 pi0 systems  

E-print Network

A partial wave analysis (PWA) of the pi-pi-pi+ and pi-pi0pi0 systems produced in the reaction pi- p -> (3pi)-p at 18 GeV/c was carried out using an isobar model assumption. This analysis is based on 3.0M pi-pi0pi0 events and 2.6M pi-pi-pi+ events and shows production of the a2(1320), pi2(1670) and \\pi(1800) mesons. An earlier analysis of 250K pi-pi-pi+ events from the same experiment showed possible evidence for a J^{PC}=1^{-+}$ exotic meson with a mass of 1.6 GeV/c^2 decaying into rho pi. In this analysis of a higher statistics sample of the (3pi)- system in two charged modes we find no evidence of an exotic meson.

A. R. Dzierba; R. Mitchell; A. P. Szczepaniak; M. Swat; S. Teige

2005-02-15

24

Dynamical coupled-channels study of pi N --> pi pi N reactions  

SciTech Connect

As a step toward performing a complete coupled-channels analysis of the world data of pi N, gamma^* N --> pi N, eta N, pi pi N reactions, the pi N --> pi pi N reactions are investigated starting with the dynamical coupled-channels model developed in Phys. Rev. C76, 065201 (2007). The channels included are pi N, eta N, and pi pi N which has pi Delta, rho N, and sigma N resonant components. The non-resonant amplitudes are generated from solving a set of coupled-channels equations with the meson-baryon potentials defined by effective Lagrangians. The resonant amplitudes are generated from 16 bare excited nucleon (N^*) states which are dressed by the non-resonant interactions as constrained by the unitarity condition. The available total cross section data of pi^+ p --> pi^+ pi^+ n, pi^+ pi^0 and pi^- p --> pi^+ pi^- n, pi^- pi^0 n, pi^0 pi^0 n can be reproduced to a very large extent both in magnitudes and energy-dependence. Possible improvements of the model are investigated, in p

Kamano, Hiroyuki; Julia Diaz, Bruno; Lee, Tsung-Shung; Matsuyama, Akihiko; Sato, Toru

2009-01-01

25

Violation of Generalized Bose-Einstein symmetry and quantum entanglement of pi(-)pi(+) isospin states in pion pair production piN->pi(-)pi(+)N  

E-print Network

Generalized Bose-Einstein symmetry requires that J+I=even for two-pion angular states of spin J and total isospin I. We show that the symmetry predicts three linearly independent constraints on partial wave intensities with even spin for pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n, pi(-)p->pi(0)pi(0)n and pi(+)p->pi(+)pi(+)n. Available data violate all three constraints for S, D^0, D^U and D^N partial waves. The violations of the symmetry imply a presence of the symmetry violating contributions to transversity amplitudes in pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n and predict quantum entanglement of pi(-)pi(+) isospin states which is excluded by the symmetry. We derive approximate lower and upper bounds on entanglement amplitudes |a_S| and |a_A|. The bounds provide a clear evidence for entanglement of pi(-)pi(+) isospin states below 840 MeV and suggest the entanglement at higher dipion masses. The small values of |a_S| \\sim 0.10-0.20 below 840 MeV explain the puzzling differences between the S-wave intensities in pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n and pi(-)p->pi(0)pi(0)n and reveal a suppression of isospin I=0,2 contribution in the S-wave amplitudes in pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n. The large isospin I=1 contribution of rho^0(770) to both S- and P-wave amplitudes is due to large entanglement amplitude |a_A| \\sim 0.98-0.99. These findings confirm the predictions of a model of non-unitary dynamics of the pion creation processes arising from a CPT violating interaction of these processes with a quantum environment.

Miloslav Svec

2007-10-30

26

Measurement of CP violation parameters with a Dalitz plot analysis of B{+/-}-->D{pi{+}pi{-}pi{0}}K{+/-}.  

PubMed

We report the results of a CP violation analysis of the decay B{+/-}-->D{pi{+}pi{-}pi;{0}}K{+/-}, where D{pi{+}pi{-}pi{0}} indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state pi{+}pi{-}pi{0}, excluding K{S}{0}pi{0}. The analysis makes use of 324 x 10{6}e{+}e{-}-->BB[over ] events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e;{+}e;{-} storage ring. Analyzing the pi;{+}pi;{-}pi;{0} Dalitz plot distribution and the B{+/-}-->D{pi{+}pi{-}pi{0}}K{+/-} branching fraction and decay rate asymmetry, we find the following one-standard-deviation constraints on the amplitude ratio and on the weak and strong phases: 0.06pi{+}pi{-}pi{0} decay amplitude. PMID:18233513

Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L

2007-12-21

27

The phase of the sigma to pi pi amplitude in J\\/Psi to omega pi^ + pi^-  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phase variation of the sigma to pi pi amplitude is accurately determined as a function of mass from BES II data for J\\/Psi to omega pi^ + pi^-. The determination arises from interference with the strong b_1(1235)pi amplitude. The observed phase variation agrees within errors with that in pi pi elastic scattering.

D. V. Bugg

2004-01-01

28

Stacking interactions in PUFÂRNA complexes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stacking interactions between amino acids and bases are common in RNA-protein interactions. Many proteins that regulate mRNAs interact with single-stranded RNA elements in the 3' UTR (3'-untranslated region) of their targets. PUF proteins are exemplary. Here we focus on complexes formed between a Caenorhabditis elegans PUF protein, FBF, and its cognate RNAs. Stacking interactions are particularly prominent and involve every

Yvonne Yiling Koh; Yeming Wang; Chen Qiu; Laura Opperman; Leah Gross; Traci M. Tanaka Hall; Marvin Wickens

2012-01-01

29

Search for the photo-excitation of exotic mesons in the pi+pi+pi- system  

E-print Network

A search for exotic mesons in the $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ system photoproduced by the charge exchange reaction $\\gamma p\\to \\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}(n)$ was carried out by the CLAS collaboration at Jefferson Lab. A tagged-photon beam with energies in the 4.8 to 5.4 GeV range, produced through bremsstrahlung from a 5.744 GeV electron beam, was incident on a liquid-hydrogen target. A Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) was performed on a sample of 83,000 events, the highest such statistics to date in this reaction at these energies. The main objective of this study was to look for the photoproduction of an exotic $J^{PC} = 1^{-+}$ resonant state in the 1 to 2 GeV mass range. Our PWA analysis, based on the isobar model, shows production of the $a_{2}(1320)$ and the $\\pi_{2}(1670)$ mesons, but no evidence for the $a_{1}(1260)$, nor the $\\pi_{1}(1600)$ exotic state at the expected levels. An upper limit of 13.5 nb is determined for the exotic $\\pi_1(1600)$ cross section, less than 2% of the $a_2(1320)$ production.

M. Nozar; C. Salgado; D. P. Weygand; L. Guo; the CLAS Collaboration

2008-05-28

30

pi pi Phase shifts from K to 2 pi  

E-print Network

We update the numerical results for the s-wave pi pi scattering phase-shift difference delta_0^0 - delta_0^2 at s = m_K^2 from a previous study of isospin breaking in K to 2 pi amplitudes in chiral perturbation theory. We include recent data for the K_S to pi pi and K^+ to pi^+ pi^0 decay widths and include experimental correlations.

V. Cirigliano; C. Gatti; M. Moulson; M. Palutan; for the FlaviaNet Kaon Working Group

2008-07-31

31

Assessment of standard force field models against high-quality ab initio potential curves for prototypes of pi-pi, CH/pi, and SH/pi interactions.  

PubMed

Several popular force fields, namely, CHARMM, AMBER, OPLS-AA, and MM3, have been tested for their ability to reproduce highly accurate quantum mechanical potential energy curves for noncovalent interactions in the benzene dimer, the benzene-CH(4) complex, and the benzene-H(2)S complex. All of the force fields are semi-quantitatively correct, but none of them is consistently reliable quantitatively. Re-optimization of Lennard-Jones parameters and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory analysis for the benzene dimer suggests that better agreement cannot be expected unless more flexible functional forms (particularly for the electrostatic contributions) are employed for the empirical force fields. PMID:19242959

Sherrill, C David; Sumpter, Bobby G; Sinnokrot, Mutasem O; Marshall, Michael S; Hohenstein, Edward G; Walker, Ross C; Gould, Ian R

2009-11-15

32

Photoproduction of {pi}{pi} Pairs off {sup 7}Li  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the quasi-free photoproduction of {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} and {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +/-} pairs from {sup 7}Li in view of the in-medium properties of hadrons. Measurements have been done using the CB/TAPS detector setup and the Glasgow photon tagging spectrometer for incident photon energies up to 820 MeV. At small invariant masses, an enhancement of the neutral invariant mass distributions is seen compared to the mixed charged channel and could be explained either by an in-medium modification of the {pi}{pi} interaction in the I = J = 0 channel or by effects related to the final state interactions.

Maghrbi, Yasser [Department of Physics, University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2011-10-21

33

The pi-pi mass spectrum in Y(4260) -> pi-pi-J/psi  

E-print Network

Three ways of fitting the pi-pi mass spectrum in Y(4260) decays are studied. Data presented recently by Belle cannot be fitted by the pi-pi S-wave intensity for elastic scattering. They can be fitted by adding a rather arbitrary destructive interference with the sigma pole term. A better fit may be obtained with the decay sequence Y -> pi-H, H -> pi-J/psi, where H is a JPC=1-- c-cbar-q-qbar state peaking at 4.0 GeV with a width ~280 MeV. A third possibility, involving a triangle diagram due to Y(4260)-> DD_1(2420), D_1->D*(2007)-pi, DD*->pi-J/psi fails to fit the data. The first and second possibilities could be resolved by analysis of the Y(4260) Dalitz plot and pi-J/psi mass projection, not presently publicly available.

D. V. Bugg

2007-01-09

34

Measurement of the Ratios of Branching Fractions B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi pi pi) and B(Bs -> Ds pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi)  

E-print Network

Using 355 pb^-1 of data collected by the CDF II detector in \\ppbar collisions at sqrt{s} = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, we study the fully reconstructed hadronic decays B -> D pi and B -> D pi pi pi. We present the first measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi pi pi) = 1.05 pm 0.10 (stat) pm 0.22 (syst). We also update our measurement of B(Bs -> Ds pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi) to 1.13 pm 0.08 (stat) pm 0.23 (syst) improving the statistical uncertainty by more than a factor of two. We find B(Bs -> Ds pi) = [3.8 pm 0.3 (stat) pm 1.3 (syst)] \\times 10^{-3} and B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) = [8.4 pm 0.8 (stat) pm 3.2 (syst)] \\times 10^{-3}.

CDF Collaboration

2006-10-16

35

Study of the Dalitz plot of the $\\eta \\rightarrow \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$ decay with the KLOE detector  

E-print Network

The decay $\\eta \\rightarrow \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$ is studied with the KLOE detector, at the DA$\\phi$NE e$^+$e$^-$ collider. Using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $1.6$ fb$^{-1}$ a new study of the Dalitz plot is presented.

Balkeståhl, L Caldeira

2015-01-01

36

Optically active homoleptic bis(phthalocyaninato) rare earth double-decker complexes bearing peripheral chiral menthol moieties: effect of pi-pi interaction on the chiral information transfer at the molecular level.  

PubMed

With the view to creating novel sandwich-type phthalocyaninato rare earth complexes toward new applications in material science and catalysis, d- and l-enantiomers of a series of optically active homoleptic bis(phthalocyaninato) rare earth double-deckers with four chiral menthol moieties at the peripheral positions of the phthalocyanine ligand, M(Pc*)(2) [Pc* = 2(3),9(10),16(17),23(24)-tetrakis(2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexoxyl)phthalocyanine; M = Eu, Y, Lu] (1-3), have been designed and prepared by treating (d)- or (l)-4-(2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexoxyl)-1,2-dicyanobenzene with the corresponding M(acac)(3).nH(2)O (acac = acetylacetonate) in the presence of the organic base 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU) in refluxing n-pentanol. For the purpose of comparative study, heteroleptic bis(phthalocyaninato) europium analogues (d)- and (l)-Eu(Pc)(Pc*) (4) as well as the unsubstituted homoleptic bis(phthalocyaninato) europium counterpart Eu(Pc)(2) (5) were also prepared. The novel synthesized bis(phthalocyaninato) rare earth double-deckers have been characterized by a wide range of spectroscopic methods including MS, (1)H NMR, IR, and electronic absorption spectroscopic measurements in addition to elemental analysis. In contrast to the CD silent monomeric metal-free 2(3),9(10),16(17),23(24)-tetrakis(2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexoxyl)phthalocyanine, observation of the CD signal in the N absorption region of 4 reveals the significant effect of intramolecular pi-pi interaction on intensifying the asymmetrical perturbation of the chiral menthol units onto the phthalocyanine chromophore, which results in successful chiral information transfer from menthol moieties to the phthalocyanine chromophore at a molecular level in the heteroleptic double-decker compound 4 despite the lack of CD signal in the Soret and Q absorption regions of the phthalocyanine ligand. This is further supported by the optical activity of homoleptic bis(phthalocyaninato) rare earth double-deckers M(Pc*)(2) (1-3), as revealed by the CD signals even in the Soret and Q absorption regions according to the CD spectroscopic result, indicating the intensified asymmetrical perturbation of the chiral menthol units onto the phthalocyanine chromophores along with the increase in the chiral menthol substituent number from 4 to 1-3. The present result at the molecular level is helpful for understanding the chiral information transfer mechanism at the supermolecular level. In addition, the electrochemical properties of bis(phthalocyaninato) rare earth complexes have also been comparatively investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. PMID:20545317

Lv, Wei; Zhu, Peihua; Bian, Yongzhong; Ma, Changqin; Zhang, Xiaomei; Jiang, Jianzhuang

2010-07-19

37

Observation of Upsilon(4S) decays to pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S) and pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(2S).  

PubMed

Observation of Upsilon(4S) decays to pi(+)pi(-)C and pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(2S)We present the first measurement of Upsilon(4S) decays to pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S) based on a sample of 230 x 106(4S) mesons collected with the BABAR detector. We measure the product branching fractions Beta(Upsilon(4S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S)) x BetaUpsilon(1S) --> mu(+)mu(-) = (2.23 +/- 0.25(stat) +/- 0.27(syst))x 10(-6) and Beta(Upsilon(4S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(2S) x Beta(Upsilon(2S) --> mu(+)mu(-))=(1.69 +/-0.26(stat) +/- 0.20(syst)) x 10(-)6, from which we derive the partial widths Gamma(Upsilon(4S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S))=(1.8 +/-0.4) keV and Gamma(Upsilon(4S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(2S))=(2.7 +/- 0.8) keV. PMID:16803371

Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C

2006-06-16

38

Exclusive Central pi+pi- production in CDF  

SciTech Connect

Using the Collider Detector at Fermilab, CDF, we have measured exclusive pi+pi- production at sqrt(s) = 900 GeV and 1960 GeV. The pi+pi- pair is central, |y| < 1.0, and there are no other particles detected in |eta| < 5.9. We discuss the mass spectrum, showing f0(980) and f2(1270) resonances, s-dependence, pT-dependence, and angular distributions.

Albrow, Michael; Swiech, Artur [Jagellonian University, Cracow, Poland; Zurek, Maria [Jagellonian University, Cracow, Poland

2013-10-14

39

Measurements of J\\/psi decays into 2(pi+pi-)eta and 3(pi+pi-)eta  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on a sample of 5.8×107J\\/psi events taken with the BESII detector, the branching fractions of J\\/psi-->2(pi+pi-)eta and J\\/psi-->3(pi+pi-)eta are measured for the first time to be (2.26±0.08±0.27)×10-3 and (7.24±0.96±1.11)×10-4, respectively.

M. Ablikim; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. G. Bian; X. Cai; J. F. Chang; H. F. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. X. Chen; J. C. Chen; Jin Chen; Jun Chen; M. L. Chen; Y. B. Chen; S. P. Chi; Y. P. Chu; X. Z. Cui; H. L. Dai; Y. S. Dai; Z. Y. Deng; L. Y. Dong; Q. F. Dong; S. X. Du; Z. Z. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; C. D. Fu; H. Y. Fu; C. S. Gao; Y. N. Gao; M. Y. Gong; W. X. Gong; S. D. Gu; Y. N. Guo; Y. Q. Guo; Z. J. Guo; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; X. He; Y. K. Heng; H. M. Hu; T. Hu; G. S. Huang; X. P. Huang; X. T. Huang; X. B. Ji; C. H. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; Y. Jin; Y. F. Lai; F. Li; G. Li; H. H. Li; J. Li; Q. J. Li; R. Y. Li; S. M. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. Q. Li; Y. L. Li; Y. F. Liang; H. B. Liao; C. X. Liu; F. Liu; Fang Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. P. Liu; R. G. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Z. X. Liu; F. Lu; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; C. L. Luo; L. X. Luo; X. L. Luo; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; J. M. Ma; L. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; X. B. Ma; X. Y. Ma; Z. P. Mao; X. H. Mo; J. Nie; Z. D. Nie; S. L. Olsen; H. P. Peng; N. D. Qi; C. D. Qian; H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; Z. Y. Ren; G. Rong; L. Y. Shan; L. Shang; D. L. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; F. Shi; X. Shi; H. S. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; X. Tang; N. Tao; Y. R. Tian; G. L. Tong; G. S. Varner; D. Y. Wang; J. Z. Wang; K. Wang; L. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; S. Z. Wang; W. F. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; Zheng Wang; C. L. Wei; D. H. Wei; N. Wu; Y. M. Wu; X. M. Xia; X. X. Xie; B. Xin; G. F. Xu; H. Xu; S. T. Xue; M. L. Yan; F. Yang; H. X. Yang; J. Yang; Y. X. Yang; M. Ye; Y. X. Ye; L. H. Yi; Z. Y. Yi; C. S. Yu; G. W. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; J. M. Yuan; Y. Yuan; S. L. Zang; Y. Zeng; Yu Zeng; B. X. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Zhang; Q. J. Zhang; S. Q. Zhang; X. M. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Y. Zhang; Yiyun Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Q. Zhang; D. X. Zhao; J. B. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; M. G. Zhao; P. P. Zhao; W. R. Zhao; X. J. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; H. Q. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; L. S. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; X. C. Zhong; B. Q. Zhou; G. M. Zhou; L. Zhou; N. F. Zhou; K. J. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Yingchun Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; B. A. Zhuang; X. A. Zhuang; B. S. Zou

2005-01-01

40

Effect of unitarization on the amplitudes for the decays K{sub 1}{sup 0} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}-} and K{sup +} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}+{pi}-}  

SciTech Connect

The unitarization of the amplitude for the decay process K{sub 1}{sup 0} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}-} and allowance for the rescattering of final-state pions in the decay process K{sup +} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}+{pi}-} make it possible to evaluate, by using the parameters extracted from data on K {sup {yields}}2{pi} decays, the K{sup +} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}+{pi}-} decay width. The result agrees with the experimental width value at a level of a few percent. Allowance for corrections for higher order terms of the momentum expansion of the amplitude for the decay process K{sup +} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}+{pi}-} leads to the slope-parameter value of g{sub ++-}{sup th} = 0.2182, which agrees with its experimental counterpart, g{sub ++-}{sup exp} = 0.2154 {+-} 0.0035.

Shabalin, E. P., E-mail: shabalin@itep.r [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

2010-11-15

41

Analytical {pi}{pi} scattering amplitude and the light scalars  

SciTech Connect

In this work we construct the {pi}{pi} scattering amplitude T{sub 0}{sup 0} with regular analytical properties in the s complex plane, which describes simultaneously the data on the {pi}{pi} scattering, {phi}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}0{gamma} decay, and {pi}{pi}{yields}KK reaction. The chiral shielding of the {sigma}(600) meson and its mixing with the f{sub 0}(980) meson are also taken into account. The data agrees with the four-quark nature of the {sigma}(600) and f{sub 0}(980) mesons. The amplitude in the range -5m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}

Achasov, N. N. [Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Sobolev Institute for Mathematics, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kiselev, A. V. [Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Sobolev Institute for Mathematics, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2011-03-01

42

K --> pi pi matrix elements from mixed action lattice QCD  

E-print Network

We present a new method for determining K --> pi pi matrix elements from lattice simulations that is less costly than direct simulations of K --> pi pi at physical kinematics. It improves, however, upon the traditional "indirect'' approach of constructing the K --> pi pi matrix elements using NLO SU(3) ChPT, which can lead to large higher-order chiral corrections. Using the explicit example of the Delta I =3/2 (27,1) operator to illustrate the method, we obtain a value for Re(A_2) that agrees with experiment and has a total uncertainty of ~20%. Although our simulations use domain-wall valence quarks on the MILC asqtad-improved gauge configurations, this method is more general and can be applied to calculations with any fermion formulation.

Jack Laiho; Ruth S. Van de Water

2010-11-19

43

Stacking interactions in PUF?RNA complexes  

SciTech Connect

Stacking interactions between amino acids and bases are common in RNA-protein interactions. Many proteins that regulate mRNAs interact with single-stranded RNA elements in the 3' UTR (3'-untranslated region) of their targets. PUF proteins are exemplary. Here we focus on complexes formed between a Caenorhabditis elegans PUF protein, FBF, and its cognate RNAs. Stacking interactions are particularly prominent and involve every RNA base in the recognition element. To assess the contribution of stacking interactions to formation of the RNA-protein complex, we combine in vivo selection experiments with site-directed mutagenesis, biochemistry, and structural analysis. Our results reveal that the identities of stacking amino acids in FBF affect both the affinity and specificity of the RNA-protein interaction. Substitutions in amino acid side chains can restrict or broaden RNA specificity. We conclude that the identities of stacking residues are important in achieving the natural specificities of PUF proteins. Similarly, in PUF proteins engineered to bind new RNA sequences, the identity of stacking residues may contribute to 'target' versus 'off-target' interactions, and thus be an important consideration in the design of proteins with new specificities.

Yiling Koh, Yvonne; Wang, Yeming; Qiu, Chen; Opperman, Laura; Gross, Leah; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wickens, Marvin (NIH); (UW)

2012-07-02

44

Testing the dynamics of B ->pi pi and constraints onalpha  

SciTech Connect

In charmless nonleptonic B decays to {pi}{pi} or {rho}{rho}, the ''color allowed'' and ''color suppressed'' tree amplitudes can be studied in a systematic expansion in {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub b}) and {Lambda}{sub QCD}/m{sub b}. At leading order in this expansion their relative strong phase vanishes. The implications of this prediction are obscured by penguin contributions. They propose to use this prediction to test the relative importance of the various penguin amplitudes using experimental data. The present B {yields} {pi}{pi} data suggest that there are large corrections to the heavy quark limit, which can be due to power corrections to the tree amplitudes, large up-penguin amplitude, or enhanced weak annihilation. Because the penguin contributions are smaller, the heavy quark limit is more consistent with the B {yields} {rho}{rho} data, and its implications may become important for the extraction of {alpha} from this mode in the future.

Grossman, Yuval; Hocker, Andreas; Ligeti, Zoltan; Pirjol, Dan

2005-07-07

45

Exclusive Measurement of the eta --> pi+ pi- gamma Decay  

Microsoft Academic Search

An exclusive measurement of the decay eta --> pi+ pi- gamma has been performed at the WASA facility at COSY. The eta mesons were produced in the fusion reaction pd --> 3He X at a proton beam momentum of 1.7 GeV\\/c. Efficiency corrected differential distributions have been extracted based on 13340\\\\pm140 events after background subtraction. The measured pion angular distribution

P. Adlarson; C. Adolph; W. Augustyniak; W. Bardan; M. Bashkanov; T. Bednarski; F. S. Bergmann; M. Berlowski; H. Bhatt; K.-T. Brinkmann; M. Büscher; H. Calén; H. Clement; D. Coderre; E. Czerwinski; E. Doroshkevich; R. Engels; W. Erven; W. Eyrich; P. Fedorets; K. Föhl; K. Fransson; F. Goldenbaum; P. Goslawski; K. Grigoryev; C.-O. Gullström; C. Hanhart; L. Heijkenskjöld; J. Heimlich; V. Hejny; F. Hinterberger; M. Hodana; B. Höistad; M. Jacewicz; A. Jany; B. R. Jany; L. Jarczyk; T. Johansson; B. Kamys; G. Kemmerling; O. Khakimova; A. Khoukaz; S. Kistryn; J. Klaja; H. Kleines; B. Klos; F. Kren; W. Krzemien; P. Kulessa; A. Kupsc; K. Lalwani; S. Leupold; B. Lorentz; A. Magiera; R. Maier; B. Marianski; P. Marciniewski; U.-G. Meißner; M. Mikirtychiants; H.-P. Morsch; P. Moskal; B. K. Nandi; S. Niedzwiecki; H. Ohm; A. Passfeld; C. Pauly; E. Perez del Rio; T. Petri; Y. Petukhov; N. Piskunov; P. Plucinski; P. Podkopal; A. Povtoreyko; D. Prasuhn; A. Pricking; K. Pysz; A. Pyszniak; T. Rausmann; C. F. Redmer; J. Ritman; A. Roy; Z. Rudy; S. Sawant; S. Schadmand; A. Schmidt; T. Sefzick; V. Serdyuk; N. Shah; M. Siemaszko; R. Siudak; T. Skorodko; M. Skurzok; J. Smyrski; V. Sopov; R. Stassen; J. Stepaniak; G. Sterzenbach; H. Stockhorst; F. Stollenwerk; A. Szczurek; A. Täschner; C. Terschlüsen; T. Tolba; A. Trzcinski; R. Varma; P. Vlasov; G. J. Wagner; W. Weglorz; A. Winnemöller; A. Wirzba; M. Wolke; A. Wronska; P. Wüstner; P. Wurm; X. Yuan; L. Yurev; J. Zabierowski; C. Zheng; M. J. Zielinski; W. Zipper; J. Zlomanczuk; P. Zupranski

2011-01-01

46

Precise branching ratio measurements of the decays D0-->pi-pi+pi0 and D0-->K-K+pi0 relative to the D0-->K-pi+pi0 decay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using 232fb-1 of e+e- collision data recorded by the BABAR experiment, we measure the rates of three-body Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the D0 meson relative to the Cabibbo-favored decay, D0-->K-pi+pi0. We find: (B(D0-->pi-pi+pi0))\\/(B(D0-->K-pi+pi0))=(10.59±0.06±0.13)×10-2 and (B(D0-->K-K+pi0))\\/(B(D0-->K-pi+pi0))=(2.37±0.03±0.04)×10-2, where the errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. These measurements are significantly more precise than the current world average measurements.

B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. De Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence

2006-01-01

47

Observation of a scalar resonance decaying to pi+pi-pi0pi0 in pp annihilation at rest  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report an analysis of pp annihilation at rest into varrho+varrho-pi0 leading to the final state pi+pi-3pi 0. A strong signal is observed for a scalar resonance with mass 1374 +\\/- 38 MeV\\/c2 and width 375 +\\/- 61 MeV\\/c2, decaying to varrho+varrho-. The resonance in varrho+varrho- represents 2.0 +\\/- 0.3% of all pp annihilation at rest. It is also observed

C. Amsler; D. S. Armstrong; I. Augustin; C. A. Baker; B. M. Barnett; C. J. Batty; K. Beuchert; P. Birien; P. Blüm; R. Bossingham; K. Braune; J. Brose; D. V. Bugg; M. Burchell; T. Case; A. Cooper; K. M. Crowe; T. Degener; H. P. Dietz; S. von Dombrowski; M. Doser; W. Dünnweber; D. Engelhardt; M. Englert; M. A. Faessler; C. Felix; G. Folger; R. Hackmann; R. P. Haddock; F. H. Heinsius; N. P. Hessey; P. Hidas; P. Illinger; D. Jamnik; Z. Jávorfi; H. Kalinowsky; B. Kämmle; T. Kiel; J. Kisiel; E. Klempt; M. Kobel; H. Koch; C. Kolo; K. Königsmann; M. Kunze; R. Landua; J. Lüdemann; H. Matthäy; M. Merkel; J. P. Merlo; C. A. Meyer; L. Montanet; A. Noble; F. Ould-Saada; K. Peters; C. N. Pinder; G. Pinter; S. Ravndal; J. Salk; A. H. Sanjari; E. Schäfer; B. Schmid; P. Schmidt; S. Spanier; C. Straßburger; U. Strohbusch; M. Suffert; D. Urner; C. Völcker; F. Walter; D. Walther; U. Wiedner; N. Winter; J. Zoll; B. Zou; C. Zupancic

1994-01-01

48

Measurement of branching fractions and mass sepctra in B to K pi pi gamma decays  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a measurement of the branching fractions of the exclusive radiative penguin processes B to K pi pi gamma in a sample of 232 million e+ e- to B Bbar decays recorded by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage ring. We reconstruct four final states: K+ pi- pi+, K+ pi- pi0, Ks pi+ pi-, and Ks pi+ pi0, where Ks to pi+ pi-, in the range m(K pi pi) < 1.8 GeV/c^2. We measure the branching fractions BR(B+ to K+ pi- pi+ gamma) = (2.95 +- 0.13 (stat.) +- 0.19 (syst.)) x 10^-5, BR(B0 to K+ pi- pi0 gamma) = (4.07 +- 0.22 (stat.) +- 0.31 (syst.)) x 10^-5, BR(B0 to K0 pi+ pi- gamma) = (1.85 +- 0.21 (stat.) +- 0.12 (syst.)) x 10^-5, and BR(B+ to K0 pi+ pi0 gamma) = (4.56 +- 0.42 (stat.) +- 0.30 (syst.)) x 10^-5.

Samuel, Alexander

49

Measurement of the branching fractions of psi(2S)-->3(pi+pi-) and J\\/psi-->2(pi+pi-)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using data samples collected at &surd;(s)=3.686 GeV and 3.650 GeV by the BESII detector at the BEPC, the branching fraction of psi(2S)-->3(pi+pi-) is measured to be [5.45±0.42(stat)±0.87(syst)]×10-4, and the relative branching fraction of J\\/psi-->2(pi+pi-) to that of J\\/psi-->mu+mu- is measured to be [6.01±0.20(stat)±0.48(syst)]% via psi(2S)-->pi+pi-J\\/psi,J\\/psi-->2(pi+pi-). The electromagnetic form factor of 3(pi+pi-) is determined to be 0.19±0.02 and 0.24±0.02 at &surd;(s)=3.650

M. Ablikim; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. G. Bian; X. Cai; J. F. Chang; H. F. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. X. Chen; J. C. Chen; Jin Chen; Jun Chen; M. L. Chen; Y. B. Chen; S. P. Chi; Y. P. Chu; X. Z. Cui; H. L. Dai; Y. S. Dai; Z. Y. Deng; L. Y. Dong; Q. F. Dong; S. X. Du; Z. Z. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; C. D. Fu; H. Y. Fu; C. S. Gao; Y. N. Gao; M. Y. Gong; W. X. Gong; S. D. Gu; Y. N. Guo; Y. Q. Guo; Z. J. Guo; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; X. He; Y. K. Heng; H. M. Hu; T. Hu; G. S. Huang; X. P. Huang; X. T. Huang; X. B. Ji; C. H. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; Y. Jin; Y. F. Lai; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; H. H. Li; J. Li; Q. J. Li; R. Y. Li; S. M. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. Q. Li; Y. L. Li; Y. F. Liang; H. B. Liao; C. X. Liu; F. Liu; Fang Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. P. Liu; R. G. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Z. X. Liu; F. Lu; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; C. L. Luo; L. X. Luo; X. L. Luo; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; J. M. Ma; L. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; X. B. Ma; X. Y. Ma; Z. P. Mao; X. H. Mo; J. Nie; Z. D. Nie; S. L. Olsen; H. P. Peng; N. D. Qi; C. D. Qian; H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; Z. Y. Ren; G. Rong; L. Y. Shan; L. Shang; D. L. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; F. Shi; X. Shi; H. S. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; X. Tang; N. Tao; Y. R. Tian; G. L. Tong; G. S. Varner; D. Y. Wang; J. Z. Wang; K. Wang; L. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; S. Z. Wang; W. F. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; Zheng Wang; C. L. Wei; D. H. Wei; N. Wu; Y. M. Wu; X. M. Xia; X. X. Xie; B. Xin; G. F. Xu; H. Xu; S. T. Xue; M. L. Yan; F. Yang; H. X. Yang; J. Yang; Y. X. Yang; M. Ye; Y. X. Ye; L. H. Yi; Z. Y. Yi; C. S. Yu; G. W. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; J. M. Yuan; Y. Yuan; S. L. Zang; Y. Zeng; Yu Zeng; B. X. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Zhang; Q. J. Zhang; S. Q. Zhang; X. M. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Y. Zhang; Yiyun Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Q. Zhang; D. X. Zhao; J. B. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; M. G. Zhao; P. P. Zhao; W. R. Zhao; X. J. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; H. Q. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; L. S. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; X. C. Zhong; B. Q. Zhou; G. M. Zhou; L. Zhou; N. F. Zhou; K. J. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Yingchun Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; B. A. Zhuang; X. A. Zhuang; B. S. Zou

2005-01-01

50

Measurement of CP Violation Parameters with a Dalitz Plot Analysis of B±-->Dpi+pi-pi0K±  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the results of a CP violation analysis of the decay B±-->Dpi+pi-pi0K±, where Dpi+pi-pi0 indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state pi+pi-pi0, excluding KS0pi0. The analysis makes use of 324×106 e+e--->BB¯ events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e+e- storage ring. Analyzing the pi+pi-pi0 Dalitz plot distribution and the B±-->Dpi+pi-pi0K± branching fraction and decay

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; L. Zhang; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. S. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim

2007-01-01

51

Determination of sigma(e+e---> pi+pi-) from radiative processes at DAPhiNE  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have measured the cross section sigma(e+e--->pi+pi-gamma) with the KLOE detector at DAPhiNE, at an energy W=Mphi=1.02 GeV. From the dependence of the cross section on m(pi+ pi-)=&surd; {W2- 2WEgamma, where Egamma is the energy of the photon radiated from the initial state, we extract sigma(e+e--->pi+pi-) for the mass range 0.35pi+pi-)<0.95 GeV2. From our result we extract the pion form

A. Aloisio; F. Ambrosino; A. Antonelli; M. Antonelli; C. Bacci; G. Bencivenni; S. Bertolucci; C. Bini; C. Bloise; V. Bocci; F. Bossi; P. Branchini; S. A. Bulychjov; R. Caloi; P. Campana; G. Capon; T. Capussela; G. Carboni; G. Cataldi; F. Ceradini; F. Cervelli; F. Cevenini; G. Chiefari; P. Ciambrone; S. Conetti; E. De Lucia; P. De Simone; G. De Zorzi; S. Dell'Agnello; A. Denig; A. Di Domenico; C. Di Donato; S. Di Falco; B. Di Micco; A. Doria; M. Dreucci; O. Erriquez; A. Farilla; G. Felici; A. Ferrari; M. L. Ferrer; G. Finocchiaro; C. Forti; A. Franceschi; P. Franzini; C. Gatti; P. Gauzzi; S. Giovannella; E. Gorini; E. Graziani; M. Incagli; W. Kluge; V. Kulikov; F. Lacava; G. Lanfranchi; J. Lee-Franzini; D. Leone; F. Lu; M. Martemianov; M. Matsyuk; W. Mei; L. Merola; R. Messi; S. Miscetti; M. Moulson; S. Müller; F. Murtas; M. Napolitano; A. Nedosekin; F. Nguyen; M. Palutan; E. Pasqualucci; L. Passalacqua; A. Passeri; V. Patera; F. Perfetto; E. Petrolo; L. Pontecorvo; M. Primavera; F. Ruggieri; P. Santangelo; E. Santovetti; G. Saracino; R. D. Schamberger; B. Sciascia; A. Sciubba; F. Scuri; I. Sfiligoi; A. Sibidanov; T. Spadaro; E. Spiriti; M. Testa; L. Tortora; P. Valente; B. Valeriani; G. Venanzoni; S. Veneziano; A. Ventura; S. Ventura; R. Versaci; I. Villella; G. Xu

2004-01-01

52

The e+e--->3(pi+pi-), 2(pi+pi-pi0) and K+K-2(pi+pi-) cross sections at center-of-mass energies from production threshold to 4.5 GeV measured with initial-state radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the processes e+e--->3(pi+pi-)gamma, 2(pi+pi-pi0)gamma and K+K-2(pi+pi-)gamma, with the photon radiated from the initial state. About 20 000, 33 000 and 4000 fully reconstructed events, respectively, have been selected from 232 fb-1 of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e+e- center-of-mass energy, so that these data can be compared with the corresponding

B. Aubert; R. Barate; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. S. Best; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; C. T. Day; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; M. Fritsch; K. Goetzen; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; D. Del Re; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; M. Dickopp; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; R. Nogowski; S. Otto; A. Petzold; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; S. Schrenk; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; D. J. Bard; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; L. Piemontese; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. R. Gaillard; J. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; W. F. Mader; U. Mallik; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; T. C. Petersen; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; A. J. Bevan; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; F. Di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; C. L. Brown; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; M. G. Green; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; M. P. Kelly; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; D. Kovalskyi; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; S. Y. Willocq; R. Cowan; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; P. M. Patel; C. T. Potter; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. De Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; H. Bulten; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; T. Pulliam; A. M. Rahimi

2006-01-01

53

Reconclining phi radiative decays with other data for a0(980), fo(980), pi-pi -> KK and pi-pi -> eta-eta  

E-print Network

Data for phi -> gamma (eta-pizero) are analysed using the KK loop model and compared with parameters of a0(980) derived from Crystal Barrel data. The eta-pi mass spectrum agrees closely and the absolute normalisation lies just within errors. However, BES parameters for fo(980) predict a normalisation for phi -> gamma (pizero-pizero) at least a factor 2 lower than is observed. This discrepancy may be eliminated by including constructive interference between fo(980) and sigma. The magnitude required for sigma -> KK is consistent with data on pi-pi -> KK. A dispersion relation analysis by Buttiker, Descotes-Genon and Moussallam of pi-pi -> KK leads to a similar conclusion. Data on pi-pi -> eta-eta also require decays of sigma to eta-eta. Four sets of pi-pi -> KK data all require a small but definite fo(1370) signal.

D. V. Bugg

2006-08-27

54

Study of the D0 \\to Pi Pi- Pi0 Decay at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

The Dalitz-plot of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} measured by the BABAR collaboration shows the structure of a final state having quantum numbers I{sup G}J{sup PC} = 0{sup -}0{sup 2-}. An isospin analysis of this Dalitz-plot finds that the fraction of the I = 0 contribution is about 96%. This high I = 0 contribution is unexpected because the weak interaction violates the isospin.

Gaspero, Mario; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

2012-04-06

55

Determination of the S-wave pi pi scattering lengths from a study of K+- -> pi+- pi0 pi0 decays  

E-print Network

We report the results from a study of the full sample of ~ 6.031 10^7 K+- -> pi+- pi0 pi0 decays recorded by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS. As first observed in this experiment, the pi0 pi0 invariant mass M00 distribution shows a cusp-like anomaly in the region around M00 = 2m+, where m+ is the charged pion mass. This anomaly has been interpreted as an effect due mainly to the final state charge exchange scattering process pi+ pi- -> p0 p0 in K+- -> pi+- pi+ pi- decay. Fits to the M00 distribution using two different theoretical formulations provide the presently most precise determination of (a0 - a2), the difference between the pi pi S-wave scattering lengths in the isospin I=0 and I=2 states. Higher-order pi pi rescattering terms, included in the two formulations, allow also an independent, though less precise, determination of a2.

NA48/2 Collaboration

2009-12-11

56

Study of the X(3872) and Y(4260) in B0-->J/psi pi+ pi- K0 and B-->J/psi pi+ pi- K- decays  

E-print Network

We present results of a search for the X(3872) in B0-->X(3872)KS0,X(3872)-->J/psi pi+ pi-, improved measurements of B-->X(3872)K-, and a study of the J/psi pi+ pi- mass region above the X(3872). We use 232x106 B[overline B] pairs collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- asymmetric-energy storage rings. The results include the 90% confidence interval 1.34x10-6X(3872)K0,X-->J/psi pi+ pi-)x10-6 and the branching fraction BR(B-->X(3872)K-,X-->J/psi pi+ pi-)=(10.1+-2.5+-1.0)x10-6. We observe a (2.7+-1.3+-0.2)MeV/c2 mass difference of the X(3872) produced in the two decay modes. Furthermore, we search for the Y(4260) in B decays and set the 95% C.L. upper limit BR(B-->Y(4260)K-,Y(4260)-->J/psi pi+ pi-)x10-5.

B. Aubert; BABAR Collaboration

2005-07-21

57

Stray field interaction of stacked amorphous tapes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, magnetic cores made of amorphous rectangular tape layers are investigated. The quality factor Q of the tape material decreases rapidly, however, when stacking at least two tape layers. The hysteresis loop becomes non-linear, and the coercivity increases. These effects are principally independent of the frequency and occur whether tape layers are insulated or not. The Kerr-microscopy was used to monitor local hysteresis loops by varying the distance of two tape layers. The magnetization direction of each magnetic domain is influenced by the anisotropy axis, the external magnetic field and the stray field of magnetic domains of the neighboring tape layers. We found that crossed easy axes (as the extreme case for inclined axes) of congruent domains retain the remagnetization and induce a plateau of the local loop. Summarizing local loops leads to the observed increase of coercivity and non-linearity of the inductively measured loop. A high Q-factor can be preserved if the easy axes of stacked tape layers are identical within the interaction range in the order of mm.

Günther, Wulf; Flohrer, Sybille

58

Measurement of sigma(e+e--->pi+pi-gamma) and extraction of sigma(e+e--->pi+pi-) below 1 GeV with the KLOE detector  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have measured the cross section sigma(e+e--->pi+pi-gamma) at an energy W=mvarphi=1.02 GeV with the KLOE detector at the electron positron collider DAPhiNE. From the dependence of the cross section on the invariant mass of the two-pion system, we extract sigma(e+e--->pi+pi-) for the mass range 0.35

A. Aloisio; F. Ambrosino; A. Antonelli; M. Antonelli; C. Bacci; M. Barva; G. Bencivenni; S. Bertolucci; C. Bini; C. Bloise; V. Bocci; F. Bossi; P. Branchini; S. A. Bulychjov; R. Caloi; P. Campana; G. Capon; T. Capussela; G. Carboni; F. Ceradini; F. Cervelli; F. Cevenini; G. Chiefari; P. Ciambrone; S. Conetti; E. de Lucia; A. de Santis; P. de Simone; G. de Zorzi; S. dell'Agnello; A. Denig; A. di Domenico; C. di Donato; S. di Falco; B. di Micco; A. Doria; M. Dreucci; O. Erriquez; A. Farilla; G. Felici; A. Ferrari; M. L. Ferrer; G. Finocchiaro; C. Forti; P. Franzini; C. Gatti; P. Gauzzi; S. Giovannella; E. Gorini; E. Graziani; M. Incagli; W. Kluge; V. Kulikov; F. Lacava; G. Lanfranchi; J. Lee-Franzini; D. Leone; M. Martemianov; M. Martini; M. Matsyuk; W. Mei; L. Merola; R. Messi; S. Miscetti; M. Moulson; S. Müller; F. Murtas; M. Napolitano; F. Nguyen; M. Palutan; E. Pasqualucci; L. Passalacqua; A. Passeri; V. Patera; F. Perfetto; E. Petrolo; L. Pontecorvo; M. Primavera; P. Santangelo; E. Santovetti; G. Saracino; R. D. Schamberger; B. Sciascia; A. Sciubba; F. Scuri; I. Sfiligoi; A. Sibidanov; T. Spadaro; E. Spiriti; M. Testa; L. Tortora; P. Valente; B. Valeriani; G. Venanzoni; S. Veneziano; A. Ventura; S. Ventura; R. Versaci; I. Villella; G. Xu

2005-01-01

59

Upper limit on the eta>pi+pi- branching ratio with the KLOE detector  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have searched with the KLOE detector for the P and CP violating decay eta-->pi+pi- in a sample of 1.55×107eta's from the decay varphi-->etagamma of varphi-mesons produced in e+e- annihilations at DAPhiNE. No signal is found. We obtain the upper limit BR(eta-->pi+pi-)<1.3×10-5 at 90% confidence level.

F. Ambrosino; A. Antonelli; M. Antonelli; C. Bacci; M. Barva; P. Beltrame; G. Bencivenni; S. Bertolucci; C. Bini; C. Bloise; V. Bocci; F. Bossi; D. Bowring; P. Branchini; R. Caloi; P. Campana; G. Capon; T. Capussela; G. Carboni; F. Ceradini; F. Cervelli; S. Chi; G. Chiefari; P. Ciambrone; S. Conetti; E. de Lucia; A. de Santis; P. de Simone; G. de Zorzi; S. dell'Agnello; A. Denig; A. di Domenico; C. di Donato; S. di Falco; B. di Micco; A. Doria; M. Dreucci; A. Farilla; G. Felici; A. Ferrari; M. L. Ferrer; G. Finocchiaro; C. Forti; P. Franzini; C. Gatti; P. Gauzzi; S. Giovannella; E. Gorini; E. Graziani; M. Incagli; W. Kluge; V. Kulikov; F. Lacava; G. Lanfranchi; J. Lee-Franzini; D. Leone; M. Martemianov; M. Martini; P. Massarotti; M. Matsyuk; W. Mei; S. Meola; R. Messi; S. Miscetti; M. Moulson; S. Müller; F. Murtas; M. Napolitano; F. Nguyen; M. Palutan; E. Pasqualucci; L. Passalacqua; A. Passeri; V. Patera; F. Perfetto; L. Pontecorvo; M. Primavera; P. Santangelo; E. Santovetti; G. Saracino; B. Sciascia; A. Sciubba; F. Scuri; I. Sfiligoi; T. Spadaro; E. Spiriti; M. Testa; L. Tortora; P. Valente; B. Valeriani; G. Venanzoni; S. Veneziano; A. Ventura; S. Ventura; R. Versaci; I. Villella; G. Xu

2005-01-01

60

Measurement of Gamma(KS-->pi+pi-(gamma))\\/Gamma(KS-->pi0pi0)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have measured the ratio RSpi=Gamma(KS-->pi+pi-(gamma))\\/Gamma(KS-->pi0pi0) with the KLOE detector at the DAPhiNE e+e- collider. This measurement is fully inclusive with respect to the pi+pi-gamma final state. The sample of over 106 two-pion decays of tagged KS mesons allows a statistical error as low as ~0.1% to be obtained. The accuracy is limited by systematic uncertainties, which are estimated primarily

A. Aloisio; F. Ambrosino; A. Antonelli; M. Antonelli; C. Bacci; R. Baldini-Ferroli; G. Bencivenni; S. Bertolucci; C. Bini; C. Bloise; V. Bocci; F. Bossi; P. Branchini; S. A. Bulychjov; G. Cabibbo; R. Caloi; P. Campana; G. Capon; G. Carboni; M. Casarsa; V. Casavola; G. Cataldi; F. Ceradini; F. Cervelli; F. Cevenini; G. Chiefari; P. Ciambrone; S. Conetti; E. De Lucia; G. De Robertis; P. de Simone; G. de Zorzi; S. Dell'Agnello; A. Denig; A. di Domenico; C. di Donato; S. di Falco; A. Doria; M. Dreucci; O. Erriquez; A. Farilla; G. Felici; A. Ferrari; M. L. Ferrer; G. Finocchiaro; C. Forti; A. Franceschi; P. Franzini; C. Gatti; P. Gauzzi; S. Giovannella; E. Gorini; F. Grancagnolo; E. Graziani; S. W. Han; M. Incagli; L. Ingrosso; W. Kluge; C. Kuo; V. Kulikov; F. Lacava; G. Lanfranchi; J. Lee-Franzini; D. Leone; F. Lu; M. Martemianov; M. Matsyuk; W. Mei; L. Merola; R. Messi; S. Miscetti; M. Moulson; S. Müller; F. Murtas; M. Napolitano; A. Nedosekin; F. Nguyen; M. Palutan; L. Paoluzi; E. Pasqualucci; L. Passalacqua; A. Passeri; V. Patera; E. Petrolo; G. Pirozzi; L. Pontecorvo; M. Primavera; F. Ruggieri; P. Santangelo; E. Santovetti; G. Saracino; R. D. Schamberger; B. Sciascia; A. Sciubba; F. Scuri; I. Sfiligoi; T. Spadaro; E. Spiriti; G. L. Tong; L. Tortora; E. Valente; P. Valente; B. Valeriani; G. Venanzoni; S. Veneziano; A. Ventura; Y. Xu; Y. Yu

2002-01-01

61

Three-particle equations for the coupled N. pi. -N. pi pi. system  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the coupled N..pi..-N..pi pi.. system is carried out using the Hamiltonian of the Chew-Low theory. This Hamiltonian describes the interaction of pions with a static nucleon through the virtual process Narrow-right-leftN+..pi... A set of three-particle equations is obtained whose solutions satisfy two- and three-particle unitarity, as well as the discontinuity relations for the production amplitudes (N+..pi -->..N+2..pi..) in the subenergy variables, i.e., the energy of one of the final state pions. It is shown that in order to satisfy the subenergy discontinuity relation, it is necessary to include all four P-wave ..pi..-N amplitudes as input to the three-particle equations. In particular, even though the ..delta.. is not an elementary particle in the model considered, its amplitude must be part of the input. The analysis presented shows how to modify the standard three-particle equations to account for single nucleon intermediate states. An expansion for the production amplitude similar to the isobar expansion emerges from the analysis. An approximation for the nucleon propagator is obtained which includes the effect of two meson states.

Fuda, M.G.

1984-08-01

62

Evidence for evolution from pure states to mixed states in pion creation process pi(-) p -> pi(-)pi(+) n on polarized target and its physical interpretation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1982 Hawking suggested that quantum fluctuations of space-time metric will induce a non-unitary evolution from pure initial states to mixed final states in particle interactions at any energy. This hypothesis can be tested using existing CERN data on pi(-) p -> pi(-)pi(+) n on polarized target at 17.2 GeV\\/c. The purity of the final state is controlled by the

Miloslav Svec

2007-01-01

63

K to pi pi Amplitudes at Unphysical Kinematics Using Domain Wall Fermions  

E-print Network

The use of chiral perturbation theory in extracting physical K to pi pi matrix elements from matrix elements calculated at unphysical kinematics is outlined. In particular, the possibility of utilizing pions with non-zero momentum in the final state, and of using partial quenching is discussed. Preliminary (not physically normalized) Delta I=3/2 (27,1) K to pi pi matrix elements are calculated on the RBC/UKQCD $24^3 \\times 64$, $L_s=16$ lattices, using 2+1 dynamical flavors and domain wall fermions, with an inverse lattice spacing of $a^{-1}=1.729(28) GeV$. Effective mass plots are presented for a light sea quark mass of $m_l^{sea}=0.005$, and various valence quark masses. The plateaux are fit and $E_{\\pi\\pi}-m_K$ is extracted.

Matthew Lightman

2007-11-26

64

Measurement of the Branching Ratio of the KL -> pi+pi- decay with the KLOE Detector  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a measurement of the branching ratio of the CP violating decay\\u000aKL->pi+pi- performed by the KLOE experiment at the phi factory DAFNE. We use\\u000a328 pb-1 of data collected in 2001 and 2002, corresponding to ~ 150 million\\u000atagged KL mesons. We find BR(KL->pi+pi-) = $(1.963 +\\/- 0.012 +\\/- 0.017)x 10^-3.\\u000aThis branching ratio measurement is fully inclusive

A. Antonelli; M. Antonelli; C. Bacci; P. Beltrame; G. Bencivenni; S. Bertolucci; C. Bini; C. Bloise; V. Bocci; F. Bossi; D. Bowring; P. Branchini; R. Caloi; P. Campana; G. Capon; T. Capussela; F. Ceradini; S. Chi; G. Chiefari; P. Ciambrone; S. Conetti; E. De Lucia; A. De Santis; P. De Simone; G. De Zorzi; S. Dell' Agnello; A. Denig; A. Di Domenico; C. Di Donato; S. Di Falco; B. Di Micco; A. Doria; M. Dreucci; G. Felici; A. Ferrari; M. L. Ferrer; G. Finocchiaro; S. Fiore; C. Forti; P. Franzini; C. Gatti; P. Gauzzi; S. Giovannella; E. Gorini; E. Graziani; M. Incagli; W. Kluge; V. Kulikov; F. Lacava; G. Lanfranchi; J. Lee-Franzini; D. Leone; M. Martini; P. Massarotti; W. Mei; S. Meola; S. Miscetti; M. Moulson; S. Muller; F. Murtas; M. Napolitano; F. Nguyen; M. Palutan; E. Pasqualucci; A. Passeri; V. Patera; F. Perfetto; L. Pontecorvo; M. Primavera; P. Santangelo; E. Santovetti; G. Saracino; B. Sciascia; A. Sciubba; F. Scuri; I. Sfiligoi; T. Spadaro; M. Testa; L. Tortora; P. Valente; B. Valeriani; G. Venanzoni; S. Veneziano; A. Ventura; R. Versaci; G. Xu

2006-01-01

65

Measurement of the D+-->pi+pi0 and D+-->K+pi0 branching fractions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present measurements of the branching fractions for the Cabbibo suppressed decays D+-->pi+pi0 and D+-->K+pi0 based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 124.3fb-1. The data were taken with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory operating on and near the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We find B(D+-->pi+pi0)=(1.25±0.10±0.09±0.04)×10-3 and B(D+-->K+pi0)=(2.52±0.47±0.25±0.08)×10-4, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second

B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; K. Goetzen; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; A. Petzold; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; D. J. Bard; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. R. Gaillard; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; C. M. Brown; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. S. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; M. P. Kelly; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; S. Y. Willocq; R. Cowan; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; D. Del Re; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; H. Bulten; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; T. Pulliam; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; C. T. Potter; R. Rahmat

2006-01-01

66

Dispersion relations with crossing symmetry for {pi}{pi}D- and F1-wave amplitudes  

SciTech Connect

Results of implementation of dispersion relations with imposed crossing symmetry condition to description of {pi}{pi}D and F1 wave amplitudes are presented. We use relations with only one subtraction what leads to small uncertainties of results and to strong constraints for tested {pi}{pi} amplitudes. Presented equations are similar to those with one subtraction (so called GKPY equations) and to those with two subtractions (the Roy's equations) for the S and P waves. Numerical calculations are done with the S and P wave input amplitudes tested already with use of the Roy's and GKPY equations.

Kaminski, R. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, Krakow (Poland)

2011-05-23

67

Search for b-->u transitions in B>[K+pi-pi0]DK  

Microsoft Academic Search

We search for decays of a B meson into a neutral D meson and a charged kaon, with the D meson decaying into a charged kaon, a charged pion, and a neutral pion. This final state can be reached through the b-->c transition B--->D0K- followed by the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed D0-->K+pi-pi0, or the b-->u transition B--->D¯0K- followed by the Cabibbo-favored D¯0-->K+pi-pi0.

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; Y. Zheng; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani

2007-01-01

68

Stacking Interactions in Denaturation of DNA Fragments  

E-print Network

A mesoscopic model for heterogeneous DNA denaturation is developed in the framework of the path integral formalism. The base pair stretchings are treated as one-dimensional, time dependent paths contributing to the partition function. The size of the paths ensemble, which measures the degree of cooperativity of the system, is computed versus temperature consistently with the model potential physical requirements. It is shown that the ensemble size strongly varies with the molecule backbone stiffness providing a quantitative relation between stacking and features of the melting transition. The latter is an overall smooth crossover which begins from the \\emph{adenine-thymine} rich portions of the fragment. The harmonic stacking coupling shifts, along the $T$-axis, the occurrence of the multistep denaturation but it does not change the character of the crossover. The methods to compute the fractions of open base pairs versus temperature are discussed: by averaging the base pair displacements over the path ensemb...

Zoli, Marco

2011-01-01

69

Hunting the CKM weak phase with time-integrated Dalitz analyses of Bs -> K pi pi decays  

E-print Network

We present a new technique to extract information on the Unitarity Triangle from the study of Bs -> K pi pi Dalitz plot. Using isospin symmetry and the possibility to access the decay amplitudes from Dalitz analyses, we propose a new strategy to extract the weak phase gamma from Bs to K pi pi.

M. Ciuchini; M. Pierini; L. Silvestrini

2007-01-11

70

Numerical analysis of the pi+pi- atom lifetime in ChPT  

E-print Network

We apply Chiral Perturbation Theory at one loop to analyze the general formula for the pi+pi- atom lifetime derived recently in the framework of QCD. The corresponding analytic expression is investigated numerically, and compared with recent work in the literature.

J. Gasser; V. E. Lyubovitskij; A. Rusetsky

1999-10-21

71

Study of J/psi->eta phi pi+pi- at BESIII  

E-print Network

Based on a sample of $2.25\\times 10^{8} J/\\psi$ events taken with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we present the results of a study of the decay $J/\\psi\\to \\eta \\phi\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$. The $Y(2175)$ resonance is observed in the invariant mass spectrum of $\\phi f_{0}(980)$ with a statistical significance of greater than $10\\sigma$. The corresponding mass and width are determined to be $M=2200\\pm 6 \\mathrm{(stat.)} \\pm 5\\mathrm{(syst.)} \\mathrm{MeV}/c^{2}$ and $\\Gamma=104\\pm 15\\mathrm{(stat.)}\\pm 15\\mathrm{(syst.)}$ MeV, respectively, and the product branching fraction is measured to be $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to\\eta Y(2175)$, $Y(2175)\\to \\phi f_{0}(980)$, $f_{0}(980)\\to \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-})= (1.20\\pm 0.14\\mathrm{(stat.)}\\pm 0.37 \\mathrm{(syst.)})\\times 10^{-4}$. The results are consistent within errors with those of previous experiments. We also measure the branching fraction of $J/\\psi\\to \\phi f_1(1285)$ with $f_1(1285)\\to \\eta\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and set upper limits on the branching fractions for $J/\\psi\\to \\phi\\eta(1405)$/$\\phi X(1835)$/$\\phi X(1870)$ with $\\eta(1405)$/$X(1835)$/$X(1870)\\to \\eta\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ at the 90\\% confidence level.

M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; X. C. Ai; O. Albayrak; M. Albrecht; D. J. Ambrose; A. Amoroso; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; R. Baldini Ferroli; Y. Ban; D. W. Bennett; J. V. Bennett; M. Bertani; D. Bettoni; J. M. Bian; F. Bianchi; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; H. Cai; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. Y. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. Chen; X. R. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; X. K. Chu; G. Cibinetto; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; A. Dbeyssi; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; F. De Mori; Y. Ding; C. Dong; J. Dong; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; P. F. Duan; J. Z. Fan; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; X. Fang; Y. Fang; L. Fava; F. Feldbauer; G. Felici; C. Q. Feng; E. Fioravanti; M. Fritsch; C. D. Fu; Q. Gao; Y. Gao; I. Garzia; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; T. Guo; Y. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Z. Haddadi; A. Hafner; S. Han; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; C. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; Y. Hu G. M. Huang G. S. Huang; H. P. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. Huang; T. Hussain; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; L. W. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; T. Johansson; A. Julin; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; X. L. Kang; X. S. Kang; M. Kavatsyuk; B. C. Ke; R. Kliemt; B. Kloss; O. B. Kolcud; B. Kopf; M. Kornicer; W. Kuehn; A. Kupsc; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; M. Lara; P. Larin; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; Jin Li; K. Li; K. Li; P. R. Li; T. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. M. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; D. X. Lin; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. P. Liu; J. Y. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y. Liu; L. D. Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; X. X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; X. C. Loue; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; R. Q. Lu; Y. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; X. R. Lyu; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; L. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. N. Ma; X. Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; S. Marcello; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; Y. J. Mo; C. Morales Morales; K. Moriya; N. Yu. Muchnoia; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; F. Nerling; I. B. Nikolaeva; Z. Ning; S. Nisar; S. L. Niu; X. Y. Niu; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; Y. N. Pu; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; L. Q. Qin; N. Qin; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; C. F. Redmer; H. L. Ren; M. Ripka; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; V. Santoro; A. Sarantsev; M. Savrié; K. Schoenning; S. Schumann; W. Shan; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; P. X. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; W. M. Song; X. Y. Song; S. Sosio; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; M. Tiemens; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; I. Uman; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; B. L. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; W. Wang; X. F. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. H. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; T. Weber; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; S. P. Wen; U. Wiedner; M. Wolke; L. H. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Y. Xia; D. Xiao; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; G. F. Xu; L. Xu; Q. J. Xu; Q. N. Xu; X. P. Xu; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; W. C. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; L. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye J. H. Yin; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; W. L. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. Yuncug; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. J. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; K. Zhang; L. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Z. H. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; J. Y. Zhao; J. Z. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; Q. W. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugovh; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; W. J. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; L. Zhou; Li Zhou; X. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; X. Y. Zhou; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

2014-12-17

72

G parity boundary conditions and Delta I = 1/2, K to pi pi decays  

E-print Network

The use of G-parity boundary conditions to compute Delta I = 1/2, K to pi pi decays is reviewed and a method to consistently treat both the pions and kaon in full QCD proposed. This approach creates a physical, final-state, pion momentum using a 3 fm box and avoids statistical noise coming from pions with smaller momentum.

Changhoan Kim; Norman H. Christ

2009-12-15

73

An interesting feature of BESIII data for J/Psi -> gamma-(etaprime-pi-pi)  

E-print Network

The eta(1835) is confirmed clearly in new BESIII data for J/Psi -> gamma (eta'-pi-pi); the angular distribution of the photon is consistent with a pseudoscalar. This makes it a candidate for an s-sbar radial excitation of eta' and eta(1440) (or one or both of eta(1405) and eta(1475)). However, a conspicuous feature of the BES III data is the absence of evidence for eta(1440) -> eta'-pi-pi while it is well known that eta(1440) appears in eta-pi-pi. Can these facts be reconciled? There is in fact a simple explanation. The channel eta(1440) -> eta-pi-pi may be explained by the two-step process eta(1440) -> [K*K]_{L=1} and [kappa K ]_{L=0}, followed by KK -> a0(980) -> eta-pi. This process does not produce any significant eta'-pi signal because of the Adler zero close to the eta'-pi threshold.

D. V. Bugg

2011-01-09

74

Dielectric Constant and Screened Interactions in AA Stacked Bilayer Graphene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AA stacked bilayer graphene has a band structure consisting of two Dirac cones, bonding and antibonding, displaced in energies. In absence of interaction between electrons, the system is metallic and the Fermi surface consists of circles in the bonding and antibonding bands which coincides exactly. In presence of interaction between electrons the system is unstable to the condensation of bonding-like electrons and antibonding-like holes. The properties and the critical temperature of this gapped phase depends strongly on the screening on the interaction between pairs at large distances. In this work we study the polarizability and the intra and interlayer screened Coulomb interactions of a AA-stacked bilayer graphene for different energy gaps in the spectrum. We obtain that the existence of a gap suppress the screening at small wavevectors. Our results indcates the importance of a self-consistent treatment of the screening in the study of gapped phases in AA stacked bilayer graphene.

Brey, Luis

75

Stacking Interactions in Denaturation of DNA Fragments  

E-print Network

A mesoscopic model for heterogeneous DNA denaturation is developed in the framework of the path integral formalism. The base pair stretchings are treated as one-dimensional, time dependent paths contributing to the partition function. The size of the paths ensemble, which measures the degree of cooperativity of the system, is computed versus temperature consistently with the model potential physical requirements. It is shown that the ensemble size strongly varies with the molecule backbone stiffness providing a quantitative relation between stacking and features of the melting transition. The latter is an overall smooth crossover which begins from the \\emph{adenine-thymine} rich portions of the fragment. The harmonic stacking coupling shifts, along the $T$-axis, the occurrence of the multistep denaturation but it does not change the character of the crossover. The methods to compute the fractions of open base pairs versus temperature are discussed: by averaging the base pair displacements over the path ensemble we find that such fractions signal the multisteps of the transition in good agreement with the indications provided by the specific heat plots.

Marco Zoli

2011-06-21

76

Improved measurements of branching fractions for B -> K pi and B -> pi pi decays  

E-print Network

We report improved measurements of branching fractions for B -> K pi and B -> pi pi decays based on a data sample of 449 million B Bbar pairs collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB e^+e^- collider. We also calculate the ratios of partial widths for the decays B -> K pi and pi pi, namely R_c = 1.08 +- 0.06 +- 0.08 and R_n = 1.08 +-0.08 +0.09-0.08, where the first and second errors are statistical and systematical, respectively. These ratios are sensitive to enhanced electroweak penguin contributions from new physics; the new measurements are, however, consistent with Standard Model expectations.

S. -W. Lin; P. Chang; for the Belle Collaboration

2007-03-20

77

Enhanced face-to-face Pi stacking in perfluoroalkylated organic semiconductor materials: Crystallographic and NMR studies of weak non-covalent interactions in condensed phases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this chapter, the synthesis of new perfluoroalkylated hydrocarbon aromatics A) 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(nonafluorobutyl)-benzene (4-C4F 9-Bz), B) 1,3,6,8-tetrakis(nonafluorobutyl)-pyrene (4-C4F 9-pyrene) and two new heteroaromatic compounds C) 3,8-bis(nonafluorobutyl)-1,10-phenanthroline(2-C4F9-1,10-phen) and D) 4,4'-bis(nonafluorobutyl)-2,2'-bipyridine (2-C4F9-bipy) were described, using copper mediated perfluoroalkylation in a mixture of DMSO(anhy) and anhydrous benzotrifluoride (BTF(anhy)). All the compounds were purified by recrystallization and characterized by 1H NMR, 19F NMR, mass spectrometry and elemental analyses. Single-crystals were obtained for these novel compounds and their packing modes are studied and compared with other literature reporting single crystal structures to study the effects of substitution of electron deficient fluoroalkyl chains on aromatics on packing modes, and weak noncovalent interactions that became the basis for the present chapter. We found that by fine-tuning the size of the aromatic core, lengthening perfluoroalkyl chain, altering the substitution position, and making use of these weak fluorous interactions, 1-D pi-pi stacking in these model compounds is achieved. This can provide us an opportunity to extend this concept to n-type solution processable air-stable organic semiconductor molecules which can be used in real world applications.

Tottempudi, Usha Kiran

78

Study of the K0L --> pi+pi-gamma Direct Emission Vertex  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have perfomed studies of the K0L-->pi+pi-gamma direct emission ( DE) and inner Bremsstrahlung ( IB) vertices, based on data collected by KTeV during the 1996 Fermilab fixed target run. We find a1\\/a2 = -0.737+\\/-0.034 GeV2 for the DE form-factor parameter in the rho-propagator parametrization, and report on fits of the form factor to linear and quadratic functions as well.

A. Alavi-Harati; T. Alexopoulos; M. Arenton; K. Arisaka; S. Averitte; A. R. Barker; L. Bellantoni; A. Bellavance; J. Belz; R. Ben-David; D. R. Bergman; E. Blucher; G. J. Bock; C. Bown; S. Bright; E. Cheu; S. Childress; R. Coleman; M. D. Corcoran; G. Corti; B. Cox; M. B. Crisler; A. R. Erwin; R. Ford; A. Glazov; A. Golossanov; G. Graham; J. Graham; K. Hagan; E. Halkiadakis; J. Hamm; K. Hanagaki; S. Hidaka; Y. B. Hsiung; V. Jejer; D. A. Jensen; R. Kessler; H. G. Kobrak; J. Ladue; A. Lath; A. Ledovskoy; P. L. McBride; P. Mikelsons; E. Monnier; T. Nakaya; K. S. Nelson; H. Nguyen; V. O'dell; M. Pang; R. Pordes; V. Prasad; B. Quinn; E. J. Ramberg; R. E. Ray; A. Roodman; M. Sadamoto; S. Schnetzer; K. Senyo; P. Shanahan; P. S. Shawhan; J. Shields; W. Slater; N. Solomey; S. V. Somalwar; R. L. Stone; I. Suzuki; E. C. Swallow; S. A. Taegar; R. J. Tesarek; G. B. Thomson; P. A. Toale; A. Tripathi; R. Tschirhart; S. E. Turner; Y. W. Wah; J. Wang; H. B. White; J. Whitmore; B. Winstein; R. Winston; T. Yamanaka; E. D. Zimmerman

2001-01-01

79

Dalitz plot analysis of the decay B0( Bmacr 0)-->K±pi-\\/+pi0  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a Dalitz-plot analysis of the charmless hadronic decays of neutral B mesons to K±pi-\\/+pi0. With a sample of (231.8±2.6)×106Upsilon(4S)-->B Bmacr decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, we measure the magnitudes and phases of the intermediate resonant and nonresonant amplitudes for B0 and Bmacr 0 decays and determine the corresponding CP-averaged

B. Aubert; M. Bona; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; T. J. Orimoto; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; N. Soni; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; B. Echenard; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; R. Ayad; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; R. Cenci; A. Cervelli

2008-01-01

80

Evidence for direct CP violation from Dalitz-plot analysis of B±-->K±pi-\\/+pi±  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a Dalitz-plot analysis of the charmless hadronic decays of charged B mesons to the final state K±pi-\\/+pi±. Using a sample of (383.2±4.2)×106 B Bmacr pairs collected by the BABAR detector, we measure CP-averaged branching fractions and direct CP asymmetries for intermediate resonant and nonresonant contributions. We find evidence for direct CP violation in the decay B±-->rho0(770)K±, with a

B. Aubert; M. Bona; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; E. Prencipe; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; C. M. Hawkes; N. Soni; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; Z. Yasin; L. Zhang; V. Sharma; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; L. Wang; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; C. H. Cheng; D. A. Doll; B. Echenard; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; M. Karbach; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; S. Playfer; J. E. Watson; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; J. Firmino da Costa; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; K. E. Alwyn; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; G. Castelli; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; P. Del Amo Sanchez; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; G. Marchiori; M. Morganti; N. Neri; E. Paoloni; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; J. Biesiada; D. Lopes Pegna; C. Lu; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith

2008-01-01

81

Pi-Pi Scattering with Nf=2+1+1 Twisted Mass Fermions  

E-print Network

Pi-Pi scattering is investigated for the first time for Nf=2+1+1 dynamical quark flavours using Wilson twisted mass fermions. L\\"uscher's finite size method is used to relate energy shifts in finite volume to scattering quantities like the scattering length in the I=2 channel. The computation is performed at several pion masses and lattice spacings utilising the stochastic LapH method.

Christopher Helmes; Christian Jost; Bastian Knippschild; Liuming Liu; Carsten Urbach; Markus Werner

2014-12-01

82

Physical matrix elements for Delta I = 3/2 channel K to pi pi decays  

E-print Network

K to pi pi matrix elements of the electroweak operator Q_(27,1)^Delta I=3/2 are calculated on the RBC/UKQCD 32^3 x 64, L_s=16 lattices, using 2+1 dynamical flavors and domain wall fermions, with an inverse lattice spacing of a^(-1)=2.42(4) GeV. Data is interpolated or extrapolated to energy conserving kinematics and a preliminary calculation of the experimental parameter |A_2| is performed.

Matthew Lightman; for the RBC; UKQCD collaborations

2009-06-11

83

Search for eta_c decays into pi pi and K Bar K  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using 58 million $J\\/\\\\psi$ events taken with the BESII detector, a search for\\u000a$eta_{c}$ CP violating decays into $\\\\pi\\\\pi$ and $\\\\bar{K}K$ has been performed.\\u000aNo clear $eta_{c}$ is observed, and upper limits for $B(eta_{c}->\\\\pi \\\\pi)$and\\u000a$B(eta_{c}->\\\\bar{K} K)$ are given at the 90% confidence level,\\u000a$B(J\\/\\\\psi->\\\\gamma\\\\eta_{c})\\\\times B(eta_{c}->\\\\pi^{+}\\\\pi^{-})<1.1\\\\times 10^{-5}$\\u000a, $B(J\\/\\\\psi->\\\\gamma\\\\eta_{c})\\\\times B(eta_{c}->\\\\pi^{0}\\\\pi^{0})<0.71\\\\times\\u000a10^{-5}$, $B(J\\/\\\\psi->\\\\gamma\\\\eta_{c})\\\\times B(eta_{c}->K^{+}K^{-})<0.96\\\\times\\u000a10^{-5}$ and $B(J\\/\\\\psi->\\\\gamma\\\\eta_{c})\\\\times\\u000aB(eta_{c}->{K_{s}}^{0}{K_{s}}^{0})<0.53\\\\times 10^{-5}$.

M. Ablikim; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. G. Bian; X. Cai; H. F. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. X. Chen; J. C. Chen; Y. B. Chen; S. P. Chi; Y. P. Chu; X. Z. Cui; Y. S. Dai; Z. Y. Deng; L. Y. Dong; Q. F. Dong; Z. Z. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; C. D. Fu; C. S. Gao; Y. N. Gao; S. D. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. N. Guo; Y. Q. Guo; Z. J. Guo; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; Y. K. Heng; H. M. Hu; T. Hu; G. S. Huang; X. P. Huang; X. T. Huang; X. B. Ji; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; Yi Jin; Y. F. Lai; G. Li; H. B. Li; H. H. Li; J. Li; R. Y. Li; S. M. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; Y. L. Li; Y. F. Liang; H. B. Liao; C. X. Liu; F. Liu; Fang Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. B. Liu; R. G. Liu; Z. A. Liu; F. Lu; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; C. L. Luo; H. L. Ma; L. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; X. B. Ma; Z. P. Mao; X. H. Mo; J. Nie; S. L. Olsen; H. P. Peng; N. D. Qi; H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; Z. Y. Ren; G. Rong; L. Y. Shan; L. Shang; D. L. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; F. Shi; X. Shi; H. S. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. Q. Tan; X. Tang; Y. R. Tian; G. L. Tong; G. S. Varner; D. Y. Wang; L. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; W. F. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; C. L. Wei; D. H. Wei; N. Wu; X. M. Xia; X. X. Xie; B. Xin; G. F. Xu; Y. Xu; M. L. Yan; F. Yang; H. X. Yang; J. Yang; Y. X. Yang; M. H. Ye; Y. X. Ye; Z. Y. Yi; G. W. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; J. M. Yuan; Y. Yuan; S. L. Zang; Y. Zeng; Yu Zeng; B. X. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; Q. J. Zhang; X. M. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Yiyun Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Q. Zhang; D. X. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; M. G. Zhao; P. P. Zhao; W. R. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; H. Q. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; L. Zhou; N. F. Zhou; K. J. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Yingchun Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; B. A. Zhuang; X. A. Zhuang; B. S. Zou

2005-01-01

84

Observation of CP violation in B(0) --> K(+)pi(-) and B(0) --> pi(+)pi(-).  

PubMed

We report observations of CP violation in the decays B(0) --> K(+)pi(-) and B(0) --> pi(+)pi(-) in a sample of 383 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S) --> BB[over] events. We find 4372+/-82 B(0) --> K(+)pi(-) decays and measure the direct CP-violating charge asymmetry A(Kpi) = -0.107+/-0.018(stat)(-0.004)(+0.007)(syst), which excludes the CP-conserving hypothesis with a significance of 5.5 standard deviations. In the same sample, we find 1139+/-49 B(0) --> pi(+)pi(-) decays and measure the CP-violating asymmetries S(pipi) = -0.60+/-0.11(stat)+/-0.03(syst) and C(pipi) = -0.21+/-0.09(stat)+/-0.02(syst). CP conservation in B(0) --> pi(+)pi(-) (S(pipi) = C(pipi) = 0) is excluded at a confidence level 1-C.L. = 8 x 10(-8), corresponding to 5.4 standard deviations. PMID:17678212

Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Fisher, P H; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F

2007-07-13

85

High-Statistics Study of the tau^- -> pi^- pi^0 nu_tau Decay  

E-print Network

We report a high-statistics measurement of the branching fraction for tau^- --> pi^- pi^0 nu_tau and the invariant mass spectrum of the produced pi^- pi^0 system using 72.2 fb^-1 of data recorded with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e^+ e^- collider. The branching fraction obtained is (25.24 +/- 0.01 +/- 0.39)%, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The unfolded pi^- pi^0 mass spectrum is used to determine resonance parameters for the rho(770), rho'(1450), and rho"(1700) mesons. We also use this spectrum to estimate the hadronic (2pi) contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon (a_{mu}^{pipi}). Our result for a_{mu}^{pipi} integrated over the mass range sqrt{s} = 2m_{pi} - 1.8 GeV/c^2 is a_{mu}^{pipi} = (523.5 +/- 1.5 (exp) +/- 2.6 (Br) +/- 2.5 (isospin))x 10^{-10}, where the first error is due to the experimental uncertainties, the second is due to the uncertainties in the branching fractions and the third is due to the uncertainties in the isospin-violating corrections.

M. Fujikawa; H. Hayashii; S. Eidelman; for the Belle Collaboration

2008-10-29

86

Measurement of CP Asymmetries and Branching Fractions in B -> pi pi and B -> K pi decays  

E-print Network

We present preliminary measurements of the CP asymmetries and branching fractions for B -> pi pi and B -> K pi decays. A total of 347 million BBbar events collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at SLAC are used for these results. We find Spipi = -0.53 +- 0.14 +-0.02, Cpipi = -0.16 +- 0.11 +- 0.03, AKpi = -0.108 +- 0.024 +- 0.008, BF(B0 -> pi0 pi0) = (1.48 +- 0.26 +- 0.12) x 10^-6, BF(B+ -> pi+pi0) = (5.12 +- 0.47 +- 0.29) x 10^-6, BF(B+ -> K+pi0) = (13.3 +- 0.56 +- 0.64) x 10^-6, Cpi0pi0 = -0.33 +- 0.36 +- 0.08, Apipi0 = -0.019 +- 0.088 +- 0.014, AKpi0 = 0.016 +- 0.041 +- 0.012. The measured values of Spipi and Cpipi imply that CP conservation in B0 -> pi+ pi- decays is excluded at the 3.6 sigma level. From these results we present bounds on the CKM angle alpha.

The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

2006-08-26

87

Isospin-breaking effects on alpha extracted in B --> pi pi, rho rho, rho pi  

E-print Network

Isospin-breaking in B --> pi pi caused by pi^0-eta-eta' mixing is studied in a model-independent way using flavor SU(3). Measured branching ratios for B^+ --> pi^+ pi^0, B^+ --> pi^+ eta^(') and B^0 --> pi^0 eta^(') imply an uncertainty in alpha smaller than 1.4 degree. We find a negligible effect of pi^0-eta-eta' mixing on alpha in B --> rho pi. Characterizing the effect of rho^0-omega mixing in B --> rho rho and in B --> rho pi by the two-pion invariant mass dependence, we point out a way of constraining this effect experimentally or eliminating it altogether. We show that a model-independent shift in alpha caused by electroweak penguin amplitudes in B --> pi pi and B --> rho rho, \\Delta alpha_{EWP}=1.5+- 0.3 degree, may be slightly different in B --> rho pi. Other sources of isospin-breaking in these processes are briefly discussed.

M. Gronau; J. Zupan

2005-04-14

88

Double Pancake Bonds: Pushing the Limits of Strong ?–? Stacking Interactions  

PubMed Central

The concept of a double-bonded pancake bonding mechanism is introduced to explain the extremely short ?–? stacking contacts in dimers of dithiatriazines. While ordinary single pancake bonds occur between radicals and already display significantly shorter interatomic distances in comparison to van der Waals (vdW) contacts, the double-bonded pancake dimer is based on diradicaloid or antiaromatic molecules and exhibits even shorter and stronger intermolecular bonds that breach into the range of extremely stretched single bonds in terms of bond distances and binding energies. These properties give rise to promising possibilities in the design of new materials with high electrical conductivity and for the field of spintronics. The analysis of the double pancake bond is based on cutting edge electron correlation theory combining multireference (nondynamical) effects and dispersion (dynamical) contributions in a balanced way providing accurate interaction energies and distributions of unpaired spins. It is also shown that the present examples do not stand isolated but that similar mechanisms operate in several analogous nonradical molecular systems to form double-bonded ?-stacking pancake dimers. We report on the amazing properties of a new type of stacking interaction mechanism between ? conjugated molecules in the form of a “double pancake bond” which breaks the record for short intermolecular distances and provides formidable strength for some ?–? stacking interactions. PMID:25203200

2014-01-01

89

Double pancake bonds: pushing the limits of strong ?-? stacking interactions.  

PubMed

The concept of a double-bonded pancake bonding mechanism is introduced to explain the extremely short ?-? stacking contacts in dimers of dithiatriazines. While ordinary single pancake bonds occur between radicals and already display significantly shorter interatomic distances in comparison to van der Waals (vdW) contacts, the double-bonded pancake dimer is based on diradicaloid or antiaromatic molecules and exhibits even shorter and stronger intermolecular bonds that breach into the range of extremely stretched single bonds in terms of bond distances and binding energies. These properties give rise to promising possibilities in the design of new materials with high electrical conductivity and for the field of spintronics. The analysis of the double pancake bond is based on cutting edge electron correlation theory combining multireference (nondynamical) effects and dispersion (dynamical) contributions in a balanced way providing accurate interaction energies and distributions of unpaired spins. It is also shown that the present examples do not stand isolated but that similar mechanisms operate in several analogous nonradical molecular systems to form double-bonded ?-stacking pancake dimers. We report on the amazing properties of a new type of stacking interaction mechanism between ? conjugated molecules in the form of a "double pancake bond" which breaks the record for short intermolecular distances and provides formidable strength for some ?-? stacking interactions. PMID:25203200

Cui, Zhong-hua; Lischka, Hans; Beneberu, Habtamu Z; Kertesz, Miklos

2014-09-17

90

New Insights into Hydrogen Bonding and Stacking Interactions in Cellulose  

SciTech Connect

In this quantum chemical study, we explore hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) and stacking interactions in different crystalline cellulose allomorphs, namely cellulose I and cellulose IIII. We consider a model system representing a cellulose crystalline core, made from six cellobiose units arranged in three layers with two chains per layer. We calculate the contributions of intrasheet and intersheet interactions to the structure and stability in both cellulose I and cellulose IIII crystalline cores. Reference structures for this study were generated from molecular dynamics simulations of water-solvated cellulose I and IIII fibrils. A systematic analysis of various conformations describing different mutual orientations of cellobiose units is performed using the hybrid density functional theory (DFT) with the M06-2X with 6-31+G (d, p) basis sets. We dissect the nature of the forces that stabilize the cellulose I and cellulose IIII crystalline cores and quantify the relative strength of H-bonding and stacking interactions. Our calculations demonstrate that individual H-bonding interactions are stronger in cellulose I than in cellulose IIII. We also observe a significant contribution from cooperative stacking interactions to the stabilization of cellulose I . In addition, the theory of atoms-in-molecules (AIM) has been employed to characterize and quantify these intermolecular interactions. AIM analyses highlight the role of nonconventional CH O H-bonding in the cellulose assemblies. Finally, we calculate molecular electrostatic potential maps for the cellulose allomorphs that capture the differences in chemical reactivity of the systems considered in our study.

Langan, Paul [ORNL

2011-01-01

91

Stacked stem cell sheets enhance cell-matrix interactions  

PubMed Central

Cell sheet engineering has enabled the production of confluent cell sheets stacked together for use as a cardiac patch to increase cell survival rate and engraftment after transplantation, thereby providing a promising strategy for high density stem cell delivery for cardiac repair. One key challenge in using cell sheet technology is the difficulty of cell sheet handling due to its weak mechanical properties. A single-layer cell sheet is generally very fragile and tends to break or clump during harvest. Effective transfer and stacking methods are needed to move cell sheet technology into widespread clinical applications. In this study, we developed a simple and effective micropipette based method to aid cell sheet transfer and stacking. The cell viability after transfer was tested and multi-layer stem cell sheets were fabricated using the developed method. Furthermore, we examined the interactions between stacked stem cell sheets and fibrin matrix. Our results have shown that the preserved ECM associated with the detached cell sheet greatly facilitates its adherence to fibrin matrix and enhances the cell sheet-matrix interactions. Accelerated fibrin degradation caused by attached cell sheets was also observed. PMID:24769850

Patel, Nikul G; Zhang, Ge

2014-01-01

92

Atomic-scale details of dislocation - stacking fault tetrahedra interaction.  

SciTech Connect

Stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) are formed during irradiation of fcc. metals and alloys with low stacking fault energy. The high number density of SFTs observed suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, be taken into account when estimating mechanical property changes of irradiated materials. The key issue is to describe the interaction between a moving dislocation and an individual SFT, which is characterized by a small physical scale of about 100 nm. In this paper we present results of an atomistic simulation of edge and screw dislocations interacting with small SFTs at different temperatures and strain rates and present mechanisms which can explain the formation of defect-free channels observed experimentally.

Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Rodney, David [Genie Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux; Bacon, David J [University of Liverpool

2005-01-01

93

Evidence for evolution from pure states to mixed states in pion creation process pi(-) p -> pi(-)pi(+) n on polarized target and its physical interpretation  

E-print Network

In 1982 Hawking suggested that quantum fluctuations of space-time metric will induce a non-unitary evolution from pure initial states to mixed final states in particle interactions at any energy. This hypothesis can be tested using existing CERN data on pi(-) p -> pi(-)pi(+) n on polarized target at 17.2 GeV/c. The purity of the final state is controlled by the purity of recoil nucleon polarization. We develop a spin formalism to calculate expressions for recoil nucleon polarization for two specific pure initial states. Imposing conditions of purity on the recoil nuclon polarization we obtain conditions on the amplitudes which are violated by model independent amplitude analysis of CERN data at large t. We conclude that pure states can evolve into mixed states in pi(-) p -> pi(-)pi(+) n. In quantum theory such non-unitary evolution occurs in open quantum systems interacting with an environment. We present evidence to validate the view of the pion creation process as an open quantum system interacting with a quantum environment. The observed process is time-irreversible and violates CPT symmetry.

Miloslav Svec

2007-09-18

94

Partial wave analysis of chic0-->pi+piK+K-  

Microsoft Academic Search

A partial wave analysis of chic0-->pi+pi-K+K- in psi(2S)-->gammachic0 decay is presented using a sample of 14×106 psi(2S) events accumulated by the BES II detector. The data are fitted to the sum of relativistic covariant tensor amplitudes for intermediate resonant decay modes. From the fit, significant contributions to chic0 decays from the channels f0(980)f0(980), f0(980)f0(2200), f0(1370)f0(1710), K*(892)0 Kmacr *(892)0, K0*(1430) Kmacr

M. Ablikim; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. G. Bian; X. Cai; H. F. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. X. Chen; J. C. Chen; Jin Chen; Y. B. Chen; S. P. Chi; Y. P. Chu; X. Z. Cui; Y. S. Dai; Z. Y. Deng; L. Y. Dong; Q. F. Dong; S. X. Du; Z. Z. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; C. D. Fu; C. S. Gao; Y. N. Gao; S. D. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. N. Guo; Y. Q. Guo; Z. J. Guo; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Y. K. Heng; H. M. Hu; T. Hu; G. S. Huang; X. P. Huang; X. T. Huang; X. B. Ji; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; Yi Jin; Y. F. Lai; G. Li; H. B. Li; H. H. Li; J. Li; R. Y. Li; S. M. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. Q. Li; Y. L. Li; Y. F. Liang; H. B. Liao; C. X. Liu; F. Liu; Fang Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. P. Liu; R. G. Liu; Z. A. Liu; F. Lu; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; C. L. Luo; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; L. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; X. B. Ma; Z. P. Mao; X. H. Mo; J. Nie; S. L. Olsen; H. P. Peng; N. D. Qi; H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; Z. Y. Ren; G. Rong; L. Y. Shan; L. Shang; D. L. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; F. Shi; X. Shi; H. S. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. Q. Tan; X. Tang; Y. R. Tian; G. L. Tong; G. S. Varner; D. Y. Wang; L. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; W. F. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; Zheng Wang; C. L. Wei; D. H. Wei; N. Wu; X. M. Xia; X. X. Xie; B. Xin; G. F. Xu; Y. Xu; M. L. Yan; F. Yang; H. X. Yang; J. Yang; Y. X. Yang; M. H. Ye; Y. X. Ye; Z. Y. Yi; G. W. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; J. M. Yuan; Y. Yuan; S. L. Zang; Y. Zeng; Yu Zeng; B. X. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; Q. J. Zhang; X. M. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Yiyun Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Q. Zhang; D. X. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; M. G. Zhao; P. P. Zhao; W. R. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; H. Q. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; L. Zhou; N. F. Zhou; K. J. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Yingchun Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; B. A. Zhuang; X. A. Zhuang; B. S. Zou

2005-01-01

95

Resonances in $J\\/\\\\psi \\\\to \\\\phi \\\\pi ^+\\\\pi ^-$ and $\\\\phi K^+K^-$  

Microsoft Academic Search

A partial wave analysis is presented of $J\\/\\\\psi \\\\to \\\\phi \\\\pi ^+\\\\pi ^-$ and\\u000a$\\\\phi K^+K^-$ from a sample of 58M $J\\/\\\\psi$ events in the BES II detector. The\\u000a$f_0(980)$ is observed clearly in both sets of data, and parameters of the\\u000aFlatt\\\\' e formula are determined accurately: $M = 965 \\\\pm 8$ (stat) $\\\\pm 6$\\u000a(syst) MeV\\/c$^2$, $g_1 =

M. Ablikim; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. G. Bian; D. V. Bugg; X. Cai; J. F. Chang; H. F. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. X. Chen; J. C. Chen; Jin Chen; Jun Chen; M. L. Chen; Y. B. Chen; S. P. Chi; Y. P. Chu; X. Z. Cui; H. L. Dai; Y. S. Dai; Z. Y. Deng; L. Y. Dong; Q. F. Dong; Z. Z. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; C. D. Fu; H. Y. Fu; C. S. Gao; Y. N. Gao; M. Y. Gong; W. X. Gong; S. D. Gu; Y. N. Guo; Y. Q. Guo; Z. J. Guo; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; Y. K. Heng; H. M. Hu; T. Hu; G. S. Huang; X. P. Huang; X. T. Huang; X. B. Ji; C. H. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; Y. Jin; Y. F. Lai; F. Li; G. Li; H. H. Li; J. Li; Q. J. Li; R. Y. Li; S. M. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; Y. L. Li; Y. F. Liang; H. B. Liao; C. X. Liu; F. Liu; Fang Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. B. Liu; R. G. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Z. X. Liu; F. Lu; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; C. L. Luo; L. X. Luo; X. L. Luo; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; J. M. Ma; L. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; X. B. Ma; X. Y. Ma; Z. P. Mao; X. H. Mo; J. Nie; Z. D. Nie; S. L. Olsen; H. P. Peng; N. D. Qi; C. D. Qian; H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; Z. Y. Ren; G. Rong; L. Y. Shan; L. Shang; D. L. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; F. Shi; X. Shi; H. S. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; X. Tang; N. Tao; Y. R. Tian; G. L. Tong; G. S. Varner; D. Y. Wang; J. Z. Wang; K. Wang; L. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; S. Z. Wang; W. F. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; Zheng Wang; C. L. Wei; D. H. Wei; Y. M. Wu; X. M. Xia; X. X. Xie; B. Xin; G. F. Xu; H. Xu; S. T. Xue; M. L. Yan; F. Yang; H. X. Yang; J. Yang; Y. X. Yang; M. Ye; Y. X. Ye; L. H. Yi; Z. Y. Yi; C. S. Yu; G. W. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; J. M. Yuan; Y. Yuan; S. L. Zang; Y. Zeng; Yu Zeng; B. X. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; Q. J. Zhang; S. Q. Zhang; X. M. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Y. Zhang; Yiyun Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Q. Zhang; D. X. Zhao; J. B. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; M. G. Zhao; P. P. Zhao; W. R. Zhao; X. J. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; H. Q. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; L. S. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; X. C. Zhong; B. Q. Zhou; G. M. Zhou; L. Zhou; N. F. Zhou; K. J. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Yingchun Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; B. A. Zhuang; X. A. Zhuang; B. S. Zou

2004-01-01

96

Renormalization group equations in resonance chiral theory: the pi pi vector form-factor  

E-print Network

The use of the equations of motion and meson field redefinitions allows the simplification of the subleading operators required in the one-loop resonance chiral theory calculation of the pi pi vector form-factor. The study of the renormalization group equations of the relevant parameters shows the existence of an infrared fixed point for all the couplings. It is important to remark that this result does not rely on the high-energy form-factor constraints, which are often considered in other works. The possibility of developing a perturbative 1/Nc expansion in the slow running region around the fixed point is shown here.

J. J. Sanz-Cillero

2009-10-14

97

Search for CP violation in the decays D0 --> K- K+ and D0 --> pi- pi+.  

PubMed

We measure time-integrated CP-violating asymmetries of neutral charmed mesons in the modes D0 --> K(-) K(+) and D0 --> pi(-) pi(+) with the highest precision to date by using D0 --> K(-) pi(+) decays to correct detector asymmetries. An analysis of 385.8 fb(-1) of data collected with the BABAR detector yields values of a(CP)(KK)=(0.00+/-0.34(stat)+/-0.13(syst))% and a(CP)(pipi)=(-0.24+/-0.52(stat)+/-0.22(syst))%, which agree with standard model predictions. PMID:18352456

Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Bailey, D; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G

2008-02-15

98

Partial wave analysis of J\\/psi-->gamma(K+K- pi+pi-)  

Microsoft Academic Search

BES data on J\\/psi-->gamma(K+K-pi+pi- ) are presented. The K*K¯* contribution peaks strongly near threshold. It is fitted with a broad 0-+ resonance with mass \\/M=1800+\\/-100 MeV, width \\/Gamma=500+\\/-200 MeV. A broad 2++ resonance peaking at 2020 MeV is also required with width \\/~500 MeV. There is further evidence for a 2-+ component peaking at 2.55 GeV. The non-K*K¯* contribution is

J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. G. Bian; A. D. Chen; G. P. Chen; H. F. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; X. D. Chen; Y. Chen; Y. B. Chen; B. S. Cheng; X. Z. Cui; H. L. Ding; L. Y. Dong; Z. Z. Du; C. S. Gao; M. L. Gao; S. Q. Gao; J. H. Gu; S. D. Gu; W. X. Gu; Y. N. Guo; Z. J. Guo; S. W. Han; Y. Han; J. T. He; K. L. He; M. He; Y. K. Heng; G. Y. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. L. Hu; Q. H. Hu; T. Hu; G. S. Huang; X. P. Huang; Y. Z. Huang; C. H. Jiang; Y. Jin; X. Ju; Z. J. Ke; Y. F. Lai; P. F. Lang; C. G. Li; D. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; P. Q. Li; W. G. Li; W. G. Li; X. H. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Z. C. Li; B. Liu; F. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; R. G. Liu; Y. Liu; Z. X. Liu; G. R. Lu; F. Lu; J. G. Lu; X. L. Luo; E. C. Ma; J. M. Ma; H. S. Mao; Z. P. Mao; X. C. Meng; X. H. Mo; J. Nie; N. D. Qi; X. R. Qi; C. D. Qian; J. F. Qiu; Y. H. Qu; Y. K. Que; G. Rong; Y. Y. Shao; B. W. Shen; D. L. Shen; H. Shen; X. Y. Shen; F. Shi; H. Z. Shi; X. F. Song; H. S. Sun; L. F. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; S. Q. Tang; G. L. Tong; F. Wang; L. Z. Wang; L. S. Wang; P. Wang; S. M. Wang; Y. Y. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; C. L. Wei; N. Wu; Y. G. Wu; D. M. Xi; X. M. Xia; Y. Xie; G. F. Xu; S. T. Xue; J. Yan; W. G. Yan; C. M. Yang; C. Y. Yang; H. X. Yang; X. F. Yang; M. H. Ye; S. W. Ye; Y. X. Ye; C. S. Yu; C. X. Yu; G. W. Yu; Y. H. Yu; Z. Q. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. L. Zhang; J. Zhang; L. S. Zhang; P. Zhang; Q. J. Zhang; S. Q. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Y. Zhang; D. X. Zhao; H. W. Zhao; J. Zhao; M. Zhao; W. R. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; J. P. Zheng; L. S. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; B. Q. Zhou; L. Zhou; K. J. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; B. A. Zhuang; D. V. Bugg; B. S. Zou

2000-01-01

99

Improved measurements of CP-violating asymmetry amplitudes in B0-->pi+pi- decays.  

PubMed

We present updated measurements of the CP-violating parameters Spipi and Cpipi in B0-->pi+pi- decays. Using a sample of 227x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) collider at SLAC, we observe 467+/-33 signal decays and measure Spipi=-0.30+/-0.17(stat)+/-0.03(syst) and Cpipi=-0.09+/-0.15(stat)+/-0.04(syst). PMID:16241716

Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M

2005-10-01

100

Towards a precision determination of {alpha} in B{yields}{pi}{pi} decays  

SciTech Connect

An assumption of isospin symmetry permits the determination of sin(2{alpha}) from the experimental study of B{yields}{pi}{pi} decays. Isospin, however, is merely an approximate symmetry; its breaking predicates a theoretical systematical error {sigma}{sub {alpha}}{sup IB} in the extraction of {alpha}. We focus on the impact of {pi}{sup 0}-{eta},{eta}{sup '} mixing, as well as the manner in which it is amenable to empirical constraint, and determine that {sigma}{sub {alpha}}{sup IB} can potentially be controlled to O(1 deg.)

Gardner, Susan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States)

2005-08-01

101

Asymmetry observables in e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{pi}+{pi}-{gamma}} in the {phi} region within a chiral unitary approach  

SciTech Connect

We make a theoretical study of the charge and forward-backward pion asymmetries in the e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{pi}+{pi}-{gamma}} process on and off the {phi} resonance energy. These observables are rather sensitive to the inner details of the theoretical models to describe the reaction. In addition to the standard implementation of the initial state radiation and the bremsstrahlung contribution to the final state radiation, we use the techniques of the chiral unitary approach to evaluate the contribution from the mechanisms of {phi} decay into {pi}{sup +{pi}-{gamma}}. This contribution involves the implementation of final state interaction from direct chiral loops, the exchange of vector and axial-vector resonances and the final state interaction through the consideration of the meson-meson unitarized amplitudes, which were found important in a previous work describing the {phi}{yields}{pi}{pi}{gamma}. We find a good reproduction of the experimental data from KLOE for the forward-backward asymmetry, both at the {phi} peak and away from it. We also make predictions for the angular distributions of the charge asymmetry and show that this observable is very sensitive to the chiral loops involved in {phi} radiative decay.

Roca, L.; Oset, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, E-30071, Murcia (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Apartado 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain)

2010-01-01

102

The target asymmetry P_z in {gamma}p-->p{pi}^+{pi}^- with the CLAS spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The study of baryon resonances provides a deeper understanding of the strong interaction because the dynamics and relevant degrees of freedom hidden within them are reflected by the properties of the excited states of baryons. Higher-lying excited states at and above 1.9 GeV/c{sup 2} are generally predicted to have strong couplings to the {pi}{pi}N final states via {pi}{Delta} or {rho}N intermediate states. Double-pion photoproduction is therefore important to find and investigate properties of highmass resonances. The CLAS g9a (FROST) experiment, as part of the N* spectroscopy program at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab), has accumulated photoproduction data using linearly- and circularly-polarized photons incident on a longitudinally-polarized butanol target in the photon energy range 0.3 to 2.4 GeV. In this contribution, the extraction of the target asymmetry for the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} will be described and preliminary results will be presented.

Sungkyun Park, CLAS Collaboration

2012-04-01

103

Search for the highly suppressed decays B>K+pi-pi- and B>K-K-pi+  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a search for the decays B--->K+pi-pi- and B--->K-K-pi+, which are highly suppressed in the standard model. Using a sample of (467±5)×106 B Bmacr pairs collected with the BABAR detector, we do not see any evidence of these decays and determine 90% confidence level upper limits of B(B--->K+pi-pi-)<9.5×10-7 and B(B--->K-K-pi+)<1.6×10-7 on the corresponding branching fractions, including systematic uncertainties.

B. Aubert; M. Bona; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; E. Prencipe; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; R. N. Cahn; R. G. Jacobsen; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Lynch; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; C. M. Hawkes; N. Soni; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; Z. Yasin; L. Zhang; V. Sharma; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; A. J. Martinez; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; C. H. Cheng; D. A. Doll; B. Echenard; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; J. F. Hirschauer; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; M. Karbach; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; M. J. Kobel; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; S. Playfer; J. E. Watson; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; V. Santoro; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; A. Adametz; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; J. A. Nash; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; J. Firmino da Costa; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; C. K. Clarke; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; W. Gradl; G. Schott; K. E. Alwyn; D. Bailey; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; X. Li; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; G. Onorato; C. Sciacca; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; W. F. Wang; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; G. Castelli; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; P. Del Amo Sanchez; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; S. Sitt; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; G. Marchiori; M. Morganti; N. Neri; E. Paoloni; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; D. Lopes Pegna; C. Lu; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith; A. V. Telnov; F. Anulli; E. Baracchini; G. Cavoto; D. Del Re; E. di Marco; R. Faccini; F. Ferrarotto; F. Ferroni; M. Gaspero; P. D. Jackson; L. Li Gioi; M. A. Mazzoni; S. Morganti; G. Piredda; F. Polci; F. Renga; C. Voena; M. Ebert; T. Hartmann; H. Schröder; R. Waldi; T. Adye; B. Franek

2008-01-01

104

Measuring the charged pion polarizability in the gamma gamma -> pi+pi- reaction  

SciTech Connect

Development has begun of a new experiment to measure the charged pion polarizability $\\alpha_{\\pi}-\\beta_{\\pi}$. The charged pion polarizability ranks among the most important tests of low-energy QCD presently unresolved by experiment. Analogous to precision measurements of $\\pi^{\\circ}\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ that test the intrinsic odd-parity (anomalous) sector of QCD, the pion polarizability tests the intrinsic even-parity sector of QCD. The measurement will be performed using the $\\gamma\\gamma\\rightarrow\\pi^{+{}}\\pi^{-{}}$ cross section accessed via the Primakoff mechanism on nuclear targets using the GlueX detector in Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The linearly polarized photon source in Hall-D will be utilized to separate the Primakoff cross-section from coherent $\\rho^{\\circ}$ production.

Lawrence, David W. [JLAB; Miskimen, Rory A. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Mushkarenkov, Alexander Nikolaevich [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Smith, Elton S. [JLAB

2013-08-01

105

Experimental study of direct photon emission in K- --> pi- pi0 gamma decay using ISTRA+ detector  

E-print Network

The branching ratio in the charged-pion kinetic energy region of 55 to 90 MeV for the direct photon emission in the K- --> pi- pi0 gamma decay has been measured using in-flight decays detected with the ISTRA+ setup operating in the 25 GeV/c negative secondary beam of the U-70 PS. The value Br(DE)=[0.37+-0.39(stat)+-0.10(syst)]*10^(-5) obtained from the analysis of 930 completely reconstructed events is consistent with the average value of two stopped-kaon experiments, but it differs by 2.5 standard deviations from the average value of three in-flight-kaon experiments. The result is also compared with recent theoretical predictions.

Uvarov, V A; Britvich, G I; Datsko, K V; Filin, A P; Inyakin, A V; Khmelnikov, V A; Konstantinov, A S; Konstantinov, V F; Korolkov, I Ya; Leontiev, V M; Novikov, V P; Obraztsov, V F; Polyakov, V A; Romanovsky, V I; Ronjin, V M; Shelikhov, V I; Smirnov, N E; Chikilev, O G; Yushchenko, O P; Bolotov, V N; Duk, V A; Laptev, S V; Polyarush, A Yu

2004-01-01

106

Experimental study of direct photon emission in K- --> pi- pi0 gamma decay using ISTRA+ detector  

E-print Network

The branching ratio in the charged-pion kinetic energy region of 55 to 90 MeV for the direct photon emission in the K- --> pi- pi0 gamma decay has been measured using in-flight decays detected with the ISTRA+ setup operating in the 25 GeV/c negative secondary beam of the U-70 PS. The value Br(DE)=[0.37+-0.39(stat)+-0.10(syst)]*10^(-5) obtained from the analysis of 930 completely reconstructed events is consistent with the average value of two stopped-kaon experiments, but it differs by 2.5 standard deviations from the average value of three in-flight-kaon experiments. The result is also compared with recent theoretical predictions.

V. A. Uvarov; S. A. Akimenko; G. I. Britvich; K. V. Datsko; A. P. Filin; A. V. Inyakin; V. A. Khmelnikov; A. S. Konstantinov; V. F. Konstantinov; I. Y. Korolkov; V. M. Leontiev; V. P. Novikov; V. F. Obraztsov; V. A. Polyakov; V. I. Romanovsky; V. M. Ronjin; V. I. Shelikhov; N. E. Smirnov; O. G. Tchikilev; O. P. Yushchenko; V. N. Bolotov; V. A. Duk; S. V. Laptev; A. Yu. Polyarush

2004-10-19

107

Precision measurement of {pi}{pi} scattering lengths at the NA48/2 experiment  

SciTech Connect

The NA48/2 experiment at CERN [1] collected {approx}18{center_dot}10{sup 9} charged kaon decays during the years 2003/4. Along with the primary goals of the collaboration, i.e. the measurement of the CP-violating asymmetry in the K{sup {+-}}{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sup {+-}}{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} decays thanks to the simultaneous collection of K{sup +} and K{sup -} events, the collected data allowed to perform many other interesting analyses. In this paper two independent measurements of {pi}{pi} scattering lengths will be reviewed, using NA48/2 data from the K{sup {+-}}{yields}e{sup {+-}}{nu}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay and from the cusp effect in K{sup {+-}}{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} respectively.

Venditti, Stefano [Universita di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

2010-12-28

108

Measurement of Branching Fractions and Mass Spectra of B to K pi pi gamma  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a measurement of the partial branching fractions and mass spectra of the exclusive radiative penguin processes B {yields} K{pi}{pi}{gamma} in the range m{sub K{pi}{pi}} < 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}. They reconstruct four final states: K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}, K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}, and K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, where K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Using 232 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage ring, they measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}) = (2.95 {+-} 0.13(stat.) {+-} 0.20(syst)) x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.07 {+-} 0.22(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma}) = (1.85 {+-} 0.21(stat.) {+-} 0.12(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}, and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.56 {+-} 0.42(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

2005-07-12

109

Vector meson production in the final state K + K -pi+pi- of photon-photon collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vector meson production is studied in the reaction gammagamma--> K + K -pi+pi-. A clear Phi(1020) signal is seen in the K + K - mass distribution and a K *0 (890) signal is visible in the K ±pi-\\/+ one. Both do not seem to be strongly correlated with quasi two body final states. Cross sections for the processes gammagamma-->

M. Althoff; W. Braunschweig; R. Gerhards; J. F. Kirschfink; H.-U. Martyn; P. Rosskamp; W. Wallraff; B. Bock; J. Eisenmann; H. M. Fischer; H. Hartmann; A. Jocksch; H. Kolanoski; H. Kück; V. Mertens; R. Wedemeyer; B. Foster; E. Bernardi; Y. Eisenberg; A. Eskreys; K. Gather; H. Hultschig; P. Joos; B. Klima; H. Kowalski; A. Ladage; B. Löhr; D. Lüke; P. Mättig; D. Notz; D. Revel; E. Ronat; D. Trines; T. Tymieniecka; R. Walczak; G. Wolf; W. Zeuner; E. Hilger; T. Kracht; H. L. Krasemann; J. Krüger; E. Lohrmann; G. Poelz; K.-U. Pösnecker; D. M. Binnie; P. Dornan; D. A. Garbutt; C. Jenkins; W. G. Jones; J. K. Sedgbeer; D. Su; J. Thomas; W. A. T. Wan Abdullah; F. Barreiro; E. Ros; M. G. Bowler; P. Bull; R. J. Cashmore; P. Dauncey; R. Devenish; G. Heath; D. J. Mellor; P. Ratoff; S. L. Lloyd; K. Bell; G. E. Forden; J. C. Hart; D. K. Hasell; D. H. Saxon; S. Brandt; M. Holder; L. Labarga; B. Neumann; U. Karshon; G. Mikenberg; A. Montag; R. Mir; E. Duchovni; A. Shapira; G. Yekutieli; G. Baranko; A. Caldwell; M. Cherney; J. M. Izen; S. Ritz; D. Strom; M. Takashima; E. Wicklund; Sau Lan Wu; G. Zobernig

1986-01-01

110

Scalar resonances in a unitary {pi}{pi} S-wave model for D{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup+}{pi}{sup-}{pi}{sup+}.  

SciTech Connect

We propose a model for D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays following experimental results which indicate that the two-pion interaction in the S wave is dominated by the scalar resonances f{sub 0}(600)/{sigma} and f{sub 0}(980). The weak decay amplitude for D{sup +} {yields} R{pi}{sup +}, where R is a resonance that subsequently decays into {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, is constructed in a factorization approach. In the S wave, we implement the strong decay R {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} by means of a scalar form factor. This provides a unitary description of the pion-pion interaction in the entire kinematically allowed mass range m{sub {pi}{pi}}{sup 2} from threshold to about 3 GeV{sup 2}. In order to reproduce the experimental Dalitz plot for D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, we include contributions beyond the S wave. For the P wave, dominated by the {rho}(770){sup 0}, we use a Breit-Wigner description. Higher waves are accounted for by using the usual isobar prescription for the f{sub 2}(1270) and {rho}(1450){sup 0}. The major achievement is a good reproduction of the experimental m{sub {pi}{pi}}{sup 2} distribution, and of the partial as well as the total D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} branching ratios. Our values are generally smaller than the experimental ones. We discuss this shortcoming and, as a by-product, we predict a value for the poorly known D {yields} {sigma} transition form factor at q{sup 2} = m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}.

Boito, D. R.; Dedonder, J.-P.; El-Bennich, B.; Leitner, O.; Loiseau, B.; Physics; Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona; Univ. de Sao Paulo; Univ. Paris; Pl. Jussieu; Lab. Nazionali de Frascati

2009-02-19

111

Dipion invariant mass spectrum in X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{pi}  

SciTech Connect

It is pointed out that dipion invariant mass spectrum in X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{pi} is a useful probe for the J{sup PC} quantum number of the X(3872), complementary to the angular distributions. If X(3872) is a {sup 1}P{sub 1} state, the dipion has a peak at a low m{sub {pi}}{sub {pi}} region, which is not in accordance with the preliminary Belle data. If X(3872) is a {sup 3}D{sub 2} or {sup 3}D{sub 3} state, the dipion spectrum shows a peak at a high m{sub {pi}}{sub {pi}} region, which is broader than the {rho} resonance that might come from the decay of a molecular state: (DD{sup )}(I=1){yields}J/{psi}{rho}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Better measurement of the m{sub {pi}}{sub {pi}} spectrum will shed light on the nature of X(3872)

Kim, Taewon; Ko, P. [Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2005-02-01

112

Delta I = 3/2, K to Pi Pi Decays with a Nearly Physical Pion Mass  

E-print Network

The Delta I = 3/2 K to Pi Pi decay amplitude is calculated on RBC/UKQCD 32^3 x 64, L_s=32 dynamical lattices with 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions using the DSDR and Iwasaki gauge action. The calculation is performed with a single pion mass (m_pi=141.9(2.3) MeV, partially quenched) and kaon mass (m_K=507.4(8.5) MeV) which are nearly physical, and with nearly energy conserving kinematics. Antiperiodic boundary conditions in two spatial directions are used to give the two pions non-zero ground state momentum. Results for time separations of 20, 24, 28 and 32 between the kaon and two-pion sources are computed and an error weighted average is performed to reduce the error. We find prelimenary results for Re(A_2)=1.396(081)_stat(160)_sys x 10^(-8) GeV and Im(A_2) = -8.46(45)_stat(1.95)_sys x 10^(-13) GeV.

Elaine J Goode; Matthew Lightman

2011-01-13

113

Precision measurement of the X(3872) mass in J/psi pi(+) pi(-) decays.  

PubMed

We present an analysis of the mass of the X(3872) reconstructed via its decay to J/psi pi(+)pi(-) using 2.4 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity from pp collisions at square root(s)=1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The possible existence of two nearby mass states is investigated. Within the limits of our experimental resolution the data are consistent with a single state, and having no evidence for two states we set upper limits on the mass difference between two hypothetical states for different assumed ratios of contributions to the observed peak. For equal contributions, the 95% confidence level upper limit on the mass difference is 3.6 MeV/c(2). Under the single-state model the X(3872) mass is measured to be 3871.61+/-0.16(stat)+/-0.19(syst) MeV/c(2), which is the most precise determination to date. PMID:19905622

Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C

2009-10-01

114

Energy dependence of the {rho} resonance in {pi} {pi} elastic scattering from lattice QCD  

SciTech Connect

We determine the energy-dependent amplitude for elastic {pi} {pi} P-wave scattering in isospin-1 by computing part of the discrete energy spectrum of QCD in finite cubic boxes. We observe a rapidly rising phase shift that can be well described by a single {rho} Resonance. The spectrum is obtained from hadron correlators computed using lattice QCD with light quark masses corresponding to m{sub {pi}}~400 MeV. Variational analyses are performed with large bases of hadron interpolating fields including, as well as fermion bilinears that resemble q{anti q} Constructions, also operators that look like pairs of pions with definite relative and total momentum. We compute the spectrum for a range of center-of-mass momenta and in various irreducible representations of the relevant symmetry group. Hence we determine more than thirty values of the isospin-1 P-wave scattering phase shift in the elastic region, mapping out its energy dependence in unprecedented detail.

Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, Christopher Thomas

2013-02-01

115

Study of the rho'(1600) Mass Region Using gammap-->pi+pi-p at 20 GeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have observed the pi+pi- decay of the rho'(1600) in the production reaction gammap-->rho'p at 20 GeV. Using a calculation which takes into account the interference of the rho' with the rho(770) and a Drell background, we find good evidence that this resonance is a radial excitation of the rho(770). The background interference strongly distorts the angular distributions predicted by

K. Abe; T. C. Bacon; J. Ballam; A. V. Bevan; H. H. Bingham; J. E. Brau; K. Braune; D. Brick; W. M. Bugg; J. M. Butler; W. Cameron; H. O. Cohn; D. C. Colley; S. Dado; R. Diamond; P. Dingus; R. Erickson; R. C. Field; B. Franek; N. Fujiwara; R. Gearhart; T. Glanzman; J. J. Goldberg; A. T. Goshaw; G. Hall; E. R. Hancock; T. Handler; H. J. Hargis; E. L. Hart; K. Hasegawa; R. I. Hulsizer; M. Jobes; G. E. Kalmus; D. P. Kelsey; T. Kitagaki; W. Kowald; A. Levy; P. W. Lucas; W. A. Mann; E. McCrory; R. Merenyi; R. Milburn; C. Milstene; K. C. Moffeit; J. J. Murray; A. Napier; S. Noguchi; F. Ochiai; S. O'Neale; A. P. Palounek; I. A. Pless; P. Rankin; W. J. Robertson; H. Sagawa; T. Sato; J. Schneps; F. J. Sewell; J. Shank; A. M. Shapiro; R. Sugahara; A. Suzuki; K. Takahashi; K. Tamai; S. Tanaka; S. Tether; W. D. Walker; M. Widgoff; C. G. Wilkins; S. Wolbers; C. A. Woods; A. Yamaguchi; R. K. Yamamoto; S. Yamashita; Y. Yoshimura; G. P. Yost; H. Yuta

1984-01-01

116

Measurement of e+e- -> pi+pi- cross section with CMD-2 around rho-meson  

E-print Network

The cross section of the process e+e- -> pi+pi- has been measured using about 114000 events collected by the CMD-2 detector at the VEPP-2M e+e- collider in the center-of-mass energy range from 0.61 to 0.96 GeV. Results of the pion form factor determination with a 0.6% systematic uncertainty are presented. Implications for the hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment are discussed.

Akhmetshin, R R; Arbuzov, A B; Aulchenko, V M; Banzarov, V S; Barkov, L M; Baru, S E; Bashtovoy, N S; Bondar, A E; Bondarev, D V; Bragin, A V; Chernyak, D V; Dhawan, S; Eidelman, S I; Fedotovich, G V; Gabyshev, N I; Gorbachev, D A; Grebenuk, A A; Grigoriev, D N; Hughes, V W; Ignatov, F V; Karpov, S V; Kazanin, V F; Khazin, B I; Koop, I A; Krokovnyi, P P; Kuraev, E A; Kurdadze, L M; Kuzmin, A S; Logashenko, I B; Lukin, P A; Lysenko, A P; Mikhailov, K Yu; Miller, J P; Milstein, A I; Nesterenko, I N; Okhapkin, V S; Polunin, A A; Popov, A S; Purlatz, T A; Roberts, B L; Root, N I; Ruban, A A; Ryskulov, N M; Shamov, A G; Shatunov, Yu M; Shwartz, B A; Sibidanov, A L; Sidorov, V A; Skrinsky, A N; Smakhtin, V P; Snopkov, I G; Solodov, E P; Stepanov, P Yu; Sukhanov, A I; Thompson, J A; Titov, V M; Yudin, Yu Y; Zverev, S G

2002-01-01

117

Kinematically complete measurement of the (pi+\\/-,pi+\\/-p) reaction on 12C at 220 MeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 12C(pi+\\/-,pi+\\/-p) reactions were studied at Tpi=220 MeV. The final particles were detected both separately and in coincidence and their momenta were measured. Calculation of the excitation energy of the residual nucleus allowed clear separation of events where an outer proton was removed. The data provide detailed evidence confirming the quasielastic picture of pion knockout reactions. Evidence for this derives

J. A. Faucett; B. E. Wood; D. K. McDaniels; P. A. M. Gram; M. E. Hamm; M. A. Oothoudt; C. A. Goulding; L. W. Swenson; K. S. Krane; A. W. Stetz; H. S. Plendl; J. Norton; H. Funsten; D. Joyce

1984-01-01

118

Study of B0 --> J/psiK(*)0pi(+)pi(-) decays with the collider detector at Fermilab.  

PubMed

We report a study of the decays B0 --> J/psiK(*)0pi(+)pi(-), which involve the creation of a uu or dd quark pair in addition to a b -->c(cs) decay. The data sample consists of 110 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root[s] = 1.8 TeV collected by the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider during 1992-1995. We measure the branching fractions to be B(B0 --> J/psiK(*0)pi(+)pi(-)) = (6.6 +/- 1.9 +/- 1.1)x10(-4) and B(B0 --> J/psiK0pi(+)pi(-)) = (10.3 +/- 3.3 +/- 1.5)x10(-4). Evidence is seen for contributions from psi(2S)K(*)0, J/psiK0rho(0), J/psiK(*+)pi(-), and J/psiK1(1270). PMID:11863882

Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Akopian, A; Albrow, M G; Amaral, P; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berge, J P; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bokhari, W; Bolla, G; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; van den Brink, S; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Buckley-Geer, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Colijn, A P; Connolly, A; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Cropp, R; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Done, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Elias, J E; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Fang, H-C; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Giannetti, P; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Grim, G; Gris, P; Groer, L; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hoffman, K D; Holck, C; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karr, K; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, A M; Lee, K; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, A; Matthews, J A J; Mayer, J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McKigney, E; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Popovic, M; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Robinson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sato, H; Savard, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Segler, S; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, C; Snider, F D; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Sphicas, P; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J

2002-02-18

119

Measurement of pi+pi? Photoproduction in Double Polarization Experiments using the CLAS Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

Spectroscopic predictions based on first principles are not possible in the non-perturbative regime of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) where the strong coupling constant is large. For this reason, effective theories and models have been developed to determine the masses, couplings, and decay widths of resonances. Various constituent quark models (CQMs) based on three quark degrees of freedom predict numerous baryon resonances that have not been experimentally verified and are thus “missing”. The persistent non-observation of these states would present a big problem as the models would have failed to describe physical reality. CQMs predict strong couplings of these unobserved or missing states to gammaN as well as to Neta, Neta[prime] or Deltapi(Delta-->ppi) making photoproduction experiments a promising method to find these missing resonances. Previous analyses of unpolarized data show the importance of polarization obervables because some resonances reveal themselves more clearly in the interference with more dominant amplitudes. In addition, the determination of resonant contributions based on unpolarized data is not unique and requires further constraints provided by single- and double-polarization observables in the Partial Wave Analysis (PWA). A linearly- and circularly-polarized photon beam will be incident on a frozen-spin butanol target in Jefferson Lab's Hall B CLAS detector located in Newport News, Va. This detector allows the target to be polarized both longitudinally as well as transversely giving rise to measurable polarization observables in pi+pi? photoproduction. This experiment (FROST) will shed some light on the problem of the missing baryon resonances serving to better understand the properties of these states.

Charles Hanretty

2007-10-01

120

Blunt-Ended DNA Stacking Interactions in a 3-Helix Motif  

PubMed Central

We demonstrate that intermolecular stacking is capable of forming one-dimensional arrays of a blunt-ended 3-helix DNA motif. The array can be visualized in the atomic force microscopy through conjugated streptavidin nanoparticles. We estimate the strength of the triple stacking interaction to be ?8.6 kcal/mol. PMID:20532374

Wang, Risheng; Kuzuya, Akinori; Liu, Wenyan

2012-01-01

121

rho0(770)-f0(980) mixing and CPT violation in a non-unitary evolution of pion creation process pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n on polarized target  

E-print Network

Unitary evolution from pure initial states to pure final states in pi(-)p-> pi(-)pi(+)n imposes constraints on pion production amplitudes that are violated by CERN data on polarized target at 17.2 GeV/c. The pion creation is a non-unitary process arising from a unitary co-evolution of the pion creation process with a quantum environment. The purpose of this work is to identify the interacting degrees of freedom of the environment in a high resolution amplitude analysis of CERN data on polarized target for dipion masses 580-1080 MeV. The S-wave spectra |S|^2 show presence of rho0(770) while P-wave spectra |L|^2 show a dip at f0(980) mass. The observed rho0(770)-f0(980) mixing is encoded in all measured density matrix elements which also encode a level splitting of the spectra arising from the interaction of the pion creation process with the environment. The analytical form of the level splitting reveals the existence of a new quantum number characterizing the environment. We propose a model for the CPT violating interaction of the pion creation process with the environment in which non-diagonal transitions between resonant qqbar modes and pi(-)pi(+) states lead to vector-scalar mixing and a dynamic entanglement of the pi(-)pi(+) isospin states. The final states pi(-)p(+)n do not posses CPT cojugate states and the concept of CPT symmetry looses its meanining.

Miloslav Svec

2007-09-18

122

Measurement of branching ratios and CP asymmetries for the decays B0->pi+pi- B0->K+pi- B0->K+K-.  

E-print Network

??Diese Doktorarbeit stellt eine Messung der Verzweigungsverhältnisse und CP Parameter der Zerfallskanäle B0->pi+pi-, B0->K+pi- und B0->K+K- vor. Der gesamte Belle Datensatz mit 772 Millionen BB… (more)

Prothmann, Kolja Andreas

2013-01-01

123

Cross sections for (pi-, pi-n) reactions on 19F and 31P in the 3-3 resonance region  

Microsoft Academic Search

Activation cross sections for the reactions 19F(pi-, pi-n) 18F and 31P(pi-, pi-n) 30P were measured at pion energies from 140 to 240 MeV and found to reach maxima of 39 +\\/- 5 mb and 60 +\\/- 11 mb, respectively, near 180 MeV. The results are compared with calculated cross sections and with the results of other measurements.

H. S. Plendl; D. Burch; K. A. Eberhard; M. Hamm; A. Richter; C. J. Umbarger; W. P. Trower

1972-01-01

124

Measurements of sigma(e^+ e^- -> Upsilon(nS)pi^+pi^-) and sigma(e^+ e^- -> b bbar) in the Upsilon(10860) and Upsilon(11020) resonance regions  

E-print Network

We report new measurements of $R_{\\Upsilon\\pi\\pi}\\equiv\\sigma(e^+e^-\\to \\Upsilon(n{\\rm S})\\pi^+\\pi^-)/\\sigma^0_{\\mu\\mu}$ ($n$ = 1, 2, 3) and $R_b\\equiv\\sigma(e^+e^-\\to b\\bar b)/\\sigma^0_{\\mu\\mu}$ (where $\\sigma^0_{\\mu\\mu}$ is the muon-pair Born cross section) in the region $\\sqrt{s} = 10.63$-$11.05$ GeV, based on data collected with the Belle detector. Distributions in $R_{\\Upsilon\\pi\\pi}$ and $R_b$ are fit for the masses and widths of the $\\Upsilon(10860)$ and $\\Upsilon(11020)$ resonances. Unlike $R_b$, which includes a large non-resonant $b\\bar{b}$ component, we find that $R_{\\Upsilon\\pi\\pi}$ is dominated by the two resonances. With $R_{\\Upsilon\\pi\\pi}$ as the basis, the total rate at the $\\Upsilon(10860)$ peak for known final states containing bottomonium(-like) resonances is estimated. We find that $\\Upsilon(10860)$ is essentially saturated by such modes, raising doubts about the validity of masses measured using $R_b$. With $R_{\\Upsilon\\pi\\pi}$, we measure $M_{10860}=(10891.1\\pm3.2^{+0.6}_{-1.5})$ MeV/$c...

Santel, D; Chang, P; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Said, S Al; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Bakich, A M; Bansal, V; Bhuyan, B; Bobrov, A; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bra?ko, M; Browder, T E; ?ervenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dingfelder, J; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hou, W -S; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Julius, T; Kang, K H; Kato, E; Kawasaki, T; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Ko, B R; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuzmin, A; Lange, J S; Lee, I S; Li, Y; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Lukin, P; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Mori, T; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Natkaniec, Z; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Oswald, C; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Petri?, M; Piilonen, L E; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shebalin, V; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Solovieva, E; Stari?, M; Steder, M; Tamponi, U; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Wagner, M N; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yang, Y -P; Yashchenko, S; Yook, Y; Yusa, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

2015-01-01

125

Search for resonances decaying to etac pi pi- in two-photon interactions  

SciTech Connect

We report a study of the process {gamma}{gamma} {yields} X {yields} {eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, where X stands for one of the resonances {chi}{sub c2}(1P), {eta}{sub c}(2S), X(3872), X(3915), or {chi}{sub c2}(2P). The analysis is performed with a data sample of 473.9 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy electron-positron collider. We do not observe a significant signal for any channel, and calculate 90% confidence-level upper limits on the products of branching fractions and two-photon widths {Lambda}{sub X{yields}{gamma}{gamma}} {Beta}(X {yields} {eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}): 15.7 eV for {chi}{sub c2}(1P), 133 eV for {eta}{sub c}(2S), 11.1 eV for X(3872) (assuming it to be a spin-2 state), 16 eV for X(3915) (assuming it to be a spin-2 state), and 19 eV for {chi}{sub c2}(2P). We also report upper limits on the ratios of branching fractions {Beta}({eta}{sub c}(2S) {yields} {eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}({eta}{sub c}(2S) {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 10.0 and {Beta}({chi}{sub c2}(1P) {yields} {eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}({chi}{sub c2}(1P) {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 32.9 at the 90% confidence level.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

2012-06-18

126

Measurement of CP Asymmetries and Branching Fractions in B0 -> pi+ pi-, B0 -> K+ pi-, B0 -> pi0 pi0, B0 -> K0 pi0 and Isospin Analysis of B -> pi pi Decays  

SciTech Connect

The authors present preliminary results of improved measurements of the CP-violating asymmetries and branching fractions in the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. This update includes all data taken at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the asymmetric PEP-II B-meson factory at SLAC, corresponding to 467 {+-} 5 million B{bar B} pairs. They find S{sub {pi}{pi}} = -0.68 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.03, C{sub {pi}{pi}} = -0.25 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, {Alpha}{sub K{sub {pi}}} = -0.107 {+-} 0.016{sub -0.004},{sup +0.006}, C{sub {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}} = -0.43 {+-} 0.26 {+-} 0.05, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.83 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (10.1 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. They observe CP violation with a significance of 6.7{sigma} in B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -} and 6.1{sigma} in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Constraints on the Unitarity Triangle angle {alpha} are determined from the isospin relation between all B {yields} {pi}{pi} rates and asymmetries.

Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2008-08-01

127

?-Stacking Interaction between Heterocyclic Rings in a Reaction Field of Biological System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reaction fields in biological systems are given by surrounding structures where various interactions such as hydrogen bonding, van der Waals, and ?-stacking interaction. However, there is no experimental method to evaluate the interaction energy. Recently, computational techniques have been used as a standard method in order to estimate the interaction energy or to verify the experimental results. Here, we are focusing on the ?-electrons, p-orbitals, and conjugate systems in relation to the ?-stacking interaction between heterocyclic rings in the reaction field: the active site of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). The electron correlation interaction was calculated on the basis of the Møller-Plesset perturbation theory. Since the His64 has two conformations in the HCA II, the rotational motion of His64 has been used to explain the catalytic mechanism of HCA II. The calculated results indicate that the ?-stacking interaction stabilizes the structure and restrict the rotational motion of His64.

Koyimatu, Muhamad; Shimahara, Hideto; Sugimori, Kimikazu; Kawaguchi, Kazutomo; Saito, Hiroaki; Nagao, Hidemi

128

Quenching of tryptophan (1)(pi,pi*) fluorescence induced by intramolecular hydrogen abstraction via an aborted decarboxylation mechanism.  

PubMed

CASSCF computations show that the hydrogen-transfer-induced fluorescence quenching of the (1)(pi,pi*) excited state of zwitterionic tryptophan occurs in three steps: (1) formation of an intramolecular excited-state complex, (2) hydrogen transfer from the amino acid side chain to the indole chromophore, and (3) radiationless decay through a conical intersection, where the reaction path bifurcates to a photodecarboxylation and a phototautomerization route. We present a general model for fluorescence quenching by hydrogen donors, where the radiationless decay occurs at a conical intersection (real state crossing). At the intersection, the reaction responsible for the quenching is aborted, because the reaction path bifurcates and can proceed forward to the products or backward to the reactants. The position of the intersection along the quenching coordinate depends on the nature of the states and, in turn, affects the formation of photoproducts during the quenching. For a (1)(n,pi*) model system reported earlier (Sinicropi, A.; Pogni, R.; Basosi, R.; Robb, M. A.; Gramlich, G.; Nau, W. M.; Olivucci, M. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2001, 40, 4185-4189), the ground and the excited state of the chromophore are hydrogen acceptors, and the excited-state hydrogen transfer is nonadiabatic and leads directly to the intersection point. There, the hydrogen transfer is aborted, and the reaction can return to the reactant pair or proceed further to the hydrogen-transfer products. In the tryptophan case, the ground state is not a hydrogen acceptor, and the excited-state hydrogen transfer is an adiabatic, sequential proton and electron transfer. The decay to the ground state occurs along a second reaction coordinate associated with decarboxylation of the amino acid side chain and the corresponding aborted conical intersection. The results show that, for (1)(pi,pi*) states, the hydrogen transfer alone is not sufficient to induce the quenching, and explain why fluorescence quenching induced by hydrogen donors is less general for (1)(pi,pi*) than for (1)(n,pi*) states. PMID:12033871

Blancafort, Lluís; González, David; Olivucci, Massimo; Robb, Michael A

2002-06-01

129

Determination of J\\/psi leptonic branching fraction via psi(2S)-->pi+pi-J\\/psi  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comparison of the rates for psi(2S)-->pi+pi-J\\/psi, J\\/psi-->l+l- and J\\/psi--> anything is used to determine the J\\/psi leptonic branching fractions. The results are B(J\\/psi-->e+e-)=(5.90+\\/-0.05+\\/-0.10)% and B(J\\/psi-->mu+mu-)=(5.84+\\/-0.06+\\/-0.10)%, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. Assuming lepton universality, the leptonic branching fraction of the J\\/psi is B(J\\/psi-->l+l-)=(5.87+\\/-0.04+\\/-0.09)% per species. This result is used to estimate the QCD scale

J. Z. Bai; J. G. Bian; I. Blum; Z. W. Chai; G. P. Chen; H. F. Chen; J. Chen; Y. Chen; Y. B. Chen; Y. Q. Chen; B. S. Cheng; X. Z. Cui; H. L. Ding; L. Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; Z. Z. Du; W. Dunwoodie; S. Feng; C. S. Gao; M. L. Gao; S. Q. Gao; P. Gratton; J. H. Gu; S. D. Gu; W. X. Gu; Y. F. Gu; Y. N. Guo; S. W. Han; Y. Han; F. A. Harris; J. He; M. He; D. G. Hitlin; G. Y. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. L. Hu; Q. H. Hu; T. Hu; X. Q. Hu; J. D. Huang; Y. Z. Huang; J. M. Izen; C. H. Jiang; Y. Jin; Z. J. Ke; M. H. Kelsey; B. K. Kim; D. Kong; Y. F. Lai; P. F. Lang; A. Lankford; C. G. Li; D. Li; H. B. Li; J. Li; P. Q. Li; R. B. Li; W. Li; W. G. Li; X. H. Li; X. N. Li; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; R. G. Liu; Y. Liu; X. C. Lou; B. Lowery; F. Lu; J. G. Lu; J. Y. Lu; L. C. Lu; C. H. Luo; A. M. Ma; E. C. Ma; J. M. Ma; R. Malchow; H. S. Mao; Z. P. Mao; X. C. Meng; J. Nie; S. L. Olsen; J. Oyang; D. Paluselli; L. J. Pan; J. Panetta; F. Porter; N. D. Qi; X. R. Qi; C. D. Qian; J. F. Qiu; Y. H. Qu; Y. K. Que; G. Rong; M. Schernau; Y. Y. Shao; B. W. Shen; D. L. Shen; H. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; H. Z. Shi; X. F. Song; J. Standifird; F. Sun; H. S. Sun; S. Q. Tang; W. Toki; G. L. Tong; F. Wang; L. S. Wang; L. Z. Wang; M. Wang; Meng Wang; P. Wang; S. M. Wang; T. J. Wang; Y. Y. Wang; M. Weaver; C. L. Wei; Y. G. Wu; D. M. Xi; X. M. Xia; P. P. Xie; Y. Xie; W. J. Xiong; C. C. Xu; G. F. Xu; S. T. Xue; J. Yan; W. G. Yan; C. M. Yang; C. Y. Yang; J. Yang; W. Yang; X. F. Yang; M. H. Ye; S. W. Ye; Y. X. Ye; K. Yi; C. S. Yu; C. X. Yu; Y. H. Yu; Z. Q. Yu; Z. T. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; B. Y. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; Dehong Zhang; H. L. Zhang; J. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; L. S. Zhang; Q. J. Zhang; S. Q. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; D. X. Zhao; H. W. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; M. Zhao; W. R. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; J. P. Zheng; L. S. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; G. P. Zhou; H. S. Zhou; L. Zhou; Q. M. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; B. A. Zhuang

1998-01-01

130

Search for CP Violation in the Decays D0-->K-K+ and D0-->pi-pi+  

Microsoft Academic Search

We measure time-integrated CP-violating asymmetries of neutral charmed mesons in the modes D0-->K-K+ and D0-->pi-pi+ with the highest precision to date by using D0-->K-pi+ decays to correct detector asymmetries. An analysis of 385.8fb-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector yields values of aCPKK=(0.00±0.34(stat)±0.13(syst))% and aCPpipi=(-0.24±0.52(stat)±0.22(syst))%, which agree with standard model predictions.

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; D. Bailey; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; Y. Zheng; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini

2008-01-01

131

Precise Measurement of the e+e--->pi+pi-(gamma) Cross Section with the Initial State Radiation Method at BABAR  

Microsoft Academic Search

A precise measurement of the cross section of the process e+e--->pi+pi-(gamma) from threshold to an energy of 3 GeV is obtained with the initial state radiation (ISR) method using 232fb-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at e+e- center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV. The ISR luminosity is determined from a study of the leptonic process e+e--->mu+mu-gamma(gamma). The leading-order hadronic

B. Aubert; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; E. Prencipe; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; M. Martinelli; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; B. Hooberman; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Lynch; I. L. Osipenkov; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; C. M. Hawkes; N. Soni; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. J. Asgeirsson; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; A. Randle-Conde; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; H. Atmacan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; G. M. Vitug; Z. Yasin; V. Sharma; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; A. J. Martinez; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; L. Wang; L. O. Winstrom; C. H. Cheng; D. A. Doll; B. Echenard; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; P. Ongmongkolkul; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; J. F. Hirschauer; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; J. G. Smith; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; W. H. Toki; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; T. M. Karbach; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; M. J. Kobel; R. Nogowski; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; D. Bernard; E. Latour; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; S. Playfer; J. E. Watson; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; E. Fioravanti; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Munerato; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; V. Santoro; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; R. Contri; E. Guido; M. Lo Vetere; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; S. Tosi; M. Morii; A. Adametz; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; F. U. Bernlochner; H. M. Lacker; T. Lueck; A. Volk; P. D. Dauncey; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; N. Arnaud; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; D. Derkach; J. Firmino da Costa; G. Grosdidier; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; B. Malaescu; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; C. K. Clarke; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; S. Paramesvaran; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; M. Fritsch; W. Gradl; A. Hafner; K. E. Alwyn; D. Bailey; R. J. Barlow; G. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; E. Salvati; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; S. W. Henderson; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; M. Schram; P. Biassoni; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; S. Stracka; L. Cremaldi; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; P. Sonnek; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; X. Nguyen; M. Simard; P. Taras; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; G. Onorato; C. Sciacca; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; W. F. Wang; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; S. J. Sekula; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; G. Castelli; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; P. Del Amo Sanchez; E. Ben-Haim; G. R. Bonneaud; H. Briand; J. Chauveau; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; G. Marchiori; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; S. Sitt; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; G. Calderini; M. Carpinelli; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; M. Morganti; N. Neri; E. Paoloni; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; D. Lopes Pegna; C. Lu; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith; A. V. Telnov; F. Anulli; E. Baracchini; G. Cavoto; R. Faccini; F. Ferrarotto; F. Ferroni; M. Gaspero; P. D. Jackson; L. Li Gioi; M. A. Mazzoni; S. Morganti; G. Piredda; F. Renga; C. Voena; M. Ebert; T. Hartmann; H. Schröder; R. Waldi; T. Adye; B. Franek; E. O. Olaiya; F. F. Wilson; S. Emery; L. Esteve; G. Hamel de Monchenault; W. Kozanecki; G. Vasseur; Ch. Yèche; M. Zito; M. T. Allen; D. Aston; D. J. Bard; R. Bartoldus; J. F. Benitez; R. Cenci; J. P. Coleman; M. R. Convery; J. C. Dingfelder; J. Dorfan; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; W. Dunwoodie; R. C. Field; M. Franco Sevilla; B. G. Fulsom; A. M. Gabareen; M. T. Graham; P. Grenier; C. Hast; W. R. Innes

2009-01-01

132

Modulating the Light Switch by [superscript 3]MLCT-[superscript 3]pi pi* State Interconversion  

SciTech Connect

The spectroscopic, electronic, and DNA-binding characteristics of two novel ruthenium complexes based on the dialkynyl ligands 2,3-bis(phenylethynyl)-1,4,8,9-tetraaza-triphenylene (bptt, 1) and 2,3-bis(4-tert-butyl-phenylethynyl)-1,4,8,9-tetraaza-triphenylene (tbptt, 2) have been investigated. Electronic structure calculations of bptt reveal that the frontier molecular orbitals are localized on the pyrazine-dialkynyl portion of the free ligand, a property that is reflected in a red shift of the lowest energy electronic transition (1: {lambda}{sub max} = 393 nm) upon substitution at the terminal phenyl groups (2: {lambda}{sub max} = 398 nm). Upon coordination to ruthenium, the low-energy ligand-centered transitions of 1 and 2 are retained, and metal-to-ligand charge transfer transitions (MLCT) centered at {lambda}{sub max} = 450 nm are observed for [Ru(phen){sub 2}bptt]{sup 2+}(3) and [Ru(phen){sub 2}tbptt]{sup 2+}(4). The photophysical characteristics of 3 and 4 in ethanol closely parallel those observed for [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} and [Ru(phen){sub 3}]{sup 2+}, indicating that the MLCT excited state is primarily localized within the [Ru(phen){sub 3}]{sup 2+} manifold of 3 and 4, and is only sparingly affected by the extended conjugation of the bptt framework. In an aqueous environment, 3 and 4 possess notably small luminescence quantum yields (3: {phi}H{sub 2}O = 0.005, 4: {phi}H{sub 2}O = 0.011) and biexponential decay kinetics (3: {tau}{sub 1} = 40 ns, {tau}{sub 2} = 230 ns; 4: {tau}{sub 1} {approx} 26 ns, {tau}{sub 2} = 150 ns). Addition of CT-DNA to an aqueous solution of 3 causes a significant increase in the luminescence quantum yield ({phi}DNA = 0.045), while the quantum yield of 4 is relatively unaffected ({phi}DNA = 0.013). The differential behavior demonstrates that tert-butyl substitution on the terminal phenyl groups inhibits the ability of 4 to intercalate with DNA. Such changes in intrinsic luminescence demonstrate that 3 binds to DNA via intercalation (K{sub b} = 3.3 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1}). The origin of this light switch behavior involves two competing {sup 3}MLCT states similar to that of the extensively studied light switch molecule [Ru(phen){sub 2}dppz]{sup 2+}. The solvent- and temperature-dependence of the luminescence of 3 reveal that the extended ligand aromaticity lowers the energy of the {sup 3}{pi}{pi}* excited state into competition with the emitting {sup 3}MLCT state. Interconversion between these two states plays a significant role in the observed photophysics and is responsible for the dual emission in aqueous environments.

Spencer, Brigitte R.; Kraft, Brian J.; Hughes, Chris G.; Pink, Maren; Zaleski, Jeffrey M. (Indiana)

2012-01-20

133

Measurements of indirect CP asymmetries in $D^0\\to K^-K^+$ and $D^0\\to\\pi^-\\pi^+$ decays  

E-print Network

A study of indirect CP violation in $D^0$ mesons through the determination of the parameter $A_\\Gamma$ is presented using a data sample of $pp$ collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$, collected with the LHCb detector and recorded at the centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV at the LHC. The parameter $A_\\Gamma$ is the asymmetry of the effective lifetimes measured in decays of $D^0$ and $\\overline{D}^0$ mesons to the CP eigenstates $K^-K^+$ and $\\pi^-\\pi^+$. Fits to the data sample yield $A_\\Gamma(KK)=(-0.35\\pm0.62\\pm0.12)\\times 10^{-3}$ and $A_\\Gamma(\\pi\\pi)=(0.33\\pm1.06\\pm0.14)\\times 10^{-3}$, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. The results represent the world's best measurements of these quantities. They show no difference in $A_\\Gamma$ between the two final states and no indication of CP violation.

Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S -F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T

2014-01-01

134

Measurement of indirect CP asymmetries in $D^0 \\to K^-K^+$ and $D^0 \\to \\pi^-\\pi^+$ decays  

E-print Network

Time-dependent $CP$ asymmetries in the decay rates of the singly Cabibbo-suppressed decays $D^0\\rightarrow K^-K^+$ and $D^0\\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^+$ are measured in $pp$ collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb experiment. The $D^0$ mesons are produced in semileptonic $b$-hadron decays, where the charge of the accompanying muon is used to determine the initial state as $D^0$ or $\\bar{D}^0$. The asymmetries in effective lifetimes between $D^0$ and $\\bar{D}^0$ decays, which are sensitive to indirect $CP$ violation, are determined to be \\begin{align*} A_{\\Gamma}(K^-K^+) = (-0.134 \\pm 0.077 \\; {}^{+0.026}_{-0.034})\\% \\ , \\\\ A_{\\Gamma}(\\pi^-\\pi^+) = (-0.092\\pm 0.145 \\; {}^{+0.025}_{-0.033})\\% \\ , \\end{align*} where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. This result is in agreement with previous measurements and with the hypothesis of no indirect $CP$ violation in $D^0$ decays.

Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Cartelle, P Alvarez; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Gutierrez, O Aquines; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Gomez, M Calvo; Campana, P; Perez, D Campora; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Akiba, K Carvalho; Mohr, RCM Casanova; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Garcia, L Castillo; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S -F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Vidal, X Cid; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A C; Torres, M Cruz; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C -T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Suárez, A Dosil; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, KD; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Rifai, I El; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Albor, V Fernandez; Rodrigues, F Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Torreira, A Gallas; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Pardiñas, J García; Garofoli, J; Tico, J Garra; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gastaldi, U; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Gándara, M Grabalosa; Diaz, R Graciani; Cardoso, L A Granado; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Morata, J A Hernando; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Gac, R Le; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U

2015-01-01

135

Amplitude analysis of e+e- => Y(nS)pi+pi- at sqrt(s)=10.865 GeV  

E-print Network

We report results on studies of the e+e- annihilation into three-body Y(nS)pi+pi- (n=1,2,3) final states including measurements of cross sections and the full amplitude analysis. The cross sections measured at sqrt(s)=10.865 GeV and corrected for the initial state radiation are sigma(e+e-=>Y(1S)pi+pi-)=(2.27+-0.12+-0.14) pb, sigma(e+e-=>Y(2S)pi+pi-)=(4.07+-0.16+-0.45) pb, and sigma(e+e-=>Y(3S)pi+pi-)=(1.46+-0.09+-0.16) pb. Amplitude analysis of the three-body Y(nS)pi+pi- final states strongly favors I^G(J^P)=1^+(1^+) quantum-number assignments for the two bottomonium-like Zb+- states, recently observed in the Y(nS)pi+- and hb(mP)pi+- (m=1,2) decay channels. The results are obtained with a $121.4 1/fb data sample collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

A. Garmash; A. Bondar; A. Kuzmin; A. Abdesselam; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; S. Al Said; D. M. Asner; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; R. Ayad; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; V. Bhardwaj; A. Bobrov; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bracko; T. E. Browder; D. Cervenkov; V. Chekelian; A. Chen; B. G. Cheon; K. Chilikin; R. Chistov; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dalseno; Z. Dolezal; A. Drutskoy; D. Dutta; S. Eidelman; D. Epifanov; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; T. Ferber; A. Frey; O. Frost; V. Gaur; S. Ganguly; R. Gillard; R. Glattauer; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; T. Hara; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; X. H. He; Y. Hoshi; W. -S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; H. J. Hyun; T. Iijima; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; T. Iwashita; I. Jaegle; T. Julius; J. H. Kang; E. Kato; P. Katrenko; H. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; H. Kichimi; C. Kiesling; D. Y. Kim; J. B. Kim; J. H. Kim; K. T. Kim; M. J. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; J. Klucar; B. R. Ko; P. Kodys; S. Korpar; P. Krizan; P. Krokovny; T. Kuhr; Y. -J. Kwon; S. -H. Lee; Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; J. Libby; C. Liu; Z. Q. Liu; D. Liventsev; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; G. B. Mohanty; A. Moll; R. Mussa; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nayak; E. Nedelkovska; N. K. Nisar; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Okuno; W. Ostrowicz; P. Pakhlov; H. Park; H. K. Park; T. K. Pedlar; R. Pestotnik; M. Petric; L. E. Piilonen; E. Ribezl; M. Ritter; M. Rohrken; A. Rostomyan; S. Ryu; T. Saito; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; D. Santel; T. Sanuki; Y. Sato; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; A. J. Schwartz; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; M. E. Sevior; M. Shapkin; V. Shebalin; C. P. Shen; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; F. Simon; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; S. Stanic; M. Staric; M. Steder; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; K. Tanida; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; K. Trabelsi; M. Uchida; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; Y. Usov; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; A. Vinokurova; V. Vorobyev; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; P. Wang; X. L. Wang; M. Watanabe; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; H. Yamamoto; Y. Yamashita; S. Yashchenko; Y. Yook; C. Z. Yuan; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; A. Zupanc

2014-03-05

136

Hybride interactions (stacking + H-bonds) between molecules bearing benzyl groups  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, the crystal structure of the 3-O- benzyl-1,2-O- isopropylidene-5,6- dideoxy-?- d-ribo-hex 5- yno-1,4- furanose is presented. This is the first noticed example in which weak hydrogen bonds prevail over the ?-? stacking interactions of the aromatic rings. As a result, the hybride interactions are formed by the ?-? stacking and the C?H⋯? hydrogen bonds. The analysis of molecular packing of crystal structures collected in the Cambridge Crystallographic Database shows that hybride interactions occur in infinite columns of benzyl groups or in binary complexes of organic molecules. Semiempirical calculations suggest that the ?-? stacking interactions and the C?H⋯? hydrogen bonds have a synergic character. Probably they are the key factor which stimulates the growth of crystals.

Ciunik, Zbigniew; Jarosz, S?awomir

1998-02-01

137

A classification of long-range interactions between two stacks of $p$ \\& $p'$-branes  

E-print Network

We generalize the computations of the long-range interactions between two parallel stacks of branes in \\cite{Wu and Wang, Prof. Lu's lecture notes} to various cases when two stacks of branes are not placed parallel to each other. We classify the nature of interaction (repulsive or attractive) for each special case and this classification can be used to justify the nature of long-range interaction between two complicated brane systems such as brane bound states. We will provide explicit examples in this paper to demonstrate this.

Jun Ouyang; Chao Wu

2014-09-03

138

Chemical interaction between glass-ceramic sealants and interconnect steels in SOFC stacks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to gain insight into the mechanism causing performance degradation and/or failure, stacks of planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are routinely dismantled and examined after operation at Forschungszentrum Jülich. The post-operation inspection focuses in particular on the chemical and mechanical compatibility aspects of cell and stack materials. In the present work a short-term degradation effect is addressed, which was found to be caused by unwanted chemical interactions between glass-ceramic sealants and ferritic steel interconnects. The post-operation inspection revealed severe steel corrosion along the seal rims. Under SOFC stack conditions rapidly growing oxide nodules were observed bridging the 200 ?m seal gap between the metallic components after a few hundred hours of operation. These oxide nodules, rich in iron, gave rise to local short-circuiting effects eventually resulting in stack failure. The present study, combined with recent model investigations triggered by the stack results, indicates that severe degradation only occurs in the case of glass-ceramic sealants which contain minor amounts of PbO. Furthermore, the rate of corrosion attack of the metallic components strongly depends on the silicon (Si) content of the ferritic steel. The stack tests suggest that increasing the Si content increases the corrosion rate, and thus detrimentally influences the stack performance.

Batfalsky, P.; Haanappel, V. A. C.; Malzbender, J.; Menzler, N. H.; Shemet, V.; Vinke, I. C.; Steinbrech, R. W.

139

Study of the D0 ---> pi- pi+ pi- pi+ decay  

SciTech Connect

Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, they present new measurements for the Cabbibo-suppressed decay mode D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. They measure the branching ratio {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.0914 {+-} 0.0018 {+-} 0.0022. An amplitude analysis has been performed, a first for this channel, in order to determine the resonant substructure of this decay mode. The dominant component is the decay D{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}(1260){sup +}{pi}{sup -}, accounting for 60% of the decay rate. The second most dominant contribution comes from the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{rho}(770){sup 0}, with a fraction of 25%. They also study the a{sub 1}(1260) line shape and resonant substructure. Using the helicity formalism for the angular distribution of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{rho}(770){sup 0}, they measure a longitudinal polarization of P{sub L} = (71 {+-} 4 {+-} 2)%.

Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; /UC, Davis; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /CINVESTAV, IPN /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U.

2007-01-01

140

Search for D0-D0 mixing and branching-ratio measurement in the decay D0-->K+ pi- pi0.  

PubMed

We analyze 230.4 fb;{-1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e;{+}e;{-} collider at SLAC to search for evidence of D0-D[over ];{0} mixing using regions of phase space in the decay D;{0}-->K;{+}pi;{-}pi;{0}. We measure the time-integrated mixing rate R_{M}=(0.023_{-0.014};{+0.018}(stat.)+/-0.004(syst.))%, and R_{M}<0.054% at the 95% confidence level, assuming CP invariance. The data are consistent with no mixing at the 4.5% confidence level. We also measure the branching ratio for D;{0}-->K;{+}pi;{-}pi;{0} relative to D;{0}-->K;{-}pi;{+}pi;{0} to be (0.214+/-0.008(stat.)+/-0.008(syst.))%. PMID:17155794

Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; Briand, H; David, P

2006-12-01

141

{eta}{sup {prime}}{r_arrow}{eta}{pi}{pi} decay as a probe of a possible lowest-lying scalar nonet  

SciTech Connect

We study the {eta}{sup {prime}}{r_arrow}{eta}{pi}{pi} decay within an effective chiral Lagrangian approach in which the lowest lying scalar meson candidates {sigma}(560) and {kappa}(900) together with the f{sub 0}(980) and a{sub 0}(980) are combined into a possible nonet. We show that there exists a unique choice of the free parameters of this model which, in addition to fitting the {pi}{pi} and {pi}K scattering amplitudes, well describes the experimental measurements for the partial decay width of {eta}{sup {prime}}{r_arrow}{eta}{pi}{pi} and the energy dependence of this decay. As a by-product, we estimate the a{sub 0}(980) width to be 70 MeV, in agreement with a new experimental analysis. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

Fariborz, A.H.; Schechter, J. [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244-1130 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244-1130 (United States)

1999-08-01

142

Measurement of D0- Dmacr 0 mixing using the ratio of lifetimes for the decays D0-->K-pi+, K-K+, and pi-pi+  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a measurement of D0- Dmacr 0 mixing parameters using the ratios of lifetimes extracted from a sample of D0 mesons produced through the process D*+-->D0pi+, which decay to K-pi+, K-K+, or pi-pi+. The lifetimes of the CP-even, Cabibbo-suppressed modes K-K+ and pi-pi+ are compared with that of the CP-mixed, Cabibbo-favored mode K-pi+ to obtain a measurement of yCP,

B. Aubert; M. Bona; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; N. Soni; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; D. A. Doll; B. Echenard; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; J. Firmino da Costa; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; G. Castelli; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; R. Cenci; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; G. Marchiori; M. A. Mazur; M. Morganti; N. Neri

2008-01-01

143

Observation of a broad structure in the pi+ pi- J/psi mass spectrum around 4.26 GeV/c2.  

PubMed

We study initial-state radiation events, e+ e- --> gammaISR pi+ pi- J/psi, with data collected with the BABAR detector. We observe an accumulation of events near 4.26 GeV/c2 in the invariant-mass spectrum of pi+ pi- J/psi. Fits to the mass spectrum indicate that a broad resonance with a mass of about 4.26 GeV/c2 is required to describe the observed structure. The presence of additional narrow resonances cannot be excluded. The fitted width of the broad resonance is 50 to 90 MeV/c2, depending on the fit hypothesis. PMID:16241645

Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R

2005-09-30

144

Effect of external electric field on H-bonding and ?-stacking interactions in guanine aggregates.  

PubMed

The structure and electronic properties of guanine oligomers and ? stacks of guanine quartets (G-quartets) with circulene are investigated under an external field through first-principles calculations. An electric field induces nonplanarity in the guanine aggregates and also leads to an increase in the H-bond distances. The calculations reveal that the binding energy of the circulenes with G-quartets increases on application of an electric field along the stacking direction. The HOMO-LUMO gap decreases substantially under the influence of an external field. The contribution of a simple dipole-dipole interaction to the stability of the stacked system is also analyzed. The electric field along the perpendicular axis increases the dipole moments of the guanine dimer, trimer, and quartet. Such an increase in the dipole moment facilitates stacking with circulenes. The stability of G-quartet-circulene ? stacks depends on the phase of the dipole moment (in-phase or out-of-phase) induced by an external electric field. The stability of stacks of bowl-shaped circulenes with G-quartets depends on the direction of the applied field. PMID:23065813

Jissy, Akkarapattiakal K; Datta, Ayan

2012-12-21

145

Can one detect new physics in I=0 and/or I=2 contributions to the decays B --> pi pi?  

E-print Network

We study the effects of new-physics contributions to B --> pi pi decays, which can be parametrized as four new complex quantities. A simple analysis is provided by utilizing the reparametrization invariance of the decay amplitudes. We find that six quantities can be reabsorbed into the definitions of Standard Model-like parameters. As a result, the usual isospin analysis provides only two constraints on new physics which are independent of estimates for the Standard Model contributions. In particular, we show that one is not sensitive to new physics affecting the I=0 amplitudes. On the other hand, I=2 new physics can be detected, and its parameters can be measured by using independent determinations of the weak phases. We obtain constraints on these new-physics parameters through a fit to the current experimental data.

Seungwon Baek; F. J. Botella; David London; Joao P. Silva

2005-06-07

146

Search for CP Violation in the Decays D0 to K- K+and D0 to pi- pi+  

SciTech Connect

We measure CP-violating asymmetries of neutral charmed mesons in the modes D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup +} and D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} with the highest precision to date by using D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays to correct detector asymmetries. An analysis of 385.8 fb{sup -}1 of data collected with the BaBar detector yields values of a{sup KK}{sub CP} = (0.00 {+-} 0.34 (stat.) {+-} 0.13 (syst.))% and a{sup {pi}{pi}}{sub CP} = (-0.24 {+-} 0.52 (stat.) {+-} 0.22 (syst.))%, which agree with Standard Model predictions.

Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer,; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC,

2007-09-24

147

Stack zooming for multi-focus interaction in time-series data visualization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Information visualization shows tremendous potential for helping both expert and casual users alike make sense of temporal data, but current time series visualization tools provide poor support for comparing several foci in a temporal dataset while retaining context and distance awareness. We introduce a method for supporting this kind of multi-focus interaction that we call stack zooming. The approach is

Waqas Javed; Niklas Elmqvist

2010-01-01

148

Evidence for $CP$ violation in $B^{+} \\to K^{*}(892)^{+} \\pi^{0}$ from a Dalitz plot analysis of $B^{+} \\to K^{0}_{\\rm S} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{0}$ decays  

E-print Network

We report a Dalitz plot analysis of charmless hadronic decays of charged $B$ mesons to the final state $K_{\\rm S}^{0}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{0}$ using the full BaBar dataset of $470.9\\pm2.8$ million $B\\bar{B}$ events collected at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance. We measure the overall branching fraction and $CP$ asymmetry to be ${\\cal B}\\left(B^{+}\\to K^{0}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{0}\\right) = \\left(45.9 \\pm 2.6 \\pm 3.0^{+8.6}_{-0.0}\\right)\\times10^{-6}$ and $A_{CP}\\left(B^{+}\\to K^{0}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{0}\\right) = 0.07 \\pm 0.05 \\pm 0.03^{+0.02}_{-0.03}$, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the signal model, respectively. This is the first measurement of the branching fraction for $B^{+} \\to K^{0}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{0}$. We find first evidence of a $CP$ asymmetry in $B^{+}\\to K^{*}(892)^{+}\\pi^{0}$ decays: $A_{CP}\\left(B^{+}\\to K^{*}(892)^{+}\\pi^{0}\\right)=-0.52 \\pm 0.14 \\pm 0.04^{+0.04}_{-0.02}$. The significance of this asymmetry, including systematic and model uncertainties, is $3.4$ standard deviations. We also measure t...

Lees, J P

2015-01-01

149

Measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in the decay X(3872) [right arrow] J/ [psi] [pi]? [pi]? at the CDFII experiment  

E-print Network

We present a measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in the decay X(3872) [right arrow] J/ [psi] [pi]? [pi]? using a 360 pb-1 sample of pp collisions at av [square root]s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at ...

Rakitin, Alexander (Alexander Yurevich)

2005-01-01

150

On Stacking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The term 'stacking' is normally associated with ? - ? interactions between aromatic moieties. The parallel alignment between adjacent DNA bases arguably constitutes the best-known example and provides the dominating contribution to the overall stability of DNA duplexes. Beyond canonical ? - ? interactions, a preliminary inspection of crystal structures of nucleic acids and their complexes with proteins reveals a wealth of additional stacking motifs including edge-to-face, H - ? , cation-?, lone pair-? and anion-? interactions. Given the ubiquity and diversity of such motifs it seems reasonable to widen the meaning of stacking beyond the standard cofacial interactions between pairs of aromatics.

Egli, Martin

151

On Stacking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The term ‘stacking' is normally associated with ? - ? interactions between aromatic moieties. The parallel alignment between adjacent DNA bases arguably constitutes the best-known example and provides the dominating contribution to the overall stability of DNA duplexes. Beyond canonical ? - ? interactions, a preliminary inspection of crystal structures of nucleic acids and their complexes with proteins reveals a wealth of additional stacking motifs including edge-to-face, H - ? , cation-?, lone pair-? and anion-? interactions. Given the ubiquity and diversity of such motifs it seems reasonable to widen the meaning of stacking beyond the standard cofacial interactions between pairs of aromatics.

Egli, Martin

152

The influence of arene-ring size on stacking interaction with canonical base pairs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stacking interactions between aromatic molecules (benzene, p-cymene, biphenyl, and di- and tetra-hydrogen anthracene) and G.C and A.T canonical Watson-Crick (WC) base pairs are explored. Two functionals with dispersion corrections: ?-B97XD and B3LYP-D3 are used. For a comparison also the MP2 and B3LYP-D3/PCM methods were used for the most stable p-cymene…WC geometries. It was found that the stacking interaction increases with the size of ?-conjugation system. Its extent is in agreement with experimental finding on anticancer activity of Ru(II) piano-stool complexes where intercalation of these aromatic molecules should play an important role. The explored structures are considered as ternary system so that decomposition of the interaction energy to pairwise and non-additivity contributions is also examined.

Formánek, Martin; Burda, Jaroslav V.

2014-04-01

153

Determination of S- and P-wave helicity amplitudes and non-unitary evolution of pion creation process pi(-)p -> pi(-)pi(+)n on polarized target  

E-print Network

We present the first model independent determination of S- and P-wave helicity amplitudes from CERN measurements of pi(-)p -> pi(-)pi(+)n on polarized target at small t and dipion masses 580-1080 MeV. The purely analytical determination of the helicity amplitudes is made possible by our finding analytical solution for relative phase omega_ij between S-wave amplitudes S_d and S_u of opposite transversity for each set of solutions for transversity amplitudes A_u(i), A_d(j),i,j=1,2. Of the six possible solutions for omega_ij only the solution with omega_ij=pi yields physical helicity amplitudes. Assigning rho^0(770) phase to the dominant P-wave helicity flip amplitude L_1(ij) necessitates a phase of the S-wave helicity flip amplitude S_1(ij) that is near to the rho^0(770) phase.These two amplitudes are consistent with rho^0(770)-f_0(980) mixing. The relative phases omega_ij=pi satisfy certain selfconsistency relation that must be satisfied in order for the four sets of solutions A_u(i),A_d(j),i,j=1,2 to be all physical solutions that can be identified with coevolution amplitudes describing the interaction of the pion creation process with a quantum environment. This test on phases omega_ij provides a new test of Kraus representation of the mixed final state density matrix. We show that the probabilities p_ij determining the final state rho_f in terms of solution states rho_f(ij) can be determined in measurements of recoil hyperon polarization in pi(-)p->pi(-)K(+)Lambda0 on polarized target.

Miloslav Svec

2007-09-14

154

Direct quantification of loop interaction and ?-? stacking for G-quadruplex stability at the submolecular level.  

PubMed

The well-demonstrated biological functions of DNA G-quadruplex inside cells call for small molecules that can modulate these activities by interacting with G-quadruplexes. However, the paucity of the understanding of the G-quadruplex stability contributed from submolecular elements, such as loops and tetraguanine (G) planes (or G-quartets), has hindered the development of small-molecule binders. Assisted by click chemistry, herein, we attached pulling handles via two modified guanines in each of the three G-quartets in human telomeric G-quadruplex. Mechanical unfolding using these handles revealed that the loop interaction contributed more to the G-quadruplex stability than the stacking of G-quartets. This result was further confirmed by the binding of stacking ligands, such as telomestatin derivatives, which led to similar mechanical stability for all three G-quartets by significant reduction of loop interactions for the top and bottom G-quartets. The direct comparison of loop interaction and G-quartet stacking in G-quadruplex provides unprecedented insights for the design of more efficient G-quadruplex-interacting molecules. Compared to traditional experiments, in which mutations are employed to elucidate the roles of specific residues in a biological molecule, our submolecular dissection offers a complementary approach to evaluate individual domains inside a molecule with fewer disturbances to the native structure. PMID:25296000

Ghimire, Chiran; Park, Soyoung; Iida, Keisuke; Yangyuoru, Philip; Otomo, Haruka; Yu, Zhongbo; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Mao, Hanbin

2014-11-01

155

Study of the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and its intermediate states  

E-print Network

We study the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$, reconstructing the \\Lambda_{c}^{+} baryon in the $p K^{-}\\pi^{+}$ mode, using a data sample of $467\\times 10^{6}$ $B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-2 storage rings at SLAC. We measure branching fractions for decays with intermediate $\\Sigma_{c}$ baryons to be ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(21.3 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 5.5) \\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(11.5\\pm 1.0 \\pm 0.5 \\pm 3.0)\\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]=(9.1 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 2.4)\\times10^{-5}$, and ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]= (2.2 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.1\\pm 0.6) \\times 10^{-5}$, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty on the $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\rightarrow\\proton\\Km\\pi^{+}$ branching fraction, respectively. For decays without $\\Sig...

Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Vetere, M Lo; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Diberder, F Le; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Biassoni, P; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Anulli, F; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Voß, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Vasseur, G; Y\\`, Ch; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Sevilla, M Franco; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Puccio, E M T; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Zambito, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Villanueva-Perez, P; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

2013-01-01

156

Delta I=3/2, K to Pi Pi Decays with Light, Non-Zero Momentum Pions  

E-print Network

Delta I=3/2, K to Pi Pi matrix elements are calculated on 68 configurations of quenched 24^3 x 64 lattices using the DBW2 action, and domain wall fermions with L_s=16. The lattice spacing is a^(-1)=1.3 GeV, corresponding to a physical volume of (3.6 fm)^3, which allows us to simulate a pion mass of m_Pi=227.6(6) MeV and a kaon mass of m_K=564(2) MeV. Twisted boundary conditions are used to give the two pions momentum. One twist corresponds to a pion momentum of p=Pi/L=170 MeV, which represents a decay that is nearly on-shell. Results for time separations of 20, 24, 28, and 32 between the kaon and the two pions are computed and an error weighted average is performed to reduced the error. The matrix elements are then found to have errors of order 3-4% for momentum 0 and Pi/L, 7% for momentum sqrt(2)*Pi/L, and 15% for momentum sqrt(3)*Pi/L.

Matthew Lightman; Elaine Goode

2009-12-09

157

Effect of Z Prime -mediated flavor-changing neutral current on B {yields} {pi}{pi} decays  

SciTech Connect

We study the effect of Z Prime -mediated flavor-changing neutral current on the B {yields} {pi}{pi} decays. The branching ratios of these decays can be enhanced remarkably in the nonuniversal Z Prime model. Our estimated branching ratios B(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) are enhanced significantly from their standard model (SM) value. For g Prime /g = 1, the branching ratios B(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) are very close to the recently observed experimental values and for higher values of g Prime /g branching ratios are more. Our calculated branching ratios B(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) and B(B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}) are also enhanced from the SM value as well as the recently observed experimental values. These enhancements of branching ratios from their SM value give the possibility of new physics.

Sahoo, S., E-mail: sukadevsahoo@yahoo.com [National Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (India); Das, C. K. [Trident Academy of Technology, Department of Physics (India); Maharana, L. [Krupajal Engineering College, Department of Physics (India)

2011-07-15

158

Measurement of central exclusive pi+pi- production in p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 0.9 and 1.96 TeV at CDF  

E-print Network

We measure exclusive $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ production in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9 and 1.96 TeV in the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We select events with two oppositely-charged particles, assumed to be pions, with pseudorapidity $|\\eta| system to have rapidity $|y|up to dipion mass $M(\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ = 5000 MeV/$c^2$, and show resonance structures attributed to $f_0$ and $f_2(1270)$ mesons. From the $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $K^+K^-$ spectra we place upper limits on exclusive $\\chi_{c0}(3415)$ production.

CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; D. Lontkovskyi; A. Lucà; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; I. Makarenko; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida; G. B. Yu; I. Yu; A. M. Zanetti; Y. Zeng; C. Zhou

2015-02-09

159

Study of B0-->pi0pi0, B±-->pi±pi0, and B±-->K±pi0 decays, and isospin analysis of B>pipi decays  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present updated measurements of the branching fractions and CP asymmetries for B0-->pi0pi0, B±-->pi±pi0, and B±-->K±pi0. Based on a sample of 383×106 Upsilon(4S)-->BB¯ decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC, we measure B(B0-->pi0pi0)=(1.47±0.25±0.12)×10-6, B(B±-->pi±pi0)=(5.02±0.46±0.29)×10-6, and B(B±-->K±pi0)=(13.6±0.6±0.7)×10-6. We also measure the CP asymmetries Cpi0pi0=-0.49±0.35±0.05, Api±pi0=0.03±0.08±0.01, and AK±pi0=0.030±0.039±0.010. Finally, we present bounds on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; M. Pelizaeus; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; Y. Zheng; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki

2007-01-01

160

Scalar mesons in the decays {eta}' {sup {yields}}3{pi}{sup 0} and {eta}' {sup {yields} {pi}0{pi}+{pi}-}  

SciTech Connect

The decays {eta} {sup {yields}}3{pi}{sup 0} and {eta} {sup {yields} {pi}0{pi}+{pi}-} are considered within the isobar model. It is shown that, in order to explain the branching ratio and the shape of the Dalitz plot for the decay {eta}' {sup {yields}}3{pi}{sup 0}, it is sufficient to take into account the contributions of the {sigma} and a{sub 0} mesons. The inclusion of the {sigma} meson is necessary for reproducing the shape of the distribution over the Dalitz plot. The branching ratio for the decay {eta}' {sup {yields} {pi}0{pi}+{pi}-} is obtained. The predictions for the distributions over the Dalitz plot for this decay are presented. These predictions depend strongly on model parameters.

Likhoded, A. K., E-mail: Anatolii.Likhoded@ihep.ru; Luchinsky, A. V., E-mail: Alexey.Luchinsky@ihep.ru; Samoylenko, V. D. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15

161

The Search and Study of Low-Mass Scalar Mesons in the Reaction np --> np Pi+Pi at Pn = 5.20 Gev\\/c^2  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using irradiation of a 1-meter Hydrogen Bubble Chamber (LHE JINR) by a quasimonochromatic neutron beam with impulse Pn=(5.20 +\\/- 0.12)GeV\\/c produced after acceleration of deuterons in the synchrophasotron (LHE JINR) 2560 events of reaction np-->npPi+Pi- were selected. After supplementary sorting out the events where a secondary proton flies forward in the general c.m.s. of reaction in the effective mass spectrum

Yu. A. Troyan; A. V. Beljaev; A. Yu. Troyan; E. B. Plekhanov; A. P. Jerusalimov; S. G. Arakelian

2008-01-01

162

High-mass rho-meson states from pd-annihilation at rest into pi-pi0pi0pspectator  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study of p-annihilation in liquid deuterium into pi-pi0pi0 and a spectator-proton is presented. A cut on the proton-momentum of <= 100 MeV\\/c ensures that annihilation takes place on a quasi-free neutron. A partial wave analysis shows contributions from three vector mesons, with masses and widths of (763.7 +\\/- 3.2; 152.8 +\\/- 4.3), (1411 +\\/- 14; 343 +\\/- 20); (1780+37-29

A. Abele; J. Adomeit; C. Amsler; D. S. Armstrong; C. A. Baker; B. M. Barnett; C. J. Batty; M. Benayoun; A. Berdoz; K. Beuchert; P. Birien; S. Bischoff; P. Blüm; K. Braune; J. Brose; D. V. Bugg; T. Case; A. Cooper; O. Cramer; K. M. Crowe; T. Degener; H. P. Dietz; N. Djaoshvili; S. V. Dombrowski; M. Doser; W. Dünnweber; D. Engelhardt; M. A. Faessler; P. Giarritta; R. Hackmann; R. P. Haddock; F. H. Heinsius; M. Herz; N. P. Hessey; P. Hidas; C. Holtzhaußen; D. Jamnik; H. Kalinowsky; B. Kalteyer; B. Kämmle; P. Kammel; T. Kiel; J. Kisiel; E. Klempt; H. Koch; C. Kolo; M. Kunze; M. Lakata; R. Landua; J. Lüdemann; H. Matthäy; R. McCrady; J. Meier; C. A. Meyer; L. Montanet; A. Noble; R. Ouared; F. Ould-Saada; K. Peters; C. N. Pinder; G. Pinter; C. Regenfus; J. Reißmann; S. Resag; W. Roethel; P. Schmidt; I. Scott; R. Seibert; S. Spanier; H. Stöck; C. Straßburger; U. Strohbusch; M. Suffert; U. Thoma; M. Tischhäuser; D. Urner; C. Völcker; F. Walter; D. Walther; U. Wiedner; B. S. Zou

1997-01-01

163

Determination of S- and P-wave helicity amplitudes and non-unitary evolution of pion creation process pi(-)p -> pi(-)pi(+)n on polarized target  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the first model independent determination of S- and P-wave helicity amplitudes from CERN measurements of pi(-)p -> pi(-)pi(+)n on polarized target at small t and dipion masses 580-1080 MeV. The purely analytical determination of the helicity amplitudes is made possible by our finding analytical solution for relative phase omega_ij between S-wave amplitudes S_d and S_u of opposite transversity

Miloslav Svec

2007-01-01

164

Interlayer-interaction dependence of latent heat in the Heisenberg model on a stacked triangular lattice with competing interactions.  

PubMed

We study the phase transition behavior of a frustrated Heisenberg model on a stacked triangular lattice by Monte Carlo simulations. The model has three types of interactions: the ferromagnetic nearest-neighbor interaction J(1) and antiferromagnetic third nearest-neighbor interaction J(3) in each triangular layer and the ferromagnetic interlayer interaction J([perpendicular]). Frustration comes from the intralayer interactions J(1) and J(3). We focus on the case that the order parameter space is SO(3)×C(3). We find that the model exhibits a first-order phase transition with breaking of the SO(3) and C(3) symmetries at finite temperature. We also discover that the transition temperature increases but the latent heat decreases as J([perpendicular])/J(1) increases, which is opposite to the behavior observed in typical unfrustrated three-dimensional systems. PMID:24329245

Tamura, Ryo; Tanaka, Shu

2013-11-01

165

Molecular dynamics study of the interactions between dislocation and imperfect stacking fault tetrahedron in Cu  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The microstructure of irradiated face centered cubic alloys with low stacking fault energy is distinguished by the formation of a high number density of nanometer size stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). A recent transmission electron microscopy investigation of high-energy proton irradiated copper [16] has shown that nearly 50% of the visible SFT population are not perfect SFTs, but rather consist of truncated SFT and/or groups of overlapping SFT. This paper presents the results of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the interaction between gliding dislocations, of either edge or screw character, and truncated SFT or overlapping SFT. The most common result of the edge dislocation interaction with a truncated SFT is defect shearing, ultimately leading to complete separation into two smaller defect clusters. Partial absorption of the truncated SFT is the most common result of the interaction with a screw dislocation, resulting in the formation of super-jog (or helical) segments as the defect is absorbed into the dislocation core. The resulting non-planar screw dislocation is self-pinned with reduced mobility and is re-emitted as a similar truncated SFT as the applied shear stress is increased. The re-emitted truncated SFT is often rotated and translated relative to the original position. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that shearing (decreased defect cluster size) and dislocation dragging of the defect clusters by partial absorption into the dislocation core contributes to the formation of defect-free channels.

Saintoyant, Lucie; Lee, Hyon-Jee; Wirth, Brian D.

2007-04-01

166

Extracting Drug-Drug Interaction from the Biomedical Literature Using a Stacked Generalization-Based Approach  

PubMed Central

Drug-drug interaction (DDI) detection is particularly important for patient safety. However, the amount of biomedical literature regarding drug interactions is increasing rapidly. Therefore, there is a need to develop an effective approach for the automatic extraction of DDI information from the biomedical literature. In this paper, we present a Stacked Generalization-based approach for automatic DDI extraction. The approach combines the feature-based, graph and tree kernels and, therefore, reduces the risk of missing important features. In addition, it introduces some domain knowledge based features (the keyword, semantic type, and DrugBank features) into the feature-based kernel, which contribute to the performance improvement. More specifically, the approach applies Stacked generalization to automatically learn the weights from the training data and assign them to three individual kernels to achieve a much better performance than each individual kernel. The experimental results show that our approach can achieve a better performance of 69.24% in F-score compared with other systems in the DDI Extraction 2011 challenge task. PMID:23785452

He, Linna; Yang, Zhihao; Zhao, Zhehuan; Lin, Hongfei; Li, Yanpeng

2013-01-01

167

Dislocation-stacking fault tetrahedron interaction: what can we learn from atomic scale modelling.  

SciTech Connect

The high number density of stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) observed in irradiated fcc metals suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, taken into account when estimating mechanical properties changes of irradiated materials. The central issue is describing the individual interaction between a moving dislocation and an SFT, which is characterized by a very fine size scale, {approx}100 nm. This scale is amenable to both in situ TEM experiments and large-scale atomic modelling. In this paper we present results of an atomistic simulation of dislocation-SFT interactions using molecular dynamics (MD). The results are compared with observations from in situ deformation experiments. It is demonstrated that in some cases the simulations and experimental observations are quite similar, suggesting a reasonable interpretation of experimental observations.

Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Matsukawa, Yoshitaka [ORNL

2004-01-01

168

Urea destabilizes RNA by forming stacking interactions and multiple hydrogen bonds with nucleic acid bases  

E-print Network

Urea titration of RNA by urea is an effective approach to investigate the forces stabilizing this biologically important molecule. We used all atom molecular dynamics simulations using two urea force fields and two RNA constructs to elucidate in atomic detail the destabilization mechanism of folded RNA in aqueous urea solutions. Urea denatures RNA by forming multiple hydrogen bonds with the RNA bases and has little influence on the phosphodiester backbone. Most significantly we discovered that urea engages in stacking interactions with the bases. We also estimate, for the first time, m-value for RNA, which is a measure of the strength of urea-RNA interactions. Our work provides a conceptual understanding of the mechanism by which urea enhances RNA folding rates.

Priyakumar, U Deva; Thirumalai, D; MacKerell, Alexander D

2009-01-01

169

Urea destabilizes RNA by forming stacking interactions and multiple hydrogen bonds with nucleic acid bases  

E-print Network

Urea titration of RNA by urea is an effective approach to investigate the forces stabilizing this biologically important molecule. We used all atom molecular dynamics simulations using two urea force fields and two RNA constructs to elucidate in atomic detail the destabilization mechanism of folded RNA in aqueous urea solutions. Urea denatures RNA by forming multiple hydrogen bonds with the RNA bases and has little influence on the phosphodiester backbone. Most significantly we discovered that urea engages in stacking interactions with the bases. We also estimate, for the first time, m-value for RNA, which is a measure of the strength of urea-RNA interactions. Our work provides a conceptual understanding of the mechanism by which urea enhances RNA folding rates.

U. Deva Priyakumar; Changbong Hyeon; D. Thirumalai; Alexander D. MacKerell Jr

2009-12-07

170

Evidence of ?-stacking Interactions in the Self-Assembly of hIAPP22–29†  

PubMed Central

The role aromatic amino acids play in the formation of amyloid is a subject of controversy. In an effort to clarify the contribution of aromaticity to the self-assembly of hIAPP22–29, peptide analogs containing electron donating groups (EDGs) or electron withdrawing groups (EWGs) as substituents on the aromatic ring of Phe-23 at the para position have been synthesized and characterized using turbidity measurements in conjunction with Raman, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Results indicate the incorporation of EDGs on the aromatic ring of Phe-23 virtually abolish the ability of hIAPP22–29 to form amyloid. Peptides containing EWGs were still capable of forming aggregates. These aggregates were found to be rich in ?-sheet secondary structure. TEM images of the aggregates confirm the presence of amyloid fibrils. The observed difference in amyloidogenic propensity between peptides containing EDGs and those with EWGs appears not to be based on differences in peptide hydrophobicity. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopic investigations reveal that the environment surrounding the aromatic ring becomes more hydrophobic and ordered upon aggregation. Furthermore, Raman measurements of peptide analogs containing EWGs, conclusively demonstrate a distinct downshift in the -C=C- ring mode (ca. 1600 cm?1) upon aggregation that has previously been shown to be indicative of ?-stacking. While previous work has demonstrated that ?-stacking is not an absolute requirement for fibrillization, our findings indicate that Phe-23 also contributes to fibril formation through ?-stacking interactions and that it is not only the hydrophobic nature of this residue that is relevant in the self-assembly of hIAPP22–29. PMID:23229921

Profit, Adam A.; Felsen, Valentina; Chinwong, Justina; Mojica, Elmer-Rico E.; Desamero, Ruel Z. B.

2012-01-01

171

Precise measurement of Gamma(KS-->pi+pi-(gamma))\\/Gamma(KS-->pi0pi0) with the KLOE detector at DAPhiNE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a sample of over 400 million phi-->KSKL decays produced during the years 2001 and 2002 at the DAPhiNE e+e- collider, the ratio RS pi=Gamma(KS-->pi+pi-(gamma))\\/Gamma(KS-->pi0pi0) has been measured with the KLOE detector. The result is RS pi=2.2555±0.0012stat±0.0021corr-stat±0.0050syst, which is in good agreement with the previously published result based on the KLOE data sample from the year 2000. The average of

F. Ambrosino; A. Antonelli; M. Antonelli; C. Bacci; P. Beltrame; G. Bencivenni; S. Bertolucci; C. Bini; C. Bloise; S. Bocchetta; V. Bocci; F. Bossi; D. Bowring; P. Branchini; R. Caloi; P. Campana; G. Capon; T. Capussela; F. Ceradini; S. Chi; G. Chiefari; P. Ciambrone; S. Conetti; E. De Lucia; A. de Santis; P. de Simone; G. de Zorzi; S. Dell'Agnello; A. Denig; A. di Domenico; C. di Donato; S. di Falco; B. di Micco; A. Doria; M. Dreucci; G. Felici; A. Ferrari; M. L. Ferrer; G. Finocchiaro; S. Fiore; C. Forti; P. Franzini; C. Gatti; P. Gauzzi; S. Giovannella; E. Gorini; E. Graziani; M. Incagli; W. Kluge; V. Kulikov; F. Lacava; G. Lanfranchi; J. Lee-Franzini; D. Leone; M. Martini; P. Massarotti; W. Mei; S. Meola; S. Miscetti; M. Moulson; S. Müller; F. Murtas; M. Napolitano; F. Nguyen; M. Palutan; E. Pasqualucci; A. Passeri; V. Patera; F. Perfetto; L. Pontecorvo; M. Primavera; P. Santangelo; E. Santovetti; G. Saracino; B. Sciascia; A. Sciubba; F. Scuri; I. Sfiligoi; T. Spadaro; M. Testa; L. Tortora; P. Valente; B. Valeriani; G. Venanzoni; S. Veneziano; A. Ventura; R. Versaci; G. Xu

2006-01-01

172

Study of the reactions pip>pi+pi-n and pip>K+Kn at 1.98 and 2.41 GeV\\/c  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have studied the reactions pi-p-->pi+pi-n and pi-p-->K+K-n at 1.98 and 2.41 GeV\\/c over a dimeson mass range from 0.75 to 1.23 GeV\\/c2. Final-state neutrons were detected near 0° corresponding to |t-t|<0.003 (GeV\\/c)2 near a dimeson mass of 1.0 GeV\\/c2. Charged particles were detected in the Argonne Effective Mass Spectrometer and\\/or scintillation detectors surrounding the hydrogen target. The mass of

R. J. Leeper; M. Buttram; H. B. Crawley; D. W. Duke; R. C. Lamb; F. C. Peterson

1977-01-01

173

Measurement of D0-D¯0 Mixing from a Time-Dependent Amplitude Analysis of D0-->K+pi-pi0 Decays  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present evidence of D0-D¯0 mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D0-->K+pi-pi0 in a data sample of 384fb-1 collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Assuming CP conservation, we measure the mixing parameters xKpipi0'=[2.61-0.68+0.57(stat)±0.39(syst)]%, yKpipi0'=[-0.06-0.64+0.55(stat)±0.34(syst)]%. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2

B. Aubert; M. Bona; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; E. Prencipe; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopezab; A. Palanoab; M. Pappagalloab; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; R. N. Cahn; R. G. Jacobsen; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Lynch; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; C. M. Hawkes; N. Soni; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; Z. Yasin; L. Zhang; V. Sharma; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; L. O. Winstrom; M. G. Wilson; C. H. Cheng; D. A. Doll; B. Echenard; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; J. F. Hirschauer; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; M. Karbach; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; M. J. Kobel; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; S. Playfer; J. E. Watson; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; V. Santoro; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; J. Firmino da Costa; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; C. K. Clarke; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; K. E. Alwyn; D. Bailey; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; X. Li; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; G. Onorato; C. Sciacca; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; W. F. Wang; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; G. Castelli; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; P. Del Amo Sanchez; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; S. Sitt; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; G. Marchiori; M. Morganti; N. Neri; E. Paoloni; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; D. Lopes Pegna; C. Lu; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith; A. V. Telnov; F. Anulli; E. Baracchini; G. Cavoto; D. Del Re; E. di Marco; R. Faccini; F. Ferrarotto; F. Ferroni; M. Gaspero; P. D. Jackson; L. Li Gioi; M. A. Mazzoni; S. Morganti; G. Piredda; F. Polci; F. Renga; C. Voena; M. Ebert

2009-01-01

174

Evidence for large direct CP violation in B+/- --> rho(770)0K+/- from analysis of three-body charmless B+/- --> K+/-pi+/-pi+/- decays.  

PubMed

We report results on a Dalitz analysis of three-body charmless B+/- --> K+/-pi+/-pi+/- decay including searches for direct CP violation. We report the first observation of the decay B+/- --> f2(1270)K+/- with a statistical significance above 6sigma. We also observe first evidence for large direct CP violation in the B+/- --> rho(770)0K+/- channel. The results are obtained with a data sample that contains 386 10(6) BB pairs collected at the Y(4s) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. PMID:16907296

Garmash, A; Abe, K; Abe, K; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Asano, Y; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Barbero, M; Bedny, I; Bitenc, U; Bizjak, I; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K-F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Chuvikov, A; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Dragic, J; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Fratina, S; Gabyshev, N; Gershon, T; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Golob, B; Gorisek, A; Ha, H C; Hara, T; Hasegawa, Y; Hastings, N C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hou, S; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y B; Iijima, T; Imoto, A; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Kapusta, P; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Khan, H R; Kichimi, H; Kim, S K; Kim, S M; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kulasiri, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Limosani, A; Lin, S-W; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; Matsumoto, T; Matyja, A; Mitaroff, W; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Nagamine, T; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Natkaniec, Z; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Ohshima, T; Okabe, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ozaki, H; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Peak, L S; Pestotnik, R; Piilonen, L E; Rozanska, M; Sakai, Y; Satoyama, N; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schümann, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Sevior, M E; Shibuya, H; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Somov, A; Stamen, R; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tian, X C; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Tsukamoto, T; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Villa, S; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Xie, Q L; Yamaguchi, A; Yamauchi, M; Yang, Heyoung; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zürcher, D

2006-06-30

175

f{sub 0}(600) and f{sub 0}(980) pole positions from a dispersive {pi}{pi} scattering data analysis  

SciTech Connect

We show how the new precise data on kaon decays together with forward dispersion relations, sum rules and once- and twice-subtracted Roy equations allow for a precise analysis of {pi}{pi} scattering. The once subtracted Roy equations provide a more stringent consistency check for the parametrizations of the S0-wave data in the region from 450 to 1100 MeV that allows us to present a preliminary determination of the f{sub 0}(600) and f{sub 0}(980) poles from the constrained dispersive data analysis.

Ruiz e Elvira, J.; Martin, R. Garcia; Pelaez, J. R. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica II, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kaminski, R. [Department of Theoretical Physics, H. Niewodniczanski Insitute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 31-342 Krakow (Poland)

2011-05-23

176

Self-assembled pi-stacks of functional dyes in solution: structural and thermodynamic features.  

PubMed

This critical review provides an overview on the formation of pi-stacks of functional dyes in solution, aiming to acquaint young researchers with this topical research field and to stimulate further advance in supramolecular dye chemistry. Different mathematical models that have been proposed and applied for the description of aggregation equilibria of pi-systems in solution are discussed. The factors that have significant impact on the structural features of aggregates and the thermodynamics of pi-pi stacking such as electrostatic interactions, size and geometry of the dye molecules are covered in this review. A comparison of the binding strength is made for different classes of functional pi-conjugated systems, from simple benzene to more extended polycyclic hydrocarbon molecules, including triphenylenes and hexabenzocoronenes, heteroaromatic porphyrins and phthalocyanines, quadrupolar naphthalene and perylene bisimides, dipolar or even zwitterionic merocyanines and squaraines, and some macrocyclic dyes. Solvent effects on binding constants are analysed by linear free energy relationships with various solvent polarity scales (98 references with multiple entries). PMID:19169466

Chen, Zhijian; Lohr, Andreas; Saha-Möller, Chantu R; Würthner, Frank

2009-02-01

177

The relevance of nonlinear stacking interactions in simple models of double-stranded DNA  

PubMed Central

Single molecule DNA experiments provide interesting data that allow a better understanding of the mechanical interactions between the strands and the nucleotides of this molecule. In some sense, these experiments complement the classical ones about DNA thermal denaturation. It is well known that the original Peyrard–Bishop (PB) model by means of a harmonic stacking potential and a nonlinear substrate potential has been able to predict the existence of a critical temperature of full denaturation of the molecule. In the present paper, driven by the findings of single molecule experiments, we substitute the original harmonic intra-strand stacking potential with a Duffing type potential. By elementary and analytical arguments, we show that with this choice it is possible to obtain a sharp transition in the classical domain wall solution of the PB model and the compactification of the classical solitary wave solutions of other models for the dynamics of DNA. We discuss why these solutions may improve our knowledge of the DNA dynamics in several directions. PMID:16971334

Saccomandi, Giuseppe; Sgura, Ivonne

2006-01-01

178

Atomic-Scale Study of Dislocation-Stacking Fault Tetrahedron Interactions. Part I: Mechanisms.  

SciTech Connect

Stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) are formed under irradiation in fcc metals and alloys. The high number density of SFTs observed suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, be taken into account when estimating mechanical property changes of irradiated materials. The key issue in this is to describe the interaction between a moving dislocation and an individual SFT, which is distinguished by a small physical size of the order of {approx}1-10 nm. We have performed atomistic simulations of edge and screw dislocations interacting with SFTs of different sizes at different temperatures and strain rates. Five possible interaction outcomes have been identified, involving either partial absorption, or shearing or restoration of SFTs. The mechanisms that give rise to these processes are described and their dependence on interaction parameters, such as SFT size, dislocation-SFT geometry, temperature and stress/strain rate are determined. Mechanisms that help to explain the formation of defect-free channels cleared by gliding dislocations, as observed experimentally, are also discussed. Hardening due to the various mechanisms and their dependence on loading conditions will be presented in a following paper (Part II).

Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Rodney, David [Genie Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux; Bacon, David J [University of Liverpool

2006-01-01

179

Pyrene-modified PNAs: Stacking interactions and selective excimer emission in PNA2DNA triplexes  

PubMed Central

Summary Pyrene derivatives can be incorporated into nucleic acid analogs in order to obtain switchable probes or supramolecular architectures. In this paper, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) containing 1 to 3 1-pyreneacetic acid units (PNA1–6) with a sequence with prevalence of pyrimidine bases, complementary to cystic fibrosis W1282X point mutation were synthesized. These compounds showed sequence-selective switch-on of pyrene excimer emission in the presence of target DNA, due to PNA2DNA triplex formation, with stability depending on the number and positioning of the pyrene units along the chain. An increase in triplex stability and a very high mismatch-selectivity, derived from combined stacking and base-pairing interactions, were found for PNA2, bearing two distant pyrene units. PMID:25161706

Guidi, Lucia; Ghidini, Alice

2014-01-01

180

Measurement of D^0-\\bar{D^0} Mixing From a Time-Dependent Amplitude Analysis of D^0\\ -> K^+\\pi^-\\pi0 Decays  

SciTech Connect

The authors present evidence of D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} in a data sample of 384 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. Assuming CP conservation, they measure the mixing parameters x{prime}{sub K{pi}{pi}{sup 0}} = [2.61{sub -0.68}{sup +0.57}(stat.) {+-} 0.39(syst.)]%, y{prime}{sub K{pi}{pi}{sup 0}} = [-0.06{sub -0.64}{sup +0.55}(stat.) {+-} 0.34(syst.)]%. The confidence level for the data to be consistent with the no-mixing hypothesis is 0.1%, including systematic uncertainties. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. They find no evidence of CP violation in mixing.

Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2008-08-04

181

Stacking Water  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students become familiar with how ocean water forms density-stratified layers in many places. They design and carry out a series of tests to show how water masses of four different densities interact, using clear straws to stack colored water of different salinities. Temperature is varied to increase the differences in density of each water sample.

182

Computational study of a screw dislocation interacting with a stacking-fault tetrahedron  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A numerical simulation study of the intersection process of a moving ½[110] screw dislocation with a perfect stacking-fault tetrahedron (SFT) in an fcc nickel crystal is carried out using molecular dynamics for different many-body potentials. When the glide plane of the screw dislocation coincides with one of the planes of the SFT, the interaction involves several dislocation reactions, jog line formation and bending of dislocation segments. The complex atomic processes are illustrated in detail and are shown to depend on the relative orientation of the defect and moving dislocation. In most cases, the jogs disappear quickly, but in special cases the jog lines in the dissociated dislocation remain even after the interaction process with the SFT, dragging some vacancies away. While in this geometrical set-up the main effect of the intersection is the ledge formation on the SFT, when the moving dislocation intersects the SFT in the middle part, it leads to slip and the separation of the SFT into two parts. Finally, if the screw dislocation passes at non-zero distance from the SFT the elastic interaction does not lead to any deformation of the SFT.

Szelestey, Peter; Patriarca, Marco; Kaski, Kimmo

2005-06-01

183

NONWATER QUALITY IMPACTS OF CLOSED-CYCLE COOLING SYSTEMS AND THE INTERACTION OF STACK GAS AND COOLING TOWER PLUMES  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of a literature survey of the nonwater quality impacts of closed-cycle cooling systems. Following discussions of cooling tower and stack gas plumes, interactions of these plumes are considered. For cooling tower plumes, plume types, behavior, salt drift g...

184

?-Stacking, C-H/?, and halogen bonding interactions in bromobenzene and mixed bromobenzene-benzene clusters.  

PubMed

Noncovalent interactions play an important role in many chemical and biochemical processes. Building upon our recent study of the homoclusters of chlorobenzene, where ?-? stacking and CH/? interactions were identified as the most important binding motifs, in this work we present a study of bromobenzene (PhBr) and mixed bromobenzene-benzene clusters. Electronic spectra in the region of the PhBr monomer S0-S1 (??*) transition were obtained using resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) methods combined with time-of-flight mass analysis. As previously found for related systems, the PhBr cluster spectra show a broad feature whose center is red-shifted from the monomer absorption, and electronic structure calculations indicate the presence of multiple isomers and Franck-Condon activity in low-frequency intermolecular modes. Calculations at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ level find in total eight minimum energy structures for the PhBr dimer: four ?-stacked structures differing in the relative orientation of the Br atoms (denoted D1-D4), one T-shaped structure (D5), and three halogen bonded structures (D6-D8). The calculated binding energies of these complexes, corrected for basis set superposition error (BSSE) and zero-point energy (ZPE), are in the range of -6 to -24 kJ/mol. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations predict that these isomers absorb over a range that is roughly consistent with the breadth of the experimental spectrum. To examine the influence of dipole-dipole interaction, R2PI spectra were also obtained for the mixed PhBr···benzene dimer, where the spectral congestion is reduced and clear vibrational structure is observed. This structure is well-simulated by Franck-Condon calculations that incorporate the lowest frequency intermolecular modes. Calculations find four minimum energy structures for the mixed dimer and predict that the binding energy of the global minimum is reduced by ~30% relative to the global minimum PhBr dimer structure. PMID:23978255

Reid, Scott A; Nyambo, Silver; Muzangwa, Lloyd; Uhler, Brandon

2013-12-19

185

Equatorial ?-stacking interactions in diruthenium (II,III) tetracarboxylate complexes containing extended ?-systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The synthesis of three new valent-averaged tetracarboxylatodiruthenium (II,III) complexes, [Ru2(1-naphthylacetate)4(H2O)2](PF6)?4THF, 1?4THF, [Ru2(2-naphthoate)4(THF)2](PF6)?3THF, 2?3THF, and [Ru2(coumarin-3-carboxylate)4(MeOH)2](PF6)?MeOH?H2O, 3?MeOH?H2O, was accomplished using a well documented carboxylate exchange reaction. All three complexes were thoroughly characterized using infrared and UV-Vis spectroscopies, elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction. Due to the extended ?-systems present, two of the complexes, 2?3THF and 3?MeOH?H2O, display extensive ?-stacking in two dimensions, with similar interactions notably absent in 1?4THF due to the perpendicular orientation of the naphthyl rings. Modest H-bonding is seen in complexes 1?4THF and 3?MeOH?H2O. As these types of complexes are noted secondary building units (SBU's) in the construction of metal-organic frameworks (MOF's), the significance of these interactions in stabilizing even larger, supramolecular structures, are noted.

O'Rourke, Natasha F.; Ronaldson, Michael; Stanley Cameron, T.; Wang, Ruiyao; Aquino, Manuel A. S.

2013-11-01

186

Substituent Effects in C6F6-C6H5X Stacking Interactions  

PubMed Central

Parallel displaced and sandwich configurations of hexafluorobenzene-substituted benzene dimers are studied by ab initio molecular orbital methods up to the MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory to reveal how substituents influence ?-? interactions. Two minimum energy configurations are found, one with the substituent group away from (2a–2f) and the other with the substituent group on top of the ?-face of the hexafluorobenzene (3a–3f). Higher binding energies are predicted for dimers with the substituent on the ?-face (3a–3f). All sandwich dimers (4a–4e) are found to be saddle points on the potential energy surfaces. A parallel displaced minimum energy configuration is also predicted for the parent complex, C6F6-C6H6, which is in contrast to predictions based on quadrupole moments of benzene and hexafuorobenzene. The preference for the parallel displaced, rather than the sandwich configuration, is rationalized based on the smaller interplanar distance in the former. The closeness of contact in the parallel displaced dimers leads to greater binding energies. The shape of the electron density isosurface of the monomers is suggested to provide a guide for the prediction of how arenes stack with one another. A large difference in binding energy between the C6F6 complex of aniline (3e) and N,N-dimethylaniline (3f) is calculated and charge-transfer interactions are suggested to play a role in the latter. PMID:17137351

Gung, Benjamin W.; Amicangelo, Jay C.

2008-01-01

187

The role of stacking interactions in the folding dynamics of DNA hairpins  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To gain a deeper insight into cellular processes such as transcription and translation, one needs to uncover the mechanisms controlling the configurational changes of nucleic acids. As a step toward this aim, we present here a novel mesoscopic-level computational model that provides a new window into nucleic acid dynamics. We validate the model by studying DNA hairpins, single-stranded molecules with two complementary segments (``stems'') linked by a non-complementary ``loop.'' Our model reproduces experimental observations and enables us to monitor the configurational dynamics of hairpins, providing clear evidence of a ``zipping'' process in the closing toward the native configuration. In addition, our model allows us to demonstrate that there is a preferred zipping pathway for folding which is both the most frequent and the fastest way for the hairpin to fold. Most importantly, our model allows us to tune the importance of the different interactions in the nucleotides and uncover the role of stacking interactions as the driving force in the zipping dynamics.

Sales-Pardo, Marta; Widom, Jon; Amaral, Luis

2006-03-01

188

Measurement of the tau--->etapi-pi+pi-nutau branching fraction and a search for a second-class current in the tau--->eta'(958)pi-nutau decay  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tau--->etapi-pi+pi-nutau decay with the eta-->gammagamma mode is studied using 384fb-1 of data collected by the BABAR detector. The branching fraction is measured to be (1.60±0.05±0.11)×10-4. It is found that tau--->f1(1285)pi-nutau-->etapi-pi+pi-nutau is the dominant decay mode with a branching fraction of (1.11±0.06±0.05)×10-4. The first error on the branching fractions is statistical and the second systematic. Note that no particle identification

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; David Nathan Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; L. Wang; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; Y. Zheng; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni

2008-01-01

189

Molecular dynamics study of the interactions between dislocation and imperfect stacking fault tetrahedron in Cu  

Microsoft Academic Search

The microstructure of irradiated face centered cubic alloys with low stacking fault energy is distinguished by the formation of a high number density of nanometer size stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). A recent transmission electron microscopy investigation of high-energy proton irradiated copper [16] has shown that nearly 50% of the visible SFT population are not perfect SFTs, but rather consist of

Lucie Saintoyant; Hyon-Jee Lee; Brian D. Wirth

2007-01-01

190

Branching fraction measurements of charged B decays to K*+K+K-, K*+pi+K-, K*+K+pi- and K*+pi+pi- final states  

Microsoft Academic Search

Branching fraction and asymmetry measurements of charmless B+-->K*+h1+h2- (where h1,2=K, pi) decays are presented, using a data sample of 232×106 Upsilon(4S)-->BB¯ decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. Using a maximum likelihood fit, the following branching fraction results were obtained: B(B+-->K*+K+K-)=(36.2±3.3±3.6)×10-6 and B(B+-->K*+pi+pi-)=(75.3±6.0±8.1)×10-6. Upper limits were set for B(B+-->K*+pi+K-)<11.8×10-6 and B(B+-->K*+K+pi-)<6.1×10-6 at 90% confidence

B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. De Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; A. Gaz

2006-01-01

191

Precise measurement of the e+e- --> pi+pi-(gamma) cross section with the initial state radiation method at BABAR.  

PubMed

A precise measurement of the cross section of the process e(+)e(-) --> pi(+)pi(-)(gamma) from threshold to an energy of 3 GeV is obtained with the initial state radiation (ISR) method using 232 fb(-1) of data collected with the BABAR detector at e(+)e(-) center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV. The ISR luminosity is determined from a study of the leptonic process e(+)e(-) --> mu(+)mu(-)gamma(gamma). The leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon magnetic anomaly calculated using the pipi cross section measured from threshold to 1.8 GeV is (514.1 +/- 2.2(stat) +/- 3.1(syst)) x 10(-10). PMID:20366141

Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L L; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B

2009-12-01

192

Measurement of D{0}-D[-over]{0} mixing from a time-dependent amplitude analysis of D{0}-->K+pi{-}pi{0} decays.  

PubMed

We present evidence of D{0}-D[-over ]{0} mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D{0}-->K+pi{-}pi;{0} in a data sample of 384 fb{-1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e{-} collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Assuming CP conservation, we measure the mixing parameters x{Kpipi{0}}{'}=[2.61{-0.68}{+0.57}(stat)+/-0.39(syst)]%, y{Kpipi;{0}}{'}=[-0.06{-0.64}{+0.55}(stat)+/-0.34(syst)]%. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. We find no evidence of CP violation in mixing. PMID:20366027

Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Vazquez, W Panduro; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Sanchez, P del Amo; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Esteve, L; Ganzhur, S F

2009-11-20

193

Energetic Salts with ?-Stacking and Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions Lead the Way to Future Energetic Materials.  

PubMed

Among energetic materials, there are two significant challenges facing researchers: 1) to develop ionic CHNO explosives with higher densities than their parent nonionic molecules and (2) to achieve a fine balance between high detonation performance and low sensitivity. We report a surprising energetic salt, hydroxylammonium 3-dinitromethanide-1,2,4-triazolone, that exhibits exceptional properties, viz., higher density, superior detonation performance, and improved thermal, impact, and friction stabilities, then those of its precursor, 3-dinitromethyl-1,2,4-triazolone. The solid-state structure features of the new energetic salt were investigated with X-ray diffraction which showed ?-stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions that contribute to closer packing and higher density. According to the experimental results and theoretical analysis, the newly designed energetic salt also gives rise to a workable compromise in high detonation properties and desirable stabilities. These findings will enhance the future prospects for rational energetic materials design and commence a new chapter in this field. PMID:25565429

Zhang, Jiaheng; Zhang, Qinghua; Vo, Thao T; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

2015-02-01

194

Synthetic Spectroscopic Models Related to Coenzymes and Base Pairs, VII. Stacking Interactions in tRNA; the „Bend” at Dimethylguanosine*†  

PubMed Central

We have examined the stacking interactions of N2-dimethyl-guanosine with the nucleosides, e.g., adenosine and cytidine, found adjacent to it in certain tRNA's, by the use of model compounds in which the trimethylene bridge was substituted for the ribose-phosphate-ribose linkage. From the hypochromism exhibited by synthetic 9-[3-(aden-9-yl)propyl]-2-dimethylaminopurine-6-one (IV) and by 9-[3-(cytos-1-yl)propyl]2-dimethylaminopurin-6-one in aqueous solution (VI) it is appearent that the interaction is at least as great between the N2-dimethylguanine moiety and adenine or cytosine as between guanine and these two bases. The fluorescence and phosphorescence emission spectra were obtained in ethylene glycol-water glass at 80°K. The exciplex fluorescence observed for both bi-molecules (IV and VI) containing the N2-dimethylguanine unit provides further evidence for stacked chromophores. PMID:5266146

Iwamura, Hajime; Leonard, Nelson J.; Eisinger, Josef

1970-01-01

195

Interaction between long period stacking order phase and deformation twin in rapidly solidified Mg 97Zn 1Y 2 alloy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interaction between long period stacking order (LPSO) phase and {1?0?1¯?2} deformation twin in rapidly solidified Mg97Zn1Y2 alloy is investigated. The densely developed LPSO phase prevents the growth of {1?0?1¯?2} deformation twin in Mg matrix. On the other hand, the LPSO phase with low density cannot be the resistance of the twinning. The trace of basal plane in such LPSO phase

M. Matsuda; S. Ii; Y. Kawamura; Y. Ikuhara; M. Nishida

2004-01-01

196

The collapse of stacking fault tetrahedra by interactions with gliding dislocations.  

SciTech Connect

The collapse of stacking-fault tetrahedra (SFT) by gliding dislocations was observed in in situ straining experiments in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). A stacking-fault tetrahedron was collapsed by intersection with a gliding perfect dislocation: only the base portion divided by the gliding plane of the dislocation annihilated, while the apex portion remained intact. As a result of analysis on evolution of atom configuration induced by intersection with perfect dislocation in SFT, it was found that an unusual atom configuration inevitably appeared in one of the ledges formed on stacking-fault planes, which is traditionally called I-ledge: the atoms on adjacent (111) planes were overlapping each other. The overlapping configuration provides a strong repulsive force, being a conceivable driving force to induce a chain reaction of atom displacements that collapses the SFT base portion.

Matsukawa, Yoshitaka [ORNL; Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL

2005-01-01

197

On ?-stacking, C-H/?, and halogen bonding interactions in halobenzene clusters: Resonant two-photon ionization studies of chlorobenzene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Noncovalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, ?-? stacking, CH/? interactions, and halogen bonding play crucial roles in a broad spectrum of chemical and biochemical processes, and can exist in cooperation or competition. Here we report studies of the homoclusters of chlorobenzene, a prototypical system where ?-? stacking, CH/? interactions, and halogen bonding interactions may all be present. The electronic spectra of chlorobenzene monomer and clusters (Clbz)n with n = 1-4 were obtained using resonant 2-photon ionization in the origin region of the S0-S1 (??*) state of the monomer. The cluster spectra show in all cases a broad spectrum whose center is redshifted from the monomer absorption. Electronic structure calculations aid in showing that the spectral broadening arises in large part from inhomogeneous sources, including the presence of multiple isomers and Franck-Condon (FC) activity associated with geometrical changes induced by electronic excitation. Calculations at the M06-2x/aug-cc-pVDZ level find in total five minimum energy structures for the dimer, four ?-stacked structures, and one T-shaped, and six representative minimum energy structures were found for the trimer. The calculated time-dependent density functional theory spectra using range-separated and meta-GGA hybrid functionals show that these isomers absorb over a range that is roughly consistent with the breadth of the experimental spectra, and the calculated absorptions are redshifted with respect to the monomer transition, in agreement with experiment. Due to the significant geometry change in the electronic transition, where for the dimer a transition from a parallel displaced to sandwich structure occurs with a reduced separation of the two monomers, significant FC activity is predicted in low frequency intermolecular modes.

Muzangwa, Lloyd; Nyambo, Silver; Uhler, Brandon; Reid, Scott A.

2012-11-01

198

The effect of stacking fault energy on interactions between an edge dislocation and a spherical void by molecular dynamics simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Molecular dynamics simulations were conducted using a set of six interatomic potentials for FCC metals that differed only in stacking fault energy (SFE), to clarify the effect of SFE on interactions between a dissociated edge dislocation and a void. There are two different types of interaction mechanism: separate depinning of the individual partial dislocations and almost simultaneous depinning of the combined partial dislocations. The interaction mechanism depends on both the SFE and void size, and changes the absolute value of the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) and its dependence on the SFE. In the separate depinning case, the CRSS is relatively low and is almost independent of the SFE, while in the simultaneous case, the CRSS is increases with SFE. The void size for which the change in interaction mechanism occurs increases with decreasing SFE.

Asari, K.; Hetland, O. S.; Fujita, S.; Itakura, M.; Okita, T.

2013-11-01

199

Measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle gamma in B+/--->D*K+/- decays with a Dalitz analysis of D-->K0(S)pi-pi+.  

PubMed

We report on a measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violating phase gamma through a Dalitz analysis of neutral D decays to K0(S)pi-pi+ in the processes B+/- -->D*K+/-, D*-->Dpi0, Dgamma. Using a sample of 227 x 10(6) BB pairs collected by the BABAR detector, we measure the amplitude ratios r(B)=0.12+/-0.03+/-0.04 and r*(B)=0.17+/-0.10+/-0.03+/-0.03, the relative strong phases delta(B)=(104+/-45(+17+16)(-21-24))degrees and delta*(B)=(-64+/-41(+14)(-12)+/-15) degrees between the amplitudes A(B- -->D*0K-) and A(B- -->D*0)K-), and gamma=(70+/-31(+12+14)(-10-11))degrees. The first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty, and the third reflects the Dalitz model uncertainty. The results for the strong and weak phases have a twofold ambiguity. PMID:16197065

Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J

2005-09-16

200

Benchmark Calculations for the Triton Binding Energy for Modern NN Forces and the pi-pi Exchange Three-Nucleon Force  

E-print Network

We present high precision benchmark calculations for the triton binding energy using the most recent, phase equivalent realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials and the Tuscon-Melbourne pi-pi three-nucleon force (3NF). That 3NF is included with partial waves up to a total two-body angular momentum of j_max=6. It is shown that the inclusion of the 3NF slows down the convergence in the partial waves and j_max=5 is needed in order to achieve converged results within a few keV. We adjust the cut-off parameter Lambda in the form factors of the Tuscon-Melbourne 3NF separately for the different NN potentials to the triton binding energy. This provides a set of phenomenological three-nucleon Hamiltonians which can be tested in three-nucleon scattering and systems with A>3. A connection between the probability to find two nucleons at short distances in the triton and the effect of that 3NF on the triton binding energy is pointed out.

A. Nogga; D. Hueber; H. Kamada; W. Gloeckle

1997-04-03

201

Effect of stacking interactions on the spectra of the monomer of PFBT: a theoretical study.  

PubMed

Conjugated polymers (CPs) contain one pi-conjugated backbone and functional groups that could be ionized in high dielectric media. These materials combine the semiconducting and photon harvesting properties of electronically delocalized polymers with the charge-mediated behavior of polyelectrolytes. CPs can be used as highly responsive optical sensors for chemical and biological targets. The density functional theory (DFT) and the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) approach were employed to simulate the absorption and emission spectra of poly[9,9'-bis(6''-N,N,N-trimethylammonium)hexyl]fluorene-co-alt-4,7-(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole) dibromide] (PFBT) in the present study. The influences on the spectra of the monomer unit F(BT)F due to stacking with the fluorene (F) and 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BT) units have been explored. The results suggest that stacking lowers the excitation and emission energy, facilitating detections of the polymers. PMID:19711936

Wang, Jing; Gu, Jiande; Leszczynski, Jerzy

2009-09-24

202

rho0(770)-f0(980) mixing and CPT violation in a non-unitary evolution of pion creation process pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n on polarized target  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unitary evolution from pure initial states to pure final states in pi(-)p-> pi(-)pi(+)n imposes constraints on pion production amplitudes that are violated by CERN data on polarized target at 17.2 GeV\\/c. The pion creation is a non-unitary process arising from a unitary co-evolution of the pion creation process with a quantum environment. The purpose of this work is to identify

Miloslav Svec

2007-01-01

203

Measurement of central exclusive pi+pi- production in p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 0.9 and 1.96 TeV at CDF  

E-print Network

We measure exclusive $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ production in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9 and 1.96 TeV in the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We select events with two oppositely-charged particles, assumed to be pions, with pseudorapidity $|\\eta| < 1.3$ and with no other particles detected in $|\\eta| < 5.9$. We require the \\pipi system to have rapidity $|y|<$ 1.0. The production mechanism of these events is expected to be dominated by double pomeron exchange, which constrains the quantum numbers of the central state. The data are potentially valuable for isoscalar meson spectroscopy, and for understanding the pomeron in a region of transition between nonperturbative and perturbative quantum chromodynamics. The data extend up to dipion mass $M(\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ = 5000 MeV/$c^2$, and show resonance structures attributed to $f_0$ and $f_2(1270)$ mesons. From the $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $K^+K^-$ spectra we place upper limits on exclusive $\\chi_{c0}(3415)$ production.

Aaltonen, T; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Marchese, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; D'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Ramos, J P Fernández; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; López, O González; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lontkovskyi, D; Lucà, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Makarenko, I; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Fernández, I Redondo; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; Denis, R St; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W -M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S; Zurek, M

2015-01-01

204

Bending and Base-Stacking Interactions in Double-Stranded Semiflexible Polymer  

E-print Network

Simple expressions for the bending and the base-stacking energy of double-stranded semiflexible biopolymers (such as DNA and actin) are derived. The distribution of the folding angle between the two strands is obtained by solving a Schr\\"{o}dinger equation variationally. Theoretical results based on this model on the extension versus force and extension versus degree of supercoiling relations of DNA chain are in good agreement with the experimental observations of Cluzel {\\it et al.} [Science {\\bf 271}, 792 (1996)], Smith {\\it et al.} [{\\it ibid.} {\\bf 271}, 795 (1996)], and Strick {\\it et al.} [{\\it ibid.} {\\bf 271}, 1835 (1996)].

Zhou Haijun; Ou-Yang Zhong-can

1998-11-10

205

Dalitz Plot Analysis of Ds+->pi+pi-pi+  

SciTech Connect

A Dalitz plot analysis of {approx} 13, 000 D{sub s}{sup +} decays to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} has been performed. A 384 fb{sup -1} data sample, recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring running at center of mass energies near 10.6 GeV, is used. Amplitudes and phases of the intermediate resonances which contribute to this final state are measured. A high precision measurement of the ratio: {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.199 {+-} 0.004 {+-} 0.006 is performed. Using a model independent partial wave analysis the amplitude and phase of the S-wave have been measured.

Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, R.N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2009-01-26

206

An Amplitude Analysis of the Decay B+- -> pi+- pi+- pi-+  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a Dalitz-plot analysis of charmless B{sup {+-}} decays to the final state {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} using 210 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by the BABAR experiment at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}) = (16.2 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(770){pi}{sup {+-}}) = (8.8 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.6{sub -0.7}{sup +0.1}) x 10{sup -6}. Measurements of branching fractions for the quasi-two-body decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(1450){pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(980){pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}} f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup {+-}} are also presented. They observe no charge asymmetries for the above modes, and there is no evidence for the decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} {chi}{sub c0}{pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(1370){pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {sigma}{pi}{sup {+-}}.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

2005-07-11

207

Destruction processes of large stacking fault tetrahedra induced by direct interaction with gliding dislocations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The destruction process of large non-truncated stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) induced by gliding dislocations was examined by in situ transmission electron microscope straining experiments. Three different destruction processes were observed: a triangular Frank loop remained after the collapse (Type 1), the whole SFT was incorporated into a gliding dislocation as multiple super jog segments (Type 2), and an apex portion of the original SFT remained as a smaller SFT while the base portion was annihilated (Type 3). The remnants of Type 1 and 2 destruction processes were similar to those of previous models proposed by Kimura, indicating that these processes are based on dislocation reactions as assumed in Kimura models. On contrary, the Type 3 process, which was entirely different from Kimura models, is occasionally accompanied by vacancy migration.

Matsukawa, Y.; Osetsky, Yu. N.; Stoller, R. E.; Zinkle, S. J.

2006-06-01

208

Stacking Interactions between Carbohydrate and Protein Quantified by Combination of Theoretical and Experimental Methods  

PubMed Central

Carbohydrate – receptor interactions are an integral part of biological events. They play an important role in many cellular processes, such as cell-cell adhesion, cell differentiation and in-cell signaling. Carbohydrates can interact with a receptor by using several types of intermolecular interactions. One of the most important is the interaction of a carbohydrate's apolar part with aromatic amino acid residues, known as dispersion interaction or CH/? interaction. In the study presented here, we attempted for the first time to quantify how the CH/? interaction contributes to a more general carbohydrate - protein interaction. We used a combined experimental approach, creating single and double point mutants with high level computational methods, and applied both to Ralstonia solanacearum (RSL) lectin complexes with ?-l-Me-fucoside. Experimentally measured binding affinities were compared with computed carbohydrate-aromatic amino acid residue interaction energies. Experimental binding affinities for the RSL wild type, phenylalanine and alanine mutants were ?8.5, ?7.1 and ?4.1 kcal.mol?1, respectively. These affinities agree with the computed dispersion interaction energy between carbohydrate and aromatic amino acid residues for RSL wild type and phenylalanine, with values ?8.8, ?7.9 kcal.mol?1, excluding the alanine mutant where the interaction energy was ?0.9 kcal.mol?1. Molecular dynamics simulations show that discrepancy can be caused by creation of a new hydrogen bond between the ?-l-Me-fucoside and RSL. Observed results suggest that in this and similar cases the carbohydrate-receptor interaction can be driven mainly by a dispersion interaction. PMID:23056230

Ne?asová, Ivona; Mishra, Sushil Kumar; Komárek, Jan; Ko?a, Jaroslav

2012-01-01

209

Gene Stacking  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a A small but increasing proportion of genetically modified crops harbour two or more novel traits due to ‘stacked’ transgenes.\\u000a A variety of methods can be used to achieve stacking, albeit with limitations. Transgene stacking can potentially widen the\\u000a scope of current plant genetic manipulation to allow whole new biochemical pathways to be introduced into plants, or to overcome\\u000a a range

E. Douglas; C. Halpin

210

Measurement of cosf 2beta in B0-->D(*)h0 Decays with a Time-Dependent Dalitz Plot Analysis of D-->Ks0pi+pi-  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the time-dependent Dalitz plot of D-->KS0pi+pi- in B0-->D(*)h0 decays, where h0 is a pi0, eta, eta', or omega meson and D*-->Dpi0, using a data sample of 383×106 Upsilon(4S)-->BB¯ decays collected with the BABAR detector. We determine cosf 2beta=0.42±0.49±0.09±0.13, sinf 2beta=0.29±0.34±0.03±0.05, and |lambda|=1.01±0.08±0.02, where the first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty, and the third,

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; D. Bailey; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; Y. Zheng; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni

2007-01-01

211

Evidence of a broad structure at an invariant mass of 4.32 GeV/c2 in the reaction e+e- --> pi+pi-psi(2S) measured at BABAR.  

PubMed

We present a measurement of the cross section of the process e(+)e(-)-->pi(+)pi(-)psi(2S) from threshold up to 8 GeV center-of-mass energy using events containing initial-state radiation, produced at the SLAC PEP-II e(+)e(-) storage rings. The study is based on 298 fb(-1) of data recorded with the BABAR detector. A structure is observed in the cross section not far above threshold, near 4.32 GeV. We also investigate the compatibility of this structure with the Y(4260) previously reported by this experiment. PMID:17677767

Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; Briand, H; David, P

2007-05-25

212

SYNTHETIC SPECTROSCOPIC MODELS RELATED TO COENZYMES AND BASE PAIRS, IV. STACKING INTERACTIONS IN TRNA; THE ANTICODON-ADJACENT BASE*  

PubMed Central

In order to test the Fuller and Hodgson hypothesis that modification of the anticodon-adjacent base in certain tRNA's not only prevents mRNA base-pairing at that site but also increases the stabilization of a stacked conformation in the anticodon loop, we have examined the interaction between adenosine and its N6-isopentenyl derivative by means of model compounds. The synthetic 9-[3-(aden-9-yl)propyl]-6-(3-methyl-2-butenylamino)purine, Ad-C3-iPAd (IV), in which the adenine and N6-substituted adenine moieties are joined at the 9 and 9? positions by a trimethylene chain, served as a useful spectroscopic model for assessing the base-base interaction free from the complicating features of the carbohydrate and phosphodiester groupings. The hypochromism for the model, which was determined in dilute aqueous solution and represents the decrease in integrated ultraviolet absorption intensity of Ad-C3-iPAd (IV) compared with equimolar 9-propyladenine (Ad-C3) and 6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl-amino)-9-propylpurine (V, iPAd-C3), was 17.9 per cent in neutral solution, 8.4 per cent in 0.1 N HCl, and 18.5 per cent in 0.1 N NaOH. Comparison with the per cent hypochromism calculated for the simple model Ad-C3-Ad (e.g., 16.5% in neutral solution) confirms the strong interaction in IV observed between uncharged plane-parallel adenine and N6-substituted adenine rings. The cause for changes in the absorption spectrum of Ad-C3-iPAd are discussed. The fluorescence and phosphorescence emission spectra of Ad-C3-iPAd in ethylene glycol-water glass at 80°K add considerable weight to the conclusion that there is a strong tendency for adenine and N6-(?2-isopentenyl)adenosine (I) to stack if this is permitted by steric considerations. PMID:5263017

Leonard, Nelson J.; Iwamura, Hajime; Eisinger, Josef

1969-01-01

213

Algebraic stacks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is an expository article on the theory of algebraic stacks. After introducing the general theory, we concentrate in the\\u000a example of the moduli stack of vector bundles, giving a detailed comparison with the moduli scheme obtained via geometric\\u000a invariant theory.

Tomás L Gómez

2001-01-01

214

Stacked generalization  

Microsoft Academic Search

: This paper introduces stacked generalization, a scheme for minimizing the generalizationerror rate of one or more generalizers. Stacked generalization works by deducing the biases of thegeneralizer(s) with respect to a provided learning set. This deduction proceeds by generalizing ina second space whose inputs are (for example) the guesses of the original generalizers when taughtwith part of the learning set

David H. Wolpert

1992-01-01

215

Synergetics of the interaction of mobile and immobile dislocations in the formation of dislocation structures in a shock wave. Effect of the stacking fault energy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A kinetic equation for the density of dislocations, which reflects the main stages of the formation of dislocation structures of different types in a shock wave, has been formulated based on the analysis of the interaction of two kinetic processes described by reaction-diffusion type equations for densities of mobile dislocations and dislocations forming immobile dipoles, respectively. It has been shown that an inhomogeneous (cellular) dislocation structure is formed at relatively low pressures behind the front of a shock wave, whereas a uniform distribution of the dislocation density with stacking faults appears at high pressures. The transition from a cellular dislocation density distribution to a uniformly distributed dislocations with stacking faults depends on the stacking fault energy ? D of the metal: the lower is the stacking fault energy, the lower is the pressure in the shock wave ? c at which the cellular dislocation structure transforms into the structure with a uniform dislocation density distribution. It has been found that the dependence of the critical pressure on the stacking fault energy ? D is described by the law ? c ˜ (? D /? b)2/3 (where ? is the shear modulus and b is the Burgers vector), which is confirmed in the experiment.

Malygin, G. A.; Ogarkov, S. L.; Andriyash, A. V.

2015-01-01

216

Simultaneous observations of aerosol-cloud-albedo interactions with three stacked unmanned aerial vehicles.  

PubMed

Aerosol impacts on climate change are still poorly understood, in part, because the few observations and methods for detecting their effects are not well established. For the first time, the enhancement in cloud albedo is directly measured on a cloud-by-cloud basis and linked to increasing aerosol concentrations by using multiple autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles to simultaneously observe the cloud microphysics, vertical aerosol distribution, and associated solar radiative fluxes. In the presence of long-range transport of dust and anthropogenic pollution, the trade cumuli have higher droplet concentrations and are on average brighter. Our observations suggest a higher sensitivity of radiative forcing by trade cumuli to increases in cloud droplet concentrations than previously reported owing to a constrained droplet radius such that increases in droplet concentrations also increase cloud liquid water content. This aerosol-cloud forcing efficiency is as much as -60 W m(-2) per 100% percent cloud fraction for a doubling of droplet concentrations and associated increase of liquid water content. Finally, we develop a strategy for detecting aerosol-cloud interactions based on a nondimensional scaling analysis that relates the contribution of single clouds to albedo measurements and illustrates the significance of characterizing cloud morphology in resolving radiometric measurements. This study demonstrates that aerosol-cloud-albedo interactions can be directly observed by simultaneous observations below, in, and above the clouds. PMID:18499803

Roberts, G C; Ramana, M V; Corrigan, C; Kim, D; Ramanathan, V

2008-05-27

217

Effect of stacking interactions on the thermodynamics and kinetics of lumiflavin: a study with improved density functionals and density functional tight-binding protocol.  

PubMed

The ?-? stacking interaction between lumiflavin and a number of ?-electron-rich molecules has been studied by density functional theory using several new-generation density functionals. Six known lumiflavin-aromatic adducts were used and the models were evaluated by comparing the geometry and energetics with experimental results. The study found that dispersion-corrected and hybrid functionals with larger (>50%) Hartree-Fock exchanges produced superior results in modeling thermodynamic characteristics of these complexes. The functional producing the best energetics for these model systems was used to study the stacking interactions of lumiflavin with biologically relevant aromatic groups. Additionally, the reduction of flavin-in the presence of both a hydride donor and a nondonor ?-electronic system was also studied. Weak interactions were observed in the stacked lumiflavin complexes of benzene, phenol, and indole, mimicking phenyl alanine, tryptophan, and tyrosine side chains, respectively, of an enzyme. The stacked complex of naphthalene and flavin showed little change in flavin's redox potential indicating insignificant effect on the thermodynamics of the hydride transfer reaction. In contrast, the hydride transfer reaction with the hydride donor N-methyl nicotinamide tells a different story, as the transition state was found to be strongly impacted by the stacking interactions. A comparison of performance between the density functional theory (DFT) and the computationally less expensive dispersion-corrected self-consistent density functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB-D) theory revealed that the latter produces consistent energetics for this hydride transfer reaction and additional DFT-computed perturbative corrections could significantly improve these results. PMID:25490119

Bresnahan, Caitlin G; Reinhardt, Clorice R; Bartholow, Thomas G; Rumpel, John P; North, Michael; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

2015-01-01

218

The nature of the $Z_b$ states from a combined analysis of $\\Upsilon(5S)\\rightarrow h_b(mP) \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ and $\\Upsilon(5S)\\rightarrow B^{(\\ast)}\\bar B^{(\\ast)}\\pi$  

E-print Network

With a combined analysis of the data on $\\Upsilon(5S)\\rightarrow h_b(1P,2P)\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $\\Upsilon(5S)\\rightarrow B^{(\\ast)}\\bar B^{(\\ast)}\\pi$ in an effective field theory approach, we determine the masses and widths of the $Z_b$ states in two scenarios. In one scenario we assume that the $Z_b$ states are pure molecular states, while in the other one we assume that the $Z_b$ states contain a compact component. We find that the present data favor that there should be some compact components inside $Z_b^{(\\prime)}$ in association with the molecular components. By fitting the invariant mass spectra of $\\Upsilon(5S)\\rightarrow h_b(1P,2P)\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $\\Upsilon(5S)\\rightarrow B^{(\\ast)}\\bar B^{\\ast}\\pi$, we determine that the probability of finding the compact components in the $Z_b$ states can be as large as about $40\\%$.

Huo, Wen-Sheng

2015-01-01

219

Dalitz Plot Analyses of B- to D+ Pi- Pi-, B+ to Pi+ Pi- Pi+ and D(S)+ to Pi+ Pi- Pi+ at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

We report on the Dalitz plot analyses of B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{sup +}. The Dalitz plot method and the most recent BABAR results are discussed.

Dong, Liaoyuan; /Iowa State U.

2012-04-10

220

Heteroaromatic ?-Stacking Energy Landscapes  

PubMed Central

In this study we investigate ?-stacking interactions of a variety of aromatic heterocycles with benzene using dispersion corrected density functional theory. We calculate extensive potential energy surfaces for parallel-displaced interaction geometries. We find that dispersion contributes significantly to the interaction energy and is complemented by a varying degree of electrostatic interactions. We identify geometric preferences and minimum interaction energies for a set of 13 5- and 6-membered aromatic heterocycles frequently encountered in small drug-like molecules. We demonstrate that the electrostatic properties of these systems are a key determinant for their orientational preferences. The results of this study can be applied in lead optimization for the improvement of stacking interactions, as it provides detailed energy landscapes for a wide range of coplanar heteroaromatic geometries. These energy landscapes can serve as a guide for ring replacement in structure-based drug design. PMID:24773380

2014-01-01

221

Measurement of cos2beta in B;{0}-->D;{(*)}h;{0} decays with a time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis of D-->K_{s};{0}pi;{+}pi;{-}.  

PubMed

We study the time-dependent Dalitz plot of D-->K_{S};{0}pi;{+}pi;{-} in B;{0}-->D;{(*)}h;{0} decays, where h;{0} is a pi;{0}, eta, eta;{'}, or omega meson and D;{*}-->Dpi;{0}, using a data sample of 383x10;{6} Upsilon(4S)-->BB[over ] decays collected with the BABAR detector. We determine cos2beta=0.42+/-0.49+/-0.09+/-0.13, sin2beta=0.29+/-0.34+/-0.03+/-0.05, and |lambda|=1.01+/-0.08+/-0.02, where the first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty, and the third, where given, is the Dalitz model uncertainty. Assuming the world average value for sin2beta and |lambda|=1, cos2beta>0 is preferred over cos2beta<0 at 86% confidence level. PMID:18233357

Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Vazquez, W Panduro; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Bailey, D; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N

2007-12-01

222

Measurements of the branching fractions of B0-->K*0K+K-, B0-->K*0pi+K-, B0-->K*0K+pi-, and B0-->K*0pi+pi-  

Microsoft Academic Search

Branching fraction measurements of charmless B0-->K*0h1+h2- (h1,2=K, pi) decays are presented, using a data sample of 383×106 Upsilon(4S)-->BB¯ decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B-meson factory at SLAC. The results are B(B0-->K*0K+K-)=(27.5±1.3±2.2)×10-6, B(B0-->K*0pi+K-)=(4.6±1.1±0.8)×10-6, and B(B0-->K*0pi+pi-)=(54.5±2.9±4.3)×10-6. The first errors quoted are statistical and the second are systematic. An upper limit is set for B(B0-->K*0K+pi-)<2.2×10-6 at 90% confidence

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; D. Bailey; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; Y. Zheng; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli

2007-01-01

223

Stacking Up  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Chimneys and stacks appear to be strong and indestructible, but chimneys begin to deteriorate from the moment they are built. Early on, no signs are apparent; but deterioration accelerates in subsequent years, and major repairs are soon needed instead of minor maintenance. With proper attention, most structures can be repaired and continue to…

Naylor, Jim

2005-01-01

224

CP violation and CPT invariance in B+- decays with final state interactions  

E-print Network

We show that, besides the usual short distance contribution for CP violation, final state interactions together with CPT invariance can play an important role in the recent observation of CP violation in three-body charmless $B^\\pm$ decays. A significant part of the observed CP asymmetry distribution in the Dalitz plot is located in a region where hadronic channels are strongly coupled. We illustrate our discussion comparing the recent observation of CP violation in the $B^\\pm\\to K^\\pm K^+ K^-$ and $B^\\pm\\to K^\\pm \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ phase space, with a calculation based on $\\pi\\pi\\to KK$ scattering.

I. Bediaga; T. Frederico; O. Lourenço

2014-05-05

225

Application of diffusion Monte Carlo to materials dominated by van der Waals interactions  

SciTech Connect

Van der Waals forces are notoriously difficult to account for from first principles. We perform extensive calculation to assess the usefulness and validity of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo when applied to van der Waals forces. We present results for noble gas solids and clusters - archetypical van der Waals dominated assemblies, as well as a relevant pi-pi stacking supramolecular complex: DNA + intercalating anti-cancer drug Ellipticine.

Benali, Anouar [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Shulenburger, Luke [Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); Romero, Nichols [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kim, Jeongnim [ORNL; Von Lilienfeld, Anatole [University of Basel

2014-01-01

226

Constraints on the CKM angle gamma in B[superscript 0]-->D[over-bar][superscript 0]K[superscript *0] and B[superscript 0]-->D[superscript 0]K[superscript *0] from a Dalitz analysis of D[superscript 0] and D[over-bar][superscript 0] decays to K[subscript S] pi+ pi-  

E-print Network

We present constraints on the angle gamma of the unitarity triangle with a Dalitz analysis of neutral D decays to K[subscript S]pi+pi- from the processes B0-->D[over-bar] 0K*0 (B[over-bar] 0-->D0K[over-bar] *0) and ...

Yamamoto, R. K.

227

Pressure-Induced Phase Transitions in Ammonium Squarate: A Supramolecular Structure Based on Hydrogen-Bonding and [pi]-Stacking Interactions  

SciTech Connect

We report the results of high-pressure Raman and X-ray diffraction measurements performed on ammonium squarate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}C{sub 4}O{sub 4}, AS), a representative supramolecular architecture based on hydrogen bonding and {pi}-stacking interactions, at various pressures up to 19 GPa. Two phase transitions at 2.7 GPa and in the pressure range of 11.1-13.6 GPa were observed. Both Raman and XRD results provide convincing evidence for these two phase transitions. The first phase transition is attributed to the rearrangements of hydrogen-bonding networks, resulting in the symmetry transformation from P2{sub 1}/c to P1. The second one, which is identified as an order-disorder phase transition, arises from significant modifications of squarate rings and random orientations of NH{sub 4}{sup +} cations. The cooperative effects between hydrogen-bonding and {pi}-stacking interactions, as well as mechanisms for the phase transitions, are discussed by virtue of the local structure of AS.

Li, Shourui; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Mi; Li, Qian; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo (Jilin)

2012-02-06

228

Branching fractions and CP asymmetries in B0-->pi0pi0, B+-->pi+pi0, and B+-->K+pi0 decays and isospin analysis of the B-->pipi system.  

PubMed

Based on a sample of 227 x 10(6) BB pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, we measure the branching fraction B(B0-->pi(0)pi(0))=(1.17+/-0.32+/-0.10)x10(-6), and the asymmetry Cpi(0)(pi(0))=-0.12+/-0.56+/-0.06. The B0-->pi(0)pi(0) signal has a significance of 5.0 sigma. We also measure B(B+-->pi(+)pi(0))=(5.8+/-0.6+/-0.4)x10(-6), B(B+-->K+pi(0))=(12.0+/-0.7+/-0.6)x10(-6), and the charge asymmetries Api(+)(pi(0))=-0.01+/-0.10+/-0.02 and AK+(pi(0))=0.06+/-0.06+/-0.01. Using isospin relations, we find an upper bound on the angle difference |alpha-alpha(eff)| of 35 degrees at the 90% C.L. PMID:15904359

Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J

2005-05-13

229

Homochiral, helical supramolecular metal-organic frameworks organized by strong ? · · · ? stacking interactions: single-crystal to single-crystal transformations in closely packed solids.  

PubMed

Enantiopure, trifunctional carboxylate ligands synthesized by linking the strong ? · · · ? stacking 1,8-naphthalimide supramolecular synthon to three naturally occurring amino acids using the azide/alkyne click reaction have been prepared [amino acid = glycine (L(gly)(-)), alanine (L(ala)(-)), and serine (L(ser)(-))]. These ligands have been used to form complexes of the formula [M(L(amino acid))2(4,4'-bipy)(H2O)2] · xH2O (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn; x = 4.25-5.52) when mixed with an appropriate metal salt and 4,4'-bipyridine by layering methods. These complexes are isostructural, with the central metal atom coordinated to two ?(1)-carboxylate ligands, two water molecules, and one end each of two 4,4'-bipyridine ligands in a distorted octahedral environment. Each ligand is oriented in a trans arrangement. These complexes all have homochiral, helical, supramolecular, three-dimensional metal-organic framework structures, with the helical organization of the individual metallic units held together solely by strong, noncovalent ? · · · ? stacking interactions of the naphthalimide; the other two dimensions are organized mainly by the bipyridine ligands. The helices are extremely large; one turn of the helix travels ? 60 Å and has a diameter of ca. 40 Å. For the achiral ligand L(gly)(-), the nickel complex forms two types of homochiral crystals in the same tube, a clear example of spontaneous resolution. Despite the large size of the individual helices, they are tightly interconnected and nestled closely together. Part of the interconnection comes from the interstitial water molecules held inside the framework of the complexes in isolated pockets by hydrogen-bonding interactions. For both [Cu(L(ala))2(4,4'-bipy)(H2O)2] · 4.25H2O and [Co(L(ser))2(4,4'-bipy)(H2O)2] · 4.68H2O, the interstitial water molecules can be removed by placing the crystals under a vacuum for several hours, a process that can be reversed by exposure to atmospheric moisture. This removal/reintroduction of the interstitial water molecules takes place with no loss of crystallinity, representing dramatic examples of single-crystal to single-crystal transformations. The structures undergo little change other than the pockets holding the interstitial water molecules in the hydrated complexes become void spaces in the dehydrated complexes. The removal/reintroduction of the water molecules in these closely packed solids is facilitated by the "soft" ? · · · ? stacking interactions organizing one dimension of the structures. The observed magnetic and Mössbauer spectral properties are typical of isolated, magnetically dilute, paramagnetic pseudooctahedral divalent transition-metal complexes. PMID:21141941

Reger, Daniel L; Horger, Jacob J; Smith, Mark D; Long, Gary J; Grandjean, Fernande

2011-01-17

230

[Structural and functional bases of the intermolecular interaction of calix[4]arene C-97 with myosin subfragment-1 of myometrium].  

PubMed

Calix[4]arene C-97 (code is shown) is the macrocyclic compound which has lipophilic intramolecular higly-structured cavity formed by four aromatic cycles, one of which on the upper rim is modified by methylene bisphosphonic group. It was shown that calix[4]arene C-97 (100 microM) efficiently inhibits ATPase activity of myosin subfragment-1 from pig myometrium, the inhibition coefficient I(0.5) being 83 +/- 7 microM. At the same time, this compound at 100 microM concentration significantly increases the effective hydrodynamic diameter of myosin subfragment-1, that may be indicative of intermolecular complexation between the calix[4]arene and myosin head. Computer simulation methods (docking, molecular dynamics, involving the Grid) have been used to clarify structural basis of the intermolecular interaction of calix[4]arene C-97 with myosin subfragment-1 of the myometrium; participation of hydrophobic, electrostatic and pi-pi (stacking) interactions between calix[4]arene C-97 and amino acid residues of myosin subfragment-1, some of them being located near the active site of the ATPase has been found out. PMID:22679756

Labyntseva, R D; Bevza, A A; Bevza, O V; Cherenok, S O; Kal'chenko, V I; Kosterin, S O

2012-01-01

231

Intermolecular interactions between imidazole derivatives intercalated in layered solids. Substituent group effect  

SciTech Connect

This study sheds light on the intermolecular interactions between imidazole derive molecules (2-methyl-imidazole, 2-ethyl-imidazole and benzimidazole) intercalated in T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layers to form a solid of formula unit T(ImD){sub 2}[Ni(CN){sub 4}]. These hybrid inorganic–organic solids were prepared by soft chemical routes and their crystal structures solved and refined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The involved imidazole derivative molecules were found coordinated through the pyridinic N atom to the axial positions for the metal T in the T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layer. In the interlayers region ligand molecules from neighboring layers remain stacked in a face-to-face configuration through dipole–dipole and quadrupole–quadrupole interactions. These intermolecular interactions show a pronounced dependence on the substituent group and are responsible for an ImD-pillaring concatenation of adjacent layers. This is supported by the structural information and the recorded magnetic data in the 2–300 K temperature range. The samples containing Co and Ni are characterized by presence of spin–orbit coupling and pronounced temperature dependence for the effective magnetic moment except for 2-ethyl-imidazole related to the local distortion for the metal coordination environment. For this last one ligand a weak ferromagnetic ordering ascribed to a super-exchange interaction between T metals from neighboring layers through the ligands ?–? interaction was detected. - Graphical abstract: In the interlayers region imidazole derivative molecules are oriented according to their dipolar and quadrupolar interactions and minimizing the steric impediment. Highlights: • Imidazole derivatives intercalation compounds. • Intermolecular interaction between intercalated imidazole derivatives. • Hybrid inorganic–organic solids. • Pi–pi interactions and ferromagnetic coupling. • Dipolar and quadrupolar interactions between intercalated imidazole derivatives.

González, M.; Lemus-Santana, A.A. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico); Rodríguez-Hernández, J. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico); Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales, Universidad de La Habana, Havana (Cuba); Aguirre-Velez, C.I. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico); Knobel, M. [Institute of Physics “Gleb Wataghin”, UNICAMP, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Reguera, E., E-mail: edilso.reguera@gmail.com [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico)

2013-08-15

232

A Survey of Aspartate-Phenylalanine and Glutamate-Phenylalanine Interactions in the Protein Data Bank: Searching for Anion-pi Pairs  

SciTech Connect

Protein structures are stabilized using noncovalent interactions. In addition to the traditional noncovalent interactions, newer types of interactions are thought to be present in proteins. One such interaction, an anion-{pi} pair, in which the positively charged edge of an aromatic ring interacts with an anion, forming a favorable anion-quadrupole interaction, has been previously proposed [Jackson, M. R., et al. (2007) J. Phys. Chem. B111, 8242-8249]. To study the role of anion-{pi} interactions in stabilizing protein structure, we analyzed pairwise interactions between phenylalanine (Phe) and the anionic amino acids, aspartate (Asp) and glutamate (Glu). Particular emphasis was focused on identification of Phe-Asp or -Glu pairs separated by less than 7 {angstrom} in the high-resolution, nonredundant Protein Data Bank. Simplifying Phe to benzene and Asp or Glu to formate molecules facilitated in silico analysis of the pairs. Kitaura-Morokuma energy calculations were performed on roughly 19000 benzene-formate pairs and the resulting energies analyzed as a function of distance and angle. Edgewise interactions typically produced strongly stabilizing interaction energies (-2 to -7.3 kcal/mol), while interactions involving the ring face resulted in weakly stabilizing to repulsive interaction energies. The strongest, most stabilizing interactions were identified as preferentially occurring in buried residues. Anion-{pi} pairs are found throughout protein structures, in helices as well as {beta} strands. Numerous pairs also had nearby cation-{pi} interactions as well as potential {pi}-{pi} stacking. While more than 1000 structures did not contain an anion-{pi} pair, the 3134 remaining structures contained approximately 2.6 anion-{pi} pairs per protein, suggesting it is a reasonably common motif that could contribute to the overall structural stability of a protein.

Philip, Vivek M [ORNL; Harris, Jason B [ORNL; Adams, Rachel M [ORNL; Nguyen, Don [University of Tennessee; Spiers, Jeremy D [ORNL; Baudry, Jerome Y [ORNL; Howell, Elizabeth E [ORNL; Hinde, Robert J [ORNL

2011-01-01

233

Recognition of O6-benzyl-2?-deoxyguanosine by a perimidinone-derived synthetic nucleoside: a DNA interstrand stacking interaction  

PubMed Central

The 2?-deoxynucleoside containing the synthetic base 1-[(2R,4S,5R)-4-hydroxy-5-(hydroxymethyl)-tetrahydrofuran-2-yl)-1H-perimidin-2(3H)-one] (dPer) recognizes in DNA the O6-benzyl-2?-deoxyguanosine nucleoside (O6-Bn-dG), formed by exposure to N-benzylmethylnitrosamine. Herein, we show how dPer distinguishes between O6-Bn-dG and dG in DNA. The structure of the modified Dickerson–Drew dodecamer (DDD) in which guanine at position G4 has been replaced by O6-Bn-dG and cytosine C9 has been replaced with dPer to form the modified O6-Bn-dG:dPer (DDD-XY) duplex [5?-d(C1G2C3X4A5A6T7T8Y9G10C11G12)-3?]2 (X = O6-Bn-dG, Y = dPer) reveals that dPer intercalates into the duplex and adopts the syn conformation about the glycosyl bond. This provides a binding pocket that allows the benzyl group of O6-Bn-dG to intercalate between Per and thymine of the 3?-neighbor A:T base pair. Nuclear magnetic resonance data suggest that a similar intercalative recognition mechanism applies in this sequence in solution. However, in solution, the benzyl ring of O6-Bn-dG undergoes rotation on the nuclear magnetic resonance time scale. In contrast, the structure of the modified DDD in which cytosine at position C9 is replaced with dPer to form the dG:dPer (DDD-GY) [5?-d(C1G2C3G4A5A6T7T8Y9G10C11G12)-3?]2 duplex (Y = dPer) reveals that dPer adopts the anti conformation about the glycosyl bond and forms a less stable wobble pairing interaction with guanine. PMID:23748954

Kowal, Ewa A.; Lad, Rahul R.; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Dhummakupt, Elizabeth; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Egli, Martin; Sturla, Shana J.; Stone, Michael P.

2013-01-01

234

Fifty years of stacking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Common-Mid-Point (CMP) stacking is a major process to enhance signal-to-noise ratio in seismic data. Since its appearance fifty years ago, CMP stacking has gone through different phases of prosperity and negligence within the geophysical community. During those times, CMP stacking developed from a simple process of averaging into a sophisticated process that involves complicated mathematics and state-of-the-art computation. This article summarizes the basic principles, assumptions, and violations related to the CMP stacking technique, presents a historical overview on the development stages of CMP stacking, and discusses its future potentiality.

Rashed, Mohamed

2014-06-01

235

Stacking with stochastic cooling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accumulation of large stacks of antiprotons or ions with the aid of stochastic cooling is more delicate than cooling a constant intensity beam. Basically the difficulty stems from the fact that the optimized gain and the cooling rate are inversely proportional to the number of particles 'seen' by the cooling system. Therefore, to maintain fast stacking, the newly injected batch has to be strongly 'protected' from the Schottky noise of the stack. Vice versa the stack has to be efficiently 'shielded' against the high gain cooling system for the injected beam. In the antiproton accumulators with stacking ratios up to 10 5 the problem is solved by radial separation of the injection and the stack orbits in a region of large dispersion. An array of several tapered cooling systems with a matched gain profile provides a continuous particle flux towards the high-density stack core. Shielding of the different systems from each other is obtained both through the spatial separation and via the revolution frequencies (filters). In the ' old AA', where the antiproton collection and stacking was done in one single ring, the injected beam was further shielded during cooling by means of a movable shutter. The complexity of these systems is very high. For more modest stacking ratios, one might use azimuthal rather than radial separation of stack and injected beam. Schematically half of the circumference would be used to accept and cool new beam and the remainder to house the stack. Fast gating is then required between the high gain cooling of the injected beam and the low gain stack cooling. RF-gymnastics are used to merge the pre-cooled batch with the stack, to re-create free space for the next injection, and to capture the new batch. This scheme is less demanding for the storage ring lattice, but at the expense of some reduction in stacking rate. The talk reviews the 'radial' separation schemes and also gives some considerations to the 'azimuthal' schemes.

Caspers, Fritz; Möhl, Dieter

2004-10-01

236

Molecular dynamics and thermodynamics of protein-RNA interactions: mutation of a conserved aromatic residue modifies stacking interactions and structural adaptation in the U1A-stem loop 2 RNA complex.  

PubMed

Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and free energy component analysis have been performed to evaluate the molecular origins of the 5.5 kcal/mol destabilization of the complex formed between the N-terminal RNP domain of U1A and stem loop 2 of U1 snRNA upon mutation of a conserved aromatic residue, Phe56, to Ala. MD simulations, including counterions and water, have been carried out on the wild type and Phe56Ala peptide-stem loop 2 RNA complexes, the free wild type and Phe56Ala peptides, and the free stem loop 2 RNA. The MD structure of the Phe56Ala-stem loop 2 complex is similar to that of the wild type complex except the stacking interaction between Phe56 and A6 of stem loop 2 is absent and loop 3 of the peptide is more dynamic. However, the MD simulations predict large changes in the structure and dynamics of helix C and increased dynamic range of loop 3 for the free Phe56Ala peptide compared to the wild type peptide. Since helix C and loop 3 are highly variable regions of RNP domains, this indicates that a significant contribution to the reduced affinity of the Phe56Ala peptide for RNA results from cooperation between highly conserved and highly variable regions of the RNP domain of U1A. Surprisingly, these structural effects, which are manifested as cooperative free energy changes, occur in the free peptide, rather than in the complex, and are revealed only by study of both the initial and final states of the complexation process. Free energy component analysis correctly accounts for the destabilization of the Phe56Ala-stem loop 2 complex, and indicates that approximately 80% of the destabilization is due to the loss of the stacking interaction and approximately 20% is due to differences in U1A adaptation. PMID:11456923

Blakaj, D M; McConnell, K J; Beveridge, D L; Baranger, A M

2001-03-21

237

VOLUME 82, NUMBER 22 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 31 MAY 1999 Bending and Base-Stacking Interactions in Double-Stranded DNA  

E-print Network

VOLUME 82, NUMBER 22 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 31 MAY 1999 Bending and Base-Stacking Interactions in Double-Stranded DNA Zhou Haijun,1,2, * Zhang Yang,1 and Ou-Yang Zhong-can1,3 1 Institute, Beijing 100084, China (Received 13 October 1998) An elastic model for double-stranded polymers

Zhang, Yang

238

An aromatic stacking interaction between subunits helps mediate DNA sequence specificity: operator site discrimination by phage lambda cI repressor.  

PubMed

Sequence specific DNA binding by regulatory proteins provides the basis for regulation of initiation of transcription. A great deal of progress has been made toward understanding sequence specific recognition by individual protein subunits. An additional level of control that needs to be understood is that due to coupling between the subunits of oligomeric regulatory proteins. An example is the bacteriophage lambda cI repressor, a dimeric protein that regulates the lysogenic to lytic genetic switch of the phage. Two levels of specificity are critical to this regulation. First, like all transcriptional regulators, dimers distinguish operator from nonspecific DNA. Direct readout of the DNA sequence by the recognition helix is considered the well understood mechanism for this. However, differential affinity for O(R)1, O(R)2 and O(R)3 is equally critical to the switch because it mediates opposing regulation of divergent promoters. Site specificity at this second level is less well understood. Conformational adaptation by both the repressor and the different operators appears to be important. To evaluate how subunit-subunit interactions are involved in this process, we investigated the effects on both dimer stability and operator binding of amino acid substitutions at the contacts between the symmetrically related helices-5 in the dimer interface. Substitutions for Tyr88 alter dimer stability and greatly perturb differential operator affinity, but generally do not affect operator versus non-operator specificity. The pattern of these effects suggests that the geometry of the face-to-face aromatic stacking interaction between symmetrically related Tyr88 in each subunit, a group in the dimer interface but far removed from the DNA binding interface, plays a critical role in operator discrimination. Conformational changes in the tertiary structure of the subunits appears to be involved. By contrast, the significant effect of I84S substitution is to greatly decrease affinity for all three operators. Presumably, the altered packing of the dimer interface causes a quarternary structural change that moves the two helix-turn-helix motifs out of register with successive DNA major grooves. PMID:9096234

Huang, Y T; Rusinova, E; Ross, J B; Senear, D F

1997-03-28

239

The effect of pi-stacking, h-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine-adenine, thymine-thymine and adenine-thymine dimers  

SciTech Connect

A combined theoretical and experimental study of the ionized dimers of thymine and adenine, TT, AA, and AT, is presented. Adiabatic and vertical ionization energies(IEs) for monomers and dimers as well as thresholds for the appearance of the protonated species are reported and analyzed. Non-covalent interactions stronglyaffect the observed IEs. The magnitude and the nature of the effect is different for different isomers of the dimers. The computations reveal that for TT, the largestchanges in vertical IEs (0.4 eV) occur in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric pi- stacked isomers, whereas in the lowest-energy symmetric h-bonded dimer the shiftin IEs is much smaller (0.1 eV). The origin of the shift and the character of the ionized states is different in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric stacked isomers. Inthe former, the initial hole is localized on one of the fragments, and the shift is due to the electrostatic stabilization of the positive charge of the ionized fragment by thedipole moment of the neutral fragment. In the latter, the hole is delocalized, and the change in IE is proportional to the overlap of the fragments' MOs. The shifts in AAare much smaller due to a less effcient overlap and a smaller dipole moment. The ionization of the h-bonded dimers results in barrierless (or nearly barrierless) protontransfer, whereas the pi-stacked dimers relax to structures with the hole stabilized by the delocalization or electrostatic interactions.

Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

2009-09-02

240

A quark model calculation of yy->pipi including final-state interactions  

SciTech Connect

A quark model calculation of the processes yy->pi+pi- and yy->pipi is performed. At tree level, only charged pions couple to the initial state photons and neutral pions are not exceeded in the final state. However a small but significant cross section is observed. We demonstrate that this may be accounted for by a rotation in isospin space induced by final-state interactions.

H.G. Blundell; S. Godfrey; G. Hay; Eric Swanson

2000-02-01

241

D0 Vent Stacks  

SciTech Connect

There are two nitrogen/argon exhaust headers in the D0 cryogenic piping system, one for the liquid argon dewar and another for the three argon calorimeters. These headers serve two functions, venting both nitrogen exhaust from the cooling loops and cold argon gas should any argon vessel blow a relief. These headers are vacuum jacketed until they exit the building. At that point, uninsulated exhaust stacks direct the flow into the atmosphere. This note deals with the these stacks.

Fuerst, J.D.; /Fermilab

1988-01-22

242

Stack filter classifiers  

SciTech Connect

Just as linear models generalize the sample mean and weighted average, weighted order statistic models generalize the sample median and weighted median. This analogy can be continued informally to generalized additive modeels in the case of the mean, and Stack Filters in the case of the median. Both of these model classes have been extensively studied for signal and image processing but it is surprising to find that for pattern classification, their treatment has been significantly one sided. Generalized additive models are now a major tool in pattern classification and many different learning algorithms have been developed to fit model parameters to finite data. However Stack Filters remain largely confined to signal and image processing and learning algorithms for classification are yet to be seen. This paper is a step towards Stack Filter Classifiers and it shows that the approach is interesting from both a theoretical and a practical perspective.

Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hush, Don [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01

243

Barrier RF stacking  

SciTech Connect

A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; /Fermilab; Zheng, H.; /Caltech; Takagi, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

2004-12-01

244

Laser pulse stacking method  

DOEpatents

A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

Moses, E.I.

1992-12-01

245

23. Brick coke quencher, brick stack, metal stack to right, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

23. Brick coke quencher, brick stack, metal stack to right, coke gas pipe to left; in background, BOF building, limestone piles, Levy's Slag Dump. Looking north/northwest - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, Wayne County, MI

246

STACK GAS REHEAT EVALUATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of technical and economic evaluations of stack gas reheat (SGR) following wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) for coal-fired power plants. The evaluations were based on information from literature and a survey of FGD users, vendors, and architect/engineer ...

247

Stacking up the Atmosphere  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this hands-on activity, participants learn the characteristics of the five layers of the atmosphere and make illustrations to represent them. They roll the drawings and place them in clear plastic cylinders, and then stack the cylinders to make a model column of the atmosphere.

Betsy Youngman

248

Toric Stacks II: Intrinsic Characterization of Toric Stacks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper and its prequel (Toric Stacks I) is to introduce and develop a theory of toric stacks which encompasses and extends the notions of toric stacks defined in [Laf02, BCS05, FMN09, Iwa09, Sat09, Tyo10], as well as classical toric varieties. While the focus of the prequel is on how to work with toric stacks, the focus

Anton Geraschenko; Matthew Satriano

2011-01-01

249

Fungal Melanins Differ in Planar Stacking Distances  

PubMed Central

Melanins are notoriously difficult to study because they are amorphous, insoluble and often associated with other biological materials. Consequently, there is a dearth of structural techniques to study this enigmatic pigment. Current models of melanin structure envision the stacking of planar structures. X ray diffraction has historically been used to deduce stacking parameters. In this study we used X ray diffraction to analyze melanins derived from Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus niger, Wangiella dermatitides and Coprinus comatus. Analysis of melanin in melanized C. neoformans encapsulated cells was precluded by the fortuitous finding that the capsular polysaccharide had a diffraction spectrum that was similar to that of isolated melanin. The capsular polysaccharide spectrum was dominated by a broad non-Bragg feature consistent with origin from a repeating structural motif that may arise from inter-molecular interactions and/or possibly gel organization. Hence, we isolated melanin from each fungal species and compared diffraction parameters. The results show that the inferred stacking distances of fungal melanins differ from that reported for synthetic melanin and neuromelanin, occupying intermediate position between these other melanins. These results suggest that all melanins have a fundamental diffracting unit composed of planar graphitic assemblies that can differ in stacking distance. The stacking peak appears to be a distinguishing universal feature of melanins that may be of use in characterizing these enigmatic pigments. PMID:22359541

Casadevall, Arturo; Nakouzi, Antonio; Crippa, Pier R.; Eisner, Melvin

2012-01-01

250

Theoretical study of the vertical excited states of benzene, pyrimidine, and pyrazine by the symmetry adapted cluster--configuration interaction method.  

PubMed

The ground state and the excited states of benzene, pyrimidine, and pyrazine have been examined by using the symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method. Detailed characterizations and the structures of the absorption peaks in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV), low energy electron impact (LEEI), and electron energy loss (EEL) spectra were theoretically clarified by calculating the excitation energy and the oscillator strength for each excited state. We show that SAC-CI has the power to well reproduce the electronic excitation spectra (VUV, LEEI, and EEL) simultaneously to an accuracy for both the singlet and the triplet excited states originated from the low-lying pi --> pi*, n --> pi*, pi --> sigma* and n --> sigma* excited states of the titled compounds. The present results are compared with those of the previous theoretical studies by methods, such as EOM-CCSD(T), STEOM-CCSD, CASPT2 and TD-B3LYP, etc. PMID:17342722

Li, Yongjian; Wan, Jian; Xu, Xin

2007-07-30

251

A free energy analysis of nucleic acid base stacking in aqueous solution.  

PubMed Central

This paper reports a theoretical study of the free energy contributions to nucleic acid base stacking in aqueous solution. Electrostatic interactions are treated by using the finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann method and nonpolar effects are treated with explicit calculation of van der Waals interactions and/or free energy-surface area relationships. Although for some pairs of bases there is a favorable Coulombic interaction in the stacked conformation, generally the net effect of electrostatic interactions is to oppose stacking. This result is caused by the loss of favorable base-solvent electrostatic interactions, that accompany the partial removal of polar atoms from water in the stacked conformation. Nonpolar interactions, involving the hydrophobic effect and enhancement of van der Waals interactions caused by close-packing, drive stacking. The calculations qualitatively reproduce the experimental dependence of stacking free energy on purine-pyrimidine composition. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8534823

Friedman, R A; Honig, B

1995-01-01

252

Stack inspection: theory and variants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stack inspection is a security mechanism implemented in runtimes such as the JVM and the CLR to accommodate components with diverse levels of trust. Although stack inspection enables the fine-grained expression of access control policies, it has rather a complex and subtle semantics. We present a formal semantics and an equational theory to explain how stack inspection affects program behaviour

Cédric Fournet; Andrew D. Gordon

2002-01-01

253

Thermoacoustic Refrigerator's Stack Optimization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator, which uses sound generation to transfer heat, was developed rapidly during the past four decades. It was regarded as a new, promising and environmentally benign alternative to conventional compression vapor refrigerators, although it was not competitive regarding the coefficient of performance (COP) yet. Thus the aim of this paper is to enhance thermoacoustic refrigerator's stack performance through optimization. A computational optimization procedure of thermoacoustic stack design was fully developed. The procedure was designed to achieve optimal coefficient of performance based on most of the design and operating parameters. Cooling load and acoustic power governing equations were set assuming the linear thermoacoustic theory. Lagrange multipliers method was used as an optimization technique tool to solve the governing equations. Numerical analyses results of the developed design procedure are presented. The results showed that the stack design parameters are the most significant parameters for the optimal overall performance. The coefficient of performance obtained increases by about 48.8% from the published experimental optimization methods. The results are in good agreement with past established studies.

El-Fawal, Mawahib Hassan; Mohd-Ghazali, Normah; Yaacob, Mohd. Shafik; Darus, Amer Nordin

2010-06-01

254

Effect of nitrogen on stacking fault energy of f.c.c. iron-based alloys  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is proposed to estimate the stacking fault energies of face-centered-cubic (f.c.c.) iron-based alloys. The segregation of alloying elements to stacking faults and the interaction of substitutional and interstitial alloying elements in solid solution and their effect on stacking fault energy have been taken into account. It is shown that at low nitrogen concentrations (e.g. 0.05wt%), the stacking fault

I. A. Yakubtsov; A. Ariapour; D. D. Perovic

1999-01-01

255

Observation of pi+pi-pi+pi- photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV at the STAR detector  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} photonuclear production in ultra-peripheral Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final states are observed at low transverse momentum and are accompanied by mutual nuclear excitation of the beam particles. The strong enhancement of the production cross section at low transverse momentum is consistent with coherent photoproduction. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} invariant mass spectrum of the coherent events exhibits a broad peak around 1540 {+-} 40 MeV/c{sup 2} with a width of 570 {+-} 60 MeV/c{sup 2}, in agreement with the photoproduction data for the {rho}{sup 0}(1700). We do not observe a corresponding peak in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final state and measure an upper limit for the ratio of the branching fractions of the {rho}{sup 0}(1700) to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} of 2.5% at 90% confidence level. The ratio of {rho}{sup 0}(1700) and {rho}{sup 0}(770) coherent production cross sections is measured to be 13.4 {+-} 0.8{sub stat.} {+-} 4.4{sub syst.}%.

STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

2010-07-05

256

Observation of pi+ pi- pi+pi- photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisons at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV at the STAR Detector  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} photonuclear production in ultraperipheral Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final states are observed at low transverse momentum and are accompanied by mutual nuclear excitation of the beam particles. The strong enhancement of the production cross section at low transverse momentum is consistent with coherent photoproduction. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} invariant mass spectrum of the coherent events exhibits a broad peak around 1540 {+-} 40 MeV/c{sup 2} with a width of 570 {+-} 60 MeV/c{sup 2}, in agreement with the photoproduction data for the {rho}{sup 0}(1700). We do not observe a corresponding peak in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final state and measure an upper limit for the ratio of the branching fractions of the {rho}{sup 0}(1700) to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} of 2.5% at 90% confidence level. The ratio of {rho}{sup 0}(1700) and {rho}{sup 0}(770) coherent production cross sections is measured to be 13.4 {+-} 0.8{sub stat.}{+-}4.4{sub syst.}%.

Abelev, B.I.; Dunlop, J.; et al. STAR Collaboration

2010-04-02

257

Observation of pi(+)pi(-)pi(+)pi(-) photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV at the STAR detector  

E-print Network

. Corliss,22 J. G. Cramer,49 H. J. Crawford,4 D. Das,5 S. Dash,13 A. Davila Leyva,43 L. C. De Silva,50 R. R. Debbe,3 T. G. Dedovich,17 M. DePhillips,3 A. A. Derevschikov,32 R. Derradi de Souza,7 L. Didenko,3 P. Djawotho,42 S. M. Dogra,16 X. Dong,21 J. L.... Anderson,18 D. Arkhipkin,3 G. S. Averichev,17 J. Balewski,22 L. S. Barnby,2 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,27 M. J. Betancourt,22 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,16 A. K. Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,11 B. Biritz,6...

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Han, L. -X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Rehberg, J. M.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.

2010-01-01

258

Measurement of the radiative width of the A 2(1320) in two-photon interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reaction e +e---> e +e- A2 (1320) has been observed by detecting the decay A 2-->pi+,pi-pi0. The two-photon width of the A 2 has been measured to be ?( A 2-->gammagamma)=(0.09±0.27 (stat)±0.16 (syst)) keV. The cross section sigma( gamma gamma-->pi+,pi-pi0 has been determined outside the A 2 resonance region.

M. Althoff; W. Braunschweig; R. Gerhards; F. J. Kirschfink; H.-U. Martyn; P. Rosskamp; W. Wallraff; B. Bock; J. Eisenmann; H. M. Fischer; H. Hartmann; A. Jocksch; H. Kolanoski; H. Kück; V. Mertens; R. Wedemeyer; B. Foster; E. Bernardi; Y. Eisenberg; A. Eskreys; K. Gather; H. Hultschig; P. Joos; B. Klima; H. Kowalski; A. Ladage; B. Löhr; D. Lüke; P. Mättig; D. Notz; D. Revel; E. Ronat; D. Trines; T. Tymieniecka; R. Walczak; G. Wolf; W. Zeuner; E. Hilger; T. Kracht; H. L. Krasemann; J. Krüger; E. Lohrmann; G. Poelz; K. U. Pösnecker; D. M. Binnie; P. J. Dornan; D. A. Garbutt; C. Jenkins; W. G. Jones; J. K. Sedgbeer; D. Su; J. Thomas; W. A. T. Wan Abdullah; F. Barreiro; E. Ros; M. G. Bowler; P. Bull; R. J. Cashmore; P. Dauncey; R. Devenish; G. Heath; D. Mellor; P. Ratoff; S. L. Lloyd; G. E. Forden; J. C. Hart; D. K. Hasell; D. H. Saxon; S. Brandt; M. Holder; L. Labarga; B. Neumann; U. Karshon; G. Mikenberg; R. Mir; A. Montag; A. Shapira; G. Yekutieli; G. Baranko; A. Caldwell; M. Cherney; J. M. Izen; S. Ritz; D. Strom; M. Takashima; E. Wicklund; Sau Lan Wu; G. Zonering

1986-01-01

259

Barrier RF stacking  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces a new method for stacking beams in the longitudinal phase space. It uses RF barriers to confine and compress beams in an accelerator, provided that the machine momentum acceptance is a few times larger than the momentum spread of the injected beam. This is the case for the Fermilab Main Injector. A barrier RF system employing Finemet cores and high-voltage solid-state switches is under construction. The goal is to double the number of protons per cycle on the production target for Run2 and NuMI experiments.

Weiren Chou and Akira Takagi

2003-02-24

260

Asymmetric Flexible Supercapacitor Stack  

PubMed Central

Electrical double layer supercapacitor is very significant in the field of electrical energy storage which can be the solution for the current revolution in the electronic devices like mobile phones, camera flashes which needs flexible and miniaturized energy storage device with all non-aqueous components. The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique over hydrogen decrepitated Mischmetal (Mm) based AB3alloy hydride. The polymer dispersed MWNTs have been obtained by insitu polymerization and the metal oxide/MWNTs were synthesized by sol-gel method. Morphological characterizations of polymer dispersed MWNTs have been carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM and HRTEM). An assymetric double supercapacitor stack has been fabricated using polymer/MWNTs and metal oxide/MWNTs coated over flexible carbon fabric as electrodes and nafion®membrane as a solid electrolyte. Electrochemical performance of the supercapacitor stack has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

2008-01-01

261

Stacked Extreme Learning Machines.  

PubMed

Extreme learning machine (ELM) has recently attracted many researchers' interest due to its very fast learning speed, good generalization ability, and ease of implementation. It provides a unified solution that can be used directly to solve regression, binary, and multiclass classification problems. In this paper, we propose a stacked ELMs (S-ELMs) that is specially designed for solving large and complex data problems. The S-ELMs divides a single large ELM network into multiple stacked small ELMs which are serially connected. The S-ELMs can approximate a very large ELM network with small memory requirement. To further improve the testing accuracy on big data problems, the ELM autoencoder can be implemented during each iteration of the S-ELMs algorithm. The simulation results show that the S-ELMs even with random hidden nodes can achieve similar testing accuracy to support vector machine (SVM) while having low memory requirements. With the help of ELM autoencoder, the S-ELMs can achieve much better testing accuracy than SVM and slightly better accuracy than deep belief network (DBN) with much faster training speed. PMID:25361517

Zhou, Hongming; Huang, Guang-Bin; Lin, Zhiping; Wang, Han; Soh, Yeng Chai

2014-10-28

262

Stacked insulator induction accelerator gaps  

SciTech Connect

Stacked insulators, with alternating layers of insulating material and conducting film, have been shown to support high surface electrical field stresses. We have investigated the application of the stacked insulator technology to the design of induction accelerator modules for the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator program. The rf properties of the accelerating gaps using stacked insulators, particularly the impedance at frequencies above the beam pipe cutoff frequency, are investigated. Low impedance is critical for Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator applications where a high current, bunched beam is trsnsported through many accelerating gaps. An induction accelerator module designs using a stacked insulator is presented.

Houck, T.I.; Westenskow, G.A.; Kim, J.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Vanecek, D.

1997-05-01

263

Stacking energies in DNA.  

PubMed

Variations in base mono- and dipoles result in variations in stacking energies for the 10 unique neighbor pairs in DNA. Stacking energies for pair M on N, expressed as TMN, were derived by matrix decomposition of a large set of linear algebraic expressions relating the measured Tm for subtransitions emanating from large polymeric DNAs, and the fractional neighbor frequencies, fMN, for the domains responsible for the transitions, Tm = sigma fMNTMN. Tm were determined for subtransitions that dissociate in approximately all-or-none fashion in high resolution melting profiles of partially deleted and recombinant forms of pBR322 DNA. Three different analytical maneuvers were undertaken to resolve subtransitions: site-specific cleavage of domains; deletion of domains; and addition of domains. Three dozen domains of widely divergent, quasi-random neighbor frequencies were identified and assigned, resulting in a unique set of values for TMN with standard deviation, sigma = +/- 0.23 degree C. The average difference between calculated and experimental Tm for domains is only +/- 0.17 degree C, indicating that the thermodynamic properties of these domains are not in any way unusual. Assuming delta S to be constant for all pairs, the corresponding delta HMN are found to have a precision of +/- 10 calories.mol-1 and an accuracy of +/- 606 calories.mol-1. TMN used to calculate melting curves by statistical mechanical analysis of sequences of the different plasmid specimens in this study were in quantitative agreement with observed curves for most sequences. These TMN differ significantly from those determined previously and also correlate poorly with values determined by quantum chemical analysis. Stabilities of neighbor pairs, expressed as the difference in free energy between that for a given pair (MN) and that for the average of like pairs (M, N), depend on the relationship of stacked purines and pyrimidines as follows. delta delta Gpu-py(-466 cal) greater than delta delta Gpu-pu(+52 cal) greater than delta delta Gpy-pu(+335 cal) Differences between experimental Tm and Tm calculated with TMN for the isolated neighbor pairs in the B-conformation are useful in the identification of altered structures and unusual modes of dissociation of helixes. A significantly higher Tm is observed for the highly biased repeated sequence synthetic helixes dA.dT, d(AGC).d(GCT), and d(GAT).d(ATC), reflecting auxiliary sources of stability such as bifurcated hydrogen bonds and/or altered structures for these helixes. PMID:1869547

Delcourt, S G; Blake, R D

1991-08-15

264

Stacking disorder in ice I.  

PubMed

Traditionally, ice I was considered to exist in two well-defined crystalline forms at ambient pressure: stable hexagonal ice (ice Ih) and metastable cubic ice (ice Ic). However, it is becoming increasingly evident that what has been called cubic ice in the past does not have a structure consistent with the cubic crystal system. Instead, it is a stacking-disordered material containing cubic sequences interlaced with hexagonal sequences, which is termed stacking-disordered ice (ice Isd). In this article, we summarise previous work on ice with stacking disorder including ice that was called cubic ice in the past. We also present new experimental data which shows that ice which crystallises after heterogeneous nucleation in water droplets containing solid inclusions also contains stacking disorder even at freezing temperatures of around -15 °C. This supports the results from molecular simulations, that the structure of ice that crystallises initially from supercooled water is always stacking-disordered and that this metastable ice can transform to the stable hexagonal phase subject to the kinetics of recrystallization. We also show that stacking disorder in ice which forms from water droplets is quantitatively distinct from ice made via other routes. The emerging picture of ice I is that of a very complex material which frequently contains stacking disorder and this stacking disorder can vary in complexity depending on the route of formation and thermal history. PMID:25380218

Malkin, Tamsin L; Murray, Benjamin J; Salzmann, Christoph G; Molinero, Valeria; Pickering, Steven J; Whale, Thomas F

2015-01-01

265

Spherical Torus Center Stack Design  

SciTech Connect

The low aspect ratio spherical torus (ST) configuration requires that the center stack design be optimized within a limited available space, using materials within their established allowables. This paper presents center stack design methods developed by the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Project Team during the initial design of NSTX, and more recently for studies of a possible next-step ST (NSST) device.

C. Neumeyer; P. Heitzenroeder; C. Kessel; M. Ono; M. Peng; J. Schmidt; R. Woolley; I. Zatz

2002-01-18

266

Measurement of the Branching Ratio for D Meson Going to Positive KAON(892)POSITIVE Muon Neutrino and Search for Coherent Charm Production in 800 Gev/c Proton-Silicon Interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis reports the results from two independent analyses:. In the first analysis, the branching ratio for the decay mode D^+to|{K }^{*0}mu^+nu has been measured with two methods. The first uses D ^0to K^-mu^+nu for normalization, and yields the result B(D^+ to|{K}^{*0}mu ^+nu) = (3.25 +/- 0.71 +/- 0.75)%. From this method we also obtain the direct measurement Gamma(D ^+to|{K}^{*0 }mu^+nu)/Gamma(D^0 to K^-mu^+nu) = 0.43 +/- 0.09 +/- 0.09. The second method uses the mode D^+ to K^-pi^+pi^+ for normalization and yields B(D^+to |{K}^{*0}mu^+ nu) = (4.18 +/- 0.66 +/- 0.96)%. Combining the results of the two methods yields B(D^+to |{K}^{*0}mu^+ nu) = (3.57 +/- 0.96)%. In the second analysis, coherent charm production in 800 GeV/c proton-Silicon interactions was searched for in the decay modes D^+to K^ -pi^+pi^+, D^0 to K^-pi^+, D ^0to K^-pi^+pi^+ pi^- and Lambda_sp {c}{+}to pK^-pi^+ . The data were recorded in the Fermilab E653 spectrometer. An active silicon wafer target assembly and a multiplicity jump trigger were used. No coherent charm signals were observed, and 90% confidence level upper limit for coherent charm pair production was determined to be 26 mu b per silicon nucleus. The results are interpreted as an upper limit of 0.2% on the amount of intrinsic charm in the proton.

Zhang, Chong

267

Measurement of the Ratios of Branching Fractions B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi pi pi) and B(Bs -> Ds pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi)  

SciTech Connect

Using 355 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, they study the fully reconstructed hadronic decays B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub (s)}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub (s)}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. They present the first measurement of the ratio of branching fractions {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 1.05 {+-} 0.10(stat.) {+-} 0.22(syst.). They also update their measurement of {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) to 1.13 {+-} 0.08(stat.) {+-} 0.23(syst.) improving the statistical uncertainty by more than a factor of two. They find {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) = [3.8 {+-} 0.3(stat.) {+-} 1.3(syst.)] x 10{sup -3} and {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = [8.4 {+-} 0.8(stat.) {+-} 3.2(syst.)] x 10{sup -3}.

Abulencia, A.; /Illinois U., Urbana; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U.; Affolder, T.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, M.G.; /Fermilab; Ambrose, D.; /Fermilab; Amerio, S.; /Padua U.; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Anikeev, K.; /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati /Taiwan, Inst. Phys.

2006-10-01

268

Measurements of the branching fractions for B{sub (s)}{yields}D{sub (s)}{pi}{pi}{pi} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{pi}{pi}  

SciTech Connect

Branching fractions of the decays H{sub b}{yields}H{sub c}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} relative to H{sub b}{yields}H{sub c}{pi}{sup -} are presented, where H{sub b} (H{sub c}) represents B{sup 0} (D{sup +}), B{sup -} (D{sup 0}), B{sub s}{sup 0} (D{sub s}{sup +}), and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} ({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}). The measurements are performed with the LHCb detector using 35 pb{sup -1} of data collected at {radical}(s)=7 TeV. The ratios of branching fractions are measured to be [B(B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=2.38{+-}0.11{+-}0.21, [B(B{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -})]= 1.27{+-}0.06{+-}0.11, [B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=2.01{+-}0.37{+-}0.20, [B({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=1.43{+-}0.16{+-}0.13 We also report measurements of partial decay rates of these decays to excited charm hadrons. These results are of comparable or higher precision than existing measurements.

Aaij, R.; Bauer, Th.; Beuzekom, M. van; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Coco, V.; van Eijk, D.; Farinelli, C.; Heijne, V.; Hulsbergen, W.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; van Leerdam, J.; Merk, M.; Mous, I.; Oggero, S.; Pellegrino, A.; du Pree, T.; Storaci, B. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2011-11-01

269

Dalitz Plot Analysis of B- -> D+ pi- pi-  

SciTech Connect

The author reports on a Dalitz plot analysis of B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} decays, based on a sample of about 383 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. They find the total branching fraction of the three-body decay: {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}) = (1.08 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -3}. the masses and widths of D*{sub 2}{sup 0} and D*{sub 0}{sup 0}, the 2{sup +} and 0{sup +} c{bar u} P-wave states decaying to D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, are measured: m{sub D*{sub 2}{sup 0}} = (2460.4 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 1.9) MeV/c{sup 2}, {Lambda}{sub D*{sub 2}{sup 0}} = (41.8 {+-} 2.5 {+-} 2.1 {+-} 2.0) MeV, m{sub D*{sub 0}{sup 0}} = (2297 {+-} 8 {+-} 5 {+-} 19) MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}{sub D*{sub 0}{sup 0}} = (273 {+-} 12 {+-} 17 {+-} 45) MeV. The stated errors reflect the statistical and systematic uncertainties, and the uncertainty related to the assumed composition of signal events and the theoretical model.

Aubert, : B.

2009-01-29

270

Effect of nitrogen on stacking fault energy of f.c.c. iron-based alloys  

SciTech Connect

A method is proposed to estimate the stacking fault energies of face-centered-cubic (f.c.c.) iron-based alloys. The segregation of alloying elements to stacking faults and the interaction of substitutional and interstitial alloying elements in solid solution and their effect on stacking fault energy have been taken into account. It is shown that at low nitrogen concentrations (e.g., 0.05 wt%), the stacking fault energy is increased mainly due to the effect arising from the bulk of the alloy. At high nitrogen concentration, (e.g., 0.5 wt%), the stacking fault energy is decreased due to the segregation of the alloying elements (mainly nitrogen) on the stacking faults of the alloy. Moreover, it is shown that in nitrogen alloying of f.c.c. iron-based alloys the magnetic contribution of the nitrogen to the stacking fault energy is negligible. The method shows reasonable agreement with existing experimental data.

Yakubtsov, I.A.; Ariapour, A.; Perovic, D.D. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science] [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science

1999-03-10

271

Amplitude Analysis of the Decay $D_s^+ \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+$ in the Experiment E831/FOCUS  

SciTech Connect

We present in this thesis the Dalitz Plot analysis of the D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decay, with the data of the E831/FOCUS, that took data in 1996 and 1997. The masses and widhts of f{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 0}(1370) are free parametres of the fit on Dalitz Plot, objectiving to study in detail these resonances. After this analysis we present the Spectator Model study on the S wave in this decay. For this study we used the formalism developed by M. Svec [2] for scattering. We present the comparison between the Isobar Model, frequently used in Dalitz Plot analysis, and this formalism.

Schilithz, Anderson Correa; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; ,

2005-01-01

272

Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Decay Rate Asymmetry of B to D_pi+ pi- pi0 K-  

SciTech Connect

The authors report the observation of the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}}K{sup -}, where D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}} indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, excluding K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. This doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay chain can be used to measure the CKM phase {gamma}. Using about 229 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring, they measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup -}}) = (5.5 {+-} 1.0 (stat.) {+-} 0.7 (syst.)) x 10{sup -6} and the decay rate asymmetry A = -0.02 {+-} 0.16 (stat.) {+-} 0.03 (syst.) for the full decay chain.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

2005-06-10

273

Measurement of CP Violation Parameters with a Dalitz Plot Analysis of B+- to D(pi+pi-pi0)K+-  

SciTech Connect

We report the results of a CP violation analysis of the decay B{sup {+-}} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}}K{sup {+-}}, where D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}} indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, excluding K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. The analysis makes use of 324 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. By analyzing the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} Dalitz plot distribution and the B{sup {+-}} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}} K{sup {+-}} branching fraction and decay rate asymmetry, we calculate parameters related to the phase {gamma} of the CKM unitarity triangle. We also measure the magnitudes and phases of the components of the D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decay amplitude.

Aubert, B.

2007-03-28

274

Observation of $\\Upsilon(4S) decays to$\\pi^+pi^-\\Upsilon(1S)$ and $\\pi^+pi^-\\Upsilon(1S)$  

SciTech Connect

The authors present the first measurement of {Upsilon}(4S) decays to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S) and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(2S) based on a sample of 230 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) mesons collected with the BABAR detector. They measure the product branching fractions {Beta}({Upsilon}(4S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S)) x {Beta}({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = (2.23 {+-} 0.25{sub stat} {+-} 0.27{sub sys}) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}({Upsilon}(4S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S)) x {Beta}({Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = (1.69 {+-} 0.26{sub stat} {+-} 0.20{sub sys}) x 10{sup -6}, from which they derive the partial widths {Lambda}({Upsilon}(4S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S)) = (1.8 {+-} 0.4) keV and {Lambda}({Upsilon}(4S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S)) = (2.7 {+-} 0.8) keV.

Aubert, B.

2006-04-19

275

Full Piezoelectric Multilayer-Stacked Hybrid Actuation/Transduction Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Stacked HYBATS (Hybrid Actuation/Transduction system) demonstrates significantly enhanced electromechanical performance by using the cooperative contributions of the electromechanical responses of multilayer, stacked negative strain components and positive strain components. Both experimental and theoretical studies indicate that, for Stacked HYBATS, the displacement is over three times that of a same-sized conventional flextensional actuator/transducer. The coupled resonance mode between positive strain and negative strain components of Stacked HYBATS is much stronger than the resonance of a single element actuation only when the effective lengths of the two kinds of elements match each other. Compared with the previously invented hybrid actuation system (HYBAS), the multilayer Stacked HYBATS can be designed to provide high mechanical load capability, low voltage driving, and a highly effective piezoelectric constant. The negative strain component will contract, and the positive strain component will expand in the length directions when an electric field is applied on the device. The interaction between the two elements makes an enhanced motion along the Z direction for Stacked-HYBATS. In order to dominate the dynamic length of Stacked-HYBATS by the negative strain component, the area of the cross-section for the negative strain component will be much larger than the total cross-section areas of the two positive strain components. The transverse strain is negative and longitudinal strain positive in inorganic materials, such as ceramics/single crystals. Different piezoelectric multilayer stack configurations can make a piezoelectric ceramic/single-crystal multilayer stack exhibit negative strain or positive strain at a certain direction without increasing the applied voltage. The difference of this innovation from the HYBAS is that all the elements can be made from one-of-a-kind materials. Stacked HYBATS can provide an extremely effective piezoelectric constant at both resonance and off resonance frequencies. The effective piezoelectric constant can be alternated by varying the size of each component, the degree of the pre-curvature of the positive strain components, the thickness of each layer in the multilayer stacks, and the piezoelectric constant of the material used. Because all of the elements are piezoelectric components, Stacked HYBATS can serve as projector and receiver for underwater detection. The performance of this innovation can be enhanced by improving the piezoelectric properties.

Su, Ji; Jiang, Xiaoning; Zu, Tian-Bing

2011-01-01

276

Fuel cell stack compressive loading system  

DOEpatents

A fuel cell module comprising a stack of fuel cells with reactant gas manifolds sealed against the external surfaces of the stack includes a constraint system for providing a compressive load on the stack wherein the constraint system maintains the stack at a constant height (after thermal expansion) and allows the compressive load to decrease with time as a result of the creep characteristics of the stack. Relative motion between the manifold sealing edges and the stack surface is virtually eliminated by this constraint system; however it can only be used with a stack having considerable resiliency and appropriate thermal expansion and creep characteristics.

Fahle, Ronald W. (Manchester, CT); Reiser, Carl A. (Glastonbury, CT)

1982-01-01

277

Investigation of the effect of shunt current on battery efficiency and stack temperature in vanadium redox flow battery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In vanadium redox flow batteries (VFB), the power of the battery is determined by the number of cells in the stack. Serial and parallel layouts are commonly adopted interactively to suit the designed power demand. The bipolar stack design inevitably introduces shunt currents bypassing into the common manifolds in the stack and thereby resulting in a parasitic loss of power and energy. During standby, shunt current and its associated internal discharge reactions can generate heat and increase stack temperature, potentially leading to thermal precipitation in the positive half-cell. This study aims to investigate the effect of shunt current on stack efficiency and temperature variation during standby periods for a 40-cell stack. Dynamic models based on mass balance, energy balance and electrical circuit are developed for simulations and the results provide an insight into stack performance that will aid in optimising stack design and suitable cooling strategies for the VFB.

Tang, Ao; McCann, John; Bao, Jie; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

2013-11-01

278

Split stack blowout prevention system  

SciTech Connect

A blowout prevention system for an offshore structure positioned on the underwater bottom in a body of water which contains moving ice masses that could force the structure off location wherein a surface blowout preventer stack for conventional well control is connected to the upper end of a riser with the lower end of the riser being disconnectably connected to a subsurface blowout preventer stack which provides the necessary well control should the structure be forced off location. The subsurface stack is positioned on a wellhead located in a chamber in the subsea bottom and is disconnectably connected to the riser so that the riser may be quickly removed from the subsea bottom should the structure be forced off location.

Crager, B.L.; Ray, D.R.; Steddum, R.E.

1980-03-18

279

Anharmonic stacking in supercoiled DNA.  

PubMed

Multistep denaturation in a short circular DNA molecule is analyzed by a mesoscopic Hamiltonian model which accounts for the helicoidal geometry. Computation of melting profiles by the path integral method suggests that stacking anharmonicity stabilizes the double helix against thermal disruption of the hydrogen bonds. Twisting is essential in the model to capture the importance of nonlinear effects on the thermodynamical properties. In a ladder model with zero twist, anharmonic stacking scarcely affects the thermodynamics. Moderately untwisted helices, with respect to the equilibrium conformation, show an energetic advantage against the overtwisted ones. Accordingly moderately untwisted helices better sustain local fluctuational openings and make more unlikely the thermally driven complete strand separation. PMID:22495298

Zoli, Marco

2012-05-16

280

Mutual coupling of stacked UHF RFID antennas in NFC applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

As RFID deployment moves from pallet level to item level, UHF RFID has gained more and more momentum in NFC (near field communication) applications recently. Similar to HF RFID tags, UHF RFID tags in NFC also use inductive coupling antennas to interact with the readers. However, in item-level deployment, items with UHF RFID tags are often stacked closely and interrogated

Xiaosheng Chen; Feng Lu; Terry T. Ye

2009-01-01

281

The Direct FuelCell™ stack engineering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

FuelCell Energy (FCE) has developed power plants in the size range of 300 kW to 3 MW for distributed power generation. Field-testing of the sub-megawatt plants is underway. The FCE power plants are based on its Direct FuelCell™ (DFC) technology. This is so named because of its ability to generate electricity directly from a hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas, by reforming it inside the fuel cell stack itself. All FCE products use identical 8000 cm 2 cell design, approximately 350-400 cells per stack, external gas manifolds, and similar stack compression systems. The difference lies in the packaging of the stacks inside the stack module. The sub-megawatt system stack module contains a single horizontal stack whereas the MW-class stack module houses four identical vertical stacks. The commonality of the design, internal reforming features, and atmospheric operation simplify the system design, reduce cost, improve efficiency, increase reliability and maintainability. The product building-block stack design has been advanced through three full-size stack operations at company's headquarters in Danbury, CT. The initial proof-of-concept of the full-size stack design was verified in 1999, followed by a 1.5 year of endurance verification in 2000-2001, and currently a value-engineered stack version is in operation. This paper discusses the design features, important engineering solutions implemented, and test results of FCE's full-size DFC stacks.

Doyon, J.; Farooque, M.; Maru, H.

282

Random stacking sequences in III-V nanowires are correlated  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate crystal plane stacking in InP nanowires with marked wurtzite/zinc-blende phase mixing. We measure the length distributions of hexagonal and cubic segments and the frequencies of all short sequences of monolayers. This reveals spatial correlations extending over several monolayers, which we describe in terms of conditional probabilities. Results can be modeled by considering the energy barriers for nucleation on top of all types of preexisting stacking. A quantitative agreement is obtained only if the interaction with the underlying layers involves the edge energy of the nucleus.

Priante, Giacomo; Harmand, Jean-Christophe; Patriarche, Gilles; Glas, Frank

2014-06-01

283

Multilayer Piezoelectric Stack Actuator Characterization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Future NASA missions are increasingly seeking to use actuators for precision positioning to accuracies of the order of fractions of a nanometer. For this purpose, multilayer piezoelectric stacks are being considered as actuators for driving these precision mechanisms. In this study, sets of commercial PZT stacks were tested in various AC and DC conditions at both nominal and extreme temperatures and voltages. AC signal testing included impedance, capacitance and dielectric loss factor of each actuator as a function of the small-signal driving sinusoidal frequency, and the ambient temperature. DC signal testing includes leakage current and displacement as a function of the applied DC voltage. The applied DC voltage was increased to over eight times the manufacturers' specifications to investigate the correlation between leakage current and breakdown voltage. Resonance characterization as a function of temperature was done over a temperature range of -180C to +200C which generally exceeded the manufacturers' specifications. In order to study the lifetime performance of these stacks, five actuators from one manufacturer were driven by a 60volt, 2 kHz sine-wave for ten billion cycles. The tests were performed using a Lab-View controlled automated data acquisition system that monitored the waveform of the stack electrical current and voltage. The measurements included the displacement, impedance, capacitance and leakage current and the analysis of the experimental results will be presented.

Sherrit, Stewart; Jones, Christopher M.; Aldrich, Jack B.; Blodget, Chad; Bao, Xioaqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

2008-01-01

284

Multibeam collimator uses prism stack  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Optical instrument creates many divergent light beams for surveying and machine element alignment applications. Angles and refractive indices of stack of prisms are selected to divert incoming laser beam by small increments, different for each prism. Angles of emerging beams thus differ by small, precisely-controlled amounts. Instrument is nearly immune to vibration, changes in gravitational force, temperature variations, and mechanical distortion.

Minott, P. O.

1981-01-01

285

STACK SAMPLING FOR ORGANIC EMISSIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper reviews some of the more important principles involved in stack sampling for organics, briefly describes and discusses recently developed equipment, and points out a few of the more serious pitfalls. Extensive references are provided, many of which are often overlooked ...

286

Stacking Bagged and Dagged Models  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we investigate the method of stacked generalization in combining models derived from different subsets of a training dataset by a single learning algorithm, as well as different algorithms. The simplest way to combine predictions from competing models is majority vote, and the effect of the sampling regime used to generate training subsets has already been studied in

Kai Ming Ting; Ian H. Witten

1997-01-01

287

POLYMERIC INTERFACES FOR STACK MONITORING  

EPA Science Inventory

Research has been performed on the use of polymeric interfaces for in situ continuous stack monitoring of gaseous pollutants. Permeabilities of candidate interface materials to SO2 were measured at temperatures from ambient to 200C, and the results were used to design interfaces ...

288

Progress Update: Stack Project Complete  

ScienceCinema

Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

Cody, Tom

2012-06-14

289

Utility stack opacity troubleshooting guidelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stack plume visibility, otherwise defined as plume opacity, has become a concern to the utility industry. This concern stems from the fact that some coal-fired stations with operating FGD systems have been cited for opacity in excess of the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) even though the particulate mass emissions are within regulated limits. Postulated causes for the unacceptable opacities

R. J. Keeth; D. A. Balfour; F. M. Meserole; T. Defries

1991-01-01

290

Rhythmic ring–ring stacking drives the circadian oscillator clockwise  

PubMed Central

The oscillator of the circadian clock of cyanobacteria is composed of three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, which together generate a self-sustained ?24-h rhythm of phosphorylation of KaiC. The mechanism propelling this oscillator has remained elusive, however. We show that stacking interactions between the CI and CII rings of KaiC drive the transition from the phosphorylation-specific KaiC–KaiA interaction to the dephosphorylation-specific KaiC–KaiB interaction. We have identified the KaiB-binding site, which is on the CI domain. This site is hidden when CI domains are associated as a hexameric ring. However, stacking of the CI and CII rings exposes the KaiB-binding site. Because the clock output protein SasA also binds to CI and competes with KaiB for binding, ring stacking likely regulates clock output. We demonstrate that ADP can expose the KaiB-binding site in the absence of ring stacking, providing an explanation for how it can reset the clock. PMID:22967510

Chang, Yong-Gang; Tseng, Roger; Kuo, Nai-Wei; LiWang, Andy

2012-01-01

291

Calculated state densities of aperiodic nucleotide base stacks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electronic density of states (DOS) histograms and of the nucleotide base stack regions of a segment of human oncogene (both single and double stranded, in B conformation) and of single-stranded random DNA base stack (also in B conformation), were calculated. The computations were performed with the help of the ab initio matrix block negative factor counting (NFC) method for the DOSs. The neglected effects of the sugar-phosphate chain and the water environment (with the counterions) were assessed on the basis of previous ab initio band structure calculations. Further, in the calculation of single nucleotide base stacks also basis set and correlation effects have been investigated. In the case of a single strand the level spacing widths of the allowed regions and the fundamental gap were calculated also with Clementi's double ? basis and corrected for correlation at the MP2 level. The inverse interaction method was applied for the study of Anderson localization.

Ye, Yuan-Jie; Chen, Run-Shen; Martinez, Alberto; Otto, Peter; Ladik, Janos

2000-05-01

292

30 CFR 77.302 - Bypass stacks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.302 Bypass stacks. Thermal dryer systems shall include a bypass stack, relief...automatic venting which will permit gases from the dryer heating unit to bypass the heating chamber...

2011-07-01

293

30 CFR 77.302 - Bypass stacks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.302 Bypass stacks. Thermal dryer systems shall include a bypass stack, relief...automatic venting which will permit gases from the dryer heating unit to bypass the heating chamber...

2010-07-01

294

30 CFR 77.302 - Bypass stacks.  

...WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.302 Bypass stacks. Thermal dryer systems shall include a bypass stack, relief...automatic venting which will permit gases from the dryer heating unit to bypass the heating chamber...

2014-07-01

295

30 CFR 77.302 - Bypass stacks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.302 Bypass stacks. Thermal dryer systems shall include a bypass stack, relief...automatic venting which will permit gases from the dryer heating unit to bypass the heating chamber...

2012-07-01

296

30 CFR 77.302 - Bypass stacks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.302 Bypass stacks. Thermal dryer systems shall include a bypass stack, relief...automatic venting which will permit gases from the dryer heating unit to bypass the heating chamber...

2013-07-01

297

Glass transition dynamics of stacked thin polymer films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The glass transition dynamics of stacked thin films of polystyrene and poly(2-chlorostyrene) were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. The glass transition temperature Tg of as-stacked thin polystyrene films has a strong depression from that of the bulk samples. However, after annealing at high temperatures above Tg, the stacked thin films exhibit glass transition at a temperature almost equal to the Tg of the bulk system. The ?-process dynamics of stacked thin films of poly(2-chlorostyrene) show a time evolution from single-thin-film-like dynamics to bulk-like dynamics during the isothermal annealing process. The relaxation rate of the ? process becomes smaller with increase in the annealing time. The time scale for the evolution of the ? dynamics during the annealing process is very long compared with that for the reptation dynamics. At the same time, the temperature dependence of the relaxation time for the ? process changes from Arrhenius-like to Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann dependence with increase of the annealing time. The fragility index increases and the distribution of the ?-relaxation times becomes smaller with increase in the annealing time for isothermal annealing. The observed change in the ? process is discussed with respect to the interfacial interaction between the thin layers of stacked thin polymer films.

Fukao, Koji; Terasawa, Takehide; Oda, Yuto; Nakamura, Kenji; Tahara, Daisuke

2011-10-01

298

?-? stacking, spin density and magnetic coupling strength.  

PubMed

The ?-? stacking interaction, one of the main intermolecular forces, sometimes leads to amazing magnetic properties. Although the concept has been raised that spin density is one of the main factors that contribute to the magnetic coupling strength in intermolecular magnetic coupling systems, it has not been confirmed either experimentally or theoretically to date. Herein we present a study on the magnetostructural data of seven unpublished Cu(II) complexes and ten reported radicals. It is confirmed for the first time that the spin density on short contact atoms is a major factor that contributes to the ?-? stacking magnetic coupling strength. Based on the reported data to date, when the short contact distance is larger than the default contact radius, medium or relatively strong magnetic coupling strength could be obtained only if the spin density on the short contact atoms is greater than 0.1350; when the C···C short contact is less than the default contact radius of 3.4 Å, but not less than 3.351 Å, and the spin density is less than 0.1, neither medium nor strong magnetic coupling strength could be observed. Further, when the short contact distance decreases with a temperature drop, the spin densities on the relevant short contact atoms increase. In the complexes reported the small spin densities on the relevant short contact atoms are the major factors that result in the weak ?-? magnetic coupling strength. PMID:24005474

Chi, Yan-Hui; Shi, Jing-Min; Li, Hong-Nan; Wei, Wei; Cottrill, Ethan; Pan, Ning; Chen, Hu; Liang, Yuan; Yu, Li; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Hou, Chao

2013-11-28

299

Categorical properties of topological and differentiable stacks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The focus of this PhD research is on the theory of topological and differentiable stacks. There are two main themes of this research. The first, is the creation of the theory of compactly generated stacks, which solve many categorical shortcomings of the theory of classical topological stacks. In particular, they are Cartesian closed. Secondly, this thesis develops the theory of

D. J. Carchedi

2011-01-01

300

Secure Communication for Smart IoT Objects: Protocol Stacks, Use Cases and Practical Examples  

E-print Network

interact with the constrained communication stack and explore pros and cons of popular security approaches by constrained network (CN) nodes due to memory space and processing power constraints. To solve these problems

Rossi, Michele

301

X-ray Stacking 2008-Apr-22 Astrostats X-ray Stacking  

E-print Network

X-ray Stacking 2008-Apr-22 Astrostats X-ray Stacking Tom Aldcroft SAO/CXC #12;X-ray Stacking 2008 to gamma rays Detection efficiency of a source class (e.g. obscured active galactic nuclei) is often best analysis for a sample Stacking ­ mean properties of sample Chandra X-ray data (faint point sources

Wolfe, Patrick J.

302

Small Scheme Stack: A Scheme TCP/IP Stack Targeting Small Embedded Applications  

E-print Network

often been used to this end, requiring compact stacks to be implemented as regular ones are too large for embedded sys- tems. Traditionally, compact stacks such as uIP [4] have been im- plemented in C. Here we report on our experience in implement- ing S3 ("Small Scheme Stack"), a compact TCP/IP stack written

Feeley, Marc

303

Module level thermal performance characterization and enhancement of chip stack and package stack memory devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Technological advances driven by the DRAM market demands resulted in thermal challenges arising from increasing power and decreasing space for cooling. This is exacerbated by the packaging of multiple devices within the same footprint based on die stacking or package stacking. In view of the thermal concerns, we conducted a comprehensive thermal study of chip stack and package stack devices

Siew Hoon Ore; W. H. Zhu; W. L. Yuan; N. Suthiwongsunthorn

2010-01-01

304

Stacked triangular lattice: Percolation properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The stacked triangular lattice has the shape of a triangular prism. In spite of being considered frequently in solid-state physics and materials science, its percolation properties have received little attention. We investigate several nonuniversal percolation properties on this lattice using Monte Carlo simulation. We show that the percolation threshold is pcbond=0.18602±0.00002 for bonds and pcsite=0.26240±0.00005 for sites. The number of clusters at the threshold per site is ncbond=0.28458±0.00005 and ncsite=0.03998±0.00005. The stacked triangular lattice is a convenient choice to study the RGB model [Schrenk , Sci. Rep.10.1038/srep00751 2, 751 (2012)]. We present results on this model and its scaling behavior at the percolation threshold.

Schrenk, K. J.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Herrmann, H. J.

2013-03-01

305

Microchip electrophoresis with sample stacking.  

PubMed

A fused quartz microchip with a serpentine column geometry is fabricated to perform rapid microchip electrophoresis of dansylated amino acids. A 67 mm separation column is constructed in a 7 x 10 mm area on a quartz substrate using standard photolithographic, etching and deposition techniques. Buffer and sample flows within the channel manifold are precisely controlled through potentials applied to the reservoirs. To enhance the detection limits, a stacking injection technique is used to concentrate the sample at the inlet of the separation column. The stacked injections exhibit high reproducibility (2.1% relative standard deviation in peak area). Using a separation length of 67 mm and a separation field strength of 1100 V/cm, separations are performed in < or = 15 s generating approximately 40,000 theoretical plates. PMID:7588514

Jacobson, S C; Ramsey, J M

1995-04-01

306

PRECISION COSMOGRAPHY WITH STACKED VOIDS  

SciTech Connect

We present a purely geometrical method for probing the expansion history of the universe from the observation of the shape of stacked voids in spectroscopic redshift surveys. Our method is an Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test based on the average sphericity of voids posited on the local isotropy of the universe. It works by comparing the temporal extent of cosmic voids along the line of sight with their angular, spatial extent. We describe the algorithm that we use to detect and stack voids in redshift shells on the light cone and test it on mock light cones produced from N-body simulations. We establish a robust statistical model for estimating the average stretching of voids in redshift space and quantify the contamination by peculiar velocities. Finally, assuming that the void statistics that we derive from N-body simulations is preserved when considering galaxy surveys, we assess the capability of this approach to constrain dark energy parameters. We report this assessment in terms of the figure of merit (FoM) of the dark energy task force and in particular of the proposed Euclid mission which is particularly suited for this technique since it is a spectroscopic survey. The FoM due to stacked voids from the Euclid wide survey may double that of all other dark energy probes derived from Euclid data alone (combined with Planck priors). In particular, voids seem to outperform baryon acoustic oscillations by an order of magnitude. This result is consistent with simple estimates based on mode counting. The AP test based on stacked voids may be a significant addition to the portfolio of major dark energy probes and its potentialities must be studied in detail.

Lavaux, Guilhem [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Wandelt, Benjamin D. [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, 98 bis, boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France)

2012-08-01

307

Membership Testing: Removing Extra Stacks from Multi-stack Pushdown Automata  

Microsoft Academic Search

We show that fixed membership testing for many interesting subclasses of multi-pushdown machines is no harder than for pushdowns\\u000a with single stack. The models we consider are MVPA, OVPA and MPDA, which have all been defined and studied in the past.\\u000a \\u000a Multi-stack pushdown automata, MPDA, have ordered stacks with pop access restricted to the stack-top of the first non-empty stack.

Nutan Limaye; Meena Mahajan

2009-01-01

308

Lightweight Stacks of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An improved design concept for direct methanol fuel cells makes it possible to construct fuel-cell stacks that can weigh as little as one-third as much as do conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks of equal power. The structural-support components of the improved cells and stacks can be made of relatively inexpensive plastics. Moreover, in comparison with conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks, the improved fuel-cell stacks can be assembled, disassembled, and diagnosed for malfunctions more easily. These improvements are expected to bring portable direct methanol fuel cells and stacks closer to commercialization. In a conventional bipolar fuel-cell stack, the cells are interspersed with bipolar plates (also called biplates), which are structural components that serve to interconnect the cells and distribute the reactants (methanol and air). The cells and biplates are sandwiched between metal end plates. Usually, the stack is held together under pressure by tie rods that clamp the end plates. The bipolar stack configuration offers the advantage of very low internal electrical resistance. However, when the power output of a stack is only a few watts, the very low internal resistance of a bipolar stack is not absolutely necessary for keeping the internal power loss acceptably low.

Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Valdez, Thomas

2004-01-01

309

Photogrammetric Technique for Timber Stack Volume Contol  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The problem of accurate log volume measurement is a very important, especially in case of seaport volume control where logs are put in a huge stack of hundred meters length and a time for volume control is strongly restricted. Current technology of volume control use manual means such as measuring tape, so the process of measurement is rather inaccurate and time consuming. To estimate the volume of timber stack its frontal area is measured and some control parts of a stack are used for stacking coefficient (wood density in a stack) determination. Non-contact vision based technique is proposed for manual measurements substituting. The developed methods are implemented in portable photogrammetric system for stack parameters measuring and documenting.

Knyaz, V. A.; Maksimov, A. A.

2014-08-01

310

Utility stack opacity troubleshooting guidelines  

SciTech Connect

Stack plume visibility, otherwise defined as plume opacity, has become a concern to the utility industry. This concern stems from the fact that some coal-fired stations with operating FGD systems have been cited for opacity in excess of the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) even though the particulate mass emissions are within regulated limits. Postulated causes for the unacceptable opacities include scrubber-generated particulate matter, condensible particulate matter such as sulfuric acid mist, fine particles penetrating the particulate control device, and/or colored gases such as nitrogen dioxide in the flue gas. It is important that the underlying cause of the plume opacity be identified to determine if it is possible to reduce plume opacity. This report presents a troubleshooting methodology developed during field tests at four utilities experiencing high stack opacities. Results from these field tests are presented as case studies to demonstrate how this methodology can be applied by a utility to determine the cause of their plume opacity. 10 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

Keeth, R.J. (United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Denver, CO (USA). Stearns-Roger Div.); Balfour, D.A.; Meserole, F.M.; Defries, T. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (USA))

1991-03-01

311

Metal gate stack plasma patterning studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary form only given. The presentation will focus on the dry etch studies required to pattern poly-Si\\/metal\\/SiON and poly-Si\\/metal\\/high-k gate stacks that might be used in the forthcoming technological nodes. As usual, two key challenges for dry etching metal gate stacks are selectivity and profile control. Smaller and smaller dimensions with more and more complex gate stacks with new materials

L. Vallier; G. Cunge; T. Chevolleau; E. Richard; O. Joubert

2006-01-01

312

String compactifications on Calabi Yau stacks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we study string compactifications on Deligne-Mumford stacks. The basic idea is that all such stacks have presentations to which one can associate gauged sigma models, where the group gauged need be neither finite nor effectively-acting. Such presentations are not unique, and lead to physically distinct gauged sigma models; stacks classify universality classes of gauged sigma models, not gauged sigma models themselves. We begin by defining and justifying a notion of "Calabi-Yau stack", recall how one defines sigma models on (presentations of) stacks, and calculate of physical properties of such sigma models, such as closed and open string spectra. We describe how the boundary states in the open string B model on a Calabi-Yau stack are counted by derived categories of coherent sheaves on the stack. Along the way, we describe numerous tests that IR physics is presentation-independent, justifying the claim that stacks classify universality classes. String orbifolds are one special case of these compactifications, a subject which has proven controversial in the past; however we resolve the objections to this description of which we are aware. In particular, we discuss the apparent mismatch between stack moduli and physical moduli, and how that discrepancy is resolved.

Pantev, Tony; Sharpe, Eric

2006-01-01

313

Refractive index sensing utilizing photonic crystal nano-beam cavity with slotted stack  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two types of optical sensor based on one-dimensional Photonic Crystal (PhC) stack nanobeam cavity has been designed, fabricated and characterized. One-dimensional PhC stack nanobeam cavity with measured Q-factors up to 27000 and a sensitivity of 270nm/RIU has been demonstrated. Then, we introduce a finite width slot between two periodic arrays of the dielectric stacks. Thus, the majority of optical field distributes in the slotted low-index area and the light matter interaction with the analytes has been enhanced. A sensitivity of 410nm/RIU has been achieved while maintaining the Q-factors near 104.

Xu, Peipeng; Yao, Kaiyuan; Zheng, Jiajiu; Guan, Xiaowei; Shi, Yaocheng

2014-03-01

314

Compactified Picard stacks over the moduli stack of stable curves with marked points  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we give a construction of algebraic (Artin) stacks endowed with a modular map onto the moduli stack of stable curves of genus g with n marked points. The stacks we construct are smooth, irreducible and have dimension 4g?3+n, yielding a geometrically meaningful compactification of the universal Picard stack parametrizing n-pointed smooth curves together with a line bundle.

Margarida Melo

2011-01-01

315

Effect of various stack parameters on temperature rise in molten carbonate fuel cell stack operation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematical stack model is used to predict the temperature at a constant-load operation of molten-carbonate fuel cell stacks. The validity of the model is proved by a comparison with measured temperature data obtained from the operation of a 5-kW test stack. The model is applied extensively for the simulation of temperature profiles in a larger stack to analyze the

Joon-Ho Koh; Byoung Sam Kang; Hee Chun Lim

2000-01-01

316

Novel silver-containing supramolecular frameworks constructed by combination of coordination bonds and supramolecular interactions.  

PubMed

The hydrothermal reactions of AgNO(3), 4,4'-bipy, and carboxylate ligands gave rise to three supramolecular architectures, namely [Ag(bipy)].H(2)SIPA.1/2bipy.H(2)O (1), [Ag(bipy)].1/2H(2)btec.H(2)O (2), and [Ag(bipy)](2).H(2)dpstc.2H(2)O (3) (H(3)SIPA = 5-sulfoisophthalic acid, bipy = 4,4'-bipyridine, H(4)btec = 1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid, H(4)dpstc = 3,3',4,4'-tetracarboxydiphenyl sulfone). All complexes are extended from Ag-bipy linear chains by the combination of coordination bonds and supramolecular interactions in two different approaches. Complexes 1 and 3 comprise two-dimensional frameworks. In the two complexes, a one-dimensional ladderlike structure is first formed by the connection of a Ag-bipy chain through hydrogen bonding between a free carboxylate/bipy ligand and weak coordinative interactions between a free carboxylate ligand and silver ion. The ladderlike structure is then extended to a two-dimensional layer architecture by pi...pi interactions between bipy ligands of the Ag-bipy chains. Complex 2 possesses a three-dimensional framework. The free H(2)btec(2)(-) ligands form a two-dimensional layer network by hydrogen-bonding interactions between protonated and deprotonated carboxylate groups; meanwhile, pi.pi interactions between bipy ligands of Ag-bipy chains also result in a two-dimensional layer. The two layers are further connected by weak Ag-O interactions to generate a three-dimensional supramolecular structure. PMID:14606846

Sun, Daofeng; Cao, Rong; Sun, Yanqiong; Bi, Wenhua; Li, Xiaoju; Wang, Yanqin; Shi, Qian; Li, Xing

2003-11-17

317

Stack Gas Desulfurization by Seawater in Shanghai  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are a series of advantages in use of seawater as absorbent to remove SO2 in stack gas. Use of seawater for stack gas desulfurization is the first choice method for thermal power plant located on seaside. A study on the possibility of desulfurization by seawater of the East China Sea has be done by our institute. The qualities of

D. N. Zhang; Q. Z. Chen; Y. X. Zhao; Y. Maeda; Y. Tsujino

2001-01-01

318

Stacked optical antennas Dieter W. Pohl,1  

E-print Network

Stacked optical antennas Dieter W. Pohl,1 Sergio G. Rodrigo,2 and Lukas Novotny2,a 1 Institute; published online 13 January 2011 We propose and analyze a stacked optical antenna SOA . It is characterized in microscopy. © 2011 American Institute of Physics. doi:10.1063/1.3541544 Optical antennas are devices

Novotny, Lukas

319

Interconnections For Stacked Parallel Computer Modules  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Concept for interconnecting modules in parallel computers leads to cheaper, smaller, lighter, lower-power computing systems for aerospace, industrial, business, and consumer applications. Computer modules stacked and interconnected in various configurations. Connections among stacks controlled by switching within gateways and/or by addresses on buses.

Johannesson, Richard T.

1996-01-01

320

Shear testing of stack bonded masonry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stack bonded masonry is scarcely used in practice, except for aesthetic reasons. Nevertheless, a regular array of units allows placing reinforcement in the joints, which can be of major importance for masonry shell roofs, as proposed by Eladio Dieste. In order to contribute to the knowledge of the behavior of stack bonded masonry under shear loading, which seems not to

P. B. Lourenço; J. O. Barros; J. T. Oliveira

2004-01-01

321

Effective Stack Design in Air Pollution Control.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Stack design problems fall into two general caterories--(1) those of building re-entry, and (2) those of general area pollution. Extensive research has developed adequate information, available in the literature, to permit effective stack design. A major roadblock to effective design has been the strong belief by architects and engineers that high…

Clarke, John H.

1968-01-01

322

Opacity of nitrogen dioxide stack plumes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Removal of the NOâ from process off-gases would enable the Purex Plant to comply with the opacity standards for air pollution control. However, a relationship between stack opacity and NOâ content of the stack gases is needed in order to implement a cost effective NOâ control method. A test was conducted in which nitrogen dioxide (NOâ) was injected into a

Evoniuk

1979-01-01

323

Wind induced vibration of a stack  

SciTech Connect

A stack supported by guy wires at four levels is subjected to large-amplitude oscillations when the wind speed is over 15 m/s. The excitation mechanisms are identified based on scoping calculations, analytical prediction using a finite element code, and observation of the stack/wire response. The stack is determined to be excited by vortex shedding. Once lock-in resonance occurs, the guy wires are excited by the transverse motion of the stack. Large-amplitude oscillations of the guy wires are due to parametric resonance. Several methods are recommended to alleviate vibrational problem for short-term and long-term solutions. A new stack which is modified based on the results of this study is not subjected to any unacceptable oscillations.

Chen, S.S.; Cai, Y.

1992-12-01

324

Wind induced vibration of a stack  

SciTech Connect

A stack supported by guy wires at four levels is subjected to large-amplitude oscillations when the wind speed is over 15 m/s. The excitation mechanisms are identified based on scoping calculations, analytical prediction using a finite element code, and observation of the stack/wire response. The stack is determined to be excited by vortex shedding. Once lock-in resonance occurs, the guy wires are excited by the transverse motion of the stack. Large-amplitude oscillations of the guy wires are due to parametric resonance. Several methods are recommended to alleviate vibrational problem for short-term and long-term solutions. A new stack which is modified based on the results of this study is not subjected to any unacceptable oscillations.

Chen, S.S.; Cai, Y.

1992-01-01

325

Modular fuel-cell stack assembly  

DOEpatents

A fuel cell assembly having a plurality of fuel cells arranged in a stack. An end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at an end of said stack. The end plate assembly has an inlet area adapted to receive an exhaust gas from the stack, an outlet area and a passage connecting the inlet area and outlet area and adapted to carry the exhaust gas received at the inlet area from the inlet area to the outlet area. A further end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at a further opposing end of the stack. The further end plate assembly has a further inlet area adapted to receive a further exhaust gas from the stack, a further outlet area and a further passage connecting the further inlet area and further outlet area and adapted to carry the further exhaust gas received at the further inlet area from the further inlet area to the further outlet area.

Patel, Pinakin (Danbury, CT)

2010-07-13

326

Carboxyl-Peptide Plane Stacking Is Important for Stabilization of Buried E305 of Trichoderma reesei Cel5A.  

PubMed

Hydrogen bonds or salt bridges are usually formed to stabilize the buried ionizable residues. However, such interactions do not exist for two buried residues D271 and E305 of Trichoderma reesei Cel5A, an endoglucanase. Mutating D271 to alanine or leucine improves the enzyme thermostability quantified by the temperature T50 due to the elimination of the desolvation penalty of the aspartic acid. However, the same mutations for E305 decrease the enzyme thermostability. Free energy calculations based on the molecular dynamics simulation predict the thermostability of D271A, D271L, and E305A (compared to WT) in line with the experimental observation but overestimate the thermostability of E305L. Quantum mechanical calculations suggest that the carboxyl-peptide plane stacking interactions occurring to E305 but not D271 are important for the carboxyl group stabilization. For the protonated carboxyl group, the interaction energy can be as much as about -4 kcal/mol for parallel stacking and about -7 kcal/mol for T-shaped stacking. For the deprotonated carboxyl group, the largest interaction energies for parallel stacking and T-shaped stacking are comparable, about -7 kcal/mol. The solvation effect generally weakens the interaction, especially for the charged system. A search of the carboxyl-peptide plane stacking in the PDB databank indicates that parallel stacking but not T-shaped stacking is quite common, and the most probable distance between the two stacking fragments is close to the value predicted by the QM calculations. This work highlights the potential role of carboxyl amide ?-? stacking in the stabilization of aspartic acid and glutamic acid in proteins. PMID:25569819

He, Chunyan; Chen, Jingfei; An, Liaoyuan; Wang, Yefei; Shu, Zhiyu; Yao, Lishan

2015-01-26

327

Dynamic behaviour of SOFC short stacks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electrical output behaviour obtained on solid oxide fuel cell stacks, based on planar anode supported cells (50 or 100 cm 2 active area) and metallic interconnects, is reported. Stacks (1-12 cells) have been operated with cathode air and anode hydrogen flows between 750 and 800 °C operating temperature. At first polarisation, an activation phase (increase in power density) is typically observed, ascribed to the cathode but not clarified. Activation may extend over days or weeks. The materials are fairly resistant to thermal cycling. A 1-cell stack cycled five times in 4 days at heating/cooling rates of 100-300 K h -1, showed no accelerated degradation. In a 5-cell stack, open circuit voltage (OCV) of all cells remained constant after three full cycles (800-25 °C). Power output is little affected by air flow but markedly influenced by small fuel flow variation. Fuel utilisation reached 88% in one 5-cell stack test. Performance homogeneity between cells lay at ±4-8% for three different 5- or 6-cell stacks, but was poor for a 12-cell stack with respect to the border cells. Degradation of a 1-cell stack operated for 5500 h showed clear dependence on operating conditions (cell voltage, fuel conversion), believed to be related to anode reoxidation (Ni). A 6-cell stack (50 cm 2 cells) delivering 100 W el at 790 °C (1 kW el L -1 or 0.34 W cm -2) went through a fuel supply interruption and a thermal cycle, with one out of the six cells slightly underperforming after these events. This cell was eventually responsible (hot spot) for stack failure.

Molinelli, Michele; Larrain, Diego; Autissier, Nordahl; Ihringer, Raphaël; Sfeir, Joseph; Badel, Nicolas; Bucheli, Olivier; Van herle, Jan

328

40 CFR 52.345 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.345 Section...PLANS Colorado § 52.345 Stack height regulations. The State of Colorado has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2010-07-01

329

40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2347 Section...CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2010-07-01

330

40 CFR 52.345 - Stack height regulations.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.345 Section...PLANS Colorado § 52.345 Stack height regulations. The State of Colorado has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2014-07-01

331

40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2347 Section...CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2013-07-01

332

40 CFR 52.345 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.345 Section...PLANS Colorado § 52.345 Stack height regulations. The State of Colorado has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2011-07-01

333

40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2347 Section...CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2011-07-01

334

40 CFR 52.345 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.345 Section...PLANS Colorado § 52.345 Stack height regulations. The State of Colorado has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2012-07-01

335

40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2347 Section...CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2014-07-01

336

40 CFR 52.345 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.345 Section...PLANS Colorado § 52.345 Stack height regulations. The State of Colorado has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2013-07-01

337

40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2347 Section...CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2012-07-01

338

Teleseismic migration with dual bootstrap stack  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A recently developed stacking scheme called dual bootstrap stack (DBS) is applied to teleseismic migration, using deep earthquakes in South America as sources and USArray as receivers. Built with statistical tests for signal significance and coherence, DBS can achieve a clean separation of signal and noise, and unlike conventional non-linear stacks such as Nth-root stack (NRS) and phase-weighted stack (PWS), it can recover signals even when the signal-to-noise ratio is lower than unity. Migration results with DBS are compared with those with linear stack, NRS and PWS, and DBS-based migration is shown to be able to detect weak, small-scale scatterers that cannot be imaged by NRS and PWS and cannot be confidently identified by linear stack. Based on migration results reproducible among multiple data sets, a number of small-scale scatterers are suggested to exist in the top 400 km and the bottom 1500 km of the mantle in the study region. Though being time-consuming, teleseismic migration with DBS is suggested to be a promising tool to map out a variety of hitherto undetected small-scale heterogeneities in the mantle.

Korenaga, Jun

2014-03-01

339

Barrier RF stacking at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

A key issue to upgrade the luminosity of the Tevatron Run2 program and to meet the neutrino requirement of the NuMI experiment at Fermilab is to increase the proton intensity on the target. This paper introduces a new scheme to double the number of protons from the Main Injector (MI) to the pbar production target (Run2) and to the pion production target (NuMI). It is based on the fact that the MI momentum acceptance is about a factor of four larger than the momentum spread of the Booster beam. Two RF barriers--one fixed, another moving--are employed to confine the proton beam. The Booster beams are injected off-momentum into the MI and are continuously reflected and compressed by the two barriers. Calculations and simulations show that this scheme could work provided that the Booster beam momentum spread can be kept under control. Compared with slip stacking, a main advantage of this new method is small beam loading effect thanks to the low peak beam current. The RF barriers can be generated by an inductive device, which uses nanocrystal magnet alloy (Finemet) cores and fast high voltage MOSFET switches. This device has been designed and fabricated by a Fermilab-KEK-Caltech team. The first bench test was successful. Beam experiments are being planned.

Weiren Chou et al.

2003-06-04

340

Dynamical stability of slip-stacking particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

2014-09-01

341

Singlet exciton fission in polycrystalline thin films of a slip-stacked perylenediimide.  

PubMed

The crystal structure of N,N-bis(n-octyl)-2,5,8,11-tetraphenylperylene-3,4:9,10-bis(dicarboximide), 1, obtained by X-ray diffraction reveals that 1 has a nearly planar perylene core and ?-? stacks at a 3.5 Å interplanar distance in well-separated slip-stacked columns. Theory predicts that slip-stacked, ?-?-stacked structures should enhance interchromophore electronic coupling and thus favor singlet exciton fission. Photoexcitation of vapor-deposited polycrystalline 188 nm thick films of 1 results in a 140 ± 20% yield of triplet excitons ((3*)1) in ?(SF) = 180 ± 10 ps. These results illustrate a design strategy for producing perylenediimide and related rylene derivatives that have the optimized interchromophore electronic interactions which promote high-yield singlet exciton fission for potentially enhancing organic solar cell performance and charge separation in systems for artificial photosynthesis. PMID:24011336

Eaton, Samuel W; Shoer, Leah E; Karlen, Steven D; Dyar, Scott M; Margulies, Eric A; Veldkamp, Brad S; Ramanan, Charusheela; Hartzler, Daniel A; Savikhin, Sergei; Marks, Tobin J; Wasielewski, Michael R

2013-10-01

342

Stacked vapor fed amtec modules  

DOEpatents

The present invention pertains to a stacked AMTEC module. The invention includes a tubular member which has an interior. The member is comprised of a ion conductor that substantially conducts ions relative to electrons, preferably a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, positioned about the interior. A porous electrode for conducting electrons and allowing sodium ions to pass therethrough, and wherein electrons and sodium ions recombine to form sodium is positioned about the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte. The electrode is operated at a temperature and a pressure that allows the recombined sodium to vaporize. Additionally, an outer current collector grid for distributing electrons throughout the porous electrode is positioned about and contacts the porous electrode. Also included in the invention is transporting means for transporting liquid sodium to the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte of the tubular member. A transition piece is positioned about the interior of the member and contacts the transporting means. The transition piece divides the member into a first cell and a second cell such that each first and second cell has a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, a first and second porous electrode and a grid. The transition piece conducts electrons from the interior of the tubular member. There is supply means for supplying sodium to the transporting means. Preferably the supply means is a shell which surrounds the tubular member and is operated at a temperature such that the vaporized sodium condenses thereon. Returning means for returning the condensed sodium from the shell to the transporting means provides a continuous supply of liquid sodium to the transporting means. Also, there are first conducting means for conducting electric current from the transition piece which extends through the shell, and second conducting means for conducting electric current to the grid of the first cell which extends through the shell.

Sievers, Robert K. (North Huntingdon, PA)

1989-01-01

343

Wearable solar cells by stacking textile electrodes.  

PubMed

A new and general method to produce flexible, wearable dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) textiles by the stacking of two textile electrodes has been developed. A metal-textile electrode that was made from micrometer-sized metal wires was used as a working electrode, while the textile counter electrode was woven from highly aligned carbon nanotube fibers with high mechanical strengths and electrical conductivities. The resulting DSC textile exhibited a high energy conversion efficiency that was well maintained under bending. Compared with the woven DSC textiles that are based on wire-shaped devices, this stacked DSC textile unexpectedly exhibited a unique deformation from a rectangle to a parallelogram, which is highly desired in portable electronics. This lightweight and wearable stacked DSC textile is superior to conventional planar DSCs because the energy conversion efficiency of the stacked DSC textile was independent of the angle of incident light. PMID:24789065

Pan, Shaowu; Yang, Zhibin; Chen, Peining; Deng, Jue; Li, Houpu; Peng, Huisheng

2014-06-10

344

Characterization of Piezoelectric Stacks for Space Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Future NASA missions are increasingly seeking to actuate mechanisms to precision levels in the nanometer range and below. Co-fired multilayer piezoelectric stacks offer the required actuation precision that is needed for such mechanisms. To obtain performance statistics and determine reliability for extended use, sets of commercial PZT stacks were tested in various AC and DC conditions at both nominal and high temperatures and voltages. In order to study the lifetime performance of these stacks, five actuators were driven sinusoidally for up to ten billion cycles. An automated data acquisition system was developed and implemented to monitor each stack's electrical current and voltage waveforms over the life of the test. As part of the monitoring tests, the displacement, impedance, capacitance and leakage current were measured to assess the operation degradation. This paper presents some of the results of this effort.

Sherrit, Stewart; Jones, Christopher; Aldrich, Jack; Blodget, Chad; Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

2008-01-01

345

40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless...61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

2011-07-01

346

40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.  

...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless...61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

2014-07-01

347

40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless...61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

2012-07-01

348

40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless...61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

2013-07-01

349

StackOverview 2.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3  

E-print Network

17 Web #12;Web Web 81% Web Web Web Web StackOverview #12;1 1 2 Web 3 2.2.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3 Web 6 3.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3

Tanaka, Jiro

350

40 CFR 61.44 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium Rocket Motor Firing § 61.44 Stack sampling. ...61.42(b). (b) All samples shall be analyzed, and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30 days after...

2012-07-01

351

40 CFR 61.33 - Stack sampling.  

...FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium § 61.33 Stack sampling. (a) Unless a waiver...Administrator. (d) All samples shall be analyzed and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30 days after the...

2014-07-01

352

40 CFR 61.44 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium Rocket Motor Firing § 61.44 Stack sampling. ...61.42(b). (b) All samples shall be analyzed, and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30 days after...

2013-07-01

353

40 CFR 61.33 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium § 61.33 Stack sampling. (a) Unless a waiver...Administrator. (d) All samples shall be analyzed and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30 days after the...

2012-07-01

354

40 CFR 61.33 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium § 61.33 Stack sampling. (a) Unless a waiver...Administrator. (d) All samples shall be analyzed and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30 days after the...

2010-07-01

355

40 CFR 61.33 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium § 61.33 Stack sampling. (a) Unless a waiver...Administrator. (d) All samples shall be analyzed and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30 days after the...

2013-07-01

356

40 CFR 61.44 - Stack sampling.  

...FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium Rocket Motor Firing § 61.44 Stack sampling. ...61.42(b). (b) All samples shall be analyzed, and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30 days after...

2014-07-01

357

40 CFR 61.33 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium § 61.33 Stack sampling. (a) Unless a waiver...Administrator. (d) All samples shall be analyzed and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30 days after the...

2011-07-01

358

Dry stacking of wastewater treatment sludges.  

PubMed

Drying pans are used during wastewater treatment (WWT) to store, stabilise and dry residual solids. The pans are filled with sludge that dries via exposure to sunshine and wind. We propose that drying pans be operated based on dry stacking principles, a technique with proven success in the mineral processing industry. The implementation of the dry stacking technique requires very little in the way of additional engineering beyond a conventional drying pan. By applying the sludge in thin layers, the sludge naturally forms its own stack with an angle that is dependent on the consistency of the material. The benefits of dry stacking are that the slope allows instantaneous run-off of rainfall and supernatant, allowing operation throughout the year rather than seasonally. The layering approach also maximises the evaporation achieved in the available deposition area compared to filling the pans sequentially. A series of laboratory tests were carried out on samples from Melbourne Water's Western Treatment Plant in Werribee, Australia, to provide validation of the dry stacking concept for WWT sludges. Rheological tests showed that samples had appropriate flow properties to form stacks. Drying and re-wetting tests on the samples indicated that a sloped, partially dry sludge sheds rainfall, depending on the slope, cake dryness and amount of rainfall. Local rainfall data was used to estimate a potential increase in pan throughput of 65%-140% due to dry stacking. The greatest improvements were predicted to occur during wetter years. In combination, the results indicated that dry stacking has the potential to dramatically improve the performance of WWT sludge drying pans. PMID:23642401

Stickland, Anthony D; Rees, Catherine A; Mosse, Kim P M; Dixon, David R; Scales, Peter J

2013-06-15

359

Stack Characterization System Development and Testing  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, as well as the rest of the U.S. Department of Energy community, has numerous off-gas stacks that need to be decommissioned, demolished, and packaged for disposal. Disposal requires a waste disposition determination phase. Process knowledge typically makes a worst-case scenario decision that may place lower-level waste into a more expensive higher-level waste disposal category. Truly useful radiological and chemical sampling can be problematic on old stacks due to their inherent height and access hazards, and many of these stacks have begun to deteriorate structurally. A remote stack characterization system (SCS) that can manage sample and data collection removes people from the hazards and provides an opportunity for access to difficult to reach internal stack areas. The SCS is a remotely operated articulated radiological data recovery system designed to deploy down into off-gas stacks from the top via crane. The battery-powered SCS is designed to stabilize itself against the stack walls and move various data recovery systems into areas of interest on the inner stack walls. Stabilization is provided by a tripod structure; sensors are mounted in a rotatable bipod underneath the tripod. Sensors include a beta/gamma/alpha detector, a removable contaminant multi-sample automated sampler, and a multi-core remote core drill. Multiple cameras provide remote task viewing, support for sampling, and video documentation of the process. A delay in funding has delayed project delivery somewhat. Therefore, this paper describes the technology and shows fabrication and testing progress to the extent that data is available.

Noakes, Mark W [ORNL] [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL] [ORNL; Lloyd, Peter D [ORNL] [ORNL; Pin, Francois G [ORNL] [ORNL; Rowe, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01

360

Derived categories and stacks in physics  

E-print Network

In this note we review how both derived categories and stacks enter physics. The physical realization of each has many formal similarities. For example, in both cases, equivalences are realized via renormalization group flow: in the case of derived categories, (boundary) renormalization group flow realizes the mathematical procedure of localization on quasi-isomorphisms, and in the case of stacks, worldsheet renormalization group flow realizes presentation-independence. For both, we outline current technical issues and applications.

E. Sharpe

2006-09-13

361

Study of the tau- ---> pi- pi- pi+ pi0 pi0 nu/tau and tau- --> 3h- 2h+ nu/tau Decays Using the BaBar Detector  

SciTech Connect

The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -} 2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decays have been studied using the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. Preliminary branching fractions are given for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and to the sub-channels {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}(782){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}. A preliminary upper limit is given on the branching fraction for the {phi}(1020){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} mode. In addition a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -}2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay (h = {pi}, K) is presented.

Sobie, R.; /Victoria U.

2005-06-21

362

Study of J/psi pi+ pi- States Produced in B0 to J/psi pi+ pi- K^0 and B- to J/psi pi+ pi- K-  

SciTech Connect

We present results of a search for the X(3872) in B{sup 0} {yields} X(3872)K{sub S}{sup 0}, X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, improved measurements of B{sup -} {yields} X(3872)K{sup -}, and a study of the J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mass region above the X(3872). We use 232 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric-energy storage rings. The results include the 90% confidence interval 1.34 x 10{sup -6} < {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} X(3872)K{sup 0}, X {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 10.3 x 10{sup -6} and the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} X(3872)K{sup -}, X {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (10.1 {+-} 2.5 {+-} 1.0) x 10{sup -6}. We observe a (2.7 {+-} 1.3 {+-} 0.2) MeV/c{sup 2} mass difference of the X(3872) produced in the two decay modes. Furthermore, we find an excess of J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} events with an invariant mass just above 4.2 GeV/c{sup 2} that is consistent with recent observations in initial state radiation events.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

2005-07-27

363

Physical Models of Noncovalent Interactions Involving Aromatic Rings  

E-print Network

-established local direct interaction model for ?-stacking that substituent effects are due solely to local electrostatic changes has also been expanded herein. First, we show that the local direct model for substituent effects in ?-stacking also applies to polar XH...

Bloom, Jacob Walter Goldstein

2014-04-17

364

Charge transport through a molecular ?-stack: double helical DNA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Double helical DNA, containing a ?-stacked array of base pairs within its interior, can be considered as a molecular analogue of solid state ?-stacked arrays. Like the solid state materials, the DNA base pair stack provides a medium to facilitate charge transport. However, owing to the dynamical motions of the base pairs within the molecular stack, as well as sequence-dependent

Christopher R. Treadway; Michael G. Hill; Jacqueline K. Barton

2002-01-01

365

INSTANTONS AND FRAMED SHEAVES ON KAHLER DELIGNE-MUMFORD STACKS  

E-print Network

analytic stacks 3 3. Differential geometry on smooth Deligne-Mumford analytic and differentiable stacks 7 4. Hermite-Einstein metrics on compact K¨ahler Deligne-Mumford analytic stacks 11 5. Hermite-Einstein metrics on some noncompact K¨ahler Deligne-Mumford analytic stacks 12 6. An application: orbifold

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

366

Stacking in colloidal nanoplatelets: tuning excitonic properties.  

PubMed

Colloidal semiconductor quantum wells, also commonly known as nanoplatelets (NPLs), have arisen among the most promising materials for light generation and harvesting applications. Recently, NPLs have been found to assemble in stacks. However, their emerging characteristics essential to these applications have not been previously controlled or understood. In this report, we systematically investigate and present excitonic properties of controlled column-like NPL assemblies. Here, by a controlled gradual process, we show that stacking in colloidal quantum wells substantially increases exciton transfer and trapping. As NPLs form into stacks, surprisingly we find an order of magnitude decrease in their photoluminescence quantum yield, while the transient fluorescence decay is considerably accelerated. These observations are corroborated by ultraefficient Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in the stacked NPLs, in which exciton migration is estimated to be in the ultralong range (>100 nm). Homo-FRET (i.e., FRET among the same emitters) is found to be ultraefficient, reaching levels as high as 99.9% at room temperature owing to the close-packed collinear orientation of the NPLs along with their large extinction coefficient and small Stokes shift, resulting in a large Förster radius of ?13.5 nm. Consequently, the strong and long-range homo-FRET boosts exciton trapping in nonemissive NPLs, acting as exciton sink centers, quenching photoluminescence from the stacked NPLs due to rapid nonradiative recombination of the trapped excitons. The rate-equation-based model, which considers the exciton transfer and the radiative and nonradiative recombination within the stacks, shows an excellent match with the experimental data. These results show the critical significance of stacking control in NPL solids, which exhibit completely different signatures of homo-FRET as compared to that in colloidal nanocrystals due to the absence of inhomogeneous broadening. PMID:25469555

Guzelturk, Burak; Erdem, Onur; Olutas, Murat; Kelestemur, Yusuf; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

2014-12-23

367

Synthesis of aluminium indium nitride (AlInN) thin films by stacked elemental layers method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AlInN thin films were synthesized on Si substrates by using stacked elemental layers (SEL) technique. Three stacking sequence Al/InN, Al/InN/Al/InN and Al/InN/Al/InN/Al/InN were prepared on Si (1 0 0) substrates by reactive RF sputtering of In target in Ar-N2 and DC sputtering of Al target in Ar atmosphere at room temperature. Annealing of the deposited stacks was carried out at 400 °C for 6 h in a three zone tube furnace. Structural properties of the annealed films were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) whereas the surface analysis of the films was carried out using field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). XRD results show the formation of wurtzite AlInN thin films which become more obvious with increasing the stacked layers. FESEM analysis reveals drops-like polycrystalline films structure with randomly oriented grains whereas the AFM results show a decrease in the surface roughness with increasing stacking sequence. The formation of more prominent AlInN films with increase of stacking layers is attributed to a uniform interaction among the top and bottom Al and InN multilayers as a result of the annealing.

Afzal, Naveed; Devarajan, Mutharasu; Ibrahim, Kamarulazizi

2014-07-01

368

Modeling theta-theta Interactions with the Effective Fragment Potential Method: The Benzene Dimer and Substituents  

SciTech Connect

This study compares the results of the general effective fragment potential (EFP2) method to the results of a previous combined coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) study [Sinnokrot and Sherrill, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2004, 126, 7690] on substituent effects in {pi}-{pi} interactions. EFP2 is found to accurately model the binding energies of the benzene-benzene, benzene-phenol, benzene-toluene, benzene-fluorobenzene, and benzene-benzonitrile dimers, as compared with high-level methods [Sinnokrot and Sherrill, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2004, 126, 7690], but at a fraction of the computational cost of CCSD(T). In addition, an EFP-based Monte Carlo/simulated annealing study was undertaken to examine the potential energy surface of the substituted dimers.

Toni Smithl; Lyudmila V. Slipchenko; Mark S. Gordon

2008-02-27

369

Inflatable containment diaphragm for sealing and removing stacks  

DOEpatents

A diaphragm with an inflatable torus-shaped perimeter is used to seal at least one end of a stack so that debris that might be hazardous will not be released during removal of the stack. A diaphragm is inserted and inflated in the lower portion of a stack just above where the stack is to be cut such that the perimeter of the diaphragm expands and forms a seal against the interior surface of the stack.

Meskanick, G.R.; Rosso, D.T.

1993-04-13