Sample records for pi-pi stacking interaction

  1. Homeotropic alignment of the lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal Sunset Yellow FCF using pi-pi stacking chemical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Han, Ganghee; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Lubensky, Tom C.; Collings, Peter J.; Yodh, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the homeotropic alignment of the lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal, Sunset Yellow FCF (SSY), using pi-pi stacking interactions between the SSY molecules and (1) thin parylene films or (2) a graphene monolayer. The nematic and columnar phases of SSY molecules arise via self-assembly in water into stacks through non-covalent attractions between the SSY molecules. Interestingly, we find that the same non-covalent interactions between SSY molecules and a parylene or graphene alignment layer lead to homeotropic anchoring of these stacks. The nematic phase of SSY is introduced between two glass substrates coated with parylene films or graphene monolayers, and homeotropic alignment of SSY is confirmed by polarized optical microscopy and conoscopy. Additionally, we observe and can explain the stripe domains that occur during cooling of the sample in this cell, and we consider possible novel applications for homeotropically aligned chromonic liquid crystals.

  2. A series of Cd(II) complexes with {pi}-{pi} stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions: Structural diversities by varying the ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiuli, E-mail: wangxiuli@bhu.edu.c [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Zhang Jinxia; Liu Guocheng; Lin Hongyan [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121000 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Seven new Cd(II) complexes consisting of different phenanthroline derivatives and organic acid ligands, formulated as [Cd(PIP){sub 2}(dnba){sub 2}] (1), [Cd(PIP)(ox)].H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd(PIP)(1,4-bdc)(H{sub 2}O)].4H{sub 2}O (3), [Cd(3-PIP){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].4H{sub 2}O (4), [Cd{sub 2}(3-PIP){sub 4}(4,4'-bpdc)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].5H{sub 2}O (5), [Cd(3-PIP)(nip)(H{sub 2}O)].H{sub 2}O (6), [Cd{sub 2}(TIP){sub 4}(4,4'-bpdc)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O (7) (PIP=2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, 3-PIP=2-(3-pyridyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, TIP=2-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, Hdnba=3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, H{sub 2}ox=oxalic acid, 1,4-H{sub 2}bdc=benzene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid, 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpdc=biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid, H{sub 2}nip=5-nitroisophthalic acid) have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Complexes 1 and 4 possess mononuclear structures; complexes 5 and 7 are isostructural and have dinuclear structures; complexes 2 and 3 feature 1D chain structures; complex 6 contains 1D double chain, which are further extended to a 3D supramolecular structure by {pi}-{pi} stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions. The N-donor ligands with extended {pi}-system and organic acid ligands play a crucial role in the formation of the final supramolecular frameworks. Moreover, thermal properties and fluorescence of 1-7 are also investigated. -- Graphical abstract: Seven new supramolecular architectures have been successfully isolated under hydrothermal conditions by reactions of different phen derivatives and Cd(II) salts together with organic carboxylate anions auxiliary ligands. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Complexes 1-7 are 0D or 1D polymeric structure, the {pi}-{pi} stacking and H-bonding interactions extend the complexes into 3D supramolecular network. To our knowledge, systematic study on {pi}-{pi} stacking and H-bonding interactions in cadmium(II) complexes are still limited. {yields} The structural differences among the title complexes indicate the importance of N-donor chelating ligands for the creation of molecular architectures. {yields} The thermal and fluorescence properties of title complexes have also been reported.

  3. Final state interactions in B --> pi pi K and B--> K antiK K decays

    E-print Network

    L. Lesniak; A. Furman; R. Kaminski; B. El-Bennich; B. Loiseau

    2006-09-07

    Analysis of charged and neutral B meson decays into pi+ pi- K, K+ K- K and K0S K0S K0S is performed using a unitary representation of the pi pi and K anti- K final state interactions. Comparison of the theoretical model with the experimental data of the Belle and BaBar Collaborations indicates that charming penguin contributions are necessary to describe the B --> f0(980) K and B --> rho(770) K decays.

  4. Photo-induced spin transition of Iron(III) compounds with pi-pi intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Hayami, Shinya; Hiki, Kenji; Kawahara, Takayoshi; Maeda, Yonezo; Urakami, Daisuke; Inoue, Katsuya; Ohama, Mitsuo; Kawata, Satoshi; Sato, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    Iron(III) spin-crossover compounds [Fe(pap)(2)]ClO(4) (1), [Fe(pap)(2)]BF(4) (2), [Fe(pap)(2)]PF(6) (3), [Fe(qsal)(2)]NCS (4), and [Fe(qsal)(2)]NCSe (5) (Hpap=2-(2-pyridylmethyleneamino)phenol and Hqsal=2-[(8-quinolinylimino)methyl]phenol) were prepared and their spin-transition properties investigated by magnetic susceptibility and Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements. The iron(III) compounds exhibited spin transition with thermal hysteresis. Single crystals of the iron(III) compounds were obtained as suitable solvent adducts for X-ray analysis, and structures in high-spin (HS) and low-spin (LS) states were revealed. Light-induced excited-spin-state trapping (LIESST) effects of the iron(III) compounds were induced by light irradiation at 532 nm for 1-3 and at 800 nm for 4 and 5. The activation energy E(a) and the low-temperature tunneling rate k(HL)(T-->0) of iron(III) LIESST compound 1 were estimated to be 1079 cm(-1) and 2.4x10(-8) s(-1), respectively, by HS-->LS relaxation experiments. The Huang-Rhys factor S of 1 was also estimated to be 50, which was similar to that expected for iron(II) complexes. It is thought that the slow relaxation in iron(III) systems is achieved by the large structural distortion between HS and LS states. Introduction of strong intermolecular interactions, such as pi-pi stacking, can also play an important role in the relaxation behavior, because it can enhance the structural distortion of the LIESST complex. PMID:19191246

  5. Self-assembled nanolayers of conjugated silane with pi-pi interlocking.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinyue; Lima, Ocelio V; Pei, Yong; Jiang, Zhang; Chen, Ziguang; Yu, Chichao; Wang, Jin; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Forsythe, Eric; Tan, Li

    2010-07-27

    The packing of electronic molecules into planar structures and an ensured pi-pi interaction within the plane are preferred for efficient organic transistors. Thin films of organic electronics are exemplar, but the widely adopted molecular design and associated fabrication lead to limited ordering in multistack construction motifs. Here we demonstrate self-assembled nanolayers of organic molecules having potential electronic utility using an amphiphilic silane as a building block. Unlike a cross-linked (tetrahedral) configuration found in conventional siloxane networks, a linear polymer chain is produced following silane polycondensation. As a result, hydrophobic branches plus a noncovalent pi-pi interlocking between the molecules promote planar packing and continuous stacking along the surface normal. In contrast to conventional pi-pi stacking or hydrogen bonding pathways in a fibrous construct, multistacked nanolayers with coexisting pi-pi and herringbone interlocking can provide unmatched properties and processing convenience in molecular electronics. PMID:20518569

  6. Observation of eta_c(1S) and eta_c(2S) decays to K K-pi pi-pi0 in two-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, P.del Amo

    2011-05-20

    We study the processes {gamma}{gamma} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and {gamma}{gamma} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} using a data sample of 519.2 fb{sup -1} recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at center-of-mass energies near the {Upsilon}(nS) (n = 2, 3, 4) resonances. We observe the {eta}{sub c}(1S), {chi}{sub c0}(1P), {chi}{sub c2}(1P), and {eta}{sub c}(2S) resonances produced in two-photon interactions and decaying to K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, with significances of 18.1, 5.7, 5.2, and 5.3 standard deviations (including systematic errors), respectively. We measure the {eta}{sub c}(2S) mass and width in K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decays, m({eta}{sub c}(2S)) = 3638.5 {+-} 1.5 {+-} 0.8 MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}({eta}{sub c}(2S)) = 13.4 {+-} 4.6 {+-} 3.2 MeV, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We search for the Z(3930) resonance and find no significant signal. We also provide the two-photon width times branching fraction values for the observed resonances.

  7. Measurement of ratio R = (BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi}{pi}{pi})/BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi})) in {pi}{sup -}-Nucleus interactions at 500 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Solano Salinas, C. J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria (Peru); CINVESTAV Merida (Mexico); Paucarchuco, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria (Peru); Fernandez, A. [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico); Sheaff, M. [University of Wisconsin (United States)

    2007-10-26

    We report a very preliminary result on the measurement of the ratio of branching ratios, for two decays D{sup 0} meson, R = (BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi}{pi}{pi})/BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi})), using data from the E791 experiment. We find R = 1.96{+-}0.0286 (stat){+-}0.06 (sys). This is in agreement with and of similar precision to the current PDG average value 1.97{+-}0.09.

  8. D+ -> K- pi+ pi+ : heavy meson decays and final state interactions

    E-print Network

    P. C. Magalhães; M. R. Robilotta; K. S. F. F. Guimarães; T. Frederico; W. S. de Paula; I. Bediaga; A. C. dos Reis; C. M. Maekawa

    2013-07-31

    We show that final state interactions are important in shaping Dalitz plots for the decay $D^+ \\rar K^- \\p^+ \\p^+$. The theoretical treatment of this reaction requires a blend of several weak and hadronic processes and hence it is necessarily involved. In this talk we present results from a calculation which is still in progress, but has already unveiled the role of important dynamical mechanisms. We do not consider explicit quark degrees of freedom and our study is performed within an effective hadronic framework. In spite of the relatively wide window of energies available in the Dalitz plot for the $D^+$ decay, we depart from $SU(3)\\times SU(3)$ chiral perturbation theory and extend its range by means of unitarization. Our present results, which concentrate on the vector weak vertex, describe qualitative features of the modulus of the decay amplitude and agrees well with its phase in the elastic region.

  9. Dalitz plot analysis of B±-->pi±pi±pi-\\/+ decays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; E. Prencipe; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Lynch; I. L. Osipenkov; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; C. M. Hawkes; N. Soni; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. J. Asgeirsson; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; A. Randle-Conde; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; H. Atmacan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; G. M. Vitug; Z. Yasin; L. Zhang; V. Sharma; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; A. J. Martinez; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; L. O. Winstrom; C. H. Cheng; D. A. Doll; B. Echenard; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; J. F. Hirschauer; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; J. G. Smith; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; M. Karbach; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; M. J. Kobel; R. Nogowski; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; S. Playfer; J. E. Watson; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; V. Santoro; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; R. Contri; E. Guido; M. Lo Vetere; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; A. Adametz; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; F. U. Bernlochner; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; J. Firmino da Costa; G. Grosdidier; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; C. K. Clarke; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; S. Paramesvaran; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; W. Gradl; A. Hafner; K. E. Alwyn; D. Bailey; R. J. Barlow; G. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; S. W. Henderson; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; M. Schram; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; S. Stracka; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; M. Simard; P. Taras; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; G. Onorato; C. Sciacca; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; W. F. Wang; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; G. Castelli; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; P. Del Amo Sanchez; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; J. Chauveau; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; S. Sitt; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; G. Calderini; M. Carpinelli; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; G. Marchiori; M. Morganti; N. Neri; E. Paoloni; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; D. Lopes Pegna; C. Lu; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith; A. V. Telnov; F. Anulli; E. Baracchini; G. Cavoto; R. Faccini; F. Ferrarotto; F. Ferroni; M. Gaspero; P. D. Jackson; L. Li Gioi; M. A. Mazzoni; S. Morganti; G. Piredda; F. Renga; C. Voena; M. Ebert; T. Hartmann; H. Schröder; R. Waldi; T. Adye; B. Franek; E. O. Olaiya; F. F. Wilson; S. Emery; L. Esteve; G. Hamel de Monchenault; W. Kozanecki; G. Vasseur; Ch. Yèche; M. Zito; X. R. Chen; H. Liu; M. V. Purohit; R. M. White; J. R. Wilson; M. T. Allen; D. Aston; R. Bartoldus; J. F. Benitez; R. Cenci; J. P. Coleman; M. R. Convery; J. C. Dingfelder; J. Dorfan; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; W. Dunwoodie

    2009-01-01

    We present a Dalitz plot analysis of charmless B± decays to the final state pi±pi±pi-\\/+ using a sample of (465±5)×106 B Bmacr pairs collected by the BABAR experiment at s=10.58GeV. We measure the branching fractions B(B±-->pi±pi±pi-\\/+)=(15.2±0.6±1.2±0.4)×10-6, B(B±-->rho0(770)pi±)=(8.1±0.7±1.2-1.1+0.4)×10-6, B(B±-->f2(1270)pi±)=(1.57±0.42±0.16-0.19+0.53)×10-6, and B(B±-->pi±pi±pi-\\/+nonresonant)=(5.3±0.7±0.6-0.5+1.1)×10-6, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and model-dependent, respectively. Measurements of branching fractions for the modes B±-->rho0(1450)pi± and B±-->f0(1370)pi± are

  10. Partial wave analysis of J\\/psi-->gamma(pi+pi- pi+pi-)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. G. Bian; A. D. Chen; G. P. Chen; H. F. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; X. D. Chen; Y. Chen; B. S. Cheng; X. Z. Cui; H. L. Ding; L. Y. Dong; Z. Z. Du; C. S. Gao; M. L. Gao; S. Q. Gao; J. H. Gu; S. D. Gu; W. X. Gu; Y. N. Guo; Z. J. Guo; S. W. Han; Y. Han; J. He; K. L. He; M. He; Y. K. Heng; G. Y. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. L. Hu; Q. H. Hu; T. Hu; G. S. Huang; X. P. Huang; Y. Z. Huang; C. H. Jiang; Y. Jin; X. Ju; Z. J. Ke; Y. F. Lai; P. F. Lang; C. G. Li; D. Li; H. B. Li; J. Li; P. Q. Li; W. Li; X. H. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Z. C. Li; B. Liu; F. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; R. G. Liu; Y. Liu; Z. X. Liu; G. R. Lu; F. Lu; J. G. Lu; X. L. Luo; E. C. Ma; J. M. Ma; H. S. Mao; Z. P. Mao; X. C. Meng; X. H. Mo; J. Nie; N. D. Qi; X. R. Qi; C. D. Qian; J. F. Qiu; Y. H. Qu; Y. K. Que; G. Rong; Y. Y. Shao; B. W. Shen; D. L. Shen; H. Shen; X. Y. Shen; F. Shi; H. Z. Shi; X. F. Song; H. S. Sun; L. F. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; S. Q. Tang; G. L. Tong; F. Wang; L. Wang; L. Z. Wang; P. Wang; S. M. Wang; Y. Y. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; C. L. Wei; N. Wu; Y. G. Wu; D. M. Xi; X. M. Xia; Y. H. Xie; G. F. Xu; S. T. Xue; J. Yan; W. G. Yan; C. M. Yang; C. Y. Yang; H. X. Yang; X. F. Yang; M. H. Ye; S. W. Ye; Y. X. Ye; C. S. Yu; C. X. Yu; G. W. Yu; Y. H. Yu; Z. Q. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. L. Zhang; J. Zhang; L. Zhang; P. Zhang; Q. J. Zhang; S. Q. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Y. Zhang; D. X. Zhao; H. W. Zhao; J. Zhao; M. Zhao; W. R. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; J. P. Zheng; L. S. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; B. Q. Zhou; L. Zhou; K. J. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; B. A. Zhuang; D. V. Bugg; B. S. Zou; I. Scott

    2000-01-01

    BES data on J\\/psi-->gamma(pi+pi- pi+pi-) have been analyzed into partial waves. We fit with resonances having JPC=2++ at 1275 MeV, 0++ at 1500 MeV, 2++ at 1565 MeV, 0++ at 1740 MeV, 2++ at 1940 MeV and 0++ at 2104 MeV, plus a broad 0- component. The 0++ resonances decay dominantly to \\/sigmasigma, while 2++ resonances in the high mass

  11. Amplitude analysis of the decay B±-->pi±pi±pi-\\/+

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; A. Pompili; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; A. B. Breon; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; C. T. Day; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; M. Fritsch; K. Goetzen; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; N. Chevalier; W. N. Cottingham; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; A. E. Blinov; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; A. N. Yushkov; D. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; C. Buchanan; B. L. Hartfiel; A. J. R. Weinstein; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; D. Del Re; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; D. B. Macfarlane; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; W. Verkerke; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; R. Andreassen; S. Jayatilleke; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; P. Rankin; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; Q. Zeng; D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; J. Brose; M. Dickopp; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; R. Nogowski; S. Otto; A. Petzold; G. Schott; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; S. Schrenk; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; D. J. Bard; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; V. Azzolini; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; L. Piemontese; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; E. Won; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; U. Langenegger; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. R. Gaillard; G. W. Morton; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; G. P. Taylor; W. P. Vazquez; M. J. Charles; W. F. Mader; U. Mallik; A. K. Mohapatra; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; J. Yi; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; X. Giroux; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; T. C. Petersen; M. Pierini; S. Plaszczynski; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; M. C. Simani; D. M. Wright; A. J. Bevan; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; R. J. Parry; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; C. M. Cormack; F. Di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; C. M. Brown; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; M. G. Green; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; C. L. Edgar; M. C. Hodgkinson; M. P. Kelly; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; D. Kovalskyi; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; V. B. Koptchev; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; S. Willocq; R. Cowan; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; P. Taras; B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. De Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca

    2005-01-01

    We present a Dalitz-plot analysis of charmless B± decays to the final state pi±pi±pi-\\/+ using 210fb-1 of data recorded by the BABAR experiment at s=10.58GeV. We measure the branching fractions B(B±-->pi±pi±pi-\\/+)=(16.2±1.2±0.9)×10-6 and B(B±-->rho0(770)pi±)=(8.8±1.0±0.6-0.7+0.1)×10-6. Measurements of branching fractions for the quasi-two-body decays B±-->rho0(1450)pi±, B±-->f0(980)pi± and B±-->f2(1270)pi± are also presented. We observe no charge asymmetries for the above modes, and there is

  12. Dipole interaction model predicted pi-pi* circular dichroism of cyclo(L-Pro)3 using structures created by semi-empirical, ab initio, and molecular mechanics methods.

    PubMed

    Lowe, S L; Pandey, R R; Czlapinski, J; Kie-Adams, G; Hoffmann, M R; Thomasson, K A; Pierce, K S

    2003-04-01

    Cyclo(l-Pro)3 (CP3) is a synthetic peptide created to model cis and torsionally strained peptide bonds that also exhibits a strong distinctive UV circular dichroic (CD) spectrum. Circular dichroic spectra were computed for the amide pi-pi* transition using the dipole interaction model for various conformations of the peptide. Conformations of CP3 were created initially from crystal data, and followed by energy minimizations via molecular mechanics using the cvff force field; the effects of additional geometric optimizations by semi-empirical and ab initio quantum mechanics were investigated. The CD spectra for each conformation were calculated using a variety of different parameters, and each result was compared with the published experimental spectrum [Deber, C.M., Scatturin, A., Vaidya, V.M. & Blout, E.R. (1970) Small cyclic proline peptides: UV absorption and CD. In: Peptides: Chemistry and Biochemistry, Proceedings of the First American Peptide Symposium (Weinstein, B., ed.), Marcel Dekker, New York pp. 163-173]. Herein, two distinct conformations, a C3 symmetric and an asymmetric form, gave CD predictions that separately did not resemble the experimental spectrum. Energy differences were predicted at various theoretical levels, including MP2 and density functional theory. When the predicted CD spectra for each conformation were multiplied by Boltzmann weighting factors created using heats of formation determined by the AM1 optimizations, the weighted composite CD spectrum created did resemble experiment for the pi-pi* transition indicating that both conformations may exist simultaneously in solution. PMID:12605604

  13. Role of multichannel pi pi scattering in decays of bottomia

    E-print Network

    Surovtsev, Yurii S; Gutsche, Thomas; Kaminski, Robert; Lyubovitskij, Valery E; Nagy, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    The effect of isoscalar S-wave multichannel pi pi -> pi pi, K antiK, eta eta scattering is considered in the analysis of decay data of the Upsilon-mesons. We show that when allowing for the final state interaction contribution to the decays Upsilon(mS) -> Upsilon(nS) pi pi (m>n, m=2,3, n=1,2) in our model-independent approach, we can explain the two-pion energetic spectra of these Upsilon transitions including the two-humped shape of the di-pion mass distribution in Upsilon(3S) -> Upsilon(1S) pi pi as the coupled-channel effect. It is shown also that the considered bottomia decay data do not offer new insights into the nature of the f0 mesons, which were not already deduced in our previous analyses of pseudoscalar meson scattering data.

  14. Structural and luminescence studies on pi...pi and Pt...Pt interactions in mixed chloro-isocyanide cyclometalated platinum(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Díez, Alvaro; Forniés, Juan; Larraz, Carmen; Lalinde, Elena; López, José A; Martín, Antonio; Moreno, M Teresa; Sicilia, Violeta

    2010-04-01

    [Pt(bzq)Cl(CNR)] [bzq = benzoquinolinate; R = tert-butyl ((t)Bu 1), 2-6-dimethylphenyl (Xyl 2), 2-naphthyl (2-Np 3)] complexes have been synthesized and structurally and photophysically characterized. 1 was found to co-crystallize in two distinct pseudopolymorphs: a red form, which exhibits an infinite 1D-chain ([1](infinity)) and a yellow form, which contains discrete dimers ([1](2)), both stabilized by interplanar pi...pi (bzq) and short Pt...Pt bonding interactions. Complex 3, generated through the unexpected garnet-red double salt isomer [Pt(bzq)(CN-2-Np)(2)][Pt(bzq)Cl(2)] 4, crystallizes as yellow Pt...Pt dimers ([3](2)), while 2 only forms pi...pi (bzq) contacting dimers. Their electronic absorption and luminescence behaviors have been investigated. According to Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) calculations, the lowest-lying absorption (CH(2)Cl(2)) has been attributed to combined (1)ILCT and (1)MLCT/(1)ML'CT (L = bzq, L' = CNR) transitions, the latter increasing from 1 to 3. In solid state, while the yellow form [1](2) exhibits a green (3)MLCT unstructured emission only at 77 K, the 1-D form [1](infinity) displays a characteristic low-energy red emission (672 nm, 298 K; 744 nm, 77 K) attributed to a mixed (3)MMCT [d(sigma*)-->p(sigma)]/(3)MMLCT [dsigma*(M(2))-->sigma(pi*)(bzq)] excited state. However, upon exposure to standard atmospheric conditions, [1](infinity) shows an irreversible change to an orange-ochre solid, whose emissive properties are similar to those of the crude 1. Complexes 2 and 3 (77 K) exhibit a structured emission from discrete fragments ((3)LC/(3)MLCT), whereas the luminescence of the garnet-red salt 4 is dominated by a low energy emission (680 nm, 298 K; 730 nm, 77 K) arising from a (3)MMLCT excited state. Solvent (CH(2)Cl(2), toluene, 2-MeTHF and CH(3)CN) and concentration-dependent emission studies at 298 K and at 77 K are also reported for 1-3. In CH(2)Cl(2) solution, the low phosphorescent emission band is ascribed to bzq intraligand charge transfer (3)ILCT mixed with metal-to-ligand (L = bzq, L' = CNR) charge transfer (3)MLCT/(3)ML'CT character with the Pt to CNR contribution increasing from 1 to 3, according to computational studies. PMID:20218654

  15. The pi -> pi pi process in nuclei and the restoration of chiral symmetry

    E-print Network

    N. Grion; M. Bregant; P. Camerini; E. Fragiacomo; S. Piano; R. Rui; E. F. Gibson; G. Hofman; E. L. Mathie; R. Meier; M. E. Sevior; G. R. Smith; R. Tacik; for the CHAOS Collaboration

    2005-08-24

    The results of an extensive campaign of measurements of the pi -> pi pi process in the nucleon and nuclei at intermediate energies are presented. The measurements were motivated by the study of strong pi pi correlations in nuclei. The analysis relies on the composite ratio C_{pi pi}^A, which accounts for the clear effect of the nuclear medium on the (pi pi) system. The comparison of the C_{pi pi}^A distributions for the (pi pi)_{I=J=0} and (pi pi)_{I=0,J=2} systems to the model predictions indicates that the C_{pi pi}^A behavior in proximity of the 2m_pi threshold is explainable through the partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclei.

  16. Synthesis, structure, and transannular pi-pi interaction of three- and four-layered [3.3]paracyclophanes.

    PubMed

    Shibahara, Masahiko; Watanabe, Motonori; Iwanaga, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Taisuke; Ideta, Keiko; Shinmyozu, Teruo

    2008-06-20

    The synthesis of three- and four-layered [3.3]paracyclophanes ([3.3]PCPs) 3-5 has been accomplished by utilizing the (p-ethylbenzenesulfonyl)methyl isocyanide (EbsMIC) method. The structures of the three- to four-layered [3.3]PCPs 3- 5 and their diones 8, 10, and 11 have been elucidated based on the (1)H NMR spectra and finally by X-ray structural analysis. In the three-layered [3.3]PCP-dione 8, the trimethylene bridges of the [3.3]PCP unit assume a chair conformation similar to that of 2, while the [3.3]PCP-2,11-dione unit assumes a boat conformation different from that of [3.3]PCP-dione 1 with a chair conformation. On the other hand, the two [3.3]PCP units in three-layered [3.3]PCP 3 both assume a boat conformation. In the four-layered [3.3]PCP-dione 10, the two outer [3.3]PCP units assume a boat conformation while the inner dione unit has a chair conformation. The trimethylene bridges in the four-layered [3.3]PCP 4 are highly disordered even at -150 degrees C. All the outer benzene rings are distorted into a boat form while the inner ones are distorted into a twist form. In the electronic spectra, bathochromic shift and hyperchromic effect are observed, but the magnitude decreases with an increase in the number of layers and the spectra become structureless. In the charge-transfer (CT) bands of the three- to four-layered [3.3]PCPs 3- 5 with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), two absorption maxima (lambda(max)) are observed. The effect of an increase in the layers becomes significant, and the changes in the longest wavelength lambda(max) values from two to three and three to four are ca. 60 and 50 nm, respectively. By comparison of the stereoisomeric four-layered [3.3]PCPs 4 (meso) and 5 (racemic), the helical arrangement of the trimethylene bridges of 5 shows a more efficient transannular pi-electronic interaction. In the three- to four-layered [3.3]PCP-diones, a magnitude of the CT interaction almost comparable to that of [3.3]PCP 2 was observed, and this indicates that the -CH(2)COCH(2)- bridges inhibit the CT interaction and that this tendency is supported by the calculated HOMO energy levels and observed oxidation potentials. Three- and four-layered [3.3]PCPs 3- 5 show reversible redox processes, and 4 and 5 show an electron-donating ability almost comparable to that of [3 6]CP. Very good correlation between the lambda(max) of the CT bands with TCNE and the oxidation potentials is observed. PMID:18498196

  17. First determination of the $CP$ content of $D \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and updated determination of the $CP$ contents of $D \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ and $D \\to K^+K^-\\pi^0$

    E-print Network

    Malde, S; Wilkinson, G; Naik, P; Prouve, C; Rademacker, J; Libby, J; Nayak, M; Gershon, T; Briere, R A

    2015-01-01

    Quantum-correlated $\\psi(3770) \\to D\\bar{D}$ decays collected by the CLEO-c experiment are used to perform a first measurement of $F_+^{4\\pi}$, the fractional $CP$-even content of the self-conjugate decay $D \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$, obtaining a value of $0.737 \\pm 0.028$. An important input to the measurement comes from the use of $D \\to K^0_{\\rm S}\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $D \\to K^0_{\\rm L}\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays to tag the signal mode. This same technique is applied to the channels $D \\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ and $D \\to K^+K^-\\pi^0$, yielding $F_+^{\\pi\\pi\\pi^0} = 1.014 \\pm 0.045 \\pm 0.022$ and $F_+^{KK\\pi^0} = 0.734 \\pm 0.106 \\pm 0.054$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. These measurements are consistent with those of an earlier analysis, based on $CP$-eigenstate tags, and can be combined to give values of $F_+^{\\pi\\pi\\pi^0} = 0.973 \\pm 0.017$ and $F_+^{KK\\pi^0} = 0.732 \\pm 0.055$. The results will enable the three modes to be included in a model-independent manner in measurements of the ...

  18. Measurements of the Branching fractions for $B_{(s)} \\\\to D_{(s)}\\\\pi\\\\pi\\\\pi$ and $\\\\Lambda_b^0 \\\\to \\\\Lambda_c^+\\\\pi\\\\pi\\\\pi$

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Aaij; B Adeva; M Adinolfi; C Adrover; A Affolder; Z Ajaltouni; J Albrecht; F Alessio; M Alexander; G Alkhazov; P Alvarez Cartelle; A A Alves; S Amato; Y Amhis; J Anderson; R B Appleby; O Aquines Gutierrez; F Archilli; L Arrabito; A Artamonov; M Artuso; E Aslanides; G Auriemma; S Bachmann; J J Back; D S Bailey; V Balagura; W Baldini; R J Barlow; C Barschel; S Barsuk; W Barter; A Bates; C Bauer; Th Bauer; A Bay; I Bediaga; K Belous; I Belyaev; E Ben-Haim; M Benayoun; G Bencivenni; S Benson; J Benton; R Bernet; M-O Bettler; M van Beuzekom; A Bien; S Bifani; A Bizzeti; P M Bjørnstad; T Blake; F Blanc; C Blanks; J Blouw; S Blusk; A Bobrov; V Bocci; A Bondar; N Bondar; W Bonivento; S Borghi; A Borgia; T J V Bowcock; C Bozzi; T Brambach; J van den Brand; J Bressieux; D Brett; S Brisbane; M Britsch; T Britton; N H Brook; H Brown; A Büchler-Germann; I Burducea; A Bursche; J Buytaert; S Cadeddu; J M Caicedo Carvajal; O Callot; M Calvi; M Calvo Gomez; A Camboni; P Campana; A Carbone; G Carboni; R Cardinale; A Cardini; L Carson; K Carvalho Akiba; G Casse; M Cattaneo; M Charles; Ph Charpentier; N Chiapolini; K Ciba; X Cid Vidal; G Ciezarek; P E L Clarke; M Clemencic; H V Cliff; J Closier; C Coca; V Coco; J Cogan; P Collins; F Constantin; G Conti; A Contu; A Cook; M Coombes; G Corti; G A Cowan; R Currie; B D'Almagne; C D'Ambrosio; P David; I De Bonis; S De Capua; M De Cian; F De Lorenzi; J M De Miranda; L De Paula; P De Simone; D Decamp; M Deckenhoff; H Degaudenzi; M Deissenroth; L Del Buono; C Deplano; O Deschamps; F Dettori; J Dickens; H Dijkstra; P Diniz Batista; S Donleavy; A Dosil Suárez; D Dossett; A Dovbnya; F Dupertuis; R Dzhelyadin; C Eames; S Easo; U Egede; V Egorychev; S Eidelman; D van Eijk; F Eisele; S Eisenhardt; R Ekelhof; L Eklund; Ch Elsasser; D G d'Enterria; D Esperante Pereira; L Estéve; A Falabella; E Fanchini; C Färber; G Fardell; C Farinelli; S Farry; V Fave; V Fernandez Albor; M Ferro-Luzzi; S Filippov; C Fitzpatrick; M Fontana; F Fontanelli; R Forty; M Frank; C Frei; M Frosini; S Furcas; A Gallas Torreira; D Galli; M Gandelman; P Gandini; Y Gao; J-C Garnier; J Garofoli; J Garra Tico; L Garrido; C Gaspar; N Gauvin; M Gersabeck; T Gershon; Ph Ghez; V Gibson; V V Gligorov; C Göbel; D Golubkov; A Golutvin; A Gomes; H Gordon; M Grabalosa Gándara; R Graciani Diaz; L A Granado Cardoso; E Graugés; G Graziani; A Grecu; S Gregson; B Gui; E Gushchin; Yu Guz; T Gys; G Haefeli; C Haen; S C Haines; T Hampson; S Hansmann-Menzemer; R Harji; N Harnew; J Harrison; P F Harrison; J He; V Heijne; K Hennessy; P Henrard; J A Hernando Morata; E van Herwijnen; E Hicks; W Hofmann; K Holubyev; P Hopchev; W Hulsbergen; P Hunt; T Huse; R S Huston; D Hutchcroft; D Hynds; V Iakovenko; P Ilten; J Imong; R Jacobsson; A Jaeger; M Jahjah Hussein; E Jans; F Jansen; P Jaton; B Jean-Marie; F Jing; M John; D Johnson; C R Jones; B Jost; S Kandybei; M Karacson; T M Karbach; J Keaveney; U Kerzel; T Ketel; A Keune; B Khanji; Y M Kim; M Knecht; S Koblitz; P Koppenburg; A Kozlinskiy; L Kravchuk; K Kreplin; M Kreps; G Krocker; P Krokovny; F Kruse; K Kruzelecki; M Kucharczyk; S Kukulak; R Kumar; T Kvaratskheliya; V N La Thi; D Lacarrere; G Lafferty; A Lai; D Lambert; R W Lambert; E Lanciotti; G Lanfranchi; C Langenbruch; T Latham; R Le Gac; J van Leerdam; J-P Lees; R Lefévre; A Leflat; J Lefrançois; O Leroy; T Lesiak; L Li; L Li Gioi; M Lieng; M Liles; R Lindner; C Linn; B Liu; G Liu; J H Lopes; E Lopez Asamar; N Lopez-March; J Luisier; F Machefert; I V Machikhiliyan; F Maciuc; O Maev; J Magnin; S Malde; R M D Mamunur; G Manca; G Mancinelli; N Mangiafave; U Marconi; R Märki; J Marks; G Martellotti; A Martens; L Martin; A Martín Sánchez; D Martinez Santos; A Massafferri; Z Mathe; C Matteuzzi; M Matveev; E Maurice; B Maynard; A Mazurov; G McGregor; R McNulty; C Mclean; M Meissner; M Merk; J Merkel; R Messi; S Miglioranzi; D A Milanes; M-N Minard; S Monteil; D Moran; P Morawski; I Mous; F Muheim; K Müller; R Muresan; B Muryn; M Musy; J Mylroie-Smith; P Naik; T Nakada; R Nandakumar; J Nardulli; I Nasteva; M Nedos; M Needham; N Neufeld; C Nguyen-Mau; M Nicol; S Nies; V Niess; N Nikitin; A Oblakowska-Mucha; V Obraztsov; S Oggero; S Ogilvy; O Okhrimenko; R Oldeman; M Orlandea; J M Otalora Goicochea; P Owen; B Pal; J Palacios; M Palutan; J Panman; A Papanestis; M Pappagallo; C Parkes; C J Parkinson; G Passaleva; G D Patel; M Patel; S K Paterson; G N Patrick; C Patrignani; C Pavel-Nicorescu; A Pazos Alvarez; A Pellegrino; G Penso; M Pepe Altarelli; S Perazzini; D L Perego; E Perez Trigo; A Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo; P Perret; M Perrin-Terrin; G Pessina; A Petrella; A Petrolini; B Pie Valls; B Pietrzyk; T Pilar; D Pinci; R Plackett; S Playfer; M Plo Casasus; G Polok; A Poluektov; E Polycarpo; D Popov; B Popovici; C Potterat; A Powell; T du Pree; J Prisciandaro; V Pugatch; A Puig Navarro; W Qian; J H Rademacker; B Rakotomiaramanana; M S Rangel; I Raniuk; G Raven; S Redford

    2011-01-01

    Branching fractions of the decays $H_b\\\\to H_c\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ relative to $H_b\\\\to H_c\\\\pi^-$ are presented, where $H_b$ ($H_c$) represents $\\\\overline{B^0}$ ($D^+$), $B^-$ ($D^0$), $\\\\overline{B_s^0}$ ($D_s^+$) and $\\\\Lambda_b^0$ ($\\\\Lambda_c^+$). The measurements are performed with the LHCb detector using 35~${\\\\rm pb^{-1}}$ of data collected at $\\\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV. The ratios of branching fractions are measured to be \\\\begin{eqnarray*} {{\\\\cal{B}}(\\\\overline{B^0}\\\\to D^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-)\\\\over{\\\\cal{B}}(\\\\overline{B^0}\\\\to D^+\\\\pi^-)} = 2.38\\\\pm0.11\\\\pm0.21 \\\

  19. First observation of decay $B_c^+\\\\to J\\/\\\\psi \\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+$

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Aaij; C Abellan Beteta; B Adeva; M Adinolfi; C Adrover; A Affolder; Z Ajaltouni; J Albrecht; F Alessio; M Alexander; S Ali; G Alkhazov; P Alvarez Cartelle; A A Alves Jr; S Amato; Y Amhis; J Anderson; R B Appleby; O Aquines Gutierrez; F Archilli; A Artamonov; M Artuso; E Aslanides; G Auriemma; S Bachmann; J J Back; V Balagura; W Baldini; R J Barlow; C Barschel; S Barsuk; W Barter; A Bates; C Bauer; Th Bauer; A Bay; I Bediaga; S Belogurov; K Belous; I Belyaev; E Ben-Haim; M Benayoun; G Bencivenni; S Benson; J Benton; R Bernet; M-O Bettler; M van Beuzekom; A Bien; S Bifani; T Bird; A Bizzeti; P M Bjørnstad; T Blake; F Blanc; C Blanks; J Blouw; S Blusk; A Bobrov; V Bocci; A Bondar; N Bondar; W Bonivento; S Borghi; A Borgia; T J V Bowcock; C Bozzi; T Brambach; J van den Brand; J Bressieux; D Brett; M Britsch; T Britton; N H Brook; H Brown; A Büchler-Germann; I Burducea; A Bursche; J Buytaert; S Cadeddu; O Callot; M Calvi; M Calvo Gomez; A Camboni; P Campana; A Carbone; G Carboni; R Cardinale; A Cardini; L Carson; K Carvalho Akiba; G Casse; M Cattaneo; Ch Cauet; M Charles; Ph Charpentier; N Chiapolini; K Ciba; X Cid Vidal; G Ciezarek; P E L Clarke; M Clemencic; H V Cliff; J Closier; C Coca; V Coco; J Cogan; P Collins; A Comerma-Montells; A Contu; A Cook; M Coombes; G Corti; B Couturier; G A Cowan; R Currie; C D'Ambrosio; P David; I De Bonis; K De Bruyn; S De Capua; M De Cian; J M De Miranda; L De Paula; P De Simone; D Decamp; M Deckenhoff; H Degaudenzi; L Del Buono; C Deplano; D Derkach; O Deschamps; F Dettori; J Dickens; H Dijkstra; P Diniz Batista; F Domingo Bonal; S Donleavy; F Dordei; A Dosil Suárez; D Dossett; A Dovbnya; F Dupertuis; R Dzhelyadin; A Dziurda; S Easo; U Egede; V Egorychev; S Eidelman; D van Eijk; F Eisele; S Eisenhardt; R Ekelhof; L Eklund; Ch Elsasser; D Elsby; D Esperante Pereira; A Falabella; C Färber; G Fardell; C Farinelli; S Farry; V Fave; V Fernandez Albor; M Ferro-Luzzi; S Filippov; C Fitzpatrick; M Fontana; F Fontanelli; R Forty; O Francisco; M Frank; C Frei; M Frosini; S Furcas; A Gallas Torreira; D Galli; M Gandelman; P Gandini; Y Gao; J-C Garnier; J Garofoli; J Garra Tico; L Garrido; D Gascon; C Gaspar; R Gauld; N Gauvin; M Gersabeck; T Gershon; Ph Ghez; V Gibson; V V Gligorov; C Göbel; D Golubkov; A Golutvin; A Gomes; H Gordon; M Grabalosa Gándara; R Graciani Diaz; L A Granado Cardoso; E Graugés; G Graziani; A Grecu; E Greening; S Gregson; B Gui; E Gushchin; Yu Guz; T Gys; C Hadjivasiliou; G Haefeli; C Haen; S C Haines; T Hampson; S Hansmann-Menzemer; R Harji; N Harnew; J Harrison; P F Harrison; T Hartmann; J He; V Heijne; K Hennessy; P Henrard; J A Hernando Morata; E van Herwijnen; E Hicks; K Holubyev; P Hopchev; W Hulsbergen; P Hunt; T Huse; R S Huston; D Hutchcroft; D Hynds; V Iakovenko; P Ilten; J Imong; R Jacobsson; A Jaeger; M Jahjah Hussein; E Jans; F Jansen; P Jaton; B Jean-Marie; F Jing; M John; D Johnson; C R Jones; B Jost; M Kaballo; S Kandybei; M Karacson; T M Karbach; J Keaveney; I R Kenyon; U Kerzel; T Ketel; A Keune; B Khanji; Y M Kim; M Knecht; R F Koopman; P Koppenburg; M Korolev; A Kozlinskiy; L Kravchuk; K Kreplin; M Kreps; G Krocker; P Krokovny; F Kruse; K Kruzelecki; M Kucharczyk; V Kudryavtsev; T Kvaratskheliya; V N La Thi; D Lacarrere; G Lafferty; A Lai; D Lambert; R W Lambert; E Lanciotti; G Lanfranchi; C Langenbruch; T Latham; C Lazzeroni; R Le Gac; J van Leerdam; J-P Lees; R Lefèvre; A Leflat; J Lefrançois; O Leroy; T Lesiak; L Li; L Li Gioi; M Lieng; M Liles; R Lindner; C Linn; B Liu; G Liu; J von Loeben; J H Lopes; E Lopez Asamar; N Lopez-March; H Lu; J Luisier; F Machefert; I V Machikhiliyan; F Maciuc; O Maev; J Magnin; S Malde; R M D Mamunur; G Manca; G Mancinelli; N Mangiafave; U Marconi; R Märki; J Marks; G Martellotti; A Martens; L Martin; A Martín Sánchez; M Martinelli; D Martinez Santos; A Massafferri; Z Mathe; C Matteuzzi; M Matveev; E Maurice; B Maynard; A Mazurov; G McGregor; R McNulty; M Meissner; M Merk; J Merkel; S Miglioranzi; D A Milanes; M-N Minard; J Molina Rodriguez; S Monteil; D Moran; P Morawski; I Mous; F Muheim; K Müller; R Muresan; B Muryn; B Muster; J Mylroie-Smith; P Naik; T Nakada; R Nandakumar; I Nasteva; M Needham; N Neufeld; A D Nguyen; C Nguyen-Mau; M Nicol; V Niess; N Nikitin; T Nikodem; A Nomerotski; A Novoselov; A Oblakowska-Mucha; V Obraztsov; S Oggero; S Ogilvy; O Okhrimenko; R Oldeman; M Orlandea; J M Otalora Goicochea; P Owen; B K Pal; J Palacios; A Palano; M Palutan; J Panman; A Papanestis; M Pappagallo; C Parkes; C J Parkinson; G Passaleva; G D Patel; M Patel; S K Paterson; G N Patrick; C Patrignani; C Pavel-Nicorescu; A Pazos Alvarez; A Pellegrino; G Penso; M Pepe Altarelli; S Perazzini; D L Perego; E Perez Trigo; A Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo; P Perret; M Perrin-Terrin; G Pessina; A Petrolini; A Phan; E Picatoste Olloqui; B Pie Valls; B Pietrzyk; T Pila?; D Pinci; R Plackett; S Playfer; M Plo Casasus; G Polok; A Poluektov

    2012-01-01

    The decay $B_c^+\\\\to J\\/\\\\psi \\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+$ is observed for the first time, using 0.8 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions at $\\\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV collected by the LHCb experiment. The ratio of branching fractions ${\\\\cal B}(B_c^+\\\\to J\\/\\\\psi \\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+)\\/{\\\\cal B}(B_c^+\\\\to J\\/\\\\psi \\\\pi^+)$ is measured to be $2.41\\\\pm0.30\\\\pm0.33$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The result is in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  20. First Measurements of eta_c Decaying into K^+K^-2(pi^+pi^-) and 3(pi^+pi^-)

    E-print Network

    Ablikim, M; Ban, Y; Bian, J G; Cai, X; Chang, J F; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J C; Chen Jin; Chen Jun; Chen, M L; Chen, Y B; Chi, S P; Chu, Y P; Cui, X Z; Dai, H L; Dai, Y S; Deng, Z Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, Q F; Du, S X; Du, Z Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Fu, H Y; Gao, C S; Gao, Y N; Gong, M Y; Gong, W X; Gu, S D; Guo, Y N; Guo, Y Q; Guo, Z J; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, X; Heng, Y K; Hu, H M; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, X P; Huang, X T; Ji, X B; Jiang, C H; Jiang, X S; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jin, Y; Yi Jin; Lai, Y F; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H H; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, Q J; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X Q; Li, Y L; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Fang Liu; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, R G; Liu, Z A; Liu, Z X; Lu, F; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Luo, L X; Luo, X L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, J M; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, X B; Ma, X Y; Mao, Z P; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Nie, Z D; Olsen, S L; Peng, H P; Qi, N D; Qian, C D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, F; Shi, X; Sun, H S; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tao, N; Tian, Y R; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, J Z; Wang, K; Wang, L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S Z; Wang, W F; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Wand, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wei, C L; Wei, D H; Wu, N; Wu, Y M; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xin, B; Xu, G F; Xu, H; Xue, S T; Yan, M L; Yang, F; Yang, H X; Yang, J; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yi, L H; Yi, Z Y; Yu, C S; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, J M; Yuan, Y; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Yu; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X M; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Zahng, Yiyun; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Q; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J B; Zhao, J W; Zhao, M G; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, X J; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, L S; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, X C; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, G M; Zhou, L; Zhou, N F; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zhuang, X A; Zou, B S

    2006-01-01

    The decays of eta_c to K^+K^-2(pi^+pi^-) and 3(pi^+pi^-) are observed for the first time using a sample of 5.8X10^7 J/\\psi events collected by the BESII detector. The product branching fractions are determined to be B(J/\\psi-->gamma eta_c)*B(eta_c-->K^+K^-pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^-)=(1.21+-0.32+- 0.23)X10^{-4}$,B(J/\\psi-->gamma eta_c)*B(eta_c-->K^{*0}\\bar{K}^{*0}pi^+pi^-)= (1.29+-0.43+-0.32)X10^{-4}$, and (J/\\psi-->gamma eta_c)* B(eta_c-->pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^-)= (2.59+-0.32+-0.48)X10^{-4}. The upper limit for eta_c-->phi pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^- is also obtained as B(J/\\psi-->gamma eta_c)*B(eta_c--> phi pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^-)< 6.03 X10^{-5} at the 90% confidence level.

  1. Search for D?-D?? mixing in D? --> K? [pi]? [pi]? [pi]? decays

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Yi, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    We present results of a search for D?-D?? mixing by analyzing D? --> K? [pi]? [pi]? [pi]? decays from events in 230.4 fb-1 e+e- data recorded by BABAR. Assuming CP conservation, we measure the time-integrated mixing rate ...

  2. Experimental studies of the $\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^0$, $K^+K^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^0$ and $p\\\\bar p\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^0$ final states produced in $e^+e^-$ annihilation at $\\\\sqrt{s}=$ 3.773 and 3.650 GeV

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; X. Cai; H. F. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. X. Chen; J. C. Chen; Y. B. Chen; Y. P. Chu; Y. S. Dai; L. Y. Diao; Z. Y. Deng; Q. F. Dong; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; C. D. Fu; C. S. Gao; Y. N. Gao; S. D. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. N. Guo; K. L. He; M. He; Y. K. Heng; J. Hou; H. M. Hu; J. H. Hu; T. Hu; X. T. Huang; X. B. Ji; X. S. Jiang; X. Y. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; Y. F. Lai; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. Li; R. Y. Li; S. M. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Y. F. Liang; H. B. Liao; B. J. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. Liu; Fang Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. B. Liu; Jian Liu; Q. Liu; R. G. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Y. C. Lou; F. Lu; G. R. Lu; J. G. Lu; C. L. Luo; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; L. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; Z. P. Mao; X. H. Mo; J. Nie; R. G. Ping; N. D. Qi; H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; Z. Y. Ren; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; L. Y. Shan; L. Shang; D. L. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; H. S. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; X. Tang; G. L. Tong; D. Y. Wang; L. Wang; L. L. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; C. L. Wei; D. H. Wei; Y. Weng; N. Wu; X. M. Xia; X. X. Xie; G. F. Xu; X. P. Xu; Y. Xu; M. L. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. X. Yang; M. H. Ye; Y. X. Ye; G. W. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; S. L. Zang; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. Q. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Yiyun Zhang; Z. X. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; D. X. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; M. G. Zhao; P. P. Zhao; W. R. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; H. Q. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; L. Zhou; K. J. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; B. A. Zhuang; X. A. Zhuang; B. S. Zou

    2007-01-01

    We report measurements of the observed cross sections for $e^+e^-\\\\to\\\\omega\\u000a\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$, $\\\\omega K^+K^-$, $\\\\omega p\\\\bar p$, $K^+K^-\\\\rho^0\\\\pi^0$,\\u000a$K^+K^-\\\\rho^+\\\\pi^-+c.c.$, $K^{*0}K^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^0+c.c.$,\\u000a$K^{*+}K^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-+c.c.$, $\\\\phi\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^0$ and $\\\\Lambda \\\\bar \\\\Lambda\\u000a\\\\pi^0$ at $\\\\sqrt s=$ 3.773 and 3.650 GeV. Upper limits (90% C.L.) are given for\\u000aobserved cross sections and for $\\\\psi(3770)$ decay branching fractions for\\u000aproduction of these final states. These measurements are made by

  3. Measurement of the decay tau--->pi-pi+pi-2pi0nutau

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Bortoletto; D. N. Brown; J. Fast; R. L. McIlwain; T. Miao; D. H. Miller; M. Modesitt; S. F. Schaffner; E. I. Shibata; I. P. Shipsey; P. N. Wang; M. Battle; J. Ernst; H. Kroha; S. Roberts; K. Sparks; E. H. Thorndike; C. H. Wang; J. Dominick; S. Sanghera; T. Skwarnicki; R. Stroynowski; M. Artuso; D. He; M. Goldberg; N. Horwitz; R. Kennett; G. C. Moneti; F. Muheim; Y. Mukhin; S. Playfer; Y. Rozen; S. Stone; M. Thulasidas; G. Vasseur; G. Zhu; J. Bartelt; S. E. Csorna; Z. Egyed; V. Jain; P. Sheldon; D. S. Akerib; B. Barish; M. Chadha; S. Chan; D. F. Cowen; G. Eigen; J. S. Miller; C. O'grady; J. Urheim; A. J. Weinstein; D. Acosta; M. Athanas; G. Masek; B. Ong; H. Paar; M. Sivertz; A. Bean; J. Gronberg; R. Kutschke; S. Menary; R. J. Morrison; S. Nakanishi; H. N. Nelson; T. K. Nelson; J. D. Richman; A. Ryd; H. Tajima; D. Schmidt; D. Sperka; M. S. Witherell; M. Procario; S. Yang; R. Balest; K. Cho; M. Dauodi; W. T. Ford; D. R. Johnson; K. Lingel; M. Lohner; P. Rankin; J. G. Smith; J. P. Alexander; C. Bebek; K. Berkelman; D. Besson; T. E. Browder; D. G. Cassel; H. A. Cho; D. M. Coffman; P. S. Drell; R. Ehrlich; M. Garcia-Sciveres; B. Geiser; B. Gittelman; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; C. D. Jones; S. L. Jones; J. Kandaswamy; N. Katayama; P. C. Kim; D. L. Kreinick; G. S. Ludwig; J. Masui; J. Mevissen; N. B. Mistry; C. R. Ng; E. Nordberg; M. Ogg; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; S. Salman; M. Sapper; H. Worden; F. Würthwein; P. Avery; A. Freyberger; J. Rodriguez; R. Stephens; J. Yelton; D. Cinabro; S. Henderson; K. Kinoshita; T. Liu; M. Saulnier; F. Shen; R. Wilson; H. Yamamoto; M. Selen; A. J. Sadoff; R. Ammar; S. Ball; P. Baringer; D. Coppage; N. Copty; R. Davis; N. Hancock; M. Kelly; N. Kwak; H. Lam; Y. Kubota; M. Lattery; J. K. Nelson; S. Patton; D. Perticone; R. Poling; V. Savinov; S. Schrenk; R. Wang; M. S. Alam; I. J. Kim; B. Nemati; J. J. O'neill; H. Severini; C. R. Sun; M. M. Zoeller; G. Crawford; C. M. Daubenmier; R. Fulton; D. Fujino; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. Lee; R. Malchow; F. Morrow; Y. Skovpen; M. Sung; C. White; J. Whitmore; P. Wilson; F. Butler; X. Fu; G. Kalbfleisch; M. Lambrecht; W. R. Ross; P. Skubic; J. Snow; P. L. Wang; M. Wood

    1993-01-01

    The decay tau--->pi-pi+pi-2pi0nutau has been observed in e+e- annihilation using the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. In a data sample collected at &surd;s ~10.6 GeV, 668+\\/-38 decay candidates have been identified by exclusively reconstructing two pi0's accompanying three charged particles, which are assumed to be pions. Normalizing to the number of tau pairs detected with one

  4. Search for the photoexcitation of exotic mesons in the pi+pi+pi- system.

    PubMed

    Nozar, M; Salgado, C; Weygand, D P; Guo, L; Adams, G; Li, Ji; Eugenio, P; Amaryan, M J; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Blaszczyk, L; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Casey, L; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cheng, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Crede, V; Cummings, J P; Dale, D; Dashyan, N; De Masi, R; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hardie, J; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Johnstone, J R; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kalantarians, N; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Krahn, Z; Kramer, L H; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Maccormick, M; Markov, N; Mattione, P; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Mueller, J; Munevar, E; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Anefalos Pereira, S; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Popa, I; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rubin, P D; Sabatié, F; Salamanca, J; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabian, Y G; Sharov, D; Shvedunov, N V; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Todor, L; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2009-03-13

    A search for exotic mesons in the pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-} system photoproduced by the charge exchange reaction gammap-->pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-}(n) was carried out by the CLAS Collaboration at Jefferson Lab. A tagged-photon beam with energies in the 4.8 to 5.4 GeV range, produced through bremsstrahlung from a 5.744 GeV electron beam, was incident on a liquid-hydrogen target. A partial wave analysis was performed on a sample of 83 000 events, the highest such statistics to date in this reaction at these energies. The main objective of this study was to look for the photoproduction of an exotic J;{PC}=1;{-+} resonant state in the 1 to 2 GeV mass range. Our partial wave analysis shows production of the a_{2}(1320) and the pi_{2}(1670) mesons, but no evidence for the a_{1}(1260), nor the pi_{1}(1600) exotic state at the expected levels. An upper limit of 13.5 nb is determined for the exotic pi_{1}(1600) cross section, less than 2% of the a_{2}(1320) production. PMID:19392105

  5. Confronting generalized hidden local symmetry chiral model with the ALEPH data on the decay {tau}{sup -{yields}{pi}+{pi}-{pi}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}

    SciTech Connect

    Achasov, N. N.; Kozhevnikov, A. A. [Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, S. L. Sobolev Institute for Mathematics, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, S.L. Sobolev Institute for Mathematics, and Novosibirsk State University, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-01

    The generalized hidden local symmetry (GHLS) model is the chiral model of pseudoscalar, vector, and axial vector mesons and their interactions. It contains also the couplings of strongly interacting particles with electroweak gauge bosons. Here, GHLS model is confronted with the ALEPH data on the decay {tau}{sup -{yields}{pi}-{pi}-{pi}+{nu}}{sub {tau}}. It is shown that the invariant mass spectrum of final pions in this decay calculated in GHLS framework with the single a{sub 1}(1260) resonance disagrees with the experimental data at any reasonable number of free GHLS parameters. Two modifications of GHLS model based on inclusion of two additional heavier axial vector mesons are studied. One of them, which gives a good description of the ALEPH data with all the parameters kept free, is shown to result in very large {Gamma}{sub a{sub 1}{sup {+-}}{sub {yields}{pi}}{sup {+-}}{sub {gamma}}}partial width. The other scheme with the GHLS parameters fixed in a way that the universality is preserved and the observed central value of {Gamma}{sub a{sub 1}{sup {+-}}{sub {yields}{pi}}{sup {+-}}{sub {gamma}}}is reached, which results in a good description of the three pion spectrum in {tau}{sup -{yields}{pi}+{pi}-{pi}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}decay.

  6. Assessment of Standard Force Field Models against High-Quality ab initio Potential Curves for Prototypes of pi-pi, CH/pi, and SH/pi Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Sherrill, David [Georgia Institute of Technology; Sinnokrot, Mutasem O [University of Jordan; Marshall, Michael S. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Hohenstein, Edward G. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Walker, Ross [San Diego Supercomputer Center; Gould, Ian R [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Several popular force fields, namely, CHARMM, AMBER, OPLS-AA, and MM3, have been tested for their ability to reproduce highly accurate quantum mechani- cal potential energy curves for noncovalent interactions in the benzene dimer, the benzene-CH4 complex, and the benzene-H2S complex. All of the force fields are semi-quantitatively correct, but none of them is consistently reliable quantitatively. Re-optimization of Lennard-Jones parameters and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory analysis for the benzene dimer suggests that better agreement cannot be expected unless more flexible functional forms (particularly for the electrostatic contributions)are employed for the empirical force fields.

  7. Measurement of the Ratios of Branching Fractions B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi pi pi) and B(Bs -> Ds pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi)

    E-print Network

    CDF Collaboration

    2006-10-16

    Using 355 pb^-1 of data collected by the CDF II detector in \\ppbar collisions at sqrt{s} = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, we study the fully reconstructed hadronic decays B -> D pi and B -> D pi pi pi. We present the first measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi pi pi) = 1.05 pm 0.10 (stat) pm 0.22 (syst). We also update our measurement of B(Bs -> Ds pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi) to 1.13 pm 0.08 (stat) pm 0.23 (syst) improving the statistical uncertainty by more than a factor of two. We find B(Bs -> Ds pi) = [3.8 pm 0.3 (stat) pm 1.3 (syst)] \\times 10^{-3} and B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) = [8.4 pm 0.8 (stat) pm 3.2 (syst)] \\times 10^{-3}.

  8. Electroweak Penguin Hunting Through B -> pi pi, pi K and Rare K and B Decays

    E-print Network

    Andrzej J. Buras; Robert Fleischer; Stefan Recksiegel; Felix Schwab

    2005-12-05

    The $B\\to\\pi K$ decays with significant electroweak penguin contributions show a puzzling pattern. We explore this "$B\\to\\pi K$ puzzle" through a systematic strategy. The starting point, which is essentially unaffected by electroweak penguins, is the determination of the angle $\\gamma$ of the unitarity triangle through the CP-violating $B^0_d\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $B^0_d\\to\\pi^-K^+$ asymmetries, yielding $\\gamma=(73.9^{+5.8}_{-6.5})^\\circ$, and the extraction of hadronic parameters through the measured $B\\to\\pi\\pi$ branching ratios. Using arguments related to the SU(3) flavour symmetry, we convert the hadronic $B\\to\\pi\\pi$ parameters into their $B\\to\\pi K$ counterparts, allowing us to predict the $B\\to\\pi K$ observables in the Standard Model. We find agreement with the data for those quantities that are only marginally affected by electroweak penguins, while this is not the case for the observables with sizeable electroweak penguin contributions. Since we may also perform a couple of internal consistency checks of our working assumptions, which are nicely satisfied for the current data, and find a small sensitivity of our results to large non-factorizable SU(3)-breaking corrections, the "$B\\to\\pi K$" puzzle may be due to new physics in the electroweak penguin sector. We show that it can indeed be resolved through such a kind of new physics with a large CP-violating phase. Further insights into the electroweak penguins are provided by the $B^+\\to\\pi^0K^+$ and $B_d^0\\to\\pi^0K_{\\rm S}$ CP asymmetries, and in particular through correlations with various rare $K$ and B decays.

  9. First observation of the decays $\\\\overline{B}^0 \\\\to D^+ K^- \\\\pi^+ \\\\pi^-$ and $B^- \\\\to D^0 K^- \\\\pi^+ \\\\pi^-$

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Aaij; C Abellan Beteta; B Adeva; M Adinolfi; C Adrover; A Affolder; Z Ajaltouni; J Albrecht; F Alessio; M Alexander; G Alkhazov; P Alvarez Cartelle; A A Alves; S Amato; Y Amhis; J Anderson; R B Appleby; O Aquines Gutierrez; F Archilli; L Arrabito; A Artamonov; M Artuso; E Aslanides; G Auriemma; S Bachmann; J J Back; D S Bailey; V Balagura; W Baldini; R J Barlow; C Barschel; S Barsuk; W Barter; A Bates; C Bauer; Th Bauer; A Bay; I Bediaga; S Belogurov; K Belous; I Belyaev; E Ben-Haim; M Benayoun; G Bencivenni; S Benson; J Benton; R Bernet; M-O Bettler; M van Beuzekom; A Bien; S Bifani; T Bird; A Bizzeti; P M Bjørnstad; T Blake; F Blanc; C Blanks; J Blouw; S Blusk; A Bobrov; V Bocci; A Bondar; N Bondar; W Bonivento; S Borghi; A Borgia; T J V Bowcock; C Bozzi; T Brambach; J van den Brand; J Bressieux; D Brett; M Britsch; T Britton; N H Brook; H Brown; A Büchler-Germann; I Burducea; A Bursche; J Buytaert; S Cadeddu; O Callot; M Calvi; M Calvo Gomez; A Camboni; P Campana; A Carbone; G Carboni; R Cardinale; A Cardini; L Carson; K Carvalho Akiba; G Casse; M Cattaneo; Ch Cauet; M Charles; Ph Charpentier; N Chiapolini; K Ciba; X Cid Vidal; G Ciezarek; P E L Clarke; M Clemencic; H V Cliff; J Closier; C Coca; V Coco; J Cogan; P Collins; A Comerma-Montells; F Constantin; A Contu; A Cook; M Coombes; G Corti; G A Cowan; R Currie; C D'Ambrosio; P David; I De Bonis; S De Capua; M De Cian; F De Lorenzi; J M De Miranda; L De Paula; P De Simone; D Decamp; M Deckenhoff; H Degaudenzi; L Del Buono; C Deplano; D Derkach; O Deschamps; F Dettori; J Dickens; H Dijkstra; P Diniz Batista; F Domingo Bonal; S Donleavy; F Dordei; A Dosil Suárez; D Dossett; A Dovbnya; F Dupertuis; R Dzhelyadin; A Dziurda; S Easo; U Egede; V Egorychev; S Eidelman; D van Eijk; F Eisele; S Eisenhardt; R Ekelhof; L Eklund; Ch Elsasser; D Elsby; D Esperante Pereira; L Estève; A Falabella; E Fanchini; C Färber; G Fardell; C Farinelli; S Farry; V Fave; V Fernandez Albor; M Ferro-Luzzi; S Filippov; C Fitzpatrick; M Fontana; F Fontanelli; R Forty; M Frank; C Frei; M Frosini; S Furcas; A Gallas Torreira; D Galli; M Gandelman; P Gandini; Y Gao; J-C Garnier; J Garofoli; J Garra Tico; L Garrido; D Gascon; C Gaspar; N Gauvin; M Gersabeck; T Gershon; Ph Ghez; V Gibson; V V Gligorov; C Göbel; D Golubkov; A Golutvin; A Gomes; H Gordon; M Grabalosa Gándara; R Graciani Diaz; L A Granado Cardoso; E Graugés; G Graziani; A Grecu; E Greening; S Gregson; B Gui; E Gushchin; Yu Guz; T Gys; G Haefeli; C Haen; S C Haines; T Hampson; S Hansmann-Menzemer; R Harji; N Harnew; J Harrison; P F Harrison; T Hartmann; J He; V Heijne; K Hennessy; P Henrard; J A Hernando Hernando Morata; E van Herwijnen; E Hicks; K Holubyev; P Hopchev; W Hulsbergen; P Hunt; T Huse; R S Huston; D Hutchcroft; D Hynds; V Iakovenko; P Ilten; J Imong; R Jacobsson; A Jaeger; M Jahjah Hussein; E Jans; F Jansen; P Jaton; B Jean-Marie; F Jing; M John; D Johnson; C R Jones; B Jost; M Kaballo; S Kandybei; M Karacson; T M Karbach; J Keaveney; I R Kenyon; U Kerzel; T Ketel; A Keune; B Khanji; Y M Kim; M Knecht; R Koopman; P Koppenburg; A Kozlinskiy; L Kravchuk; K Kreplin; M Kreps; G Krocker; P Krokovny; F Kruse; K Kruzelecki; M Kucharczyk; T Kvaratskheliya; V N La Thi; D Lacarrere; G Lafferty; A Lai; D Lambert; R W Lambert; E Lanciotti; G Lanfranchi; C Langenbruch; T Latham; C Lazzeroni; R Le Gac; J van Leerdam; J-P Lees; R Lefèvre; A Leflat; J Lefrançois; O Leroy; T Lesiak; L Li; L Li Gioi; M Lieng; M Liles; R Lindner; C Linn; B Liu; G Liu; J von Loeben; J H Lopes; E Lopez Asamar; N Lopez-March; H Lu; J Luisier; F Machefert; I V Machikhiliyan; F Maciuc; O Maev; J Magnin; S Malde; R M D Mamunur; G Manca; G Mancinelli; N Mangiafave; U Marconi; R Märki; J Marks; G Martellotti; A Martens; L Martin; A Martín Sánchez; D Martinez Santos; A Massafferri; Z Mathe; C Matteuzzi; M Matveev; E Maurice; B Maynard; A Mazurov; G McGregor; R McNulty; M Meissner; M Merk; J Merkel; R Messi; S Miglioranzi; D A Milanes; M-N Minard; J Molina Rodriguez; S Monteil; D Moran; P Morawski; I Mous; F Muheim; K Müller; R Muresan; B Muryn; B Muster; M Musy; J Mylroie-Smith; P Naik; T Nakada; R Nandakumar; I Nasteva; M Nedos; M Needham; N Neufeld; C Nguyen-Mau; M Nicol; V Niess; N Nikitin; A Nomerotski; A Novoselov; A Oblakowska-Mucha; V Obraztsov; S Oggero; S Ogilvy; O Okhrimenko; R Oldeman; M Orlandea; J M Otalora Goicochea; P Owen; K Pal; J Palacios; A Palano; M Palutan; J Panman; A Papanestis; M Pappagallo; C Parkes; C J Parkinson; G Passaleva; G D Patel; M Patel; S K Paterson; G N Patrick; C Patrignani; C Pavel-Nicorescu; A Pazos Alvarez; A Pellegrino; G Penso; M Pepe Altarelli; S Perazzini; D L Perego; E Perez Trigo; A Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo; P Perret; M Perrin-Terrin; G Pessina; A Petrella; A Petrolini; A Phan; E Picatoste Olloqui; B Pie Valls; B Pietrzyk; T Pila?; D Pinci; R Plackett; S Playfer; M Plo Casasus; G Polok; A Poluektov; E Polycarpo; D Popov

    2012-01-01

    First observations of the Cabibbo suppressed decays $\\\\bar{B}^0\\\\to D^+K^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ and $B^-\\\\to D^0K^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ are reported using 35~pb$^{-1}$ of data collected with the LHCb detector. Their branching fractions are measured with respect to the corresponding Cabibbo favored decays, from which we obtain ${\\\\cal{B}}(\\\\bar{B}^0\\\\to D^+K^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-)\\/{\\\\cal{B}}(\\\\bar{B}^0\\\\to D^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-)=(5.9\\\\pm1.1\\\\pm0.5)\\\\times10^{-2}$ and ${\\\\cal{B}}(B^-\\\\to D^0K^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-)\\/{\\\\cal{B}}(B^-\\\\to D^0\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-)=(9.4\\\\pm1.3\\\\pm0.9)\\\\times10^{-2}$, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The $B^-\\\\to D^0K^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ decay is

  10. Exclusive Central pi+pi- production in CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, Michael; Swiech, Artur [Jagellonian University, Cracow, Poland; Zurek, Maria [Jagellonian University, Cracow, Poland

    2013-10-14

    Using the Collider Detector at Fermilab, CDF, we have measured exclusive pi+pi- production at sqrt(s) = 900 GeV and 1960 GeV. The pi+pi- pair is central, |y| < 1.0, and there are no other particles detected in |eta| < 5.9. We discuss the mass spectrum, showing f0(980) and f2(1270) resonances, s-dependence, pT-dependence, and angular distributions.

  11. Study of the e+e--->pi+pi-pi0 process using initial state radiation with BABAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; J.-M. Gaillard; A. Hicheur; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; A. Palano; A. Pompili; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; A. W. Borgland; A. B. Breon; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; C. T. Day; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; V. G. Shelkov; W. A. Wenzel; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; M. Fritsch; K. Goetzen; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; N. Chevalier; W. N. Cottingham; M. P. Kelly; T. E. Latham; F. F. Wilson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; D. Thiessen; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; L. Teodorescu; A. E. Blinov; V. E. Blinov; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; V. N. Ivanchenko; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; A. N. Yushkov; D. Best; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; C. Buchanan; B. L. Hartfiel; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; D. del Re; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; D. B. Macfarlane; H. P. Paar; Sh. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; B. Dahmes; O. Long; A. Lu; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; W. Verkerke; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; S. Yang; S. Jayatilleke; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; T. Abe; F. Blanc; P. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; P. Rankin; J. G. Smith; J. Zhang; L. Zhang; A. Chen; J. L. Harton; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; Q. L. Zeng; D. Altenburg; T. Brandt; J. Brose; M. Dickopp; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. M. Lacker; R. Müller-Pfefferkorn; R. Nogowski; S. Otto; A. Petzold; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; B. Spaan; J. E. Sundermann; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; F. Brochard; P. Grenier; S. Schrenk; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; D. J. Bard; P. J. Clark; D. Lavin; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; V. Azzolini; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; L. Piemontese; A. Sarti; E. Treadwell; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; G. Crosetti; M. Lo Vetere; M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; S. Bailey; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; E. Won; R. S. Dubitzky; U. Langenegger; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; J. R. Gaillard; G. W. Morton; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; G. P. Taylor; M. J. Charles; G. J. Grenier; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; J. Lamsa; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; J. Yi; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; M. Pioppi; M. Davier; X. Giroux; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; S. Laplace; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; T. C. Petersen; S. Plaszczynski; M. H. Schune; L. Tantot; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; M. C. Simani; D. M. Wright; A. J. Bevan; C. A. Chavez; J. P. Coleman; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; R. J. Parry; D. J. Payne; R. J. Sloane; C. Touramanis; J. J. Back; C. M. Cormack; P. F. Harrison; F. Di Lodovico; G. B. Mohanty; C. L. Brown; G. Cowan; R. L. Flack; H. U. Flaecher; M. G. Green; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; M. A. Winter; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; P. A. Hart; M. C. Hodgkinson; G. D. Lafferty; A. J. Lyon; J. C. Williams; A. Farbin; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; D. Kovalskyi; C. K. Lae; V. Lillard; D. A. Roberts; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; K. T. Flood; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; V. B. Koptchev; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; S. Willocq; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; D. J. Mangeol; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; P. Taras; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; H. Bulten; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; L. Wilden; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; T. Pulliam; A. M. Rahimi

    2004-01-01

    The process e+e--->pi+pi-pi0gamma has been studied at a center-of-mass energy near the Upsilon(4S) resonance using a 89.3 fb-1 data sample collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. From the measured 3pi mass spectrum we have obtained the products of branching fractions for the omega and varphi mesons, B(omega-->e+e-)B(omega-->3pi)=(6.70±0.06±0.27)×10-5 and B(varphi-->e+e-)B(varphi-->3pi)=(4.30±0.08±0.21)×10-5 and evaluated the e+e--->pi+pi-pi0 cross section for the

  12. Electromagnetic Corrections to Pi Pi Scattering: Some Lessons for the Implementation of Meson Exchange Models

    E-print Network

    K. Maltman; C. E. Wolfe

    1996-10-31

    The leading non-Coulombic electromagnetic contributions to pi pi s-wave scattering lengths are computed in Chiral Perturbation Theory. It is shown that these corrections are zeroth order in the chiral expansion and associated with electromagnetic contact terms in the effective Lagrangian, i.e. that they do not involve explicit photon fields in the low-energy effective theory. It is pointed out that, if one followed the standard meson-exchange-model ansatz for removing electromagnetic effects, i.e. of subtracting contributions associated with explicit photon exchange and radiative corrections, as determined by the photon coupling vertices of the effective hadronic theory, one would completely miss these contributions and arrive at the erroneous conclusion that the strong interactions exhibited very large isospin breaking in pi pi scattering. Implications for electromagnetic "subtraction" procedures in other hadronic systems and the utility of the effective Lagrangian method for avoiding such errors are obvious.

  13. $\\pi\\pi$ Scattering in Three Flavour ChPT

    E-print Network

    Bijnens, J; Talavera, P; Bijnens, Johan; Dhonte, Pierre; Talavera, Pere

    2004-01-01

    We present the scattering lengths for the $\\pi\\pi$ processes in the three flavour Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) framework at next-to-next-to-leading order. We then combine this calculation with the determination of the parameters from $K_{e4}$ and the masses and decay constants and compare with the results of a dispersive analysis of $\\pi\\pi$ scattering. The comparison indicates a small but nonzero value for the $1/N_c$ suppressed NLO low energy constants $L_4^r$ and $L_6^r$.

  14. D{sup +{yields}}K{sup -{pi}+{pi}+}: three-body FSI

    SciTech Connect

    Magalhaes, P. C.; Robilotta, M. R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-11-12

    Even with the important advances of the last decade, charmed meson decays are still poorly understood theoretically. We do not understand, for example, why the kappa scalar resonance is responsible for 70% of the fit in the D{sup +{yields}}K{sup -{pi}+{pi}+} decay, as observed by the E791 (2002) experiment and confirmed by different collaborations. The fact that quark c can neither be considered soft nor heavy prevents the direct use of known theoretical results in the description of D. This scenario indicates two big gaps in the knowledge of D{sup +{yields}{pi}+{pi}+}K{sup -} decay. The first concerns the weak vertex, still not suitably treated in literature. The second is the three-body final state interaction (FSI) of the pseudoscalar mesons, until now considered in the literature as a quasi two-body interaction . This investigation aims at calculating the D{sup +{yields}{pi}+{pi}+}K{sup -} decay considering 3 body FSI.

  15. Possible resolution of the B{yields}{pi}{pi}, {pi}K puzzles

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hsiangnan [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 115 (China) and Department of Physics, Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan 300 (China) and Department of Physics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China); Mishima, Satoshi [Theory Group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    We show that there exist uncanceled soft divergences in the k{sub T} factorization for nonfactorizable amplitudes of two-body nonleptonic B meson decays, similar to those identified in hadron hadroproduction. These divergences can be grouped into a soft factor using the eikonal approximation, which is then treated as an additional nonperturbative input in the perturbative QCD formalism. Viewing the special role of the pion as a qq bound state and as a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson, we postulate that the soft effect associated with it is significant. This soft factor enhances the nonfactorizable color-suppressed tree amplitudes, such that the branching ratios B({pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) and B({pi}{sup 0}{rho}{sup 0}) are increased under the constraint of the B({rho}{sup 0}{rho}{sup 0}) data, the difference between the direct CP asymmetries A{sub CP}({pi}{sup {+-}}K{sup {+-}}) and A{sub CP}({pi}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}) is enlarged, and the mixing-induced CP asymmetry S{sub {pi}}{sup 0}{sub K{sub S}} is reduced. Namely, the known {pi}{pi} and {pi}K puzzles can be resolved simultaneously.

  16. Theory of rho - omega interference in pi+pi- production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. Goldhaber; G. C. Fox; C. Quigg

    1969-01-01

    The Coleman-Glashow model for rho - omega mass mixing permits unambiguous analysis of recent pi+pi- production data. We confirm production phase predictions of a Regge model with exchangge degenerate trajectories. We explain the anomalous rho width observed in colliding beam reactions.

  17. Stacking interactions in PUF?RNA complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Yiling Koh, Yvonne; Wang, Yeming; Qiu, Chen; Opperman, Laura; Gross, Leah; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wickens, Marvin (NIH); (UW)

    2012-07-02

    Stacking interactions between amino acids and bases are common in RNA-protein interactions. Many proteins that regulate mRNAs interact with single-stranded RNA elements in the 3' UTR (3'-untranslated region) of their targets. PUF proteins are exemplary. Here we focus on complexes formed between a Caenorhabditis elegans PUF protein, FBF, and its cognate RNAs. Stacking interactions are particularly prominent and involve every RNA base in the recognition element. To assess the contribution of stacking interactions to formation of the RNA-protein complex, we combine in vivo selection experiments with site-directed mutagenesis, biochemistry, and structural analysis. Our results reveal that the identities of stacking amino acids in FBF affect both the affinity and specificity of the RNA-protein interaction. Substitutions in amino acid side chains can restrict or broaden RNA specificity. We conclude that the identities of stacking residues are important in achieving the natural specificities of PUF proteins. Similarly, in PUF proteins engineered to bind new RNA sequences, the identity of stacking residues may contribute to 'target' versus 'off-target' interactions, and thus be an important consideration in the design of proteins with new specificities.

  18. Stacking interactions in PUF-RNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Koh, Yvonne Yiling; Wang, Yeming; Qiu, Chen; Opperman, Laura; Gross, Leah; Tanaka Hall, Traci M; Wickens, Marvin

    2011-04-01

    Stacking interactions between amino acids and bases are common in RNA-protein interactions. Many proteins that regulate mRNAs interact with single-stranded RNA elements in the 3' UTR (3'-untranslated region) of their targets. PUF proteins are exemplary. Here we focus on complexes formed between a Caenorhabditis elegans PUF protein, FBF, and its cognate RNAs. Stacking interactions are particularly prominent and involve every RNA base in the recognition element. To assess the contribution of stacking interactions to formation of the RNA-protein complex, we combine in vivo selection experiments with site-directed mutagenesis, biochemistry, and structural analysis. Our results reveal that the identities of stacking amino acids in FBF affect both the affinity and specificity of the RNA-protein interaction. Substitutions in amino acid side chains can restrict or broaden RNA specificity. We conclude that the identities of stacking residues are important in achieving the natural specificities of PUF proteins. Similarly, in PUF proteins engineered to bind new RNA sequences, the identity of stacking residues may contribute to "target" versus "off-target" interactions, and thus be an important consideration in the design of proteins with new specificities. PMID:21372189

  19. Precise branching ratio measurements of the decays D0-->pi-pi+pi0 and D0-->K-K+pi0 relative to the D0-->K-pi+pi0 decay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. De Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence

    2006-01-01

    Using 232fb-1 of e+e- collision data recorded by the BABAR experiment, we measure the rates of three-body Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the D0 meson relative to the Cabibbo-favored decay, D0-->K-pi+pi0. We find: (B(D0-->pi-pi+pi0))\\/(B(D0-->K-pi+pi0))=(10.59±0.06±0.13)×10-2 and (B(D0-->K-K+pi0))\\/(B(D0-->K-pi+pi0))=(2.37±0.03±0.04)×10-2, where the errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. These measurements are significantly more precise than the current world average measurements.

  20. Measurement of CP Violation Parameters with a Dalitz Plot Analysis of B±-->Dpi+pi-pi0K±

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; L. Zhang; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. S. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of a CP violation analysis of the decay B±-->Dpi+pi-pi0K±, where Dpi+pi-pi0 indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state pi+pi-pi0, excluding KS0pi0. The analysis makes use of 324×106 e+e--->BB¯ events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e+e- storage ring. Analyzing the pi+pi-pi0 Dalitz plot distribution and the B±-->Dpi+pi-pi0K± branching fraction and decay

  1. Electronic structure of metallouroporphyrins and their. pi. -. pi. dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.

    1984-10-11

    Systematic changes in the uv-visible absorption spectra of metallouroporphyrins are analyzed in terms of the four-orbital model of porphyrin excited states. For metallouroporphyrin monomers a relationship is discovered between the energy separation of the Soret and ..cap alpha.. bands and the ratio of their transition dipoles squared. The ..pi..-..pi.. dimers of these same metallouroporphyrins exhibit a similar, but considerably altered, relationship of this kind. The four-orbital model is shown to predict such relationships and a procedure is given for fitting the spectral data. Values for the molecular orbital parameters of the model result. Further analysis of the changes in these orbital parameters allows determination of the shifts in the highest-filled and lowest-empty ..pi.. orbitals of the porphyrin ring. It is shown that metal-dependent shifts in the frontier-orbital energies are similar for both monomers and dimers. Dimerization results in distinctive shifts in orbital energies that are independent of the metal incorporated into the porphyrin core. Dimerization also causes a change in the transition dipoles of the ..pi.. ..-->.. ..pi..* transitions that give rise to the ..cap alpha.. and Soret bands.

  2. Nonlocal chiral quark models with wavefunction renormalization: Sigma properties and {pi}-{pi} scattering parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Noguera, S. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, E-46100 Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain); Scoccola, N. N. [CONICET, Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Physics Department, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Favaloro, Solis 453, 1078 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-12-01

    We analyze the sigma meson mass and width together with the pion-pion scattering parameters in the context of nonlocal chiral quark models with wave function renormalization (WFR). We consider both nonlocal interactions based on the frequently used exponential form factor, and on fits to the quark mass and renormalization functions obtained in lattice calculations. In the case of the sigma properties, we obtain results which are less dependent on the parametrization than in the standard local Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, and which are in reasonable agreement with the recently reported empirical values. We also show that the inclusion of the WFR tend to improve the description of the {pi}-{pi} scattering parameters, with the lattice inspired parametrization providing the best overall results. Finally, we analyze the connection of the nonlocal quark models discussed here with chiral perturbation theory, and present the model predictions for the low-energy constants relevant for {pi}-{pi} scattering to O(4) in the chiral expansion.

  3. The e+e--->3(pi+pi-), 2(pi+pi-pi0) and K+K-2(pi+pi-) cross sections at center-of-mass energies from production threshold to 4.5 GeV measured with initial-state radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. S. Best; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; C. T. Day; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; M. Fritsch; K. Goetzen; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; D. Del Re; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; M. Dickopp; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; R. Nogowski; S. Otto; A. Petzold; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; S. Schrenk; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; D. J. Bard; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; L. Piemontese; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. R. Gaillard; J. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; W. F. Mader; U. Mallik; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; T. C. Petersen; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; A. J. Bevan; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; F. Di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; C. L. Brown; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; M. G. Green; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; M. P. Kelly; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; D. Kovalskyi; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; S. Y. Willocq; R. Cowan; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; P. M. Patel; C. T. Potter; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. De Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; H. Bulten; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; T. Pulliam; A. M. Rahimi

    2006-01-01

    We study the processes e+e--->3(pi+pi-)gamma, 2(pi+pi-pi0)gamma and K+K-2(pi+pi-)gamma, with the photon radiated from the initial state. About 20 000, 33 000 and 4000 fully reconstructed events, respectively, have been selected from 232 fb-1 of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e+e- center-of-mass energy, so that these data can be compared with the corresponding

  4. (pi, pi) electronic order in iron arsenide superconductors.

    PubMed

    Zabolotnyy, V B; Inosov, D S; Evtushinsky, D V; Koitzsch, A; Kordyuk, A A; Sun, G L; Park, J T; Haug, D; Hinkov, V; Boris, A V; Lin, C T; Knupfer, M; Yaresko, A N; Büchner, B; Varykhalov, A; Follath, R; Borisenko, S V

    2009-01-29

    The distribution of valence electrons in metals usually follows the symmetry of the underlying ionic lattice. Modulations of this distribution often occur when those electrons are not stable with respect to a new electronic order, such as spin or charge density waves. Electron density waves have been observed in many families of superconductors, and are often considered to be essential for superconductivity to exist. Recent measurements seem to show that the properties of the iron pnictides are in good agreement with band structure calculations that do not include additional ordering, implying no relation between density waves and superconductivity in these materials. Here we report that the electronic structure of Ba(1-x)K(x)Fe(2)As(2) is in sharp disagreement with those band structure calculations, and instead reveals a reconstruction characterized by a (pi, pi) wavevector. This electronic order coexists with superconductivity and persists up to room temperature (300 K). PMID:19177126

  5. Charge transfer and reactivity of n[pi]* and [pi][pi]* organic triplets, including anthraquinonesulfonates, in interactions with inorganic anions. A comparative study based on classical Marcus theory

    SciTech Connect

    Loeff, I.; Rabani, J.; Treinin, A. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel)); Linschitz, H. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States))

    1993-10-06

    The study of rates and radical yields in charge-transfer (CT) interactions between organic triplets and simple anions has been extended to triplets of 1-sulfonate, 1,5-disulfonate, and 2,6-disulfonate derivatives of 9,10-anthraquinone and of fluorescein dianion. New information is also presented on 1,4-naphthoquinone. For comparison, H-atom-transfer reactions of the anthraquinone triplets with 2-propanol were also studied. The new triplet-anion results, together with many previously reported data, are analyzed in the framework of a simplified Marcus theory by which the activation energy of formation of the pure charge-transfer exciplex, [Delta]G[sup [double dagger

  6. Study of $\\\\psi(2S)$ decays into $\\\\gamma K^+K^-$ and $\\\\gamma \\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; X. Cai; H. F. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. X. Chen; J. C. Chen; Jin Chen; Y. B. Chen; Y. P. Chu; Y. S. Dai; L. Y. Diao; Z. Y. Deng; Q. F. Dong; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; C. D. Fu; C. S. Gao; Y. N. Gao; S. D. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. N. Guo; Z. J. Guo; F. A. Harris; K. L He; M. He; Y. K. Heng; J. Hou; H. M. Hu; J. H. Hu; T. Hu; X. T. Huang; X. B. Ji; X. S. Jiang; X. Y. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; Y. F. Lai; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. Li; R. Y. Li; S. M. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Y. F. Liang; H. B. Liao; B. J. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. Liu; Fang Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. P. Liu; Jian Liu; Q. Liu; R. G. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Y. C. Lou; F. Lu; G. R. Lu; J. G. Lu; A. Lundborg; C. L. Luo; H. L. Ma; L. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; Z. P. Mao; X. H. Mo; J. Nie; S. L. Olsen; R. G. Ping; N. D. Qi; H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; Z. Y. Ren; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; L. Y. Shan; L. Shang; C. P. Shen; D. L. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; H. S. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; X. Tang; G. L. Tong; G. S. Varner; D. Y. Wang; L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; C. L. Wei; D. H. Wei; Y. Weng; U. Wiedner; N. Wu; X. M. Xia; X. X. Xie; G. F. Xu; X. P. Xu; Y. Xu; M. L. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. X. Yang; G. W. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; S. L. Zhang; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. Q. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Z. X. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; D. X. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; M. G. Zhao; P. P. Zhao; W. R. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; H. Q. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; L. Zhou; K. J. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; B. A. Zhuang; X. A. Zhuang; B. S. Zou

    2007-01-01

    Radiative charmonium decays from the BESII sample of 14$\\\\times10^{6}$ $\\\\psi(2S)$-events into two different final states, $\\\\gamma K^+K^-$ and $\\\\gamma\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$, are analyzed. Product branching fractions for $\\\\psi(2S)\\\\to\\\\gamma X\\\\to \\\\gamma\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$, $\\\\gamma K^+K^-$ are given, where $X=f_2(1270)$, $f_0(1500)$, and $f_0(1710)$ in $\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ and $f_2(1270)$, $f_2'(1525)$, and $f_0(1700)$ in $K^+K^-$. An angular analysis gives the ratios of the helicity projections for the $f_2(1270)$ in

  7. Study of the K(0)(L) --> pi(+)pi(-)gamma Direct Emission Vertex.

    PubMed

    Alavi-Harati, A; Alexopoulos, T; Arenton, M; Arisaka, K; Averitte, S; Barker, A R; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Belz, J; Ben-David, R; Bergman, D R; Blucher, E; Bock, G J; Bown, C; Bright, S; Cheu, E; Childress, S; Coleman, R; Corcoran, M D; Corti, G; Cox, B; Crisler, M B; Erwin, A R; Ford, R; Glazov, A; Golossanov, A; Graham, G; Graham, J; Hagan, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamm, J; Hanagaki, K; Hidaka, S; Hsiung, Y B; Jejer, V; Jensen, D A; Kessler, R; Kobrak, H G; LaDue, J; Lath, A; Ledovskoy, A; McBride, P L; Mikelsons, P; Monnier, E; Nakaya, T; Nelson, K S; Nguyen, H; O'Dell, V; Pang, M; Pordes, R; Prasad, V; Quinn, B; Ramberg, E J; Ray, R E; Roodman, A; Sadamoto, M; Schnetzer, S; Senyo, K; Shanahan, P; Shawhan, P S; Shields, J; Slater, W; Solomey, N; Somalwar, S V; Stone, R L; Suzuki, I; Swallow, E C; Taegar, S A; Tesarek, R J; Thomson, G B; Toale, P A; Tripathi, A; Tschirhart, R; Turner, S E; Wah, Y W; Wang, J; White, H B; Whitmore, J; Winstein, B; Winston, R; Yamanaka, T; Zimmerman, E D

    2001-01-29

    We have performed studies of the K(0)(L)-->pi(+)pi(-)gamma direct emission ( DE) and inner Bremsstrahlung ( IB) vertices, based on data collected by KTeV during the 1996 Fermilab fixed target run. We find a(1)/a(2) = -0.737+/-0.034 GeV2 for the DE form-factor parameter in the rho-propagator parametrization, and report on fits of the form factor to linear and quadratic functions as well. We concurrently measure gamma(K(0)(L)-->pi(+)pi(-)gamma,E(*)(gamma)>20 MeV)/gamma(K(0)(L)-->pi(+)pi(-)) = (20.8+/-0.3)x10(-3), and a K(0)(L)-->pi(+)pi(-)gamma DE/(DE+IB) branching ratio of 0.683+/-0.011. PMID:11177934

  8. Branching fraction and charge asymmetry measurements in B to J/psi pi pi decays

    E-print Network

    The BABAR collaboration; B. Aubert

    2007-04-10

    We study the decays B0 to J/psi pi+pi- and B+ to J/psi pi+pi0, including intermediate resonances, using a sample of 382 million BBbar pairs recorded by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II e+e- B factory. We measure the branching fractions B(B0 ->J/psi rho0) = (2.7 +/- 0.3 +/- 0.17) x 10-5 and B(B+ ->J/psi rho+) = (5.0 +/- 0.7 +/-0.31) x 10-5. We also set the following upper limits at the 90% confidence level: B(B0 -> J/psi pi+ \\pi- non-resonant) J/psi f_2(1270)) J/psi pi+ pi0 non-resonant) J/psi rho to be -0.11 +/- 0.12 +/- 0.08.

  9. Relation between scattering and production amplitude--Case of intermediate {sigma}-particle in {pi}{pi}-system--

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Muneyuki [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113 (Japan); Ishida, Shin [Atomic Energy Research Institute, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Tokyo 101 (Japan); Ishida, Taku [KEK, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan)

    1998-05-29

    The relation between scattering and production amplitudes are investigated, using a simple field theoretical model, from the general viewpoint of unitarity and the applicability of final state interaction (FSI-) theorem. The IA-method and VMW-method, which are applied to our phenomenological analyses [2,3] suggesting the {sigma}-existence, are obtained as the physical state representations of scattering and production amplitudes, respectively. Moreover, the VMW-method is shown to be an effective method to obtain the resonance properties from general production processes, while the conventional analyses based on the 'universality' of {pi}{pi}-scattering amplitude are powerless for this purpose.

  10. Chiral perturbation theory, K to pi pi decays and 2+1 flavor domain wall QCD

    E-print Network

    Shu Li; Norman H. Christ

    2008-12-07

    We present a calculation of the low energy constants describing the real and imaginary parts of the $K \\to \\pi \\pi$ decay amplitudes $A_0$ and $A_2$. Leading and next leading order chiral perturbation theory is used and its applicability assessed. A combination of statistical and systematic errors limits the precision of the results. The apparent limitations of chiral perturbation theory raise doubts about the accuracy of a possible extrapolation to physical $K \\to \\pi \\pi$ kinematics.

  11. Measurements of the branching fractions of charged B decays to K±pi-\\/+pi± final states

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; D. Boutigny; J.-M. Gaillard; A. Hicheur; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; P. Robbe; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; A. Palano; A. Pompili; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; A. W. Borgland; A. B. Breon; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; C. T. Day; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; J. F. Kral; G. Kukartsev; C. Leclerc; M. E. Levi; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; A. Romosan; M. T. Ronan; V. G. Shelkov; A. V. Telnov; W. A. Wenzel; K. Ford; T. J. Harrison; C. M. Hawkes; D. J. Knowles; S. E. Morgan; R. C. Penny; A. T. Watson; N. K. Watson; K. Goetzen; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; H. Schmuecker; M. Steinke; N. R. Barlow; J. T. Boyd; N. Chevalier; W. N. Cottingham; M. P. Kelly; T. E. Latham; C. Mackay; F. F. Wilson; K. Abe; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; D. Thiessen; P. Kyberd; A. K. McKemey; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. B. Golubev; V. N. Ivanchenko; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; A. N. Yushkov; D. Best; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; C. Buchanan; B. L. Hartfiel; B. C. Shen; D. del Re; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; D. B. Macfarlane; H. P. Paar; Sh. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; B. Dahmes; N. Kuznetsova; S. L. Levy; O. Long; A. Lu; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; W. Verkerke; T. W. Beck; J. Beringer; A. M. Eisner; C. A. Heusch; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; R. E. Schmitz; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. Turri; W. Walkowiak; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; S. Yang; S. Jayatilleke; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; T. Abe; F. Blanc; P. Bloom; S. Chen; P. J. Clark; W. T. Ford; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; P. Rankin; J. Roy; J. G. Smith; W. C. van Hoek; L. Zhang; J. L. Harton; T. Hu; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; J. Zhang; D. Altenburg; T. Brandt; J. Brose; T. Colberg; M. Dickopp; R. S. Dubitzky; A. Hauke; H. M. Lacker; E. Maly; R. Müller-Pfefferkorn; R. Nogowski; S. Otto; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; B. Spaan; L. Wilden; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; F. Brochard; J. Cohen-Tanugi; P. Grenier; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; A. Khan; D. Lavin; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; J. E. Swain; M. Andreotti; V. Azzolini; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; L. Piemontese; A. Sarti; E. Treadwell; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; M. Biasini; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; D. Falciai; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Pioppi; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; G. Crosetti; M. Lo Vetere; M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; S. Bailey; M. Morii; E. Won; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; I. Eschrich; J. R. Gaillard; G. W. Morton; J. A. Nash; P. Sanders; G. P. Taylor; G. J. Grenier; S.-J. Lee; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; J. Lamsa; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; J. Yi; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; S. Laplace; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; T. C. Petersen; S. Plaszczynski; M. H. Schune; L. Tantot; G. Wormser; V. Brigljevic; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; A. J. Bevan; J. P. Coleman; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; M. Kay; R. J. Parry; D. J. Payne; R. J. Sloane; C. Touramanis; J. J. Back; P. F. Harrison; H. W. Shorthouse; P. Strother; P. B. Vidal; C. L. Brown; G. Cowan; R. L. Flack; H. U. Flaecher; S. George; M. G. Green; A. Kurup; C. E. Marker; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; G. Vaitsas; M. A. Winter; D. Brown; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; R. J. Barlow; A. C. Forti; P. A. Hart; M. C. Hodgkinson; F. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; A. J. Lyon; J. H. Weatherall; J. C. Williams; A. Farbin; A. Jawahery; D. Kovalskyi; C. K. Lae; V. Lillard; D. A. Roberts; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; K. T. Flood; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; V. B. Koptchev; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; S. Willocq; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; D. J. Mangeol; P. M. Patel; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Cote-Ahern; C. Hast; P. Taras; H. Nicholson; C. Cartaro; N. Cavallo; G. De Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; J. M. Losecco; T. A. Gabriel; B. Brau; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; T. Pulliam; Q. K. Wong; J. Brau; R. Frey; C. T. Potter; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; F. Colecchia

    2004-01-01

    We present results of searches for B-meson decays to K+pi-pi+ with the BABAR detector. With a data sample of 61.6×106 BB¯ pairs, we measure the branching fractions and 90% confidence-level upper limits averaged over charge-conjugate states (the first error is statistical and the second is systematic): B[B+-->K*0(892)pi+]=(15.5±1.8+1.5-4.0)×10-6, B[B+-->f0(980)K+,f0-->pi+pi-]=(9.2±1.2+2.1-2.6)×10-6, B[B+-->D¯0pi+,D¯0-->K+pi-]=(184.6±3.2±9.7)×10-6, B[B+-->rho0(770)K+]<6.2×10-6 and B[B+-->K+pi-pi+ nonresonant]<17×10-6.

  12. Production of $\\sigma$ in $\\psi(2S)\\to \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}J/\\psi$

    E-print Network

    Ablikim, J M; Ban, Y; Cai, X; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J C; Jin, Chen; Chen, Y B; Chi, S P; Chu, Y P; Cui, X Z; Dai, Y S; Diao, L Y; Deng, Z Y; Dong, Q F; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Gao, C S; Gao, Y N; Gu, S D; Gu, Y T; Guo, Y N; Guo, Y Q; Guo, Z J; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; Heng, Y K; Hu, H M; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, X T; Ji, X B; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Yi, Jin; Lai, Y F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, H H; Li, J; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y L; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Fang, Liu; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, Q; Liu, R G; Liu, Z A; Lou, Y C; Lu, F; Lu, G R; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, X B; Mao, Z P; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Olsen, S L; Peng, H P; Ping, R G; Qi, N D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, C P; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Sun, H S; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tan, Z Q; Tang, X; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, L; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, W F; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Zhe Wang; Zheng Wang; Wei, C L; Wei, D H; Wu, N; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xu, G F; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Yan, M L; Yang, H X; Yang, Y X; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yi, Z Y; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, J M; Yuan, Y; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Yu, Zeng; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Q; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X M; Zhang, X Y; Yiyun, Zhang; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J W; Zhao, M G; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Z P; Zhou, L; Zhou, N F; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Ying Chun Zhu; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zhuang, X A; Zou, B S

    2007-01-01

    Using 14M $\\psi(2S)$ events accumulated by BESII at the BEPC, a Covariant Helicity Amplitude Analysis is performed for $\\psi(2S)\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-J/\\psi, J/\\psi\\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$. The $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ mass spectrum, distinctly different from phase space, suggests $\\sigma$ production in this process. Two different theoretical schemes are used in the global fit to the data. The results are consistent with the existence of the $\\sigma$. The $\\sigma$ pole position is determined to be $(552^{+84}_{-106})-i(232^{+81}_{-72})$~MeV/$c^2$.

  13. Production of $\\\\sigma$ in $\\\\psi(2S)\\\\to \\\\pi^{+}\\\\pi^{-}J\\/\\\\psi$

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; X. Cai; H. F. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. X. Chen; J. C. Chen; Jin Chen; Y. B. Chen; S. P. Chi; Y. P. Chu; X. Z. Cui; Y. S. Dai; L. Y. Diao; Z. Y. Deng; Q. F. Dong; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; C. D. Fu; C. S. Gao; Y. N. Gao; S. D. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. N. Guo; Y. Q. Guo; Z. J. Guo; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Y. K. Heng; H. M. Hu; T. Hu; G. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; X. B. Ji; X. S. Jiang; X. Y. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; Yi Jin; Y. F. Lai; G. Li; H. B. Li; H. H. Li; J. Li; R. Y. Li; S. M. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Y. L. Li; Y. F. Liang; H. B. Liao; B. J. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. Liu; Fang Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. B. Liu; Q. Liu; R. G. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Y. C. Lou; F. Lu; G. R. Lu; J. G. Lu; C. L. Luo; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; L. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; X. B. Ma; Z. P. Mao; X. H. Mo; J. Nie; S. L. Olsen; H. P. Peng; R. G. Ping; N. D. Qi; H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; Z. Y. Ren; G. Rong; L. Y. Shan; L. Shang; C. P. Shen; D. L. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; H. S. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. Q. Tan; X. Tang; G. L. Tong; G. S. Varner; D. Y. Wang; L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; W. F. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; Zheng Wang; C. L. Wei; D. H. Wei; N. Wu; X. M. Xia; X. X. Xie; G. F. Xu; X. P. Xu; Y. Xu; M. L. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. X. Yang; M. H. Ye; Y. X. Ye; Z. Y. Yi; G. W. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; J. M. Yuan; Y. Yuan; S. L. Zang; Y. Zeng; Yu Zeng; B. X. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. Q. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. M. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Yiyun Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; D. X. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; M. G. Zhao; P. P. Zhao; W. R. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; H. Q. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; L. Zhou; N. F. Zhou; K. J. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Yingchun Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; B. A. Zhuang; X. A. Zhuang; B. S. Zou

    2006-01-01

    Using 14M $\\\\psi(2S)$ events accumulated by BESII at the BEPC, a Covariant\\u000aHelicity Amplitude Analysis is performed for $\\\\psi(2S)\\\\to\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-J\\/\\\\psi,\\u000aJ\\/\\\\psi\\\\to \\\\mu^+\\\\mu^-$. The $\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ mass spectrum, distinctly different\\u000afrom phase space, suggests $\\\\sigma$ production in this process. Two different\\u000atheoretical schemes are used in the global fit to the data. The results are\\u000aconsistent with the existence of the $\\\\sigma$. The

  14. Penguin Zoology in $B\\to\\pi\\pi$ and the Extraction of the CKM Angle $\\alpha$

    E-print Network

    Fleischer, Robert; Fleischer, Robert; Mannel, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    We reanalyze the decay $B_d\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$ without assuming dominance of QCD penguins with internal top-quark exchanges. In that case the weak phase of the CKM angle $\\beta$. Nevertheless it is still possible to extract the CKM angle time-dependent CP-violating asymmetry of the transition $B_d\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$. Aside from that CP asymmetry this approach needs as an input only amplitudes of decays with branching ratios of order $10^{-5}$ and will thus be well within reach at future $B$-factories.

  15. Measurement of the D+-->pi+pi0 and D+-->K+pi0 branching fractions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; K. Goetzen; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; A. Petzold; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; D. J. Bard; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. R. Gaillard; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; C. M. Brown; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. S. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; M. P. Kelly; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; S. Y. Willocq; R. Cowan; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; D. Del Re; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; H. Bulten; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; T. Pulliam; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; C. T. Potter; R. Rahmat

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements of the branching fractions for the Cabbibo suppressed decays D+-->pi+pi0 and D+-->K+pi0 based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 124.3fb-1. The data were taken with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory operating on and near the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We find B(D+-->pi+pi0)=(1.25±0.10±0.09±0.04)×10-3 and B(D+-->K+pi0)=(2.52±0.47±0.25±0.08)×10-4, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second

  16. Double Delta(1232) excitation and the ABC effect in the reaction n + p -> 2H (pi pi)

    E-print Network

    C. A. Mosbacher; F. Osterfeld

    1999-03-29

    The deuteron spectrum in n+p -> 2 H(pi pi) at k_n = 1.88 GeV/c and theta_d = 0^o is explained by considering a Delta Delta excitation as the dominant reaction mechanism for the 2 pi production. We present a new theoretical approach based on a coupled channel formalism which allows to include the residual interaction within the intermediate Delta Delta and Delta N systems. The corresponding interaction potentials V_{DeltaDelta} and V_{DeltaN} are adopted from a meson exchange model with pi, rho, omega, and sigma exchange taken into account. The influence of the residual interaction on the deuteron spectrum is studied. We also predict the angular distribution of the two pions. It is shown that this distribution is closely connected to the spin structure of the DeltaDelta excitation.

  17. Hunting the CKM weak phase with time-integrated Dalitz analyses of Bs -> K pi pi decays

    E-print Network

    M. Ciuchini; M. Pierini; L. Silvestrini

    2007-01-11

    We present a new technique to extract information on the Unitarity Triangle from the study of Bs -> K pi pi Dalitz plot. Using isospin symmetry and the possibility to access the decay amplitudes from Dalitz analyses, we propose a new strategy to extract the weak phase gamma from Bs to K pi pi.

  18. Measurement of alpha / phi_2 from B to pi pi Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, A.J.

    2007-01-17

    The current results on B {yields} {pi}{pi} decays and SU(2) constraints on the Unitarity Triangle angle {alpha} or {phi}{sub 2} from the B-factories are summarized. Based on these measurements, predictions of the isospin analysis constraints at the end of the lifetime of both B-factories are given.

  19. What information can we obtain from the yield ratio $\\pi^{-}$/$\\pi^{+}$ in heavy-ion collisions?

    E-print Network

    Osada, T; Biyajima, M; Wilk, G

    1996-01-01

    The recently reported data on the yield ratio \\pi^-/\\pi^+ in central rapidity region of heavy-ion collisions are analyzed by theoretical formula which accounts for Coulomb interaction between central charged fragment (CCF) consisting of nearly stopped nucleons with effective charge Z_{\\mbox{\\scriptsize eff}} and charged pions produced in the same region of the phase space. The Coulomb wave function method is used instead of the usual Gamow factor in order to account for the finite production range of pions, \\beta. For Gaussian shape of the pion production sources it results in a quasi-scaling in \\beta and Z_{\\mbox{\\scriptsize eff}} which makes determination of parameters \\beta and Z_{\\mbox{\\scriptsize eff}} from the existing experimental data difficult. Only sufficiently accurate data taken in the extreme small m_{\\scriptscriptstyle T}-m_{\\pi} region, where this quasi-scaling is broken, could be used for this purpose.

  20. Edge-edge interactions in stacked graphene nanoplatelets

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz Silva, Eduardo [ORNL; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto [ORNL; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio [ORNL; Jia, Xiaoting [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Dresselhaus, M [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Meunier, V. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies show the dynamics of small graphene platelets on larger graphene layers. The platelets move nearly freely to eventually lock in at well-defined positions close to the edges of the larger underlying graphene sheet. While such movement is driven by a shallow potential energy surface described by an interplane interaction, the lock-in position occurs by via edge-edge interactions of the platelet and the graphene surface located underneath. Here we quantitatively study this behavior using van der Waals density functional calculations. Local interactions at the open edges are found to dictate stacking configurations that are different from Bernal (AB) stacking. These stacking configurations are known to be otherwise absent in edge-free two-dimensional (2D) graphene. The results explain the experimentally observed platelet dynamics and provide a detailed account of the new electronic properties of these combined systems.

  1. Three-body FSIs in D+ ---> K- pi+ pi+

    E-print Network

    Patrícia C. Magalhães; M. R. Robilotta; K. S. F. F. Guimarães; T. Frederico; W. de Paula; A. C. dos Reis; I. Bediaga

    2011-08-31

    We stress the importance of three-body final state interactions in $D^+ \\to K^- \\p^+ \\p^+$. The basic building block is the $K\\pi$ amplitude with parameters determined by a fit to elastic LASS data. Based on a vector weak vertex, we can describe the $K\\pi$ phase production experimental in the elastic region.

  2. Determination of the S-Wave Pi Pi Scattering Lengths From a Study of K - to Pi - Pi0 Pi0 Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Batley, J.R.; Culling, A.J.; Kalmus, G.; /Cambridge U.; Lazzeroni, C.; /Cambridge U. /Birmingham U.; Munday, D.J.; /Cambridge U.; Slater, M.W.; /Cambridge U. /Birmingham U.; Wotton, S.A.; /Cambridge U.; Arcidiacono, R.; /CERN /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Bocquet, G.; /CERN; Cabibbo, N.; /CERN /Rome U. /INFN, Rome; Ceccucci, A.; /CERN; Cundy, D.; /CERN /Turin, Cosmo-Geofisica Lab; Falaleev, V.; Fidecaro, M.; Gatignon, L.; Gonidec, A.; Kubischta, W.; /CERN; Norton, A.; /CERN /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara; Maier, A.; Patel, M.; Peters, A.; /CERN /Dubna, JINR /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Birmingham U. /Dubna, JINR /CERN /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Sofiya U. /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /INFN, Perugia /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Northwestern U. /Dubna, JINR /Chicago U., EFI /Marseille, CPPM /Chicago U., EFI /Edinburgh U. /George Mason U. /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Florence /Modena U. /INFN, Florence /INFN, Florence /Urbino U. /INFN, Florence /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Bonn U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Northwestern U. /SLAC /Northwestern U. /Northwestern U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Northwestern U. /Northwestern U. /UCLA /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Frascati /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Barcelona, IFAE /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /CERN /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /Siegen U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Bern U. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /CERN /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Madrid, CIEMAT /Vienna, OAW

    2012-03-29

    We report the results from a study of the full sample of {approx}6.031 x 10{sup 7} K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} decays recorded by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS. As first observed in this experiment, the {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} invariant mass (M{sub 00}) distribution shows a cusp-like anomaly in the region around M{sub 00} = 2m{sub +}, where m{sub +} is the charged pion mass. This anomaly has been interpreted as an effect due mainly to the final state charge exchange scattering process {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} in K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay. Fits to the M{sub 00} distribution using two different theoretical formulations provide the presently most precise determination of a{sub 0} - a{sub 2}, the difference between the {pi}{pi} S-wave scattering lengths in the isospin I = 0 and I = 2 states. Higher-order {pi}{pi} rescattering terms, included in the two formulations, allow also an independent, though less precise, determination of a{sub 2}.

  3. Charming penguins in B -> pi pi from QCD light-cone sum rules

    E-print Network

    B. Melic

    2003-06-30

    We use QCD light-cone sum rules to examine the B -> pi pi hadronic matrix element of the current-current operator with c quarks in the penguin topology (``charming penguin'') as a potential source of the substantial O(1/m_b) effects. Our results indicate that charming penguins do not generate sizable nonperturbative effects at finite m_b. The same is valid for the penguin contractions of the current-current operators with light quarks. The dominant penguin topology effects are predicted to be O(\\alpha_s). Still, the nonperturbative effects at finite m_b can accumulate to a visible effect that is illustrated by calculating the CP-asymmetry in the B^0_d -> pi^+ pi^- decay.

  4. Search for b --> u Transitions in B^{+-} --> [K^{-+} pi^{+-} pi0]_D K^{+-} Decays

    E-print Network

    The BABAR Collaboration; J. -P. Lees

    2011-04-22

    We present a study of the decays B^{+-} --> D K^{+-} with D mesons reconstructed in the K+pi-pi0 or K-pi+pi0 final states, where D indicates a D0 or a anti-D0 meson. Using a sample of 474 million BBbar pairs collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at SLAC we obtain R^{+} = (5^{+12}_{-10}(stat) ^{+2}_{-4}(syst))\\times10^{-3} and R^{-} = (12^{+12}_{-10}(stat) ^{+3}_{-5}(syst))\\times10^{-3}, from which we extract the upper limits at 90% probability: R^+ u and b --> c amplitudes r_B<0.13 at 90% probability.

  5. B {sup {yields}} {pi}{pi} decays: Branching ratios and CP asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Kaidalov, A. B., E-mail: kaidalov@itep.ru; Vysotsky, M. I. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)], E-mail: vysotsky@itep.ru

    2007-04-15

    Theoretically motivated smallness of the penguin amplitude in B {sup {yields}} {pi}{pi} decays allows one to calculate the value of the unitarity-triangle angle {alpha}(o{sub 2}) with good accuracy. The relatively large branching ratio of the decay into {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is explained by the large value of FSI phase difference between decay amplitudes with I = 0 and I = 2.

  6. Double Delta Production in the gamma d ---> p n pi+ pi- Reaction

    E-print Network

    J. A. Gomez Tejedor; E. Oset; H. Toki

    1995-01-02

    We have studied the gamma d ---> Delta++ Delta- reaction which requires the collaboration of the two nucleons in deuteron. By means of a model previously developed for the gamma p ----> p pi+ pi- reaction, the two body exchange currents leading to double delta creation are derived. A fair agreement is obtained with a recent experiment, but more precise measurements and the extension to higher photon energies look advisable in order to see the limits of the present theoretical approach

  7. Reaction {pi}N {yields} {pi}{pi}N near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Frlez, E.

    1993-11-01

    The LAMPF E1179 experiment used the {pi}{sup 0} spectrometer and an array of charged particle range counters to detect and record {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, {pi}{sup 0}p, and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}p coincidences following the reaction {pi}{sup +}p {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}p near threshold. The total cross sections for single pion production were measured at the incident pion kinetic energies 190, 200, 220, 240, and 260 MeV. Absolute normalizations were fixed by measuring {pi}{sup +}p elastic scattering at 260 MeV. A detailed analysis of the {pi}{sup 0} detection efficiency was performed using cosmic ray calibrations and pion single charge exchange measurements with a 30 MeV {pi}{sup {minus}} beam. All published data on {pi}N {yields} {pi}{pi}N, including our results, are simultaneously fitted to yield a common chiral symmetry breaking parameter {xi} ={minus}0.25{plus_minus}0.10. The threshold matrix element {vert_bar}{alpha}{sub 0}({pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}p){vert_bar} determined by linear extrapolation yields the value of the s-wave isospin-2 {pi}{pi} scattering length {alpha}{sub 0}{sup 2}({pi}{pi}) = {minus}0.041{plus_minus}0.003 m{sub {pi}}{sup {minus}1}, within the framework of soft-pion theory.

  8. Measuring gamma with B -> K pi pi and B -> K K Kbar Decays

    E-print Network

    Nicolas Rey-Le Lorier; David London

    2012-01-11

    We present a method for cleanly extracting the CP phase gamma from the Dalitz plots of B+ -> K+ pi+ pi-, Bd -> K+ pi0 pi-, Bd -> K0 pi+ pi-, Bd -> K+ K0 K-, and Bd -> K0 K0 Kbar0. The B -> K pi pi and B -> K K Kbar decays are related by flavor SU(3) symmetry, but SU(3) breaking is taken into account. Most of the experimental measurements have already been made -- what remains is a Dalitz-plot analysis of Bd -> K0 K0 Kbar0 (or Bd -> KS KS KS). We (very) roughly estimate the error on gamma to be ~25%. This is somewhat larger than the error in two-body decays, but it would be the first clean measurement of gamma in three-body decays. Furthermore, at the super-B factory, it is possible that gamma could be measured more precisely in three-body decays than in two-body decays.

  9. High-Statistics Study of the tau^- -> pi^- pi^0 nu_tau Decay

    E-print Network

    M. Fujikawa; H. Hayashii; S. Eidelman; for the Belle Collaboration

    2008-10-29

    We report a high-statistics measurement of the branching fraction for tau^- --> pi^- pi^0 nu_tau and the invariant mass spectrum of the produced pi^- pi^0 system using 72.2 fb^-1 of data recorded with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e^+ e^- collider. The branching fraction obtained is (25.24 +/- 0.01 +/- 0.39)%, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The unfolded pi^- pi^0 mass spectrum is used to determine resonance parameters for the rho(770), rho'(1450), and rho"(1700) mesons. We also use this spectrum to estimate the hadronic (2pi) contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon (a_{mu}^{pipi}). Our result for a_{mu}^{pipi} integrated over the mass range sqrt{s} = 2m_{pi} - 1.8 GeV/c^2 is a_{mu}^{pipi} = (523.5 +/- 1.5 (exp) +/- 2.6 (Br) +/- 2.5 (isospin))x 10^{-10}, where the first error is due to the experimental uncertainties, the second is due to the uncertainties in the branching fractions and the third is due to the uncertainties in the isospin-violating corrections.

  10. A study of $d^*(2380)\\to d \\pi\\pi$ decay width

    E-print Network

    Dong, Yubing; Huang, Fei; Zhang, Zongye

    2015-01-01

    The decay widths of the $\\ds\\to d \\pi^0\\pi^0$ and $\\ds\\to d \\pi^+\\pi^-$ processes are explicitly calculated in terms of our chiral quark model. By using the experimental ratios of cross sections between various decay channels, the partial widths of the $\\ds\\to pn \\pi^0\\pi^0$, $\\ds\\to pn \\pi^+\\pi^-$, $\\ds\\to pp \\pi^0\\pi^-$, and $\\ds\\to nn \\pi^+\\pi^0$ channels are also extracted. Further including the estimated partial width for the $\\ds\\to pn $ process, the total width of the $\\ds$ resonance is obtained. In the first step of the practical calculation, the effect of the dynamical structure on the width of $\\ds$ is studied in the single $\\Delta\\Delta$ channel approximation. It is found that the width is reduced by few tens of MeV, in comparison with the one obtained by considering the effect of the kinematics only. This presents the importance of such effect from the dynamical structure. However, the obtained width with the single $\\Delta\\Delta$ channel wave function is still too large to explain the data. It im...

  11. Double Pancake Bonds: Pushing the Limits of Strong ?–? Stacking Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The concept of a double-bonded pancake bonding mechanism is introduced to explain the extremely short ?–? stacking contacts in dimers of dithiatriazines. While ordinary single pancake bonds occur between radicals and already display significantly shorter interatomic distances in comparison to van der Waals (vdW) contacts, the double-bonded pancake dimer is based on diradicaloid or antiaromatic molecules and exhibits even shorter and stronger intermolecular bonds that breach into the range of extremely stretched single bonds in terms of bond distances and binding energies. These properties give rise to promising possibilities in the design of new materials with high electrical conductivity and for the field of spintronics. The analysis of the double pancake bond is based on cutting edge electron correlation theory combining multireference (nondynamical) effects and dispersion (dynamical) contributions in a balanced way providing accurate interaction energies and distributions of unpaired spins. It is also shown that the present examples do not stand isolated but that similar mechanisms operate in several analogous nonradical molecular systems to form double-bonded ?-stacking pancake dimers. We report on the amazing properties of a new type of stacking interaction mechanism between ? conjugated molecules in the form of a “double pancake bond” which breaks the record for short intermolecular distances and provides formidable strength for some ?–? stacking interactions. PMID:25203200

  12. Stacked stem cell sheets enhance cell-matrix interactions

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nikul G; Zhang, Ge

    2014-01-01

    Cell sheet engineering has enabled the production of confluent cell sheets stacked together for use as a cardiac patch to increase cell survival rate and engraftment after transplantation, thereby providing a promising strategy for high density stem cell delivery for cardiac repair. One key challenge in using cell sheet technology is the difficulty of cell sheet handling due to its weak mechanical properties. A single-layer cell sheet is generally very fragile and tends to break or clump during harvest. Effective transfer and stacking methods are needed to move cell sheet technology into widespread clinical applications. In this study, we developed a simple and effective micropipette based method to aid cell sheet transfer and stacking. The cell viability after transfer was tested and multi-layer stem cell sheets were fabricated using the developed method. Furthermore, we examined the interactions between stacked stem cell sheets and fibrin matrix. Our results have shown that the preserved ECM associated with the detached cell sheet greatly facilitates its adherence to fibrin matrix and enhances the cell sheet-matrix interactions. Accelerated fibrin degradation caused by attached cell sheets was also observed. PMID:24769850

  13. Atomic-scale details of dislocation - stacking fault tetrahedra interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Rodney, David [Genie Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux; Bacon, David J [University of Liverpool

    2005-01-01

    Stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) are formed during irradiation of fcc. metals and alloys with low stacking fault energy. The high number density of SFTs observed suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, be taken into account when estimating mechanical property changes of irradiated materials. The key issue is to describe the interaction between a moving dislocation and an individual SFT, which is characterized by a small physical scale of about 100 nm. In this paper we present results of an atomistic simulation of edge and screw dislocations interacting with small SFTs at different temperatures and strain rates and present mechanisms which can explain the formation of defect-free channels observed experimentally.

  14. Search for CP violation using Todd correlations in D0-->K+K-pi+pi- decays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Del Amo Sanchez; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; E. Prencipe; V. Tisserand; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; M. Martinelli; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; B. Hooberman; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Lynch; I. L. Osipenkov; T. Tanabe; C. M. Hawkes; N. Soni; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. J. Asgeirsson; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; A. Randle-Conde; V. E. Blinov; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; A. N. Yushkov; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; H. Atmacan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; G. M. Vitug; Z. Yasin; V. Sharma; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; A. M. Eisner; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; A. J. Martinez; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; L. O. Winstrom; C. H. Cheng; D. A. Doll; B. Echenard; D. G. Hitlin; P. Ongmongkolkul; F. C. Porter; A. Y. Rakitin; R. Andreassen; M. S. Dubrovin; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; J. F. Hirschauer; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; J. G. Smith; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; W. H. Toki; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; T. M. Karbach; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; M. J. Kobel; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; D. Bernard; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; S. Playfer; J. E. Watson; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; E. Fioravanti; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Munerato; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; M. Nicolaci; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; R. Contri; E. Guido; M. Lo Vetere; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; S. Tosi; B. Bhuyan; M. Morii; A. Adametz; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; F. U. Bernlochner; H. M. Lacker; T. Lueck; A. Volk; P. D. Dauncey; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; U. Mallik; C. Chen; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; D. Derkach; J. Firmino da Costa; G. Grosdidier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; B. Malaescu; A. Perez; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; L. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. P. Coleman; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; S. Paramesvaran; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; W. Gradl; A. Hafner; K. E. Alwyn; D. Bailey; R. J. Barlow; G. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. Anderson; R. Cenci; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; E. Salvati; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; G. Sciolla; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; M. Schram; P. Biassoni; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; S. Stracka; L. Cremaldi; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; P. Sonnek; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; X. Nguyen; M. Simard; P. Taras; G. de Nardo; D. Monorchio; G. Onorato; C. Sciacca; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; W. F. Wang; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; G. Castelli; E. Feltresi; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; E. Ben-Haim; G. R. Bonneaud; H. Briand; J. Chauveau; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; G. Marchiori; J. Ocariz; J. Prendki; S. Sitt; M. Biasini; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; G. Calderini; M. Carpinelli; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; N. Neri; E. Paoloni; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; D. Lopes Pegna; C. Lu; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith; A. V. Telnov; F. Anulli; E. Baracchini; G. Cavoto; R. Faccini; F. Ferrarotto; F. Ferroni; M. Gaspero; L. Li Gioi; M. A. Mazzoni; G. Piredda; F. Renga; M. Ebert; T. Hartmann; T. Leddig; H. Schröder; R. Waldi; T. Adye; B. Franek; E. O. Olaiya; F. F. Wilson; S. Emery; G. Hamel de Monchenault; G. Vasseur; Ch. Yèche; M. Zito; M. T. Allen; D. Aston; D. J. Bard; R. Bartoldus; J. F. Benitez; C. Cartaro; M. R. Convery; J. Dorfan; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; W. Dunwoodie; R. C. Field; M. Franco Sevilla; B. G. Fulsom; A. M. Gabareen; M. T. Graham; P. Grenier; C. Hast; W. R. Innes; M. H. Kelsey; H. Kim; P. Kim; M. L. Kocian; D. W. G. S. Leith; S. Li; B. Lindquist; S. Luitz; V. Luth; H. L. Lynch; D. B. Macfarlane; H. Marsiske; D. R. Muller; H. Neal; S. Nelson; C. P. O'Grady; I. Ofte; M. Perl; B. N. Ratcliff; A. Roodman; A. A. Salnikov; R. H. Schindler; J. Schwiening; A. Snyder; D. Su; M. K. Sullivan; K. Suzuki; J. M. Thompson; J. Va'Vra; A. P. Wagner

    2010-01-01

    We search for CP violation in a sample of 4.7×104 Cabibbo suppressed D0-->K+K-pi+pi- decays. We use 470fb-1 of data recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- storage rings running at center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV. CP violation is searched for in the difference between the T-odd asymmetries, obtained using triple product correlations, measured for D0 and D¯0

  15. Improved Measurements of CP-Violating Asymmetry Amplitudes in B0-->pi+pi- Decays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges-Pous; A. Palano; A. Pompili; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; A. W. Borgland; A. B. Breon; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; C. T. Day; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; M. Fritsch; K. Goetzen; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; N. Chevalier; W. N. Cottingham; M. P. Kelly; T. E. Latham; F. F. Wilson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; D. Thiessen; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; L. Teodorescu; A. E. Blinov; V. E. Blinov; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; V. N. Ivanchenko; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; A. N. Yushkov; D. Best; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; C. Buchanan; B. L. Hartfiel; A. J. R. Weinstein; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; D. Del Re; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; D. B. Macfarlane; H. P. Paar; Sh. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; A. Lu; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; W. Verkerke; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; S. Yang; S. Jayatilleke; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; P. Rankin; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; J. Zhang; L. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; J. L. Harton; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; Q. Zeng; B. Spaan; D. Altenburg; T. Brandt; J. Brose; M. Dickopp; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. M. Lacker; E. Maly; R. Nogowski; S. Otto; A. Petzold; G. Schott; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; S. Schrenk; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; D. J. Bard; P. J. Clark; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; V. Azzolini; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; L. Piemontese; A. Sarti; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; G. Crosetti; M. Lo Vetere; M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; S. Bailey; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; E. Won; R. S. Dubitzky; U. Langenegger; J. Marks; U. Uwer; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; J. R. Gaillard; G. W. Morton; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; G. P. Taylor; M. J. Charles; G. J. Grenier; U. Mallik; A. K. Mohapatra; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; J. Lamsa; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; J. Yi; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; X. Giroux; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; T. C. Petersen; M. Pierini; S. Plaszczynski; M. H. Schune; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; M. C. Simani; D. M. Wright; A. J. Bevan; C. A. Chavez; J. P. Coleman; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; R. J. Parry; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; C. M. Cormack; F. di Lodovico; C. L. Brown; G. Cowan; R. L. Flack; H. U. Flaecher; M. G. Green; P. S. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; M. A. Winter; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; M. C. Hodgkinson; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; C. Chen; A. Farbin; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; D. Kovalskyi; C. K. Lae; V. Lillard; D. A. Roberts; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; V. B. Koptchev; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; S. Willocq; R. Cowan; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; P. Taras; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; H. Bulten; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; L. Wilden; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; T. Pulliam

    2005-01-01

    We present updated measurements of the CP-violating parameters Spipi and Cpipi in B0-->pi+pi- decays. Using a sample of 227×106 Upsilon(4S)-->B Bmacr decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at SLAC, we observe 467±33 signal decays and measure Spipi=-0.30±0.17(stat)±0.03(syst) and Cpipi=-0.09±0.15(stat)±0.04(syst).

  16. Partial wave analysis of J\\/psi-->gamma(K+K- pi+pi-)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. G. Bian; A. D. Chen; G. P. Chen; H. F. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; X. D. Chen; Y. Chen; Y. B. Chen; B. S. Cheng; X. Z. Cui; H. L. Ding; L. Y. Dong; Z. Z. Du; C. S. Gao; M. L. Gao; S. Q. Gao; J. H. Gu; S. D. Gu; W. X. Gu; Y. N. Guo; Z. J. Guo; S. W. Han; Y. Han; J. T. He; K. L. He; M. He; Y. K. Heng; G. Y. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. L. Hu; Q. H. Hu; T. Hu; G. S. Huang; X. P. Huang; Y. Z. Huang; C. H. Jiang; Y. Jin; X. Ju; Z. J. Ke; Y. F. Lai; P. F. Lang; C. G. Li; D. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; P. Q. Li; W. G. Li; W. G. Li; X. H. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Z. C. Li; B. Liu; F. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; R. G. Liu; Y. Liu; Z. X. Liu; G. R. Lu; F. Lu; J. G. Lu; X. L. Luo; E. C. Ma; J. M. Ma; H. S. Mao; Z. P. Mao; X. C. Meng; X. H. Mo; J. Nie; N. D. Qi; X. R. Qi; C. D. Qian; J. F. Qiu; Y. H. Qu; Y. K. Que; G. Rong; Y. Y. Shao; B. W. Shen; D. L. Shen; H. Shen; X. Y. Shen; F. Shi; H. Z. Shi; X. F. Song; H. S. Sun; L. F. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; S. Q. Tang; G. L. Tong; F. Wang; L. Z. Wang; L. S. Wang; P. Wang; S. M. Wang; Y. Y. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; C. L. Wei; N. Wu; Y. G. Wu; D. M. Xi; X. M. Xia; Y. Xie; G. F. Xu; S. T. Xue; J. Yan; W. G. Yan; C. M. Yang; C. Y. Yang; H. X. Yang; X. F. Yang; M. H. Ye; S. W. Ye; Y. X. Ye; C. S. Yu; C. X. Yu; G. W. Yu; Y. H. Yu; Z. Q. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. L. Zhang; J. Zhang; L. S. Zhang; P. Zhang; Q. J. Zhang; S. Q. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Y. Zhang; D. X. Zhao; H. W. Zhao; J. Zhao; M. Zhao; W. R. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; J. P. Zheng; L. S. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; B. Q. Zhou; L. Zhou; K. J. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; B. A. Zhuang; D. V. Bugg; B. S. Zou

    2000-01-01

    BES data on J\\/psi-->gamma(K+K-pi+pi- ) are presented. The K*K¯* contribution peaks strongly near threshold. It is fitted with a broad 0-+ resonance with mass \\/M=1800+\\/-100 MeV, width \\/Gamma=500+\\/-200 MeV. A broad 2++ resonance peaking at 2020 MeV is also required with width \\/~500 MeV. There is further evidence for a 2-+ component peaking at 2.55 GeV. The non-K*K¯* contribution is

  17. Charge asymmetries in e+e- -> pi+ pi- gamma at the phi resonance

    E-print Network

    A. Gallegos; J. L. Lucio; G. Moreno; M. Napsuciale

    2010-09-09

    We consider the forward-backward pion charge asymmetry for the e^{+}e^{-}\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\gamma process. At tree level we consider bremsstrahlung and double resonance contributions. Although the latter contribution is formally sub-leading, it is enhanced at low dipion invariant mass due to $\\rho$ resonant effects. We consider also four alternative models to describe the final state radiation at the loop level: Resonance Chiral Perturbation Theory, Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory, Kaon Loop Model and Linear Sigma Model. The last three models yield results compatible with experimental data. The Kaon Loop Model requires an energy dependent phase to achieve the agreement.

  18. Measurement of the e+e--->pi+pi- cross-section with the CMD2 detector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. R. Akhmetshin; G. A. Aksenov; V. A. Astakhov; E. V. Anashkin; M. Arpagaus; V. M. Aulchenko; V. S. Banzarov; L. M. Barkov; S. E. Baru; N. S. Bashtovoy; A. E. Bondar; D. V. Chernyak; A. G. Chertovskikh; V. V. Danilov; A. S. Dvoretsky; S. I. Eidelman; G. V. Fedotovich; N. I. Gabyshev; A. A. Grebeniuk; D. N. Grigoriev; P. M. Ivanov; V. F. Kazanin; B. I. Khazin; A. V. Klimenkov; I. A. Koop; L. M. Kurdadze; A. S. Kuzmin; M. Lechner; P. A. Lukin; I. B. Logashenko; A. P. Lysenko; A. V. Maksimov; Yu. I. Merzlyakov; I. N. Nesterenko; V. S. Okhapkin; E. A. Perevedentsev; E. V. Popkov; A. A. Polunin; E. G. Pozdeev; V. I. Ptitzyn; T. A. Purlatz; N. M. Ryskulov; A. A. Ruban; A. G. Shamov; Yu. M. Shatunov; A. I. Shekhtman; M. A. Shubin; B. A. Shwartz; V. A. Sidorov; A. N. Skrinsky; V. P. Smakhtin; I. G. Snopkov; E. P. Solodov; P. Yu. Stepanov; A. I. Sukhanov; Yu. Y. Yudin; S. G. Zverev; D. H. Brown; B. L. Roberts; J. A. Thompson; V. W. Hughes

    1998-01-01

    The general purpose detector CMD-2 at the VEPP-2M electron-positron collider at Novosibirsk has collected about 11 pb-1 of integrated luminosity in the center-of-mass energy range from 0.36 up to 1.38 GeV. Data in the rho-meson energy range from 0.61 to 0.96 GeV have been analysed and preliminary results on the e+e--->pi+pi- cross-section in this energy range are presented.

  19. Strong Isospin Breaking in CP-even and CP-odd K -> pi pi Decays

    E-print Network

    C. E. Wolfe; K. Maltman

    2000-07-06

    Complete next-to-leading (chiral) order (NLO) expressions for the strong isospin-breaking (IB) contributions in K -> pi pi are used to discuss (1) for CP-even, the impact on the magnitude of the Delta I=1/2 Rule, and (2) for CP-odd, the strong IB correction, Omega_st, for the gluonic penguin contribution to epsilon'/epsilon, with particular emphasis on the strong low-energy constant (LEC) and loop contributions, numerical values for which are model-independent at NLO.

  20. Improved measurements of CP-violating asymmetry amplitudes in B0-->pi+pi- decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M

    2005-10-01

    We present updated measurements of the CP-violating parameters Spipi and Cpipi in B0-->pi+pi- decays. Using a sample of 227x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) collider at SLAC, we observe 467+/-33 signal decays and measure Spipi=-0.30+/-0.17(stat)+/-0.03(syst) and Cpipi=-0.09+/-0.15(stat)+/-0.04(syst). PMID:16241716

  1. Rotation-tunneling analysis of the origin band in the tropolone pi(*)<--pi absorption system.

    PubMed

    Bracamonte, Alfredo E; Vaccaro, Patrick H

    2004-03-01

    The tunneling-split origin band of the tropolone A (1)B(2)-X (1)A(1) (pi(*)<--pi) absorption system was interrogated under ambient, bulk-gas conditions by exploiting high-resolution degenerate four-wave mixing techniques. The inherent complexity of this spectral region was alleviated by performing polarization-resolved measurements, with judicious selection of transverse characteristics for the incident and detected electromagnetic fields enabling rovibronic transitions to be discriminated according to their attendant changes in rotational angular momentum, DeltaJ. Quantitative simulation of recorded data sets showed the vibrationless level of the electronically excited state to be bifurcated by Delta(0) (A)=19.846(25) cm(-1), representing a factor of 20 increase in proton-transfer efficiency over the corresponding level of the ground electronic state. Spectroscopic parameters extracted for the 0(+) and 0(-) manifolds of A (1)B(2) tropolone yield unexpectedly large values of the inertial defect, DeltaI(0(+) ) (A)=-0.802(86) amu A(2) and DeltaI(0(-) ) (A)=-0.882(89) amu A(2), strongly suggesting that a loss of molecular planarity accompanies the pi(*)<--pi electron promotion. These results, as well as complementary information deduced for interloping hot-band resonances, are discussed in terms of the unique structural and dynamical properties exhibited by tropolone and related proton-transfer species. PMID:15267323

  2. Axial anomaly and the interplay of quark loops with pseudoscalar and vector mesons in the gamma* --> pi+ pi0 pi- process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sanjin Benic; Dubravko Klabucar

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the ongoing measurements of the Primakoff process pi- gamma* --> pi- pi0 by COMPASS collaboration at CERN, the transition form factor for the canonical anomalous process gamma* --> pi+ pi0 pi- is calculated in a constituent quark loop model. The simplest contribution to this process is the quark \\

  3. Search for new states decaying into J/psi-pi+pi- with the ATLAS detector at the large Hadron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wei-Cheng

    Using pp collision data collected at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV in 2010 and 2011with the ATLAS detector (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS), corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.44 fb-1, the J/PsiPi+Pi- combinations have been studied. The selection criteria have been developed, the detection efficiency of the Xc(3872) signal has been evaluated, and the systematic errors have been identified. Both the Psi(2S) and the Xc(3872) signals are observed in the J/PsiPi+Pi- mass spectrum. The detection of the charmonium-like X, Y, Z states is feasible with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Other than the Psi(2 S) and the Xc(3872) signals, there is no evidence for any significant enhancement in the J/PsiPi+Pi- mass spectrum. This dissertation research establishes that ATLAS can detect Xc(3872) like new particles in the J/PsiPi+Pi- final state, and with current data sample, no new states have been observed in this study.

  4. An upper limit for the tau neutrino mass from tau -> 5pi(pi0)nutau decays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Damir Buskulic; David William Casper; I. de Bonis; D. Decamp; P. Ghez; C. Goy; J.-P. Lees; M.-N. Minard; P. Odier; B. Pietrzyk; F. Ariztizabal; M. Chmeissani; J. M. Crespo; I. Efthymiopoulos; E. Fernandez; M. Fernandez-Bosman; V. Gaitan; Ll. Garrido; M. Martinez; S. Orteu; A. Pacheco; C. Padilla; Fabrizio Palla; A. Pascual; J. A. Perlas; F. Sanchez; F. Teubert; D. Creanza; M. de Palma; A. Farilla; Giuseppe Iaselli; G. Maggi; N. Marinelli; S. Natali; S. Nuzzo; A. Ranieri; G. Raso; F. Romano; F. Ruggieri; G. Selvaggi; L. Silvestris; P. Tempesta; G. Zito; X. Huang; J. Lin; Q. Ouyang; T. Wang; Y. Xie; R. Xu; S. Xue; J. Zhang; L. Zhang; W. Zhao; G. Bonvicini; David G Cassel; M. Cattaneo; P. Comas; P. Coyle; H. Drevermann; A. Engelhardt; Roger W Forty; M. Frank; G. Ganis; M. Girone; R. Hagelberg; J. Harvey; R. Jacobsen; P. Janot; B. Jost; J. Knobloch; Ivan Lehraus; M. Maggi; C. Markou; E. B. Martin; P. Mato; H. Meinhard; Adolf G Minten; R. Miquel; K. Moffeit; P. Palazzi; J. R. Pater; P. Perrodo; J.-F. Pusztaszeri; F. Ranjard; Luigi Rolandi; D. Schlatter; M. Schmelling; W. Tejessy; I. R. Tomalin; R. Veenhof; A. Venturi; H W Wachsmuth; W. Wiedenmann; T. Wildish; W. Witzeling; J. Wotschack; Ziad J Ajaltouni; Maria Bardadin-Otwinowska; A. Barres; C. Boyer; A. Falvard; P. Gay; C. Guicheney; P. Henrard; J. Jousset; B. Michel; S. Monteil; J.-C. Montret; D. Pallin; P. Perret; F. Podlyski; J. Proriol; J.-M. Rossignol; F. Saadi; Tom Fearnley; J. B. Hansen; J. D. Hansen; P. H. Hansen; S. D. Johnson; B. S. Nilsson; A. Kyriakis; Errietta Simopoulou; I. Siotis; Anna Vayaki; K. Zachariadou; A. Blondel; G R Bonneaud; J. C. Brient; P. Bourdon; L. Passalacqua; A. Rougé; M. Rumpf; R. Tanaka; Andrea Valassi; M. Verderi; H L Videau; D. J. Candlin; M. I. Parsons; E. Veitch; E. Focardi; G. Parrini; M. Corden; M C Delfino; C H Georgiopoulos; D. E. Jaffe; A. Antonelli; G. Bencivenni; G. Bologna; F. Bossi; P. Campana; G. Capon; F. Cerutti; V. Chiarella; G. Felici; P. Laurelli; G. Mannocchi; F. Murtas; G. P. Murtas; M. Pepe-Altarelli; S. Salomone; P. Colrain; I. Ten Have; I. G. Knowles; J. G. Lynch; W J Maitland; W. T. Morton; C. Raine; P. Reeves; J. M. Scarr; K. Smith; M. G. Smith; A. S. Thompson; S. Thorn; R. M. Turnbull; U. Becker; O. Braun; C. Geweniger; G. Graefe; P. Hanke; V. Hepp; E. E. Kluge; A. Putzer; B. Rensch; M. Schmidt; J. Sommer; H. Stenzel; K. Tittel; M. Wunsch; R. Beuselinck; David M Binnie; W. Cameron; D. J. Colling; Peter J Dornan; N P Konstantinidis; L. Moneta; A. Moutoussi; J. Nash; G. San Martin; J. K. Sedgbeer; A. M. Stacey; G. Dissertori; P. Girtler; E. Kneringer; D. Kuhn; G. Rudolph; C. K. Bowdery; T. J. Brodbeck; A. J. Finch; F. Foster; G. Hughes; D. Jackson; N. R. Keemer; M. Nuttall; A D Patel; Terence Sloan; S. W. Snow; E. P. Whelan; A. Galla; A. M. Greene; K. Kleinknecht; J. Raab; B. Renk; H.-G. Sander; H. Schmidt; S. M. Walther; R. Wanke; B. Wolf; Jean-Jacques Aubert; A. M. Bencheikh; C. Benchouk; A. Bonissent; G. Bujosa; D. Calvet; J. Carr; C A Diaconu; F. Etienne; M. Thulasidas; D. Nicod; P. Payre; D. Rousseau; M. Talby; I. Abt; R W Assmann; C. Bauer; Walter Blum; D. Brown; H. Dietl; Friedrich Dydak; C. Gotzhein; A. W. Halley; K. Jakobs; H. Kroha; G. Lütjens; Gerhard Lutz; W. Männer; H.-G. Moser; R H Richter; A. Rosado-Schlosser; A. S. Schwarz; Ronald Settles; H C J Seywerd; U. Stierlin; R. St. Denis; G. Wolf; R. Alemany; J. Boucrot; O. Callot; A. Cordier; F. Courault; M. Davier; L. Duflot; J.-F. Grivaz; Ph. Heusse; M. Jacquet; D. W. Kim; F R Le Diberder; J. Lefrançois; A.-M. Lutz; G. Musolino; I A Nikolic; H. J. Park; I. C. Park; M.-H. Schune; S. Simion; J.-J. Veillet; I. Videau; P. Azzurri; D. Abbaneo; G. Bagliesi; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; U. Bottigli; C. Bozzi; G. Calderini; M. Carpinelli; M. A. Ciocci; V. Ciulli; R. dell'Orso; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. Foà; F. Forti; A. Giassi; M. A. Giorgi; A. Gregorio; F. Ligabue; A. Lusiani; P. S. Marrocchesi; A. Messineo; G. Rizzo; G. Sanguinetti; A. Sciabà; P. Spagnolo; Jack Steinberger; Roberto Tenchini; G. Tonelli; G. Triggiani; C. Vannini; P. G. Verdini; J. Walsh; A. P. Betteridge; G. A. Blair; L. M. Bryant; Y. S. Gao; M. G. Green; D. L. Johnson; T. Medcalf; Ll. M. Mir; J. A. Strong; V. Bertin; David R Botterill; R. W. Clifft; T. R. Edgecock; S. Haywood; M. Edwards; P. Maley; P. R. Norton; J. C. Thompson; B. Bloch-Devaux; P. Colas; H. Duarte; S. Emery; Witold Kozanecki; E. Lançon; M. C. Lemaire; E. Locci; B. Marx; P. Perez; J. Rander; J.-F. Renardy; A. Rosowsky; A. Roussarie; J.-P. Schuller; J. Schwindling; D. Si Mohand; A. Trabelsi; B. Vallage; R. P. Johnson; A. M. Litke; G. Taylor; J. Wear; A. Beddall; C. N. Booth; R. Boswell; S L Cartwright; F. Combley; I. Dawson; A. Koksal; M H Lehto; W. M. Newton; C. Rankin; L. F. Thompson; A. Böhrer; S. Brandt; G D Cowan; E. Feigl; Claus Grupen; G. Lutters

    1995-01-01

    From a sample of 152,000 tau decays collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP an upper limit of 24 MeV at 95% CL on the tau neutrino mass has been determined. The limit is obtained using a two dimensional likelihood fit of the visible energy and the invariant mass distribution of 25 tau -> 5pi(pi0)nutau events.

  5. 2013 Research Opportunity Seed Fund Awards PI PI Dept, College CoPI(s) CoPI Dept, College Title

    E-print Network

    Wu, Dapeng Oliver

    Approved Budget Ahn, Andrew Hi Neurology (COM) (1) Mingzhou Ding; (2) Roger Fillingim; (3) Michael; (2) Thomas Angelini (1) Food Science & Human Nutrition, IFAS; (2) Mechanical & Aerospace Opportunity Seed Fund Awards PI PI Dept, College CoPI(s) CoPI Dept, College Title Approved Budget Maupin

  6. A measurement ofB(D0 -> K-pi+pi0)\\/(B(D0 -> K-pi+))

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Barish; M. Chadha; Chan S; G. Eigen; J. S. Miller; C. O'Grady; M. Schmidtler; J. Urheim; A. J. Weinstein; F. Würthwein; D. M. Asner; M. Athanas; D. W. Bliss; W. S. Brower; G. Masek; H. P. Paar; J. Gronberg; C. M. Korte; R. Kutschke; S. Menary; R. J. Morrison; S. Nakanishi; H. N. Nelson; T. K. Nelson; C. Qiao; J. D. Richman; D. Roberts; A. Ryd; H. Tajima; M. S. Witherell; R. Balest; K. Cho; W. T. Ford; M. Lohner; P. Rankin; J. Roy; J. G. Smith; J. P. Alexander; C. Bebek; B. E. Berger; K. Berkelman; K. Bloom; D. G. Cassel; H. A. Cho; D. M. Coffman; D. S. Crowcroft; M. Dickson; P. S. Drell; D. J. Dumas; R. Ehrlich; R. Elia; P. Gaidarev; B. Gittelman; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; C. D. Jones; S. L. Jones; J. Kandaswamy; N. Katayama; P. C. Kim; D. L. Kreinick; Lee T; Liu Y; G. S. Ludwig; J. Masui; J. Mevissen; N. B. Mistry; C. R. Ng; E. Nordberg; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; A. Soffer; C. Ward; P. Avery; C. Prescott; Yang S; J. Yelton; G. Brandenburg; R. A. Briere; Liu T; M. Saulnier; R. Wilson; H. Yamamoto; T. E. Browder; Li F; J. L. Rodriguez; T. Bergfeld; B. I. Eisenstein; J. Ernst; G. E. Gladding; G. D. Gollin; M. Palmer; M. Selen; J. J. Thaler; K. W. Edwards; K. W. McLean; M. Ogg; A. Bellerive; D. I. Britton; R. Janicek; D. B. Macfarlane; P. M. Patel; B. Spaan; A. J. Sadoff; R. Ammar; P. Baringer; A. Bean; D. Besson; D. Coppage; N. Copty; R. Davis; N. Hancock; S. Kotov; I. Kravchenko; N. Kwak; S. Anderson; Y. Kubota; M. Lattery; J. K. Nelson; S. Patton; R. Poling; T. Riehle; V. Savinov; M. S. Alam; I. J. Kim; Z. Ling; A. H. Mahmood; J. J. O'Neill; H. Severini; C. R. Sun; S. Timm; F. Wappler; J. E. Duboscq; R. Fulton; D. Fujino; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; Lee J; Sung M; A. Undrus; C. White; R. Wanke; A. Wolf; M. M. Zoeller; Fu X; B. Nemati; S. J. Richichi; W. R. Ross; P. Skubic; M. Wood; M. Bishai; J. Fast; E. Gerndt; J. W. Hinson; T. Miao; D. H. Miller; M. Modesitt; E. I. Shibata; I. P. J. Shipsey; P. N. Wang; M. Yurko; L. Gibbons; S. D. Johnson; Y. Kwon; S. Roberts; E. H. Thorndike; C. P. Jessop; K. Lingel; H. Marsiske; M. L. Perl; S. F. Schaffner; R. Wang; T. E. Coan; J. Dominick; V. Fadeyev; I. Korolkov; M. Lambrecht; S. Sanghera; V. Shelkov; R. Stroynowski; I. Volobouev; G. Wei; M. Artuso; A. Efimov; M. Gao; M. Goldberg; R. Greene; D. He; N. Horwitz; S. Kopp; G. C. Moneti; Y. Mukhin; S. Playfer; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; Xing X; J. Bartelt; S. E. Csorna; V. Jain; S. Marka; A. Freyberger; D. Gibaut; K. Kinoshita; P. Pomianowski; S. Schrenk; D. Cinabro

    1996-01-01

    Using a sample of 3.1 fb-1 integrated luminosity accumulated with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we measure the ratio of branching fractions B(D0 ->K- pi+pi0)\\/(B(D0 -> K-pi+)) = 3.81 +\\/- 0.07 +\\/- 0.26, the most precise determination of this quantity to date.

  7. Scalar resonances in a unitary {pi}{pi} S-wave model for D{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup+}{pi}{sup-}{pi}{sup+}.

    SciTech Connect

    Boito, D. R.; Dedonder, J.-P.; El-Bennich, B.; Leitner, O.; Loiseau, B.; Physics; Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona; Univ. de Sao Paulo; Univ. Paris; Pl. Jussieu; Lab. Nazionali de Frascati

    2009-02-19

    We propose a model for D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays following experimental results which indicate that the two-pion interaction in the S wave is dominated by the scalar resonances f{sub 0}(600)/{sigma} and f{sub 0}(980). The weak decay amplitude for D{sup +} {yields} R{pi}{sup +}, where R is a resonance that subsequently decays into {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, is constructed in a factorization approach. In the S wave, we implement the strong decay R {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} by means of a scalar form factor. This provides a unitary description of the pion-pion interaction in the entire kinematically allowed mass range m{sub {pi}{pi}}{sup 2} from threshold to about 3 GeV{sup 2}. In order to reproduce the experimental Dalitz plot for D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, we include contributions beyond the S wave. For the P wave, dominated by the {rho}(770){sup 0}, we use a Breit-Wigner description. Higher waves are accounted for by using the usual isobar prescription for the f{sub 2}(1270) and {rho}(1450){sup 0}. The major achievement is a good reproduction of the experimental m{sub {pi}{pi}}{sup 2} distribution, and of the partial as well as the total D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} branching ratios. Our values are generally smaller than the experimental ones. We discuss this shortcoming and, as a by-product, we predict a value for the poorly known D {yields} {sigma} transition form factor at q{sup 2} = m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}.

  8. Stacking order, interaction, and weak surface magnetism in layered graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dong-Hui; Yuan, Jie; Yao, Zi-Jian; Zhou, Yi; Gao, Jin-Hua; Zhang, Fu-Chun

    2012-11-01

    Recent transport experiments have demonstrated that rhombohedral-stacking trilayer graphene is an insulator with an intrinsic gap of 6 meV and Bernal-stacking trilayer graphene is a metal. We propose a Hubbard model with a moderate U for layered graphene sheets, and show that the model well explains the experiments on the stacking-dependent energy gap. The moderate on-site Coulomb repulsion drives the metallic phase of the noninteracting system to a weak surface antiferromagnetic insulator for the rhombohedral stacking layers, while the interaction-opened energy gaps for the Bernal stacking layers are much smaller.

  9. Isospin Breaking in the Relation Between the tau-->nu_tau pi pi and e^+e^- -->pi^+ pi^- Versions of |F_?(s)|^2$ and Implications for (g-2)_mu

    E-print Network

    Kim Maltman; Carl E. Wolfe

    2005-09-21

    We investigate two points related to existing treatments of isospin-breaking corrections to the CVC relation between the e^+e^- --> pi^+ pi^- cross-section and dGamma[tau^- --> nu_tau pi^- pi^0]/ds. Implications for the value of the hadronic contribution to a_mu =(g-2)_mu /2 based on those analyses incorporating hadronic tau decay data are also considered. We conclude that the uncertainty on the isospin-breaking correction which must be applied to the tau decay data should be significantly increased, and that the central value of the rho-omega ``mixing'' contribution to this correction may be significantly smaller than indicated by the present standard determination. Such a shift would contribute to reducing the discrepancy between the tau- and electroproduction-based determinations of the leading order hadronic contribution to a_mu.

  10. Diffractive Dissociation into {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} Final States at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Florian [Physik Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen James Franck Str., D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-08-05

    QCD predicts gluonic excitations like hybrids to contribute to the meson spectrum in addition to qq-bar pair configurations. The most promising way to identify such states is the search for J{sup PC} quantum number combinations which are forbidden in the constituent quark model. The fixed target COMPASS experiment at CERN offers the opportunity to search for such states in the light quark sector with an unprecedented statistics.Diffractive reactions of 190 GeV/c pions on a lead target were studied by COMPASS during a pilot run in 2004. A Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) of the {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} final state with 42 waves including acceptance corrections through a phase-space Monte Carlo simulation of the spectrometer was performed. The exotic {pi}{sub 1}(1600) meson with quantum numbers J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} has been clearly established in the rho-pi decay channel with a mass of 1660{+-}10(stat) MeV/c{sup 2} and a width of 269{+-}21(stat) MeV/c{sup 2}. The improved detector performance in 2008 allows us to study this channel with significantly higher statistics. First results of the ongoing analysis of the 2008 data taking period, using a 190 GeV/c pion beam on a liquid hydrogen target are presented in this paper.

  11. Diffractive Dissociation into {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} Final States at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Florian [Physik Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen James Franck Str., D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-10-24

    QCD predicts gluonic excitations like hybrids to contribute to the meson spectrum in addition to qq-bar pair configurations. The most promising way to identify such states is the search for J{sup PC} quantum number combinations which are forbidden in the constituent quark model. The fixed target COMPASS experiment at CERN offers the opportunity to search for such states in the light quark sector with an unprecedented statistics.Diffractive reactions of 190 GeV/c pions on a lead target were studied by COMPASS during a pilot run in 2004. A Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) of the {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} final state with 42 waves including acceptance corrections through a phase-space Monte Carlo simulation of the spectrometer was performed. The exotic {pi}{sup 1}(1600) meson with quantum numbers J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} has been clearly established in the rho-pi decay channel with a mass of 1660{+-}10(stat) MeV/c{sup 2} and a width of 269{+-}21(stat) MeV/c{sup 2}. The improved detector performance in 2008 allows us to study this channel with significantly higher statistics. First results of the ongoing analysis of the 2008 data taking period, using a 190 GeV/c pion beam on a liquid hydrogen target are presented in this paper.

  12. Delta I = 3/2, K to Pi Pi Decays with a Nearly Physical Pion Mass

    E-print Network

    Elaine J Goode; Matthew Lightman

    2011-01-13

    The Delta I = 3/2 K to Pi Pi decay amplitude is calculated on RBC/UKQCD 32^3 x 64, L_s=32 dynamical lattices with 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions using the DSDR and Iwasaki gauge action. The calculation is performed with a single pion mass (m_pi=141.9(2.3) MeV, partially quenched) and kaon mass (m_K=507.4(8.5) MeV) which are nearly physical, and with nearly energy conserving kinematics. Antiperiodic boundary conditions in two spatial directions are used to give the two pions non-zero ground state momentum. Results for time separations of 20, 24, 28 and 32 between the kaon and two-pion sources are computed and an error weighted average is performed to reduce the error. We find prelimenary results for Re(A_2)=1.396(081)_stat(160)_sys x 10^(-8) GeV and Im(A_2) = -8.46(45)_stat(1.95)_sys x 10^(-13) GeV.

  13. Delta I=3/2 K to pi-pi decays with nearly physical kinematics

    E-print Network

    Elaine Goode; Matthew Lightman

    2011-11-21

    The \\Delta I = 3/2 K to pi pi decay amplitude is calculated on RBC/UKQCD 32^3 times 64, L_s=32 dynamical lattices with 2+1 flavours of domain wall fermions using the Dislocation Suppressing Determinant Ratio and Iwasaki gauge action. The calculation is performed close to the physical pion mass (m_pi = 142.9(1.1) MeV and with a single lattice spacing (a^-1= 1.375(9) GeV.) We find Re(A_2) = (1.436 \\pm 0.063_{stat} \\pm 0.258_{syst}) times 10^-8 GeV and Im(A_2) = (-6.29 \\pm 0.46_{stat} \\pm 1.20_{syst})\\times 10^{-13} GeV. These results are combined with the experimental result for epsilon'/epsilon to predict Im(A_0) = -5.32(64)_{stat}(71)_{syst}\\times 10^{-11} GeV within the Standard Model. We also perform a reweighting analysis to investigate the effects of partial quenching in the light-quark sector of our calculation. Following reweighting we find Re(A_2) = (1.52\\pm 0.14_{stat}) \\times 10^-8 GeV and Im(A_2) = (-6.47 \\pm 0.55_{stat})\\times 10^-13 GeV, which are consistent with our main results.

  14. Measurement of Direct Emission in the KL->pi+pi-gamma Decay Mode

    E-print Network

    Arenton, M; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Blucher, E; Bock, G J; Cheu, E; Coleman, R; Corcoran, M D; Corti, G; Cox, B; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Glazov, A; Golossanov, A; Gomes, R A; Gouffon, P; Hanagaki, K; Hsiung, Y B; Huang, H; Jensen, D A; Kessler, R; Kotera, K; Ledovskoy, A A; McBride, P L; Monnier, E; Nelson, K S; Nguyen, H; Niclasen, R; Phillips, D G; Ping, H; Prasad, V; Qi, X R; Ramberg, E J; Ray, R E; Ronquest, M; Santos, E; Shields, J; Slater, W; Smith, D; Solomey, Nickolas; Swallow, E C; Toale, P A; Tschirhart, R S; Velissaris, C; Wah, Y W; Wang, J; White, H B; Whitmore, J; Wilking, M; Winstein, B; Winston, R; Worcester, E T; Worcester, M; Yamanaka, T; Zimmerman, E D; Zukanovich-Funchal, R

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the KTeV collaboration reports the analysis of 112.1*10^3 candidate KL->pi+pi-gamma decays including a background of 671+/-41 events with the objective of determining the photon production mechanisms intrinsic to the decay process. These decays have been analyzed to extract the relative contributions of the CP violating bremsstrahlung process and the CP conserving M1 and CP violating E1 direct photon emission processes. The M1 direct photon emission amplitude and its associated vector form factor parameterized as |g_M1|(1+ (a_1/a_2)/(M(rho)^2-M(K)^2+2M(K)*E(gamma)) have been measured to be |g_M1|=1.198 +/- 0.035(stat) +/- 0.086(syst) and a_1/a_2 = -0.738 +/- 0.007(stat) +/- 0.018 (syst) GeV^2/c^2 respectively. An upper limit for the CP violating E1 direct emission amplitude |g_E1| 20 MeV.

  15. Implication of the B -> rho rho data on the B -> pi pi puzzle

    E-print Network

    Hsiang-nan Li; Satoshi Mishima

    2006-06-07

    We point out that the B -> rho rho data have seriously constrained the possibility of resolving the B -> pi pi puzzle from the large observed B^0 -> pi^0 pi^0 branching ratio in the available theoretical approaches. The next-to-leading-order (NLO) contributions from the vertex corrections, the quark loops, and the magnetic penguin evaluated in the perturbative QCD (PQCD) approach have saturated the experimental upper bound of the B^0 -> rho^0 rho^0 branching ratio, and do not help. The NLO PQCD predictions for the B^0 -> rho^\\mp rho^\\pm and B^\\pm -> rho^\\pm rho^0 branching ratios are consistent with the data. The inclusion of the NLO jet function from the soft-collinear effective theory into the QCD-improved factorization approach, though enhancing the B^0 -> pi^0 pi^0 branching ratio sufficiently, overshoots the bound of the B^0 -> rho^0 rho^0 branching ratio, and deteriorates the predictions for the B^\\pm -> pi^0 K^\\pm and B^0 -> pi^\\mp K^\\pm direct CP asymmetries.

  16. Analysis of the resonant components in $\\\\overline{B}^0_s \\\\to J\\/\\\\psi\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Aaij; C Abellan Beteta; B Adeva; M Adinolfi; C Adrover; A Affolder; Z Ajaltouni; J Albrecht; F Alessio; M Alexander; S Ali; G Alkhazov; P Alvarez Cartelle; A A Alves Jr; S Amato; Y Amhis; J Anderson; R B Appleby; O Aquines Gutierrez; F Archilli; A Artamonov; M Artuso; E Aslanides; G Auriemma; S Bachmann; J J Back; V Balagura; W Baldini; R J Barlow; C Barschel; S Barsuk; W Barter; A Bates; C Bauer; Th Bauer; A Bay; I Bediaga; S Belogurov; K Belous; I Belyaev; E Ben-Haim; M Benayoun; G Bencivenni; S Benson; J Benton; R Bernet; M-O Bettler; M van Beuzekom; A Bien; S Bifani; T Bird; A Bizzeti; P M Bjørnstad; T Blake; F Blanc; C Blanks; J Blouw; S Blusk; A Bobrov; V Bocci; A Bondar; N Bondar; W Bonivento; S Borghi; A Borgia; T J V Bowcock; C Bozzi; T Brambach; J van den Brand; J Bressieux; D Brett; M Britsch; T Britton; N H Brook; H Brown; A Büchler-Germann; I Burducea; A Bursche; J Buytaert; S Cadeddu; O Callot; M Calvi; M Calvo Gomez; A Camboni; P Campana; A Carbone; G Carboni; R Cardinale; A Cardini; L Carson; K Carvalho Akiba; G Casse; M Cattaneo; Ch Cauet; M Charles; Ph Charpentier; N Chiapolini; K Ciba; X Cid Vidal; G Ciezarek; P E L Clarke; M Clemencic; H V Cliff; J Closier; C Coca; V Coco; J Cogan; P Collins; A Comerma-Montells; A Contu; A Cook; M Coombes; G Corti; B Couturier; G A Cowan; R Currie; C D'Ambrosio; P David; I De Bonis; K De Bruyn; S De Capua; M De Cian; J M De Miranda; L De Paula; P De Simone; D Decamp; M Deckenhoff; H Degaudenzi; L Del Buono; C Deplano; D Derkach; O Deschamps; F Dettori; J Dickens; H Dijkstra; P Diniz Batista; F Domingo Bonal; S Donleavy; F Dordei; A Dosil Suárez; D Dossett; A Dovbnya; F Dupertuis; R Dzhelyadin; A Dziurda; S Easo; U Egede; V Egorychev; S Eidelman; D van Eijk; F Eisele; S Eisenhardt; R Ekelhof; L Eklund; Ch Elsasser; D Elsby; D Esperante Pereira; A Falabella; C Färber; G Fardell; C Farinelli; S Farry; V Fave; V Fernandez Albor; M Ferro-Luzzi; S Filippov; C Fitzpatrick; M Fontana; F Fontanelli; R Forty; O Francisco; M Frank; C Frei; M Frosini; S Furcas; A Gallas Torreira; D Galli; M Gandelman; P Gandini; Y Gao; J-C Garnier; J Garofoli; J Garra Tico; L Garrido; D Gascon; C Gaspar; R Gauld; N Gauvin; M Gersabeck; T Gershon; Ph Ghez; V Gibson; V V Gligorov; C Göbel; D Golubkov; A Golutvin; A Gomes; H Gordon; M Grabalosa Gándara; R Graciani Diaz; L A Granado Cardoso; E Graugés; G Graziani; A Grecu; E Greening; S Gregson; B Gui; E Gushchin; Yu Guz; T Gys; C Hadjivasiliou; G Haefeli; C Haen; S C Haines; T Hampson; S Hansmann-Menzemer; R Harji; N Harnew; J Harrison; P F Harrison; T Hartmann; J He; V Heijne; K Hennessy; P Henrard; J A Hernando Morata; E van Herwijnen; E Hicks; K Holubyev; P Hopchev; W Hulsbergen; P Hunt; T Huse; R S Huston; D Hutchcroft; D Hynds; V Iakovenko; P Ilten; J Imong; R Jacobsson; A Jaeger; M Jahjah Hussein; E Jans; F Jansen; P Jaton; B Jean-Marie; F Jing; M John; D Johnson; C R Jones; B Jost; M Kaballo; S Kandybei; M Karacson; T M Karbach; J Keaveney; I R Kenyon; U Kerzel; T Ketel; A Keune; B Khanji; Y M Kim; M Knecht; R F Koopman; P Koppenburg; M Korolev; A Kozlinskiy; L Kravchuk; K Kreplin; M Kreps; G Krocker; P Krokovny; F Kruse; K Kruzelecki; M Kucharczyk; V Kudryavtsev; T Kvaratskheliya; V N La Thi; D Lacarrere; G Lafferty; A Lai; D Lambert; R W Lambert; E Lanciotti; G Lanfranchi; C Langenbruch; T Latham; C Lazzeroni; R Le Gac; J van Leerdam; J-P Lees; R Lefèvre; A Leflat; J Lefrançois; O Leroy; T Lesiak; L Li; L Li Gioi; M Lieng; M Liles; R Lindner; C Linn; B Liu; G Liu; J von Loeben; J H Lopes; E Lopez Asamar; N Lopez-March; H Lu; J Luisier; F Machefert; I V Machikhiliyan; F Maciuc; O Maev; J Magnin; S Malde; R M D Mamunur; G Manca; G Mancinelli; N Mangiafave; U Marconi; R Märki; J Marks; G Martellotti; A Martens; L Martin; A Martín Sánchez; M Martinelli; D Martinez Santos; A Massafferri; Z Mathe; C Matteuzzi; M Matveev; E Maurice; B Maynard; A Mazurov; G McGregor; R McNulty; M Meissner; M Merk; J Merkel; S Miglioranzi; D A Milanes; M-N Minard; J Molina Rodriguez; S Monteil; D Moran; P Morawski; I Mous; F Muheim; K Müller; R Muresan; B Muryn; B Muster; J Mylroie-Smith; P Naik; T Nakada; R Nandakumar; I Nasteva; M Needham; N Neufeld; A D Nguyen; C Nguyen-Mau; M Nicol; V Niess; N Nikitin; T Nikodem; A Nomerotski; A Novoselov; A Oblakowska-Mucha; V Obraztsov; S Oggero; S Ogilvy; O Okhrimenko; R Oldeman; M Orlandea; J M Otalora Goicochea; P Owen; B K Pal; J Palacios; A Palano; M Palutan; J Panman; A Papanestis; M Pappagallo; C Parkes; C J Parkinson; G Passaleva; G D Patel; M Patel; S K Paterson; G N Patrick; C Patrignani; C Pavel-Nicorescu; A Pazos Alvarez; A Pellegrino; G Penso; M Pepe Altarelli; S Perazzini; D L Perego; E Perez Trigo; A Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo; P Perret; M Perrin-Terrin; G Pessina; A Petrolini; A Phan; E Picatoste Olloqui; B Pie Valls; B Pietrzyk; T Pila?; D Pinci; R Plackett; S Playfer; M Plo Casasus; G Polok; A Poluektov

    2012-01-01

    The decay $B^0_s \\\\to J\\/\\\\psi\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ can be exploited to study $CP$ violation. A detailed understanding of its structure is imperative in order to optimize its usefulness. An analysis of this three-body final state is performed using a 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ sample of data produced in 7 TeV $pp$ collisions at the LHC and collected by the LHCb experiment. A modified Dalitz

  17. O(m_d-m_u) Effects in CP-even and CP-odd K-->pi pi Decays

    E-print Network

    K. Maltman; C. E. Wolfe

    2000-06-09

    Strong isospin-breaking (IB) effects in CP-even and CP-odd K-->pi pi decays are computed to next-to-leading order (NLO) in the chiral expansion. The impact of these corrections on the magnitude of the Delta I=1/2 Rule and on the size of the IB correction, Omega_IB, to the gluonic penguin contribution to epsilon'/epsilon are discussed.

  18. Measurement of resonant and $CP$ components in $\\overline{B}_s^0\\to J/\\psi\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays

    E-print Network

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Callot, Olivier; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coca, Cornelia; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bonis, Isabelle; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dorosz, Piotr; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Esen, Sevda; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Hafkenscheid, Tom; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The resonant structure of the decay $\\overline{B}_s^0\\to J/\\psi\\pi^+\\pi^-$ is studied using data corresponding to 3 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity from $pp$ collisions by the LHC and collected by the LHCb detector. Five interfering $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ states are required to describe the decay: $f_0(980),~f_0(1500),~f_0(1790),~f_2(1270)$, and $f_2^{\\prime}(1525)$. An alternative model including these states and a non-resonant $J/\\psi \\pi^+\\pi^-$ component also provides a good description of the data. Based on the different transversity components measured for the spin-2 intermediate states, the final state is found to be compatible with being entirely $CP$-odd. The $CP$-even part is found to be $<2.3$% at 95% confidence level. The $f_0(500)$ state is not observed, allowing a limit to be set on the absolute value of the mixing angle with the $f_0(980)$ of $<7.7^{\\circ}$ at 90% confidence level, consistent with a tetraquark interpretation of the $f_0(980)$ substructure.

  19. A Classification of Long-Range Interactions between Two Stacks of p & p'-Branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Jun; Wu, Chao

    2015-02-01

    We generalize the computations of the long-range interactions between two parallel stacks of branes to various cases when two stacks of branes are not placed parallel to each other. We classify the nature of interaction (repulsive or attractive) for each special case and this classification can be used to justify the nature of long-range interaction between two complicated brane systems such as brane bound states. We will provide explicit examples in this paper to demonstrate this.

  20. Measurement of pi+pi? Photoproduction in Double Polarization Experiments using the CLAS Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Hanretty

    2007-10-01

    Spectroscopic predictions based on first principles are not possible in the non-perturbative regime of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) where the strong coupling constant is large. For this reason, effective theories and models have been developed to determine the masses, couplings, and decay widths of resonances. Various constituent quark models (CQMs) based on three quark degrees of freedom predict numerous baryon resonances that have not been experimentally verified and are thus “missing”. The persistent non-observation of these states would present a big problem as the models would have failed to describe physical reality. CQMs predict strong couplings of these unobserved or missing states to gammaN as well as to Neta, Neta[prime] or Deltapi(Delta-->ppi) making photoproduction experiments a promising method to find these missing resonances. Previous analyses of unpolarized data show the importance of polarization obervables because some resonances reveal themselves more clearly in the interference with more dominant amplitudes. In addition, the determination of resonant contributions based on unpolarized data is not unique and requires further constraints provided by single- and double-polarization observables in the Partial Wave Analysis (PWA). A linearly- and circularly-polarized photon beam will be incident on a frozen-spin butanol target in Jefferson Lab's Hall B CLAS detector located in Newport News, Va. This detector allows the target to be polarized both longitudinally as well as transversely giving rise to measurable polarization observables in pi+pi? photoproduction. This experiment (FROST) will shed some light on the problem of the missing baryon resonances serving to better understand the properties of these states.

  1. First observations of Y(1S)->gamma pi(+)pi(-) and Y(1S)->gamma pi(0)pi(0)

    E-print Network

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

    1999-01-01

    S) --> gamma pi(0)pi(0). For the dipion mass regime m(pi pi) > 1.0 GeV, we obtain N(Y(1S) --> gamma pi(+)pi(-)) = (6.3 +/- 1.2 +/- 1.3) x 10(-5) and B(Y(1S) --> gamma pi(0)pi(0)) = (1.7 +/- 0.6 +/- 0.3) x 10(-5)....

  2. Measurements of sigma(e^+ e^- -> Upsilon(nS)pi^+pi^-) and sigma(e^+ e^- -> b bbar) in the Upsilon(10860) and Upsilon(11020) resonance regions

    E-print Network

    Santel, D; Chang, P; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Said, S Al; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Bakich, A M; Bansal, V; Bhuyan, B; Bobrov, A; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bra?ko, M; Browder, T E; ?ervenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dingfelder, J; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hou, W -S; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Julius, T; Kang, K H; Kato, E; Kawasaki, T; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Ko, B R; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuzmin, A; Lange, J S; Lee, I S; Li, Y; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Lukin, P; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Mori, T; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Natkaniec, Z; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Oswald, C; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Petri?, M; Piilonen, L E; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shebalin, V; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Solovieva, E; Stari?, M; Steder, M; Tamponi, U; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Wagner, M N; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yang, Y -P; Yashchenko, S; Yook, Y; Yusa, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-01-01

    We report new measurements of $R_{\\Upsilon\\pi\\pi}\\equiv\\sigma(e^+e^-\\to \\Upsilon(n{\\rm S})\\pi^+\\pi^-)/\\sigma^0_{\\mu\\mu}$ ($n$ = 1, 2, 3) and $R_b\\equiv\\sigma(e^+e^-\\to b\\bar b)/\\sigma^0_{\\mu\\mu}$ (where $\\sigma^0_{\\mu\\mu}$ is the muon-pair Born cross section) in the region $\\sqrt{s} = 10.63$-$11.05$ GeV, based on data collected with the Belle detector. Distributions in $R_{\\Upsilon\\pi\\pi}$ and $R_b$ are fit for the masses and widths of the $\\Upsilon(10860)$ and $\\Upsilon(11020)$ resonances. Unlike $R_b$, which includes a large non-resonant $b\\bar{b}$ component, we find that $R_{\\Upsilon\\pi\\pi}$ is dominated by the two resonances. With $R_{\\Upsilon\\pi\\pi}$ as the basis, the total rate at the $\\Upsilon(10860)$ peak for known final states containing bottomonium(-like) resonances is estimated. We find that $\\Upsilon(10860)$ is essentially saturated by such modes, raising doubts about the validity of masses measured using $R_b$. With $R_{\\Upsilon\\pi\\pi}$, we measure $M_{10860}=(10891.1\\pm3.2^{+0.6}_{-1.5})$ MeV/$c...

  3. Study of the rare $B^{0}_{s}$ and $B^{0}$ decays into the $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ final state at LHCb

    E-print Network

    Komarov, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    A search for the rare decays B0s->pi pi mu mu and B0->pi pi mu mu is performed in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1 collected by the LHCb detector in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8TeV. Decay candidates with pion pairs that have invariant mass in the range 0.5--1.3 GeV/c2 and with muon pairs that do not originate from a resonance are considered. The first observation of the decay B0s->pi pi mu mu and the first evidence of the decay B0->pi pi mu mu are obtained and the branching fractions, restricted to the dipion-mass range considered, are measured to be Br(B0s->pi pi mu mu) = (8.6 +/- 1.5 (stat) +/- 0.7 (syst) +/- 0.7 (norm))*10^-8 and Br(B0->pi pi mu mu) = (2.11 +/- 0.51 (stat) +/- 0.15 (syst) +/- 0.16 (norm)) *10^-8, where the third uncertainty is due to the branching fraction of the decay B0->J/psi K*, used as a normalisation.

  4. Measurement of CP Asymmetries and Branching Fractions in B0 -> pi+ pi-, B0 -> K+ pi-, B0 -> pi0 pi0, B0 -> K0 pi0 and Isospin Analysis of B -> pi pi Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-08-01

    The authors present preliminary results of improved measurements of the CP-violating asymmetries and branching fractions in the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. This update includes all data taken at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the asymmetric PEP-II B-meson factory at SLAC, corresponding to 467 {+-} 5 million B{bar B} pairs. They find S{sub {pi}{pi}} = -0.68 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.03, C{sub {pi}{pi}} = -0.25 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, {Alpha}{sub K{sub {pi}}} = -0.107 {+-} 0.016{sub -0.004},{sup +0.006}, C{sub {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}} = -0.43 {+-} 0.26 {+-} 0.05, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.83 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (10.1 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. They observe CP violation with a significance of 6.7{sigma} in B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -} and 6.1{sigma} in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Constraints on the Unitarity Triangle angle {alpha} are determined from the isospin relation between all B {yields} {pi}{pi} rates and asymmetries.

  5. Observation of the Upsilon(13DJ) bottomonium state through decays to pi+pi-Upsilon(1S)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Del Amo Sanchez; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; E. Prencipe; V. Tisserand; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; M. Martinelli; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; B. Hooberman; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Lynch; I. L. Osipenkov; T. Tanabe; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. J. Asgeirsson; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; A. Randle-Conde; V. E. Blinov; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; A. N. Yushkov; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; H. Atmacan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; G. M. Vitug; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; A. M. Eisner; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; A. J. Martinez; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; L. O. Winstrom; C. H. Cheng; D. A. Doll; B. Echenard; D. G. Hitlin; P. Ongmongkolkul; F. C. Porter; A. Y. Rakitin; R. Andreassen; M. S. Dubrovin; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; J. F. Hirschauer; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; J. G. Smith; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; W. H. Toki; T. M. Karbach; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; M. J. Kobel; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; D. Bernard; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; S. Playfer; J. E. Watson; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; E. Fioravanti; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Munerato; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; M. Nicolaci; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; R. Contri; E. Guido; M. Lo Vetere; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; S. Tosi; B. Bhuyan; M. Morii; A. Adametz; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; F. U. Bernlochner; H. M. Lacker; T. Lueck; A. Volk; P. D. Dauncey; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; U. Mallik; C. Chen; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; D. Derkach; J. Firmino da Costa; G. Grosdidier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; B. Malaescu; A. Perez; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; L. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. P. Coleman; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; S. Paramesvaran; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; W. Gradl; A. Hafner; K. E. Alwyn; D. Bailey; R. J. Barlow; G. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. Anderson; R. Cenci; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; E. Salvati; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; G. Sciolla; M. Zhao; D. Lindemann; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; M. Schram; P. Biassoni; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; S. Stracka; L. Cremaldi; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; P. Sonnek; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; X. Nguyen; M. Simard; P. Taras; G. de Nardo; D. Monorchio; G. Onorato; C. Sciacca; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; W. F. Wang; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; G. Castelli; E. Feltresi; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; E. Ben-Haim; G. R. Bonneaud; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; G. Marchiori; J. Ocariz; J. Prendki; S. Sitt; M. Biasini; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; G. Casarosa; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; N. Neri; E. Paoloni; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; D. Lopes Pegna; C. Lu; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith; A. V. Telnov; F. Anulli; E. Baracchini; G. Cavoto; R. Faccini; F. Ferrarotto; F. Ferroni; M. Gaspero; L. Li Gioi; M. A. Mazzoni; G. Piredda; F. Renga; M. Ebert; T. Hartmann; T. Leddig; H. Schröder; R. Waldi; T. Adye; B. Franek; E. O. Olaiya; F. F. Wilson; S. Emery; G. Hamel de Monchenault; G. Vasseur; Ch. Yèche; M. Zito; M. T. Allen; D. Aston; D. J. Bard; R. Bartoldus; J. F. Benitez; C. Cartaro; M. R. Convery; J. Dorfan; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; W. Dunwoodie; R. C. Field; M. Franco Sevilla; B. G. Fulsom; A. M. Gabareen; M. T. Graham; P. Grenier; C. Hast; W. R. Innes; M. H. Kelsey; H. Kim; P. Kim; M. L. Kocian; D. W. G. S. Leith; S. Li; B. Lindquist; S. Luitz; V. Luth; H. L. Lynch; D. B. Macfarlane; H. Marsiske; D. R. Muller; H. Neal; S. Nelson; C. P. O'Grady; I. Ofte; M. Perl; T. Pulliam; B. N. Ratcliff; A. Roodman; A. A. Salnikov; V. Santoro; R. H. Schindler; J. Schwiening; A. Snyder; D. Su; M. K. Sullivan; S. Sun; K. Suzuki; J. M. Thompson; J. Va'Vra; A. P. Wagner; M. Weaver

    2010-01-01

    Based on 122×106Upsilon(3S) events collected with the BABAR detector, we have observed the Upsilon(13DJ) bottomonium state through the Upsilon(3S)-->gammagammaUpsilon(13DJ)-->gammagammapi+pi-Upsilon(1S) decay chain. The significance for the J=2 member of the Upsilon(13DJ) triplet is 5.8 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. The mass of the J=2 state is determined to be 10164.5±0.8(stat)±0.5(syst)MeV\\/c2. We use the pi+pi- invariant mass distribution to confirm the consistency

  6. Observation of psi(3770)->pi pi J\\/psi and measurement of Gamma(ee)[psi(2S)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. E. Adam; J. P. Alexander; K. Berkelman; D. G. Cassel; V. Crede; J. E. Duboscq; K. M. Ecklund; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; R. S. Galik; L. Gibbons; B. Gittelman; R. Gray; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; D. Hertz; C. D. Jones; J. Kandaswamy; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; H. Mahlke-Kruger; T. O. Meyer; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; E. A. Phillips; J. Pivarski; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; H. Schwarthoff; X. Shi; M. R. Shepherd; S. Stroiney; W. M. Sun; D. Urner; T. Wilksen; K. M. Weaver; M. Weinberger; S. B. Athar; P. Avery; L. Breva-Newell; R. Patel; V. Potlia; H. Stoeck; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; C. Cawlfield; B. I. Eisenstein; G. D. Gollin; I. Karliner; D. Kim; N. Lowrey; P. Naik; C. Sedlack; M. Selen; E. J. White; J. Williams; J. Wiss; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; D. Cronin-Hennessy; K. Y. Gao; D. T. Gong; J. Hietala; Y. Kubota; T. Klein; B. W. Lang; S. Z. Li; R. Poling; A. W. Scott; A. Smith; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; P. Zweber; J. Ernst; H. Severini; S. A. Dytman; W. Love; S. Mehrabyan; J. A. Mueller; V. Savinov; Z. Li; A. Lopez; H. Mendez; J. Ramirez; G. S. Huang; D. H. Miller; V. Pavlunin; B. Sanghi; I. P. J. Shipsey; G. S. Adams; M. Anderson; J. P. Cummings; I. Danko; J. Napolitano; Q. He; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; E. H. Thorndike; T. E. Coan; Y. S. Gao; F. Liu; M. Artuso; C. Boulahouache; S. Blusk; J. Butt; O. Dorjkhaidav; J. Li; N. Menaa; R. Nandakumar; K. Randrianarivony; R. Redjimi; R. Sia; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; K. Zhang; S. E. Csorna; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; M. Dubrovin; R. A. Briere; G. P. Chen; J. Chen; T. Ferguson; G. Tatishvili; H. Vogel; M. E. Watkins; J. L. Rosner

    2006-01-01

    We observe signals for the decays psi(3770)-> XJ\\/psi from data acquired with the CLEO detector operating at the CESR e(+)e(-) collider with root s=3773 MeV. We measure the following branching fractions B(psi(3770)-> XJ\\/psi) and significances: (189 +\\/- 20 +\\/- 20)x10(-5) (11.6 sigma) for X=pi(+)pi(-), (80 +\\/- 25 +\\/- 16)x10(-5) (3.4 sigma) for X=pi(0)pi(0), and (87 +\\/- 33 +\\/- 22)x10(-5) (3.5

  7. Modulating the Light Switch by [superscript 3]MLCT-[superscript 3]pi pi* State Interconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Brigitte R.; Kraft, Brian J.; Hughes, Chris G.; Pink, Maren; Zaleski, Jeffrey M. (Indiana)

    2012-01-20

    The spectroscopic, electronic, and DNA-binding characteristics of two novel ruthenium complexes based on the dialkynyl ligands 2,3-bis(phenylethynyl)-1,4,8,9-tetraaza-triphenylene (bptt, 1) and 2,3-bis(4-tert-butyl-phenylethynyl)-1,4,8,9-tetraaza-triphenylene (tbptt, 2) have been investigated. Electronic structure calculations of bptt reveal that the frontier molecular orbitals are localized on the pyrazine-dialkynyl portion of the free ligand, a property that is reflected in a red shift of the lowest energy electronic transition (1: {lambda}{sub max} = 393 nm) upon substitution at the terminal phenyl groups (2: {lambda}{sub max} = 398 nm). Upon coordination to ruthenium, the low-energy ligand-centered transitions of 1 and 2 are retained, and metal-to-ligand charge transfer transitions (MLCT) centered at {lambda}{sub max} = 450 nm are observed for [Ru(phen){sub 2}bptt]{sup 2+}(3) and [Ru(phen){sub 2}tbptt]{sup 2+}(4). The photophysical characteristics of 3 and 4 in ethanol closely parallel those observed for [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} and [Ru(phen){sub 3}]{sup 2+}, indicating that the MLCT excited state is primarily localized within the [Ru(phen){sub 3}]{sup 2+} manifold of 3 and 4, and is only sparingly affected by the extended conjugation of the bptt framework. In an aqueous environment, 3 and 4 possess notably small luminescence quantum yields (3: {phi}H{sub 2}O = 0.005, 4: {phi}H{sub 2}O = 0.011) and biexponential decay kinetics (3: {tau}{sub 1} = 40 ns, {tau}{sub 2} = 230 ns; 4: {tau}{sub 1} {approx} 26 ns, {tau}{sub 2} = 150 ns). Addition of CT-DNA to an aqueous solution of 3 causes a significant increase in the luminescence quantum yield ({phi}DNA = 0.045), while the quantum yield of 4 is relatively unaffected ({phi}DNA = 0.013). The differential behavior demonstrates that tert-butyl substitution on the terminal phenyl groups inhibits the ability of 4 to intercalate with DNA. Such changes in intrinsic luminescence demonstrate that 3 binds to DNA via intercalation (K{sub b} = 3.3 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1}). The origin of this light switch behavior involves two competing {sup 3}MLCT states similar to that of the extensively studied light switch molecule [Ru(phen){sub 2}dppz]{sup 2+}. The solvent- and temperature-dependence of the luminescence of 3 reveal that the extended ligand aromaticity lowers the energy of the {sup 3}{pi}{pi}* excited state into competition with the emitting {sup 3}MLCT state. Interconversion between these two states plays a significant role in the observed photophysics and is responsible for the dual emission in aqueous environments.

  8. Study of the reaction e^{+}e^{-}->psi(2S)pi^{-}pi^{-} via initial state radiation at BaBar

    E-print Network

    ,

    2012-01-01

    We study the process $e^+e^-\\to\\psi(2S)\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ with initial-state-radiation events produced at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy collider. The data were recorded with the \\BaBar detector at center-of-mass energies at and near the $\\Upsilon(\\mathrm{nS})$ (n = 2, 3, 4) resonances and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 520$fb^{-}$. We investigate the $\\psi(2S)\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ mass distribution from 3.95 to 5.95 $GeV/c^{2}$, and measure the center-of-mass energy dependence of the associated $e^+e^-\\to \\psi(2S)\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ cross section. The mass distribution exhibits evidence of two resonant structures. A fit to the $\\psi(2S)\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ mass distribution corresponding to the decay mode $\\psi(2S)\\to J/\\psi \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ yields a mass value of $4340 \\pm16$ (stat) $\\pm 9$ (syst) ${\\mathrm {MeV/c^{2}}}and a width of $94 \\pm 32$ (stat) $\\pm 13$ (syst) MeV for the first resonance, and for the second a mass value of $4669 \\pm 21$ (stat) $\\pm 3$ (syst) ${\\mathrm {MeV/c^{2}}}$ and a width of $104 \\pm 48$...

  9. Quark mass dependence of light resonances and phase shifts in elastic {pi}{pi} and {pi}K scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Nebreda, J.; Pelaez, J. R. [Dept. Fisica Teorica II, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-12-28

    We study the light quark mass dependence of the {pi}{pi} scattering phase shifts in standard one and two-loop SU(2) Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT). We then repeat the study with unitarized ChPT and, furthermore, we extend the analysis to SU(3) and generate the elastic f{sub 0}(600),{kappa}(800), {rho}(770) and K*(892) resonances from unitarization. The quark masses are varied up to values of interest for lattice studies. We find that the SU(2){pi}{pi} phase shifts both in standard and unitarized ChPT depend very softly on the pion mass and that our results are in fair agreement with lattice results in the I = 2, J = 0 channel. In the SU(3) amplitudes, the mass and width of the {rho}(770) and K*(892) present an analogous and smooth quark mass dependence. In contrast, both scalars present a similar non-analyticity at high quark masses. We also confirm the lattice assumption of independence of the vector two-meson coupling on the quark mass, that is, nevertheless, violated for scalars.

  10. A classification of long-range interactions between two stacks of $p$ \\& $p'$-branes

    E-print Network

    Jun Ouyang; Chao Wu

    2014-09-03

    We generalize the computations of the long-range interactions between two parallel stacks of branes in \\cite{Wu and Wang, Prof. Lu's lecture notes} to various cases when two stacks of branes are not placed parallel to each other. We classify the nature of interaction (repulsive or attractive) for each special case and this classification can be used to justify the nature of long-range interaction between two complicated brane systems such as brane bound states. We will provide explicit examples in this paper to demonstrate this.

  11. Chemical interaction between glass-ceramic sealants and interconnect steels in SOFC stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batfalsky, P.; Haanappel, V. A. C.; Malzbender, J.; Menzler, N. H.; Shemet, V.; Vinke, I. C.; Steinbrech, R. W.

    In order to gain insight into the mechanism causing performance degradation and/or failure, stacks of planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are routinely dismantled and examined after operation at Forschungszentrum Jülich. The post-operation inspection focuses in particular on the chemical and mechanical compatibility aspects of cell and stack materials. In the present work a short-term degradation effect is addressed, which was found to be caused by unwanted chemical interactions between glass-ceramic sealants and ferritic steel interconnects. The post-operation inspection revealed severe steel corrosion along the seal rims. Under SOFC stack conditions rapidly growing oxide nodules were observed bridging the 200 ?m seal gap between the metallic components after a few hundred hours of operation. These oxide nodules, rich in iron, gave rise to local short-circuiting effects eventually resulting in stack failure. The present study, combined with recent model investigations triggered by the stack results, indicates that severe degradation only occurs in the case of glass-ceramic sealants which contain minor amounts of PbO. Furthermore, the rate of corrosion attack of the metallic components strongly depends on the silicon (Si) content of the ferritic steel. The stack tests suggest that increasing the Si content increases the corrosion rate, and thus detrimentally influences the stack performance.

  12. Study of the D0 ---> pi- pi+ pi- pi+ decay

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; /UC, Davis; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /CINVESTAV, IPN /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, they present new measurements for the Cabbibo-suppressed decay mode D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. They measure the branching ratio {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.0914 {+-} 0.0018 {+-} 0.0022. An amplitude analysis has been performed, a first for this channel, in order to determine the resonant substructure of this decay mode. The dominant component is the decay D{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}(1260){sup +}{pi}{sup -}, accounting for 60% of the decay rate. The second most dominant contribution comes from the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{rho}(770){sup 0}, with a fraction of 25%. They also study the a{sub 1}(1260) line shape and resonant substructure. Using the helicity formalism for the angular distribution of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{rho}(770){sup 0}, they measure a longitudinal polarization of P{sub L} = (71 {+-} 4 {+-} 2)%.

  13. Influence of the ?–? interaction on the hydrogen bonding capacity of stacked DNA/RNA bases

    PubMed Central

    Mignon, Pierre; Loverix, Stefan; Steyaert, Jan; Geerlings, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The interplay between aromatic stacking and hydrogen bonding in nucleobases has been investigated via high-level quantum chemical calculations. The experimentally observed stacking arrangement between consecutive bases in DNA and RNA/DNA double helices is shown to enhance their hydrogen bonding ability as opposed to gas phase optimized complexes. This phenomenon results from more repulsive electrostatic interactions as is demonstrated in a model system of cytosine stacked offset-parallel with substituted benzenes. Therefore, the H-bonding capacity of the N3 and O2 atoms of cytosine increases linearly with the electrostatic repulsion between the stacked rings. The local hardness, a density functional theory-based reactivity descriptor, appears to be a key index associated with the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) minima around H-bond accepting atoms, and is inversely proportional to the electrostatic interaction between stacked molecules. Finally, the MEP minima on surfaces around the bases in experimental structures of DNA and RNA–DNA double helices show that their hydrogen bonding capacity increases when taking more neighboring (intra-strand) stacking partners into account. PMID:15788750

  14. Measurement of Partial Widths and Search for Direct CP Violation in D0 Meson Decays to K-K+ and pi-pi+

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Acosta; T. Affolder; T. Akimoto; M. G. Albrow; D. Ambrose; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; K. Anikeev; A. Annovi; J. Antos; M. Aoki; G. Apollinari; T. Arisawa; J.-F. Arguin; A. Artikov; W. Ashmanskas; A. Attal; F. Azfar; P. Azzi-Bacchetta; N. Bacchetta; H. Bachacou; W. Badgett; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; G. J. Barker; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; S. Baroiant; M. Barone; G. Bauer; F. Bedeschi; S. Belforte; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; M. Binkley; D. Bisello; M. Bishai; R. E. Blair; C. Blocker; K. Bloom; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; G. Bolla; A. Bolshov; P. S. L. Booth; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; S. Bourov; C. Bromberg; E. Brubaker; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; K. L. Byrum; S. Cabrera; P. Calafiura; M. Campanelli; M. Campbell; A. Canepa; M. Casarsa; D. Carlsmith; S. Carron; R. Carosi; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; A. Cerri; C. Cerri; L. Cerrito; J. Chapman; C. Chen; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; F. Chlebana; I. Cho; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; M. L. Chu; S. Chuang; J. Y. Chung; W.-H. Chung; Y. S. Chung; C. I. Ciobanu; M. A. Ciocci; A. G. Clark; D. Clark; M. Coca; A. Connolly; M. Convery; J. Cranshaw; B. Cooper; M. Cordelli; G. Cortiana; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; C. Currat; D. Cyr; D. Dagenhart; S. da Ronco; S. D'Auria; P. de Barbaro; S. de Cecco; G. de Lentdecker; S. dell'Agnello; M. dell'Orso; S. Demers; L. Demortier; M. Deninno; D. de Pedis; P. F. Derwent; C. Dionisi; J. R. Dittmann; P. Doksus; A. Dominguez; S. Donati; M. Donega; J. Donini; M. D'Onofrio; T. Dorigo; V. Drollinger; K. Ebina; N. Eddy; R. Ely; R. Erbacher; M. Erdmann; D. Errede; S. Errede; R. Eusebi; H.-C. Fang; S. Farrington; I. Fedorko; R. G. Feild; M. Feindt; J. P. Fernandez; C. Ferretti; R. D. Field; I. Fiori; G. Flanagan; B. Flaugher; A. Foland; S. Forrester; G. W. Foster; M. Franklin; J. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Fujii; I. Furic; A. Gajjar; A. Gallas; J. Galyardt; M. Gallinaro; M. Garcia-Sciveres; A. F. Garfinkel; C. Gay; H. Gerberich; D. W. Gerdes; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; P. Giannetti; A. Gibson; K. Gibson; C. Ginsburg; K. Giolo; M. Giordani; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; N. Goldschmidt; D. Goldstein; J. Goldstein; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; Y. Gotra; K. Goulianos; A. Gresele; M. Griffiths; C. Grosso-Pilcher; M. Guenther; J. Guimaraes da Costa; C. Haber; K. Hahn; S. R. Hahn; E. Halkiadakis; R. Handler; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; R. M. Harris; F. Hartmann; K. Hatakeyama; J. Hauser; C. Hays; H. Hayward; E. Heider; B. Heinemann; J. Heinrich; M. Hennecke; M. Herndon; C. Hill; D. Hirschbuehl; A. Hocker; K. D. Hoffman; A. Holloway; S. Hou; M. A. Houlden; B. T. Huffman; Y. Huang; R. E. Hughes; J. Huston; K. Ikado; J. Incandela; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; Y. Ishizawa; C. Issever; A. Ivanov; Y. Iwata; B. Iyutin; E. James; D. Jang; J. Jarrell; D. Jeans; H. Jensen; E. J. Jeon; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Jun; T. Junk; T. Kamon; J. Kang; M. Karagoz Unel; P. E. Karchin; S. Kartal; Y. Kato; Y. Kemp; R. Kephart; U. Kerzel; V. Khotilovich; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; T. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; B. T. King; M. Kirby; L. Kirsch; S. Klimenko; B. Knuteson; B. R. Ko; H. Kobayashi; P. Koehn; D. J. Kong; K. Kondo; J. Konigsberg; K. Kordas; A. Korn; A. Korytov; K. Kotelnikov; A. V. Kotwal; A. Kovalev; J. Kraus; I. Kravchenko; A. Kreymer; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; V. Krutelyov; S. E. Kuhlmann; N. Kuznetsova; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lai; S. Lami; S. Lammel; J. Lancaster; M. Lancaster; R. Lander; K. Lannon; A. Lath; G. Latino; R. Lauhakangas; I. Lazzizzera; Y. Le; C. Lecci; T. Lecompte; J. Lee; S. W. Lee; N. Leonardo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; K. Li; C. Lin; M. Lindgren; T. M. Liss; D. O. Litvintsev; T. Liu; Y. Liu; N. S. Lockyer; A. Loginov; M. Loreti; P. Loverre; R.-S. Lu; D. Lucchesi; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; L. Lyons; J. Lys; R. Lysak; D. MacQueen; R. Madrak; K. Maeshima; P. Maksimovic; L. Malferrari; G. Manca; R. Marginean; M. Martin; A. Martin; V. Martin; M. Martínez; T. Maruyama; H. Matsunaga; M. Mattson; P. Mazzanti; K. S. McFarland; D. McGivern; P. M. McIntyre; P. McNamara; R. Ncnulty; S. Menzemer; A. Menzione; P. Merkel; C. Mesropian; A. Messina; T. Miao; N. Miladinovic; L. Miller; R. Miller; J. S. Miller; R. Miquel; S. Miscetti; G. Mitselmakher; A. Miyamoto; Y. Miyazaki; N. Moggi; B. Mohr; R. Moore; M. Morello; A. Mukherjee; M. Mulhearn; T. Muller; R. Mumford; A. Munar; P. Murat; J. Nachtman; S. Nahn; I. Nakamura; I. Nakano; A. Napier; R. Napora; D. Naumov; V. Necula; F. Niell; J. Nielsen; C. Nelson; T. Nelson; C. Neu; M. S. Neubauer; C. Newman-Holmes; A.-S. Nicollerat; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; O. Norniella; K. Oesterberg; T. Ogawa; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; T. Ohsugi; T. Okusawa; R. Oldeman; R. Orava; W. Orejudos; C. Pagliarone

    2005-01-01

    We present a measurement of relative partial widths and decay rate CP asymmetries in K-K+ and pi-pi+ decays of D0 mesons produced in pp¯ collisions at &surd;(s)=1.96 TeV. We use a sample of 2×105 D*+-->D0pi+ (and charge conjugate) decays with the D0 decaying to K-pi+, K-K+, and pi-pi+, corresponding to 123 pb-1 of data collected by the Collider Detector at

  15. Study of the quasi-free $np \\to np \\pi^+\\pi^-$ reaction with a deuterium beam at 1.25 GeV/nucleon

    E-print Network

    Agakishiev, G; Belver, D; Belyaev, A V; Blanco, A; Böhmer, M; Boyard, J L; Braun-Munzinger, P; Cabanelas, P; Castro, E; Chernenko, S; Christ, T; Destefanis, M; Díaz, J; Dohrmann, F; Dybczak, A; Fabbietti, L; Fateev, O V; Finocchiaro, P; Fonte, P; Friese, J; Fröhlich, I; Galatyuk, T; Garzón, J A; Gernhäuser, R; Gil, A; Gilardi, C; Göbel, K; Golubeva, M; González-Díaz, D; Guber, F; Gumberidze, M; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Ierusalimov, A; Iori, I; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kämpfer, B; Karavicheva, T; Kirschner, D; Koenig, I; Koenig, W; Kolb, B W; Kotte, R; Krizek, F; Krücken, R; Kühn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Kurilkin, A; Kurilkin, P; Ladygin, V; Lang, S; Lange, J S; Lapidus, K; Liu, T; Lopes, L; Lorenz, M; Maier, L; Mangiarotti, A; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Michel, J; Morinière, E; Mousa, J; Müntz, C; Naumann, L; Otwinowski, J; Pachmayer, Y C; Palka, M; Parpottas, Y; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Reshetin, A; Rustamov, A; Sadovsky, A; Salabura, P; Schmah, A; Schwab, E; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Ströbele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlusty, P; Traxler, M; Trebacz, R; Tsertos, H; Wagner, V; Vasiliev, T; Weber, M; Wisniowski, M; Wojcik, T; Wüstenfeld, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Y; Zhou, P

    2015-01-01

    The tagged quasi-free $np \\to np\\pi^+\\pi^-$ reaction has been studied experimentally with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES) at GSI at a deuteron incident beam energy of 1.25 GeV/nucleon ($\\sqrt s \\sim$ 2.42 GeV/c for the quasi-free collision). For the first time, differential distributions for $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ production in $np$ collisions have been collected in the region corresponding to the large transverse momenta of the secondary particles. The invariant mass and angular distributions for the $np\\rightarrow np\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ reaction are compared with different models. This comparison confirms the dominance of the $t$-channel with $\\Delta\\Delta$ contribution. It also validates the changes previously introduced in the Valencia model to describe two-pion production data in other isospin channels, although some deviations are observed, especially for the $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ invariant mass spectrum. The extracted total cross section is also in much better agreement with this model. Our new me...

  16. The influence of arene-ring size on stacking interaction with canonical base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formánek, Martin; Burda, Jaroslav V.

    2014-04-01

    Stacking interactions between aromatic molecules (benzene, p-cymene, biphenyl, and di- and tetra-hydrogen anthracene) and G.C and A.T canonical Watson-Crick (WC) base pairs are explored. Two functionals with dispersion corrections: ?-B97XD and B3LYP-D3 are used. For a comparison also the MP2 and B3LYP-D3/PCM methods were used for the most stable p-cymene…WC geometries. It was found that the stacking interaction increases with the size of ?-conjugation system. Its extent is in agreement with experimental finding on anticancer activity of Ru(II) piano-stool complexes where intercalation of these aromatic molecules should play an important role. The explored structures are considered as ternary system so that decomposition of the interaction energy to pairwise and non-additivity contributions is also examined.

  17. Interplay between halogen bonds and ?-? stacking interactions: CSD search and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiying; Lu, Yunxiang; Liu, Yingtao; Zhu, Xiang; Liu, Honglai; Zhu, Weiliang

    2012-07-28

    According to our survey of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD), a great number of crystal structures, in which halogen bonds and aromatic stacking interactions are present and play an important role in crystal packing, have been extracted. In this work, ab initio calculations at the MP2 level of theory were performed to investigate the mutual influence between halogen bonds and ?-? stacking interactions. Different energetic effects are observed in the studied complexes where the two kinds of noncovalent interactions coexist, which can be rationalized by the direction of charge transfer for the two interactions. These effects have been analyzed in detail in terms of the structural, energetic, and charge transfer properties of the complexes. In addition, the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) was also employed to characterize the interactions and to examine the strengthening or weakening of the interactions, depending on the variations of electron density on the bond and cage critical points. Finally, certain crystal structures retrieved from the CSD have been selected to provide experimental evidence of the combination of the two interactions. PMID:22710562

  18. Delta I=3/2, K to Pi Pi Decays with Light, Non-Zero Momentum Pions

    E-print Network

    Matthew Lightman; Elaine Goode

    2009-12-09

    Delta I=3/2, K to Pi Pi matrix elements are calculated on 68 configurations of quenched 24^3 x 64 lattices using the DBW2 action, and domain wall fermions with L_s=16. The lattice spacing is a^(-1)=1.3 GeV, corresponding to a physical volume of (3.6 fm)^3, which allows us to simulate a pion mass of m_Pi=227.6(6) MeV and a kaon mass of m_K=564(2) MeV. Twisted boundary conditions are used to give the two pions momentum. One twist corresponds to a pion momentum of p=Pi/L=170 MeV, which represents a decay that is nearly on-shell. Results for time separations of 20, 24, 28, and 32 between the kaon and the two pions are computed and an error weighted average is performed to reduced the error. The matrix elements are then found to have errors of order 3-4% for momentum 0 and Pi/L, 7% for momentum sqrt(2)*Pi/L, and 15% for momentum sqrt(3)*Pi/L.

  19. Measurement of the E+ E- to Pi+ Pi- (Gamma) Cross Section with the ISR Method with BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Davier, Michel; /Orsay, LAL

    2011-11-30

    A precision measurement of the cross section for the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}({gamma}) is presented with the radiative return method with the high statistics data accumulated by BaBar at the {Upsilon}(4S). The luminosity is determined from the study of the corresponding leptonic process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}({gamma}), thus cancelling several factors and reducing the overall systematic uncertainty. Trigger, tracking, particle identification, and kinematic-fit {chi}{sup 2} efficiencies are evaluated from data in the same environment. Additional radiation from the initial and the final states is studied in both processes. The analysis covers the mass range between threshold and 5 GeV. Preliminary results are presented here between 0.5 and 3 GeV, with data samples of 513183 pion events and 445631 muon events. The systematic uncertainty in the main {rho} resonance region is 5.6 x 10{sup -3}. The measured mass dependent pion-pair cross section is compared with measurements from earlier experiments and used to compute the hadronic vacuum polarization contribution from the dominant {pi}{pi} channel to the muon magnetic anomaly.

  20. Implication of the B{yields}{rho}{rho} data on the B{yields}{pi}{pi} puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hsiangnan [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 115 (China) and Department of Physics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China); Mishima, Satoshi [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2006-06-01

    We point out that the B{yields}{rho}{rho} data have seriously constrained the possibility of resolving the B{yields}{pi}{pi} puzzle from the large observed B{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} branching ratio in the available theoretical approaches. The next-to-leading-order (NLO) contributions from the vertex corrections, the quark loops, and the magnetic penguin evaluated in the perturbative QCD (PQCD) approach have saturated the experimental upper bound of the B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{rho}{sup 0} branching ratio and do not help. The NLO PQCD predictions for the B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup {+-}}{rho}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}}{yields}{rho}{sup {+-}}{rho}{sup 0} branching ratios are consistent with the data. The inclusion of the NLO jet function from the soft-collinear effective theory into the QCD-improved factorization approach, though enhancing the B{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} branching ratio sufficiently, overshoots the bound of the B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{rho}{sup 0} branching ratio and deteriorates the predictions for the B{sup {+-}}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}} and B{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}K{sup {+-}} direct CP asymmetries.

  1. B-DNA structure and stability: the role of hydrogen bonding, ?-? stacking interactions, twist-angle, and solvation.

    PubMed

    Poater, Jordi; Swart, Marcel; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Fonseca Guerra, Célia

    2014-07-14

    We have computationally investigated the structure and stability of B-DNA. To this end, we have analyzed the bonding in a series of 47 stacks consisting of two base pairs, in which the base pairs cover the full range of natural Watson-Crick pairs, mismatched pairs, and artificial DNA base pairs. Our analyses provide detailed insight into the role and relative importance of the various types of interactions, such as, hydrogen bonding, ?-? stacking interactions, and solvation/desolvation. Furthermore, we have analyzed the functionality of the twist-angle on the stability of the structure. Interestingly, we can show that all stacked base pairs benefit from a stabilization by 6 to 12 kcal mol(-1) if stacked base pairs are twisted from 0° to 36°, that is, if they are mutually rotated from a congruent superposition to the mutually twisted stacking configuration that occurs in B-DNA. This holds especially for stacked AT pairs but also for other stacked base pairs, including GC. The electronic mechanism behind this preference for a twisted arrangement depends on the base pairs involved. We also show that so-called "diagonal interactions" (or cross terms) in the stacked base pairs are crucial for understanding the stability of B-DNA, in particular, in GC-rich sequences. PMID:24871817

  2. Axial anomaly and the interplay of quark loops with pseudoscalar and vector mesons in the gamma* --> pi+ pi0 pi- process

    E-print Network

    Benic, Sanjin

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the ongoing measurements of the Primakoff process pi- gamma* --> pi- pi0 by COMPASS collaboration at CERN, the transition form factor for the canonical anomalous process gamma* --> pi+ pi0 pi- is calculated in a constituent quark loop model. The simplest contribution to this process is the quark "box" amplitude. In the present paper we also explicitly include the vector meson degrees of freedom, i.e., the rho and the omega, thus giving rise to additional, resonant contributions. We find that in order to satisfy the axial anomaly result, a further subtraction in the resonant part is needed. The results are then compared with the vector meson dominance model as well as the Dyson--Schwinger calculations and the available data.

  3. Axial anomaly and the interplay of quark loops with pseudoscalar and vector mesons in the gamma* --> pi+ pi0 pi- process

    E-print Network

    Sanjin Benic; Dubravko Klabucar

    2012-01-19

    Motivated by the ongoing measurements of the Primakoff process pi- gamma* --> pi- pi0 by COMPASS collaboration at CERN, the transition form factor for the canonical anomalous process gamma* --> pi+ pi0 pi- is calculated in a constituent quark loop model. The simplest contribution to this process is the quark "box" amplitude. In the present paper we also explicitly include the vector meson degrees of freedom, i.e., the rho and the omega, thus giving rise to additional, resonant contributions. We find that in order to satisfy the axial anomaly result, a further subtraction in the resonant part is needed. The results are then compared with the vector meson dominance model as well as the Dyson--Schwinger calculations, the chiral perturbation theory result, and the available data.

  4. Measurement of sigma(e+ e- -> pi+ pi-) from threshold to 0.85 GeV^2 using Initial State Radiation with the KLOE detector

    E-print Network

    KLOE Collaboration; F. Ambrosino; F. Archilli; P. Beltrame; G. Bencivenni; C. Bini; C. Bloise; S. Bocchetta; F. Bossi; P. Branchini; G. Capon; T. Capussela; F. Ceradini; P. Ciambrone; E. De Lucia; A. De Santis; P. De Simone; G. De Zorzi; A. Denig; A. Di Domenico; C. Di Donato; B. Di Micco; M. Dreucci; G. Felici; S. Fiore; P. Franzini; C. Gatti; P. Gauzzi; S. Giovannella; E. Graziani; M. Jacewicz; W. Kluge; J. Lee-Franzini; D. Leone; P. Massarotti; S. Meola; S. Miscetti; S. Müller; F. Murtas; M. Napolitano; F. Nguyen; A. Passeri; V. Patera; P. Santangelo; C. Taccini; L. Tortora; G. Venanzoni; R. Versaci

    2011-05-21

    We have measured the cross section of the radiative process e+e- -> pi+pi-gamma with the KLOE detector at the Frascati phi-factory DAPHNE, from events taken at a CM energy W=1 GeV. Initial state radiation allows us to obtain the cross section for e+e- -> pi+pi-, the pion form factor |F_pi|^2 and the dipion contribution to the muon magnetic moment anomaly, Delta a_mu^{pipi} = (478.5+-2.0_{stat}+-5.0_{syst}+-4.5_{th}) x 10^{-10} in the range 0.1 < M_{pipi}^2 < 0.85 GeV^2, where the theoretical error includes a SU(3) ChPT estimate of the uncertainty on photon radiation from the final pions. The discrepancy between the Standard Model evaluation of a_mu and the value measured by the Muon g-2 collaboration at BNL is confirmed.

  5. Measurement of the branching ratio and search for a CP violating asymmetry in the eta -> pi+pi-e+e-(gamma) decay at KLOE

    E-print Network

    KLOE Collaboration; F. Ambrosino; A. Antonelli; M. Antonelli; F. Archilli; P. Beltrame; G. Bencivenni; S. Bertolucci; C. Bini; C. Bloise; S. Bocchetta; F. Bossi; P. Branchini; G. Capon; T. Capussela; F. Ceradini; P. Ciambrone; F. Crucianelli; E. De Lucia; A. De Santis; P. De Simone; G. De Zorzi; A. Denig; A. Di Domenico; C. Di Donato; B. Di Micco; M. Dreucci; G. Felici; S. Fiore; P. Franzini; C. Gatti; P. Gauzzi; S. Giovannella; E. Graziani; G. Lanfranchi; J. Lee-Franzini; D. Leone; M. Martini; P. Massarotti; S. Meola; S. Miscetti; M. Moulson; S. Müller; F. Murtas; M. Napolitano; F. Nguyen; M. Palutan; E. Pasqualucci; A. Passeri; V. Patera; F. Perfetto; P. Santangelo; B. Sciascia; T. Spadaro; M. Testa; L. Tortora; P. Valente; G. Venanzoni; R. Versaci; G. Xu

    2009-04-22

    We have studied the eta->pi+pi-e+e-(gamma) decay using about 1.7 fb^-1 collected by the KLOE experiment at the DAFNE phi-factory. This corresponds to about 72 millions eta mesons produced in phi radiative decays. We have measured the branching ratio, inclusive of radiative effects, with 4% accuracy: BR(eta->pi+pi-e+e-(gamma)) = (26.8 +/- 0.9_Stat. +/- 0.7_Syst.) x 10^-5. We have obtained the first measurement of the CP-odd pipi-ee decay planes angular asymmetry, A_phi = (-0.6 +/- 2.5_Stat. +/- 1.8_Syst.) x 10^-2.

  6. Single and double delta production in the 3He(gamma,pi+pi-) reaction at 380<=Egamma<=700 MeV

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. G. Watts; G. M. Huber; G. J. Lolos; B. Lasiuk; S. Kato; M. Koike; K. Maruyama; K. Niki; Y. Wada; K. Maeda; T. Suda; T. Emura; H. Miyamoto; S. Endo; Y. Sumi; O. Konno; H. Yamazaki; H. Itoh; T. Maki; A. Sasaki

    1997-01-01

    Results are presented for the 3He(gamma,pi+pi-) reaction in the region 380 <=Egamma<=700 MeV, investigated with the use of a 10% duty factor tagged photon beam, in conjunction with the TAGX multiparticle spectrometer. The study of such multipion photoproduction reactions has motivated a number of chiral symmetric models, and is expected to provide an insight on the role of the Delta

  7. Search for the C-parity violating process J\\/psi-->gammagamma via psi(2S)-->pi+pi-J\\/psi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Ablikim; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; X. Cai; H. F. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. X. Chen; J. C. Chen; Y. B. Chen; Y. P. Chu; Y. S. Dai; L. Y. Diao; Z. Y. Deng; Q. F. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; C. D. Fu; C. S. Gao; Y. N. Gao; S. D. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. N. Guo; Z. J. Guo; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Y. K. Heng; J. Hou; H. M. Hu; J. H. Hu; T. Hu; G. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; X. B. Ji; X. S. Jiang; X. Y. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; Y. F. Lai; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. Li; R. Y. Li; S. M. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Y. F. Liang; H. B. Liao; B. J. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. Liu; Fang Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. P. Liu; Jian Liu; Q. Liu; R. G. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Y. C. Lou; F. Lu; G. R. Lu; J. G. Lu; C. L. Luo; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; L. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; Z. P. Mao; X. H. Mo; J. Nie; S. L. Olsen; R. G. Ping; N. D. Qi; H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; Z. Y. Ren; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; L. Y. Shan; L. Shang; C. P. Shen; D. L. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; H. S. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; X. Tang; G. L. Tong; G. S. Varner; D. Y. Wang; L. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; W. F. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; C. L. Wei; D. H. Wei; U. Wiedner; Y. Weng; N. Wu; X. M. Xia; X. X. Xie; G. F. Xu; X. P. Xu; Y. Xu; M. L. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. X. Yang; M. H. Ye; Y. X. Ye; G. W. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; S. L. Zang; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. Q. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Yiyun Zhang; Z. X. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; D. X. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; M. G. Zhao; P. P. Zhao; W. R. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; H. Q. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; L. Zhou; K. J. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; B. A. Zhuang; X. A. Zhuang; B. S. Zou

    2007-01-01

    Using 14.0×106psi(2S) events collected with the BES-II detector, the C-parity violating process J\\/psi-->gammagamma via psi(2S)-->pi+pi-J\\/psi is studied. We determine a new upper limit for the J\\/psi-->gammagamma branching ratio of B(J\\/psi-->gammagamma)<2.2×10-5 at the 90% C.L., which is about 20 times lower than the previous measurement.

  8. Observation of a pbar p mass threshold enhancement in Psi' --> pi+pi- J\\/Psi(J\\/Psi --> gamma pbar p) decay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; L. An; Q. An; Z. H. An; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; N. Berger; J. M. Bian; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; X. Cai; G. F. Cao; X. X. Cao; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; L. P. Chen; M. L. Chen; P. Chen; S. J. Chen; Y. B. Chen; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; M. Y. Duan; J. Fang; C. Q. Feng; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; M. Greco; S. Grishin; Y. T. Gu; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; Y. P. Guo; S. Q. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; X. W. Hu; B. Huang; G. M. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. P. Huang; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. K. Jia; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; S. Komamiya; W. Kuehn; S. Lange; J. K. C. Leung; C. Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; Lik J; J. C. Li; L. Li; Q. J. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Y. X. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; T. R. Liang; Y. Y. Liang; Y. F. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. Y. Liu; F. H. Liu; G. C. Liu; H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. Liu; K. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. H. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Y. F. Liu; Y. W. Liu; Z. A. Liu; G. R. Lu; J. G. Lü; Q. W. Lü; X. R. Lü; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; X. Ma; M. Maggiora; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. Min; X. H. Mo; N. Yu. Muchnoi; Y. Nefedov; F. P. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; C. S. J. Pun; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; J. F. Qiu; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; S. Sonoda; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; X. D. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; H. L. Tian; D. Toth; G. S. Varner; X. Wan; B. Q. Wang; J. K. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; P. Wang; Q. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. D. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; S. P. Wen; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; Y. M. Wu; Z. Wu; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; H. Xu; M. Xu; X. P. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Z. Xu; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; M. Yang; P. Yang; S. M. Yang; Y. X. Yang; M. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; L. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; L. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; C. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; L. Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; B. Zhong; J. Zhong; L. Zhou; Z. L. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; X. W. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou; J. X. Zuo; P. Zweber

    2010-01-01

    The decay channel Psi' --> pi+pi- J\\/Psi(J\\/Psi --> gammapbar p) is studied using a sample of 1.06 × 108 Psi' events collected by the BESIII experiment at BEPCII. A strong enhancement at threshold is observed in the pbar p invariant mass spectrum. The enhancement can be fitted with an S-wave Breit-Wigner resonance function with a resulting peak mass of M

  9. Measurement of the CP-violating phase $\\\\phi_s$ in $\\\\overline{B}^0_s \\\\to J\\/\\\\psi\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ decays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Aaij; C Abellan Beteta; B Adeva; M Adinolfi; C Adrover; A Affolder; Z Ajaltouni; J Albrecht; F Alessio; M Alexander; S Ali; G Alkhazov; P Alvarez Cartelle; A A Alves Jr; S Amato; Y Amhis; J Anderson; R B Appleby; O Aquines Gutierrez; F Archilli; A Artamonov; M Artuso; E Aslanides; G Auriemma; S Bachmann; J J Back; V Balagura; W Baldini; R J Barlow; C Barschel; S Barsuk; W Barter; A Bates; C Bauer; Th Bauer; A Bay; I Bediaga; S Belogurov; K Belous; I Belyaev; E Ben-Haim; M Benayoun; G Bencivenni; S Benson; J Benton; R Bernet; M-O Bettler; M van Beuzekom; A Bien; S Bifani; T Bird; A Bizzeti; P M Bjørnstad; T Blake; F Blanc; C Blanks; J Blouw; S Blusk; A Bobrov; V Bocci; A Bondar; N Bondar; W Bonivento; S Borghi; A Borgia; T J V Bowcock; C Bozzi; T Brambach; J van den Brand; J Bressieux; D Brett; M Britsch; T Britton; N H Brook; H Brown; A Büchler-Germann; I Burducea; A Bursche; J Buytaert; S Cadeddu; O Callot; M Calvi; M Calvo Gomez; A Camboni; P Campana; A Carbone; G Carboni; R Cardinale; A Cardini; L Carson; K Carvalho Akiba; G Casse; M Cattaneo; Ch Cauet; M Charles; Ph Charpentier; N Chiapolini; K Ciba; X Cid Vidal; G Ciezarek; P E L Clarke; M Clemencic; H V Cliff; J Closier; C Coca; V Coco; J Cogan; P Collins; A Comerma-Montells; A Contu; A Cook; M Coombes; G Corti; B Couturier; G A Cowan; R Currie; C D'Ambrosio; P David; I De Bonis; K De Bruyn; S De Capua; M De Cian; J M De Miranda; L De Paula; P De Simone; D Decamp; M Deckenhoff; H Degaudenzi; L Del Buono; C Deplano; D Derkach; O Deschamps; F Dettori; J Dickens; H Dijkstra; P Diniz Batista; F Domingo Bonal; S Donleavy; F Dordei; A Dosil Suárez; D Dossett; A Dovbnya; F Dupertuis; R Dzhelyadin; A Dziurda; S Easo; U Egede; V Egorychev; S Eidelman; D van Eijk; F Eisele; S Eisenhardt; R Ekelhof; L Eklund; Ch Elsasser; D Elsby; D Esperante Pereira; A Falabella; C Färber; G Fardell; C Farinelli; S Farry; V Fave; V Fernandez Albor; M Ferro-Luzzi; S Filippov; C Fitzpatrick; M Fontana; F Fontanelli; R Forty; O Francisco; M Frank; C Frei; M Frosini; S Furcas; A Gallas Torreira; D Galli; M Gandelman; P Gandini; Y Gao; J-C Garnier; J Garofoli; J Garra Tico; L Garrido; D Gascon; C Gaspar; R Gauld; N Gauvin; M Gersabeck; T Gershon; Ph Ghez; V Gibson; V V Gligorov; C Göbel; D Golubkov; A Golutvin; A Gomes; H Gordon; M Grabalosa Gándara; R Graciani Diaz; L A Granado Cardoso; E Graugés; G Graziani; A Grecu; E Greening; S Gregson; B Gui; E Gushchin; Yu Guz; T Gys; C Hadjivasiliou; G Haefeli; C Haen; S C Haines; T Hampson; S Hansmann-Menzemer; R Harji; N Harnew; J Harrison; P F Harrison; T Hartmann; J He; V Heijne; K Hennessy; P Henrard; J A Hernando Morata; E van Herwijnen; E Hicks; K Holubyev; P Hopchev; W Hulsbergen; P Hunt; T Huse; R S Huston; D Hutchcroft; D Hynds; V Iakovenko; P Ilten; J Imong; R Jacobsson; A Jaeger; M Jahjah Hussein; E Jans; F Jansen; P Jaton; B Jean-Marie; F Jing; M John; D Johnson; C R Jones; B Jost; M Kaballo; S Kandybei; M Karacson; T M Karbach; J Keaveney; I R Kenyon; U Kerzel; T Ketel; A Keune; B Khanji; Y M Kim; M Knecht; R F Koopman; P Koppenburg; M Korolev; A Kozlinskiy; L Kravchuk; K Kreplin; M Kreps; G Krocker; P Krokovny; F Kruse; K Kruzelecki; M Kucharczyk; V Kudryavtsev; T Kvaratskheliya; V N La Thi; D Lacarrere; G Lafferty; A Lai; D Lambert; R W Lambert; E Lanciotti; G Lanfranchi; C Langenbruch; T Latham; C Lazzeroni; R Le Gac; J van Leerdam; J-P Lees; R Lefèvre; A Leflat; J Lefrançois; O Leroy; T Lesiak; L Li; L Li Gioi; M Lieng; M Liles; R Lindner; C Linn; B Liu; G Liu; J von Loeben; J H Lopes; E Lopez Asamar; N Lopez-March; H Lu; J Luisier; F Machefert; I V Machikhiliyan; F Maciuc; O Maev; J Magnin; S Malde; R M D Mamunur; G Manca; G Mancinelli; N Mangiafave; U Marconi; R Märki; J Marks; G Martellotti; A Martens; L Martin; A Martín Sánchez; M Martinelli; D Martinez Santos; A Massafferri; Z Mathe; C Matteuzzi; M Matveev; E Maurice; B Maynard; A Mazurov; G McGregor; R McNulty; M Meissner; M Merk; J Merkel; S Miglioranzi; D A Milanes; M-N Minard; J Molina Rodriguez; S Monteil; D Moran; P Morawski; I Mous; F Muheim; K Müller; R Muresan; B Muryn; B Muster; J Mylroie-Smith; P Naik; T Nakada; R Nandakumar; I Nasteva; M Needham; N Neufeld; A D Nguyen; C Nguyen-Mau; M Nicol; V Niess; N Nikitin; T Nikodem; A Nomerotski; A Novoselov; A Oblakowska-Mucha; V Obraztsov; S Oggero; S Ogilvy; O Okhrimenko; R Oldeman; M Orlandea; J M Otalora Goicochea; P Owen; B K Pal; J Palacios; A Palano; M Palutan; J Panman; A Papanestis; M Pappagallo; C Parkes; C J Parkinson; G Passaleva; G D Patel; M Patel; S K Paterson; G N Patrick; C Patrignani; C Pavel-Nicorescu; A Pazos Alvarez; A Pellegrino; G Penso; M Pepe Altarelli; S Perazzini; D L Perego; E Perez Trigo; A Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo; P Perret; M Perrin-Terrin; G Pessina; A Petrolini; A Phan; E Picatoste Olloqui; B Pie Valls; B Pietrzyk; T Pila?; D Pinci; R Plackett; S Playfer; M Plo Casasus; G Polok; A Poluektov

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of the mixing-induced $CP$-violating phase $\\\\phi_s$ in $B^0_s$ decays is of prime importance in probing new physics. Here $7421 \\\\pm 105$ signal events from the dominantly $CP$-odd final state $J\\/\\\\psi\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ are selected in 1 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data collected at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV with the LHCb detector. A time-dependent fit to the data yields a value of

  10. Axial-ligand control of the photophysical behavior of ruthenium(II) tetraphenyl- and octaethylporphyrin. Contrasting properties of metalloporphyrin (. pi. ,. pi. *) and (d,. pi. *) excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, L.M.A.; Holten, D.

    1988-02-11

    The photophysical behavior of the ruthenium(II) porphyrins depends dramatically on the axial ligands coordinated to the central metal ion. The authors have measured the picosecond and slower time scale transient absorption spectra and kinetics, emission data, and ground-state absorption spectra for two classes of complexes: RuP(CO)(L) and RuP(L)/sub 2/. Results are compared for complexes in which the porphyrin macrocycle (P) is tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) or octaethylporphyrin (OEP) and the axial ligand L is piperidine (pip), pyridine (py), dimethyl sulfoxide (Me/sub 2/SO), or ethanol (EtOH). They assign the lowest excited state of all the RuP(CO)(L) complexes, including those with L absent, as the lowest excited triplet state, /sup 3/(..pi..,..pi..*), of the porphyrin ring. /sup 3/(..pi..,..pi..*) appears to form in high yield from the ring excited singlet, /sup 1/(..pi..,..pi..*), in less than or equal to 30 ps. On the other hand, they assign the lowest excited state of the RuP(L)/sub 2/ complexes, except for RuTPP(Me/sub 2/SO)/sub 2/, as a metal-to-ring (d,..pi..*), charge-transfer (CT) state. Although /sup 3/(..pi..,..pi..*) appears to be the lowest excited state in all the RuP(CO)(L) complexes investigated, they propose that the deactivation of this state nonetheless proceeds, in part, via a shorter lived (d,..pi..*) state at higher energy. The photodissociation quantum yield is measured to be approx. 10/sup -4/ for two of the complexes.

  11. Observation of the $\\psi(1^3D_2)$ state in $e^+e^-\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\gamma\\chi_{c1}$ at BESIII

    E-print Network

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, R Q; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Pu, Y N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ren, H L; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Xu, Z R; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation of the $X(3823)$ in the process $e^+e^-\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-X(3823) \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\gamma\\chi_{c1}$ with a statistical significance of $6.2\\sigma$, in data samples at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}=$4.230, 4.260, 4.360, 4.420 and 4.600~GeV collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII electron positron collider. The measured mass of the $X(3823)$ is $(3821.7\\pm 1.3\\pm 0.7)$~MeV/$c^2$, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic, and the width is less than $16$~MeV at the 90\\% confidence level. The products of the Born cross sections for $e^+e^-\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-X(3823)$ and the branching ratio $\\mathcal{B}[X(3823)\\to \\gamma\\chi_{c1,c2}]$ are also measured. These measurements are in good agreement with the assignment of the $X(3823)$ as the $\\psi(1^3D_2)$ charmonium state.

  12. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc+/- to J/psi pi+/- and B+/- to J/psi K+/- and B(Bc+/- to J/psi pi+/- pi+/- pi-/+)/B(Bc+/- to J/psi pi+/-) in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, V. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2015-01-01

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (sigma(Bc+) B(Bc+ to J/psi pi+))/ (sigma(B+) B(B+ to J/psi K+)) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Bc+/- and B+/- mesons with transverse momentum pt > 15 GeV and rapidity abs(y) < 1.6. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 inverse femtobarns. The ratio is determined to be [0.48 +/- 0.05 (stat) +/- 0.03 (syst) +/- 0.05 (tau_{Bc})]% The J/psi pi+/- pi+/- pi-/+ decay mode is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed to measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions B(Bc+/- to J/psi pi+/- pi+/- pi-/+) / B(Bc+/- to J/psi pi+/-) is measured to be 2.55 +/- 0.80 (stat) +/- 0.33 (syst) +0.04/-0.01 (tau[Bc+]), consistent with the previous LHCb result.

  13. Molecular dynamics study of the interactions between dislocation and imperfect stacking fault tetrahedron in Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saintoyant, Lucie; Lee, Hyon-Jee; Wirth, Brian D.

    2007-04-01

    The microstructure of irradiated face centered cubic alloys with low stacking fault energy is distinguished by the formation of a high number density of nanometer size stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). A recent transmission electron microscopy investigation of high-energy proton irradiated copper [16] has shown that nearly 50% of the visible SFT population are not perfect SFTs, but rather consist of truncated SFT and/or groups of overlapping SFT. This paper presents the results of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the interaction between gliding dislocations, of either edge or screw character, and truncated SFT or overlapping SFT. The most common result of the edge dislocation interaction with a truncated SFT is defect shearing, ultimately leading to complete separation into two smaller defect clusters. Partial absorption of the truncated SFT is the most common result of the interaction with a screw dislocation, resulting in the formation of super-jog (or helical) segments as the defect is absorbed into the dislocation core. The resulting non-planar screw dislocation is self-pinned with reduced mobility and is re-emitted as a similar truncated SFT as the applied shear stress is increased. The re-emitted truncated SFT is often rotated and translated relative to the original position. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that shearing (decreased defect cluster size) and dislocation dragging of the defect clusters by partial absorption into the dislocation core contributes to the formation of defect-free channels.

  14. Modulation of stacking interactions by transition-metal coordination: ab initio benchmark studies.

    PubMed

    Mutter, Shaun T; Platts, James A

    2010-05-10

    A series of ab initio calculations are used to determine the C--Hpi and pipi-stacking interactions of aromatic rings coordinated to transition-metal centres. Two model complexes have been employed, namely, ferrocene and chromium benzene tricarbonyl. Benchmark data obtained from extrapolation of MP2 energies to the basis set limit, coupled with CCSD(T) correction, indicate that coordinated aromatic rings are slightly weaker hydrogen-bond acceptors but are significantly stronger hydrogen-bond donors than uncomplexed rings. It is found that pipi stacking to a second benzene is stronger than in the free benzene dimer, especially in the chromium case. This is assigned, by use of energy partitioning in the local correlation method, to dispersion interactions between metal d and benzene pi orbitals. The benchmark data is also used to test the performance of more efficient theoretical methods, indicating that spin-component scaling of MP2 energies performs well in all cases, whereas various density functionals describe some complexes well, but others with errors of more than 1 kcal mol(-1). PMID:20373305

  15. Dislocation-stacking fault tetrahedron interaction: what can we learn from atomic scale modelling.

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Matsukawa, Yoshitaka [ORNL

    2004-01-01

    The high number density of stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) observed in irradiated fcc metals suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, taken into account when estimating mechanical properties changes of irradiated materials. The central issue is describing the individual interaction between a moving dislocation and an SFT, which is characterized by a very fine size scale, {approx}100 nm. This scale is amenable to both in situ TEM experiments and large-scale atomic modelling. In this paper we present results of an atomistic simulation of dislocation-SFT interactions using molecular dynamics (MD). The results are compared with observations from in situ deformation experiments. It is demonstrated that in some cases the simulations and experimental observations are quite similar, suggesting a reasonable interpretation of experimental observations.

  16. Urea destabilizes RNA by forming stacking interactions and multiple hydrogen bonds with nucleic acid bases

    E-print Network

    Priyakumar, U Deva; Thirumalai, D; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2009-01-01

    Urea titration of RNA by urea is an effective approach to investigate the forces stabilizing this biologically important molecule. We used all atom molecular dynamics simulations using two urea force fields and two RNA constructs to elucidate in atomic detail the destabilization mechanism of folded RNA in aqueous urea solutions. Urea denatures RNA by forming multiple hydrogen bonds with the RNA bases and has little influence on the phosphodiester backbone. Most significantly we discovered that urea engages in stacking interactions with the bases. We also estimate, for the first time, m-value for RNA, which is a measure of the strength of urea-RNA interactions. Our work provides a conceptual understanding of the mechanism by which urea enhances RNA folding rates.

  17. Urea destabilizes RNA by forming stacking interactions and multiple hydrogen bonds with nucleic acid bases

    E-print Network

    U. Deva Priyakumar; Changbong Hyeon; D. Thirumalai; Alexander D. MacKerell Jr

    2009-12-07

    Urea titration of RNA by urea is an effective approach to investigate the forces stabilizing this biologically important molecule. We used all atom molecular dynamics simulations using two urea force fields and two RNA constructs to elucidate in atomic detail the destabilization mechanism of folded RNA in aqueous urea solutions. Urea denatures RNA by forming multiple hydrogen bonds with the RNA bases and has little influence on the phosphodiester backbone. Most significantly we discovered that urea engages in stacking interactions with the bases. We also estimate, for the first time, m-value for RNA, which is a measure of the strength of urea-RNA interactions. Our work provides a conceptual understanding of the mechanism by which urea enhances RNA folding rates.

  18. Measurement of D0-D¯0 Mixing Parameters Using D0-->KS0pi+pi- and D0-->KS0K+K- Decays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Del Amo Sanchez; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; E. Prencipe; V. Tisserand; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; M. Martinelli; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; B. Hooberman; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Lynch; I. L. Osipenkov; T. Tanabe; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. J. Asgeirsson; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; A. Randle-Conde; V. E. Blinov; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; A. N. Yushkov; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; H. Atmacan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; G. M. Vitug; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; A. M. Eisner; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; A. J. Martinez; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; L. O. Winstrom; C. H. Cheng; D. A. Doll; B. Echenard; D. G. Hitlin; P. Ongmongkolkul; F. C. Porter; A. Y. Rakitin; R. Andreassen; M. S. Dubrovin; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; J. F. Hirschauer; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; J. G. Smith; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; W. H. Toki; T. M. Karbach; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; M. J. Kobel; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; D. Bernard; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; S. Playfer; J. E. Watson; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; E. Fioravanti; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Munerato; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; M. Nicolaci; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; R. Contri; E. Guido; M. Lo Vetere; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; S. Tosi; B. Bhuyan; C. L. Lee; M. Morii; A. Adametz; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; F. U. Bernlochner; H. M. Lacker; T. Lueck; A. Volk; P. D. Dauncey; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; U. Mallik; C. Chen; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; D. Derkach; J. Firmino da Costa; G. Grosdidier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; B. Malaescu; A. Perez; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; L. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. P. Coleman; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; S. Paramesvaran; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; W. Gradl; A. Hafner; K. E. Alwyn; D. Bailey; R. J. Barlow; G. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. Anderson; R. Cenci; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; E. Salvati; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; G. Sciolla; M. Zhao; D. Lindemann; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; M. Schram; P. Biassoni; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; S. Stracka; L. Cremaldi; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; P. Sonnek; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; X. Nguyen; M. Simard; P. Taras; G. de Nardo; D. Monorchio; G. Onorato; C. Sciacca; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; W. F. Wang; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; G. Castelli; E. Feltresi; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; E. Ben-Haim; G. R. Bonneaud; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; G. Marchiori; J. Ocariz; J. Prendki; S. Sitt; M. Biasini; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; G. Casarosa; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; N. Neri; E. Paoloni; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; D. Lopes Pegna; C. Lu; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith; A. V. Telnov; F. Anulli; E. Baracchini; G. Cavoto; R. Faccini; F. Ferrarotto; F. Ferroni; M. Gaspero; L. Li Gioi; M. A. Mazzoni; G. Piredda; F. Renga; M. Ebert; T. Hartmann; T. Leddig; H. Schröder; R. Waldi; T. Adye; B. Franek; E. O. Olaiya; F. F. Wilson; S. Emery; G. Hamel de Monchenault; G. Vasseur; Ch. Yèche; M. Zito; I. J. R. Aitchison; M. T. Allen; D. Aston; D. J. Bard; R. Bartoldus; J. F. Benitez; C. Cartaro; M. R. Convery; J. Dorfan; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; W. Dunwoodie; R. C. Field; M. Franco Sevilla; B. G. Fulsom; A. M. Gabareen; M. T. Graham; P. Grenier; C. Hast; W. R. Innes; M. H. Kelsey; H. Kim; P. Kim; M. L. Kocian; D. W. G. S. Leith; S. Li; B. Lindquist; S. Luitz; V. Luth; H. L. Lynch; D. B. Macfarlane; H. Marsiske; D. R. Muller; H. Neal; S. Nelson; C. P. O'Grady; I. Ofte; M. Perl; T. Pulliam; B. N. Ratcliff; A. Roodman; A. A. Salnikov; V. Santoro; R. H. Schindler; J. Schwiening; A. Snyder; D. Su; M. K. Sullivan; S. Sun; K. Suzuki; J. M. Thompson

    2010-01-01

    We report a direct measurement of D0-D¯0 mixing parameters through a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the Dalitz plots of D0-->KS0pi+pi- and, for the first time, D0-->KS0K+K- decays. The low-momentum pion pis+ in the decay D*+-->D0pis+ identifies the flavor of the neutral D meson at its production. Using 468.5fb-1 of e+e- colliding-beam data recorded near s=10.6GeV by the BABAR detector at

  19. Measurement of D0-D¯0 Mixing from a Time-Dependent Amplitude Analysis of D0-->K+pi-pi0 Decays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; M. Bona; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; E. Prencipe; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopezab; A. Palanoab; M. Pappagalloab; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; R. N. Cahn; R. G. Jacobsen; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Lynch; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; C. M. Hawkes; N. Soni; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; Z. Yasin; L. Zhang; V. Sharma; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; L. O. Winstrom; M. G. Wilson; C. H. Cheng; D. A. Doll; B. Echenard; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; J. F. Hirschauer; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; M. Karbach; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; M. J. Kobel; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; S. Playfer; J. E. Watson; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; V. Santoro; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; J. Firmino da Costa; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; C. K. Clarke; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; K. E. Alwyn; D. Bailey; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; X. Li; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; G. Onorato; C. Sciacca; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; W. F. Wang; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; G. Castelli; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; P. Del Amo Sanchez; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; S. Sitt; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; G. Marchiori; M. Morganti; N. Neri; E. Paoloni; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; D. Lopes Pegna; C. Lu; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith; A. V. Telnov; F. Anulli; E. Baracchini; G. Cavoto; D. Del Re; E. di Marco; R. Faccini; F. Ferrarotto; F. Ferroni; M. Gaspero; P. D. Jackson; L. Li Gioi; M. A. Mazzoni; S. Morganti; G. Piredda; F. Polci; F. Renga; C. Voena; M. Ebert

    2009-01-01

    We present evidence of D0-D¯0 mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D0-->K+pi-pi0 in a data sample of 384fb-1 collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Assuming CP conservation, we measure the mixing parameters xKpipi0'=[2.61-0.68+0.57(stat)±0.39(syst)]%, yKpipi0'=[-0.06-0.64+0.55(stat)±0.34(syst)]%. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2

  20. Search for the C-parity violating process J/psi->gamma gamma via psi(2S)->pi+pi- J/psi

    E-print Network

    M. Ablikim; J. Z. Bai

    2007-09-21

    Using 14.0\\times 10^6 \\psi(2S) events collected with the BES-II detector, the C-parity violating process J/psi->gamma gamma via psi(2S)->pi+pi- J/psi is studied. We determine a new upper limit for the J/psi->gamma gamma branching ratio of B(J/psi->gamma gamma)<2.2\\times 10^{-5} at the 90% C.L., which is about 20 times lower than the previous measurement.

  1. Search for D0-D¯0 Mixing and Branching-Ratio Measurement in the Decay D0-->K+pi-pi0

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube

    2006-01-01

    We analyze 230.4fb-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider at SLAC to search for evidence of D0-D¯0 mixing using regions of phase space in the decay D0-->K+pi-pi0. We measure the time-integrated mixing rate RM=(0.023-0.014+0.018(stat.)±0.004(syst.))%, and RM<0.054% at the 95% confidence level, assuming CP invariance. The data are consistent with no mixing at the 4.5%

  2. Study of a narrow pi+ pi- peak at about 755 MeV/c^2 in bar-p n --> 2 pi+ 3 pi- annihilation at rest

    E-print Network

    Mario Gaspero

    2009-02-06

    A narrow peak in the pi+ pi- mass distribution was seen by the Rome-Syracuse Collaboration in bar-p n --> 2 pi+ 3 pi- annihilation at rest 39 years ago. The reanalysis of this peak finds a mass of 757.4 +- 2.6 MeV/c^2 and a width slightly narrower than the experimental resolution. The evidence of the peak is 5.2 standard deviations. This state is generated in (12.4 +- 2.4)% of the bar-p n --> 2 pi+ 3 pi- annihilations at rest. No spin analysis is possible with the statistics of the experiment.

  3. Self-Induced Uniaxial Strain in MoS2 Monolayers with Local van der Waals-Stacked Interlayer Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kenan; Hu, Shuhong; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Tianning; Zhou, Xiaohao; Sun, Yan; Li, Tian-Xin; Fan, Hong Jin; Shen, Guozhen; Chen, Xin; Dai, Ning

    2015-03-24

    Strain engineering is an effective method to tune the properties of electrons and phonons in semiconductor materials, including two-dimensional (2D) layered materials (e.g., MoS2 or graphene). External artificial stress (ExAS) or heterostructure stacking is generally required to induce strains for modulating semiconductor bandgaps and optoelectronic functions. For layered materials, the van der Waals-stacked interlayer interaction (vdW-SI) has been considered to dominate the interlayer stacking and intralayer bonding. Here, we demonstrate self-induced uniaxial strain in the MoS2 monolayer without the assistance of ExAS or heterostructure stacking processes. The uniaxial strain occurring in local monolayer regions is manifested by the Raman split of the in-plane vibration modes E2g(1) and is essentially caused by local vdW-SI within the single layer MoS2 due to a unique symmetric bilayer stacking. The local stacked configuration and the self-induced uniaxial strain may provide improved understanding of the fundamental interlayer interactions and alternative routes for strain engineering of layered structures. PMID:25716291

  4. Determination of Base Binding Strength and Base Stacking Interaction of DNA Duplex Using Atomic Force Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tian-biao; Zhang, Chang-lin; Dong, Zai-li; Guan, Yi-fu

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most crucial properties of DNA, the structural stability and the mechanical strength are attracting a great attention. Here, we take advantage of high force resolution and high special resolution of Atom Force Microscope and investigate the mechanical force of DNA duplexes. To evaluate the base pair hydrogen bond strength and base stacking force in DNA strands, we designed two modes (unzipping and stretching) for the measurement rupture forces. Employing k-means clustering algorithm, the ruptured force are clustered and the mean values are estimated. We assessed the influence of experimental parameters and performed the force evaluation for DNA duplexes of pure dG/dC and dA/dT base pairs. The base binding strength of single dG/dC and single dA/dT were estimated to be 20.0 ± 0.2?pN and 14.0 ± 0.3?pN, respectively, and the base stacking interaction was estimated to be 2.0 ± 0.1?pN. Our results provide valuable information about the quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of the DNA duplexes. PMID:25772017

  5. Determination of base binding strength and base stacking interaction of DNA duplex using atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Biao; Zhang, Chang-Lin; Dong, Zai-Li; Guan, Yi-Fu

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most crucial properties of DNA, the structural stability and the mechanical strength are attracting a great attention. Here, we take advantage of high force resolution and high special resolution of Atom Force Microscope and investigate the mechanical force of DNA duplexes. To evaluate the base pair hydrogen bond strength and base stacking force in DNA strands, we designed two modes (unzipping and stretching) for the measurement rupture forces. Employing k-means clustering algorithm, the ruptured force are clustered and the mean values are estimated. We assessed the influence of experimental parameters and performed the force evaluation for DNA duplexes of pure dG/dC and dA/dT base pairs. The base binding strength of single dG/dC and single dA/dT were estimated to be 20.0 ± 0.2?pN and 14.0 ± 0.3?pN, respectively, and the base stacking interaction was estimated to be 2.0 ± 0.1?pN. Our results provide valuable information about the quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of the DNA duplexes. PMID:25772017

  6. A study of $CP$ violation in $B^\\mp \\rightarrow Dh^\\mp$ ($h=K,\\pi$) with the modes $D \\rightarrow K^\\mp \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0$, $D \\rightarrow \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ and $D \\rightarrow K^+K^-\\pi^0$

    E-print Network

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of the decays of $B^\\mp \\rightarrow D K^\\mp$ and $B^\\mp \\rightarrow D \\pi^\\mp $ is presented in which the $D$ meson is reconstructed in the three-body final states $K^\\mp \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0$, $\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$ and $K^+ K^- \\pi^0$. Using data from LHCb corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0~fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions, measurements of several $CP$ observables are performed. First observations are obtained of the suppressed ADS decay $B^\\mp \\rightarrow [\\pi^\\mp K^\\pm \\pi^0]_D \\pi^\\mp$ and the quasi-GLW decay $B^\\mp \\rightarrow [K^+ K^- \\pi^0]_D \\pi^\\mp$. The results are interpreted in the context of the unitarity triangle angle $\\gamma$ and related parameters.

  7. A study of $CP$ violation in $B^\\mp \\rightarrow Dh^\\mp$ ($h=K,\\pi$) with the modes $D \\rightarrow K^\\mp \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0$, $D \\rightarrow \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ and $D \\rightarrow K^+K^-\\pi^0$

    E-print Network

    LHCb Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of the decays of $B^\\mp \\rightarrow D K^\\mp$ and $B^\\mp \\rightarrow D \\pi^\\mp $ is presented in which the $D$ meson is reconstructed in the three-body final states $K^\\mp \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0$, $\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$ and $K^+ K^- \\pi^0$. Using data from LHCb corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions, measurements of several $CP$ observables are performed. First observations are obtained of the suppressed ADS decay $B^\\mp \\rightarrow [\\pi^\\mp K^\\pm \\pi^0]_D \\pi^\\mp$ and the quasi-GLW decay $B^\\mp \\rightarrow [K^+ K^- \\pi^0]_D \\pi^\\mp$. The results are interpreted in the context of the unitarity triangle angle $\\gamma$ and related parameters.

  8. Atomic-Scale Study of Dislocation-Stacking Fault Tetrahedron Interactions. Part I: Mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Rodney, David [Genie Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux; Bacon, David J [University of Liverpool

    2006-01-01

    Stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) are formed under irradiation in fcc metals and alloys. The high number density of SFTs observed suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, be taken into account when estimating mechanical property changes of irradiated materials. The key issue in this is to describe the interaction between a moving dislocation and an individual SFT, which is distinguished by a small physical size of the order of {approx}1-10 nm. We have performed atomistic simulations of edge and screw dislocations interacting with SFTs of different sizes at different temperatures and strain rates. Five possible interaction outcomes have been identified, involving either partial absorption, or shearing or restoration of SFTs. The mechanisms that give rise to these processes are described and their dependence on interaction parameters, such as SFT size, dislocation-SFT geometry, temperature and stress/strain rate are determined. Mechanisms that help to explain the formation of defect-free channels cleared by gliding dislocations, as observed experimentally, are also discussed. Hardening due to the various mechanisms and their dependence on loading conditions will be presented in a following paper (Part II).

  9. Pyrene-modified PNAs: Stacking interactions and selective excimer emission in PNA2DNA triplexes

    PubMed Central

    Guidi, Lucia; Ghidini, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Summary Pyrene derivatives can be incorporated into nucleic acid analogs in order to obtain switchable probes or supramolecular architectures. In this paper, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) containing 1 to 3 1-pyreneacetic acid units (PNA1–6) with a sequence with prevalence of pyrimidine bases, complementary to cystic fibrosis W1282X point mutation were synthesized. These compounds showed sequence-selective switch-on of pyrene excimer emission in the presence of target DNA, due to PNA2DNA triplex formation, with stability depending on the number and positioning of the pyrene units along the chain. An increase in triplex stability and a very high mismatch-selectivity, derived from combined stacking and base-pairing interactions, were found for PNA2, bearing two distant pyrene units. PMID:25161706

  10. Measurement of D^0-\\bar{D^0} Mixing From a Time-Dependent Amplitude Analysis of D^0\\ -> K^+\\pi^-\\pi0 Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-08-04

    The authors present evidence of D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} in a data sample of 384 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. Assuming CP conservation, they measure the mixing parameters x{prime}{sub K{pi}{pi}{sup 0}} = [2.61{sub -0.68}{sup +0.57}(stat.) {+-} 0.39(syst.)]%, y{prime}{sub K{pi}{pi}{sup 0}} = [-0.06{sub -0.64}{sup +0.55}(stat.) {+-} 0.34(syst.)]%. The confidence level for the data to be consistent with the no-mixing hypothesis is 0.1%, including systematic uncertainties. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. They find no evidence of CP violation in mixing.

  11. Stacking Water

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this lesson, students become familiar with how ocean water forms density-stratified layers in many places. They design and carry out a series of tests to show how water masses of four different densities interact, using clear straws to stack colored water of different salinities. Temperature is varied to increase the differences in density of each water sample.

  12. Measurement of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ using $B^\\pm \\to D K^\\pm$ with $D \\to K^0_{\\rm S} \\pi^+\\pi^-, K^0_{\\rm S} K^+ K^-$ decays

    E-print Network

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gavrilov, Gennadii; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury

    2014-01-01

    A binned Dalitz plot analysis of $B^\\pm \\to D K^\\pm$ decays, with $D \\to K^0_{\\rm S} \\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $D \\to K^0_{\\rm S} K^+ K^-$, is performed to measure the $C\\!P$-violating observables $x_{\\pm}$ and $y_{\\pm}$, which are sensitive to the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle $\\gamma$. The analysis exploits a sample of proton-proton collision data corresponding to 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb experiment. Measurements from CLEO-c of the variation of the strong-interaction phase of the $D$ decay over the Dalitz plot are used as inputs. The values of the parameters are found to be $x_+ = ( -7.7 \\pm 2.4 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 0.4 )\\times 10^{-2}$, $x_- = (2.5 \\pm 2.5 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 0.5) \\times 10^{-2}$, $y_+ = (-2.2 \\pm 2.5 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 1.0)\\times 10^{-2}$, and $y_- = (7.5 \\pm 2.9 \\pm 0.5 \\pm 1.4) \\times 10^{-2}$. The first, second, and third uncertainties are the statistical, the experimental systematic, and that associated with the precision of the strong-phase parameters. These are the most precise measurements of these obs...

  13. Equatorial ?-stacking interactions in diruthenium (II,III) tetracarboxylate complexes containing extended ?-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, Natasha F.; Ronaldson, Michael; Stanley Cameron, T.; Wang, Ruiyao; Aquino, Manuel A. S.

    2013-11-01

    The synthesis of three new valent-averaged tetracarboxylatodiruthenium (II,III) complexes, [Ru2(1-naphthylacetate)4(H2O)2](PF6)?4THF, 1?4THF, [Ru2(2-naphthoate)4(THF)2](PF6)?3THF, 2?3THF, and [Ru2(coumarin-3-carboxylate)4(MeOH)2](PF6)?MeOH?H2O, 3?MeOH?H2O, was accomplished using a well documented carboxylate exchange reaction. All three complexes were thoroughly characterized using infrared and UV-Vis spectroscopies, elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction. Due to the extended ?-systems present, two of the complexes, 2?3THF and 3?MeOH?H2O, display extensive ?-stacking in two dimensions, with similar interactions notably absent in 1?4THF due to the perpendicular orientation of the naphthyl rings. Modest H-bonding is seen in complexes 1?4THF and 3?MeOH?H2O. As these types of complexes are noted secondary building units (SBU's) in the construction of metal-organic frameworks (MOF's), the significance of these interactions in stabilizing even larger, supramolecular structures, are noted.

  14. Molecular dynamics study of the interactions between dislocation and imperfect stacking fault tetrahedron in Cu

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucie Saintoyant; Hyon-Jee Lee; Brian D. Wirth

    2007-01-01

    The microstructure of irradiated face centered cubic alloys with low stacking fault energy is distinguished by the formation of a high number density of nanometer size stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). A recent transmission electron microscopy investigation of high-energy proton irradiated copper [16] has shown that nearly 50% of the visible SFT population are not perfect SFTs, but rather consist of

  15. Bd^0(t)->pi^+pi^- and Bs^0(t)-> K^+ K^- Decays: A Tool to Measure New-Physics Parameters

    E-print Network

    David London; Joaquim Matias; Javier Virto

    2005-01-13

    If physics beyond the standard model is present in B decays, experimental measurements seem to suggest that it principally affects those processes with significant b->s penguin amplitudes. It was recently argued that, in general, such new-physics (NP) effects can be parametrized in terms of a single NP amplitude A^q and phase \\Phi_q, for q=u,d,s,c. In this paper, we show that the study of the decays Bs(t) -> K^+ K^- and Bd(t) -> \\pi^+\\pi^- allows one to measure the NP parameters A^u and \\Phi_u. We examine the implications for this method of the latest experimental results on these decays. If NP is found in Bs(t) -> K^+ K^-, it can be partially identified through measurements of Bs(t)-> K^0 \\bar K^0.

  16. Measurement of D{0}-D[-over]{0} mixing from a time-dependent amplitude analysis of D{0}-->K+pi{-}pi{0} decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Vazquez, W Panduro; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Sanchez, P del Amo; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Esteve, L; Ganzhur, S F

    2009-11-20

    We present evidence of D{0}-D[-over ]{0} mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D{0}-->K+pi{-}pi;{0} in a data sample of 384 fb{-1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e{-} collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Assuming CP conservation, we measure the mixing parameters x{Kpipi{0}}{'}=[2.61{-0.68}{+0.57}(stat)+/-0.39(syst)]%, y{Kpipi;{0}}{'}=[-0.06{-0.64}{+0.55}(stat)+/-0.34(syst)]%. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. We find no evidence of CP violation in mixing. PMID:20366027

  17. Precise measurement of the e+e- --> pi+pi-(gamma) cross section with the initial state radiation method at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L L; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B

    2009-12-01

    A precise measurement of the cross section of the process e(+)e(-) --> pi(+)pi(-)(gamma) from threshold to an energy of 3 GeV is obtained with the initial state radiation (ISR) method using 232 fb(-1) of data collected with the BABAR detector at e(+)e(-) center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV. The ISR luminosity is determined from a study of the leptonic process e(+)e(-) --> mu(+)mu(-)gamma(gamma). The leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon magnetic anomaly calculated using the pipi cross section measured from threshold to 1.8 GeV is (514.1 +/- 2.2(stat) +/- 3.1(syst)) x 10(-10). PMID:20366141

  18. Measurements of Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0-->pi+pi-, K+pi-, K+K- Decays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; D. Boutigny; J.-M. Gaillard; A. Hicheur; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; P. Robbe; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; A. Palano; A. Pompili; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; A. W. Borgland; A. B. Breon; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; J. F. Kral; C. Leclerc; M. E. Levi; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; A. Romosan; M. T. Ronan; V. G. Shelkov; A. V. Telnov; W. A. Wenzel; T. J. Harrison; C. M. Hawkes; D. J. Knowles; S. W. O'Neale; R. C. Penny; A. T. Watson; N. K. Watson; T. Deppermann; K. Goetzen; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; K. Peters; H. Schmuecker; M. Steinke; N. R. Barlow; W. Bhimji; J. T. Boyd; N. Chevalier; P. J. Clark; W. N. Cottingham; C. Mackay; F. F. Wilson; K. Abe; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; D. Thiessen; S. Jolly; A. K. McKemey; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. B. Golubev; V. N. Ivanchenko; A. A. Korol; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; A. N. Yushkov; D. Best; M. Chao; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; S. McMahon; D. P. Stoker; C. Buchanan; S. Chun; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; D. B. Macfarlane; H. Paar; S. Prell; Sh. Rahatlou; G. Raven; U. Schwanke; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; B. Dahmes; P. A. Hart; N. Kuznetsova; S. L. Levy; O. Long; A. Lu; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; W. Verkerke; J. Beringer; A. M. Eisner; M. Grothe; C. A. Heusch; W. S. Lockman; T. Pulliam; T. Schalk; R. E. Schmitz; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. Turri; W. Walkowiak; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; S. Yang; S. Jayatilleke; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; T. Barillari; P. Bloom; W. T. Ford; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; P. Rankin; J. Roy; J. G. Smith; W. C. van Hoek; L. Zhang; J. L. Harton; T. Hu; M. Krishnamurthy; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; J. Zhang; D. Altenburg; T. Brandt; J. Brose; T. Colberg; M. Dickopp; R. S. Dubitzky; A. Hauke; E. Maly; R. Müller-Pfefferkorn; S. Otto; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; B. Spaan; L. Wilden; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; F. Brochard; J. Cohen-Tanugi; S. Ferrag; S. T'jampens; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; A. Anjomshoaa; R. Bernet; A. Khan; D. Lavin; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; J. E. Swain; J. Tinslay; M. Falbo; C. Borean; C. Bozzi; L. Piemontese; A. Sarti; E. Treadwell; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; D. Falciai; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; A. Zallo; S. Bagnasco; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; G. Crosetti; M. Lo Vetere; M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; F. C. Pastore; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; S. Bailey; M. Morii; R. Bartoldus; G. J. Grenier; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; J. Lamsa; W. T. Meyer; E. I. Rosenberg; J. Yi; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; H. M. Lacker; S. Laplace; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; T. C. Petersen; S. Plaszczynski; M. H. Schune; L. Tantot; S. Trincaz-Duvoid; G. Wormser; R. M. Bionta; V. Brigljevic; D. J. Lange; K. van Bibber; D. M. Wright; A. J. Bevan; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; M. George; M. Kay; D. J. Payne; R. J. Sloane; C. Touramanis; M. L. Aspinwall; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; I. Eschrich; G. W. Morton; J. A. Nash; P. Sanders; D. Smith; G. P. Taylor; J. J. Back; G. Bellodi; P. Dixon; P. F. Harrison; R. J. Potter; H. W. Shorthouse; P. Strother; P. B. Vidal; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; S. George; M. G. Green; A. Kurup; C. E. Marker; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; G. Vaitsas; M. A. Winter; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; R. J. Barlow; A. C. Forti; F. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; A. J. Lyon; N. Savvas; J. H. Weatherall; J. C. Williams; A. Farbin; A. Jawahery; V. Lillard; D. A. Roberts; J. R. Schieck; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; K. T. Flood; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; V. B. Koptchev; T. B. Moore; H. Staengle; S. Willocq; B. Brau; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Milek; P. M. Patel; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; C. Hast; P. Taras; H. Nicholson; C. Cartaro; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; J. M. Losecco; J. R. Alsmiller; T. A. Gabriel; J. Brau; R. Frey; M. Iwasaki; C. T. Potter; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; F. Colecchia; A. Dorigo; F. Galeazzi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; M. Benayoun; H. Briand; J. Chauveau; P. David; Ch. de La Vaissière; L. del Buono; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Ocariz; M. Pivk; L. Roos; J. Stark; P. F. Manfredi; V. Re; V. Speziali; L. Gladney; Q. H. Guo

    2002-01-01

    We present measurements of branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries for two-body neutral B¯ meson decays to charged pions and kaons based on a sample of about 88×106 Upsilon(4S)-->BB¯ decays. From a time-independent fit we measure the charge-averaged branching fractions B(B0-->pi+pi- )=(4.7±0.6±0.2)×10-6, B(B0-->K+pi- )=(17.9±0.9±0.7)×10-6, and the direct CP-violating charge asymmetry AKpi=-0.102±0.050±0.016 [-0.188,-0.016], where the ranges in square brackets indicate the 90%

  19. Measurement of D0-D0bar mixing from a time-dependent amplitude analysis of D0 -> K+ pi- pi0 decays

    E-print Network

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Graugès-Pous, E; Lopezab, L; Palanoab, A; Pappagalloab, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabé, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schröder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreottiab, M; Bettonia, D; Bozzia, C; Calabreseab, R; Cecchiab, A; Cibinettoab, G; Franchiniab, P; Luppiab, E; Negriniab, M; Petrellaab, A; Piemontesea, L; Santoroab, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzoa, A; Contriab, R; Lo Vetereab, M; Macria, M M; Mongeab, M R; Passaggioa, S; Patrignaniab, C; Robuttia, E; Santroniab, A; Tosiab, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Bquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; FirminodaeCosta, J; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaroab, A; Lombardoa, V; Palomboab, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardoab, G; Listaa, L; Monorchioab, D; Onoratoab, G; Sciaccaab, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelliab, G; Gagliardiab, N; Margoniab, M; Morandina, M; Posoccoa, M; Rotondoa, M; Simonettoab, F; Stroiliab, R; Vociab, C; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, P; Ocariz, J; Pérez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasiniab, M; Covarelliab, R; Manoniab, E; Angeliniab, C; Batignaniab, G; Bettariniab, S; Carpinelliab, M; Cervelliab, A; Fortiab, F; Giorgiab, M A; Lusianiac, A; Marchioriab, G; Morgantiab, M; Neriab, N; Paoloniab, E; Rizzoab, G; Walsha, J J; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anullia, F; Baracchiniab, E; Cavotoa, G; del Reab, D; Di Marcoab, E; Facciniab, R; Ferrarottoa, F; Ferroniab, F; Gasperoab, M; Jacksona, P D; Li Gioia, L; Mazzonia, M A; Morgantia, S; Pireddaa, G; Polciab, F; Rengaab, F; Voenaa, C

    2008-01-01

    We present evidence of $D^0$-$\\bar{D^0}$ mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D0->K+pi-pi0 in a data sample of 384 fb^-1 collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider at SLAC. Assuming CP conservation, we measure the mixing parameters x'_{Kpipi0} = [2.61^{+0.57}_{-0.68} (stat.) +- 0.39 (syst.)]%, y'_{Kpipi0} = [-0.06 ^{+0.55}_{-0.64} (stat.) +- 0.34 (syst.)]%. The confidence level for the data to be consistent with the no-mixing hypothesis is 0.1%, including systematic uncertainties. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. We find no evidence of CP violation in mixing.

  20. Branching fraction measurements of charged B decays to K*+K+K-, K*+pi+K-, K*+K+pi- and K*+pi+pi- final states

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. De Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; A. Gaz

    2006-01-01

    Branching fraction and asymmetry measurements of charmless B+-->K*+h1+h2- (where h1,2=K, pi) decays are presented, using a data sample of 232×106 Upsilon(4S)-->BB¯ decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. Using a maximum likelihood fit, the following branching fraction results were obtained: B(B+-->K*+K+K-)=(36.2±3.3±3.6)×10-6 and B(B+-->K*+pi+pi-)=(75.3±6.0±8.1)×10-6. Upper limits were set for B(B+-->K*+pi+K-)<11.8×10-6 and B(B+-->K*+K+pi-)<6.1×10-6 at 90% confidence

  1. Study of a Narrow pi+ pi- Peak at about 755 MeV/c**2 in pbar n --> 2 pi+ 3 pi- Annihilation at Rest

    E-print Network

    Mario Gaspero

    2010-05-13

    A narrow peak in the pi+ pi- mass distribution was seen by the Rome-Syracuse Collaboration in pbar n --> 2 pi+ 3 pi- annihilation at rest in 1970. It was ignored for 40 years. The reanalysis of this peak finds that it has the mass 757.4 +- 2.8_stat +- 1.1_sys MeV/c**2 and a width consistent with the experimental resolution. The evidence of the peak is 5.2 standard deviations. The peak is generated in (1.03 +- 0.21_stat +- 0.21_sys)% of the pbar n annihilations at rest. No spin analysis is possible with the statistics of the experiment but there are arguments suggesting that it has JP = 0+.

  2. Energetic salts with ?-stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions lead the way to future energetic materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaheng; Zhang, Qinghua; Vo, Thao T; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2015-02-01

    Among energetic materials, there are two significant challenges facing researchers: 1) to develop ionic CHNO explosives with higher densities than their parent nonionic molecules and (2) to achieve a fine balance between high detonation performance and low sensitivity. We report a surprising energetic salt, hydroxylammonium 3-dinitromethanide-1,2,4-triazolone, that exhibits exceptional properties, viz., higher density, superior detonation performance, and improved thermal, impact, and friction stabilities, then those of its precursor, 3-dinitromethyl-1,2,4-triazolone. The solid-state structure features of the new energetic salt were investigated with X-ray diffraction which showed ?-stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions that contribute to closer packing and higher density. According to the experimental results and theoretical analysis, the newly designed energetic salt also gives rise to a workable compromise in high detonation properties and desirable stabilities. These findings will enhance the future prospects for rational energetic materials design and commence a new chapter in this field. PMID:25565429

  3. Novel computational study on ?-stacking to understand mechanistic interactions of Tryptanthrin analogues with DNA.

    PubMed

    Terryn, Raymond J; German, Helen W; Kummerer, Theresa M; Sinden, Richard R; Baum, J Clayton; Novak, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Based on recently published initial experimental results on the intercalation of a class of broad spectrum antiparasitic compounds, we present a purely theoretical approach for determining if these compounds may preferentially intercalate with guanosine/cytosine (GC)-rich or adenosine/thymidine (TA)-rich regions of DNA. The predictive model presented herein is based upon utilization of density functional theory (DFT) to determine a priori how the best intercalator may energetically and sterically interact with each of the nucleoside base pairs. A potential new method using electrostatic potential maps (EPMs) to visually select the best poses is introduced and compared to the existing brute-force center of mass (COM) approach. The EPM and COM predictions are in agreement with each other, but the EPM method is potentially much more efficient. We report that 4-azatryptantrin, the best intercalator, is predicted to favor ?-stacking with GC over that of TA by approximately 2-4?kcal/mol. This represents a significant difference if one takes into account the Boltzmann distribution at physiological temperature. This theoretical method will be utilized to guide future experimental studies on the elucidation of possible mechanism(s) for the action of these antiparasitic compounds at the molecular level. PMID:24156546

  4. Doping Dependence of the $(\\pi,\\pi)$ Shadow Band in La-Based Cuprates Studied by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z. X.

    2011-08-15

    The ({pi},{pi}) shadow band (SB) in La-based cuprate family (La214) was studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) over a wide doping range from x = 0.01 to x = 0.25. Unlike the well-studied case of the Bi-based cuprate family, an overall strong, monotonic doping dependence of the SB intensity at the Fermi level (E{sub F}) was observed. In contrast to a previous report for the presence of the SB only close to x = 1/8, we found it exists in a wide doping range, associated with a doping-independent ({pi},{pi}) wave vector but strongly doping-dependent intensity: It is the strongest at x {approx} 0.03 and systematically diminishes as the doping increases until it becomes negligible in the overdoped regime. This SB with the observed doping dependence of intensity can in principle be caused by the antiferromagnetic fluctuations or a particular form of low-temperature orthorhombic lattice distortion known to persist up to x {approx} 0.21 in the system, with both being weakened with increasing doping. However, a detailed binding energy dependent analysis of the SB at x = 0.07 does not appear to support the former interpretation, leaving the latter as a more plausible candidate, despite a challenge in quantitatively linking the doping dependences of the SB intensity and the magnitude of the lattice distortion. Our finding highlights the necessity of a careful and global consideration of the inherent structural complications for correctly understanding the cuprate Fermiology and its microscopic implication.

  5. The collapse of stacking fault tetrahedra by interactions with gliding dislocations.

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukawa, Yoshitaka [ORNL; Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    The collapse of stacking-fault tetrahedra (SFT) by gliding dislocations was observed in in situ straining experiments in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). A stacking-fault tetrahedron was collapsed by intersection with a gliding perfect dislocation: only the base portion divided by the gliding plane of the dislocation annihilated, while the apex portion remained intact. As a result of analysis on evolution of atom configuration induced by intersection with perfect dislocation in SFT, it was found that an unusual atom configuration inevitably appeared in one of the ledges formed on stacking-fault planes, which is traditionally called I-ledge: the atoms on adjacent (111) planes were overlapping each other. The overlapping configuration provides a strong repulsive force, being a conceivable driving force to induce a chain reaction of atom displacements that collapses the SFT base portion.

  6. {pi}N and {pi}{pi}N Couplings of the {delta}(1232) and Its Chiral Partners

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, K. [Department of Physics, Chung-Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 320, Taiwan (China); Hosaka, A. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 10-1, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Dmitrasinovic, V. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, lab 010, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Beograd, Serbia (Serbia )

    2008-08-29

    We investigate the interactions and chiral properties of the four spin-(3/2) baryons N{sup -}(D{sub 13}), N{sup +}(P{sub 13}), {delta}{sup +}(P{sub 33}), and {delta}{sup -}(D{sub 33}) together with the nucleon. We construct the SU(2){sub R}xSU(2){sub L} invariant interactions between the spin-(1/2) and spin-(3/2) baryons with the aid of a new, specially developed spin and isospin projection technique for these baryon fields, where the chiral invariant interactions contain one- and two-pion couplings. We obtain simple relations for the coupling constants of the one- and two-pion spin-(1/2)-(3/2) transitions terms. The relation for the one-pion interactions reasonably agrees with the experiments, which suggests that these spin-(3/2) baryons are chiral partners.

  7. On ?-stacking, C-H/?, and halogen bonding interactions in halobenzene clusters: Resonant two-photon ionization studies of chlorobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzangwa, Lloyd; Nyambo, Silver; Uhler, Brandon; Reid, Scott A.

    2012-11-01

    Noncovalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, ?-? stacking, CH/? interactions, and halogen bonding play crucial roles in a broad spectrum of chemical and biochemical processes, and can exist in cooperation or competition. Here we report studies of the homoclusters of chlorobenzene, a prototypical system where ?-? stacking, CH/? interactions, and halogen bonding interactions may all be present. The electronic spectra of chlorobenzene monomer and clusters (Clbz)n with n = 1-4 were obtained using resonant 2-photon ionization in the origin region of the S0-S1 (??*) state of the monomer. The cluster spectra show in all cases a broad spectrum whose center is redshifted from the monomer absorption. Electronic structure calculations aid in showing that the spectral broadening arises in large part from inhomogeneous sources, including the presence of multiple isomers and Franck-Condon (FC) activity associated with geometrical changes induced by electronic excitation. Calculations at the M06-2x/aug-cc-pVDZ level find in total five minimum energy structures for the dimer, four ?-stacked structures, and one T-shaped, and six representative minimum energy structures were found for the trimer. The calculated time-dependent density functional theory spectra using range-separated and meta-GGA hybrid functionals show that these isomers absorb over a range that is roughly consistent with the breadth of the experimental spectra, and the calculated absorptions are redshifted with respect to the monomer transition, in agreement with experiment. Due to the significant geometry change in the electronic transition, where for the dimer a transition from a parallel displaced to sandwich structure occurs with a reduced separation of the two monomers, significant FC activity is predicted in low frequency intermolecular modes.

  8. Measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle gamma in B+/--->D*K+/- decays with a Dalitz analysis of D-->K0(S)pi-pi+.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J

    2005-09-16

    We report on a measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violating phase gamma through a Dalitz analysis of neutral D decays to K0(S)pi-pi+ in the processes B+/- -->D*K+/-, D*-->Dpi0, Dgamma. Using a sample of 227 x 10(6) BB pairs collected by the BABAR detector, we measure the amplitude ratios r(B)=0.12+/-0.03+/-0.04 and r*(B)=0.17+/-0.10+/-0.03+/-0.03, the relative strong phases delta(B)=(104+/-45(+17+16)(-21-24))degrees and delta*(B)=(-64+/-41(+14)(-12)+/-15) degrees between the amplitudes A(B- -->D*0K-) and A(B- -->D*0)K-), and gamma=(70+/-31(+12+14)(-10-11))degrees. The first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty, and the third reflects the Dalitz model uncertainty. The results for the strong and weak phases have a twofold ambiguity. PMID:16197065

  9. Benchmark Calculations for the Triton Binding Energy for Modern NN Forces and the pi-pi Exchange Three-Nucleon Force

    E-print Network

    A. Nogga; D. Hueber; H. Kamada; W. Gloeckle

    1997-04-03

    We present high precision benchmark calculations for the triton binding energy using the most recent, phase equivalent realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials and the Tuscon-Melbourne pi-pi three-nucleon force (3NF). That 3NF is included with partial waves up to a total two-body angular momentum of j_max=6. It is shown that the inclusion of the 3NF slows down the convergence in the partial waves and j_max=5 is needed in order to achieve converged results within a few keV. We adjust the cut-off parameter Lambda in the form factors of the Tuscon-Melbourne 3NF separately for the different NN potentials to the triton binding energy. This provides a set of phenomenological three-nucleon Hamiltonians which can be tested in three-nucleon scattering and systems with A>3. A connection between the probability to find two nucleons at short distances in the triton and the effect of that 3NF on the triton binding energy is pointed out.

  10. Low-fluence femtosecond-laser interaction with a Mo/Si multilayer stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höche, T.; Ruthe, D.; Petsch, T.

    Nanostructural damage caused by low-fluence, non-ablating femtosecond laser irradiation of Mo/Si multilayer stacks is studied by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. A laterally homogeneous modification of the multilayer structure is observed including a complete intermixing of silicon and molybdenum in the depth range between 0 and 20 nm. Below this amorphous layer, molybdenum layers become more and more stable until below 80 nm depth, the pristine microstructure of the non-processed multilayer is observed.

  11. CDF Grid computing and the decay X(3872) ---> J/psi pi+ pi- with J/psi ---> e+ e-

    SciTech Connect

    Kerzel, Ulrich; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2005-11-01

    The main aim of physics research is to obtain a consistent description of nature leading to a detailed understanding of the phenomena observed in experiments. The field of particle physics focuses on the discovery and understanding of the fundamental particles and the forces by which they interact with each other. Using methods from group theory, the present knowledge can be mathematically described by the so-called ''Standard Model'', which interprets the fundamental particles (quarks and leptons) as quantum-mechanical fields interacting via the electromagnetic, weak and strong force. These interactions are mediated via gauge particles such as the photon (for the electromagnetic force), W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} (for the weak force) and gluons (for the strong force). Gravitation is not yet included in this description as it presently cannot be formulated in a way to be incorporated in the Standard Model. However, the gravitational force is negligibly small on microscopic levels. The validity of this mathematical approach is tested experimentally by accelerating particles such as electrons and protons, as well as their antiparticles, to high energies and observing the reactions as these particles collide using sophisticated detectors. Due to the high energy of the particles involved, these detectors need to be as big as a small house to allow for precision measurements. Comparing the predictions from theory with the analyzed reactions observed in these collisions, the Standard Model has been established as a well-founded theory. Precision measurements from the four experiments (Aleph, Delphi, Opal, L3) the Large Electron Positron collider (LEP), operated at CERN during the years 1989-2000, allow the determination of the Standard Model parameters with enormous accuracy.

  12. Interaction-enhanced electron-hole and valley asymmetries in the lowest Landau level of ABA-stacked trilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizuya, K.

    2014-04-01

    In a magnetic field, graphene trilayers support a special multiplet of 12 zero(-energy)-mode Landau levels with a threefold degeneracy in Landau orbitals. A close look is made into such zero-mode levels in ABA-stacked trilayers, with the Coulomb interaction taken into account. It turns out that the zero-mode Landau levels of ABA trilayers are greatly afflicted with electron-hole and valley asymmetries, which come from general hopping parameters and which are enhanced by the Coulomb interaction and the associated vacuum effect, the orbital Lamb shift, that lifts the zero-mode degeneracy. These asymmetries substantially affect the way the zero-mode levels evolve with filling via Coulomb interactions, and its consequences are discussed in the light of experiments.

  13. Evidence of a Broad Structure at an Invariant Mass of 4.32GeV\\/c2 in the Reaction e+e--->pi+pi-psi(2S) Measured at BABAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence

    2007-01-01

    We present a measurement of the cross section of the process e+e--->pi+pi-psi(2S) from threshold up to 8 GeV center-of-mass energy using events containing initial-state radiation, produced at the SLAC PEP-II e+e- storage rings. The study is based on 298fb-1 of data recorded with the BABAR detector. A structure is observed in the cross section not far above threshold, near 4.32

  14. Measurement of central exclusive pi+pi- production in p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 0.9 and 1.96 TeV at CDF

    E-print Network

    CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; D. Lontkovskyi; A. Lucà; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; I. Makarenko; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida; G. B. Yu; I. Yu; A. M. Zanetti; Y. Zeng; C. Zhou

    2015-02-09

    We measure exclusive $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ production in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9 and 1.96 TeV in the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We select events with two oppositely-charged particles, assumed to be pions, with pseudorapidity $|\\eta| < 1.3$ and with no other particles detected in $|\\eta| < 5.9$. We require the \\pipi system to have rapidity $|y|<$ 1.0. The production mechanism of these events is expected to be dominated by double pomeron exchange, which constrains the quantum numbers of the central state. The data are potentially valuable for isoscalar meson spectroscopy, and for understanding the pomeron in a region of transition between nonperturbative and perturbative quantum chromodynamics. The data extend up to dipion mass $M(\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ = 5000 MeV/$c^2$, and show resonance structures attributed to $f_0$ and $f_2(1270)$ mesons. From the $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $K^+K^-$ spectra we place upper limits on exclusive $\\chi_{c0}(3415)$ production.

  15. Dalitz Plot Analysis of B+- --> pi+-pi+-pi-+ Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, The BABAR; Aubert, B.

    2009-02-23

    The authors present a Dalitz-plot analysis of charmless B{sup {+-}} decays to the final state {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} using a sample of (465 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR experiment at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. They measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}) = (15.2 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(770){pi}{sup {+-}}) = (8.1 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 1.2{sub -1.1}{sup +0.4}) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup {+-}}) = (1.57 {+-} 0.42 {+-} 0.16{sub -0.19}{sup +0.53}) x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} nonresonant) = (5.3 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 0.6{sub -0.5}{sup +1.1}) x 10{sup -6}, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and model-dependent, respectively. Measurements of branching fractions for the modes B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(1450){pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(1370){pi}{sup {+-}} are also presented. They observe no significant direct CP asymmetries for the above modes, and there is no evidence for the decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(980){pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup {+-}} {yields} {chi}{sub c0}{pi}{sup {+-}}, or B{sup {+-}} {yields} {chi}{sub c2}{pi}{sup {+-}}.

  16. Destruction processes of large stacking fault tetrahedra induced by direct interaction with gliding dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukawa, Y.; Osetsky, Yu. N.; Stoller, R. E.; Zinkle, S. J.

    2006-06-01

    The destruction process of large non-truncated stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) induced by gliding dislocations was examined by in situ transmission electron microscope straining experiments. Three different destruction processes were observed: a triangular Frank loop remained after the collapse (Type 1), the whole SFT was incorporated into a gliding dislocation as multiple super jog segments (Type 2), and an apex portion of the original SFT remained as a smaller SFT while the base portion was annihilated (Type 3). The remnants of Type 1 and 2 destruction processes were similar to those of previous models proposed by Kimura, indicating that these processes are based on dislocation reactions as assumed in Kimura models. On contrary, the Type 3 process, which was entirely different from Kimura models, is occasionally accompanied by vacancy migration.

  17. Stacking interactions in RNA and DNA: Roll-slide energy hyperspace for ten unique dinucleotide steps.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanchita; Kailasam, Senthilkumar; Bansal, Manju; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2015-03-01

    Understanding dinucleotide sequence directed structures of nuleic acids and their variability from experimental observation remained ineffective due to unavailability of statistically meaningful data. We have attempted to understand this from energy scan along twist, roll, and slide degrees of freedom which are mostly dependent on dinucleotide sequence using ab initio density functional theory. We have carried out stacking energy analysis in these dinucleotide parameter phase space for all ten unique dinucleotide steps in DNA and RNA using DFT-D by ?B97X-D/6-31G(2d,2p), which appears to satisfactorily explain conformational preferences for AU/AU step in our recent study. We show that values of roll, slide, and twist of most of the dinucleotide sequences in crystal structures fall in the low energy region. The minimum energy regions with large twist values are associated with the roll and slide values of B-DNA, whereas, smaller twist values correspond to higher stability to RNA and A-DNA like conformations. Incorporation of solvent effect by CPCM method could explain the preference shown by some sequences to occur in B-DNA or A-DNA conformations. Conformational preference of BII sub-state in B-DNA is preferentially displayed mainly by pyrimidine-purine steps and partly by purine-purine steps. The purine-pyrimidine steps show largest effect of 5-methyl group of thymine in stacking energy and the introduction of solvent reduces this effect significantly. These predicted structures and variabilities can explain the effect of sequence on DNA and RNA functionality. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 103: 134-147, 2015. PMID:25257334

  18. Effects of Low-k Stack Structure on Performance of Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Devices and Chip Package Interaction Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagami, Masayoshi; Inoue, Naoya; Ueki, Makoto; Narihiro, Mitsuru; Tada, Munehiro; Yamamoto, Hironori; Ito, Fuminori; Furutake, Naoya; Saito, Shinobu; Onodera, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Tsuneo; Hayashi, Yoshihiro

    2012-09-01

    Low capacitance and highly reliable Cu dual-damascene (DD) interconnects have been developed with self-organized “seamless low-k SiOCH stacks” (SEALS) structure. A carbon-rich sub-nano porous SiOCH (k=2.5) was directly stacked on an oxygen-rich porous SiOCH (k=2.7) in the SEALS structure, without a hard-mask (HM) and etch-stop (ES) layer of SiO2. The effective k-value (keff) of the Cu DD interconnect including the SiCN capping layer (k=4.9) was reduced to 2.9 compared to 3.4 on a conventional hybrid structure with SiO2-HM and ES, which had been used in 65-nm-node mass production. The interconnect delay of a 45-nm-node complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) ring oscillator (RO) was reduced by 15% referring to that of the conventional hybrid structure. Interconnect reliabilities, such as the interline time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) and thermal cycles, were unchanged from those of the conventional hybrid interconnects. No failure was detected for chip package interaction (CPI) during reliability tests in a plastic ball grid array (PBGA) package. SEALS is a promising structure for scaled down ultra large scale integrations (ULSIs) for highly reliable and high speed operation, and low power consumption.

  19. Stacking Interactions between Carbohydrate and Protein Quantified by Combination of Theoretical and Experimental Methods

    PubMed Central

    Ne?asová, Ivona; Mishra, Sushil Kumar; Komárek, Jan; Ko?a, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate – receptor interactions are an integral part of biological events. They play an important role in many cellular processes, such as cell-cell adhesion, cell differentiation and in-cell signaling. Carbohydrates can interact with a receptor by using several types of intermolecular interactions. One of the most important is the interaction of a carbohydrate's apolar part with aromatic amino acid residues, known as dispersion interaction or CH/? interaction. In the study presented here, we attempted for the first time to quantify how the CH/? interaction contributes to a more general carbohydrate - protein interaction. We used a combined experimental approach, creating single and double point mutants with high level computational methods, and applied both to Ralstonia solanacearum (RSL) lectin complexes with ?-l-Me-fucoside. Experimentally measured binding affinities were compared with computed carbohydrate-aromatic amino acid residue interaction energies. Experimental binding affinities for the RSL wild type, phenylalanine and alanine mutants were ?8.5, ?7.1 and ?4.1 kcal.mol?1, respectively. These affinities agree with the computed dispersion interaction energy between carbohydrate and aromatic amino acid residues for RSL wild type and phenylalanine, with values ?8.8, ?7.9 kcal.mol?1, excluding the alanine mutant where the interaction energy was ?0.9 kcal.mol?1. Molecular dynamics simulations show that discrepancy can be caused by creation of a new hydrogen bond between the ?-l-Me-fucoside and RSL. Observed results suggest that in this and similar cases the carbohydrate-receptor interaction can be driven mainly by a dispersion interaction. PMID:23056230

  20. Improved measurement of the CKM angle gamma in B\\/+-->D(*)K(*)-\\/+ decays with a Dalitz plot analysis of D decays to KS0pi+pi- and KS0K+K-

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; M. Bona; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; E. Prencipe; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; C. M. Hawkes; N. Soni; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; Z. Yasin; L. Zhang; V. Sharma; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; L. Wang; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; C. H. Cheng; D. A. Doll; B. Echenard; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; M. Karbach; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; S. Playfer; J. E. Watson; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; J. Firmino da Costa; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; K. E. Alwyn; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; G. Castelli; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; P. Del Amo Sanchez; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; G. Marchiori; M. Morganti; N. Neri; E. Paoloni; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; J. Biesiada; D. Lopes Pegna; C. Lu; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith

    2008-01-01

    We report on an improved measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violating phase gamma through a Dalitz plot analysis of neutral D meson decays to KS0pi+pi- and KS0K+K- produced in the processes B-\\/+-->DK-\\/+, B-\\/+-->D*K-\\/+ with D*-->Dpi0, Dgamma, and B-\\/+-->DK*-\\/+ with K*-\\/+-->KS0pi-\\/+. Using a sample of 383×106 B Bmacr pairs collected by the BABAR detector, we measure gamma=(76±22±5±5)° (mod 180°), where the first

  1. Consequences of the BaBar e^+e^- --> pi^+pi^- Measurement for the Determination of Model-Dependent rho-omega Mixing Effects in Pi_{??}(m_?^2) and (g-2)_mu

    E-print Network

    C. E. Wolfe; K. Maltman

    2010-11-19

    We update our analysis of rho-omega mixing effects in the pion form factor to incorporate the recently published BaBar e^+e^- --> pi^+\\pi^- cross-sections. The implications for tau-decay-based Standard Model estimates of the leading order hadronic contribution [a_\\mu]_{had}^{LO}, to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and for the extraction of the off-diagonal vector meson self-energy matrix element, Pi_{\\rho\\omega}(m_\\rho^2), are discussed.

  2. Slip stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyomi Koba and James Steimel

    2002-09-19

    We have started beam studies for ''slip stacking''[1] in the Main Injector in order to increase proton intensity on a target for anti-proton production. It has been verified that the system for slip stacking is working with low intensity beam. For a high intensity operation, we are developing a feedback[2][3] and feedforward system.

  3. Stacked generalization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David H. Wolpert

    1992-01-01

    : This paper introduces stacked generalization, a scheme for minimizing the generalizationerror rate of one or more generalizers. Stacked generalization works by deducing the biases of thegeneralizer(s) with respect to a provided learning set. This deduction proceeds by generalizing ina second space whose inputs are (for example) the guesses of the original generalizers when taughtwith part of the learning set

  4. ?-Cooperativity effect on the base stacking interactions in DNA: is there a novel stabilization factor coupled with base pairing H-bonds?

    PubMed

    Karab?y?k, Hande; Sevinçek, Resul; Karab?y?k, Hasan

    2014-08-01

    The results from absolutely localized molecular orbital (ALMO)-energy decomposition analysis (EDA) and ALMO-charge transfer analysis (CTA) at M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level reveal that double-proton transfer (DPT) reactions through base pairing H-bonds have nonignorable effects on the stacking energies of dinucleotide steps, which introduces us to a novel stabilization (or destabilization) factor in the DNA duplex. Thus, intra- and inter-strand base stacking interactions are coalesced with each other mediated by H-bridged quasirings between base pairs. Changes in stacking energies of dinucleotide steps depending on the positions of H atoms are due to variations in local aromaticities of individual nucleobases, manifesting ?-cooperativity effects. CT analyses show that dispersion forces in dinucleotide steps can lead to radical changes in the redox properties of nucleobases, in particular those of adenine and guanine stacked dimers in a strand. Besides Watson-Crick rules, novel base pairing rules were propounded by considering CT results. According to these, additional base pairing through ?-stacks of nucleobases in dinucleotide steps does not cause any intrinsic oxidative damage to the associated nucleobases throughout DPT. PMID:24953339

  5. Synergetics of the interaction of mobile and immobile dislocations in the formation of dislocation structures in a shock wave. Effect of the stacking fault energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malygin, G. A.; Ogarkov, S. L.; Andriyash, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    A kinetic equation for the density of dislocations, which reflects the main stages of the formation of dislocation structures of different types in a shock wave, has been formulated based on the analysis of the interaction of two kinetic processes described by reaction-diffusion type equations for densities of mobile dislocations and dislocations forming immobile dipoles, respectively. It has been shown that an inhomogeneous (cellular) dislocation structure is formed at relatively low pressures behind the front of a shock wave, whereas a uniform distribution of the dislocation density with stacking faults appears at high pressures. The transition from a cellular dislocation density distribution to a uniformly distributed dislocations with stacking faults depends on the stacking fault energy ? D of the metal: the lower is the stacking fault energy, the lower is the pressure in the shock wave ? c at which the cellular dislocation structure transforms into the structure with a uniform dislocation density distribution. It has been found that the dependence of the critical pressure on the stacking fault energy ? D is described by the law ? c ˜ (? D /? b)2/3 (where ? is the shear modulus and b is the Burgers vector), which is confirmed in the experiment.

  6. Simultaneous observations of aerosol-cloud-albedo interactions with three stacked unmanned aerial vehicles.

    PubMed

    Roberts, G C; Ramana, M V; Corrigan, C; Kim, D; Ramanathan, V

    2008-05-27

    Aerosol impacts on climate change are still poorly understood, in part, because the few observations and methods for detecting their effects are not well established. For the first time, the enhancement in cloud albedo is directly measured on a cloud-by-cloud basis and linked to increasing aerosol concentrations by using multiple autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles to simultaneously observe the cloud microphysics, vertical aerosol distribution, and associated solar radiative fluxes. In the presence of long-range transport of dust and anthropogenic pollution, the trade cumuli have higher droplet concentrations and are on average brighter. Our observations suggest a higher sensitivity of radiative forcing by trade cumuli to increases in cloud droplet concentrations than previously reported owing to a constrained droplet radius such that increases in droplet concentrations also increase cloud liquid water content. This aerosol-cloud forcing efficiency is as much as -60 W m(-2) per 100% percent cloud fraction for a doubling of droplet concentrations and associated increase of liquid water content. Finally, we develop a strategy for detecting aerosol-cloud interactions based on a nondimensional scaling analysis that relates the contribution of single clouds to albedo measurements and illustrates the significance of characterizing cloud morphology in resolving radiometric measurements. This study demonstrates that aerosol-cloud-albedo interactions can be directly observed by simultaneous observations below, in, and above the clouds. PMID:18499803

  7. Measurement of the K0 charge radius and a CP-violating asymmetry and a search for CP-violating E1 direct photon emission in the rare decay KL--> pi+ pi- e+ e-.

    PubMed

    Abouzaid, E; Arenton, M; Barker, A R; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Blucher, E; Bock, G J; Cheu, E; Coleman, R; Corcoran, M D; Corti, G; Cox, B; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Glazov, A; Golossanov, A; Gomes, R A; Gouffon, P; Hanagaki, K; Hsiung, Y B; Huang, H; Jensen, D A; Kessler, R; Kotera, K; Ledovskoy, A; McBride, P L; Monnier, E; Nelson, K S; Nguyen, H; Niclasen, R; Ping, H; Qi, X R; Ramberg, E J; Ray, R E; Ronquest, M; Santos, E; Shields, J; Slater, W; Smith, D; Solomey, N; Swallow, E C; Toale, P A; Tschirhart, R; Velissaris, C; Wah, Y W; Wang, J; White, H B; Whitmore, J; Wilking, M; Winstein, B; Winston, R; Worchester, E T; Worchester, M; Yamanaka, T; Zimmerman, E D; Zukanovich, R F

    2006-03-17

    Using the complete KTeV data set of 5,241 candidate K(L)--> pi(+) pi(-) e(+) e(-) decays (including an estimated background of 204 +/- 14 events), we have measured the coupling g(CR)= 0.163 +/- 0.0149(stat) +/- 0.023(syst) of the CP conserving charge radius process and from it determined a K(0) charge radius of = [-0.077 +/- 0.007(stat) +/- 0.011(syst)]fm(2). We have determined a first experimental upper limit of 0.04 (90% C.L.) /g(e1)/ / /g(M1)/ of the couplings for the E1 and M1 direct photon emission processes. We also report the measurement of /g(M1)/ including a vector form factor /g(M1)/(1 + (a(1)/a(2))/((M(2)(p)-(M(2)(k))= 2M(K)E(gamma*)), where vector /g(M1)/= 1.11+/- 0.12(stat) +/- 0.08(syst) and a(1)/a(2) = [-0.744 +/- 0.027(stat) +/- 0.032(syst)] GeV(2)/c(2). Finally, a CP-violating asymmetry of [13.6 +/- 1.4(stat) +/- 1.5(syst)]% in the CP and T odd angle phi between the decay planes of the e(+) e(-) and pi(+) pi(-) pairs in the K(L) center of mass is reported. PMID:16605723

  8. A Measurement of the K0 Charge Radius and a CP Violating Asymmetry Together with a Search for CP Violating E1 Direct Photon Emission in the Rare Decay KL->pi+pi-e+e-

    E-print Network

    Abouzaid, E; Barker, A R; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Blucher, E; Bock, G J; Cheu, E; Coleman, R; Corcoran, M D; Corti, G; Cox, B; Erwin, A R; Escobar, C O; Glazov, A; Golossanov, A; Gomes, R A; Gouffon, P; Hanagaki, K; Hsiung, Y B; Huang, H; Jensen, D A; Kessler, R; Kotera, K; Ledovskoy, A A; McBride, P L; Monnier, E; Nelson, K S; Nguyen, H; Niclasen, R; Ping, H; Qi, X R; Ramberg, E J; Ray, R E; Ronquest, M; Santos, E; Shields, J; Slater, W; Smith, D; Solomey, Nickolas; Swallow, E C; Toale, P A; Tschirhart, R S; Velissaris, C; Wah, Y W; Wang, J; White, H B; Whitmore, J; Wilking, M; Winstein, B; Winston, R; Worchester, E T; Worchester, M; Yamanaka, T; Zimmerman, E D; Zukanovich-Funchal, R

    2006-01-01

    Using the complete KTeV data set of 5241 candidate KL->pi+pi-e+e- decays (including an estimated background of 204+-14 events), we have measured the coupling gCR=0.163+- 0.014(stat)+-0.023(syst) of the CP conserving charge radius process and from it determined a K0 charge radius of (K0)=(-0.077+-0.007(stat)+-0.011(syst)) fm**2. We have also determined a first experimental upper limit of 0.04 (90% CL) for the ratio |g_{E1}|/|g_{M1}| of the coupling for the E1 direct photon emission process relative to the coupling for M1 direct photon emission process. We also report the measurement of its associated vector form factor |gM1`|(1+ (a_1/a_2)/(M(rho)**2-M(K)**2)+2M(K)E(gamma*)) where |gM1`|=(1.11+- 0.12(stat)+-0.08(syst) and a_1/a_2 = (-0.744+-0.027(stat)0.032(syst)) GeV**2/c**2. In addition, a measurement of the manifestly CP violating asymmetry of magnitude (13.6+- 1.4+-(stat)+-1.5(syst))% in the CP and T odd angle phi between the decay planes of the e+e- and pi+pi- pairs in the KL center of mass system is repor...

  9. Light-emitting self-assembled peptide nucleic acids exhibit both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing.

    PubMed

    Berger, Or; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Grunwald, Assaf; Liebes-Peer, Yael; Bachar, Mor; Buzhansky, Ludmila; Mossou, Estelle; Forsyth, V Trevor; Schwartz, Tal; Ebenstein, Yuval; Frolow, Felix; Shimon, Linda J W; Patolsky, Fernando; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-05-01

    The two main branches of bionanotechnology involve the self-assembly of either peptides or DNA. Peptide scaffolds offer chemical versatility, architectural flexibility and structural complexity, but they lack the precise base pairing and molecular recognition available with nucleic acid assemblies. Here, inspired by the ability of aromatic dipeptides to form ordered nanostructures with unique physical properties, we explore the assembly of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), which are short DNA mimics that have an amide backbone. All 16 combinations of the very short di-PNA building blocks were synthesized and assayed for their ability to self-associate. Only three guanine-containing di-PNAs-CG, GC and GG-could form ordered assemblies, as observed by electron microscopy, and these di-PNAs efficiently assembled into discrete architectures within a few minutes. The X-ray crystal structure of the GC di-PNA showed the occurrence of both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing. The assemblies were also found to exhibit optical properties including voltage-dependent electroluminescence and wide-range excitation-dependent fluorescence in the visible region. PMID:25775151

  10. Pressure-Induced Phase Transitions in Ammonium Squarate: A Supramolecular Structure Based on Hydrogen-Bonding and [pi]-Stacking Interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shourui Li; Kai Wang; Mi Zhou; Qian Li; Bingbing Liu; Guangtian Zou; Bo Zou

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of high-pressure Raman and X-ray diffraction measurements performed on ammonium squarate ((NH)CO, AS), a representative supramolecular architecture based on hydrogen bonding and -stacking interactions, at various pressures up to 19 GPa. Two phase transitions at 2.7 GPa and in the pressure range of 11.1-13.6 GPa were observed. Both Raman and XRD results provide convincing evidence for

  11. Stacking Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Chimneys and stacks appear to be strong and indestructible, but chimneys begin to deteriorate from the moment they are built. Early on, no signs are apparent; but deterioration accelerates in subsequent years, and major repairs are soon needed instead of minor maintenance. With proper attention, most structures can be repaired and continue to…

  12. CP violation and CPT invariance in B+- decays with final state interactions

    E-print Network

    I. Bediaga; T. Frederico; O. Lourenço

    2014-05-05

    We show that, besides the usual short distance contribution for CP violation, final state interactions together with CPT invariance can play an important role in the recent observation of CP violation in three-body charmless $B^\\pm$ decays. A significant part of the observed CP asymmetry distribution in the Dalitz plot is located in a region where hadronic channels are strongly coupled. We illustrate our discussion comparing the recent observation of CP violation in the $B^\\pm\\to K^\\pm K^+ K^-$ and $B^\\pm\\to K^\\pm \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ phase space, with a calculation based on $\\pi\\pi\\to KK$ scattering.

  13. Manifestation of ?-? Stacking Interactions in Luminescence Properties and Energy Transfer in Aromatically-Derived Tb, Eu and Gd Tris(pyrazolyl)borate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Mikhalyova, Elena A; Yakovenko, Anastasiya V; Zeller, Matthias; Kiskin, Mikhail A; Kolomzarov, Yuriy V; Eremenko, Igor L; Addison, Anthony W; Pavlishchuk, Vitaly V

    2015-04-01

    The three new complexes Tp(Py)Ln(CH3CO2)2(H2O) (Ln = Eu (1), Gd(2), or Tb (3)) were prepared and characterized crystallographically. In the crystal lattices of these complexes, separate molecules are connected in infinite chains by ?-stacking interactions. Complexes 1 and 3 display intense photoluminescence and triboluminescence (red and green respectively), while compound 3 exhibits electroluminescence commencing at 9 V in an ITO/PVK/3/Al device (ITO = indium-tin oxide, PVK = poly(N-vinylcarbazole)). A series of Eu/Tb-doped Gd compounds was prepared by cocrystallization from mixtures of 1 and 2 or 2 and 3, respectively. It was shown that ?-stacking interactions are involved in increasing the efficiency of energy transfer from the gadolinium complex to emitting [Tp(Py)Eu](2+) or [Tp(Py)Tb](2+) centers, and this energy transfer occurs through hundreds of molecules, resembling the process of energy harvesting in chloroplast stacks. PMID:25797500

  14. Quantum-mechanical computations on the electronic structure of trans-resveratrol and trans-piceatannol: a theoretical study of the stacking interactions in trans-resveratrol dimers.

    PubMed

    Mikulski, Damian; Molski, Marcin

    2012-07-01

    Accurate quantum-chemical calculations based on the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation method (MP2) and density functional theory (DFT) were performed for the first time to investigate the electronic structures of trans-resveratrol and trans-piceatannol, as well as to study the stacking interaction between trans-resveratrol molecules. Ab initio MP2 calculations performed with using standard split-valence Pople basis sets led us to conclude that these compounds have structures that deviate strongly from planarity, whereas the DFT computations for the same basis sets revealed that the equilibrium geometries of these bioactive polyphenols are planar. Furthermore, the results obtained at the MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVTZ and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ levels indicated that the geometries of trans-resveratrol and trans-piceatannol are practically planar at their absolute energy minima. The relative energies of the equilibrium geometries of trans-resveratrol on its potential energy surface were computed at the MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVTZ level. According to the results obtained, a T-shaped (edge-to-phase) conformer of trans-resveratrol dimer is the most stable in vacuum. This T-shaped conformer is mainly stabilized by strong hydrogen bonding and weak C-H...? interactions. Stacked structures with parallel-displaced trans-stilbene skeletons were also found to be energetically stable. The vertical separation and twist angle dependencies of the stacking energy were investigated at the MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVTZ, B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ, and HF/aug-cc-pVTZ levels. The standard B3LYP functional and the Hartree-Fock method neglect long-range attractive dispersion interactions. The MP2 computations revealed that the London dispersion energy cannot be neglected at long or short distances. The stacked model considered here may be useful for predicting the quantum nature of the interactions in ?-stacked systems of other naturally occurring stilbenoids, and can help to enhance our understanding of the antioxidant and anticancer activities of trans-resveratrol. PMID:22249749

  15. Application of diffusion Monte Carlo to materials dominated by van der Waals interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Benali, Anouar [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Shulenburger, Luke [Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); Romero, Nichols [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kim, Jeongnim [ORNL; Von Lilienfeld, Anatole [University of Basel

    2014-01-01

    Van der Waals forces are notoriously difficult to account for from first principles. We perform extensive calculation to assess the usefulness and validity of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo when applied to van der Waals forces. We present results for noble gas solids and clusters - archetypical van der Waals dominated assemblies, as well as a relevant pi-pi stacking supramolecular complex: DNA + intercalating anti-cancer drug Ellipticine.

  16. A mixed basis with off-center Gaussian functions for the calculation of the potential energy surfaces for ?-stacking interactions: dimers of benzene and planar C?.

    PubMed

    Yurtsever, Ersin

    2015-01-01

    A practical mixed basis set was developed to facilitate accurate calculations of potential energy surfaces for ?-stacking interactions. Correlation consistent basis sets (cc-PVXZ) were augmented by p-type Gaussian functions placed above and below the planes of C6 moieties. Møller-Plesset (MP2, SCS-MP2) and coupled cluster [CCSD(T)] calculations show that such generated basis sets provide an accurate description of ?-stacking systems with favorable computation times compared to the standard augmented basis sets. The addition of these off-center functions eliminates the linear dependence of the augmented basis sets, which is one of the most encountered numerical problems during calculation of the oligomers of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In this work, we present a comparative study of the general characteristics of the potential energy surfaces for the parallel stacked and T-shape conformations of benzene and planar C6 clusters, using a combination of cc-PVXZ and our optimized functions. We discuss properties, such as the depth and curvature of the potential functions, short and long distance behavior, and the frictional forces between two model monomers. PMID:25605600

  17. Contribution of Partial Charge Interactions and Base Stacking to the Efficiency of Primer Extension at and beyond Abasic Sites in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Shuangluo; Vashishtha, Ashwani; Bulkley, David; Eom, Soo Hyun; Wang, Jimin; Konigsberg, William H. (Yale); (Gwangju)

    2012-08-31

    During DNA synthesis, base stacking and Watson-Crick (WC) hydrogen bonding increase the stability of nascent base pairs when they are in a ternary complex. To evaluate the contribution of base stacking to the incorporation efficiency of dNTPs when a DNA polymerase encounters an abasic site, we varied the penultimate base pairs (PBs) adjacent to the abasic site using all 16 possible combinations. We then determined pre-steady-state kinetic parameters with an RB69 DNA polymerase variant and solved nine structures of the corresponding ternary complexes. The efficiency of incorporation for incoming dNTPs opposite an abasic site varied between 2- and 210-fold depending on the identity of the PB. We propose that the A rule can be extended to encompass the fact that DNA polymerase can bypass dA/abasic sites more efficiently than other dN/abasic sites. Crystal structures of the ternary complexes show that the surface of the incoming base was stacked against the PB's interface and that the kinetic parameters for dNMP incorporation were consistent with specific features of base stacking, such as surface area and partial charge-charge interactions between the incoming base and the PB. Without a templating nucleotide residue, an incoming dNTP has no base with which it can hydrogen bond and cannot be desolvated, so that these surrounding water molecules become ordered and remain on the PB's surface in the ternary complex. When these water molecules are on top of a hydrophobic patch on the PB, they destabilize the ternary complex, and the incorporation efficiency of incoming dNTPs is reduced.

  18. Modulation of the stacking interaction of MN4 (M=Pt, Pd, Au) complexes with tryptophan through N-heterocyclic ligands.

    PubMed

    Tsotsoros, Samantha D; Bate, Aaron B; Dows, Martina G; Spell, Sarah R; Bayse, Craig A; Farrell, Nicholas P

    2014-03-01

    A survey of selected N-heterocycle ligands showed that platination of 4-N-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) in [Pt(dien)L](2+) (dien=diethylenetriamine) gave especially strong ?-? stacking interactions with tryptophan and the tryptophan-containing C-terminal zinc finger (ZF) of the HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) nucleocapsid protein NCp7. The association constants (all at 10(3)M(-1)) were significantly stronger (25.0 and 28.1 for tryptophan and ZF respectively) than those previously measured for the purine nucleobase 9-ethylguanine (9EtG) in [Pt(dien)(9EtG)](2+) (6.88 and 7.55 for tryptophan and ZF respectively). Extension to Pd and Au complexes also confirmed the utility of DMAP in assisting stacking interactions. The results confirm the utility of a "bioinorganic" approach to targeting and inactivation of medicinal chemistry targets using the dual approach of target recognition (non-covalent) followed by target fixation (covalent). PMID:24206773

  19. Branching fractions and CP asymmetries in B0-->pi0pi0, B+-->pi+pi0, and B+-->K+pi0 decays and isospin analysis of the B-->pipi system.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J

    2005-05-13

    Based on a sample of 227 x 10(6) BB pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, we measure the branching fraction B(B0-->pi(0)pi(0))=(1.17+/-0.32+/-0.10)x10(-6), and the asymmetry Cpi(0)(pi(0))=-0.12+/-0.56+/-0.06. The B0-->pi(0)pi(0) signal has a significance of 5.0 sigma. We also measure B(B+-->pi(+)pi(0))=(5.8+/-0.6+/-0.4)x10(-6), B(B+-->K+pi(0))=(12.0+/-0.7+/-0.6)x10(-6), and the charge asymmetries Api(+)(pi(0))=-0.01+/-0.10+/-0.02 and AK+(pi(0))=0.06+/-0.06+/-0.01. Using isospin relations, we find an upper bound on the angle difference |alpha-alpha(eff)| of 35 degrees at the 90% C.L. PMID:15904359

  20. Fuel cell stack arrangements

    DOEpatents

    Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Boro, PA); Somers, Edward V. (Murrysville, PA)

    1982-01-01

    Arrangements of stacks of fuel cells and ducts, for fuel cells operating with separate fuel, oxidant and coolant streams. An even number of stacks are arranged generally end-to-end in a loop. Ducts located at the juncture of consecutive stacks of the loop feed oxidant or fuel to or from the two consecutive stacks, each individual duct communicating with two stacks. A coolant fluid flows from outside the loop, into and through cooling channels of the stack, and is discharged into an enclosure duct formed within the loop by the stacks and seals at the junctures at the stacks.

  1. Cross Sections for the Reactions e+e to K+ K- pi+pi-, K+ K- pi0pi0, and K+ K- K+ K- Measured Using Initial-State Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Palano, A.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Bari /Bari U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-19

    We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}-{gamma}, K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, and K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{gamma}, where the photon is radiated from the initial state. About 84000, 8000, and 4200 fully reconstructed events, respectively, are selected from 454 fb{sup -1} of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy, so that the K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} data can be compared with direct measurements of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} reaction. No direct measurements exist for the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} or e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -} reactions, and we present an update of our previous result with doubled statistics. Studying the structure of these events, we find contributions from a number of intermediate states, and extract their cross sections. In particular, we perform a more detailed study of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{pi}{gamma} reaction, and confirm the presence of the Y (2175) resonance in the {phi}(1020)f{sub 0}(980) and K{sup +}K{sup -} f{sub 0}(980) modes. In the charmonium region, we observe the J/{psi} in all three final states and in several intermediate states, as well as the {phi}(2S) in some modes, and measure the corresponding branching fractions.

  2. Intermolecular interactions between imidazole derivatives intercalated in layered solids. Substituent group effect

    SciTech Connect

    González, M.; Lemus-Santana, A.A. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico); Rodríguez-Hernández, J. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico); Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales, Universidad de La Habana, Havana (Cuba); Aguirre-Velez, C.I. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico); Knobel, M. [Institute of Physics “Gleb Wataghin”, UNICAMP, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Reguera, E., E-mail: edilso.reguera@gmail.com [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico)

    2013-08-15

    This study sheds light on the intermolecular interactions between imidazole derive molecules (2-methyl-imidazole, 2-ethyl-imidazole and benzimidazole) intercalated in T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layers to form a solid of formula unit T(ImD){sub 2}[Ni(CN){sub 4}]. These hybrid inorganic–organic solids were prepared by soft chemical routes and their crystal structures solved and refined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The involved imidazole derivative molecules were found coordinated through the pyridinic N atom to the axial positions for the metal T in the T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layer. In the interlayers region ligand molecules from neighboring layers remain stacked in a face-to-face configuration through dipole–dipole and quadrupole–quadrupole interactions. These intermolecular interactions show a pronounced dependence on the substituent group and are responsible for an ImD-pillaring concatenation of adjacent layers. This is supported by the structural information and the recorded magnetic data in the 2–300 K temperature range. The samples containing Co and Ni are characterized by presence of spin–orbit coupling and pronounced temperature dependence for the effective magnetic moment except for 2-ethyl-imidazole related to the local distortion for the metal coordination environment. For this last one ligand a weak ferromagnetic ordering ascribed to a super-exchange interaction between T metals from neighboring layers through the ligands ?–? interaction was detected. - Graphical abstract: In the interlayers region imidazole derivative molecules are oriented according to their dipolar and quadrupolar interactions and minimizing the steric impediment. Highlights: • Imidazole derivatives intercalation compounds. • Intermolecular interaction between intercalated imidazole derivatives. • Hybrid inorganic–organic solids. • Pi–pi interactions and ferromagnetic coupling. • Dipolar and quadrupolar interactions between intercalated imidazole derivatives.

  3. Electrochemical cell stack assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2010-06-22

    Multiple stacks of tubular electrochemical cells having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films arranged in parallel on stamped conductive interconnect sheets or ferrules. The stack allows one or more electrochemical cell to malfunction without disabling the entire stack. Stack efficiency is enhanced through simplified gas manifolding, gas recycling, reduced operating temperature and improved heat distribution.

  4. A Survey of Aspartate-Phenylalanine and Glutamate-Phenylalanine Interactions in the Protein Data Bank: Searching for Anion-pi Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Vivek M [ORNL; Harris, Jason B [ORNL; Adams, Rachel M [ORNL; Nguyen, Don [University of Tennessee; Spiers, Jeremy D [ORNL; Baudry, Jerome Y [ORNL; Howell, Elizabeth E [ORNL; Hinde, Robert J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Protein structures are stabilized using noncovalent interactions. In addition to the traditional noncovalent interactions, newer types of interactions are thought to be present in proteins. One such interaction, an anion-{pi} pair, in which the positively charged edge of an aromatic ring interacts with an anion, forming a favorable anion-quadrupole interaction, has been previously proposed [Jackson, M. R., et al. (2007) J. Phys. Chem. B111, 8242-8249]. To study the role of anion-{pi} interactions in stabilizing protein structure, we analyzed pairwise interactions between phenylalanine (Phe) and the anionic amino acids, aspartate (Asp) and glutamate (Glu). Particular emphasis was focused on identification of Phe-Asp or -Glu pairs separated by less than 7 {angstrom} in the high-resolution, nonredundant Protein Data Bank. Simplifying Phe to benzene and Asp or Glu to formate molecules facilitated in silico analysis of the pairs. Kitaura-Morokuma energy calculations were performed on roughly 19000 benzene-formate pairs and the resulting energies analyzed as a function of distance and angle. Edgewise interactions typically produced strongly stabilizing interaction energies (-2 to -7.3 kcal/mol), while interactions involving the ring face resulted in weakly stabilizing to repulsive interaction energies. The strongest, most stabilizing interactions were identified as preferentially occurring in buried residues. Anion-{pi} pairs are found throughout protein structures, in helices as well as {beta} strands. Numerous pairs also had nearby cation-{pi} interactions as well as potential {pi}-{pi} stacking. While more than 1000 structures did not contain an anion-{pi} pair, the 3134 remaining structures contained approximately 2.6 anion-{pi} pairs per protein, suggesting it is a reasonably common motif that could contribute to the overall structural stability of a protein.

  5. Stretching Single-Stranded DNA: Interplay of Electrostatic, Base-Pairing, and Base-Pair Stacking Interactions

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Yang

    intermolecular and intramolecular forces with high accuracy (see Smith et al., 1992, 1996; Cluzel et al., 1996 and Interfaces, 14424 Potsdam, Germany ABSTRACT Recent single-macromolecule observations revealed that the force interactions all incorporated. The simulated force-extension profiles for both random and designed sequences

  6. Computational study of Peptide plane stacking with polar and ionizable amino Acid side chains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yefei; Wang, Jia; Yao, Lishan

    2015-04-01

    Parallel and T-shaped stacking interactions of the peptide plane with polar and ionizable amino acid side chains (including aspartic/glutamic acid, asparagine/glutamine, and arginine) are investigated using the quantum mechanical MP2 and CCSD computational methods. It is found that the electrostatic interaction plays an essential role in determining the optimal stacking configurations for all investigated stacking models. For certain complexes, the dispersion interaction also contributes considerably to stacking. In the gas phase, the stacking interaction of the charged system is stronger than that of the neutral system, and T-shaped stacking is generally more preferred than parallel stacking, with the stacking energy in the range of -4 to -18 kcal/mol. The solvation effect overall weakens stacking, especially for the charged system and the T-shaped stacking configurations. In water, the interaction energies of different stacking models are comparable. PMID:25826573

  7. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Imaging Reveals Differential Interactions of N-Glycan Processing Enzymes across the Golgi Stack in Planta1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Schoberer, Jennifer; Liebminger, Eva; Botchway, Stanley W.; Strasser, Richard; Hawes, Chris

    2013-01-01

    N-Glycan processing is one of the most important cellular protein modifications in plants and as such is essential for plant development and defense mechanisms. The accuracy of Golgi-located processing steps is governed by the strict intra-Golgi localization of sequentially acting glycosidases and glycosyltransferases. Their differential distribution goes hand in hand with the compartmentalization of the Golgi stack into cis-, medial-, and trans-cisternae, which separate early from late processing steps. The mechanisms that direct differential enzyme concentration are still unknown, but the formation of multienzyme complexes is considered a feasible Golgi protein localization strategy. In this study, we used two-photon excitation-Förster resonance energy transfer-fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to determine the interaction of N-glycan processing enzymes with differential intra-Golgi locations. Following the coexpression of fluorescent protein-tagged amino-terminal Golgi-targeting sequences (cytoplasmic-transmembrane-stem [CTS] region) of enzyme pairs in leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana spp.), we observed that all tested cis- and medial-Golgi enzymes, namely Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Golgi ?-mannosidase I, Nicotiana tabacum ?1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I, Arabidopsis Golgi ?-mannosidase II (GMII), and Arabidopsis ?1,2-xylosyltransferase, form homodimers and heterodimers, whereas among the late-acting enzymes Arabidopsis ?1,3-galactosyltransferase1 (GALT1), Arabidopsis ?1,4-fucosyltransferase, and Rattus norvegicus ?2,6-sialyltransferase (a nonplant Golgi marker), only GALT1 and medial-Golgi GMII were found to form a heterodimer. Furthermore, the efficiency of energy transfer indicating the formation of interactions decreased considerably in a cis-to-trans fashion. The comparative fluorescence lifetime imaging of several full-length cis- and medial-Golgi enzymes and their respective catalytic domain-deleted CTS clones further suggested that the formation of protein-protein interactions can occur through their amino-terminal CTS region. PMID:23400704

  8. A simple machine simulator for teaching stack frames

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dino Schweitzer; Jeff Boleng

    2010-01-01

    Stack frames are a fundamental concept in computer science often taught in an operating systems or an assembly language programming course. Computer security courses also rely on an understanding of stack frame concepts when teaching buffer overflow attacks. To assist students in learning the fundamentals of stack frames and related concepts, we have developed an interactive Simple Machine Simulator tool

  9. Fifty years of stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashed, Mohamed

    2014-06-01

    Common-Mid-Point (CMP) stacking is a major process to enhance signal-to-noise ratio in seismic data. Since its appearance fifty years ago, CMP stacking has gone through different phases of prosperity and negligence within the geophysical community. During those times, CMP stacking developed from a simple process of averaging into a sophisticated process that involves complicated mathematics and state-of-the-art computation. This article summarizes the basic principles, assumptions, and violations related to the CMP stacking technique, presents a historical overview on the development stages of CMP stacking, and discusses its future potentiality.

  10. Color Diagrams for Non Vacuum Reggeons in Hadron-Hadron Interactions

    E-print Network

    V. A. Abramovsky; N. V. Radchenko

    2010-09-15

    One-to-one correspondence between dual diagrams of dual resonance model and QCD based color diagrams describing non vacuum exchanges in pi+ pi-, pi+- p, p anti p interactions is discussed. Both for dual and color diagrams there are state with quark-antiquark in t channel and state, in which only coherent quark string exists, in s channel. There are no such dual diagrams in pp interaction. Color diagram for pp interaction was found basing on principle of conformity. Secondary hadrons spectrum, obtained from this diagram, has nucleon in its central region. This effect may lead to increase of baryon chemical potential in nucleus-nucleus collisions in facilities NICA and FAIR.

  11. Interaction of La0.58Sr0.40Co0.20Fe0.80O3-? cathode with volatile Cr in a stack test - Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzler, Norbert H.; Sebold, Doris; Wessel, Egbert

    2014-05-01

    Anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells with special thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes made by sol-gel technology were operated in a short stack sequentially for about 1300 h at temperatures of 700 °C and subsequently for 1200 h at 600 °C, respectively. The stack was operated galvanostatically at a constant current density of 500 mA cm-2. After operation, the stack was dismantled and the cells were analyzed with respect to Cr interaction with the LSCF cathode. Chemical analysis revealed typical overall Cr amounts of several tenths ?g cm-2 cathode area depending on the operation time. SEM cross sections showed less SrCrO4 formation at the typical sites for LSCF (top side of cathode) but there was evidence of chromate formation at the border between the cathode and barrier (electrolyte) layer. This location of foreign phase formation was unexpected. Additional TEM characterizations were therefore conducted. The TEM investigation verified the presence of Cr-containing crystals and revealed pore formation in the barrier layer. The formation of SrCrO4 at this borderline and pore formation were found for the first time after SOFC stack operation.

  12. Ferromagnetism in ABC-stacked trilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Richard; van Gelderen, Ralph; Smith, C. Morais

    2013-03-01

    In this article we study the ferromagnetic behavior of ABC-stacked trilayer graphene. This is done using a nearest-neighbor tight-binding model, in the presence of long-range Coulomb interactions. For a given electron-electron interaction g and doping level n, we determine whether the total energy is minimized for a paramagnetic or ferromagnetic configuration of our variational parameters. The g versus n phase diagram is first calculated for the unscreened case. We then include the effects of screening using a simplified expression for the fermion bubble diagram. We show that ferromagnetism in ABC-stacked trilayer graphene is more robust than in monolayer, in bilayer, and in ABA-stacked trilayer graphene. Although the screening reduces the ferromagnetic regime in ABC-stacked trilayer graphene, the critical doping level remains one order of magnitude larger than in unscreened bilayer graphene.

  13. The effect of pi-stacking, h-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine-adenine, thymine-thymine and adenine-thymine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2009-09-02

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the ionized dimers of thymine and adenine, TT, AA, and AT, is presented. Adiabatic and vertical ionization energies(IEs) for monomers and dimers as well as thresholds for the appearance of the protonated species are reported and analyzed. Non-covalent interactions stronglyaffect the observed IEs. The magnitude and the nature of the effect is different for different isomers of the dimers. The computations reveal that for TT, the largestchanges in vertical IEs (0.4 eV) occur in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric pi- stacked isomers, whereas in the lowest-energy symmetric h-bonded dimer the shiftin IEs is much smaller (0.1 eV). The origin of the shift and the character of the ionized states is different in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric stacked isomers. Inthe former, the initial hole is localized on one of the fragments, and the shift is due to the electrostatic stabilization of the positive charge of the ionized fragment by thedipole moment of the neutral fragment. In the latter, the hole is delocalized, and the change in IE is proportional to the overlap of the fragments' MOs. The shifts in AAare much smaller due to a less effcient overlap and a smaller dipole moment. The ionization of the h-bonded dimers results in barrierless (or nearly barrierless) protontransfer, whereas the pi-stacked dimers relax to structures with the hole stabilized by the delocalization or electrostatic interactions.

  14. B^0 to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0Time Dependent Dalitz Analysis at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Cavoto, Gianluca

    2007-04-06

    The author presents here results of a time-dependent analysis of the Dalitz structure of neutral B meson decays to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} from a dataset of 346 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) center of mass energy by the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} accelerator. No significant CP violation effects are observed and 68% confidence interval is derived on the weak angle {alpha} to be [75,152].

  15. Interfaces for stack inspection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frédéric Besson; Thomas De Grenier De Latour; Thomas P. Jensen

    2005-01-01

    Stack inspection is a mechanism for programming secure applications in the presence of code from various protection domains. Run-time checks of the call stack allow a method to obtain information about the code that (directly or indirectly) invoked it in order to make access control decisions. This mechanism is part of the security architecture of Java and the .NET Common

  16. Stacked Blocks Tutorial Written by Michael Tonks

    E-print Network

    Stacked Blocks Tutorial For ME 577 Written by Michael Tonks #12;CE/TOL Stacked Blocks TutorialStacked Blocks TutorialStacked Blocks TutorialStacked Blocks Tutorial 2 TABLE OF CONTENTSTABLE OF CONTENTSTABLE:.................................................................................................................15 #12;CE/TOL Stacked Blocks TutorialStacked Blocks TutorialStacked Blocks TutorialStacked Blocks

  17. Study of the Tau- to Pi- Pi+ Pi- Pi0 Nu/Tau And Tau- to Pi- Pi- Pi+ Eta Nu/Tau Decays Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sobie, Randall; /Victoria U.

    2007-11-14

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays have been studied with the BABAR detector. Preliminary branching fractions on the two modes are presented. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} mode is found to have a large contribution from the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is studied using the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode and the {tau}{sup -} f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is seen to be the primary source of these decays. A 90% confidence level upper limit is placed on the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay which proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of perfect isospin symmetry.

  18. Angular Distribution of Charge Exchange and Inelastic Neutrons in pi--p Interactions at 313 and 371 MeV

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Don L. Lind; Barry C. Barish; Richard J. Kurz; Philip M. Ogden; Victor Perez-Mendez

    1965-01-01

    Neutron angular distributions from the charge-exchange (pi0n) and inelastic modes (pi0pi0n,pi+pi-n) of the pi--p interaction have been investigated at 313 and 371 MeV incident-pion kinetic energy. The data were obtained with an electronic counter system. Elastic and inelastic neutrons were separated in the all-neutral final states by time of flight. At both energies the charge-exchange differential cross section at the

  19. The physical basis of nucleic acid base stacking in water.

    PubMed Central

    Luo, R; Gilson, H S; Potter, M J; Gilson, M K

    2001-01-01

    It has been argued that the stacking of adenyl groups in water must be driven primarily by electrostatic interactions, based upon NMR data showing stacking for two adenyl groups joined by a 3-atom linker but not for two naphthyl groups joined by the same linker. In contrast, theoretical work has suggested that adenine stacking is driven primarily by nonelectrostatic forces, and that electrostatic interactions actually produce a net repulsion between adenines stacking in water. The present study provides evidence that the experimental data for the 3-atom-linked bis-adenyl and bis-naphthyl compounds are consistent with the theory indicating that nonelectrostatic interactions drive adenine stacking. First, a theoretical conformational analysis is found to reproduce the observed ranking of the stacking tendencies of the compounds studied experimentally. A geometric analysis identifies two possible reasons, other than stronger electrostatic interactions, why the 3-atom-linked bis-adenyl compounds should stack more than the bis-naphthyl compounds. First, stacked naphthyl groups tend to lie further apart than stacked adenyl groups, based upon both quantum calculations and crystal structures. This may prevent the bis-naphthyl compound from stacking as extensively as the bis-adenyl compound. Second, geometric analysis shows that more stacked conformations are sterically accessible to the bis-adenyl compound than to the bis-naphthyl compound because the linker is attached to the sides of the adenyl groups, but to the ends of the naphthyl groups. Finally, ab initio quantum mechanics calculations and energy decompositions for relevant conformations of adenine and naphthalene dimers support the view that stacking in these compounds is driven primarily by nonelectrostatic interactions. The present analysis illustrates the importance of considering all aspects of a molecular system when interpreting experimental data, and the value of computer models as an adjunct to chemical intuition. PMID:11159389

  20. Nature and Magnitude of Aromatic Stacking of Nucleic Acid Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Sponer, Jiri; Riley, Kevin E.; Hobza, Pavel

    2008-04-07

    This review summarises recent advances in quantum chemical calculations of base-stacking forces in nucleic acids. We explain in detail the very complex relationship between the gas-phase basestacking energies, as revealed by quantum chemical (QM) calculations, and the highly variable roles of these interactions in nucleic acids. This issue is rarely discussed in quantum chemical and physical chemistry literature. We further extensively discuss methods that are available for basestacking studies, complexity of comparison of stacking calculations with gas phase experiments, balance of forces in stacked complexes of nucleic acid bases, and the relation between QM and force field descriptions. We also review all recent calculations on base-stacking systems, including details analysis of the B-DNA stacking. Specific attention is paid to the highest accuracy QM calculations, to the decomposition of the interactions, and development of dispersion-balanced DFT methods. Future prospects of computational studies of base stacking are discussed.

  1. Effect of interaction on the exfoliation and dispersion of a stack of platelets in a dynamic polymer matrix and solvent particles by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Barry; Pandey, Ras

    2009-03-01

    We consider a stack (layer) of four sheets in host matrix of mobile polymer chains and solvent particles and study their exfoliation and dispersion on a discrete lattice. Sheets and chains are created by tethering particles (nodes) by the bond-fluctuation mechanism. Each component interacts and executes their stochastic motion via Metropolis algorithm. Entropic constraints (excluded volume and entanglement [1]) play a critical role in a relatively dense matrix. Therefore, the density of these constituents and their molecular weight are carefully selected to make this study feasible. Exfoliation of the sheets is examined by varying the interactions among different components, i.e., solvent particles, polymer chains, and platelets. The relaxation time for dispersion in the self-organizing dynamic mixture increases on increasing the molecular weight. Exfoliation ceases in a matrix with chains beyond a certain length. [1] R.B. Pandey and B.L. Farmer, J. Polym. Sci. Part B 46, 2696 (2008).

  2. Stack filter classifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hush, Don [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Just as linear models generalize the sample mean and weighted average, weighted order statistic models generalize the sample median and weighted median. This analogy can be continued informally to generalized additive modeels in the case of the mean, and Stack Filters in the case of the median. Both of these model classes have been extensively studied for signal and image processing but it is surprising to find that for pattern classification, their treatment has been significantly one sided. Generalized additive models are now a major tool in pattern classification and many different learning algorithms have been developed to fit model parameters to finite data. However Stack Filters remain largely confined to signal and image processing and learning algorithms for classification are yet to be seen. This paper is a step towards Stack Filter Classifiers and it shows that the approach is interesting from both a theoretical and a practical perspective.

  3. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  4. 23. Brick coke quencher, brick stack, metal stack to right, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Brick coke quencher, brick stack, metal stack to right, coke gas pipe to left; in background, BOF building, limestone piles, Levy's Slag Dump. Looking north/northwest - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, Wayne County, MI

  5. Nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, William B. (Inventor); Kontos, Karen B. (Inventor); Weir, Donald S. (Inventor); Nolcheff, Nick A. (Inventor); Gunaraj, John A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator vane having a characteristic curve that is characterized by a nonlinear sweep and a nonlinear lean is provided. The stator is in an axial fan or compressor turbomachinery stage that is comprised of a collection of vanes whose highly three-dimensional shape is selected to reduce rotor-stator and rotor-strut interaction noise while maintaining the aerodynamic and mechanical performance of the vane. The nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator vane reduces noise associated with the fan stage of turbomachinery to improve environmental compatibility.

  6. Inertia Coin Stack Challenge

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-07-08

    In this activity, learners experiment with inertia by performing an easy and hands-on investigation with a playing card and a stack of coins. The activity includes an accompanying Mr. O video which explores Newton's First Law of Motion and inertia in greater detail. Suggestions for extra challenge: add more coins, try different cards.

  7. Stacking up the Atmosphere

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Betsy Youngman

    In this hands-on activity, participants learn the characteristics of the five layers of the atmosphere and make illustrations to represent them. They roll the drawings and place them in clear plastic cylinders, and then stack the cylinders to make a model column of the atmosphere.

  8. STACK GAS REHEAT EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of technical and economic evaluations of stack gas reheat (SGR) following wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) for coal-fired power plants. The evaluations were based on information from literature and a survey of FGD users, vendors, and architect/engineer ...

  9. Energy Expenditure of Sport Stacking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Steven R.; Udermann, Brian E.; Reineke, David M.; Battista, Rebecca A.

    2009-01-01

    Sport stacking is an activity taught in many physical education programs. The activity, although very popular, has been studied minimally, and the energy expenditure for sport stacking is unknown. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to determine the energy expenditure of sport stacking in elementary school children and to compare that value…

  10. 30 CFR 77.302 - Bypass stacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.302 Bypass stacks. Thermal dryer systems shall include a bypass stack, relief stack or individual discharge stack provided...

  11. 30 CFR 77.302 - Bypass stacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.302 Bypass stacks. Thermal dryer systems shall include a bypass stack, relief stack or individual discharge stack provided...

  12. Desalting of phosphopeptides by tandem polypyrrole-c18 reverse phase micropipette tip (TMTip(PPY-C18)) based on hybrid electrostatic, ?-? stacking and hydrophobic interactions for mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shi; Wang, Xiaoli; Fu, Jieying; Hu, Xuejiao; Xiao, Xiao; Huang, Lulu; Zhou, Youe; Zhong, Hongying

    2012-04-29

    Desalting and concentration of peptides using reverse phase (RP) C18 chromatographic material based on hydrophobic interaction is a routine approach used in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics. However, MS detection of small hydrophilic peptides, in particular, phosphopeptides that bear multiple negative charges, is challenging due to the insufficient binding to C18 stationary phase. We described here the development of a new desalting method that takes the unique properties of polypyrrole (PPY). The presence of positively charged nitrogen atoms under acidic conditions and polyunsaturated bonds in polypyrrole provide a prospect for enhanced adsorption of phosphopeptides or hydrophilic peptides through extra electrostatic and ?-? stacking interactions in addition to hydrophobic interactions. In tandem with reversed phase C18 chromatographic material, the new type of desalting method termed as TMTip(PPY-C18) can significantly improve the MS detection of phosphopeptides with multiple phosphate groups and other small hydrophilic peptides. It has been applied to not only tryptic digest of model proteins but also the analysis of complex lysates of zebrafish eggs. The number of detected phosphate groups on a peptide ranged from 1 to 6. Particularly, polypyrrole based method can also be used in basic condition. Thus it provides a useful means to handle peptides that may not be detectable in acidic condition. It can be envisioned that the TMTip(PPY-C18) should be able to facilitate the exploration of large scale phosphoproteome. PMID:22483212

  13. Observation of pi+pi-pi+pi- photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV at the STAR detector

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    We present a measurement of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} photonuclear production in ultra-peripheral Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final states are observed at low transverse momentum and are accompanied by mutual nuclear excitation of the beam particles. The strong enhancement of the production cross section at low transverse momentum is consistent with coherent photoproduction. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} invariant mass spectrum of the coherent events exhibits a broad peak around 1540 {+-} 40 MeV/c{sup 2} with a width of 570 {+-} 60 MeV/c{sup 2}, in agreement with the photoproduction data for the {rho}{sup 0}(1700). We do not observe a corresponding peak in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final state and measure an upper limit for the ratio of the branching fractions of the {rho}{sup 0}(1700) to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} of 2.5% at 90% confidence level. The ratio of {rho}{sup 0}(1700) and {rho}{sup 0}(770) coherent production cross sections is measured to be 13.4 {+-} 0.8{sub stat.} {+-} 4.4{sub syst.}%.

  14. Observation of pi(+)pi(-)pi(+)pi(-) photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV at the STAR detector

    E-print Network

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Han, L. -X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Rehberg, J. M.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.

    2010-01-01

    . Anderson,18 D. Arkhipkin,3 G. S. Averichev,17 J. Balewski,22 L. S. Barnby,2 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,27 M. J. Betancourt,22 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,16 A. K. Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,11 B. Biritz,6... L. C. Bland,3 B. E. Bonner,36 J. Bouchet,18 E. Braidot,27 A. V. Brandin,25 A. Bridgeman,1 E. Bruna,52 S. Bueltmann,29 I. Bunzarov,17 T. P. Burton,2 X. Z. Cai,40 H. Caines,52 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,5 O. Catu,52 D. Cebra,5 R. Cendejas,6 M...

  15. Tensor deep stacking networks.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Brian; Deng, Li; Yu, Dong

    2013-08-01

    A novel deep architecture, the tensor deep stacking network (T-DSN), is presented. The T-DSN consists of multiple, stacked blocks, where each block contains a bilinear mapping from two hidden layers to the output layer, using a weight tensor to incorporate higher order statistics of the hidden binary (½0; 1) features. A learning algorithm for the T-DSN’s weight matrices and tensors is developed and described in which the main parameter estimation burden is shifted to a convex subproblem with a closed-form solution. Using an efficient and scalable parallel implementation for CPU clusters, we train sets of T-DSNs in three popular tasks in increasing order of the data size: handwritten digit recognition using MNIST (60k), isolated state/phone classification and continuous phone recognition using TIMIT (1.1 m), and isolated phone classification using WSJ0 (5.2 m). Experimental results in all three tasks demonstrate the effectiveness of the T-DSN and the associated learning methods in a consistent manner. In particular, a sufficient depth of the T-DSN, a symmetry in the two hidden layers structure in each T-DSN block, our model parameter learning algorithm, and a softmax layer on top of T-DSN are shown to have all contributed to the low error rates observed in the experiments for all three tasks. PMID:23267198

  16. Role of synergistic ?-? stacking and X-HCl (X = C, N, O) H-bonding interactions in gelation and gel phase crystallization.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Subham; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2015-04-25

    The self-assembly of p-pyridyl-ended oligo-p-phenylenevinylenes (OPVs) in ethanol leads to the formation of either hollow or solid microrods. The corresponding protonated OPVs with n-butyl chains induce transparent gelation and also gel phase crystallization owing to various synergistic noncovalent interactions. The chloride ion-selective gelation, AIEE and stimuli responsiveness of the gel are also observed. PMID:25805244

  17. An atomic force microcopy study of the mechanical and electricalproperties of monolayer films of molecules with aromatic end groups

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liang; Park, J.Y.; Ma, H.; Jen, A.K.-Y.; Salmeron, M.

    2007-09-06

    The effect of intermolecular {pi}-{pi} stacking on the electrical and mechanical properties of monolayer films molecules containing aromatic groups was studied using atomic force microscopy. Two types of aromatic molecules, (4-mercaptophenyl) anthrylacetylene (MPAA) and (4-mercaptophenyl)-phenylacetylene (MPPA) were used as model systems with different {pi}-{pi} stacking strength. Monolayer films of these molecules on Au(111) surfaces exhibited conductivities differing by more than one order of magnitude, MPAA being the most conductive and MPPA the least conductive. The response to compressive loads by the AFM tip was also found to be very different for both molecules. In MPAA films distinct molecular conductivity changes are observed upon mechanical perturbation. This effect however was not observed on the MPPA film, where intermolecular {pi}-{pi} interactions are likely weaker.

  18. Zigzag stacks and m-regular linear stacks.

    PubMed

    Chen, William Y C; Guo, Qiang-Hui; Sun, Lisa H; Wang, Jian

    2014-12-01

    The contact map of a protein fold is a graph that represents the patterns of contacts in the fold. It is known that the contact map can be decomposed into stacks and queues. RNA secondary structures are special stacks in which the degree of each vertex is at most one and each arc has length of at least two. Waterman and Smith derived a formula for the number of RNA secondary structures of length n with exactly k arcs. Höner zu Siederdissen et al. developed a folding algorithm for extended RNA secondary structures in which each vertex has maximum degree two. An equation for the generating function of extended RNA secondary structures was obtained by Müller and Nebel by using a context-free grammar approach, which leads to an asymptotic formula. In this article, we consider m-regular linear stacks, where each arc has length at least m and the degree of each vertex is bounded by two. Extended RNA secondary structures are exactly 2-regular linear stacks. For any m ? 2, we obtain an equation for the generating function of the m-regular linear stacks. For given m, we deduce a recurrence relation and an asymptotic formula for the number of m-regular linear stacks on n vertices. To establish the equation, we use the reduction operation of Chen, Deng, and Du to transform an m-regular linear stack to an m-reduced zigzag (or alternating) stack. Then we find an equation for m-reduced zigzag stacks leading to an equation for m-regular linear stacks. PMID:25455155

  19. Spherical Torus Center Stack Design

    SciTech Connect

    C. Neumeyer; P. Heitzenroeder; C. Kessel; M. Ono; M. Peng; J. Schmidt; R. Woolley; I. Zatz

    2002-01-18

    The low aspect ratio spherical torus (ST) configuration requires that the center stack design be optimized within a limited available space, using materials within their established allowables. This paper presents center stack design methods developed by the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Project Team during the initial design of NSTX, and more recently for studies of a possible next-step ST (NSST) device.

  20. The role of intermolecular interactions in the assemblies of Fe{sup II} and Co{sup II} tetrakis-isothiocyanatometalates with tris(1,10-phenanthroline)-Ru{sup II}: Crystal structures of two dual-metal assemblies featuring octahedral cationic and tetrahedral anionic modules

    SciTech Connect

    Ghazzali, Mohamed [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)], E-mail: mghazz@chalmers.se; Langer, Vratislav; Ohrstroem, Lars [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2008-09-15

    Two new dual-metal assemblies: 2[Ru(phen){sub 3}]{sup 2+}.[Fe(SCN){sub 4}]{sup 2-}.2SCN{sup -}.4H{sub 2}O 1 and [Ru(phen){sub 3}]{sup 2+}.[Co(SCN){sub 4}]{sup 2-}2, (phen:1,10-phenanthroline), have been prepared and their structures were characterized by X-ray diffraction. In 1, the cationic octahedral enantiomers are arranged with a {lambda}{delta}{lambda}{delta}{lambda} sequence supported by {pi}-{pi} stacking and the anionic inorganic tetrahedral units are oriented between these stacks by interacting with the nearby water molecules through strong O-H...O and O-H...S hydrogen bonds. In 2, homochiral double helices in the b-direction are revealed, with tetrakis-isothiocyanate Co{sup II} anions arranged in the crystal to furnish one-dimensional (1D)-helical chains with S...S intermolecular interactions at 3.512(2) and 3.966(2) A supporting [Ru(phen){sub 3}]{sup 2+}{lambda}- and {delta}-helices with Ru...Ru shortest distance of 8.676(7) A. In both 1 and 2, the supramolecular assembly is maintained by C-H...S hydrogen bonds extending between the phenanthroline aromatic carbons in the cationic nodes and the sulphur atoms of the isothiocyanates anions. Analysis of S...S interactions in isothiocyanate containing compounds using Cambridge structural database (CSD) showed an angle dependence categorizing these interactions into 'type-I' and 'type-II'. - Graphical abstract: Side projection in 2 showing the crankshaft caused by S...S interactions in [Co(NCS){sub 4}]{sup 2-} in-between [Ru{sup II}(phen){sub 3}]{sup 2+} helices. Only isothiocyanates arms of [Co(NCS){sub 4}]{sup 2-} that are part of S...S interactions are shown and [Ru{sup II}(phen){sub 3}]{sup 2+} are presented as polyhedra.

  1. Seismic qualification of ventilation stack

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.W.; Huang, S.N.; Lindquist, M.R.

    1993-10-01

    This paper describes the method to be used to qualify the 105 K ventilation stack at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington, under seismic and wind loadings. The stack stands at 175 ft (53.34 m), with a diameter tapering from 22 ft (6.71 m) at the foundation to 12.83 ft (3.91 m) at the top. Although the stack is classified as Safety Class 3 (low hazard), it is treated as a Safety Class 1 (high hazard) component, as failure could damage a Safety Class 1 facility (the irradiated fuel storage basin). The evaluation used U.S. Department of Energy criteria specified in UCRL 15910 (1990). The seismic responses of the stack under earthquake loading were obtained from modal analyses with response spectrum input that used the ANSYS (1989) finite-element computer code. The moments and shear forces from the results of seismic analysis were used to qualify the reinforcement capacity of the stack structure by the ultimate-strength method. The wind forces acting on the stack in both along-wind and crosswind directions were also calculated. Presented are evaluations of the soil bearing pressure, the moment, and the shear capacity of the stack foundation.

  2. {pi}{pi} scattering in a nonlocal chiral quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Osipov, A. A., E-mail: osipov@nu.jinr.ru; Radzhabov, A. E., E-mail: aradzh@thsun1.jinr.ru; Volkov, M. K., E-mail: volkov@thsun1.jinr.r [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2007-11-15

    We consider a nonlocal version of the Nambu and Jona-Lasinio model with the SU(2) x SU(2) chiral symmetry broken by the current-quark-mass term. The nonlocality is contained in the quark-antiquark bilinears of the four-quark vertices as a form factor of the Gaussian type. The model has three parameters which can be fixed in favor of the values of the pion mass m{pi}, the pion decay constant f{pi}, and the current quark mass m{sub c}. It is shown that, in the model, the main low-energy theorems which are known for pions are fulfilled. The s-, p-, and d-wave scattering lengths in all isotopic channels and the s-wave slope parameters are calculated, and the results are in satisfactory agreement with phenomenological data.

  3. Measurement of the Ratios of Branching Fractions B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi pi pi) and B(Bs -> Ds pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi)

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; /Illinois U., Urbana; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U.; Affolder, T.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, M.G.; /Fermilab; Ambrose, D.; /Fermilab; Amerio, S.; /Padua U.; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Anikeev, K.; /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati /Taiwan, Inst. Phys.

    2006-10-01

    Using 355 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, they study the fully reconstructed hadronic decays B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub (s)}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub (s)}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. They present the first measurement of the ratio of branching fractions {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 1.05 {+-} 0.10(stat.) {+-} 0.22(syst.). They also update their measurement of {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) to 1.13 {+-} 0.08(stat.) {+-} 0.23(syst.) improving the statistical uncertainty by more than a factor of two. They find {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) = [3.8 {+-} 0.3(stat.) {+-} 1.3(syst.)] x 10{sup -3} and {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = [8.4 {+-} 0.8(stat.) {+-} 3.2(syst.)] x 10{sup -3}.

  4. Stacking Faults in Cotton Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divakara, S.; Niranjana, A. R.; Siddaraju, G. N.; Somashekar, R.

    2011-07-01

    The stacking faults in different variety of cotton fibers have been quantified using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) data. Exponential functions for the column length distribution have been used for the determination of microstructural parameters. The crystal imperfection parameters like crystal size , lattice strain (g in %), stacking faults (?d) and twin faults (?) have been determined by profile analysis using Fourier method of Warren. We examined different variety of raw cotton fibers using WAXS techniques. In all these cases we note that, the stacking faults are quite significant in determining the property of cotton fibers.

  5. Mechanical Stiffening of Porphyrin Nanorings through Supramolecular Columnar Stacking

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Solvent-induced aggregates of nanoring cyclic polymers may be transferred by electrospray deposition to a surface where they adsorb as three-dimensional columnar stacks. The observed stack height varies from single rings to four stacked rings with a layer spacing of 0.32 ± 0.04 nm as measured using scanning tunneling microscopy. The flexibility of the nanorings results in distortions from a circular shape, and we show, through a comparison with Monte Carlo simulations, that the bending stiffness increases linearly with the stack height. Our results show that noncovalent interactions may be used to control the shape and mechanical properties of artificial macromolecular aggregates offering a new route to solvent-induced control of two-dimensional supramolecular organization. PMID:23789845

  6. Structural Consequences of Anionic Host-Cationic Guest Interactions in a Supramolecular Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael D.; Johnson, Darren W.; Szigethy, Geza; Davis, Anna V.; Teat, Simon J.; Oliver, Allen G.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-07-09

    The molecular structure of the self-assembled supramolecular assembly [M{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} has been explored with different metals (M = Ga{sup III}, Fe{sup III}, Ti{sup IV}) and different encapsulated guests (NEt{sub 4}{sup +}, BnNMe{sub 3}{sup +}, Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +}, Cp*{sub 2}Co{sup +}) by X-ray crystallography. While the identity of the metal ions at the vertices of the M{sub 4}L{sub 6} structure is found to have little effect on the assembly structure, encapsulated guests significantly distort the size and shape of the interior cavity of the assembly. Cations on the exterior of the assembly are found to interact with the assembly through either {pi}-{pi}, cation-{pi}, or CH-{pi} interactions. In some cases, the exterior guests interact with only one assembly, but cations with the ability to form multiple {pi}-{pi} interactions are able to interact with adjacent assemblies in the crystal lattice. The solvent accessible cavity of the assembly is modeled using the rolling probe method and found to range from 253-434 {angstrom}{sup 3}, depending on the encapsulated guest. Based on the volume of the guest and the volume of the cavity, the packing coefficient for each host-guest complex is found to range from 0.47-0.67.

  7. Amplitude Analysis of the Decay $D_s^+ \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+$ in the Experiment E831/FOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Schilithz, Anderson Correa; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; ,

    2005-01-01

    We present in this thesis the Dalitz Plot analysis of the D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decay, with the data of the E831/FOCUS, that took data in 1996 and 1997. The masses and widhts of f{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 0}(1370) are free parametres of the fit on Dalitz Plot, objectiving to study in detail these resonances. After this analysis we present the Spectator Model study on the S wave in this decay. For this study we used the formalism developed by M. Svec [2] for scattering. We present the comparison between the Isobar Model, frequently used in Dalitz Plot analysis, and this formalism.

  8. Search for D0--anti-D0 Mixing in the Decays D0 --> K+ pi- pi+ pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-26

    We present a search for D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing in the decays D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using 230.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. Assuming CP conservation, we measure the time-integrated mixing rate R{sub M} = (0.019{sub -0.015}{sup +0.016}(stat.) {+-} 0.002(syst.))%, and R{sub M} < 0.048% at the 95% confidence level. Using a frequentist method, we estimate that the data are consistent with no mixing at the 4.3% confidence level. We present results both with and without the assumption of CP conservation. By combining the value of R{sub M} from this analysis with that obtained from an analysis of the decays D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, we find R{sub M} = (0.020{sub -0.010}{sup +0.011})%, where the uncertainty is statistical only. We determine the upper limit R{sub M} < 0.042% at the 95% confidence level, and we find the combined data are consistent with the no-mixing hypothesis at the 2.1% confidence level.

  9. The Search for Exotic Mesons in gamma p -> pi+pi+pi-n with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Bookwalter

    2011-12-01

    The {pi}{sub 1}(1600), a J{sup PC} = 1{sup {-+}} exotic meson has been observed by experiments using pion beams. Theorists predict that photon beams could produce gluonic hybrid mesons, of which the {pi}{sub 1}(1600) is a candidate, at enhanced levels relative to pion beams. The g12 rungroup at Jefferson Lab's CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) has recently acquired a large photoproduction dataset, using a liquid hydrogen target and tagged photons from a 5.71 GeV electron beam. A partial-wave analysis of 502K {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n events selected from the g12 dataset has been performed, and preliminary fit results show strong evidence for well-known states such as the a{sub 1}(1260), a{sub 2}(1320), and {pi}{sub 2}(1670). However, we observe no evidence for the production of the {pi}{sub 1}(1600) in either the partial-wave intensities or the relative complex phase between the 1{sup {-+}} and the 2{sup {-+}} (corresponding to the {pi}{sub 2}) partial waves.

  10. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Decay Rate Asymmetry of B to D_pi+ pi- pi0 K-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-06-10

    The authors report the observation of the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}}K{sup -}, where D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}} indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, excluding K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. This doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay chain can be used to measure the CKM phase {gamma}. Using about 229 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring, they measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup -}}) = (5.5 {+-} 1.0 (stat.) {+-} 0.7 (syst.)) x 10{sup -6} and the decay rate asymmetry A = -0.02 {+-} 0.16 (stat.) {+-} 0.03 (syst.) for the full decay chain.

  11. Full Piezoelectric Multilayer-Stacked Hybrid Actuation/Transduction Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji; Jiang, Xiaoning; Zu, Tian-Bing

    2011-01-01

    The Stacked HYBATS (Hybrid Actuation/Transduction system) demonstrates significantly enhanced electromechanical performance by using the cooperative contributions of the electromechanical responses of multilayer, stacked negative strain components and positive strain components. Both experimental and theoretical studies indicate that, for Stacked HYBATS, the displacement is over three times that of a same-sized conventional flextensional actuator/transducer. The coupled resonance mode between positive strain and negative strain components of Stacked HYBATS is much stronger than the resonance of a single element actuation only when the effective lengths of the two kinds of elements match each other. Compared with the previously invented hybrid actuation system (HYBAS), the multilayer Stacked HYBATS can be designed to provide high mechanical load capability, low voltage driving, and a highly effective piezoelectric constant. The negative strain component will contract, and the positive strain component will expand in the length directions when an electric field is applied on the device. The interaction between the two elements makes an enhanced motion along the Z direction for Stacked-HYBATS. In order to dominate the dynamic length of Stacked-HYBATS by the negative strain component, the area of the cross-section for the negative strain component will be much larger than the total cross-section areas of the two positive strain components. The transverse strain is negative and longitudinal strain positive in inorganic materials, such as ceramics/single crystals. Different piezoelectric multilayer stack configurations can make a piezoelectric ceramic/single-crystal multilayer stack exhibit negative strain or positive strain at a certain direction without increasing the applied voltage. The difference of this innovation from the HYBAS is that all the elements can be made from one-of-a-kind materials. Stacked HYBATS can provide an extremely effective piezoelectric constant at both resonance and off resonance frequencies. The effective piezoelectric constant can be alternated by varying the size of each component, the degree of the pre-curvature of the positive strain components, the thickness of each layer in the multilayer stacks, and the piezoelectric constant of the material used. Because all of the elements are piezoelectric components, Stacked HYBATS can serve as projector and receiver for underwater detection. The performance of this innovation can be enhanced by improving the piezoelectric properties.

  12. Investigation of the effect of shunt current on battery efficiency and stack temperature in vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ao; McCann, John; Bao, Jie; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2013-11-01

    In vanadium redox flow batteries (VFB), the power of the battery is determined by the number of cells in the stack. Serial and parallel layouts are commonly adopted interactively to suit the designed power demand. The bipolar stack design inevitably introduces shunt currents bypassing into the common manifolds in the stack and thereby resulting in a parasitic loss of power and energy. During standby, shunt current and its associated internal discharge reactions can generate heat and increase stack temperature, potentially leading to thermal precipitation in the positive half-cell. This study aims to investigate the effect of shunt current on stack efficiency and temperature variation during standby periods for a 40-cell stack. Dynamic models based on mass balance, energy balance and electrical circuit are developed for simulations and the results provide an insight into stack performance that will aid in optimising stack design and suitable cooling strategies for the VFB.

  13. Nature and magnitude of aromatic base stacking in DNA and RNA: Quantum chemistry, molecular mechanics, and experiment.

    PubMed

    Sponer, Ji?í; Sponer, Judit E; Mládek, Arnošt; Jure?ka, Petr; Banáš, Pavel; Otyepka, Michal

    2013-12-01

    Base stacking is a major interaction shaping up and stabilizing nucleic acids. During the last decades, base stacking has been extensively studied by experimental and theoretical methods. Advanced quantum-chemical calculations clarified that base stacking is a common interaction, which in the first approximation can be described as combination of the three most basic contributions to molecular interactions, namely, electrostatic interaction, London dispersion attraction and short-range repulsion. There is not any specific ?-? energy term associated with the delocalized ? electrons of the aromatic rings that cannot be described by the mentioned contributions. The base stacking can be rather reasonably approximated by simple molecular simulation methods based on well-calibrated common force fields although the force fields do not include nonadditivity of stacking, anisotropy of dispersion interactions, and some other effects. However, description of stacking association in condensed phase and understanding of the stacking role in biomolecules remain a difficult problem, as the net base stacking forces always act in a complex and context-specific environment. Moreover, the stacking forces are balanced with many other energy contributions. Differences in definition of stacking in experimental and theoretical studies are explained. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 99: 978-988, 2013. PMID:23784745

  14. Progress Update: Stack Project Complete

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

  15. Multibeam collimator uses prism stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, P. O.

    1981-01-01

    Optical instrument creates many divergent light beams for surveying and machine element alignment applications. Angles and refractive indices of stack of prisms are selected to divert incoming laser beam by small increments, different for each prism. Angles of emerging beams thus differ by small, precisely-controlled amounts. Instrument is nearly immune to vibration, changes in gravitational force, temperature variations, and mechanical distortion.

  16. Progress Update: Stack Project Complete

    ScienceCinema

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

  17. Rhythmic ring–ring stacking drives the circadian oscillator clockwise

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yong-Gang; Tseng, Roger; Kuo, Nai-Wei; LiWang, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The oscillator of the circadian clock of cyanobacteria is composed of three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, which together generate a self-sustained ?24-h rhythm of phosphorylation of KaiC. The mechanism propelling this oscillator has remained elusive, however. We show that stacking interactions between the CI and CII rings of KaiC drive the transition from the phosphorylation-specific KaiC–KaiA interaction to the dephosphorylation-specific KaiC–KaiB interaction. We have identified the KaiB-binding site, which is on the CI domain. This site is hidden when CI domains are associated as a hexameric ring. However, stacking of the CI and CII rings exposes the KaiB-binding site. Because the clock output protein SasA also binds to CI and competes with KaiB for binding, ring stacking likely regulates clock output. We demonstrate that ADP can expose the KaiB-binding site in the absence of ring stacking, providing an explanation for how it can reset the clock. PMID:22967510

  18. Calculated state densities of aperiodic nucleotide base stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yuan-Jie; Chen, Run-Shen; Martinez, Alberto; Otto, Peter; Ladik, Janos

    2000-05-01

    Electronic density of states (DOS) histograms and of the nucleotide base stack regions of a segment of human oncogene (both single and double stranded, in B conformation) and of single-stranded random DNA base stack (also in B conformation), were calculated. The computations were performed with the help of the ab initio matrix block negative factor counting (NFC) method for the DOSs. The neglected effects of the sugar-phosphate chain and the water environment (with the counterions) were assessed on the basis of previous ab initio band structure calculations. Further, in the calculation of single nucleotide base stacks also basis set and correlation effects have been investigated. In the case of a single strand the level spacing widths of the allowed regions and the fundamental gap were calculated also with Clementi's double ? basis and corrected for correlation at the MP2 level. The inverse interaction method was applied for the study of Anderson localization.

  19. Properties of stacked NbN tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedbabny, H.-J.; Rogalla, H.

    1989-03-01

    Stacks of up to three tunnel junctions were fabricated using the NbN-MgO technique. Different preparation methods were tested, and two gave favorable results. In the first one, the whole stack is prepared in-situ and structured afterwards by lift-off and reactive and argon ion etching. The authors investigated the resulting I-V (current-voltage) characteristics of stacks of 8.3 mV. Since it was not possible to establish electrical connections to the intermediate electrodes by this method, a second one was applied in which each NbN/MgO layer is prepared in a separate step and structured by lift-off. Here the I-V characteristics, the interaction between the tunnel junctions, and their RF properties were investigated. Shapiro steps and photon-assisted tunneling were observed in the I-V characteristics of a receiver junction, while the bottom tunnel junctions was used as a microwave generator.

  20. Glass transition dynamics of stacked thin polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukao, Koji; Terasawa, Takehide; Oda, Yuto; Nakamura, Kenji; Tahara, Daisuke

    2011-10-01

    The glass transition dynamics of stacked thin films of polystyrene and poly(2-chlorostyrene) were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. The glass transition temperature Tg of as-stacked thin polystyrene films has a strong depression from that of the bulk samples. However, after annealing at high temperatures above Tg, the stacked thin films exhibit glass transition at a temperature almost equal to the Tg of the bulk system. The ?-process dynamics of stacked thin films of poly(2-chlorostyrene) show a time evolution from single-thin-film-like dynamics to bulk-like dynamics during the isothermal annealing process. The relaxation rate of the ? process becomes smaller with increase in the annealing time. The time scale for the evolution of the ? dynamics during the annealing process is very long compared with that for the reptation dynamics. At the same time, the temperature dependence of the relaxation time for the ? process changes from Arrhenius-like to Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann dependence with increase of the annealing time. The fragility index increases and the distribution of the ?-relaxation times becomes smaller with increase in the annealing time for isothermal annealing. The observed change in the ? process is discussed with respect to the interfacial interaction between the thin layers of stacked thin polymer films.

  1. Glass transition dynamics of stacked thin polymer films.

    PubMed

    Fukao, Koji; Terasawa, Takehide; Oda, Yuto; Nakamura, Kenji; Tahara, Daisuke

    2011-10-01

    The glass transition dynamics of stacked thin films of polystyrene and poly(2-chlorostyrene) were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. The glass transition temperature T(g) of as-stacked thin polystyrene films has a strong depression from that of the bulk samples. However, after annealing at high temperatures above T(g), the stacked thin films exhibit glass transition at a temperature almost equal to the T(g) of the bulk system. The ?-process dynamics of stacked thin films of poly(2-chlorostyrene) show a time evolution from single-thin-film-like dynamics to bulk-like dynamics during the isothermal annealing process. The relaxation rate of the ? process becomes smaller with increase in the annealing time. The time scale for the evolution of the ? dynamics during the annealing process is very long compared with that for the reptation dynamics. At the same time, the temperature dependence of the relaxation time for the ? process changes from Arrhenius-like to Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann dependence with increase of the annealing time. The fragility index increases and the distribution of the ?-relaxation times becomes smaller with increase in the annealing time for isothermal annealing. The observed change in the ? process is discussed with respect to the interfacial interaction between the thin layers of stacked thin polymer films. PMID:22181166

  2. Characterization of Piezoelectric Stack Actuators for Vibrothermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Jyani; Reusser, Ricky; Holland, Stephen D.

    2011-06-01

    Vibrothermography, also known as Sonic IR and thermosonics, is an NDE technique for finding cracks and flaws based on vibration-induced frictional rubbing of unbonded surfaces. The vibration is usually generated by a piezoelectric stack actuator which transduces electrical energy into large amplitude mechanical vibrations. The amplitude and impedance transfer characteristics of the transducer system control the vibration of the sample. Within a linear contact (no tip chatter) model, the interaction between the transducer system and the specimen can be characterized using the theory of linear time-invariant (LTI) systems and electro-mechanical Norton equivalence. We present quantitative measurements of the performance of piezoelectric stack actuators in a vibrothermography excitation system and investigate the effect of actuator performance and specimen characteristics on the induced vibration in the specimen. We show that the system resonances generated because of metal-metal contact of specimen and actuator are broken by adding a couplant between specimen and actuator. Finally, we give criteria for actuator and couplant selection for vibrothermography.

  3. PRECISION COSMOGRAPHY WITH STACKED VOIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Lavaux, Guilhem [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Wandelt, Benjamin D. [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, 98 bis, boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France)

    2012-08-01

    We present a purely geometrical method for probing the expansion history of the universe from the observation of the shape of stacked voids in spectroscopic redshift surveys. Our method is an Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test based on the average sphericity of voids posited on the local isotropy of the universe. It works by comparing the temporal extent of cosmic voids along the line of sight with their angular, spatial extent. We describe the algorithm that we use to detect and stack voids in redshift shells on the light cone and test it on mock light cones produced from N-body simulations. We establish a robust statistical model for estimating the average stretching of voids in redshift space and quantify the contamination by peculiar velocities. Finally, assuming that the void statistics that we derive from N-body simulations is preserved when considering galaxy surveys, we assess the capability of this approach to constrain dark energy parameters. We report this assessment in terms of the figure of merit (FoM) of the dark energy task force and in particular of the proposed Euclid mission which is particularly suited for this technique since it is a spectroscopic survey. The FoM due to stacked voids from the Euclid wide survey may double that of all other dark energy probes derived from Euclid data alone (combined with Planck priors). In particular, voids seem to outperform baryon acoustic oscillations by an order of magnitude. This result is consistent with simple estimates based on mode counting. The AP test based on stacked voids may be a significant addition to the portfolio of major dark energy probes and its potentialities must be studied in detail.

  4. Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

    2009-05-01

    Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative “all modes” failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

  5. Boston Harbor sewage stack (for microcomputers). Software

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The Boston Harbor Sewage Stack is interactive educational computer program about how municipalities deal with sewage, how sewage systems work, non point pollution, and what citizens can do to help - focusing on Boston Harbor and the Boston Harbor Cleanup. The program is written at a level accessible to middle-school students, but with enough depth for adults. Schools and environmental organizations, especially in coastal areas, will find this program a useful addition to their environmental education offerings. The program shows what happens to sewage - from the moment of flush to its passage through the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority's sewage system and into Boston Harbor - now and as the cleanup proceeds. Users encounter topics for exploration, including storm sewers and combined sewer overflows (CSOs); non point pollution from pets, spilled waste oil, lawn and garden chemicals, and other sources; what not to flush and why; how officials can tell if water is polluted; and why it all matters.

  6. Measurement of ? meson production in ?? interactions and ?(?-->??) with the KLOE detector

    E-print Network

    KLOE-2 Collaboration; :; D. Babusci; D. Badoni; I. Balwierz-Pytko; G. Bencivenni; C. Bini; C. Bloise; F. Bossi; P. Branchini; A. Budano; L. Caldeira Balkestaahl; G. Capon; F. Ceradini; P. Ciambrone; E. Czerwinski; E. Dane; E. De Lucia; G. De Robertis; A. De Santis; A. Di Domenico; C. Di Donato; R. Di Salvo; D. Domenici; O. Erriquez; G. Fanizzi; A. Fantini; G. Felici; S. Fiore; P. Franzini; P. Gauzzi; G. Giardina; S. Giovannella; F. Gonnella; E. Graziani; F. Happacher; L. Heijkenskj; B. Hoistad; L. Iafolla; M. Jacewicz; T. Johansson; A. Kupsc; J. Lee-Franzini; B. Leverington; F. Loddo; S. Loffredo; G. Mandaglio; M. Martemianov; M. Martini; M. Mascolo; R. Messi; S. Miscetti; G. Morello; D. Moricciani; P. Moskal; F. Nguyen; A. Passeri; V. Patera; I. Prado Longhi; A. Ranieri; C. F. Redmer; P. Santangelo; I. Sarra; M. Schioppa; B. Sciascia; M. Silarski; C. Taccini; L. Tortora; G. Venanzoni; W. Wislicki; M. Wolke; J. Zdebik

    2012-12-12

    We present a measurement of {\\eta} meson production in photon-photon interactions produced by electron-positron beams colliding with \\sqrt{s}=1 GeV. The measurement is done with the KLOE detector at the \\phi-factory DA{\\Phi}NE with an integrated luminosity of 0.24 fb^{-1}. The e^+e^- --> e^+e^-{\\eta} cross section is measured without detecting the outgoing electron and positron, selecting the decays {\\eta}-->{\\pi}^+{\\pi}^-{\\pi}^0 and {\\eta}-->{\\pi}^0{\\pi}^0{\\pi}^0. The most relevant background is due to e^+e^- --> {\\eta}{\\gamma} when the monochromatic photon escapes detection. The cross section for this process is measured as {\\sigma}(e^+e^- -->{\\eta}{\\gamma}) = (856 \\pm 8_{stat} \\pm 16_{syst}) pb. The combined result for the e^+e^- -->e^+e^-{\\eta} cross section is {\\sigma}(e^+e^- -->e^+e^-{\\eta}) = (32.72 \\pm 1.27_{stat} \\pm 0.70_{syst}) pb. From this we derive the partial width {\\Gamma}({\\eta}-->{\\gamma}{\\gamma}) = (520 \\pm 20_{stat} \\pm 13_{syst}) eV. This is in agreement with the world average and is the most precise measurement to date.

  7. Lightweight Stacks of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Valdez, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    An improved design concept for direct methanol fuel cells makes it possible to construct fuel-cell stacks that can weigh as little as one-third as much as do conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks of equal power. The structural-support components of the improved cells and stacks can be made of relatively inexpensive plastics. Moreover, in comparison with conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks, the improved fuel-cell stacks can be assembled, disassembled, and diagnosed for malfunctions more easily. These improvements are expected to bring portable direct methanol fuel cells and stacks closer to commercialization. In a conventional bipolar fuel-cell stack, the cells are interspersed with bipolar plates (also called biplates), which are structural components that serve to interconnect the cells and distribute the reactants (methanol and air). The cells and biplates are sandwiched between metal end plates. Usually, the stack is held together under pressure by tie rods that clamp the end plates. The bipolar stack configuration offers the advantage of very low internal electrical resistance. However, when the power output of a stack is only a few watts, the very low internal resistance of a bipolar stack is not absolutely necessary for keeping the internal power loss acceptably low.

  8. Stacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimber, Lizzie

    2010-01-01

    Linton Waters and Jayne Kranat ran a session on the Nuffield "Applying Mathematical Processes" (AMP) activities at BCME7 in Manchester in April this year. These 1-2 hour activities are revamps of some of the Graded Assessment in Mathematics (GAIM) resources, developed in the 1980s, and are freely available via the Nuffield website and the original…

  9. New Monte Carlo Implementation of Quark-Gluon-String model of p-barp-Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Galoyan, A. [LPP Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Uzhinsky, V.V. [LIT Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2005-10-26

    A problem of soft p-barp-interaction description is considered in the framework of the Dual Parton or Quark-Gluon-String model. The model is a combination of the Regge phenomenology, quark ideas, and 1/Nf expansion of QCD. The cross sections of the p-barp-processes are given by the Regge phenomenology. According to the 1/Nf expansion of QCD, inelastic interactions are treated as creation of quark-gluon strings. The string fragmentation is considered at quark level. The main problem is a description of low mass string fragmentation and fragmentation of massive constituent quarks. It is solved by choosing various phenomenological dependencies. As a results, a good description of {pi}+{pi}-, K+K-, n-barn, {lambda}-bar{lambda} and other channels of the interactions has been reached, and a Monte Carlo program for event simulation of the interactions is proposed.

  10. Molecular adsorption induces the transformation of rhombohedral- to Bernal-stacking order in trilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Yan, Jiaxu; Chen, Chang-Hsiao; Lei, Liu; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Shen, Zexiang; Li, Lain-Jong

    2013-06-01

    The Bernal (ABA)-stacked graphene trilayer is presumed to be thermodynamically more stable than the rhombohedral (ABC) counterpart. However, the thermal transformation from ABC to ABA domains does not occur at a temperature lower than 1,000?°C. Here we report that ABC-stacked trilayers are transformed to ABA-stacked layers after an organic molecule triazine is evaporated onto graphene surfaces at 150?°C. The transformation is found to always initiate at the ABA-ABC domain boundaries. Simulations based on density function theory considering the van der Waals interaction suggest that after triazine decoration the energy difference between ABA and ABC domains is larger, providing a driving force for stacking transformation. The molecular dynamics simulation results further suggest that the triazine decoration on the wrinkles at the ABC-ABA domain boundary activates the wrinkle sliding toward the ABC domains, leading to the stacking transformation from ABC to ABA.

  11. The propargylbenzene dimer: C-H? assisted ?-? stacking.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Aniket; Sen, Saumik; Patwari, G Naresh

    2015-04-14

    The propargylbenzene dimer was investigated using mass selected electronic and infrared spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations. The IR spectrum in the acetylenic C-H stretching region indicates that the two propargylbenzene units in the dimer are in an almost identical environment. The stabilization energies calculated at various levels of theory predict that the anti-parallel structure is the most stable isomer. The observed spectra are assigned to ?-stacked structures which incorporate C-H? interaction. The symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) based energy decomposition analysis reveals that electrostatics contributes around 35% while the rest is due to dispersion. Comparison with the phenylacetylene and toluene dimers indicates that the higher stabilization energy of the PrBz dimer can be attributed to the synergy between the ?-? stacking and C-H? interactions. PMID:25758455

  12. Ultra-dark graphene stack metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugh, Sunny; Man, Mengren; Chen, Zhihong; Webb, Kevin J.

    2015-02-01

    We present a fabrication method to achieve a graphene stack metamaterial, a periodic array of unit cells composed of graphene and a thin insulating spacer, that allows accumulation of the strong absorption from individual graphene sheets and low reflectivity from the stack. The complex sheet conductivity of graphene from experimental data models the measured power transmitted as a function of wavelength and number of periods in the stack. Simulated results based on the extracted graphene complex sheet conductivity for thicker stacks suggest that the graphene stack reflectivity and the per-unit-length absorption can be controlled to exceed the performance of competing light absorbers. Furthermore, the electrical properties of graphene coupled with the stack absorption characteristics provide for applications in optoelectronic devices.

  13. Hydrogen Embrittlement And Stacking-Fault Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, R. A.; Johnson, M. H.; Davis, J. H.; Oh, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Embrittlement in Ni/Cu alloys appears related to stacking-fault porbabilities. Report describes attempt to show a correlation between stacking-fault energy of different Ni/Cu alloys and susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Correlation could lead to more fundamental understanding and method of predicting susceptibility of given Ni/Cu alloy form stacking-fault energies calculated from X-ray diffraction measurements.

  14. Manifold seal for fuel cell stack assembly

    DOEpatents

    Schmitten, Phillip F. (N. Huntingdon, PA); Wright, Maynard K. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1989-01-01

    An assembly for sealing a manifold to a stack of fuel cells includes a first resilient member for providing a first sealing barrier between the manifold and the stack. A second resilient member provides a second sealing barrier between the manifold and the stack. The first and second resilient members are retained in such a manner as to define an area therebetween adapted for retaining a sealing composition.

  15. Flexible interconnects for fuel cell stacks

    DOEpatents

    Lenz, David J.; Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc

    2004-11-09

    An interconnect that facilitates electrical connection and mechanical support with minimal mechanical stress for fuel cell stacks. The interconnects are flexible and provide mechanically robust fuel cell stacks with higher stack performance at lower cost. The flexible interconnects replace the prior rigid rib interconnects with flexible "fingers" or contact pads which will accommodate the imperfect flatness of the ceramic fuel cells. Also, the mechanical stress of stacked fuel cells will be smaller due to the flexibility of the fingers. The interconnects can be one-sided or double-sided.

  16. [An oligopeptide improves solubility of paclitaxel by non-covalent interaction].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Guo, Tao; Ge, Jing-Wen; Li, Hai-Yan; Xu, Xue-Jun; Sun, Li-Xin; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2012-07-01

    Based on the principle of non-covalent interactions between oligopeptides and paclitaxel for improving the solubility of paclitaxel, an oligopeptide, N terminal-W(L)-FFGREKD-C terminal (W8), was designed and the solubilization effect of W8 on paclitaxel was detected through experiments. The binding efficiency and the possible optimal conformation were optimized by molecular docking program. The solubilization effect of W8 on paclitaxel was determined by RP-HPLC. And the solubilization mechanism of oligopeptide to paclitaxel was proposed at molecular level. It was indicated from the docking result that there existed pi-pi interactions and several hydrogen-bond interactions between the oligopeptide and paclitaxel. After being solubilized by the oligopeptide, the aqueous solubility of paclitaxel was increased to 28 times. This study provided basis for further research of the solubilization of paclitaxel by oligopeptide and confirmed a novel approach for the design of safe oligopeptide solubilizing excipient. PMID:22993863

  17. Stacked graphs--geometry & aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Byron, Lee; Wattenberg, Martin

    2008-01-01

    In February 2008, the New York Times published an unusual chart of box office revenues for 7500 movies over 21 years. The chart was based on a similar visualization, developed by the first author, that displayed trends in music listening. This paper describes the design decisions and algorithms behind these graphics, and discusses the reaction on the Web. We suggest that this type of complex layered graph is effective for displaying large data sets to a mass audience. We provide a mathematical analysis of how this layered graph relates to traditional stacked graphs and to techniques such as ThemeRiver, showing how each method is optimizing a different "energy function". Finally, we discuss techniques for coloring and ordering the layers of such graphs. Throughout the paper, we emphasize the interplay between considerations of aesthetics and legibility. PMID:18988970

  18. Stacked optical antennas Dieter W. Pohl,1

    E-print Network

    Novotny, Lukas

    Stacked optical antennas Dieter W. Pohl,1 Sergio G. Rodrigo,2 and Lukas Novotny2,a 1 Institute; published online 13 January 2011 We propose and analyze a stacked optical antenna SOA . It is characterized in microscopy. © 2011 American Institute of Physics. doi:10.1063/1.3541544 Optical antennas are devices

  19. Effective Stack Design in Air Pollution Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, John H.

    1968-01-01

    Stack design problems fall into two general caterories--(1) those of building re-entry, and (2) those of general area pollution. Extensive research has developed adequate information, available in the literature, to permit effective stack design. A major roadblock to effective design has been the strong belief by architects and engineers that high…

  20. ESSENTIAL DIMENSION AND ALGEBRAIC STACKS PATRICK BROSNAN

    E-print Network

    that in Definition 1.1 the essential dimension of a depends on the field L. We write ed a instead of ed(a, LESSENTIAL DIMENSION AND ALGEBRAIC STACKS PATRICK BROSNAN , ZINOVY REICHSTEIN , AND ANGELO VISTOLI Abstract. We define and study the essential dimension of an algebraic stack. We compute the essential

  1. Polar stacking of molecules in liquid chloroform.

    PubMed

    Shephard, J J; Soper, A K; Callear, S K; Imberti, S; Evans, J S O; Salzmann, C G

    2015-03-01

    Using neutron diffraction and the isotopic substitution technique we have investigated the local structure of liquid chloroform. A strong tendency for polar stacking of molecules with collinear alignment of dipole moments is found. We speculate that these polar stacks contribute to the performance of chloroform as a solvent. PMID:25562307

  2. Testing of Bluetooth protocol stack using emulator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dongxiang Ye; Zhong'ao Jiang; Hong Lin; Qiang Gao

    2001-01-01

    Bluetooth is a promising new technology for short range wireless connectivity between mobile devices. Nevertheless, before the massive products come into the market, reliability of protocol stack and profiles, and interoperability of different Bluetooth products from different vendors are yet to overcome. In this article, we proposed an conformance testing architecture using emulator for different protocol stacks. Our purpose to

  3. Modular fuel-cell stack assembly

    DOEpatents

    Patel, Pinakin (Danbury, CT)

    2010-07-13

    A fuel cell assembly having a plurality of fuel cells arranged in a stack. An end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at an end of said stack. The end plate assembly has an inlet area adapted to receive an exhaust gas from the stack, an outlet area and a passage connecting the inlet area and outlet area and adapted to carry the exhaust gas received at the inlet area from the inlet area to the outlet area. A further end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at a further opposing end of the stack. The further end plate assembly has a further inlet area adapted to receive a further exhaust gas from the stack, a further outlet area and a further passage connecting the further inlet area and further outlet area and adapted to carry the further exhaust gas received at the further inlet area from the further inlet area to the further outlet area.

  4. Carboxyl-peptide plane stacking is important for stabilization of buried E305 of Trichoderma reesei Cel5A.

    PubMed

    He, Chunyan; Chen, Jingfei; An, Liaoyuan; Wang, Yefei; Shu, Zhiyu; Yao, Lishan

    2015-01-26

    Hydrogen bonds or salt bridges are usually formed to stabilize the buried ionizable residues. However, such interactions do not exist for two buried residues D271 and E305 of Trichoderma reesei Cel5A, an endoglucanase. Mutating D271 to alanine or leucine improves the enzyme thermostability quantified by the temperature T50 due to the elimination of the desolvation penalty of the aspartic acid. However, the same mutations for E305 decrease the enzyme thermostability. Free energy calculations based on the molecular dynamics simulation predict the thermostability of D271A, D271L, and E305A (compared to WT) in line with the experimental observation but overestimate the thermostability of E305L. Quantum mechanical calculations suggest that the carboxyl-peptide plane stacking interactions occurring to E305 but not D271 are important for the carboxyl group stabilization. For the protonated carboxyl group, the interaction energy can be as much as about -4 kcal/mol for parallel stacking and about -7 kcal/mol for T-shaped stacking. For the deprotonated carboxyl group, the largest interaction energies for parallel stacking and T-shaped stacking are comparable, about -7 kcal/mol. The solvation effect generally weakens the interaction, especially for the charged system. A search of the carboxyl-peptide plane stacking in the PDB databank indicates that parallel stacking but not T-shaped stacking is quite common, and the most probable distance between the two stacking fragments is close to the value predicted by the QM calculations. This work highlights the potential role of carboxyl amide ?-? stacking in the stabilization of aspartic acid and glutamic acid in proteins. PMID:25569819

  5. On the role of the final-state interactions in rare B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Kaidalov, A. B.; Vysotsky, M. I. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2009-12-15

    The effects of final-state interactions (FSI) in hadronic B decays are investigated. The model for FSI, based on Regge phenomenology of high-energy hadronic interactions, is proposed. It is shown that this model explains the pattern of phases in matrix elements of B {yields} {pi}{pi} and B {yields} {rho}{rho} decays. These phases play an important role for CP violation in B decays. The most precise determination of the unitarity triangle angle {alpha} from B{sub d} {yields} {rho}{pi} decays is performed. The relation between CP asymmetries in B {yields} K{pi} decays is discussed. It is emphasized that the large-distance FSI can explain the structure of polarizations of the vector mesons in B decays and other puzzles like a very large branching ratio of the B decay to {Xi}{sub c{Lambda}c}.

  6. Stacking of metal chelates with benzene: can dispersion-corrected DFT be used to calculate organic-inorganic stacking?

    PubMed

    Malenov, Dušan P; Ninkovi?, Dragan B; Zari?, Snežana D

    2015-03-16

    CCSD(T)/CBS energies for stacking of nickel and copper chelates are calculated and used as benchmark data for evaluating the performance of dispersion-corrected density functionals for calculating the interaction energies. The best functionals for modeling the stacking of benzene with the nickel chelate are M06HF-D3 with the def2-TZVP basis set, and B3LYP-D3 with either def2-TZVP or aug-cc-pVDZ basis set, whereas for copper chelate the PBE0-D3 with def2-TZVP basis set yielded the best results. M06L-D3 with aug-cc-pVDZ gives satisfying results for both chelates. Most of the tested dispersion-corrected density functionals do not reproduce the benchmark data for stacking of benzene with both nickel (no unpaired electrons) and copper chelate (one unpaired electron), whereas a number of these functionals perform well for interactions of organic molecules. PMID:25630762

  7. Antiretroviral and immunosuppressive drug-drug interactions in human immunodeficiency virus-infected liver and kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Marfo, K; Greenstein, S

    2009-11-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has significantly reduced mortality, and prolonged life expectancy of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients. Such improvements have led to increasing numbers of HIV-infected patients with end-stage organ disease as potential candidates for transplantation. A HAART regimen usually consists of a combination of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI), and/or protease inhibitors (PI). PI are known to strongly inhibit the cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) enzyme system that is responsible for the metabolism of immunosuppressive drugs, such as tacrolimus, sirolimus, and cyclosporine. Besides these pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions, potential pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions may also occur with concomitant HAART and antimetabolites, such as mycophenolate mofetil. An approach to immunosuppressive management in HIV-infected organ transplant recipients requires attention to such complexities as unique drug-drug interactions and increased drug-related toxicities. PMID:19917390

  8. Slip stacking experiments at Fermilab main injector

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyomi Koba et al.

    2003-06-02

    In order to achieve an increase in proton intensity, Fermilab Main Injector will use a stacking process called ''slip stacking''. The intensity will be doubled by injecting one train of bunches at a slightly lower energy, another at a slightly higher energy, then bringing them together for the final capture. Beam studies have started for this process and we have already verified that, at least for a low beam intensity, the stacking procedure works as expected. For high intensity operation, development work of the feedback and feedforward systems is under way.

  9. Dynamical stability of slip-stacking particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-09-01

    We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

  10. Photonic band gap of a graphene-embedded quarter-wave stack

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yuancheng [Ames Laboratory; Wei, Zeyong [Tongji University; Li, Hongqiang [Tongji University; Chen, Hong [Tongji University; Soukoulis, Costas M [Ames Laboratory

    2013-12-10

    Here, we present a mechanism for tailoring the photonic band structure of a quarter-wave stack without changing its physical periods by embedding conductive sheets. Graphene is utilized and studied as a realistic, two-dimensional conductive sheet. In a graphene-embedded quarter-wave stack, the synergic actions of Bragg scattering and graphene conductance contributions open photonic gaps at the center of the reduced Brillouin zone that are nonexistent in conventional quarter-wave stacks. Such photonic gaps show giant, loss-independent density of optical states at the fixed lower-gap edges, of even-multiple characteristic frequency of the quarter-wave stack. The conductive sheet-induced photonic gaps provide a platform for the enhancement of light-matter interactions.

  11. Singlet exciton fission in polycrystalline thin films of a slip-stacked perylenediimide.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Samuel W; Shoer, Leah E; Karlen, Steven D; Dyar, Scott M; Margulies, Eric A; Veldkamp, Brad S; Ramanan, Charusheela; Hartzler, Daniel A; Savikhin, Sergei; Marks, Tobin J; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2013-10-01

    The crystal structure of N,N-bis(n-octyl)-2,5,8,11-tetraphenylperylene-3,4:9,10-bis(dicarboximide), 1, obtained by X-ray diffraction reveals that 1 has a nearly planar perylene core and ?-? stacks at a 3.5 Å interplanar distance in well-separated slip-stacked columns. Theory predicts that slip-stacked, ?-?-stacked structures should enhance interchromophore electronic coupling and thus favor singlet exciton fission. Photoexcitation of vapor-deposited polycrystalline 188 nm thick films of 1 results in a 140 ± 20% yield of triplet excitons ((3*)1) in ?(SF) = 180 ± 10 ps. These results illustrate a design strategy for producing perylenediimide and related rylene derivatives that have the optimized interchromophore electronic interactions which promote high-yield singlet exciton fission for potentially enhancing organic solar cell performance and charge separation in systems for artificial photosynthesis. PMID:24011336

  12. Asymmetric noncovalent synthesis of self-assembled one-dimensional stacks by a chiral supramolecular auxiliary approach.

    PubMed

    George, Subi J; de Bruijn, Robin; Tomovi?, Željko; Van Averbeke, Bernard; Beljonne, David; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Schenning, Albertus P H J; Meijer, E W

    2012-10-24

    Stereoselective noncovalent synthesis of one-dimensional helical self-assembled stacks of achiral oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) ureidotriazine (AOPV3) monomers is obtained by a chiral supramolecular auxiliary approach. The racemic mixture of helical stacks of achiral AOPV3 molecules is converted into homochiral helical stacks, as shown by both spectroscopic measurements and molecular modeling simulations. The conversion is promoted by an orthogonal two-point ion-pair interaction with the chiral auxiliary dibenzoyl tartaric acid (D- or L-TA) molecules, which biases the angle population distribution and thereby the stack helicity. The induced preferred helicity is maintained by the OPV stacks even after the removal of the chiral auxiliary by extraction with ethylenediamine (EDA), due to the kinetic stability of the OPV stacks at room temperature. Spectroscopic probing of the helical self-assembly and the racemization process of these ?-conjugated OPV chromophores shed further light into the mechanistic pathways of this chiral asymmetric noncovalent synthesis and the kinetic stability of the stacks produced. The racemization of the stacks follows first-order kinetics and no switch in mechanism is observed as a result of a temperature change; therefore, a racemization via disassembly assembly is proposed. Remarkably, the preferred helicity of the stacks of achiral AOPV3 can be retained almost completely after a heating-cooling cycle where the stacks first partially depolymerize and then polymerize again with the still existing stacks being the seeds for self-assembly of achiral AOPV3. Only after a fully dissociated state is obtained at high temperatures, the optical activity of the supramolecular stack self-assembled at room temperature is lost. PMID:23030496

  13. Stacked vapor fed amtec modules

    DOEpatents

    Sievers, Robert K. (North Huntingdon, PA)

    1989-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a stacked AMTEC module. The invention includes a tubular member which has an interior. The member is comprised of a ion conductor that substantially conducts ions relative to electrons, preferably a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, positioned about the interior. A porous electrode for conducting electrons and allowing sodium ions to pass therethrough, and wherein electrons and sodium ions recombine to form sodium is positioned about the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte. The electrode is operated at a temperature and a pressure that allows the recombined sodium to vaporize. Additionally, an outer current collector grid for distributing electrons throughout the porous electrode is positioned about and contacts the porous electrode. Also included in the invention is transporting means for transporting liquid sodium to the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte of the tubular member. A transition piece is positioned about the interior of the member and contacts the transporting means. The transition piece divides the member into a first cell and a second cell such that each first and second cell has a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, a first and second porous electrode and a grid. The transition piece conducts electrons from the interior of the tubular member. There is supply means for supplying sodium to the transporting means. Preferably the supply means is a shell which surrounds the tubular member and is operated at a temperature such that the vaporized sodium condenses thereon. Returning means for returning the condensed sodium from the shell to the transporting means provides a continuous supply of liquid sodium to the transporting means. Also, there are first conducting means for conducting electric current from the transition piece which extends through the shell, and second conducting means for conducting electric current to the grid of the first cell which extends through the shell.

  14. Framed sheaves on projective stacks

    E-print Network

    Ugo Bruzzo; Francesco Sala

    2014-11-05

    Given a normal projective irreducible stack $\\mathscr X$ over an algebraically closed field of characteristic zero we consider framed sheaves on $\\mathscr X$, i.e., pairs $(\\mathcal E,\\phi_{\\mathcal E})$, where $\\mathcal E$ is a coherent sheaf on $\\mathscr X$ and $\\phi_{\\mathcal E}$ is a morphism from $\\mathcal E$ to a fixed coherent sheaf $\\mathcal F$. After introducing a suitable notion of (semi)stability, we construct a projective scheme, which is a moduli space for semistable framed sheaves with fixed Hilbert polynomial, and an open subset of it, which is a fine moduli space for stable framed sheaves. If $\\mathscr X$ is a projective irreducible orbifold of dimension two and $\\mathcal F$ a locally free sheaf on a smooth divisor $\\mathscr D\\subset \\mathscr X$ satisfying certain conditions, we consider $(\\mathscr{D}, \\mathcal{F})$-framed sheaves, i.e., framed sheaves $(\\mathcal E,\\phi_{\\mathcal E})$ with $\\mathcal E$ a torsion-free sheaf which is locally free in a neighborhood of $\\mathscr D$, and ${\\phi_{\\mathcal{E}}}_{| \\mathscr{D}}$ an isomorphism. These pairs are $\\mu$-stable for a suitable choice of a parameter entering the (semi)stability condition, and of the polarization of $\\mathscr X$. This implies the existence of a fine moduli space parameterizing isomorphism classes of $(\\mathscr{D}, \\mathcal{F})$-framed sheaves on $\\mathscr{X}$ with fixed Hilbert polynomial, which is a quasi-projective scheme. In an appendix we develop the example of stacky Hirzebruch surfaces. This is the first paper of a project aimed to provide an algebro-geometric approach to the study of gauge theories on a wide class of 4-dimensional Riemannian manifolds by means of framed sheaves on "stacky" compactifications of them. In particular, in a subsequent paper we will use these results to study gauge theories on ALE spaces of type $A_k$.

  15. SHEAVES ON ALGEBRAIC STACKS 1. Introduction 1

    E-print Network

    de Jong, A. Johan

    4 5. Computing pushforward 6 6. The structure sheaf 8 7. Sheaves of modules 9 8. Representable, it is a problematic beast, because it turns out that a morphism of algebraic stacks does not induce a morphism

  16. StackOverview 2.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

    E-print Network

    Tanaka, Jiro

    17 Web #12;Web Web 81% Web Web Web Web StackOverview #12;1 1 2 Web 3 2.2.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3 Web 6 3.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3

  17. Beam loading compensation for slip stacking

    SciTech Connect

    James Steimel; Tim Berenc; Claudio Rivetta

    2003-06-04

    This paper discusses the beam loading compensation requirements to make slip stacking practical in the Fermilab main injector. It also discusses some of the current plans for meeting these requirements with a digital, direct RF feedback system.

  18. 40 CFR 61.33 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium § 61.33 Stack sampling. (a) Unless a waiver...Administrator. (d) All samples shall be analyzed and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30 days after the...

  19. Wearable solar cells by stacking textile electrodes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shaowu; Yang, Zhibin; Chen, Peining; Deng, Jue; Li, Houpu; Peng, Huisheng

    2014-06-10

    A new and general method to produce flexible, wearable dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) textiles by the stacking of two textile electrodes has been developed. A metal-textile electrode that was made from micrometer-sized metal wires was used as a working electrode, while the textile counter electrode was woven from highly aligned carbon nanotube fibers with high mechanical strengths and electrical conductivities. The resulting DSC textile exhibited a high energy conversion efficiency that was well maintained under bending. Compared with the woven DSC textiles that are based on wire-shaped devices, this stacked DSC textile unexpectedly exhibited a unique deformation from a rectangle to a parallelogram, which is highly desired in portable electronics. This lightweight and wearable stacked DSC textile is superior to conventional planar DSCs because the energy conversion efficiency of the stacked DSC textile was independent of the angle of incident light. PMID:24789065

  20. 49 CFR 178.606 - Stacking test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...subjected to a stacking test. (b) Number of test samples. Three test...packagings constructed of stainless steel, monel, or nickel, only one...required. Exceptions for the number of aluminum and steel sample packagings used...

  1. 40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless...61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

  2. 40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless...61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

  3. 40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless...61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

  4. 40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless...61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

  5. 40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless...61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

  6. Stacking for Cosmic Magnetism with SKA Surveys

    E-print Network

    Stil, J M

    2015-01-01

    Stacking polarized radio emission in SKA surveys provides statistical information on large samples that is not accessible otherwise due to limitations in sensitivity, source statistics in small fields, and averaging over frequency (including Faraday synthesis). Polarization is a special case because one obvious source of stacking targets is the Stokes I source catalog, possibly in combination with external catalogs, for example an SKA HI survey or a non-radio survey. We point out the significance of stacking sub-samples selected by additional observable parameters to investigate relations that reveal more about the physics of the source. Applications of stacking polarization include, but are not limited to, obtaining in a statistical sense polarization information to the detection limit in total intensity, depolarization as a function of cosmic time at consistent source-frame wavelengths, magnetic field properties in objects with a low radio luminosity such as dwarf and low-surface-brightness galaxies, and in...

  7. 40 CFR 61.44 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium Rocket Motor Firing § 61.44 Stack sampling...after samples are taken and before any subsequent rocket motor firing or propellant disposal at the given site. All...

  8. 40 CFR 61.44 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium Rocket Motor Firing § 61.44 Stack sampling...after samples are taken and before any subsequent rocket motor firing or propellant disposal at the given site. All...

  9. 40 CFR 61.44 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium Rocket Motor Firing § 61.44 Stack sampling...after samples are taken and before any subsequent rocket motor firing or propellant disposal at the given site. All...

  10. 40 CFR 61.44 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium Rocket Motor Firing § 61.44 Stack sampling...after samples are taken and before any subsequent rocket motor firing or propellant disposal at the given site. All...

  11. 40 CFR 61.44 - Stack sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium Rocket Motor Firing § 61.44 Stack sampling...after samples are taken and before any subsequent rocket motor firing or propellant disposal at the given site. All...

  12. PAH emission from various industrial stacks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hsi-Hsien Yang; Wen-Jhy Lee; Shui-Jen Chen; Soon-Onn Lai

    1998-01-01

    The emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from various industrial stacks (blast furnace, basic oxygen furnace, coke oven, electric arc furnace, heavy oil plant, power plant and cement plant) in southern Taiwan were investigated. PAH concentrations (?g\\/N m3) and PAH emission factors (?g\\/kg feedstock) were determined. In addition to these eight stationary industrial stacks, an industrial waste incinerator, a diesel

  13. Evaluating user interfaces for stack mode viewing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, M. Stella; Kirkpatrick, Arthur E.; Knight, Adelle; Forster, Bruce

    2007-03-01

    The goal of this research was to evaluate two different stack mode layouts for 3D medical images - a regular stack mode layout where just the topmost image was visible, and a new stack mode layout, which included the images just before and after the main image. We developed stripped down user interfaces to test the techniques, and designed a look-alike radiology task using 3D artificial target stimuli implanted in the slices of medical image volumes. The task required searching for targets and identifying the range of slices containing the targets. Eight naive students participated, using a within-subjects design. We measured the response time and accuracy of subjects using the two layouts and tracked the eyegaze of several subjects while they performed the task. Eyegaze data was divided into fixations and saccades Subjects were 19% slower with the new stack layout than the standard stack layout, but 5 of the 8 subjects preferred the new layout. Analysis of the eyegaze data showed that in the new technique, the context images on both sides were fixated once the target was found in the topmost image. We believe that the extra time was caused by the difficulty in controlling the rate of scrolling, causing overshooting. We surmise that providing some contextual detail such as adjacent slices in the new stack mode layout is helpful to reduce cognitive load for this radiology look-alike task.

  14. Stacking-dependent band gap and quantum transport in trilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, W.; Jing, L.; Velasco, J.; Lee, Y.; Liu, G.; Tran, D.; Standley, B.; Aykol, M.; Cronin, S. B.; Smirnov, D.; Koshino, M.; McCann, E.; Bockrath, M.; Lau, C. N.

    2011-12-01

    Graphene is an extraordinary two-dimensional (2D) system with chiral charge carriers and fascinating electronic, mechanical and thermal properties. In multilayer graphene, stacking order provides an important yet rarely explored degree of freedom for tuning its electronic properties. For instance, Bernal-stacked trilayer graphene (B-TLG) is semi-metallic with a tunable band overlap, and rhombohedral-stacked trilayer graphene (r-TLG) is predicted to be semiconducting with a tunable band gap. These multilayer graphenes are also expected to exhibit rich novel phenomena at low charge densities owing to enhanced electronic interactions and competing symmetries. Here we demonstrate the dramatically different transport properties in TLG with different stacking orders, and the unexpected spontaneous gap opening in charge neutral r-TLG. At the Dirac point, B-TLG remains metallic, whereas r-TLG becomes insulating with an intrinsic interaction-driven gap ~6meV. In magnetic fields, well-developed quantum Hall (QH) plateaux in r-TLG split into three branches at higher fields. Such splitting is a signature of the Lifshitz transition, a topological change in the Fermi surface, that is found only in r-TLG. Our results underscore the rich interaction-induced phenomena in trilayer graphene with different stacking orders, and its potential towards electronic applications.

  15. Hydrogen effects on crystal dislocations and stacking-fault energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Paulo Jorge

    The mechanisms of hydrogen shielding the interaction of dislocations with other elastic centers are outlined. In-situ straining transmission electron microscope experiments show that the effect of hydrogen on the interaction between dislocations is reversible, whereas in systems where significant levels of impurities exist, the effect of hydrogen is to decrease the interaction between dislocations and solute atoms. Both observations strongly support the HELP mechanism to account for the observed hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility. In addition, the effect of hydrogen on the nature (screw vs. edge) of dislocations in high-purity aluminum are discussed. Hydrogen stabilizes the edge dislocation segments which results in a decreased ability of dislocations to cross-slip. It suggests that hydrogen has a tendency to promote slip planarity. Finally, the effect of hydrogen on the stacking-fault energy of an austenitic stainless steel is presented. Measurements done on dislocation nodes reveal a reduction of approximately 19% when comparing the stacking fault energies in vacuum and 40 torr of hydrogen.

  16. Study of the tau- ---> pi- pi- pi+ pi0 pi0 nu/tau and tau- --> 3h- 2h+ nu/tau Decays Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sobie, R.; /Victoria U.

    2005-06-21

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -} 2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decays have been studied using the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. Preliminary branching fractions are given for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and to the sub-channels {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}(782){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}. A preliminary upper limit is given on the branching fraction for the {phi}(1020){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} mode. In addition a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -}2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay (h = {pi}, K) is presented.

  17. Measurement of CP Parameters in B- --> D(pi+pi-pi0)K- and Study of the X(3872) in B --> J/psi pi+ pi- K with the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Winklmeier, Frank; /SLAC

    2006-09-18

    This dissertation presents two analyses performed on data collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric-energy B Factory. First, a Dalitz analysis is shown that performs the first measurement of CP violation parameters in the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}}K{sup -} using the decay rate asymmetry and D{sup 0} - {bar D}{sup 0} interference. The results can be used to further constrain the value of the CKM angle {gamma}. The second analysis studies the properties of the X(3872) in neutral and charged B {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}K decays. Measurements of the branching ratio and mass are presented as well as the search for additional resonances at higher masses.

  18. Modeling theta-theta Interactions with the Effective Fragment Potential Method: The Benzene Dimer and Substituents

    SciTech Connect

    Toni Smithl; Lyudmila V. Slipchenko; Mark S. Gordon

    2008-02-27

    This study compares the results of the general effective fragment potential (EFP2) method to the results of a previous combined coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) study [Sinnokrot and Sherrill, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2004, 126, 7690] on substituent effects in {pi}-{pi} interactions. EFP2 is found to accurately model the binding energies of the benzene-benzene, benzene-phenol, benzene-toluene, benzene-fluorobenzene, and benzene-benzonitrile dimers, as compared with high-level methods [Sinnokrot and Sherrill, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2004, 126, 7690], but at a fraction of the computational cost of CCSD(T). In addition, an EFP-based Monte Carlo/simulated annealing study was undertaken to examine the potential energy surface of the substituted dimers.

  19. Final State Interaction Effect in Pure Annihilation $B_s \\to ??$ Decay

    E-print Network

    Mohammad Rahim Talebtash; Hossein Mehraban

    2014-11-19

    We analyzed the process of $B_s\\rightarrow \\rho \\rho$ decay in QCD factorization (QCDF) and final state interaction (FSI) effects. In QCDF for this decay we have only the annihilation graph and we expected small Branching ratio. Then we considered FSI effect as a sizable correction where the intermediate states are $\\pi^0\\pi^0$, $\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $K^0\\bar{K^0}$ and $K^+K^-$ mesons. To consider the amplitudes of these intermediate states, QCDF approach was used. The experimental branching ratio of $B_s\\rightarrow \\rho\\rho$ is less than $3.20\\times 10^{-4}$ and our result is $1.08 \\times 10^{-9}$ and $3.29 \\times10^{-4}$ from QCDF and FSI, respectively.

  20. Manifold gasket accommodating differential movement of fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, Dana A. (New Milford, CT); Farooque, Mohammad (Danbury, CT)

    2007-11-13

    A gasket for use in a fuel cell system having at least one externally manifolded fuel cell stack, for sealing the manifold edge and the stack face. In accordance with the present invention, the gasket accommodates differential movement between the stack and manifold by promoting slippage at interfaces between the gasket and the dielectric and between the gasket and the stack face.

  1. High Voltage Marx Generator Implementation using IGBT Stacks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jong-Hyun Kim; Byung-Duk Min; Sergey Shenderey; Geun-Hie Rim

    2007-01-01

    High voltage Marx generator implementation using IGBT (Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor) stacks is proposed in this paper. To protect the Marx generator at the moment of breakdown, AOCP (Active Over-Current Protection) part is included. The Marx generator is composed of 12 stages and each stage is made of IGBT stacks, two diode stacks, and capacitors. IGBT stack is used as

  2. High voltage pulse power implementation using IGBT stacks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jong-Hyun Kim; Myung-Hyo Ryu; Byung-Duk Min; Ju-Won Baek; Jong-Soo Kim; Geun-Hie Rim

    2006-01-01

    High voltage pulse power implementation using IGBT stacks is proposed in this paper. High voltage pulse power implementation uses Marx circuit as the main circuit. The Marx circuit is composed of 12 stages and each stage is made of IGBT stack, two diode stacks, and capacitor. Diode stacks and inductor are used to charge high voltage capacitor of each stage

  3. Stacking in colloidal nanoplatelets: tuning excitonic properties.

    PubMed

    Guzelturk, Burak; Erdem, Onur; Olutas, Murat; Kelestemur, Yusuf; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2014-12-23

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum wells, also commonly known as nanoplatelets (NPLs), have arisen among the most promising materials for light generation and harvesting applications. Recently, NPLs have been found to assemble in stacks. However, their emerging characteristics essential to these applications have not been previously controlled or understood. In this report, we systematically investigate and present excitonic properties of controlled column-like NPL assemblies. Here, by a controlled gradual process, we show that stacking in colloidal quantum wells substantially increases exciton transfer and trapping. As NPLs form into stacks, surprisingly we find an order of magnitude decrease in their photoluminescence quantum yield, while the transient fluorescence decay is considerably accelerated. These observations are corroborated by ultraefficient Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in the stacked NPLs, in which exciton migration is estimated to be in the ultralong range (>100 nm). Homo-FRET (i.e., FRET among the same emitters) is found to be ultraefficient, reaching levels as high as 99.9% at room temperature owing to the close-packed collinear orientation of the NPLs along with their large extinction coefficient and small Stokes shift, resulting in a large Förster radius of ?13.5 nm. Consequently, the strong and long-range homo-FRET boosts exciton trapping in nonemissive NPLs, acting as exciton sink centers, quenching photoluminescence from the stacked NPLs due to rapid nonradiative recombination of the trapped excitons. The rate-equation-based model, which considers the exciton transfer and the radiative and nonradiative recombination within the stacks, shows an excellent match with the experimental data. These results show the critical significance of stacking control in NPL solids, which exhibit completely different signatures of homo-FRET as compared to that in colloidal nanocrystals due to the absence of inhomogeneous broadening. PMID:25469555

  4. Inflatable containment diaphragm for sealing and removing stacks

    DOEpatents

    Meskanick, G.R.; Rosso, D.T.

    1993-04-13

    A diaphragm with an inflatable torus-shaped perimeter is used to seal at least one end of a stack so that debris that might be hazardous will not be released during removal of the stack. A diaphragm is inserted and inflated in the lower portion of a stack just above where the stack is to be cut such that the perimeter of the diaphragm expands and forms a seal against the interior surface of the stack.

  5. Crystallographic stacking faults in antiferromagnetically coupled media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambon, C.; Holloway, L.; Antel, W. J.; Laidler, H.; Girt, E.; Harkness, S. D.

    2002-05-01

    Synchrotron x-ray scattering has been used to examine stacking faults in the constituent layers of an antiferromagnetically coupled (AFC) media film. By varying the x-ray incident angle, we have varied the x-ray penetration depth and, hence, the layer under examination. Three films were studied, one consisting of a full AFC media structure and the other two consisting of a single magnetic layer with the thicknesses of the constituent layers in the AFC medium. The stacking faults in the bottom magnetic layer were investigated using the single layer film. The stacking fault density in the top AFC media layer was measured using careful depth profiling to ensure that the penetration depth of the x rays remained within the top layer. We were unable to estimate the stacking faults in the bottom layer film but the stacking fault densities are constant at approximately 5% for the top layer of the AFC media and the top layer single film within a relatively large error of 3%.

  6. Technical description of Stack 296-B-5

    SciTech Connect

    Ridge, T.M.

    1994-11-15

    Of particular concern to facilities on the Hanford site is Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 40, Part 61, Subpart H, ``National emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities.`` Assessments of facility stacks and potential radionuclide emissions determined whether these stacks would be subject to the sampling and monitoring requirements of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H. Stack 296-B-5 exhausts 221-BB building which houses tanks containing B Plant steam condensate and B Plant process condensate from the operation of the low-level waste concentrator. The assessment of potential radionuclide emissions from the 296-B-5 stack resulted in an effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual of less than 0.1 millirem per year. Therefore, the stack is not subject to the sampling and monitoring requirements of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H. However, the sampling and monitoring system must be in compliance with the Environmental Compliance Manual, WHC-CM-7-5. Currently, 296-B-5 is sampled continuously with a record sampler and continuous air monitor (CAM).

  7. Fuel cell stack monitoring and system control

    DOEpatents

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2005-01-25

    A control method for monitoring a fuel cell stack in a fuel cell system in which the actual voltage and actual current from the fuel cell stack are monitored. A preestablished relationship between voltage and current over the operating range of the fuel cell is established. A variance value between the actual measured voltage and the expected voltage magnitude for a given actual measured current is calculated and compared with a predetermined allowable variance. An output is generated if the calculated variance value exceeds the predetermined variance. The predetermined voltage-current for the fuel cell is symbolized as a polarization curve at given operating conditions of the fuel cell. Other polarization curves may be generated and used for fuel cell stack monitoring based on different operating pressures, temperatures, hydrogen quantities.

  8. Radiation Tolerant Intelligent Memory Stack (RTIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Tak-kwong; Herath, Jeffrey A.

    2006-01-01

    The Radiation Tolerant Intelligent Memory Stack (RTIMS), suitable for both geostationary and low earth orbit missions, has been developed. The memory module is fully functional and undergoing environmental and radiation characterization. A self-contained flight-like module is expected to be completed in 2006. RTIMS provides reconfigurable circuitry and 2 gigabits of error corrected or 1 gigabit of triple redundant digital memory in a small package. RTIMS utilizes circuit stacking of heterogeneous components and radiation shielding technologies. A reprogrammable field programmable gate array (FPGA), six synchronous dynamic random access memories, linear regulator, and the radiation mitigation circuitries are stacked into a module of 42.7mm x 42.7mm x 13.00mm. Triple module redundancy, current limiting, configuration scrubbing, and single event function interrupt detection are employed to mitigate radiation effects. The mitigation techniques significantly simplify system design. RTIMS is well suited for deployment in real-time data processing, reconfigurable computing, and memory intensive applications.

  9. Intelligent Control System of Stack-boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Li; Jingxia, Niu; Jianhua, Lang; Shaofeng, Li; Zhi, Li

    Boiler combustion control system's basic task is to make fuel burn calories adapt to the needs of the water temperature and ensure the economical combustion and the safe operation. In the foundations which have analyzed the stack-boiler's work process and control system structure, the system designed by using the self-learning and self-optimizing fuzzy control system of the PC to make air/coal ratio achieve the best and realize the optimized combustion; through PLC to accelerate the speed of response to the boiler, and speed up the PC to optimize the speed and realize the double loop control system for stack-boiler. The control system in premise of the stack-boiler reaches the goal of the load to achieve the highest efficiency of the boiler combustion.

  10. Study of charmonium resonances in the gg -> K0SK pi- and gg -> K K-pi pi-pi0 processes

    SciTech Connect

    Biassoni, Pietro; /U. Milan, Dept. Phys.

    2012-02-22

    This thesis reports the analysis of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} processes using the final dataset of the BABAR experiment located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. From previous measurements, the K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} final state is known to show a clear signal from the {eta}{sub c}(2S) particle. This c{bar c} state escaped detection for almost twenty years and its properties are still not well established on the experimental ground, while accurate predictions exist on the theoretical side. The e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} process is first studied in this thesis. An accurate determination of the {eta}{sub c}(2S) properties is obtained in the K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay mode. We also report the first observation of {eta}{sub c}(2S) and other charmonium states to the K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} final state. The results of this thesis have been published in Physical Review D, and will be useful to test theoretical models describing the charmonium system. The thesis is organized in four chapters. The first one gives a brief introduction of the theoretical models used to describe the charmonium system. The second one discuss the current status of conventional and exotic charmonium spectroscopy, reporting recent experimental results and their interpretation. The third Chapter is devoted to describe the BABAR experiment. The analysis technique and results are described in Chapter 4. Finally, conclusions from this analysis are drawn.

  11. First observation and measurement of the resonant structure of the lambda_b->lambda_c pi-pi+pi- decay mode

    SciTech Connect

    Azzurri, P.; Barria, P.; Ciocci, M.A.; Donati, S.; Vataga, E.

    2009-12-01

    The authors present the first observation of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay using data from an integrated luminosity of approximately 2.4 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They also present the first observation of the resonant decays {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup 0} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and measure their relative branching ratios.

  12. Study of the doubly and singly Cabibbo suppressed decays D+ --> K+ pi- pi+ and D(s)+ --> K+ pi- pi+ in the FOCUS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Edera, Laura; /Milan U.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis illustrates a complete study of the doubly and singly Cabibbo suppressed decays D{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. Data for this analysis have been collected by the fixed-target high-energy photoproduction experiment FOCUS at Fermilab. The authors have selected the D{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} samples with cuts to obtain a sufficiently high statistics, a good signal to noise ratio and, at the same time, eliminate possible contaminations from the more copious and favored decays. The D{sup +} yield consists of 189 {+-} 24 events, with a signal to noise ratio {approx} 1; the D{sub s}{sup +} yield is 567 {+-} 31 and the signal to noise ratio is {approx} 2.5. The authors have measured {Lambda}(D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Lambda}(D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.0065 {+-} 0.0008 {+-} 0.004 and {Lambda}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Lambda}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.127 {+-} 0.007 {+-} 0.014, improving the previous determinations of a factor of 2 and 5, respectively. The author has also performed a Dalitz plot analysis for both decays. The amplitude analysis for D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} represents the first available measurement for this channel.

  13. First Observation of the Cabibbo-suppressed Decays Xi+(c) ---> Sigma+ pi- pi+ and Xi+(c) ---> Sigma- pi+ pi+ and Measurement of their Branching Ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Engelfried, J.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Akgun, U.; /Iowa U.; Alkhazov, Georgiy; /St. Petersburg, INP; Amaro-Reyes, J.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Ayan, Ahmet Sedat; /Iowa U.; Balatz, M.Y.; /Moscow, ITEP; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Bondar, N.F.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Cooper, Peter S.; /Fermilab /Michigan U., Flint

    2008-04-01

    The authors report the first observation of two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. They observe 56 {+-} 13 over a background of 21, and 23 {+-} 7 over a background of 12 events, respectively, for the signals. The data were accumulated using the SELEX spectrometer during the 1996-1997 fixed target run at Fermilab, chiefly from a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratios of the decays relative to the Cabibbo-favored {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} are measured to be B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/B({xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.50 {+-} 0.20, and B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.23 {+-} 0.11, respectively. They also report branching ratios for the same decay modes of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}.

  14. Branching Ratio Measurements of B ---> J/psi eta K and B+- ---> D0 K+- with D0 ---> pi+ pi- pi0

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Qinglin; /Colorado State U.

    2006-03-08

    Results are presented for the decays of B {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K and B{sup {+-}} {yields} DK{sup {+-}}, respectively, with experimental data collected with BABAR detector at PEP-II, located at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). With 90 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, we obtained branching fractions of {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sup {+-}}) = [10.8 {+-} 2.3(stat) {+-} 2.4(syst)] x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sub S}{sup 0}) = [8.4 {+-} 2.6(stat) {+-} 2.7(syst)] x 10{sup -5}; and we set an upper limit of {Beta}[B{sup {+-}} {yields} X(3872)K{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sup {+-}}] < 7.7 x 10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. The branching fraction of decay chain {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} DK{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}) = [5.5 {+-} 1.0(stat) {+-} 0.7(syst)] x 10{sup -6} with 229 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events at {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, here D represents the neutral D meson. The decay rate asymmetry is A = 0.02 {+-} 0.16(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst) for this full decay chain. This decay can be used to extract the unitarity angle {gamma}, a weak CP violation phase, through the interference of decay production of D{sup 0} and {bar D}{sup 0} to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}.

  15. Fuel cell stack monitoring and system control

    DOEpatents

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2004-02-17

    A control method for monitoring a fuel cell stack in a fuel cell system in which the actual voltage and actual current from the fuel cell stack are monitored. A preestablished relationship between voltage and current over the operating range of the fuel cell is established. A variance value between the actual measured voltage and the expected voltage magnitude for a given actual measured current is calculated and compared with a predetermined allowable variance. An output is generated if the calculated variance value exceeds the predetermined variance. The predetermined voltage-current for the fuel cell is symbolized as a polarization curve at given operating conditions of the fuel cell.

  16. Testing of Bluetooth protocol stack using emulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dongxiang; Jiang, Zhong'ao; Lin, Hong; Gao, Qiang

    2001-10-01

    Bluetooth is a promising new technology for short range wireless connectivity between mobile devices. Nevertheless, before the massive products come into the market, reliability of protocol stack and profiles, and interoperability of different Bluetooth products from different vendors are yet to overcome. In this article, we proposed an conformance testing architecture using emulator for different protocol stacks. Our purpose to use emulator instead of hardware is to provide a higher degree of control in testing the system for setting various parameters and test the protocol for a large number of nodes.

  17. Stacked Deck: An Effective, School-Based Program for the Prevention of Problem Gambling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert J.; Wood, Robert T.; Currie, Shawn R.

    2010-01-01

    School-based prevention programs are an important component of problem gambling prevention, but empirically effective programs are lacking. Stacked Deck is a set of 5-6 interactive lessons that teach about the history of gambling; the true odds and "house edge"; gambling fallacies; signs, risk factors, and causes of problem gambling; and skills…

  18. Observations of cooling tower and stack plumes and their comparison with plume model "ALINA"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haman, Krzysztof E.; Malinowski, Szymon P.

    Aircraft observations of stack and cooling tower plumes taken at a big power plant are compared with corresponding outputs of one-dimensional plume model ALINA, yielding certain improvements to the entrainment parametrization and dynamics of the model. Some observations of plume-plume and plume-environment interactions are reported.

  19. Stacking of SKA data: comparing uv-plane and image-plane stacking

    E-print Network

    Knudsen, K K; Vlemmings, W; Conway, J; Marti-Vidal, I

    2015-01-01

    Stacking as a tool for studying objects that are not individually detected is becoming popular even for radio interferometric data, and will be widely used in the SKA era. Stacking is typically done using imaged data rather than directly using the visibilities (the uv-data). We have investigated and developed a novel algorithm to do stacking using the uv-data. We have performed exten- sive simulations comparing to image-stacking, and summarize the results of these simulations. Furthermore, we disuss the implications in light of the vast data volume produced by the SKA. Having access to the uv-stacked data provides a great advantage, as it allows the possibility to properly analyse the result with respect to calibration artifacts as well as source properties such as size. For SKA the main challenge lies in archiving the uv-data. For purposes of robust stacking analysis, it would be strongly desirable to either keep the calibrated uv-data at least in an aver- age form, or implement a stacking queue where stacki...

  20. Interaction

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wolfgang Christian

    Set values for the initial position, velocity, and mass of the two particles, and click on the button "Initialize Animation" to play the animation using your specified values. Note, if m or v are too large, the particles may actually pass through one another which will seem a little strange. Note: the interaction between the particles is a "non-contact" interaction, much like the electrostatic force on two charges. Mathematically, it is actually a Hooke's law interaction.

  1. Analysis of stacking overlap in nucleic acid structures: algorithm and application.

    PubMed

    Pingali, Pavan Kumar; Halder, Sukanya; Mukherjee, Debasish; Basu, Sankar; Banerjee, Rahul; Choudhury, Devapriya; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2014-08-01

    RNA contains different secondary structural motifs like pseudo-helices, hairpin loops, internal loops, etc. in addition to anti-parallel double helices and random coils. The secondary structures are mainly stabilized by base-pairing and stacking interactions between the planar aromatic bases. The hydrogen bonding strength and geometries of base pairs are characterized by six intra-base pair parameters. Similarly, stacking can be represented by six local doublet parameters. These dinucleotide step parameters can describe the quality of stacking between Watson-Crick base pairs very effectively. However, it is quite difficult to understand the stacking pattern for dinucleotides consisting of non canonical base pairs from these parameters. Stacking interaction is a manifestation of the interaction between two aromatic bases or base pairs and thus can be estimated best by the overlap area between the planar aromatic moieties. We have calculated base pair overlap between two consecutive base pairs as the buried van der Waals surface between them. In general, overlap values show normal distribution for the Watson-Crick base pairs in most double helices within a range from 45 to 50 Å(2) irrespective of base sequence. The dinucleotide steps with non-canonical base pairs also are seen to have high overlap value, although their twist and few other parameters are rather unusual. We have analyzed hairpin loops of different length, bulges within double helical structures and pseudo-continuous helices using our algorithm. The overlap area analyses indicate good stacking between few looped out bases especially in GNRA tetraloop, which was difficult to quantitatively characterise from analysis of the base pair or dinucleotide step parameters. This parameter is also seen to be capable to distinguish pseudo-continuous helices from kinked helix junctions. PMID:24990628

  2. Stacking of oligo- and polythiophene cations in solution: Surface tension and dielectric saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherlis, Damián A.; Fattebert, Jean-Luc; Marzari, Nicola

    2006-05-01

    The stacking of positively charged (or doped) terthiophene oligomers and quaterthiophene polymers in solution is investigated applying a recently developed unified electrostatic and cavitation model for first-principles calculations in a continuum solvent. The thermodynamic and structural patterns of the dimerization are explored in different solvents, and the distinctive roles of polarity and surface tension are characterized and analyzed. Interestingly, we discover a saturation in the stabilization effect of the dielectric screening that takes place at rather small values of ?0. Moreover, we address the interactions in trimers of terthiophene cations, with the aim of generalizing the results obtained for the dimers to the case of higher-order stacks and nanoaggregates.

  3. YIELD IMPROVEMENT CASE STUDY: STACKED SPRING CAPS

    E-print Network

    Beckermann, Christoph

    ), and the total height is 1.7". The cap is cast from WCB steel in a no-bake sand mold, with a final casting weight mold box stacking arrangements. In this paper, `yield' is defined as the total weight of the castings produced by a mold assembly divided by the total weight of the melt poured to produce the castings

  4. Explosive demolition of K East Reactor Stack

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2010-09-02

    Using $420,000 in Recovery Act funds, the Department of Energy and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company topped off four months of preparations when they safely demolished the exhaust stack at the K East Reactor and equipment inside the reactor building on July 23, 2010.

  5. ESSENTIAL DIMENSION AND ALGEBRAIC STACKS PATRICK BROSNAN

    E-print Network

    Brosnan, Patrick

    that in Definition 1.1 the essential dimension of a depends on the field L. We write ed a instead of ed(a, LESSENTIAL DIMENSION AND ALGEBRAIC STACKS PATRICK BROSNAN , ZINOVY REICHSTEIN , AND ANGELO VISTOLI Abstract. Essential dimension is a numerical invariant of an algebraic group G introduced by J. Buhler

  6. Development of stacked multiple bandgap solar cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. P. Ruth; J. J. Coleman; S. W. Zehr; R. D. Dupuis; H. T. Yang; D. L. Miller; P. D. Dapkus

    1979-01-01

    Stacked multiple bandgap solar cells utilize separate junctions or solar cells or selected properties which are combined in series both optically and electrically to obtain higher conversion efficiencies than can be achieved by any of the cells individually. Basic requirements for the successful fabrication of high efficiency tandem structures will be defined, and the apparent practical limitations on the formation

  7. Arrays of stacked metal coordination compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bulkowski, J.E.

    1986-10-21

    A process is disclosed for preparing novel arrays of metal coordination compounds characterized by arrangement of the metal ions, separated by a linking agent, in stacked order one above the other. The process permits great flexibility in the design of the array. For example, layers of different composition can be added to the array at will. 3 figs.

  8. A study of flow through stacked screens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes numerical and experimental studies on the pressure loss characteristics of the flow through stacked screens. The flow through each screen is simulated as a core outside a boundary layer developing along the surface of the wire consisting of the screen. Within the core, the flow is modeled as one?dimensional for simplicity, and as two?dimensional for a more

  9. Protocols stack & connection establishment in Bluetooth radio

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. R. Chaudhry; M. I. Sheikh

    2002-01-01

    Some of the issues to be considered in the design of the higher layers of its protocol stack are those that allow the Bluetooth module to be easily integrated into any existing device that may benefit from being connected. Further, for rapid acceptance into the market, it should be possible for existing applications developed over conventional protocols to be easily

  10. SRS reactor stack plume marking tests

    SciTech Connect

    Petry, S.F.

    1992-03-01

    Tests performed in 105-K in 1987 and 1988 demonstrated that the stack plume can successfully be made visible (i.e., marked) by introducing smoke into the stack breech. The ultimate objective of these tests is to provide a means during an emergency evacuation so that an evacuee can readily identify the stack plume and evacuate in the opposite direction, thus minimizing the potential of severe radiation exposure. The EPA has also requested DOE to arrange for more tests to settle a technical question involving the correct calculation of stack downwash. New test canisters were received in 1988 designed to produce more smoke per unit time; however, these canisters have not been evaluated, because normal ventilation conditions have not been reestablished in K Area. Meanwhile, both the authorization and procedure to conduct the tests have expired. The tests can be performed during normal reactor operation. It is recommended that appropriate authorization and procedure approval be obtained to resume testing after K Area restart.

  11. Removing Sulphur Dioxide From Stack Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, A. V.

    1973-01-01

    Process types, process concepts, claims and counterclaims, cost factors, and the level of developed technology for sulfur dioxide control in stack gases are focused upon and evaluated. Wet and dry processes as well as recovery and throwaway processes are compared. (BL)

  12. Stack Gas Scrubber Makes the Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Describes a year long test of successful sulfur dioxide removal from stack gas with a calcium oxide slurry. Sludge disposal problems are discussed. Cost is estimated at 0.6 mill per kwh not including sludge removal. A flow diagram and equations are included. (GH)

  13. Development of mechanically stacked tandem concentrator cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cape, J.A.; Fraas, L.M.; McLeod, P.S.; Partain, L.D.

    1987-10-01

    Mechanically stacked, multijunction (MSMJ) solar cells offer an excellent prospect for significantly increased efficiencies in the near term. In this work, we examine several new concepts for a MSMJ solar cell. These MSMJ cell concepts include the following: A GaAsP cell grown on a GaP substrate for stacking onto a silicon cell; a GaSb cell grown lattice-matched on a GaSb substrate for stacking beneath a GaAs cell; and a Ge cell for stacking beneath a GaAs cell. The growth of GaAsP and of GaSb by vacuum chemical epitaxy and the development of GaSb solar cells are described. The development of a germanium solar cell and of a 26.1% GaAs/Ge MSMJ cell is also described. Finally, this work has identified approaches for achieving efficiencies with a MSMJ cell in excess of 30%. 19 refs., 18 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Measurement of heat conduction through stacked screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. A.; Kuriyama, T.; Kuriyama, F.; Radebaugh, R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental apparatus for the measurement of heat conduction through stacked screens as well as some experimental results taken with the apparatus. Screens are stacked in a fiberglass-epoxy cylinder, which is 24.4 mm in diameter and 55 mm in length. The cold end of the stacked screens is cooled by a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler at cryogenic temperature, and the hot end is maintained at room temperature. Heat conduction through the screens is determined from the temperature gradient in a calibrated heat flow sensor mounted between the cold end of the stacked screens and the GM cryocooler. The samples used for these experiments consisted of 400-mesh stainless steel screens, 400-mesh phosphor bronze screens, and two different porosities of 325-mesh stainless steel screens. The wire diameter of the 400-mesh stainless steel and phosphor bronze screens was 25.4 micrometers and the 325-mesh stainless steel screen wire diameters were 22.9 micrometers and 27.9 micrometers. Standard porosity values were used for the experimental data with additional porosity values used on selected experiments. The experimental results showed that the helium gas between each screen enhanced the heat conduction through the stacked screens by several orders of magnitude compared to that in vacuum. The conduction degradation factor is the ratio of actual heat conduction to the heat conduction where the regenerator material is assumed to be a solid rod of the same cross sectional area as the metal fraction of the screen. This factor was about 0.1 for the stainless steel and 0.022 for the phosphor bronze, and almost constant for the temperature range of 40 to 80 K at the cold end.

  15. Intramolecular electronic interactions between nonconjugated arene and quinone chromophores.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Georg; Kahlert, Björn; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Boese, Roland; Bläser, Dieter

    2010-06-30

    The novel surprisingly colorful dark blue and orange-red molecular clips 1 and 2 containing a central p-benzoquinone spacer-unit and anthracene or napththalene sidewalls were synthesized by DDQ oxidation of the corresponding colorless hydroquinone clips 7 and 8. The colors of the quinone clips result from broad absorption bands in the visible range (1, lambda(max) = 537 nm and 2, lambda(max) = 423 and lambda(shoulder) =515 nm) showing bathochromic shifts of 112 and 90 nm, respectively, compared to the similarly tetraalkyl-substituted duroquinone 31, even though the clips 1 and 2 only contain insulated pi systems as chromophores, a central tetraalkyl-substituted p-benzoquinone spacer-unit and two anthracene or two naphthalene sidewalls. To elucidate the electronic properties of these clips, we prepared the compound 3, the anti-configured isomer of clip 2, and the benzene-, naphthalene-, and anthracene-substituted quinones 4, 5, and 6, the so-called "half-clips". The "half-clips" 6 and 5 show a similar color change and the same trend in the UV/vis absorption spectra as the anthracene and naphthalene clip 1 and 2. This finding already rules out that the color of these systems is a result of "through-space" pi-pi interactions between the aromatic sidewalls in the molecular clips 1 and 2. Quantum chemical ab initio calculations provide good evidence that the bathochromic shift of the absorption band at the longest wavelength observed in the UV/vis spectra of the clip quinones 2, 3, and 1 and the "half-clip" quinones 4, 5, and 6 with an increasing number of rings in the anellated aromatic unit (from benzene to anthracene) is the result of an increasing configuration interaction between a n --> pi* excitation of the quinoid component and a pi --> pi* excitation with intramolecular charge transfer (CT) character. The initial pi orbitals involved here and in higher lying transitions mainly stem from through-space interactions between pi orbitals of the aromatic sidewalls and pi orbitals of the quinone moiety with varying degree of mixing. The configuration interaction in the excited states can be considered to be a homoconjugation, that is, the relevant charge transfer states are formed across an allegedly insulating aliphatic bridge. The UV/vis spectra of the molecular clips 1-3, the "half-clips" 4-6, and the quinones 32 and 33 simulated by means of quantum chemical ab initio calculations agree well with the experimental spectra. PMID:20521832

  16. 40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height...EPA's modified requirements. The State of Utah agrees to process appropriate...

  17. 40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height...EPA's modified requirements. The State of Utah agrees to process appropriate...

  18. 40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height...EPA's modified requirements. The State of Utah agrees to process appropriate...

  19. 40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height...EPA's modified requirements. The State of Utah agrees to process appropriate...

  20. 40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height...EPA's modified requirements. The State of Utah agrees to process appropriate...

  1. 40 CFR 52.2633 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...52.2633 Stack height regulations. In a letter dated December 9, 1988, to Douglas M. Skie, EPA, from Charles A. Collins, Administrator of The Air Quality Division, the State committed to conduct stack height evaluations in accordance with...

  2. 40 CFR 52.2633 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...52.2633 Stack height regulations. In a letter dated December 9, 1988, to Douglas M. Skie, EPA, from Charles A. Collins, Administrator of The Air Quality Division, the State committed to conduct stack height evaluations in accordance with...

  3. 40 CFR 52.2633 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...52.2633 Stack height regulations. In a letter dated December 9, 1988, to Douglas M. Skie, EPA, from Charles A. Collins, Administrator of The Air Quality Division, the State committed to conduct stack height evaluations in accordance with...

  4. 40 CFR 52.2633 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...52.2633 Stack height regulations. In a letter dated December 9, 1988, to Douglas M. Skie, EPA, from Charles A. Collins, Administrator of The Air Quality Division, the State committed to conduct stack height evaluations in accordance with...

  5. 40 CFR 52.2633 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...52.2633 Stack height regulations. In a letter dated December 9, 1988, to Douglas M. Skie, EPA, from Charles A. Collins, Administrator of The Air Quality Division, the State committed to conduct stack height evaluations in accordance with...

  6. VIEW OF STACK WITH AUTOMOBILE AND TRACTOR REPAIR SHOP TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF STACK WITH AUTOMOBILE AND TRACTOR REPAIR SHOP TO THE FAR RIGHT. WAREHOUSE WITH ITS RIDGELINE ROTARY VENTS TO RIGHT OF STACK. VIEW FROM THE WEST - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  7. 40 CFR 52.1832 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) North Dakota § 52.1832 Stack height regulations. The State of North Dakota has committed to revise its stack...modified requirements. The State of North Dakota agrees to make the...

  8. 40 CFR 52.1832 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) North Dakota § 52.1832 Stack height regulations. The State of North Dakota has committed to revise its stack...modified requirements. The State of North Dakota agrees to make the...

  9. 40 CFR 52.1832 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) North Dakota § 52.1832 Stack height regulations. The State of North Dakota has committed to revise its stack...modified requirements. The State of North Dakota agrees to make the...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1832 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) North Dakota § 52.1832 Stack height regulations. The State of North Dakota has committed to revise its stack...modified requirements. The State of North Dakota agrees to make the...

  11. 40 CFR 52.1832 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) North Dakota § 52.1832 Stack height regulations. The State of North Dakota has committed to revise its stack...modified requirements. The State of North Dakota agrees to make the...

  12. Project W-420 Stack Monitoring system upgrades conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    TUCK, J.A.

    1998-11-06

    This document describes the scope, justification, conceptual design, and performance of Project W-420 stack monitoring system upgrades on six NESHAP-designated, Hanford Tank Farms ventilation exhaust stacks.

  13. 40 CFR 52.1388 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1388 Stack height regulations. The State of Montana has committed to revise its stack height...EPA's modified requirements. The State of Montana agrees to make the appropriate...

  14. Diagnosis of PEMFC Stack Failures via Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy.

    E-print Network

    Victoria, University of

    i Diagnosis of PEMFC Stack Failures via Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. by Walter Roberto on a PEMFC stack under real operating conditions. They are also the basis of ongoing research, development

  15. Heated Jets Emitting From a Rectangular Stack into a Cross Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. E.; Elliott, G.; Christensen, K. T.

    2011-11-01

    A detailed analysis of jets in cross-flow is performed where jets heated to a centerline temperature To= 425,emit from a rectangular stack (AR = 3.76) into T?= 300 ,cross-wind at area-averaged momentum flux ratio r = 3.3. Cross-flow and jet centerline velocities are U?= 10,/s and Vo= 50,/s, respectively. Injection is normal to the bounding wall from a raised stack such that the initial incidence of jet interaction with cross-flow occurs well outside of the boundary layer. Rake-mounted thermocouple measurements of mean temperature and cross-plane stereoscopic PIV measurements of the turbulent flow field are performed at multiple stations downstream of the stack in spanwise--wall- normal regions of interest. Stack yaw angles of 0^o, 45^o, and 90^o comprise a set of key orientations from which inferences can be made of real-world heated jet in cross-flow behavior where cross-flow directionality may vary under shifting mean wind direction. From the measurements made under each of these stack orientations, the downstream dispersion of the heated jet fluid is characterized as is the downstream evolution of the turbulence and associated vortical structures.

  16. Promoting RNA helical stacking via A-minor junctions

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Cody; Chworos, Arkadiusz; Jaeger, Luc

    2011-01-01

    RNA molecules take advantage of prevalent structural motifs to fold and assemble into well-defined 3D architectures. The A-minor junction is a class of RNA motifs that specifically controls coaxial stacking of helices in natural RNAs. A sensitive self-assembling supra-molecular system was used as an assay to compare several natural and previously unidentified A-minor junctions by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy. This class of modular motifs follows a topological rule that can accommodate a variety of interchangeable A-minor interactions with distinct local structural motifs. Overall, two different types of A-minor junctions can be distinguished based on their functional self-assembling behavior: one group makes use of triloops or GNRA and GNRA-like loops assembling with helices, while the other takes advantage of more complex tertiary receptors specific for the loop to gain higher stability. This study demonstrates how different structural motifs of RNA can contribute to the formation of topologically equivalent helical stacks. It also exemplifies the need of classifying RNA motifs based on their tertiary structural features rather than secondary structural features. The A-minor junction rule can be used to facilitate tertiary structure prediction of RNAs and rational design of RNA parts for nanobiotechnology and synthetic biology. PMID:20876687

  17. Multi-energy, single-isotope imaging using stacked detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, B. S.; Shokouhi, S.; Barrett, H. H.; Peterson, T. E.

    2007-08-01

    We investigated a scheme for concurrently detecting low- and high-energy emissions from 123I with a stacked silicon double-sided strip detector (DSSD) and modular scintillation camera (Modcam) from the FastSPECT II design. We sequentially acquired both low- and high-energy emission images of an 123I object with a prototype DSSD and a Modcam. A sandwich aperture increases spatial resolution in the low-magnification DSSD image via a smaller pinhole diameter and allows a higher magnification image on the Modcam. Molybdenum, the insert material, efficiently stops 20-30 keV photons due to its ˜20 keV K-edge. Theoretically, less than 10% of 159 keV photons interact in 0.035 cm thick sheet of molybdenum, while this thickness stops virtually all ˜30 keV photons. Thus, photons from both energy regions will be incident upon their respective detectors with little cross talk. With a multi-pinhole collimator, we can decode multiplexed images on the Modcam by making use of the lower-magnification DSSD image. This approach can provide an increase in system sensitivity compared to single-detector configurations. Using MCNP5 we examined the potential benefits and drawbacks of stacked detectors and the sandwich aperture for small-animal pinhole SPECT via the synthetic-collimator method. Simulation results encourage us to construct the novel aperture and use it with our new DSSDs designed for mounting in a transmission configuration.

  18. Multi-energy, single-isotope imaging using stacked detectors.

    PubMed

    McDonald, B S; Shokouhi, S; Barrett, H H; Peterson, T E

    2007-08-21

    We investigated a scheme for concurrently detecting low- and high-energy emissions from (123)I with a stacked silicon double-sided strip detector (DSSD) and modular scintillation camera (Modcam) from the FastSPECT II design. We sequentially acquired both low- and high-energy emission images of an (123)I object with a prototype DSSD and a Modcam. A sandwich aperture increases spatial resolution in the low-magnification DSSD image via a smaller pinhole diameter and allows a higher magnification image on the Modcam. Molybdenum, the insert material, efficiently stops 20-30 keV photons due to its ?20 keV K-edge. Theoretically, less than 10% of 159 keV photons interact in 0.035 cm thick sheet of molybdenum, while this thickness stops virtually all ?30 keV photons. Thus, photons from both energy regions will be incident upon their respective detectors with little cross talk. With a multi-pinhole collimator, we can decode multiplexed images on the Modcam by making use of the lower-magnification DSSD image. This approach can provide an increase in system sensitivity compared to single-detector configurations. Using MCNP5 we examined the potential benefits and drawbacks of stacked detectors and the sandwich aperture for small-animal pinhole SPECT via the synthetic-collimator method. Simulation results encourage us to construct the novel aperture and use it with our new DSSDs designed for mounting in a transmission configuration. PMID:19081759

  19. Evaluation of a stack: A concrete chimney with brick liner

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, J.R.; Amin, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Porthouse, R.A. [Chimney Consultants, West Lebanon, NH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A 200 ft. tall stack, consisting of a concrete chimney with an independent acid proof brick liner built in the 1950`s, serving the Separations facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS), was evaluated for the performance category 3 (PC3) level of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) effects. The inelastic energy absorption capacity of the concrete chimney was considered in the evaluation of the earthquake resistance, in particular, to compute the F{sub {mu}} factor. The calculated value of F{sub {mu}} exceeded 3.0, while the seismic demand for the PC3 level, using an F{sub {mu}} value of 1.5, was found to be less than the capacity of the concrete chimney. The capacity formulation of ACI 307 was modified to incorporate the effect of an after design opening on the tension side. There are considerable uncertainties in determining the earthquake resistance of the independent brick liner. The critical liner section, located at the bottom of the breeching opening, does not meet the current recommendations. A discussion is provided for the possible acceptable values for the ``Moment Reduction Factor``, R{sub w} or F{sub {mu}} for the liner. Comments are provided on the comparison of stack demands using response spectra (RS) versus time history (TH) analysis, with and without soil structure interaction (SSI) effects.

  20. DC moment tensor estimation based on P- and S-waveform stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weginger, Stefan; Brückl, Ewald

    2014-05-01

    Matching synthetic records to observed waveforms represents the most rigorous method to determine the complete focal mechanism of an earthquake. The recordings are usually filtered by band pass with an upper corner frequency of 0.03 - 0.05 Hz. The method has been successfully applied to earthquakes on global and regional scales. Currently, for a routine application the method appears to be limited to earthquakes M ? ~4 because of the lack of signal in the low frequency range and the difficulty to appropriately calculate Green's functions in the higher frequency range. Alternatives restricted to the determination of DC-focal mechanisms are methods which match manually picked polarities of P- and S-wave arrivals. The result of manual polarity picking may become strongly influenced by the interpreter at magnitude M < 3. We present a method which is also based on the polarities of P- and S-wave arrivals, but avoids the subjective component of polarity picking. We consider P-, SH-and SV-waveforms, band-pass filtered with a lower corner frequency just above the micro-seismic noise spectrum and weighting according to the S/N ratio. Filter design and the determination of the length of the waveforms (first two lobes) are done interactively. The polarity of an individual waveform is derived from the sign of the integral over the amplitudes of the first lobe minus the integral over the amplitudes of the second lobe. We produce three types of waveform stacks. The first stack ("crude stack") is simply the sum of the P- (or SH, or SV) waveforms. In order to generate the second stack ("maximum stack") we change the polarities of the individual waveforms to achieve a maximum objective function of the stacked traces. As objective function we choose the semblance times the difference of the integrals defining the polarity of a waveform. In case the brute and the maximum stacks are similar, the seismic source may have been an explosion. In case the objective function of the maximum stack is significantly higher than that of the brute stack we perform stacks where negative polarities of individual waveforms have been changed according to an assumed orientation of a DC-source ("DC-stack"). We calculate the objective functions for a dense 3D-grid covering all possible orientations of a DC-source. Waveforms from stations near the nodal planes get lower weights. We plot the objective functions at the positions of the corresponding T- and P-axes in stereographic projections for P-, SH-, and SV-waveforms and find optimum DC-stacks at the maxima of the objective functions. The plots show clearly the ambiguities of the solutions. Additional criteria are proposed to assess the quality of the optimum DC-stacks and to find an entire solution based on a weighted combination of the P-, SH- and SV- DC-stacks. The method has been successfully applied to several earthquakes M <3 in and near the Vienna basin. Further testing and comparisons with conventional methods are necessary to evaluate the benefit of this new method.

  1. Wafer warpage analysis of stacked wafers for 3D integration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Youngrae Kim; Sung-Keun Kang; Sung-Dong Kim; Sarah Eunkyung Kim

    The demand for wafer stacking technology has been increasing significantly. Although many technical challenges of wafer stacking have improved greatly, there are still many processing issues to be resolved. One of them is wafer warpage since it causes process and product failures such as delamination, cracking, mechanical stresses, and even electrical failure. In this study the warpage of multi-stacked wafers

  2. Take It From The Top: How Does This Stack Up?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Exploratorium

    2012-06-26

    In this activity, learners explore center of gravity, or balance point, of stacked blocks. Simple wooden blocks can be stacked so that the top block extends completely past the end of the bottom block, seemingly in a dramatic defiance of gravity. A mathematical pattern can be noted in the stacking.

  3. System for inspection of stacked cargo containers

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen (Pinole, CA)

    2011-08-16

    The present invention relates to a system for inspection of stacked cargo containers. One embodiment of the invention generally comprises a plurality of stacked cargo containers arranged in rows or tiers, each container having a top, a bottom a first side, a second side, a front end, and a back end; a plurality of spacers arranged in rows or tiers; one or more mobile inspection devices for inspecting the cargo containers, wherein the one or more inspection devices are removeably disposed within the spacers, the inspection means configured to move through the spacers to detect radiation within the containers. The invented system can also be configured to inspect the cargo containers for a variety of other potentially hazardous materials including but not limited to explosive and chemical threats.

  4. SOFC cells and stacks for complex fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Edward M. Sabolsky; Matthew Seabaugh; Katarzyna Sabolsky; Sergio A. Ibanez; Zhimin Zhong

    2007-07-01

    Reformed hydrocarbon and coal (syngas) fuels present an opportunity to integrate solid oxide fuel cells into the existing fuel infrastructure. However, these fuels often contain impurities or additives that may lead to cell degradation through sulfur poisoning or coking. Achieving high performance and sulfur tolerance in SOFCs operating on these fuels would simplify system balance of plant and sequestration of anode tail gas. NexTech Materials, Ltd., has developed a suite of materials and components (cells, seals, interconnects) designed for operation in sulfur-containing syngas fuels. These materials and component technologies have been integrated into an SOFC stack for testing on simulated propane, logistic fuel reformates and coal syngas. Details of the technical approach, cell and stack performance is reported.

  5. Radiation-Tolerant Intelligent Memory Stack - RTIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Tak-kwong; Herath, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation provides reconfigurable circuitry and 2-Gb of error-corrected or 1-Gb of triple-redundant digital memory in a small package. RTIMS uses circuit stacking of heterogeneous components and radiation shielding technologies. A reprogrammable field-programmable gate array (FPGA), six synchronous dynamic random access memories, linear regulator, and the radiation mitigation circuits are stacked into a module of 42.7 42.7 13 mm. Triple module redundancy, current limiting, configuration scrubbing, and single- event function interrupt detection are employed to mitigate radiation effects. The novel self-scrubbing and single event functional interrupt (SEFI) detection allows a relatively soft FPGA to become radiation tolerant without external scrubbing and monitoring hardware

  6. Annular feed air breathing fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A stack of polymer electrolyte fuel cells is formed from a plurality of unit cells where each unit cell includes fuel cell components defining a periphery and distributed along a common axis, where the fuel cell components include a polymer electrolyte membrane, an anode and a cathode contacting opposite sides of the membrane, and fuel and oxygen flow fields contacting the anode and the cathode, respectively, wherein the components define an annular region therethrough along the axis. A fuel distribution manifold within the annular region is connected to deliver fuel to the fuel flow field in each of the unit cells. In a particular embodiment, a single bolt through the annular region clamps the unit cells together. In another embodiment, separator plates between individual unit cells have an extended radial dimension to function as cooling fins for maintaining the operating temperature of the fuel cell stack.

  7. A computational study on the stacking interaction in quinhydrone.

    PubMed

    Moa, María J González; Mandado, Marcos; Mosquera, Ricardo A

    2007-03-15

    The stability and electron density topology of quinhydrone complex was studied using multiple computational levels, including MPW1B95 Truhlar's density functional. The QTAIM analysis demonstrates that an electron population transfer from hydroquinone to quinone monomer accompanies the complex formation. The variations undergone by atomic populations indicate that the electron transfer through HOMO LUMO overlap is combined with a reorganization of the electron density within each monomer. Variations of two- and six-center delocalization indices show a small reduction of electron delocalization in the hydroquinone ring upon complex formation. PMID:17309243

  8. Stacked switchable element and diode combination

    DOEpatents

    Branz, Howard M.; Wang, Qi

    2006-06-27

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  9. Band structure of ABC -stacked graphene trilayers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fan Zhang; Bhagawan Sahu; Hongki Min; Allan H. MacDonald

    2010-01-01

    The ABC -stacked N -layer-graphene family of two-dimensional electron systems is described at low energies by two remarkably flat bands with Bloch states that have strongly momentum-dependent phase differences between carbon pi -orbital amplitudes on different layers and large associated momentum-space Berry phases. These properties are most easily understood using a simplified model with only nearest-neighbor interlayer hopping which leads

  10. Stacked complementary metasurfaces for ultraslow microwave metamaterials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Navarro-Cía; M. Aznabet; M. Beruete; F. Falcone; O. El Mrabet; M. Sorolla; M. Essaaidi

    2010-01-01

    We have experimentally realized at microwaves a dual-band ultraslow regime by constructing a metamaterial based upon the alternative stack of conventional- and complementary-split-ring-resonators-surfaces. The group delay reaches values larger than two orders of magnitude than those obtained when the electromagnetic wave propagates the same thickness in free-space. The ultraslow waves have been initially predicted by a numerical eigenmode analysis and

  11. Stacked Switchable Element and Diode Combination

    DOEpatents

    Branz, H. M.; Wang, Q.

    2006-06-27

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  12. Subsea BOP stack built for Caspian drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-16

    This paper reports that Shaffer Inc. completed construction of a multi-million dollar subsea drilling system for Caspmorneftegas, an operating company in the Republic of Azerbaijan. The subsea stack will be installed on the semisubmersible drilling rig Shelf 7 currently under construction in Astrakan in the Soviet Union. Shelf 7 will drill wells in the Caspian Sea, one of the most prolific production areas in the Soviet Union.

  13. IRM Enforcement of Java Stack Inspection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Úlfar Erlingsson; Fred B. Schneider

    2000-01-01

    Two implementations are given for Java's stack-inspection access- control policy. Each implementation is obtained by generating an in- lined reference monitor (IRM) for a dieren t formulation of the policy. Performance of the implementations is evaluated, and one is found to be competitive with Java's less-exible, JVM-resident implementation. The exercise illustrates the power of the IRM approach for enforcing security

  14. Manipulation of two-electron states by the electric field in stacked self-assembled dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, M. P.; Szafran, B.; Peeters, F. M.

    2008-10-01

    A pair of electrons in vertically stacked self-assembled quantum dots is studied and the singlet-triplet energy splitting is calculated in an external electric field using the configuration-interaction method. We show that for double quantum dots the dependence of the singlet energy levels on the electric field involves multiple avoided crossings of three energy levels. The exchange interaction, i.e., the energy difference of the lowest triplet and lowest singlet states, can be tuned by an electric field in a wide range of several tens of meV. For electric fields exceeding a threshold value the exchange interaction becomes a linear function of the field when the two electrons in the singlet state start to occupy the same dot. We also consider non-symmetric confinement, non-perfectly aligned dots, in horizontal as well as vertical field orientation. In a stack of three vertically coupled dots the depth of the confinement in the central dot can be used to enhance the exchange interaction. For a deeper central dot the dependence of the exchange interaction on the electric field is anomalous—it initially decreases when the field is applied in both directions parallel and antiparallel to the axis of the stack. Such a behavior is never observed for a pair of quantum dots.

  15. Extended life PZT stack test fixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badescu, M.; Sherrit, S.; Bao, X.; Aldrich, J.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Jones, C.

    2008-03-01

    Piezoelectric stacks are being sought to be used as actuators for precision positioning and deployment of mechanisms in future planetary missions. Beside the requirement for very high operation reliability, these actuators may be required to operate in space environments that are considered harsh compared to normal terrestrial conditions. These environmental conditions include low and high temperatures and vacuum or high pressure. Additionally, the stacks are subjected to high stress and in some applications need to operate for extended time periods. Many of these requirements are beyond the current industry design margins for nominal terrestrial applications. In order to investigate some of the properties to assess the durability of such actuators and their limitations we have developed a new type of test fixture that can be easily integrated in various test chambers for simulating environmental conditions, can provide access for multiple measurements while being exposed to adjustable stress levels. We have designed and built two versions of these test fixture and these fixtures were made to be adjustable for testing stacks with different dimensions and can be easily used in small or large numbers. The properties that were measured using these fixtures include impedance, capacitance, dielectric loss factor, leakage current, displacement, breakdown voltage, and lifetime performance. The fixtures characteristics and the test capabilities are presented in this paper.

  16. Electronic Hybridization of Large-Area Stacked Graphene Films

    E-print Network

    Robinson, Jeremy T; Diaconescu, C Bogdan; Long, James P; Culbertson, James C; Ohta, Taisuke; Friedman, Adam L; Beechem, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Direct, tunable coupling between individually assembled graphene layers is a next step towards designer two-dimensional (2D) crystal systems, with relevance for fundamental studies and technological applications. Here we describe the fabrication and characterization of large-area (> cm^2), coupled bilayer graphene on SiO2/Si substrates. Stacking two graphene films leads to direct electronic interactions between layers, where the resulting film properties are determined by the local twist angle. Polycrystalline bilayer films have a "stained-glass window" appearance explained by the emergence of a narrow absorption band in the visible spectrum that depends on twist angle. Direct measurement of layer orientation via electron diffraction, together with Raman and optical spectroscopy, confirms the persistence of clean interfaces over large areas. Finally, we demonstrate that interlayer coupling can be reversibly turned off through chemical modification, enabling optical-based chemical detection schemes. Together, ...

  17. Short protection device for stack of electrolytic cells

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Murray (Newington, CT); Schroll, Craig R. (West Hartford, CT)

    1985-10-22

    Electrical short protection is provided in an electrolytic cell stack by the combination of a thin, nonporous ceramic shield and a noble metal foil disposed on opposite sides of the sealing medium in a gas manifold gasket. The thin ceramic shield, such as alumina, is placed between the porous gasket and the cell stack face at the margins of the negative end plate to the most negative cells to impede ion current flow. The noble metal foil, for instance gold, is electrically coupled to the negative potential of the stack to collect positive ions at a harmless location away from the stack face. Consequently, corrosion products from the stack structure deposit on the foil rather than on the stack face to eliminate electrical shorting of cells at the negative end of the stack.

  18. Trait stacking via targeted genome editing.

    PubMed

    Ainley, William M; Sastry-Dent, Lakshmi; Welter, Mary E; Murray, Michael G; Zeitler, Bryan; Amora, Rainier; Corbin, David R; Miles, Rebecca R; Arnold, Nicole L; Strange, Tonya L; Simpson, Matthew A; Cao, Zehui; Carroll, Carley; Pawelczak, Katherine S; Blue, Ryan; West, Kim; Rowland, Lynn M; Perkins, Douglas; Samuel, Pon; Dewes, Cristie M; Shen, Liu; Sriram, Shreedharan; Evans, Steven L; Rebar, Edward J; Zhang, Lei; Gregory, Phillip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Webb, Steven R; Petolino, Joseph F

    2013-12-01

    Modern agriculture demands crops carrying multiple traits. The current paradigm of randomly integrating and sorting independently segregating transgenes creates severe downstream breeding challenges. A versatile, generally applicable solution is hereby provided: the combination of high-efficiency targeted genome editing driven by engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) with modular 'trait landing pads' (TLPs) that allow 'mix-and-match', on-demand transgene integration and trait stacking in crop plants. We illustrate the utility of nuclease-driven TLP technology by applying it to the stacking of herbicide resistance traits. We first integrated into the maize genome an herbicide resistance gene, pat, flanked with a TLP (ZFN target sites and sequences homologous to incoming DNA) using WHISKERS™-mediated transformation of embryogenic suspension cultures. We established a method for targeted transgene integration based on microparticle bombardment of immature embryos and used it to deliver a second trait precisely into the TLP via cotransformation with a donor DNA containing a second herbicide resistance gene, aad1, flanked by sequences homologous to the integrated TLP along with a corresponding ZFN expression construct. Remarkably, up to 5% of the embryo-derived transgenic events integrated the aad1 transgene precisely at the TLP, that is, directly adjacent to the pat transgene. Importantly and consistent with the juxtaposition achieved via nuclease-driven TLP technology, both herbicide resistance traits cosegregated in subsequent generations, thereby demonstrating linkage of the two independently transformed transgenes. Because ZFN-mediated targeted transgene integration is becoming applicable across an increasing number of crop species, this work exemplifies a simple, facile and rapid approach to trait stacking. PMID:23953646

  19. Magnetic study of a one-dimensional Mn(II) coordination polymer dealing with ?-? stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jing-Min; Meng, Xian-Zhe; Sun, You-Min; Xu, Hai-Yan; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Peng; Liu, Lian-Dong

    2009-01-01

    A new one-dimensional chain manganese(II) coordination polymer, {[Mn(?-Dpd)(Q) 2(H 2O) 2]2(ClO 4)} n (Dpd = 2,5-dimethylpyrazine-1,4-dioxide; Q = 8-hydroxylquinoline N-oxide), was synthesized with 2,5-dimethylpyrazine-1,4-dioxide as bridge ligand and 8-hydroxylquinoline N-oxide as terminal ligand, and its crystal structure determined by X-ray crystallography. The structure analysis indicates that there are two pathways for magnetic interactions: one is through bridge ligand 2,5-dimethylpyrazine-1,4-dioxide, and another is by ?-? stacking of adjacent quinoline rings. The theoretical calculations reveal that there exist a anti-ferromagnetic interaction from spin delocalization and a ferromagnetic interaction from spin polarization for 2,5-dimethylpyrazine-1,4-dioxide bridge pathway, but the anti-ferromagnetic interaction is stronger than the ferromagnetic interaction, leading to an anti-ferromagnetic interaction with J = -2.53 cm -1; whereas for the ?-? stacking pathway it resulted in a ferromagnetic interaction with J = 0.013 cm -1. The experimental fitting on the data of the variable temperature magnetic susceptibilities gave the magnetic interaction constant J = 0.07 cm -1, which is similar with the results of the theoretical calculations.

  20. Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM); Ramsey, John C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-03-08

    A stack of direct methanol fuel cells exhibiting a circular footprint. A cathode and anode manifold, tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are located within the circular footprint. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet cathode manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold, where the serpentine channels of the anode are orthogonal to the serpentine channels of the cathode. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  1. Performance of low resistance microchannel plate stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Stock, J.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from an evaluation of three sets of low resistance microchannel plate (MCP) stacks; the tests encompassed gain, pulse-height distribution, background rate, event rate capacity as a function of illuminated area, and performance changes due to high temperature bakeout and high flux UV scrub. The MCPs are found to heat up, requiring from minutes to hours to reach stabilization. The event rate is strongly dependent on the size of the area being illuminated, with larger areas experiencing a gain drop onset at lower rates than smaller areas.

  2. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Xu, Wei; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2014-04-01

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  3. Fuel cell stack with passive air supply

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2006-01-17

    A fuel cell stack has a plurality of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) where each PEFC includes a rectangular membrane electrode assembly (MEA) having a fuel flow field along a first axis and an air flow field along a second axis perpendicular to the first axis, where the fuel flow field is long relative to the air flow field. A cathode air flow field in each PEFC has air flow channels for air flow parallel to the second axis and that directly open to atmospheric air for air diffusion within the channels into contact with the MEA.

  4. Combined effect of stacking and magnetic field on plasmon excitations in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jhao-Ying; Gumbs, Godfrey; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2014-04-01

    The electronic excitations of bilayer graphene (BLG) under a magnetic field are investigated with the use of the Peierls tight-binding model in conjunction with random-phase approximation (RPA). The interlayer atomic interactions, interlayer Coulomb interactions, and magnetic field effects are simultaneously included in the dielectric-function matrix. That enables us to derive the magneto-Coulomb-excitation spectrum of different stacking structures. The two typical arrangements of BLGs, AB and AA, are considered in this article. AB-BLG exhibits many discrete energy-loss peaks, which correspond to the quantization of electron energies. On the other hand, the AA-BLG spectra possess a unique and pronounced peak at low frequency. This peak represents the collective excitation of the entire low-frequency Landau states. The dependence of the energy-loss peaks on the momentum transfer and the magnetic field strength is presented. Accordingly, two kinds of plasmon modes produced by the layer stacking are clearly distinguished.

  5. Molecular-level interactions in soils and sediments: the role of aromatic pi-systems.

    PubMed

    Keiluweit, Marco; Kleber, Markus

    2009-05-15

    This review intends to deepen our understanding of mechanisms by which molecules with aromatic moieties attach to organic and mineral components of terrestrial environments. We present published evidence for the existence of specific, sorptive interactions of aromatic moieties with environmental sorbents. We find that aromatic pi-systems within organic compounds have the capacity to adsorb to minerals and organic soil and sediment components such as natural organic matter (NOM) and fire-derived black carbon (BC) through specific sorptive forces other than hydrophobic interactions. Polar interactions of aromatic pi-donor and -acceptor compounds show adsorption energies between 4 and 167 kJ mol(-1). Bonding strengths of cation-pi interactions and pi-pi electron donor-acceptor (EDA) interactions appear to be larger than H bonding strengths and comparable to inner- and outer-sphere complex formation. We conclude that, in analogy to polar and ionizable functional groups, components with aromatic pi-donor and -acceptor systems equip organic molecules with a substantial sorptive potential. This observation has important implications for the fate and transport of aromatic contaminants. The resulting sorptive interactions might also play a yet-overlooked functional role in the complex chain of processes which preserve NOM against decomposition. PMID:19544834

  6. Dalitz-plot Analysis of B0 -> anti-D0 pi pi-

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U.; /more authors.; ,

    2010-08-25

    The authors report preliminary results from a study of the decay B{sup 0} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using a data sample of 470.9 {+-} 2.8 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Using the Dalitz-plot analysis technique, they find contributions from the intermediate resonances D*{sub 2}(2460){sup -}, D*{sub 0}(2400){sup -}, {rho}(770){sup 0} and f{sub 2}(1270) as well as a {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} S-wave term, a {bar D}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} nonresonant S-wave term and a virtual D*(2010) amplitude. They measure the branching fractions of the contributing decays.

  7. Study of the decay tau(-)->2 pi(-)pi(+)3 pi(0)nu(tau)

    E-print Network

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1997-11-01

    VOLUME 79, NUMBER 20 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 17NOVEMBER 1997 Study of the Decay t 2 ! 2p 2 p 1 3p 0 n t S. Anderson, 1 Y. Kubota, 1 S J. Lee, 1 J.J. O?Neill, 1 S. Patton, 1 R. Poling, 1 T. Riehle, 1 V. Savinov, 1 A. Smith, 1 M.S. Alam, 2 S.B. Athar.... Wanke, 3 A. Wolf, 3 M.M. Zoeller, 3 B. Nemati, 4 S.J. Richichi, 4 W.R. Ross, 4 P. Skubic, 4 M. Bishai, 5 J. Fast, 5 J.W. Hinson, 5 N. Menon, 5 D.H. Miller, 5 E.I. Shibata, 5 I.P.J. Shipsey, 5 M. Yurko, 5 L. Gibbons, 6 S. Glenn, 6 S.D. Johnson, 6 Y. Kwon...

  8. S-wave K- pi+ system in D+ ---> K- pi+ pi+ decays from Fermilab E791

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, B.T.; /Cincinnati U.

    2005-06-01

    A new approach to the analysis of three body decays is presented. Model-independent results are obtained for the S-wave K{pi} amplitude as a function of K{pi} invariant mass. These are compared with results from K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} elastic scattering, and the prediction of the Watson theorem, that the phase behavior be the same below K{eta}' threshold, is tested. Contributions from I = 1/2 and I = 3/2 are not resolved in this study. If I = 1/2 dominates, however, the Watson theorem does not describe these data well.

  9. Time-dependent amplitude analysis of $B^0 \\to K^0_S\\pi^ pi^-$

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2009-05-26

    In this paper we present results from a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{sub s}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay. In Sec. II we describe the time-dependent DP formalism, and introduce the signal parameters that are extracted in the fit to data. In Sec. III we briefly describe the BABAR detector and the data set. In Sec. IV, we explain the selection requirements used to obtain the signal candidates and suppress backgrounds. In Sec. V we describe the fit method and the approach used to control experimental effects such as resolution. In Sec. VI we present the results of the fit, and extract parameters relevant to the contributing intermediate resonant states. In Sec. VII we discuss systematic uncertainties in the results, and finally we summarize the results in Sec. VIII.

  10. Measurement of direct photon emission in the K(L) ---> pi+ pi- gamma decay mode

    SciTech Connect

    Abouzaid, E.; /Chicago U., EFI; Arenton, M.; /Virginia U.; Barker, A.R.; /Colorado U.; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Bellavance, A.; /Rice U.; Blucher, E.; /Chicago U., EFI; Bock,; /Fermilab; Cheu, E.; /Arizona U.; Coleman, R.; /Fermilab; Corcoran, M.D.; /Rice U.; Corti, G.; /Virginia U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-04-01

    In this paper the KTeV collaboration reports the analysis of 112.1 x 10{sup 3} candidate K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} decays including a background of 671 {+-} 41 events with the objective of determining the photon production mechanisms intrinsic to the decay process. These decays have been analyzed to extract the relative contributions of the Cp violating bremsstrahlung process and the CP conserving M1 and CP violating E1 direct photon emission processes. The M1 direct photon emission amplitude and its associated vector form factor parameterized as |{bar g}{sub M1}|(1 + a{sub 1}/a{sub 2}/(M{sub {rho}}{sup 2}-M{sub K}{sup 2}) + 2M{sub K}E{sub {gamma}}) have been measured to be |{bar g}{sub M1}| = 1.198 {+-} 0.035(stat) {+-} 0.086(syst) and a{sub 1}/a{sub 2} = =0.738 {+-} 0.007(stat) {+-} 0.018(syst) GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} respectively. An upper limit for the CP violating E1 direct emission amplitude |g{sub E1}| {le} 0.1 (90%CL) has been found. The overall ratio of direct photon emission (DE) to total photon emission including the bremsstrahlung process (IB) has been determined to be DE/(DE + IB) = 0.689 {+-} 0.021 for E{sub {gamma}} {ge} 20 MeV.

  11. Search for tau- ---> 4pi- 3pi+ (pi0) nu/tau Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Antonian, R.; Kass, R.; Allmendinger, T.; /Ohio State U.; Hast, C.; /SLAC

    2005-06-21

    A search for the decay of the {tau} lepton to seven charged pions and at most one {pi}{sup 0} was performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The analysis uses data recorded on and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance between 1999 and 2003, a total of 124.3 fb{sup -1}. They observe 7 events with an expected background of 11.9 {+-} 2.2 events and calculate a preliminary upper limit of BR({tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -} 3{pi}{sup +}({pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}}) < 2.7 x 10{sup -7} at 90% CL. This is a significant improvement over the previous limit established by the CLEO Collaboration.

  12. Dalitz Plot Analysis of $B^0_d \\to K+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$ Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhitang; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-05-05

    This thesis describes a Dalitz plot analysis of B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays. The data sample comprises 213 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California (SLAC). Preliminary results are presented for measurements of the inclusive branching fraction, quasi-two-body fractions and CP-violating charge asymmetries for intermediate states including K*(892){sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {rho}(770){sup -}K{sup +}. Observations of B{sup 0} decays to the K{pi} S-wave intermediate states, K*{sub 0}(1430){sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K*{sub 0}(1430){sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, are reported. Evidence of the decay B{sup 0} {yields} K*(892){sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is seen. We set upper limits at 90% confidence level on branching fractions of the nonresonant and other less significant intermediate states.

  13. Transition nucleon resonance electrocouplings from CLAS data on pi+pi-p electroproduction off protons.

    SciTech Connect

    Victor Mokeev

    2011-10-01

    Electrocouplings of excited proton states with masses less than 1.8 GeV were determined for the first time from the CLAS data on {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}p electroproduction at photon virtualities Q{sup 2} < 1.5 GeV {sup 2}. Electrocouplings were obtained from a combined fit of all available observables within the framework of a phenomenological reaction model. Accurate information on the Q{sup 2}-evolution of {gamma}{sub virt}NN* electrocouplings for many excited proton states with masses less than 1.8 GeV and at photon virtualities up to 1.5 GeV{sup 2} have become available from CLAS data on {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}p electroproduction. These results open up new opportunities for theory to explore confinement mechanisms in the baryon sector through their manifestation in the structure of excited proton states of various quantum numbers, as it was outlined. The analysis reported here covers the range of photon virtualities, where both meson-baryon and quark degrees of freedom can be relevant. Our results on high lying N* electrocouplings for the first time make it possible to explore the transition from meson-baryon to quark degrees of freedom in the structure of excited proton states with masses above 1.6 GeV within the framework of dynamical coupled channel approaches under development in EBAC at Jefferson Lab.

  14. Measurement of the Branching Ratio Lambda_c+ -> p pi+ pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Hinojosa, Guillermo; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2008-03-01

    The confirmation of the Cabibbo-suppressed charm baryon decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is reported. All data analyzed are from SELEX, a fixed target experiment at Fermilab that took data during 1996 and 1997, mainly with a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratio of the Cabibbo-suppressed decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} relative to the Cabibbo-favored mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is measured to be: {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.103 {+-} 0.022.

  15. Measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in X(3872) ---> J/psi pi+ pi- decays

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan,

    2005-12-01

    The authors measure the dipion mass spectrum in X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays using 360 pb{sup -1} of {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. The spectrum is fit with predictions for odd C-parity ({sup 3}S{sub 1}, {sup 1}P{sub 1}, and {sup 3}D{sub J}) charmonia decaying to J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, as well as event C-parity states in which the pions are from {rho}{sup 0} decay. The latter case also encompasses exotic interpretations, such as a D{sup 0}{bar D}*{sup 0} molecule. Only the {sup 3}S{sub 1} and J/{psi} {rho} hypotheses are compatible with the data. Since {sup 3}S{sub 1} is untenable on other grounds, decay via J/{psi} {rho} is favored, which implies C = +1 for the X(3872). Models for different J/{psi}-{rho} angular momenta L are considered. Flexibility in the models, especially the introduction of {rho}-{omega} interference, enable good descriptions of the data for both L = 0 and 1.

  16. Dalitz analysis of D-0 -> K-S(0)pi(+)pi(-)

    E-print Network

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Besson, David Zeke; Zhao, X.

    2002-12-01

    321.000610.00063 .013515 .02555 0:34.00060:13 .01350:31.01350:26 .02550:03.02550:02 0 (fixed) 26:4.00060:9 .01350:9.01350:4 .02550:7.02552:5 10 .02553 114.00067 .01356.01352 .02554.02555 0:72.00060:18 .01350:04.01350:10 .02550:06.02550:07 02 .01350...:15 .02550:03 150.00062.00062 .01352 .02555 65:7.00061:3 .01351:1.01351:4 .02552:6.02553:0 .01350:04 .02550:02 188.00064 .01355.01358 .02553.02556 4:3.00060:5 .01351:1 .02550:4 .00060:5 0:4 308.000612 .013515.013566 .025525.02556 0:27.00060:15 .01350...

  17. Search for b --> u Transitions in B^{+-} --> [K^{-+} pi^{+-} pi0]_D K^{+-} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-12

    The authors present a study of the decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} DK{sup {+-}} with D mesons reconstructed in the K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} or K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} final states, where D indicates a D{sup 0} or a {bar D}{sup 0} meson. Using a sample of 474 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC, they measure the ratios R{sup {+-}} {triple_bond} {Lambda}(B{sup {+-}}{yields}[K{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}]{sub D}K{sup {+-}})/{Lambda}(B{sup {+-}}{yields}[K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup 0}]{sub D}K{sup {+-}}). They obtain R{sup +} = (5{sub -10}{sup +12}(stat){sub -4}{sup +2}(syst)) x 10{sup -3} and R{sup -} = (12{sub -10}{sup +12}(stat){sub -5}{sup +3}(syst)) x 10{sup -3}, from which they extract the upper limits at 90% probability: R{sup +} < 23 x 10{sup -3} and R{sup -} < 29 x 10{sup -3}. Using these measurements, they obtain an upper limit for the ratio r{sub B} of the magnitudes of the b {yields} u and b {yields} c amplitudes r{sub B} < 0.13 at 90% probability.

  18. The handbag contribution to gamma gamma to pi pi and K K

    E-print Network

    M. Diehl; P. Kroll; C. Vogt

    2002-02-22

    We investigate the soft handbag contribution to two-photon annihilation into pion or kaon pairs at large energy and momentum transfer. The amplitude is expressed as a hard gamma gamma -> q qbar subprocess times a form factor describing the soft transition from q qbar to the meson pair. We find the calculated angular dependence of the cross section in good agreement with data, and extract annihilation form factors of plausible size. A key prediction of the handbag mechanism is that the differential cross section is the same for charged and neutral pion pairs, in striking contrast with what is found in the hard scattering approach.

  19. Observation of new states decaying into Lambda(+)(c)pi(-)pi(+)

    E-print Network

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke

    2001-05-01

    evidence for two new states: one is broad and has an invariant mass roughly 480 MeV above that of the Lambda (+)(c) baryon; the other is narrow with an invariant mass of 596 +/- 1 +/- 2 MeV above the Lambda (+)(c) mass....

  20. Water and thermal management for Ballard PEM fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaochen; Zhou, Biao; Sobiesiak, Andrzej

    A water and thermal management model for a Ballard PEM fuel cell stack was developed to investigate its performance. A general calculation methodology was developed to implement this model. Knowing a set of gas feeding conditions (i.e., pressure, temperature, flow rate) and stack physical conditions (i.e., channel geometry, heat transfer coefficients, operating current), the model could provide information regarding the reaction products (i.e., water and heat), stack power, stack temperature, and system efficiency, thereby assisting the designer in achieving the best thermal and water management. Furthermore, if the stack undergoes a perturbation, such as the initial start-up, quick change in current, or a shutdown, the model could predict the dynamic information regarding stack temperature, cell voltage, and power as a function of time.

  1. Generalized stacking fault energies of alloys.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Lu, Song; Hu, Qing-Miao; Kwon, Se Kyun; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2014-07-01

    The generalized stacking fault energy (? surface) provides fundamental physics for understanding the plastic deformation mechanisms. Using the ab initio exact muffin-tin orbitals method in combination with the coherent potential approximation, we calculate the ? surface for the disordered Cu-Al, Cu-Zn, Cu-Ga, Cu-Ni, Pd-Ag and Pd-Au alloys. Studying the effect of segregation of the solute to the stacking fault planes shows that only the local chemical composition affects the ? surface. The calculated alloying trends are discussed using the electronic band structure of the base and distorted alloys.Based on our ? surface results, we demonstrate that the previous revealed 'universal scaling law' between the intrinsic energy barriers (IEBs) is well obeyed in random solid solutions. This greatly simplifies the calculations of the twinning measure parameters or the critical twinning stress. Adopting two twinnability measure parameters derived from the IEBs, we find that in binary Cu alloys, Al, Zn and Ga increase the twinnability, while Ni decreases it. Aluminum and gallium yield similar effects on the twinnability. PMID:24903220

  2. Annular feed air breathing fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM); Neutzler, Jay K. (Peoria, AZ)

    1997-01-01

    A stack of polymer electrolyte fuel cells is formed from a plurality of unit cells where each unit cell includes fuel cell components defining a periphery and distributed along a common axis, where the fuel cell components include a polymer electrolyte membrane, an anode and a cathode contacting opposite sides of the membrane, and fuel and oxygen flow fields contacting the anode and the cathode, respectively, wherein the components define an annular region therethrough along the axis. A fuel distribution manifold within the annular region is connected to deliver fuel to the fuel flow field in each of the unit cells. The fuel distribution manifold is formed from a hydrophilic-like material to redistribute water produced by fuel and oxygen reacting at the cathode. In a particular embodiment, a single bolt through the annular region clamps the unit cells together. In another embodiment, separator plates between individual unit cells have an extended radial dimension to function as cooling fins for maintaining the operating temperature of the fuel cell stack.

  3. A 10B-based neutron detector with stacked Multiwire Proportional Counters and macrostructured cathodes

    E-print Network

    Stefanescu, I; Birch, J; Defendi, I; Hall-Wilton, R; Hoglund, C; Hultman, L; Zee, M; Zeitelhack, K

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of the measurements of the detection efficiency for a 4.7 \\r{A} neutron beam incident upon a detector incorporating a stack of up to five MultiWire Proportional Counters (MWPC) with Boron-coated cathodes. The cathodes were made of Aluminum and had a surface exhibiting millimeter-deep V-shaped grooves of 45{\\deg}, upon which the thin Boron film was deposited by DC magnetron sputtering. The incident neutrons interacting with the converter layer deposited on the sidewalls of the grooves have a higher capture probability, owing to the larger effective absorption film thickness. This leads to a higher overall detection efficiency for the grooved cathode when compared to a cathode with a flat surface. Both the experimental results and the predictions of the GEANT4 model suggests that a 5-counter detector stack with coated grooved cathodes has the same efficiency as a 7-counter stack with flat cathodes. The reduction in the number of counters in the stack without altering the detection efficie...

  4. Co-flow planar SOFC fuel cell stack

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-11-30

    A co-flow planar solid oxide fuel cell stack with an integral, internal manifold and a casing/holder to separately seal the cell. This construction improves sealing and gas flow, and provides for easy manifolding of cell stacks. In addition, the stack construction has the potential for an improved durability and operation with an additional increase in cell efficiency. The co-flow arrangement can be effectively utilized in other electrochemical systems requiring gas-proof separation of gases.

  5. Cassette less SOFC stack and method of assembly

    DOEpatents

    Meinhardt, Kerry D

    2014-11-18

    A cassette less SOFC assembly and a method for creating such an assembly. The SOFC stack is characterized by an electrically isolated stack current path which allows welded interconnection between frame portions of the stack. In one embodiment electrically isolating a current path comprises the step of sealing a interconnect plate to a interconnect plate frame with an insulating seal. This enables the current path portion to be isolated from the structural frame an enables the cell frame to be welded together.

  6. Stacking of blocks by chimpanzees: developmental processes and physical understanding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Misato Hayashi

    2007-01-01

    The stacking-block task has been used to assess cognitive development in both humans and chimpanzees. The present study reports\\u000a three aspects of stacking behavior in chimpanzees: spontaneous development, acquisition process following training, and physical\\u000a understanding assessed through a cylindrical-block task. Over 3 years of longitudinal observation of block manipulation, one\\u000a of three infant chimpanzees spontaneously started to stack up cubic

  7. Short protection device for stack of electrolytic cells

    DOEpatents

    Katz, M.; Schroll, C.R.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention relates to a device for preventing the electrical shorting of a stack of electrolytic cells during an extended period of operation. The device has application to fuel cell and other electrolytic cell stacks operating in low or high temperature corrosive environments. It is of particular importance for use in a stack of fuel cells operating with molten metal carbonate electrolyte for the production of electric power. Also, the device may have application in similar technology involving stacks of electrolytic cells for electrolysis to decompose chemical compounds.

  8. Optimizing the Stack Length of Thermoacoustic Prime Movers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pease, David; Andersen, Bonnie

    2011-10-01

    Thermoacoustics involves the fusion of thermodynamic and acoustic phenomena. Common applications of thermoacoustics include air conditioning and electricity generation. There are many components within a thermoacoustic device to optimize. The quarter-wave resonator used contains the heat exchangers and the stack. The temperature gradient between heat exchangers across the stack must exceed a critical temperature gradient for acoustic oscillations to be produced. The power of the device is also proportion the ratio of the two gradients minus one. The region between stack elements is the productive volume where the thermoacoustic effect takes place. Decreasing the length between heat exchangers will increase the temperature gradient, but will reduce the productive volume. This research tested four different stack lengths from 0.014'' to 0.060'' to find the optimum stack length for a temperature difference of 150 K. In order to do this, an optimum amount of stack, given the local ambient environmental conditions, operating frequency, and stack length had to be found first. With the optimum stack amount, the optimal stack length was found to be 0.030'', giving a temperature gradient of 1970 K/cm.

  9. Analysis of NSTX Upgrade OH Magnet and Center Stack

    SciTech Connect

    A. Zolfaghari, P. Titus, J. Chrzanowski, A. Salehzadeh, F. Dahlgren

    2010-11-30

    The new ohmic heating (OH) coil and center stack for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) upgrade are required to meet cooling and structural requirements for operation at the enhanced 1 Tesla toroidal field and 2 MA plasma current. The OH coil is designed to be cooled in the time between discharges by water flowing in the center of the coil conductor. We performed resistive heating and thermal hydraulic analyses to optimize coolant channel size to keep the coil temperature below 100 C and meet the required 20 minute cooling time. Coupled electromagnetic, thermal and structural FEA analyses were performed to determine if the OH coil meets the requirements of the structural design criteria. Structural response of the OH coil to its self-field and the field from other coils was analyzed. A model was developed to analyze the thermal and electromagnetic interaction of centerstack components such as the OH coil, TF inner legs and the Bellville washer preload mechanism. Torsional loads from the TF interaction with the OH and poloidal fields are transferred through the TF flag extensions via a torque transfer coupling to the rest of the tokamak structure. A 3D FEA analysis was performed to qualify this design. The results of these analyses, which will be presented in this paper, have led to the design of OH coil and centerstack components that meet the requirements of the NSTX-upgrade structural design criteria.

  10. Considerations of Glass Sealing SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Weil, K. Scott; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Paxton, Dean M.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2003-08-31

    Due to their TEC matching to PEN components, excellent oxidation resistance, low cost and good fabricability, stainless steels have been used as the interconnect materials in planar SOFC. For being hermetical, the stainless steel interconnect ought to be sealed to YSZ electrolyte and/or another piece of metallic interconnect, usually using a sealing glass. The seal performance, which is critical factor to determine the reliability and durability of SOFC stack, largely depends on the chemical compatibility between the sealing glass and stainless steel. In this work, the ferritic stainless steel 446 and a barium-aluminosilicate base glass have been taken as an example for metallic interconnects and sealing glass, respectively, and the corrosion at the interface of metal and sealing glass has been investigated and understood. The methodology and results of the microscopic analysis and thermodynamic modeling will be presented, and the mechanism of corrosion at the interface will be discussed as well.

  11. Designer Infrared Filters using Stacked Metal Lattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.; Rebbert, M.; Sternberg, O.

    2003-01-01

    We have designed and fabricated infrared filters for use at wavelengths greater than or equal to 15 microns. Unlike conventional dielectric filters used at the short wavelengths, ours are made from stacked metal grids, spaced at a very small fraction of the performance wavelengths. The individual lattice layers are gold, the spacers are polyimide, and they are assembled using integrated circuit processing techniques; they resemble some metallic photonic band-gap structures. We simulate the filter performance accurately, including the coupling of the propagating, near-field electromagnetic modes, using computer aided design codes. We find no anomalous absorption. The geometrical parameters of the grids are easily altered in practice, allowing for the production of tuned filters with predictable useful transmission characteristics. Although developed for astronomical instrumentation, the filters arc broadly applicable in systems across infrared and terahertz bands.

  12. Image Stacking Techniques for GEO Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privett, G.; Appleby, G.; Sherwood, R.

    2014-09-01

    The detection of GEO satellites at faint magnitudes requires careful image processing. Image stacking techniques - registration followed by the combination of image sets - are frequently employed to reduce the impact of photon/electronic noise, image sensor artefacts and gamma ray strikes. They allow improved photometric results and enhanced sensitivity to be obtained. We present a comparative study of six possible approaches to the technique in a GEO satellite detection context. The authors examine data from a contemporaneous GEO satellite photometry monitoring activity undertaken during March 2014 by the British Geological Surveys Satellite Geodesy Facility in the UK, SpaceInsight Ltd in Cyprus and the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory from the South Atlantic. Other results from the 3 site collection activity are also discussed.

  13. Simultaneous stack gas scrubbing wastewater purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Variations of a process for removing sulfur dioxide from stack gases and using it to treat municipal waste water are described. The once-through system lowers the pH of the scrubbing water from minor depressions to a pH of about 2.5 under certain conditions. A recycle system uses iron for catalytic oxidation of sulfurous acid to sulfuric acid allowing very large amounts of sulfur dioxide to be absorbed in a small portion of water. The partial recycle system uses municipal wastewater and iron as a scrubbing medium, followed by neutralization of the wastewater with lime to produce an iron hydroxide precipitation which, when removed, produces tertiary quality treated wastewater. The SO2 scrubber is described, test results are analyzed, and a preliminary capital cost estimate for the three processes is included.

  14. Pin stack array for thermoacoustic energy conversion

    DOEpatents

    Keolian, Robert M. (Monterey, CA); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A thermoacoustic stack for connecting two heat exchangers in a thermoacoustic energy converter provides a convex fluid-solid interface in a plane perpendicular to an axis for acoustic oscillation of fluid between the two heat exchangers. The convex surfaces increase the ratio of the fluid volume in the effective thermoacoustic volume that is displaced from the convex surface to the fluid volume that is adjacent the surface within which viscous energy losses occur. Increasing the volume ratio results in an increase in the ratio of transferred thermal energy to viscous energy losses, with a concomitant increase in operating efficiency of the thermoacoustic converter. The convex surfaces may be easily provided by a pin array having elements arranged parallel to the direction of acoustic oscillations and with effective radial dimensions much smaller than the thicknesses of the viscous energy loss and thermoacoustic energy transfer volumes.

  15. Manifold seal structure for fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Collins, William P. (South Windsor, CT)

    1988-01-01

    The seal between the sides of a fuel cell stack and the gas manifolds is improved by adding a mechanical interlock between the adhesive sealing strip and the abutting surface of the manifolds. The adhesive is a material which can flow to some extent when under compression, and the mechanical interlock is formed providing small openings in the portion of the manifold which abuts the adhesive strip. When the manifolds are pressed against the adhesive strips, the latter will flow into and through the manifold openings to form buttons or ribs which mechanically interlock with the manifolds. These buttons or ribs increase the bond between the manifolds and adhesive, which previously relied solely on the adhesive nature of the adhesive.

  16. Using stacked generalization to predict membrane protein types based on pseudo-amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang-Quan; Yang, Jie; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2006-10-21

    Membrane proteins are vitally important for many biological processes and have become an attractive target for both basic research and drug design. Knowledge of membrane protein types often provides useful clues in deducing the functions of uncharacterized membrane proteins. With the unprecedented increasing of newly found protein sequences in the post-genomic era, it is highly demanded to develop an automated method for fast and accurately identifying the types of membrane proteins according to their amino acid sequences. Although quite a few identifiers have been developed in this regard through various approaches, such as covariant discriminant (CD), support vector machine (SVM), artificial neural network (ANN), and K-nearest neighbor (KNN), classifier the way they operate the identification is basically individual. As is well known, wise persons usually take into account the opinions from several experts rather than rely on only one when they are making critical decisions. Likewise, a sophisticated identifier should be trained by several different modes. In view of this, based on the frame of pseudo-amino acid that can incorporate a considerable amount of sequence-order effects, a novel approach called "stacked generalization" or "stacking" has been introduced. Unlike the "bagging" and "boosting" approaches which only combine the classifiers of a same type, the stacking approach can combine several different types of classifiers through a meta-classifier to maximize the generalization accuracy. The results thus obtained were very encouraging. It is anticipated that the stacking approach may also hold a high potential to improve the identification quality for, among many other protein attributes, subcellular location, enzyme family class, protease type, and protein-protein interaction type. The stacked generalization classifier is available as a web-server named "SG-MPt_Pred" at: http://202.120.37.186/bioinf/wangsq/service.htm. PMID:16806277

  17. Dielectric elastomer generators that stack up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, T. G.; Rosset, S.; Anderson, I. A.; Shea, H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and testing of a soft dielectric elastomer power generator with a volume of less than 1 cm3. The generator is well suited to harvest energy from ambient and from human body motion as it can harvest from low frequency (sub-Hz) motions, and is compact and lightweight. Dielectric elastomers are highly stretchable variable capacitors. Electrical energy is produced when the deformation of a stretched, charged dielectric elastomer is relaxed; like-charges are compressed together and opposite-charges are pushed apart, resulting in an increased voltage. This technology provides an opportunity to produce soft, high energy density generators with unparalleled robustness. Two major issues block this goal: current configurations require rigid frames that maintain the dielectric elastomer in a prestretched state, and high energy densities have come at the expense of short lifetime. This paper presents a self-supporting stacked generator configuration which does not require rigid frames. The generator consists of 48 generator films stacked on top of each other, resulting in a structure that fits within an 11 mm diameter footprint while containing enough active material to produce useful power. To ensure sustainable power production, we also present a mathematical model for designing the electronic control of the generator which optimizes energy production while limiting the electrical stress on the generator below failure limits. When cyclically compressed at 1.6 Hz, our generator produced 1.8 mW of power, which is sufficient for many low-power wireless sensor nodes. This performance compares favorably with similarly scaled electromagnetic, piezoelectric, and electrostatic generators. The generator’s small form factor and ability to harvest useful energy from low frequency motions such as tree swaying or shoe impact provides an opportunity to deliver power to remote wireless sensor nodes or to distributed points in the human body without the need for costly periodic battery replacement.

  18. Using Memory Mapping to Support Cactus Stacks in WorkStealing Runtime Systems

    E-print Network

    Leiserson, Charles E.

    Using Memory Mapping to Support Cactus Stacks in Work­Stealing Runtime Systems I­Ting Angelina Lee a ``cactus stack,'' wherein a function's accesses to stack variables properly respect the func­ tion, and . bounded and efficient use of memory for the cactus stack. We have addressed this cactus­stack problem

  19. Using Memory Mapping to Support Cactus Stacks in Work-Stealing Runtime Systems

    E-print Network

    Huang, Zhiyi

    Using Memory Mapping to Support Cactus Stacks in Work-Stealing Runtime Systems I-Ting Angelina Lee a "cactus stack," wherein a function's accesses to stack variables properly respect the func- tion's calling, and · bounded and efficient use of memory for the cactus stack. We have addressed this cactus-stack problem

  20. Qualification Tests for the Air Sampling System at the 296-Z-7 Stack, Addendum 1

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Maughan, A. D.

    2002-02-05

    This addendum report documents tests performed to verify that the stack flow monitoring system for the 296-Z-7 ventilation exhaust stack meets the applicable regulatory criteria regarding stack flow measurement accuracy. These criteria ensure that the stack flow measurements have sufficient accuracy for use in estimating stack emissions. The tests performed demonstrated that operability and accuracy requirements were met.

  1. Monte-Carlo study of the phase transition in the AA-stacked bilayer graphene

    E-print Network

    A. A. Nikolaev; M. V. Ulybyshev

    2014-12-04

    Tight-binding model of the AA-stacked bilayer graphene with screened electron-electron interactions has been studied using the Hybrid Monte Carlo simulations on the original double-layer hexagonal lattice. Instantaneous screened Coulomb potential is taken into account using Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation. G-type antiferromagnetic ordering has been studied and the phase transition with spontaneous generation of the mass gap has been observed. Dependence of the antiferromagnetic condensate on the on-site electron-electron interaction is examined.

  2. FEDERAL FACILITY COMPLIANCE AGREEMENT (FFCA) STACK ISOLATION PROJECT FUNCTIONS & REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    TRANBARGER, R.K.

    2003-12-16

    This document delineates the functions and requirements for the FFCA Stack Isolation Project for the 244-A, 244-BX, 244-5, and 244-TX DCRTs. The isolation of each ventilation system and stack includes the electrical, instrumentation, and mechanical isolation of the ventilation system and the installation of primary and annulus breather filters to provide passive ventilation to meet the FFCA requirements.

  3. Stacking-dependent optical absorption in multilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshino, Mikito

    2013-01-01

    We study the infrared optical absorption properties of ABA- and ABC-stacked graphene multilayers using the effective mass approximation. We calculate the optical absorption spectrum at various carrier densities, and find the characteristic features that identify the stacking types and the number of layers. We fully include the band parameters and discuss detailed features such as trigonal warping and electron-hole asymmetry.

  4. Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking* Mark A. Lemley**

    E-print Network

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Reply Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking* Mark A. Lemley** & Carl Shapiro*** We argued in our article, Patent Holdup and Royalty Stacking,1 that the threat to obtain a permanent injunction can greatly enhance a patent holder's negotiating power, leading to royalty rates that exceed a benchmark level based

  5. Computer Center: 2 HyperCard Stacks for Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhrkopf, Richard, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Two Hypercard stacks are reviewed including "Amino Acids," created to help students associate amino acid names with their structures, and "DNA Teacher," a tutorial on the structure and function of DNA. Availability, functions, hardware requirements, and general comments on these stacks are provided. (CW)

  6. Optimal Folding Of Bit Sliced Stacks+ Doowon Paik Sartaj Sahni

    E-print Network

    Sahni, Sartaj K.

    ) routing is done on metal layer 1 while the inter com- ponent (i.e., intra slice but across components) routing is done on metal layer 2. A component stack may be folded at component i1 by rotating components i Science Foundation under grant MIP 86-17374. 1 #12;2 1 Introduction A stack of bit sliced components

  7. Stress analysis of stacked Si wafer in 3D WLP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ki-Ho Maeng; Youngrae Kim; Sung-Geun Kang; Sung-Dong Kim; Sarah Eunkyung Kim

    2011-01-01

    In 3D wafer-stacking technology, one of the major manufacturing issues is wafer warpage because it causes process and product failures, such as delamination, cracking, mechanical stresses, and even electrical failure. In this study, the wafer warpage and local strain of thinned Si wafers in a wafer stack were investigated. A blanket Cu film was deposited on a Si wafer by

  8. 2. RICE THRESHING MILL WITH CHIMNEY STACK. Fire burned on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. RICE THRESHING MILL WITH CHIMNEY STACK. Fire burned on top of water pipe at base of chimney stack and steam went thru pipes to boiler on south side of wall. - Mansfield Plantation, Rice Threshing Mill, U.S. Route 701 vicinity, Georgetown, Georgetown County, SC

  9. Development of internal reforming carbonate fuel cell stack technology

    SciTech Connect

    Farooque, M.

    1990-10-01

    Activities under this contract focused on the development of a coal-fueled carbonate fuel cell system design and the stack technology consistent with the system design. The overall contract effort was divided into three phases. The first phase, completed in January 1988, provided carbonate fuel cell component scale-up from the 1ft{sup 2} size to the commercial 4ft{sup 2} size. The second phase of the program provided the coal-fueled carbonate fuel cell system (CGCFC) conceptual design and carried out initial research and development needs of the CGCFC system. The final phase of the program emphasized stack height scale-up and improvement of stack life. The results of the second and third phases are included in this report. Program activities under Phase 2 and 3 were designed to address several key development areas to prepare the carbonate fuel cell system, particularly the coal-fueled CFC power plant, for commercialization in late 1990's. The issues addressed include: Coal-Gas Related Considerations; Cell and Stack Technology Improvement; Carbonate Fuel Cell Stack Design Development; Stack Tests for Design Verification; Full-Size Stack Design; Test Facility Development; Carbonate Fuel Cell Stack Cost Assessment; and Coal-Fueled Carbonate Fuel Cell System Design. All the major program objectives in each of the topical areas were successfully achieved. This report is organized along the above-mentioned topical areas. Each topical area has been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. Center Stack Casing Bellows NSTX-CALC-133-10

    E-print Network

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    NSTX Center Stack Casing Bellows NSTX-CALC-133-10 Rev 0 January 2011 Prepared By the calculation is being performed.) There are two bellows used on the NSTX center stack, upper and lower of the vacuum vessel structure. The bellows must maintain the normal vacuum conditions for the necessary

  11. Testing versus Static Analysis of Maximum Stack Size Mahdi Eslamimehr

    E-print Network

    Palsberg, Jens

    , University of California, Los Angeles Jens Palsberg palsberg@ucla.edu UCLA, University of California, Los Angeles Abstract--For event-driven software on resource-constrained devices, estimates of the maximum stack overflow and failed [8]. Intuitively, the maximum stack size during a run is the high water mark

  12. Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack

    DOEpatents

    Wright, George T. (15 Cherry Hills Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

    1992-01-01

    An off-gas stack for a melter comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes pervents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

  13. Training Function Stacks to play the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma.

    E-print Network

    Ashlock, Dan

    Training Function Stacks to play the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma. Daniel Ashlock Department of Mathematics and Statistics University of Guelph Guelph, Ontario, Canada, N1G 2W1 dashlock@uoguelph.ca ABSTRACT called a function stack is introduced and trained to play the iterated prisoner's dilemma

  14. Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack

    DOEpatents

    Wright, G.T.

    1991-04-08

    This report describes an off-gas stack for a melter, furnace or reaction vessel comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes prevents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

  15. Simultaneous stack-gas scrubbing and waste water treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poradek, J. C.; Collins, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    Simultaneous treatment of wastewater and S02-laden stack gas make both treatments more efficient and economical. According to results of preliminary tests, solution generated by stack gas scrubbing cycle reduces bacterial content of wastewater. Both processess benefit by sharing concentrations of iron.

  16. Implement of Bluetooth protocol stack on Windows CE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tao Xiao; Xiaojun Jin

    2002-01-01

    Emerging technologies such as Bluetooth are expected to be ubiquitous solution for providing short range, low power, low cost, pico-cellular wireless connectivity. In this paper we study the theory of FSM (finite state machine) and the implementation of the Bluetooth protocol stack. We also study how to port the host protocol stack to the Windows CE operating system in detail.

  17. A Unit Cell Laboratory Experiment: Marbles, Magnets, and Stacking Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, David C.

    2011-01-01

    An undergraduate first-semester general chemistry laboratory experiment introducing face-centered, body-centered, and simple cubic unit cells is presented. Emphasis is placed on the stacking arrangement of solid spheres used to produce a particular unit cell. Marbles and spherical magnets are employed to prepare each stacking arrangement. Packing…

  18. Stacked Anodized Metal Substrate for high thermal dissipation performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chang-Hyun Lim; Young-Ki Lee; Ki-Ho Seo; Jong-Woon Kim; Seog-Moon Choi

    2010-01-01

    A novel fabrication method for stacking metal substrates using AMS (Anodized Metal Substrate) is suggested. This stacking technology can meet needs about superior heat dissipation capabilities for multi layer substrate in some application fields like automobile electronics applications. Moreover conventional processes which have been used for normal PCB (Printed Circuit Board) process and any special processes are not adopted for

  19. Notch loaded stacked disk patch antenna for wideband operation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Ansari; Prabhakar Singh; Satya Kesh Dubey; R. U. Khan; Babau R. Vishvakarma

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the analysis of a symmetrically notch loaded stacked circular disk patch antenna is carried out. It is found that the bandwidth of notch loaded disk antenna depends directly on the notch dimensions. Bandwidth of the notch loaded patch is found to be 27. 89 %. Stacking of the patch with parasitic element further improves the bandwidth to

  20. Wireless Sensor Networks: The Protocol Stack Iowa State University

    E-print Network

    McCalley, James D.

    duty-cycled WSN Layers Application Structural health monitoring system Routing Collection Tree Protocol-cycled WSN Layers Application Structural health monitoring system Routing Collection Tree Protocol (CTP) MAC (Iowa State) WSN Protocol Stack March 26, 2014 2 / 15 #12;Protocol Stack Computer networks have layers

  1. RADON MITIGATION EFFECTS OF PASSIVE STACKS IN RESIDENTIAL NEW CONSTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the effects of passive stacks in mitigating radon levels in residential new construction. Although passive stacks have been installed as a radon resistant measure in new houses, little quantitative data on their performance has been collected. This study invol...

  2. The performance of silicon detectors for the SiliPET project: A small animal PET scanner based on stacks of silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auricchio, Natalia; di Domenico, Giovanni; Zavattini, Guido; Milano, Luciano; Malaguti, Roberto

    2011-02-01

    We propose a new scanner for small animal Positron Emission Tomography (PET) based on stacks of double sided silicon detectors. Each stack is made of 40 planar detectors with dimension 60×60×1 mm 3 and 128 orthogonal strips on both sides to read the two coordinates of interaction, the third being the detector number in the stack. Multiple interactions in a stack are discarded by an exclusive OR applied between each detector plane of a stack. In this way we achieve a precise determination of the interaction point of the two 511 keV photons. The reduced dimensions of the scanner also improve the solid angle coverage resulting in a high sensitivity. Preliminary results were obtained with MEGA prototype tracker (11 double sided Si detector layers), divided into two stacks 2 cm apart made of, respectively, 5 and 6 prototype layers, placing a small spherical 22Na source in different positions. We report on the results, spatial resolution, imaging and timing performances obtained with double sided silicon detectors, manufactured by ITC-FBK, having an active area of 3×3 cm 2, thickness of 1 mm and a strip pitch of 500 ?m. Two different strip widths of 300 and 200 ?m equipped with 64 orthogonal p and n strips on opposite sides were read out with the VATAGP2.5 ASIC, a 128-channel "general purpose" charge sensitive amplifier.

  3. Exploring coherent transport through ?-stacked systems for molecular electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Solomon, Gemma C

    2014-01-01

    Understanding electron transport across ?-stacked systems can help to elucidate the role of intermolecular tunneling in molecular junctions and potentially with the design of high-efficiency molecular devices. Here we show how conjugation length and substituent groups influence the electron transport and thermoelectric response in the ?-stacked structures by investigating five representative stacked molecular junctions. We found that a ?-stacked system of two substituted anthracenes exhibits good thermopower and a high power factor, suggesting that increased conjugation can enhance the thermoelectric response. The fully eclipsed structure of quinhydrone exhibits a high power factor at the minimum energy structure and could thus be a better candidate in a thermoelectric device compared with the other ?-stacked systems considered. PMID:25283989

  4. Electrolyte matrix in a molten carbonate fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Reiser, C.A.; Maricle, D.L.

    1987-04-21

    A fuel cell stack is disclosed with modified electrolyte matrices for limiting the electrolytic pumping and electrolyte migration along the stack external surfaces. Each of the matrices includes marginal portions at the stack face of substantially greater pore size than that of the central body of the matrix. Consequently, these marginal portions have insufficient electrolyte fill to support pumping or wicking of electrolyte from the center of the stack of the face surfaces in contact with the vertical seals. Various configurations of the marginal portions include a complete perimeter, opposite edge portions corresponding to the air plenums and tab size portions corresponding to the manifold seal locations. These margins will substantially limit the migration of electrolyte to and along the porous manifold seals during operation of the electrochemical cell stack. 6 figs.

  5. Stacked endoplasmic reticulum sheets are connected by helicoidal membrane motifs

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Mark; Shemesh, Tom; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Klemm, Robin W.; Schalek, Richard; Hayworth, Kenneth J.; Hand, Arthur R.; Yankova, Maya; Huber, Greg; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Rapoport, Tom A.; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) often forms stacked membrane sheets, an arrangement that is likely required to accommodate a maximum of membrane-bound polysomes for secretory protein synthesis. How sheets are stacked is unknown. Here, we used novel staining and automated ultra-thin sectioning electron microscopy methods to analyze stacked ER sheets in neuronal cells and secretory salivary gland cells of mice. Our results show that stacked ER sheets form a continuous membrane system in which the sheets are connected by twisted membrane surfaces with helical edges of left- or right-handedness. The three-dimensional structure of tightly stacked ER sheets resembles a parking garage, in which the different levels are connected by helicoidal ramps. A theoretical model explains the experimental observations and indicates that the structure corresponds to a minimum of elastic energy of sheet edges and surfaces. The structure allows the dense packing of ER sheets in the restricted space of a cell. PMID:23870120

  6. Modulation of kinase-inhibitor interactions by auxiliary protein binding: Crystallography studies on Aurora A interactions with VX-680 and with TPX2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Baoguang; Smallwood, Angela; Yang, Jingsong; Koretke, Kristin; Nurse, Kelvin; Calamari, Amy; Kirkpatrick, Robert B.; Lai, Zhihong (GSKPA)

    2008-10-24

    VX-680, also known as MK-0457, is an ATP-competitive small molecule inhibitor of the Aurora kinases that has entered phase II clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. We have solved the cocrystal structure of AurA/TPX2/VX-680 at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. In the crystal structure, VX-680 binds to the active conformation of AurA. The glycine-rich loop in AurA adopts a unique bent conformation, forming a {pi}-{pi} interaction with the phenyl group of VX-680. In contrast, in the published AurA/VX-680 structure, VX-680 binds to AurA in the inactive conformation, interacting with a hydrophobic pocket only present in the inactive conformation. These data suggest that TPX2, a protein cofactor, can alter the binding mode of VX-680 with AurA. More generally, the presence of physiologically relevant cofactor proteins can alter the kinetics, binding interactions, and inhibition of enzymes, and studies with these multiprotein complexes may be beneficial to the discovery and optimization of enzyme inhibitors as therapeutic agents.

  7. Four-tiered {pi} interaction at the dimeric interface of HIV-1 integrase critical for DNA integration and viral infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q. [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Hombrouck, Anneleen [Laboratory for Molecular Virology and Gene Therapy, KULeuven and IRC KULAK, Kapucijnenvoer 33, B-3000 Leuven, Flanders (Belgium); Dayam, Raveendra [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Debyser, Zeger [Laboratory for Molecular Virology and Gene Therapy, KULeuven and IRC KULAK, Kapucijnenvoer 33, B-3000 Leuven, Flanders (Belgium); Neamati, Nouri [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States)], E-mail: neamati@usc.edu

    2008-08-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for viral infection. Here, we report an extensive {pi} electron orbital interaction between four amino acids, W132, M178, F181 and F185, located at the dimeric interface of IN that is critical for the strand transfer activity alone. Catalysis of nine different mutant IN proteins at these positions were evaluated. Whereas the 3'-processing activity is predominantly strong, the strand transfer activity of each enzyme was completely dependent on an intact {pi} electron orbital interaction at the dimeric interface. Four representative IN mutants were constructed in the context of the infectious NL4.3 HIV-1 viral clone. Whereas viruses with an intact {pi} electron orbital interaction at the IN dimeric interface replicated comparable to wild type, viruses containing an abolished {pi} interaction were non-infectious. Q-PCR analysis of viral DNA forms during viral replication revealed pleiotropic effects of most mutations. We hypothesize that the {pi} interaction is a critical contact point for the assembly of functional IN multimeric complexes, and that IN multimerization is required for a functional pre-integration complex. The rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the disruption of this {pi}-{pi} interaction should lead to powerful anti-retroviral drugs.

  8. Spectroscopic signatures for interlayer coupling in MoS2-WSe2 van der Waals stacking.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ming-Hui; Li, Ming-Yang; Zhang, Wengjing; Hsu, Wei-Ting; Chang, Wen-Hao; Terrones, Mauricio; Terrones, Humberto; Li, Lain-Jong

    2014-09-23

    Stacking of MoS2 and WSe2 monolayers is conducted by transferring triangular MoS2 monolayers on top of WSe2 monolayers, all grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) studies reveal that these mechanically stacked monolayers are not closely coupled, but after a thermal treatment at 300 °C, it is possible to produce van der Waals solids consisting of two interacting transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayers. The layer-number sensitive Raman out-of-plane mode A(2)1g for WSe2 (309 cm(-1)) is found sensitive to the coupling between two TMD monolayers. The presence of interlayer excitonic emissions and the changes in other intrinsic Raman modes such as E? for MoS2 at 286 cm(-1) and A(2)1g for MoS2 at around 463 cm(-1) confirm the enhancement of the interlayer coupling. PMID:25196077

  9. Creating a Rackspace and NASA Nebula compatible cloud using the OpenStack project (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R.

    2010-12-01

    NASA and Rackspace have both provided technology to the OpenStack that allows anyone to create a private Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) cloud using open source software and commodity hardware. OpenStack is designed and developed completely in the open and with an open governance process. NASA donated Nova, which powers the compute portion of NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform, and Rackspace donated Swift, which powers Rackspace Cloud Files. The project is now in continuous development by NASA, Rackspace, and hundreds of other participants. When you create a private cloud using Openstack, you will have the ability to easily interact with your private cloud, a government cloud, and an ecosystem of public cloud providers, using the same API.

  10. Large changes of graphene conductance as a function of lattice orientation between stacked layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunsoo; Qi, Yabing; Kwon, Sangku; Salmeron, Miquel; Park, Jeong Young

    2015-01-01

    Using the conductive tip of an atomic force microscope as an electrode, we found that the electrical conductance of graphite terraces separated by steps can vary by large factors of up to 100, depending on the relative lattice orientation of the surface and subsurface layers. This effect can be attributed to interlayer interactions that, when stacked commensurately in a Bernal sequence (ABAB…), cause the band gap to open. Misaligned layers, on the other hand, behave like graphene. Angular misorientations of a few degrees were found to cause large increases in the conductance of the top layer, with the maximum occurring around 30°. These results suggest new applications for graphene multilayers by stacking layers at various angles to control the resistance of the connected graphene ribbons in devices.

  11. To Stack or Not To Stack: Spectral Energy Distribution Properties of Lyman Alpha Emitting Galaxies at z=2.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Carlos J.; Bish, H.; Acquaviva, V.; Gawiser, E. J.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Ciardullo, R.; CANDELS Collaboration; MUSYC Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of Vargas et al. (2013, ArXiV: 1309.6341). We use the Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) GOODS-S multi-wavelength catalog to identify counterparts for 20 Ly? Emitting (LAE) galaxies at z = 2.1. We build several types of stacked Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of these objects. We combine photometry to form average and median flux-stacked SEDs, and postage stamp images to form average and median image-stacked SEDs. We also introduce scaled flux stacks that eliminate the influence of variation in overall brightness. We use the SED fitting code SpeedyMC to constrain the physical properties of individual objects and stacks. Our LAEs at z = 2.1 have stellar masses ranging from 2 × 10^7 Msun - 8 × 10^9 Msun (median = 3 × 10^8 Msun), ages ranging from 4 Myr to 500 Myr (median =100 Myr), and E(B-V) between 0.02 and 0.24 (median = 0.12). The SED parameters of the flux stacks match the average and median values of the individual objects, with the flux-scaled median SED performing best with reduced uncertainties. Median image-stacked SEDs provide a poor representation of the median individual object, and none of the stacking methods captures the large dispersion of LAE properties.

  12. First principle study on generalized stacking fault energy and surface energy of B2-AgRE intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lili; Wu, Xiaozhi; Wang, Rui; Wu, Shaohua; Feng, Huifang

    2012-11-01

    The generalized stacking fault energies and surface energies for AgRE (RE=Sc, Tm, Dy, Tb, Ce) intermetallics with B2 structure have been investigate d using the first principle calculations. The Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof exchange-correlation functional for the generalized-gradient-approximation is used and the electron-ion interaction is described by the full potential frozen-core projector augmented wave. The generalized stacking fault energy along <1 0 0>, <1 1 0> and <1 1 1> directions in {1 1 0} plane have been calculated. The ductility and brittleness of AgRE have been discussed based on the Rice criterion by using the ratio between surface energies and the unstable stacking fault energies. The ideal shear strength and the theoretical cleavage strength are also presented.

  13. Slow-wave resonance in periodic stacks of anisotropic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figotin, Alex; Vitebskiy, Ilya

    2007-11-01

    We consider a Fabry-Perot resonance (a transmission band edge resonance) in periodic layered structures involving birefringent layers. In a previous publication [Phys. Rev. E 72, 036619 (2005)] we have shown that the presence of birefringent layers with misaligned in-plane anisotropy can dramatically enhance the performance of the photonic-crystal resonator. It allows us to reduce its size by an order of magnitude without compromising on its performance. The key characteristic of the enhanced slow-wave resonator is that the Bloch dispersion relation ?(k) of the periodic structure displays a degenerate photonic band edge, in the vicinity of which the dispersion curve can be approximated as ??˜(?k)4 , rather than ??˜(?k)2 . Such a situation can be realized in specially arranged stacks of misaligned anisotropic layers. On the down side, the presence of birefringent layers results in the slow-wave resonance being coupled only with one (elliptic) polarization component of the incident wave, while the other polarization component is reflected back to space. In this paper we show how a small modification of the periodic layered array can solve the above fundamental problem and provide a perfect impedance match regardless of the incident wave polarization, while preserving the giant slow-wave resonance characteristic of a degenerate photonic band edge. Both features are of critical importance for many practical applications, such as the enhancement of various light-matter interactions, light amplification and lasing, optical and microwave filters, antennas, etc.

  14. 21 CFR 866.2440 - Automated medium dispensing and stacking device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Automated medium dispensing and stacking device. ...Devices § 866.2440 Automated medium dispensing and stacking device. (a) Identification. An automated medium dispensing and stacking device...

  15. Magnetic relaxation in nano-particle stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A.; Southern, P.; Schwarzacher, W.

    2005-01-01

    The remanent magnetisation and magnetic relaxation of Ni-Cu/Cu superlattice nanowires have been investigated. Arrays of superlattice nanowires were prepared by template deposition through polycarbonate nanoporous membranes using a single electrolyte bath. The thicknesses of nickel-rich layers (tNi) and copper layers (tCu) were independently controlled by monitoring the current during deposition. A study of the remanent magnetisation at 5K for tNi = 30Å and a range of values of tCu reveals the existence of inter-layer demagnetising interactions within each array. However the demagnetising interaction strength appears to reach a minimum level, believed to be due to intra-layer interactions caused by island formation within nickel-rich layers. Magnetic relaxation measurements on the same arrays after removal of a saturating (5T) field at various temperatures show M to decrease linearly with ln(t). The data were analyzed using the T ln(t/?0) scaling technique, revealing the effective energy barrier distribution of the arrays to be constructed of two components, possibly due to non- (or weakly-) interacting particles and strongly-interacting particles respectively. The weakly-interacting component is observed to decrease with decreasing tCu and is believed to be caused by large individual nickel islands (corresponding to inter-layer interactions), while the strongly-interacting component is believed to be due to fragmented nickel islands (corresponding to intra-layer interactions).

  16. Predicting helical coaxial stacking in RNA multibranch loops.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Rahul; Mathews, David H

    2007-07-01

    The hypothesis that RNA coaxial stacking can be predicted by free energy minimization using nearest-neighbor parameters is tested. The results show 58.2% positive predictive value (PPV) and 65.7% sensitivity for accuracy of the lowest free energy configuration compared with crystal structures. The probability of each stacking configuration can be predicted using a partition function calculation. Based on the dependence of accuracy on the calculated probability of the stacks, a probability threshold of 0.7 was chosen for predicting coaxial stacks. When scoring these likely stacks, the PPV was 66.7% at a sensitivity of 51.9%. It is observed that the coaxial stacks of helices that are not separated by unpaired nucleotides can be predicted with a significantly higher accuracy (74.0% PPV, 66.1% sensitivity) than the coaxial stacks mediated by noncanonical base pairs (55.9% PPV, 36.5% sensitivity). It is also shown that the prediction accuracy does not show any obvious trend with multibranch loop complexity as measured by three different parameters. PMID:17507661

  17. Stacking-dependent magnetoelectronic properties in multilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chiun-Yan; Wu, Jhao-Ying; Chiu, Yu-Huang; Chang, Cheng-Pong; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2014-11-01

    The generalized Peierls tight-binding model is developed to study multilayer graphenes. For an N -layer system, there are N groups of conduction and valence Landau levels. Each group is clearly specified by the corresponding sublattice. The Landau-level spectra strongly depend on the stacking configuration. ABC-stacked graphenes exhibit two kinds of Landau-level anticrossings, the intergroup and intragroup Landau levels, as a function of the applied magnetic field. On the other hand, in contrast to its frequent wide-energy presence in ABC-stacked graphenes, the anticrossing only occurs occasionally in AB-stacked graphenes, and is absent in AA-stacked graphenes. Furthermore, all 4 N Dirac-point related Landau levels are distributed over a limited energy range near the Fermi level. In AA- and AB-stacked graphenes, the total number of such levels is fixed, while their energies depend on the stacking configuration. These results reflect the main features of the zero-field band structures.

  18. Predicting helical coaxial stacking in RNA multibranch loops

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Rahul; Mathews, David H.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that RNA coaxial stacking can be predicted by free energy minimization using nearest-neighbor parameters is tested. The results show 58.2% positive predictive value (PPV) and 65.7% sensitivity for accuracy of the lowest free energy configuration compared with crystal structures. The probability of each stacking configuration can be predicted using a partition function calculation. Based on the dependence of accuracy on the calculated probability of the stacks, a probability threshold of 0.7 was chosen for predicting coaxial stacks. When scoring these likely stacks, the PPV was 66.7% at a sensitivity of 51.9%. It is observed that the coaxial stacks of helices that are not separated by unpaired nucleotides can be predicted with a significantly higher accuracy (74.0% PPV, 66.1% sensitivity) than the coaxial stacks mediated by noncanonical base pairs (55.9% PPV, 36.5% sensitivity). It is also shown that the prediction accuracy does not show any obvious trend with multibranch loop complexity as measured by three different parameters. PMID:17507661

  19. Design validation of the PBFA-Z vacuum insulator stack

    SciTech Connect

    Shoup, R.W.; Long, F.; Martin, T.H. [and others

    1997-07-01

    Sandia has developed PBFA-Z, a 20-MA driver for z-pinch experiments by replacing the water lines, insulator stack. and MITLs on PBFA II with hardware of a new design. The PBFA-Z accelerator was designed to deliver 20 MA to a 15-mg z-pinch load in 100 ns. The accelerator was modeled using circuit codes to determine the time-dependent voltage and current waveforms at the input and output of the water lines, the insulator stack, and the MITLs. The design of the vacuum insulator stack was dictated by the drive voltage, the electric field stress and grading requirements, the water line and MITL interface requirements, and the machine operations and maintenance requirements. The insulator stack consists of four separate modules, each of a different design because of different voltage drive and hardware interface requirements. The shape of the components in each module, i.e., grading rings, insulator rings, flux excluders, anode and cathode conductors, and the design of the water line and MITL interfaces, were optimized by using the electrostatic analysis codes, ELECTRO and JASON. The time-dependent performance of the insulator stacks was evaluated using IVORY, a 2-D PIC code. This paper will describe the insulator stack design, present the results of the ELECTRO and IVORY analyses, and show the results of the stack measurements.

  20. Parachute having improved vent line stacking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hengel, John E.

    1994-01-01

    A parachute having an improved vent line stacking wherein the parachute is provided with a canopy having a central vent opening and a vent band secured to the canopy around the periphery of the vent opening, with a plurality of vent lines each lying on a diameter of the vent opening and having its ends secured to the vent band on opposite sides of the vent opening is described. The vent lines are sewed to the vent band in an order such that the end of a first vent line is sewed to the vent band at a starting point with the end of a second vent band then being sewed to the vent band adjacent to and counterclockwise from the first band. A third vent band is sewed to the vent band adjacent to and clockwise from the first band, with a fourth vent band being sewed to the vent band adjacent to and counterclockwise from the second vent band. It can be seen that, if the vent lines are numbered in the order of being sewed to the vent band, the odd numbered vent lines will run consecutively in a clockwise direction and the even numbered lines will run consecutively in a counterclockwise direction from the starting point. With this order of assembly, each and every vent line will be separated from adjacent vent lines by no more than one vent line in the center of the vent opening where the vent lines cross.

  1. Lithiation-induced shuffling of atomic stacks.

    PubMed

    Nie, Anmin; Cheng, Yingchun; Zhu, Yihan; Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti; Tao, Runzhe; Mashayek, Farzad; Han, Yu; Schwingenschlögl, Udo; Klie, Robert F; Vaddiraju, Sreeram; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2014-09-10

    In rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, understanding the atomic-scale mechanism of Li-induced structural evolution occurring at the host electrode materials provides essential knowledge for design of new high performance electrodes. Here, we report a new crystalline-crystalline phase transition mechanism in single-crystal Zn-Sb intermetallic nanowires upon lithiation. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy, we observed that stacks of atomic planes in an intermediate hexagonal (h-)LiZnSb phase are "shuffled" to accommodate the geometrical confinement stress arising from lamellar nanodomains intercalated by lithium ions. Such atomic rearrangement arises from the anisotropic lithium diffusion and is accompanied by appearance of partial dislocations. This transient structure mediates further phase transition from h-LiZnSb to cubic (c-)Li2ZnSb, which is associated with a nearly "zero-strain" coherent interface viewed along the [001]h/[111]c directions. This study provides new mechanistic insights into complex electrochemically driven crystalline-crystalline phase transitions in lithium-ion battery electrodes and represents a noble example of atomic-level structural and interfacial rearrangements. PMID:25158147

  2. Membrane adhesion dictates Golgi stacking and cisternal morphology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Intaek; Tiwari, Neeraj; Dunlop, Myun Hwa; Graham, Morven; Liu, Xinran; Rothman, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Two classes of proteins that bind to each other and to Golgi membranes have been implicated in the adhesion of Golgi cisternae to each other to form their characteristic stacks: Golgi reassembly and stacking proteins 55 and 65 (GRASP55 and GRASP65) and Golgin of 45 kDa and Golgi matrix protein of 130 kDa. We report here that efficient stacking occurs in the absence of GRASP65/55 when either Golgin is overexpressed, as judged by quantitative electron microscopy. The Golgi stacks in these GRASP-deficient HeLa cells were normal both in morphology and in anterograde cargo transport. This suggests the simple hypothesis that the total amount of adhesive energy gluing cisternae dictates Golgi cisternal stacking, irrespective of which molecules mediate the adhesive process. In support of this hypothesis, we show that adding artificial adhesive energy between cisternae and mitochondria by dimerizing rapamycin-binding domain and FK506-binding protein domains that are attached to cisternal adhesive proteins allows mitochondria to invade the stack and even replace Golgi cisternae within a few hours. These results indicate that although Golgi stacking is a highly complicated process involving a large number of adhesive and regulatory proteins, the overriding principle of a Golgi stack assembly is likely to be quite simple. From this simplified perspective, we propose a model, based on cisternal adhesion and cisternal maturation as the two core principles, illustrating how the most ancient form of Golgi stacking might have occurred using only weak cisternal adhesive processes because of the differential between the rate of influx and outflux of membrane transport through the Golgi. PMID:24449908

  3. Molecule-substrate interaction channels of metal-phthalocyanines on graphene on Ni(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Dou Weidong; Huang Shuping; Zhang, R. Q.; Lee, C. S. [Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF) and Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2011-03-07

    Molecule-substrate interaction channels of metal-phthalocyanines (MPcs, including NiPc, CuPc, ZnPc, FePc, and CoPc) on graphene on Ni(111) were investigated by employing high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Except the expected IR-active modes, some Raman-active modes were also observed in all of MPcs, which are considered in this study. From the origination of the Raman-active features, it was deduced that MPcs are coupled with the substrate mainly through their central metal atom. The Raman-active modes appear as symmetric peaks in the HREELS in the case of MPcs with Ni, Cu, and Zn, whereas they are asymmetric and appear as a Fano line shape in the case of MPcs with Fe and Co. This spectroscopic difference indicates that the molecule-substrate coupling is completely different in the two cases mentioned above. The molecule-substrate interaction strength is considerably weak and comparable with the {pi}-{pi} interaction between molecules in the case of MPcs with Ni, Cu, and Zn, whereas it is much stronger in the case of MPcs with Fe and Co. From the HREELS observations, it can be suggested that the whole molecule can be effectively decoupled from the underneath Ni(111) by inserting a single layer of graphene between them in the case of MPcs with Ni, Cu, and Zn, whereas only benzene rings can be completely decoupled in the case of MPcs with Fe and Co.

  4. Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control

    DOEpatents

    Kunz, H.R.; Guthrie, R.J.; Katz, M.

    1987-03-17

    An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate. 5 figs.

  5. Visualization of stacking faults in fcc crystals in plastic deformations

    E-print Network

    Takeshi Kawasaki; Akira Onuki

    2011-11-27

    Using molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate the dynamics of stacking faults in fcc crystals in uniaxial stretching in a Lennard-Jones binary mixture composed of 4096 particles in three dimensions. We visualize stacking faults using a disorder variable $D_j(t)$ for each particle $j$ constructed from local bond order parameters based on spherical harmonics (Steinhardt order parameters). Also introducing a method of bond breakage, we examine how stacking faults are formed and removed by collective particle motions. These processes are relevant in plasticity of fcc crystals.

  6. Fabrication of high gradient insulators by stack compression

    DOEpatents

    Harris, John Richardson; Sanders, Dave; Hawkins, Steven Anthony; Norona, Marcelo

    2014-04-29

    Individual layers of a high gradient insulator (HGI) are first pre-cut to their final dimensions. The pre-cut layers are then stacked to form an assembly that is subsequently pressed into an HGI unit with the desired dimension. The individual layers are stacked, and alignment is maintained, using a sacrificial alignment tube that is removed after the stack is hot pressed. The HGI's are used as high voltage vacuum insulators in energy storage and transmission structures or devices, e.g. in particle accelerators and pulsed power systems.

  7. Remote fire stack igniter. [with solenoid-controlled valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, W. L. (inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An igniter is described mounted on a vent stack with an upper, flame cage near the top of the stack to ignite emissions from the stack. The igniter is a tube with a lower, open, flared end having a spark plug near the lower end and a solenoid-controlled valve which supplies propane fuel from a supply tank. Propane from the tank is supplied at the top under control of a second, solenoid-controlled valve. The valve controlling the lower supply is closed after ignition at the flame cage. The igniter is economical, practical, and highly reliable.

  8. Ablation of film stacks in solar cell fabrication processes

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-04-02

    A dielectric film stack of a solar cell is ablated using a laser. The dielectric film stack includes a layer that is absorptive in a wavelength of operation of the laser source. The laser source, which fires laser pulses at a pulse repetition rate, is configured to ablate the film stack to expose an underlying layer of material. The laser source may be configured to fire a burst of two laser pulses or a single temporally asymmetric laser pulse within a single pulse repetition to achieve complete ablation in a single step.

  9. Anomeric effect and hydrogen-bonded supramolecular motif in 5-(3-fluoro-4-methoxyphenyl)-1-[(3-fluoro-4-methoxyphenyl)aminomethyl]-1,3,5-triazinane-2-thione.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenfeng; Zhang, Jinming; Zhang, Guisheng; Wang, Jange

    2009-11-01

    In the title compound, C(18)H(20)F(2)N(4)O(2)S, the triazinane-2-thione ring adopts an envelope conformation, the ring substituents lie on the same side of the mean plane of the heterocyclic ring and the exo lp-N-C-N(triaz) unit (lp is a lone pair and triaz is the triazinane ring) exhibits an antiperiplanar orientation, which is shown to be governed by strong anomeric effects. Molecules are linked into a complex three-dimensional framework by a combination of two N-H...S hydrogen bonds, three C-H...F hydrogen bonds and a pi-pi stacking interaction. PMID:19893235

  10. Contributions of stacking, preorganization, and hydrogen bonding to the thermodynamic stability of duplexes between RNA and 2'-O-methyl RNA with Locked Nucleic Acids (LNA)†

    PubMed Central

    Kierzek, Elzbieta; Pasternak, Anna; Pasternak, Karol; Gdaniec, Zofia; Yildirim, Ilyas; Turner, Douglas H.; Kierzek, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    Locked Nucleic Acids (LNA) considerably enhance the thermodynamic stability of DNA and RNA duplexes. We report the thermodynamic stabilities of LNA-2'-O-methyl RNA/RNA duplexes designed to provide insight into the contributions of stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions to the enhanced stability. The results show that hydrogen bonding of LNA nucleotides is similar to that of 2'-O-methyl RNA nucleotides, whereas the 3'-stacking interactions are on average about 0.7 kcal/mol more favorable at 37 °C than for 2'-O-methyl or RNA nucleotides. Moreover, NMR spectra suggest helical pre-organization of the single stranded tetramer, CLAMALUM, probably due to restriction of some torsion angles. Thus enhanced stacking interactions and helical pre-organization of single stranded oligonucleotides contribute to the extraordinary stabilization of duplexes by LNA nucleotides. PMID:19348504

  11. A high efficiency label-free photonic biosensor based on vertically stacked ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanella, C. E.; Campanella, C. M.; De Leonardis, F.; Passaro, V. M. N.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we propose an optical biosensor based on two vertically stacked Silicon on Insulator (SOI) micro-ring resonators interacting with a microfluidic ring channel. This device behaves as a resonant optical coupler and it is very sensitive to the variation of the coupling coefficient between the two vertically stacked ring resonators. A ring microfluidic channel is proposed in the coupling region between the two vertically