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Sample records for pi-pi stacking interaction

  1. Homeotropic alignment of the lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal Sunset Yellow FCF using pi-pi stacking chemical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Han, Ganghee; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Lubensky, Tom C.; Collings, Peter J.; Yodh, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the homeotropic alignment of the lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal, Sunset Yellow FCF (SSY), using pi-pi stacking interactions between the SSY molecules and (1) thin parylene films or (2) a graphene monolayer. The nematic and columnar phases of SSY molecules arise via self-assembly in water into stacks through non-covalent attractions between the SSY molecules. Interestingly, we find that the same non-covalent interactions between SSY molecules and a parylene or graphene alignment layer lead to homeotropic anchoring of these stacks. The nematic phase of SSY is introduced between two glass substrates coated with parylene films or graphene monolayers, and homeotropic alignment of SSY is confirmed by polarized optical microscopy and conoscopy. Additionally, we observe and can explain the stripe domains that occur during cooling of the sample in this cell, and we consider possible novel applications for homeotropically aligned chromonic liquid crystals. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the National Science Foundation through NSF DMR-1205463 and UPENN MRSEC DMR-1120901

  2. A series of Cd(II) complexes with {pi}-{pi} stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions: Structural diversities by varying the ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiuli; Zhang Jinxia; Liu Guocheng; Lin Hongyan

    2011-02-15

    Seven new Cd(II) complexes consisting of different phenanthroline derivatives and organic acid ligands, formulated as [Cd(PIP){sub 2}(dnba){sub 2}] (1), [Cd(PIP)(ox)].H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd(PIP)(1,4-bdc)(H{sub 2}O)].4H{sub 2}O (3), [Cd(3-PIP){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].4H{sub 2}O (4), [Cd{sub 2}(3-PIP){sub 4}(4,4'-bpdc)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].5H{sub 2}O (5), [Cd(3-PIP)(nip)(H{sub 2}O)].H{sub 2}O (6), [Cd{sub 2}(TIP){sub 4}(4,4'-bpdc)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O (7) (PIP=2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, 3-PIP=2-(3-pyridyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, TIP=2-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, Hdnba=3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, H{sub 2}ox=oxalic acid, 1,4-H{sub 2}bdc=benzene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid, 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpdc=biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid, H{sub 2}nip=5-nitroisophthalic acid) have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Complexes 1 and 4 possess mononuclear structures; complexes 5 and 7 are isostructural and have dinuclear structures; complexes 2 and 3 feature 1D chain structures; complex 6 contains 1D double chain, which are further extended to a 3D supramolecular structure by {pi}-{pi} stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions. The N-donor ligands with extended {pi}-system and organic acid ligands play a crucial role in the formation of the final supramolecular frameworks. Moreover, thermal properties and fluorescence of 1-7 are also investigated. -- Graphical abstract: Seven new supramolecular architectures have been successfully isolated under hydrothermal conditions by reactions of different phen derivatives and Cd(II) salts together with organic carboxylate anions auxiliary ligands. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Complexes 1-7 are 0D or 1D polymeric structure, the {pi}-{pi} stacking and H-bonding interactions extend the complexes into 3D supramolecular network. To our knowledge, systematic study on {pi}-{pi} stacking and H-bonding interactions in cadmium(II) complexes are still limited. {yields} The structural

  3. Intracomplex {pi}-{pi} stacking interaction between adjacent phenanthroline molecules in complexes with rare-earth nitrates: Crystal and molecular structures of bis(1,10-Phenanthroline)trinitratoytterbium and bis(1,10-Phenanthroline)trinitratolanthanum

    SciTech Connect

    Sadikov, G. G. Antsyshkina, A. S.; Rodnikova, M. N.; Solonina, I. A.

    2009-01-15

    Crystals of the compounds Yb(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(Phen){sub 2} and La(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(Phen){sub 2} (Phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) are investigated using X-ray diffraction. It is established that there exist two different crystalline modifications: the main modification (phase 1) is characteristic of all members of the isostructural series, and the second modification (phase 2) is observed only for the Eu, Er, and Yb elements. It is assumed that the stability and universality of main phase 1 are associated with the occurrence of the nonbonded {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions between the adjacent phenanthroline ligands in the complexes. The indication of the interactions is a distortion of the planar shape of the Phen molecule (the folding of the metallocycle along the N-N line with a folding angle of 11{sup o}-13{sup o} and its 'boomerang' distortion). The assumption regarding the {pi}-{pi} stacking interaction is very consistent with the shape of the ellipsoids of atomic thermal vibrations, as well as with the data obtained from thermography and IR spectroscopy. An analysis of the structures of a number of rare-earth compounds has demonstrated that the intracomplex {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions directly contribute to the formation of supramolecular associates in the crystals, such as molecular dimers, supramolecules, chain and layered ensembles, and framework systems.

  4. {pi}-{pi} Interactions and magnetic properties in a series of hybrid inorganic-organic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M.; Lemus-Santana, A.A.; Rodriguez-Hernandez, J.; Knobel, M.; Reguera, E.

    2013-01-15

    The series of hybrid inorganic-organic solids T(Im){sub 2}[Ni(CN){sub 4}] with T=Fe, Co, Ni and Im=imidazole were prepared by soft chemical routes from aqueous solutions of the involved building units: imidazole, T{sup 2+} metal and the [Ni(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} anionic block. The obtained samples were characterized from infrared and UV-vis spectroscopies, and thermogravimetric, X-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements. Anhydrous solids which crystallize with a monoclinic unit cell, in the I2/a space group with four formula units per cell (Z=4) were obtained. Their crystal structure was solved ab initio from the recorded X-ray powder patterns and then refined by the Rietveld method. The metal T is found with octahedral coordination to four N ends of CN groups and two imidazole molecules while the inner Ni atom preserves its planar coordination. The system of layers remains stacked in an ordered 3D structure through dipole-dipole and {pi}-{pi} interactions between imidazole rings from neighboring layers. In this way, a pillared structure is achieved without requiring the coordination of both nitrogen atoms from imidazole ring. The recorded magnetic data indicate the occurrence of a predominant ferromagnetic interaction at low temperature for Co and Ni but not for Fe. Such magnetic ordering is more favorable for Ni with transition temperature of 14.67 K, which was ascribed to the relatively high polarizing power for this metal. Within the considered T metals, to nickel the highest electron-withdrawing ability corresponds and this leads to an increase for the metal-ligand electron clouds overlapping and to a stronger {pi}-{pi} attractive interaction, two factors that result into a higher magnetic ordering temperature. - Graphical Abstract: Magnetic ordering through the {pi}-{pi} interaction between the imidazole rings. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid inorganic-organic solids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid inorganic-organic molecular based

  5. Photoluminescence and conductivity of self-assembled pi-pi stacks of perylene bisimide dyes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhijian; Stepanenko, Vladimir; Dehm, Volker; Prins, Paulette; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Seibt, Joachim; Marquetand, Philipp; Engel, Volker; Würthner, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The self-assembly of a new, highly fluorescent perylene bisimide dye 2 into pi stacks, both in solution and condensed phase, has been studied in detail by NMR spectroscopy, vapor pressure osmometry (VPO), UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), optical polarizing microscopy (OPM) and X-ray diffraction. The NMR and VPO measurements revealed the formation of extended pi-pi stacks of the dye molecules in solution. The aggregate size determined from VPO and DOSY NMR measurements agree well with that obtained from the concentration and temperature-dependent UV/Vis spectral data by employing the isodesmic model (equal K model). In the condensed state, dye 2 possesses a hexagonal columnar liquid crystalline (LC) phase as confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The columnar stacking of this dye has been further explored by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Well-resolved columnar nanostructures of the compound are observed on graphite surface. A color-tunable luminescence from green to red has been observed upon aggregation which is accompanied by an increase of the fluorescence lifetime and depolarization. The observed absorption properties can be explained in terms of molecular exciton theory. The charge transport properties of dye 2 have been investigated by pulse radiolysis-time resolved microwave conductivity measurements and a 1D charge carrier mobility up to 0.42 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) is obtained. Considering the promising self-assembly, semiconducting, and luminescence properties of this dye, it might serve as a useful functional material for nano(opto)electronics. PMID:17143925

  6. Equation of state of an interacting pion gas with realistic {pi}-{pi} interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, R.; Wambach, J.

    1996-06-01

    Within the finite-temperature Green{close_quote}s-function formalism we study the equation of state of a hot interacting pion gas at zero chemical potential. Employing realistic {pi}{pi} meson-exchange interactions, we self-consistently calculate the in-medium single-pion self-energy and the {pi}{pi} scattering amplitude in the quasiparticle approximation. These quantities are then used to evaluate the thermodynamic potential {Omega}{sub {pi}}({ital T}) from which the state variables of pressure, entropy, and energy density can be derived. In contrast to earlier calculations based on the low-energy Weinberg Lagrangian we find an overall increase as compared to the free-gas results. We also consider the possibility of a dropping {rho}-meson mass as suggested by the {open_quote}{open_quote}Brown-Rho scaling{close_quote}{close_quote} law. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Self-assembled nanolayers of conjugated silane with pi-pi interlocking.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinyue; Lima, Ocelio V; Pei, Yong; Jiang, Zhang; Chen, Ziguang; Yu, Chichao; Wang, Jin; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Forsythe, Eric; Tan, Li

    2010-07-27

    The packing of electronic molecules into planar structures and an ensured pi-pi interaction within the plane are preferred for efficient organic transistors. Thin films of organic electronics are exemplar, but the widely adopted molecular design and associated fabrication lead to limited ordering in multistack construction motifs. Here we demonstrate self-assembled nanolayers of organic molecules having potential electronic utility using an amphiphilic silane as a building block. Unlike a cross-linked (tetrahedral) configuration found in conventional siloxane networks, a linear polymer chain is produced following silane polycondensation. As a result, hydrophobic branches plus a noncovalent pi-pi interlocking between the molecules promote planar packing and continuous stacking along the surface normal. In contrast to conventional pi-pi stacking or hydrogen bonding pathways in a fibrous construct, multistacked nanolayers with coexisting pi-pi and herringbone interlocking can provide unmatched properties and processing convenience in molecular electronics. PMID:20518569

  8. DABCO-metallopophyrin binding: Ternary complexes, host-guest chemistry, and the measurement of. pi. -. pi. interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C.A.; Meah, M.N.; Sanders, J.K.M. )

    1990-07-18

    Transient ternary complexes of the general form metalloporphyrin-DABCO-metalloporphyrin are described and characterized by NMR spectroscopy: the protons of DABCO (1,4-diazobicyclo(2.2.2)octane) molecules sandwiched between two diamagnetic metalloporphyrins resonate around {minus}5 ppm. The same structural motif is shown to occur when DABCO binds within the cavity of cofacial metalloporphyrin dimers. The kinetics and thermodynamics of intracavity binding were measured by electronic and NMR spectroscopy and lead to an estimate of 48 {plus minus} 10 kJ mol{sup {minus}1} (11.5 {plus minus} 2.4 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}) for the enthalpy of the {pi}-{pi} interaction between two zinc porphyrin moieties. The mechanism of ligand exchange and isomer interconversion for one of the porphyrin dimers has also been elucidated.

  9. Noncovalent Pi-Pi Stacking at the Carbon-Electrolyte Interface: Controlling the Voltage Window of Electrochemical Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengya; Westover, Andrew S; Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Muralidharan, Nitin; Boire, Timothy C; Sung, Hak-Joon; Pint, Cary L

    2016-08-01

    A key parameter in the operation of an electrochemical double-layer capacitor is the voltage window, which dictates the device energy density and power density. Here we demonstrate experimental evidence that π-π stacking at a carbon-ionic liquid interface can modify the operation voltage of a supercapacitor device by up to 30%, and this can be recovered by steric hindrance at the electrode-electrolyte interface introduced by poly(ethylene oxide) polymer electrolyte additives. This observation is supported by Raman spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry that each independently elucidates the signature of π-π stacking between imidazole groups in the ionic liquid and the carbon surface and the role this plays to lower the energy barrier for charge transfer at the electrode-electrolyte interface. This effect is further observed universally across two separate ionic liquid electrolyte systems and is validated by control experiments showing an invariant electrochemical window in the absence of a carbon-ionic liquid electrode-electrolyte interface. As interfacial or noncovalent interactions are usually neglected in the mechanistic picture of double-layer capacitors, this work highlights the importance of understanding chemical properties at supercapacitor interfaces to engineer voltage and energy capability. PMID:27380273

  10. Observation of eta_c(1S) and eta_c(2S) decays to K K-pi pi-pi0 in two-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, P.del Amo

    2011-05-20

    We study the processes {gamma}{gamma} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and {gamma}{gamma} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} using a data sample of 519.2 fb{sup -1} recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at center-of-mass energies near the {Upsilon}(nS) (n = 2, 3, 4) resonances. We observe the {eta}{sub c}(1S), {chi}{sub c0}(1P), {chi}{sub c2}(1P), and {eta}{sub c}(2S) resonances produced in two-photon interactions and decaying to K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, with significances of 18.1, 5.7, 5.2, and 5.3 standard deviations (including systematic errors), respectively. We measure the {eta}{sub c}(2S) mass and width in K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decays, m({eta}{sub c}(2S)) = 3638.5 {+-} 1.5 {+-} 0.8 MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}({eta}{sub c}(2S)) = 13.4 {+-} 4.6 {+-} 3.2 MeV, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We search for the Z(3930) resonance and find no significant signal. We also provide the two-photon width times branching fraction values for the observed resonances.

  11. Intramolecular "Aryl-metal chelate ring" pi,pi-interactions as structural evidence for metalloaromaticity in (aromatic alpha,alpha'-diimine)-copper(II) chelates: molecular and crystal structure of aqua(1,10-phenanthroline)(2-benzylmalonato)copper(II) three-hydrate.

    PubMed

    Castiñeiras, A; Sicilia-Zafra, A G; González-Pérez, J M; Choquesillo-Lazarte, D; Niclós-Gutiérrez, J

    2002-12-30

    By reaction of Cu(2)CO(3)(OH)(2), 2-benzylmalonic acid (H(2)Bzmal), and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), [Cu(Bzmal)(phen)(H(2)O)] x 3H(2)O (compound 1) has been obtained and characterized by thermal, spectral, magnetic, and X-ray diffraction methods. The molecular structure of 1 is remarkably similar to that of [Cu(Bzmal)(bipy)(H(2)O)] x 2H(2)O (compound 2, bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine). In both complexes, the aryl(Bzmal) ring produces an unexpected pi,pi-stacking interaction with the Cu(II)-(aromatic alpha,alpha'-diimine) chelate ring, at an average distance d(pi)(-)(pi) of 3.40 A, involving roughly parallel and smoothly slipped rings. This insight is discussed as new structural evidence for metalloaromaticity of Cu(II)-(aromatic alpha,alpha'-diimine) chelate rings. Interestingly, 1 recognizes itself by a weak intermolecular pi,pi-stacking interaction between aryl(Bzmal) ligands to give pairs of complex molecules. In contrast, there is an intermolecular pyridyl-pyridyl pi,pi-stacking interaction also forming pairs of complex molecules in 2. PMID:12495333

  12. Measurement of ratio R = (BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi}{pi}{pi})/BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi})) in {pi}{sup -}-Nucleus interactions at 500 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Solano Salinas, C. J.; Paucarchuco, C.; Fernandez, A.; Sheaff, M.

    2007-10-26

    We report a very preliminary result on the measurement of the ratio of branching ratios, for two decays D{sup 0} meson, R = (BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi}{pi}{pi})/BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi})), using data from the E791 experiment. We find R = 1.96{+-}0.0286 (stat){+-}0.06 (sys). This is in agreement with and of similar precision to the current PDG average value 1.97{+-}0.09.

  13. Study of the D{sup 0{yields}{pi}+{pi}-{pi}0} decay at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspero, Mario

    2010-08-05

    The Dalitz-plot of the decay D{sup 0{yields}{pi}+{pi}-{pi}0} measured by the BABAR collaboration shows the structure of a final state having quantum numbers I{sup G}J{sup PC} = 0{sup -}0{sup --}. An isospin analysis of this Dalitz-plot finds that the fraction of the I = 0 contribution is about 96%. This high I = 0 contribution is unexpected because the weak interaction violates the isospin.

  14. Hydrogen bonding and pi-pi interactions in a laminar structure: benzene-1,3-dicarboxylic acid-4-methylpyridine (1/2).

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhi-Min; Feng, Hai; Tu, Bing; Li, Mei-Chao; Hu, Mao-Lin

    2005-10-01

    The title complex, C8H6O4.2C6H7N, consists of two crystallographically independent 1:2 clusters of benzene-1,3-dicarboxylic acid and 4-methylpyridine. Each cluster, the components of which are linked by O-H...N hydrogen bonds, is almost planar by alignment of C-H...O hydrogen bonds. Herring-bone ribbons of clusters are formed by other C-H...O hydrogen bonds, and these ribbons are further packed to form a laminar structure by pi-pi interactions. PMID:16210766

  15. Diffractive Pion Dissociation into {pi}{sup -{pi}+{pi}-{pi}+{pi}-} at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Neubert, S.

    2010-08-05

    At the COMPASS experiment a sample of {approx}380000 exclusive events of diffractive pion dissociation on a lead target into a {pi}{sup -{pi}+{pi}-{pi}+{pi}-} final state has been recorded in 2004. The 5{pi} invariant mass spectrum shows a momentum transfer dependent structure peaking around 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}. In the (4{pi}){sup 0} subsystem there is a clear signal for the f{sub 1}(1285) resonance decaying into 4 pions. In this note we describe the data sample and explore the physics potential of this final state.

  16. New type of dual solid-state thermochromism: modulation of intramolecular charge transfer by intermolecular pi-pi interactions, kinetic trapping of the aci-nitro group, and reversible molecular locking.

    PubMed

    Naumov, Pance; Lee, Sang Cheol; Ishizawa, Nobuo; Jeong, Young Gyu; Chung, Ihn Hee; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2009-10-22

    When heated above room temperature, some crystalline polymorphs of the 1,3-bis(hydroxyalkylamino)-4,6-dinitrobenzenes (BDBn, n = 2-5), bis(hydroxyalkyl) analogues of the intramolecular charge-transfer molecule 1,3-diamino-4,6-dinitrobenzene, exhibit "dual" thermochromism: gradual color change from yellow to orange at lower temperatures, and sharp color change from orange to red at higher temperatures. These two thermochromic changes are related to different solid-state processes. When allowed to cool to room temperature, the yellow color of the thermochromic molecules with different alkyl length (n) is recovered with unexpectedly different kinetics, the order of the respective rate constants ranging from 10(-7)-10(-6) s(-1) for BDB2 to about 0.1 s(-1) in the case of BDB3. The thermochromic mechanism and the reasons behind the different kinetics were clarified on the basis of detailed crystallographic characterization, kinetic thermoanalysis, and spectroscopic study of eight crystalline forms (seven polymorphs and one solvate). It was found that the polymorphism is due to the possibility of "locking" and "unlocking" of the alkyl arms by formation of a strong intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl groups at their hydroxyl termini. The locking of BDB2, with shortest alkyl arms, is reversible and it can be controlled thermally; either of the two conformations can be obtained in the solid state by proper thermal treatment. By use of high temperature in situ single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of BDB3, direct evidence was obtained that the gradual thermochromic change is related to increased distance and weakened pi-pi interactions between the stacked benzene rings: the lattice expands preferably in the stacking direction, causing enhanced oscillator strength and red shift of the absorption edge of the intramolecular charge transfer transition. The second, sharp thermochromic change had been assigned previously to solid-solid phase transition triggered

  17. Nitrogen-Doping Enables Covalent-Like pi-pi Bonding between Graphenes

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yong-Hui; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kertesz, Prof. Miklos

    2015-01-01

    The neighboring layers in bi-layer (and few-layer) graphenes of both AA and AB stacking motifs are known to be separated at a distance corresponding to van der Waals (vdW) interactions. In this Letter, we present for the first time a new aspect of graphene chemistry in terms of a special chemical bonding between the giant graphene molecules . Through rigorous theoretical calculations, we demonstrate that the N-doped graphenes (NGPs) with various doping levels can form an unusual two-dimensional (2D) pi pi bonding in bi-layer NGPs bringing the neighboring NGPs to significantly reduced interlayer separations. The interlayer binding energies can be enhanced by up to 50% compared to the pristine graphene bi-layers that are characterized by only vdW interactions. Such an unusual chemical bonding arises from the pi pi overlap across the vdW gap while the individual layers maintain their in-plane pi-conjugation and are accordingly planar. The existence of the resulting interlayer covalent-like bonding is corroborated by electronic structure calculations and crystal orbital overlap population (COOP) analyses. In NGP-based graphite with the optimal doping level, the NGP layers are uniformly stacked and the 3D bulk exhibits metallic characteristics both in the in-plane and along the stacking directions.

  18. Dispersion relations with crossing symmetry for {pi}{pi} D- and F-wave amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, R.

    2011-04-01

    A set of once subtracted dispersion relations with imposed crossing symmetry condition for the {pi}{pi} D- and F-wave amplitudes is derived and analyzed. An example of numerical calculations in the effective two-pion mass range from the threshold to 1.1 GeV is presented. It is shown that these new dispersion relations impose quite strong constraints on the analyzed {pi}{pi} interactions and are very useful tools to test the {pi}{pi} amplitudes. One of the goals of this work is to provide a complete set of equations required for easy use. Full analytical expressions are presented. Along with the well-known dispersion relations successful in testing the {pi}{pi} S- and P-wave amplitudes, those presented here for the D and F waves give a complete set of tools for analyses of the {pi}{pi} interactions.

  19. Dynamical coupled-channels study of {pi}N {right arrow} {pi pi}N reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Kamano, H.; Julia-Diaz, B.; Lee, T.-S. H.; Matsuyama, A.; Sato, T.; Physics; Jefferson Lab.; Univ. of Barcelona; Shizuoka Univ.; Osaka Univ.

    2009-02-24

    As a step toward performing a complete coupled-channels analysis of the world data of {pi}N,{gamma}*N {yields} {pi}N,{eta}N,{pi}{pi}N reactions, the {pi}N {yields} {pi}{pi}N reactions are investigated starting with the dynamical coupled-channels model developed in Phys. Rev. C 76, 065201 (2007). The channels included are {pi}N,{eta}N, and {pi}{pi}N which has {pi}{Delta},{rho}N, and {sigma}N resonant components. The nonresonant amplitudes are generated from solving a set of coupled-channels equations with the meson-baryon potentials defined by effective Lagrangians. The resonant amplitudes are generated from 16 bare excited nucleon (N*) states that are dressed by the nonresonant interactions as constrained by the unitarity condition. The data of total cross sections and {pi}N and {pi}{pi} invariant mass distributions of {pi} + p {yields} {pi} + {pi} + n, {pi} + {pi}0p and {pi} - p {yields} {pi} + {pi} - n, {pi} - {pi}0p,{pi}0{pi}0n reactions from threshold to the invariant mass W = 2 GeV can be described to a very large extent. We show the importance of the coupled-channels effects and the strong interference among the contributions from the {pi}{Delta},{sigma}N, and {rho}N channels. The large interference between the resonant and nonresonant amplitudes is also demonstrated. Possible future developments are discussed.

  20. Dynamical coupled-channels study of pi N --> pi pi N reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kamano, Hiroyuki; Julia Diaz, Bruno; Lee, Tsung-Shung; Matsuyama, Akihiko; Sato, Toru

    2009-01-01

    As a step toward performing a complete coupled-channels analysis of the world data of pi N, gamma^* N --> pi N, eta N, pi pi N reactions, the pi N --> pi pi N reactions are investigated starting with the dynamical coupled-channels model developed in Phys. Rev. C76, 065201 (2007). The channels included are pi N, eta N, and pi pi N which has pi Delta, rho N, and sigma N resonant components. The non-resonant amplitudes are generated from solving a set of coupled-channels equations with the meson-baryon potentials defined by effective Lagrangians. The resonant amplitudes are generated from 16 bare excited nucleon (N^*) states which are dressed by the non-resonant interactions as constrained by the unitarity condition. The available total cross section data of pi^+ p --> pi^+ pi^+ n, pi^+ pi^0 and pi^- p --> pi^+ pi^- n, pi^- pi^0 n, pi^0 pi^0 n can be reproduced to a very large extent both in magnitudes and energy-dependence. Possible improvements of the model are investigated, in p

  1. Measurement of CP violation parameters with a Dalitz plot analysis of B{+/-}-->D{pi{+}pi{-}pi{0}}K{+/-}.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2007-12-21

    We report the results of a CP violation analysis of the decay B{+/-}-->D{pi{+}pi{-}pi;{0}}K{+/-}, where D{pi{+}pi{-}pi{0}} indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state pi{+}pi{-}pi{0}, excluding K{S}{0}pi{0}. The analysis makes use of 324 x 10{6}e{+}e{-}-->BB[over ] events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e;{+}e;{-} storage ring. Analyzing the pi;{+}pi;{-}pi;{0} Dalitz plot distribution and the B{+/-}-->D{pi{+}pi{-}pi{0}}K{+/-} branching fraction and decay rate asymmetry, we find the following one-standard-deviation constraints on the amplitude ratio and on the weak and strong phases: 0.06pi{+}pi{-}pi{0} decay amplitude. PMID:18233513

  2. Charmless decays B{yields}{pi}{pi},{pi}K and KK in broken SU(3) symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yueliang; Zhou Yufeng

    2005-08-01

    Charmless B decay modes B{yields}{pi}{pi},{pi}K and KK are systematically investigated with and without flavor SU(3) symmetry. Independent analyses on {pi}{pi} and {pi}K modes both favor a large ratio between color-suppressed tree (C) and tree (T) diagram, which suggests that they are more likely to originate from long distance effects. The sizes of QCD penguin diagrams extracted individually from {pi}{pi}, {pi}K and KK modes are found to follow a pattern of SU(3) breaking in agreement with the naive factorization estimates. Global fits to these modes are done under various scenarios of SU(3) relations. The results show good determinations of weak phase {gamma} in consistency with the standard model (SM), but a large electroweak penguin (P{sub EW}) relative to T+C with a large relative strong phase is favored, which requires a big enhancement of color-suppressed electroweak penguin (P{sub EW}{sup C}) compatible in size but destructively interfering with P{sub EW} within the SM, or implies new physics. The possibilities of sizable contributions from nonfactorizable diagrams such as W exchange (E), annihilation (A), and penguin-annihilation diagrams (P{sub A}) are investigated. The implications to the branching ratios and CP violations in KK modes are discussed.

  3. Search for the photoexcitation of exotic mesons in the pi+pi+pi- system.

    PubMed

    Nozar, M; Salgado, C; Weygand, D P; Guo, L; Adams, G; Li, Ji; Eugenio, P; Amaryan, M J; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Blaszczyk, L; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Casey, L; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cheng, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Crede, V; Cummings, J P; Dale, D; Dashyan, N; De Masi, R; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hardie, J; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Johnstone, J R; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kalantarians, N; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Krahn, Z; Kramer, L H; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Maccormick, M; Markov, N; Mattione, P; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Mueller, J; Munevar, E; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Anefalos Pereira, S; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Popa, I; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rubin, P D; Sabatié, F; Salamanca, J; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabian, Y G; Sharov, D; Shvedunov, N V; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Todor, L; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2009-03-13

    A search for exotic mesons in the pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-} system photoproduced by the charge exchange reaction gammap-->pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-}(n) was carried out by the CLAS Collaboration at Jefferson Lab. A tagged-photon beam with energies in the 4.8 to 5.4 GeV range, produced through bremsstrahlung from a 5.744 GeV electron beam, was incident on a liquid-hydrogen target. A partial wave analysis was performed on a sample of 83 000 events, the highest such statistics to date in this reaction at these energies. The main objective of this study was to look for the photoproduction of an exotic J;{PC}=1;{-+} resonant state in the 1 to 2 GeV mass range. Our partial wave analysis shows production of the a_{2}(1320) and the pi_{2}(1670) mesons, but no evidence for the a_{1}(1260), nor the pi_{1}(1600) exotic state at the expected levels. An upper limit of 13.5 nb is determined for the exotic pi_{1}(1600) cross section, less than 2% of the a_{2}(1320) production. PMID:19392105

  4. The estimation of production rates of {\\pi }^{+}{K}^{-}, {\\pi }^{-}{K}^{+} and {\\pi }^{+}{\\pi }^{-} atoms in proton–nucleus interactions at 450 GeV c–1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchakov, O. E.; Nemenov, L. L.

    2016-09-01

    Short-lived (τ ∼ 3× {10}-15 s) {π }+{K}-, {K}+{π }- and {π }+{π }- atoms as well as long-lived (τ ≥slant 1× {10}-11 s) {π }+{π }- atoms produced in proton–nucleus interactions at 24 GeV c–1 are observed and studied in the DIRAC experiment at the CERN Proton Synchroton. The purpose of this paper is to show that the yields of the short-lived {π }+{K}-, {K}+{π }- and {π }+{π }- atoms in proton–nucleus interactions at 450 GeV c–1 and {θ }{{lab}}=4^\\circ are estimated to be, respectively 67 ± 13, 31 ± 6 and 15 ± 2 times higher. This may allow a significant improvement of the precision of their lifetime measurement and π π and π K scattering length combinations | {a}0-{a}2| and | {a}1/2-{a}3/2| . The yields of the long-lived {π }+{K}-, {K}+{π }- and {π }+{π }- atoms at 450 GeV c–1 are estimated to be 265 ± 53, 120 ± 24 and 60 ± 9 times higher per time unit than at 24 GeV c–1. This may allow the resonance method to be used for measuring the Lamb shift in the π π atom and a new π π scattering length combination 2{a}0+{a}2 to be obtained.

  5. The f0 Mesons in Processes pi][pi [right arrow] [pi][pi], KK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovtsev, Yu. S.; Krupa, D.; Nagy, M.

    2002-06-01

    Combined analysis the experimental data on the processes pi][pi [right arrow] pi][pi, KK in the channel with IGJPC = 0+0++ in a model-independent approach leads to the following results: 1) The f0(665) state with properties of the sigma-meson is proved to exist; 2) It is shown that the f0(980) and especially f0(1370) (if exists) have a dominant ss component; 3) Indications for the glueball nature of the f0(1500) and for the considerable ss component in the f0(1710) are obtained; 4) Conclusion on the linear realization of chiral symmetry (chiS) is drawn.

  6. Observation of Upsilon(4S) decays to pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S) and pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(2S).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perl, M; Perazzo, A; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-06-16

    Observation of Upsilon(4S) decays to pi(+)pi(-)C and pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(2S)We present the first measurement of Upsilon(4S) decays to pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S) based on a sample of 230 x 106(4S) mesons collected with the BABAR detector. We measure the product branching fractions Beta(Upsilon(4S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S)) x BetaUpsilon(1S) --> mu(+)mu(-) = (2.23 +/- 0.25(stat) +/- 0.27(syst))x 10(-6) and Beta(Upsilon(4S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(2S) x Beta(Upsilon(2S) --> mu(+)mu(-))=(1.69 +/-0.26(stat) +/- 0.20(syst)) x 10(-)6, from which we derive the partial widths Gamma(Upsilon(4S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(1S))=(1.8 +/-0.4) keV and Gamma(Upsilon(4S) --> pi(+)pi(-)Upsilon(2S))=(2.7 +/- 0.8) keV. PMID:16803371

  7. Reexamining B{yields}{pi}{pi}, {pi}K decays in QCD factorization approach

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xinqiang; Yang Yadong

    2005-10-01

    Motivated by the recent experimental data, we have revisited the B{yields}{pi}K,{pi}{pi} decays in the framework of QCD factorization, with inclusion of the important strong penguin corrections of order {alpha}{sub s}{sup 2} induced by b{yields}Dg*g* (D=d or s and g* denotes an off-shell gluon) transitions. We find that these higher order strong penguin contributions can provide {approx}30% enhancement to the penguin-dominated B{yields}{pi}K decay rates, and such an enhancement can improve the consistency between the theoretical predictions and the experimental data significantly, while for the tree-dominated B{yields}{pi}{pi} decays, these higher order contributions play only a minor role. When these strong penguin contributions are summed, only a small strong phase remains and the direct CP asymmetries get small corrections. We also find that patterns of the ratios between the CP-averaged branching fractions remain nearly unaffected even after including these higher order corrections and the {pi}K puzzle still persists. Our results may indicate that to resolve the puzzle one would have to resort to new physics contributions in the electroweak penguin sector as found by Buras et al.

  8. Exclusive Central pi+pi- production in CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, Michael; Swiech, Artur; Zurek, Maria

    2013-10-14

    Using the Collider Detector at Fermilab, CDF, we have measured exclusive pi+pi- production at sqrt(s) = 900 GeV and 1960 GeV. The pi+pi- pair is central, |y| < 1.0, and there are no other particles detected in |eta| < 5.9. We discuss the mass spectrum, showing f0(980) and f2(1270) resonances, s-dependence, pT-dependence, and angular distributions.

  9. Effect of unitarization on the amplitudes for the decays K{sub 1}{sup 0} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}-} and K{sup +} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}+{pi}-}

    SciTech Connect

    Shabalin, E. P.

    2010-11-15

    The unitarization of the amplitude for the decay process K{sub 1}{sup 0} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}-} and allowance for the rescattering of final-state pions in the decay process K{sup +} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}+{pi}-} make it possible to evaluate, by using the parameters extracted from data on K {sup {yields}}2{pi} decays, the K{sup +} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}+{pi}-} decay width. The result agrees with the experimental width value at a level of a few percent. Allowance for corrections for higher order terms of the momentum expansion of the amplitude for the decay process K{sup +} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}+{pi}-} leads to the slope-parameter value of g{sub ++-}{sup th} = 0.2182, which agrees with its experimental counterpart, g{sub ++-}{sup exp} = 0.2154 {+-} 0.0035.

  10. Analytical {pi}{pi} scattering amplitude and the light scalars

    SciTech Connect

    Achasov, N. N.; Kiselev, A. V.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we construct the {pi}{pi} scattering amplitude T{sub 0}{sup 0} with regular analytical properties in the s complex plane, which describes simultaneously the data on the {pi}{pi} scattering, {phi}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}0{gamma} decay, and {pi}{pi}{yields}KK reaction. The chiral shielding of the {sigma}(600) meson and its mixing with the f{sub 0}(980) meson are also taken into account. The data agrees with the four-quark nature of the {sigma}(600) and f{sub 0}(980) mesons. The amplitude in the range -5m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}

  11. Stacking interactions and DNA intercalation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dr. Shen; Cooper, Valentino R; Thonhauser, Prof. Timo; Lundqvist, Prof. Bengt I.; Langreth, David C.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between stacking interactions and the intercalation of proflavine and ellipticine within DNA is investigated using a nonempirical van der Waals density functional for the correlation energy. Our results, employing a binary stack model, highlight fundamental, qualitative differences between base-pair base-pair interactions and that of the stacked intercalator base pair system. Most notable result is the paucity of torque which so distinctively defines the Twist of DNA. Surprisingly, this model, when combined with a constraint on the twist of the surrounding base-pair steps to match the observed unwinding of the sugar-phosphate backbone, was sufficient for explaining the experimentally observed proflavine intercalator configuration. Our extensive mapping of the potential energy surface of base-pair intercalator interactions can provide valuable information for future nonempirical studies of DNA intercalation dynamics.

  12. Crystal engineering using bisphenols and trisphenols. Complexes with 1,10-phenanthroline: hydrogen-bonded chains in adducts with 4,4'-biphenol (1/1) and 4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol (2/3), pi-pi stacked chains in the (1/2) adduct with 4,4'-thiodiphenol, and pairwise-interwoven nets in 1,1,1-tris(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethane-1,10-phenanthroline-methanol (1/1/1).

    PubMed

    Ferguson; Glidewell; Lavender

    1999-08-01

    In 4,4'-biphenol-1,10-phenanthroline (1/1) [systematic name: 4,4'-biphenyldiol-1,10-phenanthroline (1/1)] the diphenol molecules lie across centres of inversion and the phenanthroline molecules lie across twofold rotation axes; the phenanthroline molecules act as chain-building units and the molecular components are linked into steeply zigzag C(16) chains parallel to [101] by means of O-H.N hydrogen bonds. In the structure of 4,4'-thiodiphenol-1,10-phenanthroline (1/2) the phenanthroline molecules act as chain-terminating units; the supramolecular aggregation is finite, with the bisphenol linked to each phenanthroline molecule by means of a single O-H.N hydrogen bond. pi-pi stacking interactions between the phenanthroline molecules in neighbouring hydrogen-bonded aggregates serve to link these aggregates into a continuous two-dimensional array. The phenanthroline molecules in 4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol-1,10-phenanthroline (2/3) play two roles: molecules in general positions act as chain-terminating units and are linked to the sulfonyldiphenol molecules by means of three-centre O-H.(N)(2) hydrogen bonds, while those lying across twofold rotation axes act as chain builders and are linked to two different sulfonyldiphenol molecules by means of a two-centre O-H.N hydrogen bond in each case; the resulting U-shaped five-component aggregates are further linked by C-H.O=S hydrogen bonds into a C(3)(3)(17)[R(2)(2)(12)] 'chain of rings' along [001]. In 1,1,1-tris(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethane-1,10-phenanthroline-methanol (1/1/1) [systematic name: 4,4',4"-ethylidynetriphenol-1,10-phenanthroline-methanol (1/1/1)] the phenanthroline molecules again act as chain-terminating units: the trisphenol molecules and the methanol molecules are linked by O-H.O hydrogen bonds into two-dimensional nets built from R(6)(6)(42) rings, and pairs of these nets are interwoven. The formation of each net utilizes two hydroxyl groups per trisphenol molecule as hydrogen-bond donors and the remaining hydroxyl

  13. Possible resolution of the B{yields}{pi}{pi}, {pi}K puzzles

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hsiangnan; Mishima, Satoshi

    2011-02-01

    We show that there exist uncanceled soft divergences in the k{sub T} factorization for nonfactorizable amplitudes of two-body nonleptonic B meson decays, similar to those identified in hadron hadroproduction. These divergences can be grouped into a soft factor using the eikonal approximation, which is then treated as an additional nonperturbative input in the perturbative QCD formalism. Viewing the special role of the pion as a qq bound state and as a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson, we postulate that the soft effect associated with it is significant. This soft factor enhances the nonfactorizable color-suppressed tree amplitudes, such that the branching ratios B({pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) and B({pi}{sup 0}{rho}{sup 0}) are increased under the constraint of the B({rho}{sup 0}{rho}{sup 0}) data, the difference between the direct CP asymmetries A{sub CP}({pi}{sup {+-}}K{sup {+-}}) and A{sub CP}({pi}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}) is enlarged, and the mixing-induced CP asymmetry S{sub {pi}}{sup 0}{sub K{sub S}} is reduced. Namely, the known {pi}{pi} and {pi}K puzzles can be resolved simultaneously.

  14. Puzzles in B{yields}{pi}{pi},{pi}K decays: Possible implications for R-parity violating supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yadong; Wang, Rumin; Lu, G.R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent experiments suggest that certain data of B{yields}{pi}{pi},{pi}K decays are inconsistent with the standard model expectations. We try to explain the discrepancies with R-parity violating supersymmetry. By employing the QCD factorization approach, we study these decays in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation. We show that R-parity violation can resolve the discrepancies in both B{yields}{pi}{pi} and B{yields}{pi}K decays, and find that in some regions of parameter space all these requirements, including the CP averaged branching ratios and the direct CP asymmetries, can be satisfied. Furthermore, we have derived stringent bounds on relevant R-parity violating couplings from the latest experimental data, and some of these constraints are stronger than the existing bounds.

  15. Hadronic decays of the tau lepton : {tau}- {yields} ({pi}{pi}{pi})- {nu}{tau} within Resonance Chiral Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Pich, A.; Portoles, J.

    2006-01-12

    {tau} decays into hadrons foresee the study of the hadronization of vector and axial-vector QCD currents, yielding relevant information on the dynamics of the resonances entering into the processes. We analyse {tau} {yields} {pi}{pi}{pi}{nu}{tau} decays within the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory, comparing this theoretical scheme with the experimental data, namely ALEPH spectral function and branching ratio. Hence we get values for the mass and on-shell width of the a 1 (1260) resonance, and provide the structure functions that have been measured by OPAL and CLEO-II.

  16. Dynamical coupled-channels study of {pi}N{yields}{pi}{pi}N reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kamano, H.; Julia-Diaz, B.; Lee, T.-S. H.; Matsuyama, A.; Sato, T.

    2009-02-15

    As a step toward performing a complete coupled-channels analysis of the world data of {pi}N,{gamma}*N{yields}{pi}N,{eta}N,{pi}{pi}N reactions, the {pi}N{yields}{pi}{pi}N reactions are investigated starting with the dynamical coupled-channels model developed in Phys. Rev. C 76, 065201 (2007). The channels included are {pi}N,{eta}N, and {pi}{pi}N which has {pi}{delta},{rho}N, and {sigma}N resonant components. The nonresonant amplitudes are generated from solving a set of coupled-channels equations with the meson-baryon potentials defined by effective Lagrangians. The resonant amplitudes are generated from 16 bare excited nucleon (N*) states that are dressed by the nonresonant interactions as constrained by the unitarity condition. The data of total cross sections and {pi}N and {pi}{pi} invariant mass distributions of {pi}{sup +}p{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}n,{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}p and {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n,{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}p,{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}n reactions from threshold to the invariant mass W=2 GeV can be described to a very large extent. We show the importance of the coupled-channels effects and the strong interference among the contributions from the {pi}{delta},{sigma}N, and {rho}N channels. The large interference between the resonant and nonresonant amplitudes is also demonstrated. Possible future developments are discussed.

  17. Testing the dynamics of B ->pi pi and constraints onalpha

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Yuval; Hocker, Andreas; Ligeti, Zoltan; Pirjol, Dan

    2005-07-07

    In charmless nonleptonic B decays to {pi}{pi} or {rho}{rho}, the ''color allowed'' and ''color suppressed'' tree amplitudes can be studied in a systematic expansion in {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub b}) and {Lambda}{sub QCD}/m{sub b}. At leading order in this expansion their relative strong phase vanishes. The implications of this prediction are obscured by penguin contributions. They propose to use this prediction to test the relative importance of the various penguin amplitudes using experimental data. The present B {yields} {pi}{pi} data suggest that there are large corrections to the heavy quark limit, which can be due to power corrections to the tree amplitudes, large up-penguin amplitude, or enhanced weak annihilation. Because the penguin contributions are smaller, the heavy quark limit is more consistent with the B {yields} {rho}{rho} data, and its implications may become important for the extraction of {alpha} from this mode in the future.

  18. Dispersion relation bounds for {pi}{pi} scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar, Aneesh V.; Mateu, Vicent

    2008-05-01

    Axiomatic principles such as analyticity, unitarity, and crossing symmetry constrain the second derivative of the {pi}{pi} scattering amplitudes in some channels to be positive in a region of the Mandelstam plane. Since this region lies in the domain of validity of chiral perturbation theory, we can use these positivity conditions to bound linear combinations of l{sub 1} and l{sub 2}. We compare our predictions with those derived previously in the literature using similar methods. We compute the one-loop {pi}{pi} scattering amplitude in the linear sigma model (LSM) using the MS scheme, a result hitherto absent in the literature. The LSM values for l{sub 1} and l{sub 2} violate the bounds for small values of m{sub {sigma}}/m{sub {pi}}. We show how this can occur, while still being consistent with the axiomatic principles.

  19. Photoproduction of $\\pi^+ \\pi^-$ meson pairs on the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Marco A. Battaglieri; DeVita, Raffaella; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2009-10-01

    The exclusive reaction $\\gamma p \\to p \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ was studied in the photon energy range 3.0 - 3.8 GeV and momentum transfer range $0.4<-t<1.0$ GeV$^2$. Data were collected with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. In this kinematic range the integrated luminosity was about 20 pb$^{-1}$. The reaction was isolated by detecting the $\\pi^+$ and proton in CLAS, and reconstructing the $\\pi^-$ via the missing-mass technique. Moments of the di-pion decay angular distributions were derived from the experimental data. Differential cross sections for the $S$, $P$, and $D$-waves in the $M_{\\pi^+\\pi^-}$ mass range $0.4-1.4$ GeV were derived performing a partial wave expansion of the extracted moments. Besides the dominant contribution of the $\\rho(770)$ meson in the $P$-wave, evidence for the $f_0(980)$ and the $f_2(1270)$ mesons was found in the $S$ and $D$-waves, respectively. The differential production cross sections $d\\sigma/dt$ for individual waves in the mass range of the above-mentioned mesons were extracted. This is the first time the $f_0(980)$ has been measured in a photoproduction experiment.

  20. Nonfactorizable Contributions to B {yields} {pi}{pi} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmann, T.

    2004-09-17

    We investigate to what extent the experimental information on B {yields} {pi}{pi} branching fractions and CP asymmetries can be used to better understand the QCD dynamics in these decays. For this purpose we decompose the independent isospin amplitudes into factorizable and non-factorizable contributions. The former can be estimated within the framework of QCD factorization for exclusive B decays. The latter vanish in the heavy-quark limit, m{sub b} {yields} {infinity}, and are treated as unknown hadronic parameters. We discuss at some length in which way the non-factorizable contributions are treated in different theoretical and phenomenological frameworks. We point out the potential differences between the phenomenological treatment of power-corrections in the ''BBNS approach'', and the appearance of power-suppressed operators in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET). On that basis we define a handful of different (but generic) scenarios where the non-factorizable part of isospin amplitudes is parameterized in terms of three or four unknowns, which can be constrained by data. We also give some short discussion on the implications of our analysis for B {yields} {pi}K decays. In particular, since non-factorizable QCD effects in B {yields} {pi}{pi} may be large, we cannot exclude sizeable non-factorizable effects, which violate SU(3){sub F} flavour symmetry, or even isospin symmetry (via long-distance QED effects). This may help to explain certain puzzles in connection with isospin-violating observables in B {yields} {pi}K decays.

  1. Study of the D0 \\to Pi Pi- Pi0 Decay at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspero, Mario; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2012-04-06

    The Dalitz-plot of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} measured by the BABAR collaboration shows the structure of a final state having quantum numbers I{sup G}J{sup PC} = 0{sup -}0{sup 2-}. An isospin analysis of this Dalitz-plot finds that the fraction of the I = 0 contribution is about 96%. This high I = 0 contribution is unexpected because the weak interaction violates the isospin.

  2. Stacking interactions in PUF-RNA complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Yiling Koh, Yvonne; Wang, Yeming; Qiu, Chen; Opperman, Laura; Gross, Leah; Tanaka Hall, Traci M; Wickens, Marvin

    2012-07-02

    Stacking interactions between amino acids and bases are common in RNA-protein interactions. Many proteins that regulate mRNAs interact with single-stranded RNA elements in the 3' UTR (3'-untranslated region) of their targets. PUF proteins are exemplary. Here we focus on complexes formed between a Caenorhabditis elegans PUF protein, FBF, and its cognate RNAs. Stacking interactions are particularly prominent and involve every RNA base in the recognition element. To assess the contribution of stacking interactions to formation of the RNA-protein complex, we combine in vivo selection experiments with site-directed mutagenesis, biochemistry, and structural analysis. Our results reveal that the identities of stacking amino acids in FBF affect both the affinity and specificity of the RNA-protein interaction. Substitutions in amino acid side chains can restrict or broaden RNA specificity. We conclude that the identities of stacking residues are important in achieving the natural specificities of PUF proteins. Similarly, in PUF proteins engineered to bind new RNA sequences, the identity of stacking residues may contribute to 'target' versus 'off-target' interactions, and thus be an important consideration in the design of proteins with new specificities.

  3. Boron- and Nitrogen-Doped Phenalenyls: Unexpected 2e/ and 4e/all-sites pi-pi Covalency and Genuine Pancake Double Bonding

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tian, Yong-Hui; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2015-01-01

    Phenalenyl is an important neutral pi-radical due to its capability to form unconventional pancake pi-pi bonding interactions, whereas its analogues with graphitic boron (B) or nitrogen (N)-doping have been regarded as closed-shell systems and therefore received much less attention. By using high-level quantum chemistry calculations, we show that the B- and N-doped closed-shell phenalenyls unexpectedly form open-shell singlet pi-dimers with diradicaloid character featuring 2e/all-sites double pi-pi bonding. Moreover, by proper substitutions, the doped phenalenyl derivatives can be made open-shell species that form closed shell singlet pi-dimers bound by stronger 4e/all-sites double pi-pi bonding. The covalent pi-pi bonding overlap is distributedmore » on all of the atomic sites giving robust and genuine pancake-shaped pi-dimers which, depending on the number of electrons available in the bonding interactions, are equally or more stable than the pi-dimers of the pristine phenalenyl.« less

  4. Measuring the Photon Polarization in Radiative B --> K-pi-pi-gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Gronau, Michael

    2001-08-13

    We propose a way of measuring the photon polarization in radiative B decays into K resonance states decaying to K{pi}{pi}, which can test the Standard Model and probe new physics. The photon polarization is shown to be measured by the up-down asymmetry of the photon direction relative to the K{pi}{pi} decay plane in the K resonance rest frame. The integrated asymmetry in K{sub 1}(1400) {yields} K{pi}{pi}, calculated to be 0.25, is measurable at currently operating B factories.

  5. Scalar mesons in. pi pi. and K-barK: Results of a unitary amplitude analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wicklund, A.B.; Ayres, D.S.; Cohen, D.; Diebold, R.; Pawlicki, A.J.

    1980-11-03

    The ..pi pi -->..K-barK S wave has been extracted from an amplitude analysis of K-barK production. With use of unitarity constraints, evidence has been found for a resonance in ..pi pi -->..K-barK at 1425 +- 14 MeV/c/sup 2/ having a width 160 +- 30 MeV/c/sup 2/; this state is a likely candidate for the QQ-bar, J/sup P/C=0/sup + +/ nonet. It is shown that the S*(980), which is a background to this resonance, must be a very broad effect and is likely a K-barK virtual bound state.

  6. Determination of the S-Wave Pi Pi Scattering Lengths From a Study of K - to Pi - Pi0 Pi0 Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Batley, J.R.; Culling, A.J.; Kalmus, G.; Lazzeroni, C.; Munday, D.J.; Slater, M.W.; Wotton, S.A.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bocquet, G.; Cabibbo, N.; Ceccucci, A.; Cundy, D.; Falaleev, V.; Fidecaro, M.; Gatignon, L.; Gonidec, A.; Kubischta, W.; Norton, A.; Maier, A.; Patel, M.; Peters, A.; /CERN /Dubna, JINR /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Birmingham U. /Dubna, JINR /CERN /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Sofiya U. /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /INFN, Perugia /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Northwestern U. /Dubna, JINR /Chicago U., EFI /Marseille, CPPM /Chicago U., EFI /Edinburgh U. /George Mason U. /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Florence /Modena U. /INFN, Florence /INFN, Florence /Urbino U. /INFN, Florence /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Bonn U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Northwestern U. /SLAC /Northwestern U. /Northwestern U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Northwestern U. /Northwestern U. /UCLA /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Frascati /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Barcelona, IFAE /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /CERN /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /Siegen U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Bern U. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /CERN /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Madrid, CIEMAT /Vienna, OAW

    2012-03-29

    We report the results from a study of the full sample of {approx}6.031 x 10{sup 7} K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} decays recorded by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS. As first observed in this experiment, the {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} invariant mass (M{sub 00}) distribution shows a cusp-like anomaly in the region around M{sub 00} = 2m{sub +}, where m{sub +} is the charged pion mass. This anomaly has been interpreted as an effect due mainly to the final state charge exchange scattering process {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} in K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay. Fits to the M{sub 00} distribution using two different theoretical formulations provide the presently most precise determination of a{sub 0} - a{sub 2}, the difference between the {pi}{pi} S-wave scattering lengths in the isospin I = 0 and I = 2 states. Higher-order {pi}{pi} rescattering terms, included in the two formulations, allow also an independent, though less precise, determination of a{sub 2}.

  7. Testing the dynamics of B{yields}{pi}{pi} and constraints on {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Yuval; Hoecker, Andreas; Ligeti, Zoltan; Pirjol, Dan

    2005-11-01

    In charmless nonleptonic B decays to {pi}{pi} or {rho}{rho}, the 'color allowed' and 'color suppressed' tree amplitudes can be studied in a systematic expansion in {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub b}) and {lambda}{sub QCD}/m{sub b}. At leading order in this expansion their relative strong phase vanishes. The implications of this prediction are obscured by penguin contributions. We propose to use this prediction to test the relative importance of the various penguin amplitudes using experimental data. The present B{yields}{pi}{pi} data suggest that there are large corrections to the heavy quark limit, which can be due to power corrections to the tree amplitudes, large up-penguin amplitude, or enhanced weak annihilation. Because the penguin contributions are smaller, the heavy quark limit is more consistent with the B{yields}{rho}{rho} data, and its implications may become important for the extraction of {alpha} from this mode in the future.

  8. B {sup {yields}} {pi}{pi} decays: Branching ratios and CP asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Kaidalov, A. B. Vysotsky, M. I.

    2007-04-15

    Theoretically motivated smallness of the penguin amplitude in B {sup {yields}} {pi}{pi} decays allows one to calculate the value of the unitarity-triangle angle {alpha}(o{sub 2}) with good accuracy. The relatively large branching ratio of the decay into {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is explained by the large value of FSI phase difference between decay amplitudes with I = 0 and I = 2.

  9. Measurement of direct photon emission in K+-->pi(+)pi(0)gamma decay

    PubMed

    Adler; Aoki; Ardebili; Atiya; Bergbusch; Blackmore; Bryman; Chiang; Convery; Diwan; Frank; Haggerty; Inagaki; Ito; Kabe; Kettell; Kishi; Kitching; Kobayashi; Komatsubara; Konaka; Kuno; Kuriki; Kycia; Li; Littenberg

    2000-12-01

    We have performed a measurement of the K+-->pi(+)pi(0)gamma decay and have observed 2x10(4) events. The best fit to the decay spectrum gives a branching ratio for direct photon emission of (4.7+/-0.8+/-0. 3)x10(-6) in the pi(+) kinetic energy region of 55 to 90 MeV and requires no component due to interference with inner bremsstrahlung. PMID:11102135

  10. Observation of CP violation in B(0) --> K(+)pi(-) and B(0) --> pi(+)pi(-).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Fisher, P H; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2007-07-13

    We report observations of CP violation in the decays B(0) --> K(+)pi(-) and B(0) --> pi(+)pi(-) in a sample of 383 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S) --> BB[over] events. We find 4372+/-82 B(0) --> K(+)pi(-) decays and measure the direct CP-violating charge asymmetry A(Kpi) = -0.107+/-0.018(stat)(-0.004)(+0.007)(syst), which excludes the CP-conserving hypothesis with a significance of 5.5 standard deviations. In the same sample, we find 1139+/-49 B(0) --> pi(+)pi(-) decays and measure the CP-violating asymmetries S(pipi) = -0.60+/-0.11(stat)+/-0.03(syst) and C(pipi) = -0.21+/-0.09(stat)+/-0.02(syst). CP conservation in B(0) --> pi(+)pi(-) (S(pipi) = C(pipi) = 0) is excluded at a confidence level 1-C.L. = 8 x 10(-8), corresponding to 5.4 standard deviations. PMID:17678212

  11. Exclusive Central $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ Production in Proton Antiproton Collisions at the CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Exclusive $\\pi^{=}\\pi^{-}$ production in proton-antiproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9 and 1.96 TeV in the Collider Detector at Fermilab has been measured. We select events with two particles with opposite charge in pseudorapidity region -1.3 < $\\eta$ < 1.3 with no other particles detected in -5.9 < $\\eta$ < 5.9. Particles are assumed to be pions. The $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$system is required to have rapidity -1.0 < $y$ < 1.0. The data are expected to be dominated by the double pomeron exchange mechanism. Therefore, the quantum numbers of the central state are constrained. The data extend up to dipion mass M($\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$) = 5000 MeV/$c^2$. Resonance structures consistent with $f_0$ and $f_2$(1270) mesons are visible. The results are valuable for light hadron spectroscopy and for providing information about the nature of the pomeron in a region between non-perturbative and perturbative quantum chromodynamics

  12. Large electroweak penguin contribution in B{yields}K{pi} and {pi}{pi} decay modes

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Tadashi

    2004-11-01

    We discuss a possibility of large electroweak penguin contribution in B{yields}K{pi} and {pi}{pi} from recent experimental data. The experimental data may be suggesting that there are some discrepancies between the data and theoretical estimation in the branching ratios of them. In B{yields}K{pi} decays, to explain it, a large electroweak penguin contribution and large strong phase differences seem to be needed. The contributions should appear also in B{yields}{pi}{pi}. We show, as an example, a solution to solve the discrepancies in both B{yields}K{pi} and B{yields}{pi}{pi}. However the magnitude of the parameters and the strong phase estimated from experimental data are quite large compared with the theoretical estimations. It may be suggesting some new physics effects are included in these processes. We will have to discuss about the dependence of the new physics. To explain both modes at once, we may need large electroweak penguin contribution with new weak phases and some SU(3) breaking effects by new physics in both QCD and electroweak penguin-type processes.

  13. Reaction {pi}N {yields} {pi}{pi}N near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Frlez, E.

    1993-11-01

    The LAMPF E1179 experiment used the {pi}{sup 0} spectrometer and an array of charged particle range counters to detect and record {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, {pi}{sup 0}p, and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}p coincidences following the reaction {pi}{sup +}p {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}p near threshold. The total cross sections for single pion production were measured at the incident pion kinetic energies 190, 200, 220, 240, and 260 MeV. Absolute normalizations were fixed by measuring {pi}{sup +}p elastic scattering at 260 MeV. A detailed analysis of the {pi}{sup 0} detection efficiency was performed using cosmic ray calibrations and pion single charge exchange measurements with a 30 MeV {pi}{sup {minus}} beam. All published data on {pi}N {yields} {pi}{pi}N, including our results, are simultaneously fitted to yield a common chiral symmetry breaking parameter {xi} ={minus}0.25{plus_minus}0.10. The threshold matrix element {vert_bar}{alpha}{sub 0}({pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}p){vert_bar} determined by linear extrapolation yields the value of the s-wave isospin-2 {pi}{pi} scattering length {alpha}{sub 0}{sup 2}({pi}{pi}) = {minus}0.041{plus_minus}0.003 m{sub {pi}}{sup {minus}1}, within the framework of soft-pion theory.

  14. Study of the anomalous process {gamma}{pi}{yields}{pi}{pi}

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Alkofer, R.

    1995-08-01

    The {gamma}{pi} {yields} {pi}{pi} form factor, F{sup 3{pi}}(s), is calculated in generalized impulse approximation within the Dyson-Schwinger Equation framework. This is an anomalous process and as such its form is a fundamentally important characteristic of the quantum field theoretical structure of QCD because it signals the breaking of the U{sub A} symmetry by quantization. There is only one experimental measurement of F{sup 3{pi}}(s) at s {approximately} 8m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}, which has large errors, however, there is an approved experiment at CEBAF to study F{sup 3{pi}}(s) in the reaction {gamma}{pi}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} near threshold. This is to be done by measuring {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}n cross sections near t {approx_equal} {sup -}m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}. Present calculations of F{sup 3{pi}}(s) are either unrelated to QCD or rely on {open_quotes}low-energy{close_quotes} expansions. The approach we employ, which manifestly incorporates the large space-like-q{sup 2} renormalization group properties of QCD and allows a realistic extrapolation to small space-like-q{sup 2}, allows us to go beyond such {open_quotes}low-energy{close_quotes} expansions and relate F{sup 3{pi}}(s) to the structure of the effective quark-quark interaction in the infrared. Our preliminary results are encouraging. The chiral limit value, F{sup 3{pi}}(s=0), obtained in our approach agrees with that which one expects from the connection between anomalous processes and the quantization of QCD. Our results also indicate that the form factor grows smoothly away from the chiral point. Our detailed calculation will allow us to address the question of the reliability of the extrapolation to the pion mass shell that is necessary in interpreting the data.

  15. Improved measurements of CP-violating asymmetry amplitudes in B0-->pi+pi- decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-10-01

    We present updated measurements of the CP-violating parameters Spipi and Cpipi in B0-->pi+pi- decays. Using a sample of 227x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) collider at SLAC, we observe 467+/-33 signal decays and measure Spipi=-0.30+/-0.17(stat)+/-0.03(syst) and Cpipi=-0.09+/-0.15(stat)+/-0.04(syst). PMID:16241716

  16. Search for CP violation in the decays D0 --> K- K+ and D0 --> pi- pi+.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Bailey, D; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2008-02-15

    We measure time-integrated CP-violating asymmetries of neutral charmed mesons in the modes D0 --> K(-) K(+) and D0 --> pi(-) pi(+) with the highest precision to date by using D0 --> K(-) pi(+) decays to correct detector asymmetries. An analysis of 385.8 fb(-1) of data collected with the BABAR detector yields values of a(CP)(KK)=(0.00+/-0.34(stat)+/-0.13(syst))% and a(CP)(pipi)=(-0.24+/-0.52(stat)+/-0.22(syst))%, which agree with standard model predictions. PMID:18352456

  17. Simple description of {pi}{pi} scattering to 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, M.; Sannino, F.; Schechter, J.

    1996-08-01

    Motivated by the 1/{ital N}{sub {ital c}} expansion, we present a simple model of {pi}{pi} scattering as a sum of a {ital current}-{ital algebra} contact term and resonant pole exchanges. The model preserves crossing symmetry as well as unitarity up to 1.2 GeV. Key features include chiral dynamics, vector meson dominance, a broad low energy scalar ({sigma}) meson, and a {ital Ramsauer}-{ital Townsend} mechanism for the understanding of the 980 MeV region. We discuss in detail the {ital regularization} (corresponding to rescattering effects) necessary to make all these nice features work. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. The target asymmetry P_z in {gamma}p-->p{pi}^+{pi}^- with the CLAS spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sungkyun Park, CLAS Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    The study of baryon resonances provides a deeper understanding of the strong interaction because the dynamics and relevant degrees of freedom hidden within them are reflected by the properties of the excited states of baryons. Higher-lying excited states at and above 1.9 GeV/c{sup 2} are generally predicted to have strong couplings to the {pi}{pi}N final states via {pi}{Delta} or {rho}N intermediate states. Double-pion photoproduction is therefore important to find and investigate properties of highmass resonances. The CLAS g9a (FROST) experiment, as part of the N* spectroscopy program at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab), has accumulated photoproduction data using linearly- and circularly-polarized photons incident on a longitudinally-polarized butanol target in the photon energy range 0.3 to 2.4 GeV. In this contribution, the extraction of the target asymmetry for the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} will be described and preliminary results will be presented.

  19. Precision measurement of {pi}{pi} scattering lengths at the NA48/2 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Venditti, Stefano

    2010-12-28

    The NA48/2 experiment at CERN [1] collected {approx}18{center_dot}10{sup 9} charged kaon decays during the years 2003/4. Along with the primary goals of the collaboration, i.e. the measurement of the CP-violating asymmetry in the K{sup {+-}}{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sup {+-}}{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} decays thanks to the simultaneous collection of K{sup +} and K{sup -} events, the collected data allowed to perform many other interesting analyses. In this paper two independent measurements of {pi}{pi} scattering lengths will be reviewed, using NA48/2 data from the K{sup {+-}}{yields}e{sup {+-}}{nu}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay and from the cusp effect in K{sup {+-}}{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} respectively.

  20. The phase-shift of isospin-2 pi-pi scattering from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef J. Dudek, Robert G. Edwards, Michael J. Peardon, David G. Richards, Christopher E. Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Finite-volume lattice QCD calculations offer the possibility of extracting resonance parameters from the energy-dependent elastic phase-shift computed using the L\\"uscher technique. In this letter, as a trial of the method, we report on the extraction of the non-resonant phase-shift for $S$ and $D$-wave $\\pi\\pi$ isospin-2 scattering from dynamical lattice QCD computations. We define a variational basis of operators resembling pairs of pions of definite relative momentum and extract a spectrum of excited states that maps to phase-shifts at a set of discrete scattering momenta. Computations are performed with pion masses between $400$ and $520$ MeV on multiple spatial volumes. We observe no significant quark mass dependence in the phase-shifts extracted which are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data at low momentum.

  1. Phase shift of isospin-2 {pi}{pi} scattering from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Richards, David G.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Peardon, Michael J.

    2011-04-01

    Finite-volume lattice QCD calculations offer the possibility of extracting resonance parameters from the energy-dependent elastic phase-shift computed using the Luescher technique. In this letter, as a trial of the method, we report on the extraction of the nonresonant phase-shift for S and D-wave {pi}{pi} isospin-2 scattering from dynamical lattice QCD computations. We define a variational basis of operators resembling pairs of pions of definite relative momentum and extract a spectrum of excited states that maps to phase-shifts at a set of discrete scattering momenta. Computations are performed with pion masses between 400 and 520 MeV on multiple spatial volumes. We observe no significant quark mass dependence in the phase-shifts extracted which are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data at low momentum.

  2. Measuring the charged pion polarizability in the gamma gamma -> pi+pi- reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, David W.; Miskimen, Rory A.; Mushkarenkov, Alexander Nikolaevich; Smith, Elton S.

    2013-08-01

    Development has begun of a new experiment to measure the charged pion polarizability $\\alpha_{\\pi}-\\beta_{\\pi}$. The charged pion polarizability ranks among the most important tests of low-energy QCD presently unresolved by experiment. Analogous to precision measurements of $\\pi^{\\circ}\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ that test the intrinsic odd-parity (anomalous) sector of QCD, the pion polarizability tests the intrinsic even-parity sector of QCD. The measurement will be performed using the $\\gamma\\gamma\\rightarrow\\pi^{+{}}\\pi^{-{}}$ cross section accessed via the Primakoff mechanism on nuclear targets using the GlueX detector in Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The linearly polarized photon source in Hall-D will be utilized to separate the Primakoff cross-section from coherent $\\rho^{\\circ}$ production.

  3. Edge-edge interactions in stacked graphene nanoplatelets

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz Silva, Eduardo; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Jia, Xiaoting; Sumpter, Bobby G; Dresselhaus, M; Meunier, V.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies show the dynamics of small graphene platelets on larger graphene layers. The platelets move nearly freely to eventually lock in at well-defined positions close to the edges of the larger underlying graphene sheet. While such movement is driven by a shallow potential energy surface described by an interplane interaction, the lock-in position occurs by via edge-edge interactions of the platelet and the graphene surface located underneath. Here we quantitatively study this behavior using van der Waals density functional calculations. Local interactions at the open edges are found to dictate stacking configurations that are different from Bernal (AB) stacking. These stacking configurations are known to be otherwise absent in edge-free two-dimensional (2D) graphene. The results explain the experimentally observed platelet dynamics and provide a detailed account of the new electronic properties of these combined systems.

  4. Measurement of Branching Fractions and Mass Spectra of B to K pi pi gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-12

    The authors present a measurement of the partial branching fractions and mass spectra of the exclusive radiative penguin processes B {yields} K{pi}{pi}{gamma} in the range m{sub K{pi}{pi}} < 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}. They reconstruct four final states: K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}, K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}, and K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, where K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Using 232 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage ring, they measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}) = (2.95 {+-} 0.13(stat.) {+-} 0.20(syst)) x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.07 {+-} 0.22(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma}) = (1.85 {+-} 0.21(stat.) {+-} 0.12(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}, and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.56 {+-} 0.42(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}.

  5. Tetraquark interpretation of the BELLE data on the anomalous Upsilon(1S)pi+ pi- and Upsilon(2S)pi+ pi- production near the Upsilon(5S) resonance.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed; Hambrock, Christian; Aslam, M Jamil

    2010-04-23

    We analyze the Belle data [K. F. Chen (Belle Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 112001 (2008); I. Adachi (Belle Collaboration), arXiv:0808.2445] on the processes e+ e- --> Upsilon(1S)pi+ pi-, Upsilon(2S)pi+ pi- near the peak of the Upsilon(5S) resonance, which are found to be anomalously large in rates compared to similar dipion transitions between the lower Upsilon resonances. Assuming these final states arise from the production and decays of the J(PC)=1(--) state Y(b)(10,890), which we interpret as a bound (diquark-antidiquark) tetraquark state [bq][bq], a dynamical model for the decays Y(b) --> Upsilon(1S)pi+ pi-, Upsilon(2S)pi+ pi- is presented. Depending on the phase space, these decays receive significant contributions from the scalar 0(++) states, f0(600) and f0(980), and from the 2(++) qq-meson f(2)(1270). Our model provides excellent fits for the decay distributions, supporting Y(b) as a tetraquark state. PMID:20482041

  6. Observation of CP Violation in B0 to K+pi- and B0 to pi+pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-03-14

    The authors report observations of CP violation in the decays B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} in a sample of 383 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events. They find 4372 {+-} 82 B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays and measure the direct Cp-violating charge asymmetry {Alpha}{sub K{pi}} = -0.107 {+-} 0.018(stat){sub -0.004}{sup +0.007}(syst), which excludes the CP-conserving hypothesis with a significance of 5.5 standard deviations. In the same sample they find 1139 {+-} 49 B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays and measure the CP-violating asymmetries S{sub {pi}{pi}} = -0.60 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst) and C{sub {pi}{pi}} = -0.21 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.02(syst). CP conservation in B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} (S{sub {pi}{pi}} = C{sub {pi}{pi}} = 0) is excluded at a confidence level 1-C.L. = 8 x 10{sup -8}, corresponding to 5.4 standard deviations.

  7. Interaction driven quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood; Nam, Jungtae; Kim, Keun Soo; Eom, Jonghwa

    2016-01-01

    The honeycomb lattice structure of graphene gives rise to its exceptional electronic properties of linear dispersion relation and its chiral nature of charge carriers. The exceptional electronic properties of graphene stem from linear dispersion relation and chiral nature of charge carries, originating from its honeycomb lattice structure. Here, we address the quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers and single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The quantum Hall plateaus started to appear more than 3 T and became clearer at higher magnetic fields up to 9 T. Shubnikov-de Hass oscillations were manifestly observed in graphene bilayers texture. These unusual plateaus may have been due to the layers interaction in artificially stacked graphene bilayers. Our study initiates the understanding of interactions between artificially stacked graphene layers. PMID:27098387

  8. Interaction driven quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood; Nam, Jungtae; Kim, Keun Soo; Eom, Jonghwa

    2016-01-01

    The honeycomb lattice structure of graphene gives rise to its exceptional electronic properties of linear dispersion relation and its chiral nature of charge carriers. The exceptional electronic properties of graphene stem from linear dispersion relation and chiral nature of charge carries, originating from its honeycomb lattice structure. Here, we address the quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers and single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The quantum Hall plateaus started to appear more than 3 T and became clearer at higher magnetic fields up to 9 T. Shubnikov-de Hass oscillations were manifestly observed in graphene bilayers texture. These unusual plateaus may have been due to the layers interaction in artificially stacked graphene bilayers. Our study initiates the understanding of interactions between artificially stacked graphene layers. PMID:27098387

  9. Interaction driven quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Siddique, Salma; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Ramay, Shahid Mahmood; Nam, Jungtae; Kim, Keun Soo; Eom, Jonghwa

    2016-04-01

    The honeycomb lattice structure of graphene gives rise to its exceptional electronic properties of linear dispersion relation and its chiral nature of charge carriers. The exceptional electronic properties of graphene stem from linear dispersion relation and chiral nature of charge carries, originating from its honeycomb lattice structure. Here, we address the quantum Hall effect in artificially stacked graphene bilayers and single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The quantum Hall plateaus started to appear more than 3 T and became clearer at higher magnetic fields up to 9 T. Shubnikov-de Hass oscillations were manifestly observed in graphene bilayers texture. These unusual plateaus may have been due to the layers interaction in artificially stacked graphene bilayers. Our study initiates the understanding of interactions between artificially stacked graphene layers.

  10. Combining information from B{yields}{pi}{pi} and B{yields}{pi}{rho},{pi}{omega} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, M.; Zenczykowski, P.

    2005-06-01

    We consider the B{yields}{pi}{pi} and B{yields}{pi}{rho},{pi}{omega} decays alongside each other, taking into account the contributions from all individual penguin amplitudes generated by the internal t, c, and u quarks. We argue that three ratios of penguin amplitudes, each for a different internal quark, formed by dividing the individual penguin amplitude in B{yields}{pi}{pi} by the corresponding amplitude in B{yields}{pi}{rho},{pi}{omega}, should be equal. We study the implications of the assumed existence of this connection between B{yields}{pi}{pi} and B{yields}{pi}{rho},{pi}{omega}. First, accepting that in the B{yields}{pi}{pi} decays the ratio C/T of the color-suppressed factorization amplitude C to the tree factorization amplitude T is negligible, we determine the ratio of individual penguin amplitudes. Then, from the B{yields}{pi}{rho},{pi}{omega} data, we extract the effective (i.e. possibly containing some penguin terms) tree and the effective color-suppressed amplitudes relevant for these processes, and the corresponding solutions for the factorization amplitudes. Finally, we argue that the C/T ratio in B{yields}{pi}{pi} should be identical to its counterpart in B{yields}{pi}{rho},{pi}{omega} (relevant for pion emission from the decaying b quark). This constraint permits the determination of C/T and of other amplitude ratios directly from the data. Although the |C/T| ratio extracted from the available data still carries a substantial error, it is consistent with the expected value of 0.25-0.5.

  11. Aromatic stacking interactions govern catalysis in aryl-alcohol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Patricia; Hernández-Ortega, Aitor; Lucas, Fátima; Carro, Juan; Herguedas, Beatriz; Borrelli, Kenneth W; Guallar, Victor; Martínez, Angel T; Medina, Milagros

    2015-08-01

    Aryl-alcohol oxidase (AAO, EC 1.1.3.7) generates H2 O2 for lignin degradation at the expense of benzylic and other π system-containing primary alcohols, which are oxidized to the corresponding aldehydes. Ligand diffusion studies on Pleurotus eryngii AAO showed a T-shaped stacking interaction between the Tyr92 side chain and the alcohol substrate at the catalytically competent position for concerted hydride and proton transfers. Bi-substrate kinetics analysis revealed that reactions with 3-chloro- or 3-fluorobenzyl alcohols (halogen substituents) proceed via a ping-pong mechanism. However, mono- and dimethoxylated substituents (in 4-methoxybenzyl and 3,4-dimethoxybenzyl alcohols) altered the mechanism and a ternary complex was formed. Electron-withdrawing substituents resulted in lower quantum mechanics stacking energies between aldehyde and the tyrosine side chain, contributing to product release, in agreement with the ping-pong mechanism observed in 3-chloro- and 3-fluorobenzyl alcohol kinetics analysis. In contrast, the higher stacking energies when electron donor substituents are present result in reaction of O2 with the flavin through a ternary complex, in agreement with the kinetics of methoxylated alcohols. The contribution of Tyr92 to the AAO reaction mechanism was investigated by calculation of stacking interaction energies and site-directed mutagenesis. Replacement of Tyr92 by phenylalanine does not alter the AAO kinetic constants (on 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol), most probably because the stacking interaction is still possible. However, introduction of a tryptophan residue at this position strongly reduced the affinity for the substrate (i.e. the pre-steady state Kd and steady-state Km increase by 150-fold and 75-fold, respectively), and therefore the steady-state catalytic efficiency, suggesting that proper stacking is impossible with this bulky residue. The above results confirm the role of Tyr92 in substrate binding, thus governing the kinetic mechanism

  12. Preferential pi-pi complexation between tamoxifen and borage oil/gamma linolenic acid: transcutaneous delivery and NMR spectral modulation.

    PubMed

    Heard, Charles M; Gallagher, Simon J; Congiatu, Costantino; Harwood, John; Thomas, Christopher P; McGuigan, Christopher; Nemcová, Marta; Nouskova, Tereza

    2005-09-30

    The effect of different proportions of borage oil on the in vitro transcutaneous delivery of tamoxifen were studied, with the aim of developing a gel capable of the simultaneous delivery of tamoxifen and gamma linolenic acid across (breast) skin. Supplementary work probed 1H NMR spectral data for tamoxifen in the presence of different proportions of polyunsaturated or unsaturated fatty acids. Typical, non-aqueous gels were modified to contain 1% tamoxifen and three levels of borage oil ( approximately 25% gamma linolenic acid) and the transcutaneous delivery of both tamoxifen and GLA across full thickness skin determined in vitro. Both tamoxifen and gamma linolenic acid permeated the skin with the ratio of moles being consistent at approximately 4:1. This was irrespective of time, amount of borage oil contained in the formulation (above a minimum) and the presence of other (unsaturated) excipients: mineral oil, Miglyiol 810N, white soft paraffin, PEG400 and Cabosil M5. Dose-dependent downfield shifts of tamoxifen aromatic protons were observed in the presence of borage oil and linolenic acid (gamma and alpha), but not saturated triacyl glycerol. The permeation data suggested vehicular complexation between tamoxifen and polyunsaturated constituents of borage oil and that such complexes permeated the skin intact. The 1H NMR data supported the hypothesis that such complexation was a consequence of preferential pi-pi orbital interactions between the phenyl groups of tamoxifen and the multiple double bonds of GLA. The mechanism for the permeation of intact complexes across skin remains to be elucidated. PMID:16115741

  13. New Insights into Hydrogen Bonding and Stacking Interactions in Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Langan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    In this quantum chemical study, we explore hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) and stacking interactions in different crystalline cellulose allomorphs, namely cellulose I and cellulose IIII. We consider a model system representing a cellulose crystalline core, made from six cellobiose units arranged in three layers with two chains per layer. We calculate the contributions of intrasheet and intersheet interactions to the structure and stability in both cellulose I and cellulose IIII crystalline cores. Reference structures for this study were generated from molecular dynamics simulations of water-solvated cellulose I and IIII fibrils. A systematic analysis of various conformations describing different mutual orientations of cellobiose units is performed using the hybrid density functional theory (DFT) with the M06-2X with 6-31+G (d, p) basis sets. We dissect the nature of the forces that stabilize the cellulose I and cellulose IIII crystalline cores and quantify the relative strength of H-bonding and stacking interactions. Our calculations demonstrate that individual H-bonding interactions are stronger in cellulose I than in cellulose IIII. We also observe a significant contribution from cooperative stacking interactions to the stabilization of cellulose I . In addition, the theory of atoms-in-molecules (AIM) has been employed to characterize and quantify these intermolecular interactions. AIM analyses highlight the role of nonconventional CH O H-bonding in the cellulose assemblies. Finally, we calculate molecular electrostatic potential maps for the cellulose allomorphs that capture the differences in chemical reactivity of the systems considered in our study.

  14. Scalar resonances in a unitary {pi}{pi} S-wave model for D{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup+}{pi}{sup-}{pi}{sup+}.

    SciTech Connect

    Boito, D. R.; Dedonder, J.-P.; El-Bennich, B.; Leitner, O.; Loiseau, B.; Physics; Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona; Univ. de Sao Paulo; Univ. Paris; Pl. Jussieu; Lab. Nazionali de Frascati

    2009-02-19

    We propose a model for D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays following experimental results which indicate that the two-pion interaction in the S wave is dominated by the scalar resonances f{sub 0}(600)/{sigma} and f{sub 0}(980). The weak decay amplitude for D{sup +} {yields} R{pi}{sup +}, where R is a resonance that subsequently decays into {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, is constructed in a factorization approach. In the S wave, we implement the strong decay R {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} by means of a scalar form factor. This provides a unitary description of the pion-pion interaction in the entire kinematically allowed mass range m{sub {pi}{pi}}{sup 2} from threshold to about 3 GeV{sup 2}. In order to reproduce the experimental Dalitz plot for D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, we include contributions beyond the S wave. For the P wave, dominated by the {rho}(770){sup 0}, we use a Breit-Wigner description. Higher waves are accounted for by using the usual isobar prescription for the f{sub 2}(1270) and {rho}(1450){sup 0}. The major achievement is a good reproduction of the experimental m{sub {pi}{pi}}{sup 2} distribution, and of the partial as well as the total D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} branching ratios. Our values are generally smaller than the experimental ones. We discuss this shortcoming and, as a by-product, we predict a value for the poorly known D {yields} {sigma} transition form factor at q{sup 2} = m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}.

  15. Stacked stem cell sheets enhance cell-matrix interactions

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nikul G; Zhang, Ge

    2014-01-01

    Cell sheet engineering has enabled the production of confluent cell sheets stacked together for use as a cardiac patch to increase cell survival rate and engraftment after transplantation, thereby providing a promising strategy for high density stem cell delivery for cardiac repair. One key challenge in using cell sheet technology is the difficulty of cell sheet handling due to its weak mechanical properties. A single-layer cell sheet is generally very fragile and tends to break or clump during harvest. Effective transfer and stacking methods are needed to move cell sheet technology into widespread clinical applications. In this study, we developed a simple and effective micropipette based method to aid cell sheet transfer and stacking. The cell viability after transfer was tested and multi-layer stem cell sheets were fabricated using the developed method. Furthermore, we examined the interactions between stacked stem cell sheets and fibrin matrix. Our results have shown that the preserved ECM associated with the detached cell sheet greatly facilitates its adherence to fibrin matrix and enhances the cell sheet-matrix interactions. Accelerated fibrin degradation caused by attached cell sheets was also observed. PMID:24769850

  16. Diffractive Dissociation into {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} Final States at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Florian

    2010-08-05

    QCD predicts gluonic excitations like hybrids to contribute to the meson spectrum in addition to qq-bar pair configurations. The most promising way to identify such states is the search for J{sup PC} quantum number combinations which are forbidden in the constituent quark model. The fixed target COMPASS experiment at CERN offers the opportunity to search for such states in the light quark sector with an unprecedented statistics.Diffractive reactions of 190 GeV/c pions on a lead target were studied by COMPASS during a pilot run in 2004. A Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) of the {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} final state with 42 waves including acceptance corrections through a phase-space Monte Carlo simulation of the spectrometer was performed. The exotic {pi}{sub 1}(1600) meson with quantum numbers J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} has been clearly established in the rho-pi decay channel with a mass of 1660{+-}10(stat) MeV/c{sup 2} and a width of 269{+-}21(stat) MeV/c{sup 2}. The improved detector performance in 2008 allows us to study this channel with significantly higher statistics. First results of the ongoing analysis of the 2008 data taking period, using a 190 GeV/c pion beam on a liquid hydrogen target are presented in this paper.

  17. Diffractive Dissociation into {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} Final States at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Florian

    2011-10-24

    QCD predicts gluonic excitations like hybrids to contribute to the meson spectrum in addition to qq-bar pair configurations. The most promising way to identify such states is the search for J{sup PC} quantum number combinations which are forbidden in the constituent quark model. The fixed target COMPASS experiment at CERN offers the opportunity to search for such states in the light quark sector with an unprecedented statistics.Diffractive reactions of 190 GeV/c pions on a lead target were studied by COMPASS during a pilot run in 2004. A Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) of the {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} final state with 42 waves including acceptance corrections through a phase-space Monte Carlo simulation of the spectrometer was performed. The exotic {pi}{sup 1}(1600) meson with quantum numbers J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} has been clearly established in the rho-pi decay channel with a mass of 1660{+-}10(stat) MeV/c{sup 2} and a width of 269{+-}21(stat) MeV/c{sup 2}. The improved detector performance in 2008 allows us to study this channel with significantly higher statistics. First results of the ongoing analysis of the 2008 data taking period, using a 190 GeV/c pion beam on a liquid hydrogen target are presented in this paper.

  18. Interactive histology of large-scale biomedical image stacks.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Won-Ki; Schneider, Jens; Turney, Stephen G; Faulkner-Jones, Beverly E; Meyer, Dominik; Westermann, Rüdiger; Reid, R Clay; Lichtman, Jeff; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2010-01-01

    Histology is the study of the structure of biological tissue using microscopy techniques. As digital imaging technology advances, high resolution microscopy of large tissue volumes is becoming feasible; however, new interactive tools are needed to explore and analyze the enormous datasets. In this paper we present a visualization framework that specifically targets interactive examination of arbitrarily large image stacks. Our framework is built upon two core techniques: display-aware processing and GPU-accelerated texture compression. With display-aware processing, only the currently visible image tiles are fetched and aligned on-the-fly, reducing memory bandwidth and minimizing the need for time-consuming global pre-processing. Our novel texture compression scheme for GPUs is tailored for quick browsing of image stacks. We evaluate the usability of our viewer for two histology applications: digital pathology and visualization of neural structure at nanoscale-resolution in serial electron micrographs. PMID:20975179

  19. Atomic-scale details of dislocation - stacking fault tetrahedra interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N; Stoller, Roger E; Rodney, David; Bacon, David J

    2005-01-01

    Stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) are formed during irradiation of fcc. metals and alloys with low stacking fault energy. The high number density of SFTs observed suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, be taken into account when estimating mechanical property changes of irradiated materials. The key issue is to describe the interaction between a moving dislocation and an individual SFT, which is characterized by a small physical scale of about 100 nm. In this paper we present results of an atomistic simulation of edge and screw dislocations interacting with small SFTs at different temperatures and strain rates and present mechanisms which can explain the formation of defect-free channels observed experimentally.

  20. Study of B0 --> J/psiK(*)0pi(+)pi(-) decays with the collider detector at Fermilab.

    PubMed

    Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Akopian, A; Albrow, M G; Amaral, P; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berge, J P; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bokhari, W; Bolla, G; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; van den Brink, S; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Buckley-Geer, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Colijn, A P; Connolly, A; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Cropp, R; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Done, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Elias, J E; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Fang, H-C; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Giannetti, P; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Grim, G; Gris, P; Groer, L; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hoffman, K D; Holck, C; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karr, K; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, A M; Lee, K; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, A; Matthews, J A J; Mayer, J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McKigney, E; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Popovic, M; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Robinson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sato, H; Savard, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Segler, S; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, C; Snider, F D; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Sphicas, P; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J

    2002-02-18

    We report a study of the decays B0 --> J/psiK(*)0pi(+)pi(-), which involve the creation of a uu or dd quark pair in addition to a b -->c(cs) decay. The data sample consists of 110 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root[s] = 1.8 TeV collected by the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider during 1992-1995. We measure the branching fractions to be B(B0 --> J/psiK(*0)pi(+)pi(-)) = (6.6 +/- 1.9 +/- 1.1)x10(-4) and B(B0 --> J/psiK0pi(+)pi(-)) = (10.3 +/- 3.3 +/- 1.5)x10(-4). Evidence is seen for contributions from psi(2S)K(*)0, J/psiK0rho(0), J/psiK(*+)pi(-), and J/psiK1(1270). PMID:11863882

  1. Search for resonances decaying to etac pi pi- in two-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V.E.; /more authors..

    2012-06-18

    We report a study of the process {gamma}{gamma} {yields} X {yields} {eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, where X stands for one of the resonances {chi}{sub c2}(1P), {eta}{sub c}(2S), X(3872), X(3915), or {chi}{sub c2}(2P). The analysis is performed with a data sample of 473.9 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy electron-positron collider. We do not observe a significant signal for any channel, and calculate 90% confidence-level upper limits on the products of branching fractions and two-photon widths {Lambda}{sub X{yields}{gamma}{gamma}} {Beta}(X {yields} {eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}): 15.7 eV for {chi}{sub c2}(1P), 133 eV for {eta}{sub c}(2S), 11.1 eV for X(3872) (assuming it to be a spin-2 state), 16 eV for X(3915) (assuming it to be a spin-2 state), and 19 eV for {chi}{sub c2}(2P). We also report upper limits on the ratios of branching fractions {Beta}({eta}{sub c}(2S) {yields} {eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}({eta}{sub c}(2S) {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 10.0 and {Beta}({chi}{sub c2}(1P) {yields} {eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}({chi}{sub c2}(1P) {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 32.9 at the 90% confidence level.

  2. Measurement of CP Asymmetries and Branching Fractions in B0 -> pi+ pi-, B0 -> K+ pi-, B0 -> pi0 pi0, B0 -> K0 pi0 and Isospin Analysis of B -> pi pi Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-08-01

    The authors present preliminary results of improved measurements of the CP-violating asymmetries and branching fractions in the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. This update includes all data taken at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the asymmetric PEP-II B-meson factory at SLAC, corresponding to 467 {+-} 5 million B{bar B} pairs. They find S{sub {pi}{pi}} = -0.68 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.03, C{sub {pi}{pi}} = -0.25 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, {Alpha}{sub K{sub {pi}}} = -0.107 {+-} 0.016{sub -0.004},{sup +0.006}, C{sub {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}} = -0.43 {+-} 0.26 {+-} 0.05, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.83 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (10.1 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. They observe CP violation with a significance of 6.7{sigma} in B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -} and 6.1{sigma} in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Constraints on the Unitarity Triangle angle {alpha} are determined from the isospin relation between all B {yields} {pi}{pi} rates and asymmetries.

  3. Modulating the Light Switch by [superscript 3]MLCT-[superscript 3]pi pi* State Interconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Brigitte R.; Kraft, Brian J.; Hughes, Chris G.; Pink, Maren; Zaleski, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-20

    intercalation (K{sub b} = 3.3 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1}). The origin of this light switch behavior involves two competing {sup 3}MLCT states similar to that of the extensively studied light switch molecule [Ru(phen){sub 2}dppz]{sup 2+}. The solvent- and temperature-dependence of the luminescence of 3 reveal that the extended ligand aromaticity lowers the energy of the {sup 3}{pi}{pi}* excited state into competition with the emitting {sup 3}MLCT state. Interconversion between these two states plays a significant role in the observed photophysics and is responsible for the dual emission in aqueous environments.

  4. RKKY interaction in AB-stacked multilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liwei; Lü, Xiaoling; Gao, Wenzhu; Yu, Guodong; Liu, Zhe; Zheng, Yisong

    2012-05-01

    The RKKY interaction between two magnetic impurities absorbed on the surface layer of half-filled AB-stacked multilayer graphene (ABSMLG) is theoretically studied based on the lattice Green’s function technique. In comparison with the case of monolayer graphene, the RKKY interaction in such multilayer graphene presents distinct properties in some aspects. Firstly, from the numerical results, we find that the thickness of the ABSMLG influences the RKKY interaction in a complicated manner, depending on the odd/even parity of the number of layers and the sublattice attribution of the positions of the two magnetic impurities. Then, we derive the asymptotic expressions of the RKKY interactions in ABSMLG in the long-distance limit. For even-layered ABSMLG, we find that the RKKY interactions of the 1A-1A, 1B-1A and 1B-1B couplings fall off as 1/R2, 1/R4 and 1/R6 (1A and 1B stand for, respectively, the sublattice points in the surface layer, which are positioned directly on the plaquette and on a lattice point of the layer underneath). On the other hand, in odd-layered ABSMLG, the decays of these interactions follow the 1/R2, 1/R3 and 1/R3 power laws respectively. In addition, we also find that these analytical expressions are quantitatively valid to describe the RKKY interaction in ABSMLG when the distance between the two magnetic impurities is larger than the lattice constant of graphene by one order of magnitude.

  5. Study of the D0 ---> pi- pi+ pi- pi+ decay

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /CINVESTAV, IPN /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, they present new measurements for the Cabbibo-suppressed decay mode D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. They measure the branching ratio {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.0914 {+-} 0.0018 {+-} 0.0022. An amplitude analysis has been performed, a first for this channel, in order to determine the resonant substructure of this decay mode. The dominant component is the decay D{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}(1260){sup +}{pi}{sup -}, accounting for 60% of the decay rate. The second most dominant contribution comes from the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{rho}(770){sup 0}, with a fraction of 25%. They also study the a{sub 1}(1260) line shape and resonant substructure. Using the helicity formalism for the angular distribution of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{rho}(770){sup 0}, they measure a longitudinal polarization of P{sub L} = (71 {+-} 4 {+-} 2)%.

  6. Search for D0-D0 mixing and branching-ratio measurement in the decay D0-->K+ pi- pi0.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; Briand, H; David, P

    2006-12-01

    We analyze 230.4 fb;{-1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e;{+}e;{-} collider at SLAC to search for evidence of D0-D[over ];{0} mixing using regions of phase space in the decay D;{0}-->K;{+}pi;{-}pi;{0}. We measure the time-integrated mixing rate R_{M}=(0.023_{-0.014};{+0.018}(stat.)+/-0.004(syst.))%, and R_{M}<0.054% at the 95% confidence level, assuming CP invariance. The data are consistent with no mixing at the 4.5% confidence level. We also measure the branching ratio for D;{0}-->K;{+}pi;{-}pi;{0} relative to D;{0}-->K;{-}pi;{+}pi;{0} to be (0.214+/-0.008(stat.)+/-0.008(syst.))%. PMID:17155794

  7. Observation of a broad structure in the pi+ pi- J/psi mass spectrum around 4.26 GeV/c2.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; van Bakel, N; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Williams, G; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2005-09-30

    We study initial-state radiation events, e+ e- --> gammaISR pi+ pi- J/psi, with data collected with the BABAR detector. We observe an accumulation of events near 4.26 GeV/c2 in the invariant-mass spectrum of pi+ pi- J/psi. Fits to the mass spectrum indicate that a broad resonance with a mass of about 4.26 GeV/c2 is required to describe the observed structure. The presence of additional narrow resonances cannot be excluded. The fitted width of the broad resonance is 50 to 90 MeV/c2, depending on the fit hypothesis. PMID:16241645

  8. Search for CP Violation in the Decays D0 to K- K+and D0 to pi- pi+

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2007-09-24

    We measure CP-violating asymmetries of neutral charmed mesons in the modes D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup +} and D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} with the highest precision to date by using D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays to correct detector asymmetries. An analysis of 385.8 fb{sup -}1 of data collected with the BaBar detector yields values of a{sup KK}{sub CP} = (0.00 {+-} 0.34 (stat.) {+-} 0.13 (syst.))% and a{sup {pi}{pi}}{sub CP} = (-0.24 {+-} 0.52 (stat.) {+-} 0.22 (syst.))%, which agree with Standard Model predictions.

  9. A breathing wormlike chain model on DNA denaturation and bubble: effects of stacking interactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Yeol; Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Sung, Wokyung

    2008-02-01

    DNA stably exists as a double-stranded structure due to hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions between bases. The stacking interactions are strengthened when DNA is paired, which results in great enhancement of bending rigidity. We study the effects of this stacking-induced stiffness difference on DNA denaturation and bubble formations. To this end, we model double-stranded DNA as a duplex of two semiflexible chains whose persistence length varies depending on the base-pair distance. Using this model, we perform the Langevin dynamics simulation to examine the characteristics of the denaturation transition and the statistics of the bubbles. We find that the inclusion of the stacking interactions causes the denaturation transition to be much sharper than otherwise. At physiological temperature, the stacking interactions prohibit the initiation of bubble formation but promote bubbles, once grown, to retain the large size. PMID:18266461

  10. Measurement of partial widths and search for direct CP violation in D0 meson decays to K-K+ and pi-pi+.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerri, C; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; 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Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; 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Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; Ncnulty, R; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nicollerat, A-S; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reichold, A; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schemitz, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stefanini, A; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2005-04-01

    We present a measurement of relative partial widths and decay rate CP asymmetries in K-K+ and pi(-)pi(+) decays of D0 mesons produced in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV. We use a sample of 2x10(5) D(*+)-->D0pi(+) (and charge conjugate) decays with the D0 decaying to K-pi(+), K-K+, and pi(-)pi(+), corresponding to 123 pb(-1) of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No significant direct CP violation is observed. We measure Gamma(D0-->K-K+)/Gamma(D0-->K-pi(+))=0.0992+/-0.0011+/-0.0012, Gamma(D0-->pi(-)pi(+))/Gamma(D0-->K-pi(+))=0.035 94+/-0.000 54+/-0.000 40, A(CP)(K-K+)=(2.0+/-1.2+/-0.6)%, and A(CP)(pi(-)pi(+))=(1.0+/-1.3+/-0.6)%, where, in all cases, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. PMID:15903906

  11. Structure and intermolecular interactions of glipizide from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Burley, Jonathan C

    2005-12-01

    The crystal structure of glipizide, used as a major treatment of type-2 diabetes, has been determined ab initio using variable-temperature laboratory X-ray powder diffraction combined with a direct-space Monte Carlo/simulated annealing methodology. The strengths of the intermolecular interactions (van der Waals, pi-pi stacking, hydrogen bonding and steric interlock) were quantitatively estimated using the thermal expansion data, which were collected in the same set of experiments as those used to determine the structure. PMID:16306678

  12. Stacking Interactions between 9-Methyladenine and Heterocycles Commonly Found in Pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    An, Yi; Doney, Analise C; Andrade, Rodrigo B; Wheeler, Steven E

    2016-05-23

    Complexes of 9-methyladenine with 46 heterocycles commonly found in drugs were located using dispersion-corrected density functional theory, providing a representative set of 408 unique stacked dimers. The predicted binding enthalpies for each heterocycle span a broad range, highlighting the strong dependence of heterocycle stacking interactions on the relative orientation of the interacting rings. Overall, the presence of NH and carbonyl groups lead to the strongest stacking interactions with 9-methyadenine, and the strength of π-stacking interactions is sensitive to the distribution of heteroatoms within the ring as well as the specific tautomer considered. Although molecular dipole moments provide a sound predictor of the strengths and orientations of the 28 monocyclic heterocycles considered, dipole moments for the larger fused heterocycles show very little correlation with the predicted binding enthalpies. PMID:27074615

  13. Relative substituent position on the strength of π-π stacking interactions

    PubMed Central

    Emenike, Bright U.; Alverez, Celeste N.; Rakovan, John; Kirschbaum, Kristin; Jain, Nirbhay

    2010-01-01

    It was observed that the relative position of the arene substituents have a profound influence on the strength of π-π stacking in the 9-benzyl substituted triptycene system. A new series of model compounds (3a-i) capable of revealing quantitatively π-π stacking interactions was studied. This series of compounds (3a-i) has an ortho substituted methyl group in one of the two interacting arenes and the syn/anti ratios were determined and compared to a series previously studied compounds (4a-i) that have a para methyl group on the corresponding arene. A greater than 50% increase in the strength of π-π stacking interactions was observed with the methyl group in the ortho position comparing to that in the para position. No difference in π-π stacking interactions was observed when the other aromatic ring was a pentafluorobenzoate group. PMID:20209117

  14. Experimental and theoretical insights in the alkene-arene intramolecular π-stacking interaction.

    PubMed

    Corne, Valeria; Sarotti, Ariel M; Ramirez de Arellano, Carmen; Spanevello, Rolando A; Suárez, Alejandra G

    2016-01-01

    Chiral acrylic esters derived from biomass were developed as models to have a better insight in the aryl-vinyl π-stacking interactions. Quantum chemical calculations, NMR studies and experimental evidences demonstrated the presence of equilibriums of at least four different conformations: π-stacked and face-to-edge, each of them in an s-cis/s-trans conformation. The results show that the stabilization produced by the π-π interaction makes the π-stacked conformation predominant in solution and this stabilization is slightly affected by the electron density of the aromatic counterpart. PMID:27559414

  15. Experimental and theoretical insights in the alkene–arene intramolecular π-stacking interaction

    PubMed Central

    Corne, Valeria; Sarotti, Ariel M; Ramirez de Arellano, Carmen; Spanevello, Rolando A

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chiral acrylic esters derived from biomass were developed as models to have a better insight in the aryl–vinyl π-stacking interactions. Quantum chemical calculations, NMR studies and experimental evidences demonstrated the presence of equilibriums of at least four different conformations: π-stacked and face-to-edge, each of them in an s-cis/s-trans conformation. The results show that the stabilization produced by the π–π interaction makes the π-stacked conformation predominant in solution and this stabilization is slightly affected by the electron density of the aromatic counterpart. PMID:27559414

  16. A theoretical study of π-stacking interactions in C-substituted tetrazoles.

    PubMed

    Farrokhzadeh, Abdolkarim; Modarresi-Alam, Ali Reza; Akher, Farideh Badichi; Ebrahimi, Ali

    2016-06-01

    The π-stacking effects of benzene ring (Ben) with 1H- and 2H-tetrazole derivatives (1H-TZ-X and 2H-TZ-X) substituted at C5 (where X is Cl, COH, NO, NO2, CN, NH2, OH, OCH3, SH and H) has been investigated by the quantum mechanical calculations at the M06-2X/6-311++G** level. The results indicate the 1H-TZ-X||Ben complexes (|| donates π-stacking interaction) are more stable than 2H-TZ-X||Ben while in unstacked forms, 1H-TZ-X is less stable than 2H-TZ-X. All substituents enhance the π-stacking interaction relative to the unsubstituted ones and enhancement is higher for the electron-withdrawing substituents (EWSs). Also, investigation of the local and direct effect of substituents in stacking interaction showed that all substituents regardless of whether are electron donating or electron withdrawing have an additive effect in π-stacking interaction. Excellent correlations were found between the binding energies of the complexes and combination of substituent constant terms. The results showed that the electrostatic interaction alone is not responsible for stacking stabilization but charge penetration is important. Furthermore, analysis of aromaticity, AIM, ESP and NPA were investigated to obtain aromaticity index, non-bonding interactions, chemical reactivity and polarity (dipole moment), respectively. PMID:27258189

  17. Pi-stacked interactions in explosive crystals: buffers against external mechanical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaoyang; Wang, Xiaochuan; Huang, Hui

    2008-07-01

    The pi-stacked interactions in some explosive crystal packing are discussed. Taking a typical pi-stacked explosive 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene-1,3,5-triamine (TATB) as a sample and using molecular simulations, we investigated the nature of the pi-stacked interactions versus the external mechanical stimuli causing possible slide and compression of explosives. As a result, between the neighbor layers in the TATB unit cell, the electrostatic attraction decreases with a little decrease of vdW attraction when its top layer slides, whereas the vdW attraction increases with a decrease of electrostatic attraction when TATB crystal is compressed along its c axis. Meanwhile, we studied the correlation between the pi-stacked structures and the impact sensitivities of explosives by means of three representatives including TATB with typical planar pi-stacked structures, 2,2-dinitroethylene-1,1-diamine (Fox-7) with wavelike pi-stacked structures, and 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX) without pi-stacked structure. The results showed that pi-stacked structures, particularly planar layers, can effectively buffer against external mechanical stimuli. That is, pi-stacked structures can partly convert the mechanical energy acting on them into their intermolecular interaction energy, to avoid the increase of the molecular vibration resulting in the explosive decomposition, the formation of hot spots, and the final detonation. This is another reason for the low mechanical sensitivity of pi-stacked explosives besides their stable conjugated molecular structures. PMID:18529058

  18. Effect of Z Prime -mediated flavor-changing neutral current on B {yields} {pi}{pi} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, S.; Das, C. K.; Maharana, L.

    2011-07-15

    We study the effect of Z Prime -mediated flavor-changing neutral current on the B {yields} {pi}{pi} decays. The branching ratios of these decays can be enhanced remarkably in the nonuniversal Z Prime model. Our estimated branching ratios B(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) are enhanced significantly from their standard model (SM) value. For g Prime /g = 1, the branching ratios B(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) are very close to the recently observed experimental values and for higher values of g Prime /g branching ratios are more. Our calculated branching ratios B(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) and B(B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}) are also enhanced from the SM value as well as the recently observed experimental values. These enhancements of branching ratios from their SM value give the possibility of new physics.

  19. Model-independent constraints on the weak phase {alpha} (or {phi}{sub 2}) and QCD penguin pollution in B{yields}{pi}{pi} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Zhizhong; Zhang He

    2005-03-01

    We present an algebraic isospin approach towards a more straightforward and model-independent determination of the weak phase {alpha} (or {phi}{sub 2}) and QCD penguin pollution in B{yields}{pi}{pi} decays. The world averages of current experimental data allow us to impose some useful constraints on the isospin parameters of B{yields}{pi}{pi} transitions. We find that the magnitude of {alpha} (or {phi}{sub 2}) extracted from the indirect CP violation in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mode is in agreement with the standard-model expectation from other indirect measurements, but its fourfold discrete ambiguity has to be resolved in the near future.

  20. Scalar mesons in the decays {eta}' {sup {yields}}3{pi}{sup 0} and {eta}' {sup {yields} {pi}0{pi}+{pi}-}

    SciTech Connect

    Likhoded, A. K. Luchinsky, A. V. Samoylenko, V. D.

    2010-10-15

    The decays {eta} {sup {yields}}3{pi}{sup 0} and {eta} {sup {yields} {pi}0{pi}+{pi}-} are considered within the isobar model. It is shown that, in order to explain the branching ratio and the shape of the Dalitz plot for the decay {eta}' {sup {yields}}3{pi}{sup 0}, it is sufficient to take into account the contributions of the {sigma} and a{sub 0} mesons. The inclusion of the {sigma} meson is necessary for reproducing the shape of the distribution over the Dalitz plot. The branching ratio for the decay {eta}' {sup {yields} {pi}0{pi}+{pi}-} is obtained. The predictions for the distributions over the Dalitz plot for this decay are presented. These predictions depend strongly on model parameters.

  1. Pi-Pi complexation of bupivacaine and analogues with aromatic receptors: Implications for overdose remediation

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Evon; Lee, Y-H; Partch, Richard; Dennis, Donn; Morey, Timothy; Varshney, Manoj

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of the important but often overdosed local anesthetic bupivacaine, its structural analogs 2,6-dimethylaniline, and N-methyl-2,6-dimethylacetanilide, and cocaine, with several electron deficient aromatic moieties were studied primarily by proton NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy. In solution, the anesthetic, its analogs and cocaine are electron donors and form π-π charge transfer complexes with strong aromatic acceptors, as monitored by the upfield changes induced in the NMR chemical shifts (δ) and red-shifted UV-vis wavelength (λmax) absorbance of the acceptors. The equilibrium binding constant, K, was determined from the 1H NMR charge transfer induced chemical shift changes and used to calculate the free energy (ΔG) for complex formation of three acceptor-donor pairs. HPLC results indicate that the concentrations of free bupivacaine, its analogs and of cocaine are reduced from solution via binding to aromatic-functionalized silica. PMID:18019843

  2. Stacking interaction and its role in kynurenic acid binding to glutamate ionotropic receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, Alexander V; Zakharov, Gennady A; Shchegolev, Boris F; Savvateeva-Popova, Elena V

    2012-05-01

    Stacking interaction is known to play an important role in protein folding, enzyme-substrate and ligand-receptor complex formation. It has been shown to make a contribution into the aromatic antagonists binding with glutamate ionotropic receptors (iGluRs), in particular, the complex of NMDA receptor NR1 subunit with the kynurenic acid (KYNA) derivatives. The specificity of KYNA binding to the glutamate receptors subtypes might partially result from the differences in stacking interaction. We have calculated the optimal geometry and binding energy of KYNA dimers with the four types of aromatic amino acid residues in Rattus and Drosophila ionotropic iGluR subunits. All ab initio quantum chemical calculations were performed taking into account electron correlations at MP2 and MP4 perturbation theory levels. We have also investigated the potential energy surfaces (PES) of stacking and hydrogen bonds (HBs) within the receptor binding site and calculated the free energy of the ligand-receptor complex formation. The energy of stacking interaction depends both on the size of aromatic moieties and the electrostatic effects. The distribution of charges was shown to determine the geometry of polar aromatic ring dimers. Presumably, stacking interaction is important at the first stage of ligand binding when HBs are weak. The freedom of ligand movements and rotation within receptor site provides the precise tuning of the HBs pattern, while the incorrect stacking binding prohibits the ligand-receptor complex formation. PMID:21833825

  3. Quantifying the π-Stacking Interactions in Nitroarene Binding Sites of Proteins.

    PubMed

    An, Yi; Bloom, Jacob W G; Wheeler, Steven E

    2015-11-12

    Stacking interactions in nitroarene binding sites of proteins were studied through analyses of structures in the protein data bank (PDB), as well as DFT and ab initio computations applied to model systems. Stacked dimers of mono-, di-, and trinitrobenzene with the amino acid side chains histidine (His), phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), and tryptophan (Trp) were optimized at the B97-D/TZV(2d,2p) level of theory. Binding energies for the global minimum dimer geometries were further refined at the estimated CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The results show that the interactions between aromatic amino acids and nitroarenes are very strong (up to -14.6 kcal mol(-1)), and the regiochemistry of the nitro substituents plays a significant role in the relative monomer orientations and strength of the interaction. In contrast to model stacked benzene dimers, effects of nitro substituents in stacking complexes with aromatic amino acid side chains are not perfectly additive. This is attributed to direct interactions of the nitro substituents with functional groups in the amino acid side chain. Overall, the strength of stacking interactions with these nitrobenzenes follows the order Trp > Tyr > Phe ≈ His. We also analyzed nitroarene binding sites in the PDB. Out of 216 selected crystal structures containing nitroarene ligands, 191 have nearby aromatic residues, providing 65 examples of π-stacking interactions involving a nitroarene. Of these, the representations of the different aromatic amino acids (Trp > Tyr > Phe > His) are correlated with the strength of model complexes of nitroarenes, with the exception of His. B97-D computations applied to complexes extracted from these crystal structures reveal that π-stacking interactions between the nitroarene and aromatic amino acid side chains exhibit a broad range of strengths, with many contributing significantly to binding. PMID:26491883

  4. Aromatic-aromatic interaction of amitriptyline: implication of overdosed drug detoxification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Won; Flint, Jason; Morey, Timothy; Dennis, Donn; Partch, Richard; Baney, Ronald

    2005-02-01

    The objectives of this work are to explore the pi-pi complexation of amitriptyline with pi electron-deficient aromatic rings and demonstrate the feasibility of pi-pi complexation for overdosed drug detoxification. Water-soluble oligochitosan was chemically modified with dinitrobenzenesulfonyl groups to induce selective binding toward amitriptyline through pi-pi complexation. NMR studies showed that benzenesulfonyl and dinitrobenzenesulfonyl protons were upfield shifted by the addition of amitriptyline, indicating the formation of pi-pi complexes. The pi-pi complexation of amitriptyline is driven primarily by a desolvation driving force, whereas the magnitude of interaction is dictated by the complementrary electrostatic interaction. Isolated rat heart tests revealed that dinitrobenzenesulfonyl oligochitosan prevented the amitriptyline-induced cardiotoxicity and was itself not cardiotoxic. PMID:15614810

  5. Understanding Stacking Interactions between an Aromatic Ring and Nucleobases in Aqueous Solution: Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Kataev, Evgeny A; Shumilova, Tatiana A; Fiedler, Benjamin; Anacker, Tony; Friedrich, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Stacking interactions between aromatic compounds and nucleobases are crucial in recognition of nucleotides and nucleic acids, but a comprehensive understanding of the strength and selectivity of these interactions in aqueous solution has been elusive. To this end, model complexes have been designed and analyzed by experiment and theory. For the first time, stacking free energies between five nucleobases and anthracene were determined experimentally from thermodynamic double mutant cycles. Three different experimental methods were proposed and evaluated. The dye prefers to bind nucleobases in the order (kcal/mol): G (1.3) > T (0.9) > U (0.8) > C (0.5) > A (0.3). The respective trend of interaction free energies extracted from DFT calculations correlates to that obtained experimentally. Analysis of the data suggests that stacking interactions dominate over hydrophobic effects in an aqueous solution and can be predicted with DFT calculations. PMID:27314892

  6. Dynamic investigation of PEFC stacks in interaction with the air supply system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipps, F.; Simons, G.; Schiefer, K.

    This paper explores the behaviour of a dynamically operated fuel cell system regarding to an automotive application, examining the air supply and their interaction with the fuel cell stacks. The dynamic limits of stack operation are also discussed. Finally, the paper provides a description of the test facility used in these investigations. The research of dynamically operated fuel cell stacks shows that in order to achieve high energy efficiency, a power-dependent modulation of the pressure and flow rate of the air supply is necessary. A test facility designed for energy management and power train research (up to 42 kW) was used for the experiment. A number of 11.5 kW fuel cell stacks was examined experimentally with respect to performance in interaction with the air supply in stationary and dynamic operation. The stacks were tested individually and in parallel. All of them were operated "dead-end" on the hydrogen side. Experimental results varying the parameters and load curves applied to the air supply system are given in the paper. The results show different dynamic behaviours between the stacks and a substantial difference in efficiency and dynamic response of the fuel cell system operated with different strategies. The results of different operating strategies for fuel cell systems, with respect to the interaction between the fuel cell stack and the air supply and in their dependency on air mass flow and pressure level are presented. The examinations were done with the test facility using real current demand profile of the experimental car HyLite ® from zero to full load and the New European Drive Cycle (NEDC).

  7. The stacking interactions of bipyridine complexes: the influence of the metal ion type on the strength of interactions.

    PubMed

    Sredojević, Dušan N; Petrović, Predrag V; Janjić, Goran V; Brothers, Edward N; Hall, Michael B; Zarić, Snežana D

    2016-01-01

    The strength of the stacking interactions in the bipy complexes of nickel, palladium, and platinum, [M(CN)2 bipy]2 (M = Ni, Pd, Pt), was calculated using the ωB97xD/def2-TZVP method. The results show that for all considered geometries, interactions are the strongest for platinum, and weakest for nickel complexes, as a result of higher dispersion contributions of platinum over the palladium and nickel complexes. It was also shown that strength of interactions considerably rises with an increase of the stacking overlap area. As a consequence of the favorable electrostatic term, the strength of interactions also rises when metal atom and cyano ligands are involved in the overlap with bipy ligand. The strongest interaction was calculated in the platinum complex, for the geometry that has overlap of metal and cyano ligands with bipy ligand with an energy of -39.80 kcal mol(-1). The energies for similar geometries of palladium and nickel complexes are -34.60 and -32.45 kcal mol(-1). These energies, remarkably, exceed the strength of the stacking interactions between organic aromatic molecules. These results can be of importance in all systems with stacking interactions, from materials to biomolecules. PMID:26757913

  8. Double Dalitz plot analysis of the decay B{sup 0{yields}}DK{sup +{pi}-}, D{yields}K{sub S}{sup 0{pi}+{pi}-}

    SciTech Connect

    Gershon, Tim; Poluektov, Anton

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that it is possible to perform a model-independent extraction of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa unitarity triangle angle {gamma} using only the decays B{sup 0{yields}}DK{sup +{pi}-} with D{yields}K{sub S}{sup 0{pi}+{pi}-} and B{sup 0{yields}}DK{sup +{pi}-} with flavor-specific D decays. The proposed method can also utilize the B{sup 0{yields}}DK{sup +{pi}-} data with CP-eigenstate decays of the D meson in a model-independent way.

  9. Double pancake bonds: pushing the limits of strong π-π stacking interactions.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhong-hua; Lischka, Hans; Beneberu, Habtamu Z; Kertesz, Miklos

    2014-09-17

    The concept of a double-bonded pancake bonding mechanism is introduced to explain the extremely short π-π stacking contacts in dimers of dithiatriazines. While ordinary single pancake bonds occur between radicals and already display significantly shorter interatomic distances in comparison to van der Waals (vdW) contacts, the double-bonded pancake dimer is based on diradicaloid or antiaromatic molecules and exhibits even shorter and stronger intermolecular bonds that breach into the range of extremely stretched single bonds in terms of bond distances and binding energies. These properties give rise to promising possibilities in the design of new materials with high electrical conductivity and for the field of spintronics. The analysis of the double pancake bond is based on cutting edge electron correlation theory combining multireference (nondynamical) effects and dispersion (dynamical) contributions in a balanced way providing accurate interaction energies and distributions of unpaired spins. It is also shown that the present examples do not stand isolated but that similar mechanisms operate in several analogous nonradical molecular systems to form double-bonded π-stacking pancake dimers. We report on the amazing properties of a new type of stacking interaction mechanism between π conjugated molecules in the form of a "double pancake bond" which breaks the record for short intermolecular distances and provides formidable strength for some π-π stacking interactions. PMID:25203200

  10. Stacking of purines in water: the role of dipolar interactions in caffeine.

    PubMed

    Tavagnacco, L; Di Fonzo, S; D'Amico, F; Masciovecchio, C; Brady, J W; Cesàro, A

    2016-05-11

    During the last few decades it has been ascertained that base stacking is one of the major contributions stabilizing nucleic acid conformations. However, the understanding of the nature of the interactions involved in the stacking process remains under debate and it is a subject of theoretical and experimental studies. Structural similarity between purine bases (guanine and adenine) in DNA and the caffeine molecule makes caffeine an excellent model for the purine bases. The present study clearly shows that dipolar interactions play a fundamental role in determining stacking of purine molecules in solution. In order to reach this achievement, polarized ultraviolet Raman resonant scattering experiments have been carried out on caffeine aqueous solutions as a function of concentration and temperature. The investigation pointed out at the aggregation and solvation properties, particularly at elevated temperatures. Kubo-Anderson theory was used as a framework to investigate the non-coincidence effect (NCE) occurring in the totally symmetric breathing modes of the purine rings, and in the bending modes of the methyl groups of caffeine. The NCE concentration dependence shows that caffeine aggregation at 80 °C occurs by planar stacking of the hydrophobic faces. The data clearly indicate that dipolar interactions determine the reorientational motion of the molecules in solution and are the driving force for the stacking of caffeine. In parallel, the observed dephasing times imply a change in caffeine interactions as a function of temperature and concentration. A decrease, at low water content, of the dephasing time for the ring breathing vibration mode indicates that self-association alters the solvation structure that is detectable at low concentration. These results are in agreement with simulation predictions and serve as an important validation of the models used in those calculations. PMID:27127808

  11. Dynamics of dislocation interactions with stacking-fault tetrahedra at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, M.; Kacher, J.; Robertson, I. M.

    2013-02-01

    The interaction process between dislocations and large stacking-fault tetrahedra was observed in real time at high temperature during deformation experiments in situ in the transmission electron microscope. Dislocation interactions with tetrahedra resulted in them being annihilated and converted to another defect type. Dislocation bypass of the tetrahedra occurred by cross-slip. The latter interaction occurred slowly and halted the progress of the dislocation. Annihilation versus bypass by dislocation cross-slip was dictated by the location at which the slip plane intersected the tetrahedron - on the face or along the edges with the stair-rod dislocations. In general, the interactions, at best, were weakly temperature dependent.

  12. The influence of arene-ring size on stacking interaction with canonical base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formánek, Martin; Burda, Jaroslav V.

    2014-04-01

    Stacking interactions between aromatic molecules (benzene, p-cymene, biphenyl, and di- and tetra-hydrogen anthracene) and G.C and A.T canonical Watson-Crick (WC) base pairs are explored. Two functionals with dispersion corrections: ω-B97XD and B3LYP-D3 are used. For a comparison also the MP2 and B3LYP-D3/PCM methods were used for the most stable p-cymene…WC geometries. It was found that the stacking interaction increases with the size of π-conjugation system. Its extent is in agreement with experimental finding on anticancer activity of Ru(II) piano-stool complexes where intercalation of these aromatic molecules should play an important role. The explored structures are considered as ternary system so that decomposition of the interaction energy to pairwise and non-additivity contributions is also examined.

  13. An application of the van der Waals density functional: Hydrogen bonding and stacking interactions between nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Valentino R; Thonhauser, T; Langreth, David C

    2008-05-28

    We apply the van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) to study hydrogen bonding and stacking interactions between nucleobases. The excellent agreement of our results with high level quantum chemical calculations highlights the value of the vdW-DF for first-principles investigations of biologically important molecules. Our results suggest that, in the case of hydrogen-bonded nucleobase pairs, dispersion interactions reduce the cost of propeller twists while having a negligible effect on buckling. Furthermore, the efficient scaling of DFT methods allowed for the easy optimization of separation distance between nucleobase stacks, indicating enhancements in the interaction energy of up to 3 kcalmol over previous fixed distance calculations. We anticipate that these results are significant for extending the vdW-DF method to model larger vdW complexes and biological molecules. PMID:18513005

  14. Observation of the decay B+/--->pi+/-pi0, study of B+/--->K+/-pi0, and search for B0-->pi0pi0.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; Van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Borean, C; Bozzi, C; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Back, J J; Bellodi, G; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Pulliam, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-07-11

    We present results for the branching fractions and charge asymmetries in B+/--->h(+/-)pi(0) (where h(+/-)=pi(+/-),K+/-) and a search for the decay B0-->pi(0)pi(0) using a sample of approximately 88 x 10(6) BBmacr; pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We measure B(B+/--->pi(+/-)pi(0))=(5.5(+1.0)(-0.9)+/-0.6)x10(-6), where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The B+/--->pi(+/-)pi(0) signal has a significance of 7.7sigma including systematic uncertainties. We simultaneously measure the K+/-pi(0) branching fraction to be B(B+/--->K+/-pi(0))=(12.8(+1.2)(-1.1)+/-1.0)x10(-6). The charge asymmetries are Api(+/-)(pi(0))=-0.03(+0.18)(-0.17)+/-0.02 and AK+/-(pi(0))=-0.09+/-0.09+/-0.01. We place a 90% confidence-level upper limit on the branching fraction B(B0-->pi(0)pi(0)) of 3.6 x 10(-6). PMID:12906470

  15. Measurements of branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries in B0-->pi+pi-, K+pi-, K+K- decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H; Prell, S; Rahatlou, Sh; Raven, G; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Bloom, P; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Falbo, M; Borean, C; Bozzi, C; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Lange, D J; van Bibber, K; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Taylor, G P; Back, J J; Bellodi, G; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J L; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Savvas, N; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R G; Gabriel, T A; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Campagna, E; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J S; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Aston, D; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges, E; Haas, T; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Himel, T; Hryn'ova, T; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, S W; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mohapatra, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2002-12-31

    We present measurements of branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries for two-body neutral B meson decays to charged pions and kaons based on a sample of about 88x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays. From a time-independent fit we measure the charge-averaged branching fractions B(B0-->pi+pi-)=(4.7+/-0.6+/-0.2)x10(-6), B(B0-->K+pi-)=(17.9+/-0.9+/-0.7)x10(-6), and the direct CP-violating charge asymmetry A(Kpi)=-0.102+/-0.050+/-0.016 [-0.188,-0.016], where the ranges in square brackets indicate the 90% confidence intervals. From a time-dependent fit we measure the B0-->pi+pi- CP-violating parameters S(pipi)=0.02+/-0.34+/-0.05 [-0.54,+0.58] and C(pipi)=-0.30+/-0.25+/-0.04 [-0.72,+0.12]. PMID:12513134

  16. Measurement of D^0-\\bar{D^0} Mixing From a Time-Dependent Amplitude Analysis of D^0\\ -> K^+\\pi^-\\pi0 Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-08-04

    The authors present evidence of D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} in a data sample of 384 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. Assuming CP conservation, they measure the mixing parameters x{prime}{sub K{pi}{pi}{sup 0}} = [2.61{sub -0.68}{sup +0.57}(stat.) {+-} 0.39(syst.)]%, y{prime}{sub K{pi}{pi}{sup 0}} = [-0.06{sub -0.64}{sup +0.55}(stat.) {+-} 0.34(syst.)]%. The confidence level for the data to be consistent with the no-mixing hypothesis is 0.1%, including systematic uncertainties. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. They find no evidence of CP violation in mixing.

  17. Charmed Baryon Spectroscopy and Search for $CP$ Violation in $D^0 \\to K_S^0\\,\\pi^+\\,\\pi^-$ at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Felix

    2011-10-28

    In this thesis two different analyses are presented, namely the measurements of the properties of $\\Lambda_c(2595)^+$, $\\Lambda_c(2625)^+$, $\\Sigma_c(2455)^{++,0}$, and $\\Sigma_c(2520)^{++,0}$ baryons as well as the search for $CP$ violation in the Dalitz plot of the decay $D^0 \\to K_S^0\\,\\pi^+\\,\\pi^-$. Both studies are performed using data corresponding to 5.2\\,\\invfb respective 6.0\\,\\invfb of integrated luminosity from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96\\,TeV, collected with the CDF~II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The masses and decay widths of the mentioned charmed baryon resonances are measured with uncertainties comparable to the world averages for $\\Sigma_c$ states, and significantly smaller uncertainties than the world averages for excited $\\Lambda_c^+$ states. No hints for any $CP$ violating effects in the resonant substructure of $D^0 \\to K_S^0\\,\\pi^+\\,\\pi^-$ are found.

  18. Determining the photon polarization of the b{yields}s{gamma} using the B{yields}K{sub 1}(1270){gamma}{yields}(K{pi}{pi}){gamma} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, E.

    2011-05-01

    Recently the radiative B decay to the strange axial-vector mesons, B{yields}K{sub 1}(1270){gamma}, has been observed with a rather large branching ratio. This process is particularly interesting as the subsequent K{sub 1} decay into its three-body final state allows us to determine the polarization of the photon, which is mostly left- (right-)handed for B(B) in the SM while various new physics models predict additional right- (left-)handed components. A new method is proposed to determine the polarization, exploiting the full Dalitz plot distribution, which seems to reduce significantly the statistical errors. This polarization measurement requires, however, detailed knowledge of the K{sub 1{yields}}K{pi}{pi} strong interaction decays, namely, the various partial wave amplitudes into the several possible quasi-two-body channels, as well as their relative phases. The pattern of partial waves is especially complex for the K{sub 1}(1270). We attempt to obtain the information through the combination of an experimental input and a theoretical one, provided by the {sup 3}P{sub 0} quark-pair-creation model.

  19. Stack zooming for multifocus interaction in skewed-aspect visual spaces.

    PubMed

    Javed, Waqas; Elmqvist, Niklas

    2013-08-01

    Many 2D visual spaces have a virtually one-dimensional nature with very high aspect ratio between the dimensions: examples include time-series data, multimedia data such as sound or video, text documents, and bipartite graphs. Common among these is that the space can become very large, e.g., temperature measurements could span a long time period, surveillance video could cover entire days or weeks, and documents can have thousands of pages. Many analysis tasks for such spaces require several foci while retaining context and distance awareness. In this extended version of our IEEE PacificVis 2010 paper, we introduce a method for supporting this kind of multifocus interaction that we call stack zooming. The approach is based on building hierarchies of 1D strips stacked on top of each other, where each subsequent stack represents a higher zoom level, and sibling strips represent branches in the exploration. Correlation graphics show the relation between stacks and strips of different levels, providing context and distance awareness for the foci. The zoom hierarchies can also be used as graphical histories and for communicating insights to stakeholders and can be further extended with annotation and integrated statistics. PMID:23744266

  20. Folic acid-polydopamine nanofibers show enhanced ordered-stacking via π-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hailong; Yu, Xiang; Liu, Yang; Shi, Zujin; Liu, Huihui; Nie, Zongxiu; Wu, Decheng; Jin, Zhaoxia

    2015-06-21

    Recent research has indicated that polydopamine and synthetic eumelanins are optoelectronic biomaterials in which one-dimensional aggregates composed of ordered-stacking oligomers have been proposed as unique organic semiconductors. However, improving the ordered-stacking of oligomers in polydopamine nanostructures is a big challenge. Herein, we first demonstrate how folic acid molecules influence the morphology and nanostructure of polydopamine via tuning the π-π interactions of oligomers. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry reveals that porphyrin-like tetramers are characteristic of folic acid-polydopamine (FA-PDA) nanofibers. X-ray diffraction combined with simulation studies indicate that these oligomers favour aggregation into graphite-like ordered nanostructures via strong π-π interactions. High-resolution TEM characterization of carbonized FA-PDA hybrids show that in FA-PDA nanofibers the size of the graphite-like domains is over 100 nm. The addition of folic acid in polydopamine enhances the ordered stacking of oligomers in its nanostructure. Our study steps forward to discover the mystery of the structure-property relationship of FA-PDA hybrids. It paves a way to optimize the properties of PDA through the design and selection of oligomer structures. PMID:25959650

  1. Cy3-DNA Stacking Interactions Strongly Depend on the Identity of the Terminal Basepair

    PubMed Central

    Spiriti, Justin; Binder, Jennifer K.; Levitus, Marcia; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the effect of the first basepair on the conformational dynamics of the fluorescent dye Cy3 attached to the 5′ end of double-stranded DNA using Gaussian-mixture adaptive umbrella sampling simulations. In the simulations, the sampling of all five dihedral angles along the linker was enhanced, so that both stacked and unstacked states were sampled. The affinity of Cy3 for a T·A basepair (with the dye attached to T) was found to be significantly less than for the other basepairs. This was verified experimentally by measuring the activation energies for cis-trans isomerization of the dye. The simulation and experimental results indicate the existence of partially unstacked conformations amenable to photoisomerization. The simulations also showed that stacking of Cy3 straightens the DNA while stabilizing the first basepair. Our findings indicate that fluorescence is modulated by Cy3-DNA interactions in a sequence-dependent manner. PMID:21320450

  2. Limits on D0-macro D0 mixing and CP violation from the ratio of lifetimes for decay to K-pi+, K-K+, and pi- pi+.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Barillari, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Aspinwall, M L; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Pulliam, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-09-19

    We present a measurement of D0-macro D0 mixing parameters using the ratios of lifetimes extracted from samples of D0 mesons decaying to K-pi(+), K-K+, and pi(-)pi(+). Using 91 fb(-1) of data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory, we obtain a value Y=[0.8+/-0.4(stat.)(+0.5)(-0.4)(syst.)]%, which, in the limit of CP conservation, corresponds to the mixing parameter y=Delta Gamma/2 Gamma. Using the difference in lifetimes of D0 and macro D0 mesons, we obtain the CP-violation parameter Delta Y=[-0.8+/-0.6(stat.)+/-0.2(syst.)]%. PMID:14525353

  3. Measurement of CP–Violating Asymmetries in $D^0 \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ and $D^0 \\to K^+ K^- $ Decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Di Canto, Angelo

    2012-04-12

    We report a search for non–Standard Model physics through the measurement of CP–violating asymmetries in the singly–Cabibbo– suppressed $D^0 \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ and $D^0 \\to K^+ K^- $ decays reconstructed in about 5.9 fb-1 of CDF data. We use the strong $D^{*+} \\to D^0\\pi^+$ decay (“D tag”) to identify the flavor of the charmed meson at production time and exploit CP–conserving strong cc pair–production in pp collisions. Large samples of Cabibbo–favored $D^0 \\to K^-\\pi^+$ decays with and without D tag are used to highly suppress systematic uncertainties due to detector effects. The results are the world’s most precise measurements to date and have been published by Physical Review D in January 2012 [1].

  4. Precise measurement of the e+e- --> pi+pi-(gamma) cross section with the initial state radiation method at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L L; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-12-01

    A precise measurement of the cross section of the process e(+)e(-) --> pi(+)pi(-)(gamma) from threshold to an energy of 3 GeV is obtained with the initial state radiation (ISR) method using 232 fb(-1) of data collected with the BABAR detector at e(+)e(-) center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV. The ISR luminosity is determined from a study of the leptonic process e(+)e(-) --> mu(+)mu(-)gamma(gamma). The leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon magnetic anomaly calculated using the pipi cross section measured from threshold to 1.8 GeV is (514.1 +/- 2.2(stat) +/- 3.1(syst)) x 10(-10). PMID:20366141

  5. Measurement of D{0}-D[-over]{0} mixing from a time-dependent amplitude analysis of D{0}-->K+pi{-}pi{0} decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Vazquez, W Panduro; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Sanchez, P del Amo; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Esteve, L; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Ricca, G Della; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-11-20

    We present evidence of D{0}-D[-over ]{0} mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D{0}-->K+pi{-}pi;{0} in a data sample of 384 fb{-1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e{-} collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Assuming CP conservation, we measure the mixing parameters x{Kpipi{0}}{'}=[2.61{-0.68}{+0.57}(stat)+/-0.39(syst)]%, y{Kpipi;{0}}{'}=[-0.06{-0.64}{+0.55}(stat)+/-0.34(syst)]%. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. We find no evidence of CP violation in mixing. PMID:20366027

  6. Doping Dependence of the $(\\pi,\\pi)$ Shadow Band in La-Based Cuprates Studied by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z. X.

    2011-08-15

    The ({pi},{pi}) shadow band (SB) in La-based cuprate family (La214) was studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) over a wide doping range from x = 0.01 to x = 0.25. Unlike the well-studied case of the Bi-based cuprate family, an overall strong, monotonic doping dependence of the SB intensity at the Fermi level (E{sub F}) was observed. In contrast to a previous report for the presence of the SB only close to x = 1/8, we found it exists in a wide doping range, associated with a doping-independent ({pi},{pi}) wave vector but strongly doping-dependent intensity: It is the strongest at x {approx} 0.03 and systematically diminishes as the doping increases until it becomes negligible in the overdoped regime. This SB with the observed doping dependence of intensity can in principle be caused by the antiferromagnetic fluctuations or a particular form of low-temperature orthorhombic lattice distortion known to persist up to x {approx} 0.21 in the system, with both being weakened with increasing doping. However, a detailed binding energy dependent analysis of the SB at x = 0.07 does not appear to support the former interpretation, leaving the latter as a more plausible candidate, despite a challenge in quantitatively linking the doping dependences of the SB intensity and the magnitude of the lattice distortion. Our finding highlights the necessity of a careful and global consideration of the inherent structural complications for correctly understanding the cuprate Fermiology and its microscopic implication.

  7. Lattice extraction of K{yields}{pi}{pi} amplitudes to next-to-leading order in partially quenched and in full chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Laiho, Jack; Soni, Amarjit

    2005-01-01

    We show that it is possible to construct {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon} to next-to-leading order (NLO) using partially quenched chiral perturbation theory (PQChPT) from amplitudes that are computable on the lattice. We demonstrate that none of the needed amplitudes require 3-momentum on the lattice for either the full theory or the partially quenched theory; nondegenerate quark masses suffice. Furthermore, we find that the electro-weak penguin ({delta}I=3/2 and 1/2) contributions to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon} in PQChPT can be determined to NLO using only degenerate (m{sub K}=m{sub {pi}}) K{yields}{pi} computations without momentum insertion. Issues pertaining to power divergent contributions, originating from mixing with lower dimensional operators, are addressed. Direct calculations of K{yields}{pi}{pi} at unphysical kinematics are plagued with enhanced finite volume effects in the (partially) quenched theory, but in simulations when the sea quark mass is equal to the up and down quark mass the enhanced finite volume effects vanish to NLO in PQChPT. In embedding the QCD penguin left-right operator onto PQChPT an ambiguity arises, as first emphasized by Golterman and Pallante. With one version [the 'PQS' (patially quenched singlet)] of the QCD penguin, the inputs needed from the lattice for constructing K{yields}{pi}{pi} at NLO in PQChPT coincide with those needed for the full theory. Explicit expressions for the finite logarithms emerging from our NLO analysis to the above amplitudes also are given.

  8. Interlayer-interaction dependence of latent heat in the Heisenberg model on a stacked triangular lattice with competing interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Ryo; Tanaka, Shu

    2013-11-01

    We study the phase transition behavior of a frustrated Heisenberg model on a stacked triangular lattice by Monte Carlo simulations. The model has three types of interactions: the ferromagnetic nearest-neighbor interaction J1 and antiferromagnetic third nearest-neighbor interaction J3 in each triangular layer and the ferromagnetic interlayer interaction J⊥. Frustration comes from the intralayer interactions J1 and J3. We focus on the case that the order parameter space is SO(3)×C3. We find that the model exhibits a first-order phase transition with breaking of the SO(3) and C3 symmetries at finite temperature. We also discover that the transition temperature increases but the latent heat decreases as J⊥/J1 increases, which is opposite to the behavior observed in typical unfrustrated three-dimensional systems.

  9. Silver(I) complexes in coordination supramolecular system with bulky acridine-based ligands: syntheses, crystal structures, and theoretical investigations on C-H...Ag close interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Sen; Chen, Pei-Quan; Yang, En-Cui; Tian, Jin-Lei; Bu, Xian-He; Li, Zheng-Ming; Sun, Hong-Wei; Lin, Zhenyang

    2006-07-24

    In our efforts to investigate the coordination architectures of transition metals and organic ligands with tailored structures, we have prepared two structurally related rigid bulky acridine-based ligands, 9-[3-(2-pyridyl)pyrazol-1-yl]- acridine (L(1)) and 9-(1-imidazolyl)acridine (L2), and synthesized and characterized four of their Ag(I) complexes, {[AgL1](ClO4)}2 (1), {[AgL1](NO3)}2 (2), [AgL2(2)](ClO4) (3), and {[(Ag3L2(3))(NO3)](NO3)2(H2O)}(infinity) (4). The single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the structures of 1 and 2 are similar to each other, with the two intramolecular Ag(I) centers of each complex being encircled by two L1 ligands; this forms a unique boxlike cyclic dimer, which is further linked to form one-dimensional (1D) chains of 1 and a two-dimensional (2D) network of 2 by intermolecular face-to-face pi...pi stacking and/or weak C-H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions, respectively. 3 has a mononuclear structure, which is further assembled into a 2D network via intermolecular Ag...O and pi...pi stacking weak interactions. 4 possesses two different 1D motifs that are further interlinked through interlayer face-to-face pi...pi stacking and Ag...O weak interactions, resulting in a 2D network. It is worth noting that one of the interesting structural features of 1, 2, and 4 is the presence of obvious C-H...M hydrogen-bonding interactions between the Ag centers and some acridine ring H atoms identified by X-ray diffraction on the basis of the van der Waals radii. Furthermore, as a representative example, full geometry optimization on the basis of the experimental structure, the natural bond orbital (NBO), and topological analysis of 1 were carried out by DFT and AIM (Atoms in Molecules) calculations. The total C-H...Ag interaction energy in 1 is estimated to be about 14 kJ/mol. Therefore, this work offers three new rare examples (1, 2, and 4) that exhibit C-H...Ag weak interactions, in which the N donors of the acridine rings coordinate

  10. Extracting Drug-Drug Interaction from the Biomedical Literature Using a Stacked Generalization-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    He, Linna; Yang, Zhihao; Zhao, Zhehuan; Lin, Hongfei; Li, Yanpeng

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) detection is particularly important for patient safety. However, the amount of biomedical literature regarding drug interactions is increasing rapidly. Therefore, there is a need to develop an effective approach for the automatic extraction of DDI information from the biomedical literature. In this paper, we present a Stacked Generalization-based approach for automatic DDI extraction. The approach combines the feature-based, graph and tree kernels and, therefore, reduces the risk of missing important features. In addition, it introduces some domain knowledge based features (the keyword, semantic type, and DrugBank features) into the feature-based kernel, which contribute to the performance improvement. More specifically, the approach applies Stacked generalization to automatically learn the weights from the training data and assign them to three individual kernels to achieve a much better performance than each individual kernel. The experimental results show that our approach can achieve a better performance of 69.24% in F-score compared with other systems in the DDI Extraction 2011 challenge task. PMID:23785452

  11. Dislocation-stacking fault tetrahedron interaction: what can we learn from atomic scale modelling.

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N; Stoller, Roger E; Matsukawa, Yoshitaka

    2004-01-01

    The high number density of stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) observed in irradiated fcc metals suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, taken into account when estimating mechanical properties changes of irradiated materials. The central issue is describing the individual interaction between a moving dislocation and an SFT, which is characterized by a very fine size scale, {approx}100 nm. This scale is amenable to both in situ TEM experiments and large-scale atomic modelling. In this paper we present results of an atomistic simulation of dislocation-SFT interactions using molecular dynamics (MD). The results are compared with observations from in situ deformation experiments. It is demonstrated that in some cases the simulations and experimental observations are quite similar, suggesting a reasonable interpretation of experimental observations.

  12. Determination of Base Binding Strength and Base Stacking Interaction of DNA Duplex Using Atomic Force Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tian-biao; Zhang, Chang-lin; Dong, Zai-li; Guan, Yi-fu

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most crucial properties of DNA, the structural stability and the mechanical strength are attracting a great attention. Here, we take advantage of high force resolution and high special resolution of Atom Force Microscope and investigate the mechanical force of DNA duplexes. To evaluate the base pair hydrogen bond strength and base stacking force in DNA strands, we designed two modes (unzipping and stretching) for the measurement rupture forces. Employing k-means clustering algorithm, the ruptured force are clustered and the mean values are estimated. We assessed the influence of experimental parameters and performed the force evaluation for DNA duplexes of pure dG/dC and dA/dT base pairs. The base binding strength of single dG/dC and single dA/dT were estimated to be 20.0 ± 0.2 pN and 14.0 ± 0.3 pN, respectively, and the base stacking interaction was estimated to be 2.0 ± 0.1 pN. Our results provide valuable information about the quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of the DNA duplexes. PMID:25772017

  13. Self-induced uniaxial strain in MoS2 monolayers with local van der Waals-stacked interlayer interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kenan; Hu, Shuhong; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Tianning; Zhou, Xiaohao; Sun, Yan; Li, Tian-Xin; Fan, Hong Jin; Shen, Guozhen; Chen, Xin; Dai, Ning

    2015-03-24

    Strain engineering is an effective method to tune the properties of electrons and phonons in semiconductor materials, including two-dimensional (2D) layered materials (e.g., MoS2 or graphene). External artificial stress (ExAS) or heterostructure stacking is generally required to induce strains for modulating semiconductor bandgaps and optoelectronic functions. For layered materials, the van der Waals-stacked interlayer interaction (vdW-SI) has been considered to dominate the interlayer stacking and intralayer bonding. Here, we demonstrate self-induced uniaxial strain in the MoS2 monolayer without the assistance of ExAS or heterostructure stacking processes. The uniaxial strain occurring in local monolayer regions is manifested by the Raman split of the in-plane vibration modes E2g(1) and is essentially caused by local vdW-SI within the single layer MoS2 due to a unique symmetric bilayer stacking. The local stacked configuration and the self-induced uniaxial strain may provide improved understanding of the fundamental interlayer interactions and alternative routes for strain engineering of layered structures. PMID:25716291

  14. Influence of the π–π interaction on the hydrogen bonding capacity of stacked DNA/RNA bases

    PubMed Central

    Mignon, Pierre; Loverix, Stefan; Steyaert, Jan; Geerlings, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The interplay between aromatic stacking and hydrogen bonding in nucleobases has been investigated via high-level quantum chemical calculations. The experimentally observed stacking arrangement between consecutive bases in DNA and RNA/DNA double helices is shown to enhance their hydrogen bonding ability as opposed to gas phase optimized complexes. This phenomenon results from more repulsive electrostatic interactions as is demonstrated in a model system of cytosine stacked offset-parallel with substituted benzenes. Therefore, the H-bonding capacity of the N3 and O2 atoms of cytosine increases linearly with the electrostatic repulsion between the stacked rings. The local hardness, a density functional theory-based reactivity descriptor, appears to be a key index associated with the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) minima around H-bond accepting atoms, and is inversely proportional to the electrostatic interaction between stacked molecules. Finally, the MEP minima on surfaces around the bases in experimental structures of DNA and RNA–DNA double helices show that their hydrogen bonding capacity increases when taking more neighboring (intra-strand) stacking partners into account. PMID:15788750

  15. Measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle gamma in B+/--->D*K+/- decays with a Dalitz analysis of D-->K0(S)pi-pi+.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-09-16

    We report on a measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violating phase gamma through a Dalitz analysis of neutral D decays to K0(S)pi-pi+ in the processes B+/- -->D*K+/-, D*-->Dpi0, Dgamma. Using a sample of 227 x 10(6) BB pairs collected by the BABAR detector, we measure the amplitude ratios r(B)=0.12+/-0.03+/-0.04 and r*(B)=0.17+/-0.10+/-0.03+/-0.03, the relative strong phases delta(B)=(104+/-45(+17+16)(-21-24))degrees and delta*(B)=(-64+/-41(+14)(-12)+/-15) degrees between the amplitudes A(B- -->D*0K-) and A(B- -->D*0)K-), and gamma=(70+/-31(+12+14)(-10-11))degrees. The first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty, and the third reflects the Dalitz model uncertainty. The results for the strong and weak phases have a twofold ambiguity. PMID:16197065

  16. Measurement of gamma in B-+ to D(*) K-+ and B-+ to D K*-+ Decays with a Dalitz Analysis of D to Ks pi- pi+

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-08-04

    We present a measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violating phase {gamma} with a Dalitz plot analysis of neutral D-meson decays to the K{sub S}{sup 0} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} final state from B{sup {-+}} {yields} D{sup (*)}K{sup {-+}} and B{sup {-+}} {yields} DK*{sup {-+}} decays, using a sample of 227 million B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector. We measure {gamma} = (67 {+-} 28 {+-} 13 {+-} 11){sup o}, where the first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty and the third reflects the Dalitz model uncertainty. This result suffers from a two-fold ambiguity. The contribution to the Dalitz model uncertainty due to the description of the {pi}{pi} S-wave in D{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, evaluated using a K-matrix formalism, is found to be 3{sup o}.

  17. Atomic-Scale Study of Dislocation-Stacking Fault Tetrahedron Interactions. Part I: Mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N; Rodney, David; Bacon, David J

    2006-01-01

    Stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) are formed under irradiation in fcc metals and alloys. The high number density of SFTs observed suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, be taken into account when estimating mechanical property changes of irradiated materials. The key issue in this is to describe the interaction between a moving dislocation and an individual SFT, which is distinguished by a small physical size of the order of {approx}1-10 nm. We have performed atomistic simulations of edge and screw dislocations interacting with SFTs of different sizes at different temperatures and strain rates. Five possible interaction outcomes have been identified, involving either partial absorption, or shearing or restoration of SFTs. The mechanisms that give rise to these processes are described and their dependence on interaction parameters, such as SFT size, dislocation-SFT geometry, temperature and stress/strain rate are determined. Mechanisms that help to explain the formation of defect-free channels cleared by gliding dislocations, as observed experimentally, are also discussed. Hardening due to the various mechanisms and their dependence on loading conditions will be presented in a following paper (Part II).

  18. New nucleotide pairs for stable DNA triplexes stabilized by stacking interaction.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Masahiro; Banba, Jun-ichi; Kanamori, Takashi; Tawarada, Ryuya; Ohkubo, Akihiro; Sekine, Mitsuo; Seio, Kohji

    2008-07-30

    New nucleotide pairs applicable to formation of DNA triplexes were developed. We designed oligonucleotides incorporating 5-aryl deoxycytidine derivatives (dC5Ars) and cyclic deoxycytidine derivatives, dCPPP and dCPPI, having an expanded aromatic area, as the second strand. As pairing partners, two types of abasic residues (C3: propylene linker, phi: abasic base) were chosen. It was concluded that, when the 5-aryl-modified cytosine bases paired with the abasic sites in TFOs in a space-fitting manner, the stability of the resulting triplexes significantly increased. The recognition of C3 toward dC5Ars was selective because of the stacking interactions between their aromatic part and the nucleobases flanking the abasic site. These results indicate the potential utility of new nucleotide triplets for DNA triplex formation, which might expand the variety of structures and sequences and might be useful for biorelated fields such as DNA nanotechnologies. PMID:18611007

  19. CDF Grid computing and the decay X(3872) ---> J/psi pi+ pi- with J/psi ---> e+ e-

    SciTech Connect

    Kerzel, Ulrich; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2005-11-01

    The main aim of physics research is to obtain a consistent description of nature leading to a detailed understanding of the phenomena observed in experiments. The field of particle physics focuses on the discovery and understanding of the fundamental particles and the forces by which they interact with each other. Using methods from group theory, the present knowledge can be mathematically described by the so-called ''Standard Model'', which interprets the fundamental particles (quarks and leptons) as quantum-mechanical fields interacting via the electromagnetic, weak and strong force. These interactions are mediated via gauge particles such as the photon (for the electromagnetic force), W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} (for the weak force) and gluons (for the strong force). Gravitation is not yet included in this description as it presently cannot be formulated in a way to be incorporated in the Standard Model. However, the gravitational force is negligibly small on microscopic levels. The validity of this mathematical approach is tested experimentally by accelerating particles such as electrons and protons, as well as their antiparticles, to high energies and observing the reactions as these particles collide using sophisticated detectors. Due to the high energy of the particles involved, these detectors need to be as big as a small house to allow for precision measurements. Comparing the predictions from theory with the analyzed reactions observed in these collisions, the Standard Model has been established as a well-founded theory. Precision measurements from the four experiments (Aleph, Delphi, Opal, L3) the Large Electron Positron collider (LEP), operated at CERN during the years 1989-2000, allow the determination of the Standard Model parameters with enormous accuracy.

  20. Hybrid simulation approach incorporating microscopic interaction along with rigid body degrees of freedom for stacking between base pairs.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Manas; Halder, Sukanya; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2016-04-01

    Stacking interaction between the aromatic heterocyclic bases plays an important role in the double helical structures of nucleic acids. Considering the base as rigid body, there are total of 18 degrees of freedom of a dinucleotide step. Some of these parameters show sequence preferences, indicating that the detailed atomic interactions are important in the stacking. Large variants of non-canonical base pairs have been seen in the crystallographic structures of RNA. However, their stacking preferences are not thoroughly deciphered yet from experimental results. The current theoretical approaches use either the rigid body degrees of freedom where the atomic information are lost or computationally expensive all atom simulations. We have used a hybrid simulation approach incorporating Monte-Carlo Metropolis sampling in the hyperspace of 18 stacking parameters where the interaction energies using AMBER-parm99bsc0 and CHARMM-36 force-fields were calculated from atomic positions. We have also performed stacking energy calculations for structures from Monte-Carlo ensemble by Dispersion corrected density functional theory. The available experimental data with Watson-Crick base pairs are compared to establish the validity of the method. Stacking interaction involving A:U and G:C base pairs with non-canonical G:U base pairs also were calculated and showed that these structures were also sequence dependent. This approach could be useful to generate multiscale modeling of nucleic acids in terms of coarse-grained parameters where the atomic interactions are preserved. This method would also be useful to predict structure and dynamics of different base pair steps containing non Watson-Crick base pairs, as found often in the non-coding RNA structures. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 212-226, 2016. PMID:26600167

  1. Simulation of the photodeactivation of formamide in the nO-pi* and pi-pi* states: an ab initio on-the-fly surface-hopping dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Antol, Ivana; Eckert-Maksić, Mirjana; Barbatti, Mario; Lischka, Hans

    2007-12-21

    The short-time photodynamics (1 ps) of formamide in its low-lying singlet excited n(O)-pi(*) and pi-pi(*) states have been investigated by the direct trajectory surface-hopping method based on multiconfigurational ab initio calculations. The simulations showed that in both states, the primary deactivation process is C-N bond dissociation. In the ground state, the energy is transferred to (a) translational motion of the HCO and NH(2) fragments, (b) additional C-H dissociation from the vibrationally hot HCO fragment, or (c) formation of NH(3) and CO. In addition to the C-N dissociation pathway, C-O bond fission is found to be an additional primary deactivation path in the pi-pi(*) dynamics. From fractional occupations of trajectories, lifetimes of formamide were estimated: tau(S(1))=441 fs and tau(S(2))=66 fs. PMID:18154378

  2. C--H...O hydrogen-bonding and C--H...pi interactions in 3-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,5,7-trimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine-2,4-dione.

    PubMed

    Patel, Urmila H; Patel, Pinal D; Thakker, Neha

    2007-06-01

    In the title compound, C(16)H(14)FN(3)O(2), a diverse set of weak intermolecular C--H...pi, pi-pi and C--H...O interactions link the molecules into sheets. The C--H...O interactions generate centrosymmetric rings with a graph-set motif of R(2)(2)(14) and chains with a C(8) motif. PMID:17551197

  3. An Amplitude Analysis of the Decay B+- -> pi+- pi+- pi-+

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-11

    The authors present a Dalitz-plot analysis of charmless B{sup {+-}} decays to the final state {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} using 210 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by the BABAR experiment at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}) = (16.2 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(770){pi}{sup {+-}}) = (8.8 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.6{sub -0.7}{sup +0.1}) x 10{sup -6}. Measurements of branching fractions for the quasi-two-body decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(1450){pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(980){pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}} f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup {+-}} are also presented. They observe no charge asymmetries for the above modes, and there is no evidence for the decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} {chi}{sub c0}{pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(1370){pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {sigma}{pi}{sup {+-}}.

  4. Dalitz Plot Analysis of Ds+->pi+pi-pi+

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, R.N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-01-26

    A Dalitz plot analysis of {approx} 13, 000 D{sub s}{sup +} decays to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} has been performed. A 384 fb{sup -1} data sample, recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring running at center of mass energies near 10.6 GeV, is used. Amplitudes and phases of the intermediate resonances which contribute to this final state are measured. A high precision measurement of the ratio: {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.199 {+-} 0.004 {+-} 0.006 is performed. Using a model independent partial wave analysis the amplitude and phase of the S-wave have been measured.

  5. Dalitz Plot Analysis of B+- --> pi+-pi+-pi-+ Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, The BABAR; Aubert, B.

    2009-02-23

    The authors present a Dalitz-plot analysis of charmless B{sup {+-}} decays to the final state {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} using a sample of (465 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR experiment at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. They measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}) = (15.2 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(770){pi}{sup {+-}}) = (8.1 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 1.2{sub -1.1}{sup +0.4}) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup {+-}}) = (1.57 {+-} 0.42 {+-} 0.16{sub -0.19}{sup +0.53}) x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} nonresonant) = (5.3 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 0.6{sub -0.5}{sup +1.1}) x 10{sup -6}, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and model-dependent, respectively. Measurements of branching fractions for the modes B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(1450){pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(1370){pi}{sup {+-}} are also presented. They observe no significant direct CP asymmetries for the above modes, and there is no evidence for the decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(980){pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup {+-}} {yields} {chi}{sub c0}{pi}{sup {+-}}, or B{sup {+-}} {yields} {chi}{sub c2}{pi}{sup {+-}}.

  6. NONWATER QUALITY IMPACTS OF CLOSED-CYCLE COOLING SYSTEMS AND THE INTERACTION OF STACK GAS AND COOLING TOWER PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a literature survey of the nonwater quality impacts of closed-cycle cooling systems. Following discussions of cooling tower and stack gas plumes, interactions of these plumes are considered. For cooling tower plumes, plume types, behavior, salt drift g...

  7. Note: Resonance magnetoelectric interactions in laminate of FeCuNbSiB and multilayer piezoelectric stack for magnetic sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianqiang; Lu, Caijiang; Xu, Changbao; Zhong, Ming

    2015-09-01

    This paper develops a simple miniature magnetoelectric (ME) laminate FeCuNbSiB/PZT-stack made up of magnetostrictive Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 (FeCuNbSiB) foils and piezoelectric Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 (PZT) multilayer stack vibrator. Resonant ME interactions of FeCuNbSiB/PZT-stack with different layers of FeCuNbSiB foil (L) are investigated in detail. The experimental results show that the ME voltage coefficient reaches maximum value of 141.5 (V/cm Oe) for FeCuNbSiB/PZT-stack with L = 6. The AC-magnetic sensitivities can reach 524.29 mV/Oe and 1.8 mV/Oe under resonance 91.6 kHz and off-resonance 1 kHz, respectively. The FeCuNbSiB/PZT-stack can distinguish small dc-magnetic field of ∼9 nT. The results indicate that the proposed ME composites are very promising for the cheap room-temperature magnetic field sensing technology. PMID:26429496

  8. Note: Resonance magnetoelectric interactions in laminate of FeCuNbSiB and multilayer piezoelectric stack for magnetic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianqiang; Lu, Caijiang; Xu, Changbao; Zhong, Ming

    2015-09-01

    This paper develops a simple miniature magnetoelectric (ME) laminate FeCuNbSiB/PZT-stack made up of magnetostrictive Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 (FeCuNbSiB) foils and piezoelectric Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 (PZT) multilayer stack vibrator. Resonant ME interactions of FeCuNbSiB/PZT-stack with different layers of FeCuNbSiB foil (L) are investigated in detail. The experimental results show that the ME voltage coefficient reaches maximum value of 141.5 (V/cm Oe) for FeCuNbSiB/PZT-stack with L = 6. The AC-magnetic sensitivities can reach 524.29 mV/Oe and 1.8 mV/Oe under resonance 91.6 kHz and off-resonance 1 kHz, respectively. The FeCuNbSiB/PZT-stack can distinguish small dc-magnetic field of ˜9 nT. The results indicate that the proposed ME composites are very promising for the cheap room-temperature magnetic field sensing technology.

  9. Control of intramolecular π-π stacking interaction in cationic iridium complexes via fluorination of pendant phenyl rings.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Ma, Dongxin; Duan, Lian; Wei, Yongge; Qiao, Juan; Zhang, Deqiang; Dong, Guifang; Wang, Liduo; Qiu, Yong

    2012-04-16

    Intramolecular π-π stacking interaction in one kind of phosphorescent cationic iridium complexes has been controlled through fluorination of the pendant phenyl rings on the ancillary ligands. Two blue-green-emitting cationic iridium complexes, [Ir(ppy)(2)(F2phpzpy)]PF(6) (2) and [Ir(ppy)(2)(F5phpzpy)]PF(6) (3), with the pendant phenyl rings on the ancillary ligands substituted with two and five fluorine atoms, respectively, have been synthesized and compared to the parent complex, [Ir(ppy)(2)(phpzpy)]PF(6) (1). Here Hppy is 2-phenylpyridine, F2phpzpy is 2-(1-(3,5-difluorophenyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine, F5phpzpy is 2-(1-pentafluorophenyl-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)-pyridine, and phpzpy is 2-(1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine. Single crystal structures reveal that the pendant phenyl rings on the ancillary ligands stack to the phenyl rings of the ppy ligands, with dihedral angles of 21°, 18°, and 5.0° between least-squares planes for complexes 1, 2, and 3, respectively, and centroid-centroid distances of 3.75, 3.65, and 3.52 Å for complexes 1, 2, and 3, respectively, indicating progressively reinforced intramolecular π-π stacking interactions from complexes 1 to 2 and 3. Compared to complex 1, complex 3 with a significantly reinforced intramolecular face-to-face π-π stacking interaction exhibits a significantly enhanced (by 1 order of magnitude) photoluminescent efficiency in solution. Theoretical calculations reveal that in complex 3 it is unfavorable in energy for the pentafluorophenyl ring to swing by a large degree and the intramolecular π-π stacking interaction remains on the lowest triplet state. PMID:22462475

  10. Trinuclear organooxotin assemblies from solvothermal synthesis reaction: Crystal structure, hydrogen bonding and π π stacking interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chunlin; Sun, Junshan; Zhang, Rufen

    2007-05-01

    Two new trinuclear mono-organooxotin(IV) complexes with 2,3,4,5-tetrafluorobenzoic acid and sodium perchlorate of the types: [(SnR) 3(OH)(2,3,4,5-F 4C 6HCO 2) 4 · ClO 4] · [O 2CC 6HF 4](R = PhCH 2, 1; o- F-PhCH 2 for 2), have been solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by elemental, IR, 1H, 13C and 119Sn NMR and X-ray crystallography diffraction analyses. Complex 2 is also characterized by X-ray crystallography diffraction analyses. In complex 2, four carboxyl groups and a perchlorate bridged three tin atoms in a cyclohexane chair arrangement and form the basic framework. A hydroxyl group comprises the oxygen components of the stannoxane ring system. In these complexes, weak but significant intramolecular hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interaction are also shown. These contacts lead to aggregation and supramolecular assembly of complexes 1 and 2 into 1D or 2D framework.

  11. Structure of Musashi1 in a complex with target RNA: the role of aromatic stacking interactions.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Takako; Nagata, Takashi; Tsuda, Kengo; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Imai, Takao; Okano, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Toshio; Katahira, Masato

    2012-04-01

    Mammalian Musashi1 (Msi1) is an RNA-binding protein that regulates the translation of target mRNAs, and participates in the maintenance of cell 'stemness' and tumorigenesis. Msi1 reportedly binds to the 3'-untranslated region of mRNA of Numb, which encodes Notch inhibitor, and impedes initiation of its translation by competing with eIF4G for PABP binding, resulting in triggering of Notch signaling. Here, the mechanism by which Msi1 recognizes the target RNA sequence using its Ribonucleoprotein (RNP)-type RNA-binding domains (RBDs), RBD1 and RBD2 has been revealed on identification of the minimal binding RNA for each RBD and determination of the three-dimensional structure of the RBD1:RNA complex. Unique interactions were found for the recognition of the target sequence by Msi1 RBD1: adenine is sandwiched by two phenylalanines and guanine is stacked on the tryptophan in the loop between β1 and α1. The minimal recognition sequences that we have defined for Msi1 RBD1 and RBD2 have actually been found in many Msi1 target mRNAs reported to date. The present study provides molecular clues for understanding the biology involving Musashi family proteins. PMID:22140116

  12. The collapse of stacking fault tetrahedra by interactions with gliding dislocations.

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukawa, Yoshitaka; Osetskiy, Yury N; Stocks, George Malcolm; Zinkle, Steven J

    2005-01-01

    The collapse of stacking-fault tetrahedra (SFT) by gliding dislocations was observed in in situ straining experiments in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). A stacking-fault tetrahedron was collapsed by intersection with a gliding perfect dislocation: only the base portion divided by the gliding plane of the dislocation annihilated, while the apex portion remained intact. As a result of analysis on evolution of atom configuration induced by intersection with perfect dislocation in SFT, it was found that an unusual atom configuration inevitably appeared in one of the ledges formed on stacking-fault planes, which is traditionally called I-ledge: the atoms on adjacent (111) planes were overlapping each other. The overlapping configuration provides a strong repulsive force, being a conceivable driving force to induce a chain reaction of atom displacements that collapses the SFT base portion.

  13. Evidence of a broad structure at an invariant mass of 4.32 GeV/c2 in the reaction e+e- --> pi+pi-psi(2S) measured at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; Briand, H; David, P

    2007-05-25

    We present a measurement of the cross section of the process e(+)e(-)-->pi(+)pi(-)psi(2S) from threshold up to 8 GeV center-of-mass energy using events containing initial-state radiation, produced at the SLAC PEP-II e(+)e(-) storage rings. The study is based on 298 fb(-1) of data recorded with the BABAR detector. A structure is observed in the cross section not far above threshold, near 4.32 GeV. We also investigate the compatibility of this structure with the Y(4260) previously reported by this experiment. PMID:17677767

  14. The Soil Stack: An Interactive Computer Program Describing Basic Soil Science and Soil Degradation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cattle, S. R.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A computer program dealing with numerous aspects of soil degradation has a target audience of high school and university students (16-20 year olds), and is presented in a series of cards grouped together as stacks. Describes use of the software in Australia. (LZ)

  15. Center motions of nonoverlapping condensates coupled by long-range dipolar interaction in bilayer and multilayer stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao-Chun; Wu, Wen-Chin

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the effect of anisotropic and long-range dipole-dipole interaction (DDI) on the center motions of nonoverlapping Bose-Einstein condensates in bilayer and multilayer stacks. In the bilayer, it is shown analytically that while DDI plays no role in the in-phase modes of center motions of condensates, out-of-phase mode frequency (ωo) depends crucially on the strength of DDI (ad). At the small-ad limit, ωo2(ad)-ωo2(0)∝ad. In the multilayer stack, transverse modes associated with center motions of coupled condensates are found to be optical-phonon-like. At the long-wavelength limit, phonon velocity is proportional to ad.

  16. Energy hyperspace for stacking interaction in AU/AU dinucleotide step: Dispersion-corrected density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanchita; Kailasam, Senthilkumar; Bansal, Manju; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2014-01-01

    Double helical structures of DNA and RNA are mostly determined by base pair stacking interactions, which give them the base sequence-directed features, such as small roll values for the purine-pyrimidine steps. Earlier attempts to characterize stacking interactions were mostly restricted to calculations on fiber diffraction geometries or optimized structure using ab initio calculations lacking variation in geometry to comment on rather unusual large roll values observed in AU/AU base pair step in crystal structures of RNA double helices. We have generated stacking energy hyperspace by modeling geometries with variations along the important degrees of freedom, roll, and slide, which were chosen via statistical analysis as maximally sequence dependent. Corresponding energy contours were constructed by several quantum chemical methods including dispersion corrections. This analysis established the most suitable methods for stacked base pair systems despite the limitation imparted by number of atom in a base pair step to employ very high level of theory. All the methods predict negative roll value and near-zero slide to be most favorable for the purine-pyrimidine steps, in agreement with Calladine's steric clash based rule. Successive base pairs in RNA are always linked by sugar-phosphate backbone with C3'-endo sugars and this demands C1'-C1' distance of about 5.4 Å along the chains. Consideration of an energy penalty term for deviation of C1'-C1' distance from the mean value, to the recent DFT-D functionals, specifically ωB97X-D appears to predict reliable energy contour for AU/AU step. Such distance-based penalty improves energy contours for the other purine-pyrimidine sequences also. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 101: 107-120, 2014. PMID:23722519

  17. Dalitz Plot Analyses of B- to D+ Pi- Pi-, B+ to Pi+ Pi- Pi+ and D(S)+ to Pi+ Pi- Pi+ at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Liaoyuan; /Iowa State U.

    2012-04-10

    We report on the Dalitz plot analyses of B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{sup +}. The Dalitz plot method and the most recent BABAR results are discussed.

  18. The effect of stacking fault energy on interactions between an edge dislocation and a spherical void by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asari, K.; Hetland, O. S.; Fujita, S.; Itakura, M.; Okita, T.

    2013-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were conducted using a set of six interatomic potentials for FCC metals that differed only in stacking fault energy (SFE), to clarify the effect of SFE on interactions between a dissociated edge dislocation and a void. There are two different types of interaction mechanism: separate depinning of the individual partial dislocations and almost simultaneous depinning of the combined partial dislocations. The interaction mechanism depends on both the SFE and void size, and changes the absolute value of the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) and its dependence on the SFE. In the separate depinning case, the CRSS is relatively low and is almost independent of the SFE, while in the simultaneous case, the CRSS is increases with SFE. The void size for which the change in interaction mechanism occurs increases with decreasing SFE.

  19. Growing Ultra-flat Organic Films on Graphene with a Face-on Stacking via Moderate Molecule-Substrate Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ti; Kafle, Tika R.; Kattel, Bhupal; Liu, Qingfeng; Wu, Judy; Chan, Wai-Lun

    2016-01-01

    The electronic properties of small molecule organic crystals depend heavily on the molecular orientation. For multi-layer organic photovoltaics, it is desirable for the molecules to have a face-on orientation in order to enhance the out-of-plane transport properties. However, it is challenging to grow well-ordered and smooth films with a face-on stacking on conventional substrates such as metals and oxides. In this work, metal-phthalocyanine molecules is used as a model system to demonstrate that two-dimensional crystals such as graphene can serve as a template for growing high quality, ultra-flat organic films with a face-on orientation. Furthermore, the molecule-substrate interaction is varied systematically from strong to weak interaction regime with the interaction strength characterized by ultrafast electron transfer measurements. We find that in order to achieve the optimum orientation and morphology, the molecule-substrate interaction needs to be strong enough to ensure a face-on stacking while it needs to be weak enough to avoid film roughening. PMID:27356623

  20. Growing Ultra-flat Organic Films on Graphene with a Face-on Stacking via Moderate Molecule-Substrate Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ti; Kafle, Tika R.; Kattel, Bhupal; Liu, Qingfeng; Wu, Judy; Chan, Wai-Lun

    2016-06-01

    The electronic properties of small molecule organic crystals depend heavily on the molecular orientation. For multi-layer organic photovoltaics, it is desirable for the molecules to have a face-on orientation in order to enhance the out-of-plane transport properties. However, it is challenging to grow well-ordered and smooth films with a face-on stacking on conventional substrates such as metals and oxides. In this work, metal-phthalocyanine molecules is used as a model system to demonstrate that two-dimensional crystals such as graphene can serve as a template for growing high quality, ultra-flat organic films with a face-on orientation. Furthermore, the molecule-substrate interaction is varied systematically from strong to weak interaction regime with the interaction strength characterized by ultrafast electron transfer measurements. We find that in order to achieve the optimum orientation and morphology, the molecule-substrate interaction needs to be strong enough to ensure a face-on stacking while it needs to be weak enough to avoid film roughening.

  1. Growing Ultra-flat Organic Films on Graphene with a Face-on Stacking via Moderate Molecule-Substrate Interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ti; Kafle, Tika R; Kattel, Bhupal; Liu, Qingfeng; Wu, Judy; Chan, Wai-Lun

    2016-01-01

    The electronic properties of small molecule organic crystals depend heavily on the molecular orientation. For multi-layer organic photovoltaics, it is desirable for the molecules to have a face-on orientation in order to enhance the out-of-plane transport properties. However, it is challenging to grow well-ordered and smooth films with a face-on stacking on conventional substrates such as metals and oxides. In this work, metal-phthalocyanine molecules is used as a model system to demonstrate that two-dimensional crystals such as graphene can serve as a template for growing high quality, ultra-flat organic films with a face-on orientation. Furthermore, the molecule-substrate interaction is varied systematically from strong to weak interaction regime with the interaction strength characterized by ultrafast electron transfer measurements. We find that in order to achieve the optimum orientation and morphology, the molecule-substrate interaction needs to be strong enough to ensure a face-on stacking while it needs to be weak enough to avoid film roughening. PMID:27356623

  2. Isomorphous dichloro- and dibromo(2-methyl-2-phenylpropyl)phenylstannane, both displaying the same intramolecular pi-pi interaction at 120 K.

    PubMed

    Bomfim, Joäo A S; Filgueiras, Carlos A L; Howie, R Alan; Skakle, Janet M S; Wardell, James L

    2003-12-01

    The title compounds, dichloro- and dibromoneophylphenyltin, [SnCl(2)(C(6)H(5))(C(10)H(13))] and [SnBr(2)(C(6)H(5))(C(10)H(13))], respectively, are remarkable for the 'U' shape of the molecules, whereby the two phenyl groups are brought face-to-face in an arrangement that permits intermolecular C-H.pi bonds to connect the molecules into layers parallel to (100). Intermolecular Sn-halide bonds are notably absent from the structures. PMID:14671349

  3. Organic pi-stacked materials for electronic applications: Synthesis, characterizations, modeling and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jie

    structure, a pi-stack forms a tilted staircase motif with strong pi-pi overlap within the stack. EBTz-COOH shows a dimer-like packing motif similar to the dimer, (EBTz)2 due to the introduction of H-bonding. Semi-empirical MO calculations (ZINDO/S) were used to evaluate interchain interactions between molecules in their experimentally determined positions in the solid-state. The results show that the strong interchain interactions along the pi-stacking direction may exceed that of herringbone structures (e.g. pentacene). The ZINDO/S method can also be used to study the Davydov splitting and the exciton band structure in the solid-state.

  4. Interaction of small mobile stacking fault tetrahedra with free surfaces, dislocations, and interfaces in Cu and Cu-Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Enrique; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2016-02-01

    The presence of stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) in face-centered-cubic metals substantially modifies the material response to external loading. These defects are extremely stable with increasing energetic stability as they grow in size. At the sizes visible within a transmission electron microscope, they appear nearly immobile. We have recently shown that these defects might indeed migrate, with defective SFTs exhibiting particularly high mobilities. In this paper, using molecular dynamics, we show how mobile SFTs interact with various types of extended defects, including free surfaces, dislocations, and interfaces in Cu and Cu-Nb systems. We observe a direct relation between the energetics of a single vacancy interacting with each external defect and the propensity for the SFT to be absorbed. Finally, using mesoscale modeling, we show how the fact that SFTs can migrate influences the system evolution and potentially important observables of interest such as the void denuded zones around defect sinks.

  5. Stacking interactions in RNA and DNA: Roll-slide energy hyperspace for ten unique dinucleotide steps.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanchita; Kailasam, Senthilkumar; Bansal, Manju; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2015-03-01

    Understanding dinucleotide sequence directed structures of nuleic acids and their variability from experimental observation remained ineffective due to unavailability of statistically meaningful data. We have attempted to understand this from energy scan along twist, roll, and slide degrees of freedom which are mostly dependent on dinucleotide sequence using ab initio density functional theory. We have carried out stacking energy analysis in these dinucleotide parameter phase space for all ten unique dinucleotide steps in DNA and RNA using DFT-D by ωB97X-D/6-31G(2d,2p), which appears to satisfactorily explain conformational preferences for AU/AU step in our recent study. We show that values of roll, slide, and twist of most of the dinucleotide sequences in crystal structures fall in the low energy region. The minimum energy regions with large twist values are associated with the roll and slide values of B-DNA, whereas, smaller twist values correspond to higher stability to RNA and A-DNA like conformations. Incorporation of solvent effect by CPCM method could explain the preference shown by some sequences to occur in B-DNA or A-DNA conformations. Conformational preference of BII sub-state in B-DNA is preferentially displayed mainly by pyrimidine-purine steps and partly by purine-purine steps. The purine-pyrimidine steps show largest effect of 5-methyl group of thymine in stacking energy and the introduction of solvent reduces this effect significantly. These predicted structures and variabilities can explain the effect of sequence on DNA and RNA functionality. PMID:25257334

  6. Evidence of π-stacking Interactions in the Self-Assembly of hIAPP22–29†

    PubMed Central

    Profit, Adam A.; Felsen, Valentina; Chinwong, Justina; Mojica, Elmer-Rico E.; Desamero, Ruel Z. B.

    2012-01-01

    The role aromatic amino acids play in the formation of amyloid is a subject of controversy. In an effort to clarify the contribution of aromaticity to the self-assembly of hIAPP22–29, peptide analogs containing electron donating groups (EDGs) or electron withdrawing groups (EWGs) as substituents on the aromatic ring of Phe-23 at the para position have been synthesized and characterized using turbidity measurements in conjunction with Raman, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Results indicate the incorporation of EDGs on the aromatic ring of Phe-23 virtually abolish the ability of hIAPP22–29 to form amyloid. Peptides containing EWGs were still capable of forming aggregates. These aggregates were found to be rich in β-sheet secondary structure. TEM images of the aggregates confirm the presence of amyloid fibrils. The observed difference in amyloidogenic propensity between peptides containing EDGs and those with EWGs appears not to be based on differences in peptide hydrophobicity. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopic investigations reveal that the environment surrounding the aromatic ring becomes more hydrophobic and ordered upon aggregation. Furthermore, Raman measurements of peptide analogs containing EWGs, conclusively demonstrate a distinct downshift in the -C=C- ring mode (ca. 1600 cm−1) upon aggregation that has previously been shown to be indicative of π-stacking. While previous work has demonstrated that π-stacking is not an absolute requirement for fibrillization, our findings indicate that Phe-23 also contributes to fibril formation through π-stacking interactions and that it is not only the hydrophobic nature of this residue that is relevant in the self-assembly of hIAPP22–29. PMID:23229921

  7. Measurement of cos2beta in B;{0}-->D;{(*)}h;{0} decays with a time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis of D-->K_{s};{0}pi;{+}pi;{-}.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Vazquez, W Panduro; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Bailey, D; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-12-01

    We study the time-dependent Dalitz plot of D-->K_{S};{0}pi;{+}pi;{-} in B;{0}-->D;{(*)}h;{0} decays, where h;{0} is a pi;{0}, eta, eta;{'}, or omega meson and D;{*}-->Dpi;{0}, using a data sample of 383x10;{6} Upsilon(4S)-->BB[over ] decays collected with the BABAR detector. We determine cos2beta=0.42+/-0.49+/-0.09+/-0.13, sin2beta=0.29+/-0.34+/-0.03+/-0.05, and |lambda|=1.01+/-0.08+/-0.02, where the first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty, and the third, where given, is the Dalitz model uncertainty. Assuming the world average value for sin2beta and |lambda|=1, cos2beta>0 is preferred over cos2beta<0 at 86% confidence level. PMID:18233357

  8. Stacking Interactions between Carbohydrate and Protein Quantified by Combination of Theoretical and Experimental Methods

    PubMed Central

    Nečasová, Ivona; Mishra, Sushil Kumar; Komárek, Jan; Koča, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate – receptor interactions are an integral part of biological events. They play an important role in many cellular processes, such as cell-cell adhesion, cell differentiation and in-cell signaling. Carbohydrates can interact with a receptor by using several types of intermolecular interactions. One of the most important is the interaction of a carbohydrate's apolar part with aromatic amino acid residues, known as dispersion interaction or CH/π interaction. In the study presented here, we attempted for the first time to quantify how the CH/π interaction contributes to a more general carbohydrate - protein interaction. We used a combined experimental approach, creating single and double point mutants with high level computational methods, and applied both to Ralstonia solanacearum (RSL) lectin complexes with α-l-Me-fucoside. Experimentally measured binding affinities were compared with computed carbohydrate-aromatic amino acid residue interaction energies. Experimental binding affinities for the RSL wild type, phenylalanine and alanine mutants were −8.5, −7.1 and −4.1 kcal.mol−1, respectively. These affinities agree with the computed dispersion interaction energy between carbohydrate and aromatic amino acid residues for RSL wild type and phenylalanine, with values −8.8, −7.9 kcal.mol−1, excluding the alanine mutant where the interaction energy was −0.9 kcal.mol−1. Molecular dynamics simulations show that discrepancy can be caused by creation of a new hydrogen bond between the α-l-Me-fucoside and RSL. Observed results suggest that in this and similar cases the carbohydrate-receptor interaction can be driven mainly by a dispersion interaction. PMID:23056230

  9. Van der Waals stacks of few-layer h-AlN with graphene: an ab initio study of structural, interaction and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato B.; de Brito Mota, F.; Rivelino, R.; Kakanakova-Georgieva, A.; Gueorguiev, G. K.

    2016-04-01

    Graphite-like hexagonal AlN (h-AlN) multilayers have been experimentally manifested and theoretically modeled. The development of any functional electronics applications of h-AlN would most certainly require its integration with other layered materials, particularly graphene. Here, by employing vdW-corrected density functional theory calculations, we investigate structure, interaction energy, and electronic properties of van der Waals stacking sequences of few-layer h-AlN with graphene. We find that the presence of a template such as graphene induces enough interlayer charge separation in h-AlN, favoring a graphite-like stacking formation. We also find that the interface dipole, calculated per unit cell of the stacks, tends to increase with the number of stacked layers of h-AlN and graphene.

  10. Comprehensive molecular dynamics simulations of the stacking fault tetrahedron interacting with a mixed dislocation at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Haidong; Wang, Qingyuan; Ouyang, Chaojun

    2015-10-01

    The defect-free channels were frequently observed in irradiated materials, i.e. copper, as a result of the stacking fault tetrahedron (SFT) interactions with dislocations. However, the underlying mechanisms for this process are still unclear to date. To address them, a comprehensive study on the interactions between SFTs and mixed dislocations was performed using molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, eight interaction geometries were considered, in terms of the dislocation Burgers vector directions, dislocation gliding directions and intersection positions on SFT. Various interaction outcomes were revealed after dislocation detachment. (1) SFT is fully absorbed through the transformation into Lomer dislocations, and subsequently moves out of free surfaces along the dislocation. (2) SFT is partially absorbed with the absorbed SFT base moving out of free surfaces along the dislocation. (3) SFT is not absorbed but sheared with ledges left on the SFT faces. (4) SFT is unaffected by the mixed dislocation. The current simulations, especially the full SFT absorption, provide important insights into the forming mechanisms of defect-free channels in irradiated materials.

  11. Non-covalent stacking interactions directing the structural and photophysical features of mono- and dinuclear cyclometalated palladium(ii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Santana, M D; López-Banet, L; Sánchez, G; Pérez, J; Pérez, E; García, L; Serrano, J L; Espinosa, A

    2016-05-17

    The solution/solid state luminescence properties of selected orthometalated palladium complexes have been investigated in parallel with the relevant structural information provided by their X-ray crystal structures and theoretical calculations. Two cyclometalated backbones with different stacking abilities and a selection of bridging O^O, O^N or N^S ligands comprise the series under study, [{Pd(μ-L) (C^N)}2] (C^N = N-phenylpyrazole (Phpz) ; N-benzylideneaniline (Bza) ; L = acetate (Aco) , succinimidate (succ) , phthalimidate (phthal) , 1-methylimidazoline-2 thionate (Smeimid) ), completed with mononuclear [Pd(C^N)(N-pClPhsal)] (N-pClPhsal = chlorophenylsalycilaldiminate) complexes. New compounds , and were synthesized and the X-ray structures of , , , and have been elucidated in order to examine and compare solid-state Pd(C^N)-Pd(C^N) and ligand-ligand interactions with the rest of the series. The molecular structures of the complexes reveal intramolecular PdPd distances between 2.842 and 2.999 Å and π-π and C-Hπ interactions. All complexes studied show emission in the solid state at room temperature and a relationship is observed between emission energy, the nature of the lowest energy excited state, and metal-metal interactions. DFT calculations are undertaken to gain insight into the relationship between the structure and photophysical properties of the complexes. PMID:27137832

  12. π-Stacking, C-H/π, and halogen bonding interactions in bromobenzene and mixed bromobenzene-benzene clusters.

    PubMed

    Reid, Scott A; Nyambo, Silver; Muzangwa, Lloyd; Uhler, Brandon

    2013-12-19

    Noncovalent interactions play an important role in many chemical and biochemical processes. Building upon our recent study of the homoclusters of chlorobenzene, where π-π stacking and CH/π interactions were identified as the most important binding motifs, in this work we present a study of bromobenzene (PhBr) and mixed bromobenzene-benzene clusters. Electronic spectra in the region of the PhBr monomer S0-S1 (ππ*) transition were obtained using resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) methods combined with time-of-flight mass analysis. As previously found for related systems, the PhBr cluster spectra show a broad feature whose center is red-shifted from the monomer absorption, and electronic structure calculations indicate the presence of multiple isomers and Franck-Condon activity in low-frequency intermolecular modes. Calculations at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ level find in total eight minimum energy structures for the PhBr dimer: four π-stacked structures differing in the relative orientation of the Br atoms (denoted D1-D4), one T-shaped structure (D5), and three halogen bonded structures (D6-D8). The calculated binding energies of these complexes, corrected for basis set superposition error (BSSE) and zero-point energy (ZPE), are in the range of -6 to -24 kJ/mol. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations predict that these isomers absorb over a range that is roughly consistent with the breadth of the experimental spectrum. To examine the influence of dipole-dipole interaction, R2PI spectra were also obtained for the mixed PhBr···benzene dimer, where the spectral congestion is reduced and clear vibrational structure is observed. This structure is well-simulated by Franck-Condon calculations that incorporate the lowest frequency intermolecular modes. Calculations find four minimum energy structures for the mixed dimer and predict that the binding energy of the global minimum is reduced by ~30% relative to the global minimum PhBr dimer

  13. Equatorial π-stacking interactions in diruthenium (II,III) tetracarboxylate complexes containing extended π-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, Natasha F.; Ronaldson, Michael; Stanley Cameron, T.; Wang, Ruiyao; Aquino, Manuel A. S.

    2013-11-01

    The synthesis of three new valent-averaged tetracarboxylatodiruthenium (II,III) complexes, [Ru2(1-naphthylacetate)4(H2O)2](PF6)ṡ4THF, 1ṡ4THF, [Ru2(2-naphthoate)4(THF)2](PF6)ṡ3THF, 2ṡ3THF, and [Ru2(coumarin-3-carboxylate)4(MeOH)2](PF6)ṡMeOHṡH2O, 3ṡMeOHṡH2O, was accomplished using a well documented carboxylate exchange reaction. All three complexes were thoroughly characterized using infrared and UV-Vis spectroscopies, elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction. Due to the extended π-systems present, two of the complexes, 2ṡ3THF and 3ṡMeOHṡH2O, display extensive π-stacking in two dimensions, with similar interactions notably absent in 1ṡ4THF due to the perpendicular orientation of the naphthyl rings. Modest H-bonding is seen in complexes 1ṡ4THF and 3ṡMeOHṡH2O. As these types of complexes are noted secondary building units (SBU's) in the construction of metal-organic frameworks (MOF's), the significance of these interactions in stabilizing even larger, supramolecular structures, are noted.

  14. Simultaneous observations of aerosol–cloud–albedo interactions with three stacked unmanned aerial vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, G. C.; Ramana, M. V.; Corrigan, C.; Kim, D.; Ramanathan, V.

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol impacts on climate change are still poorly understood, in part, because the few observations and methods for detecting their effects are not well established. For the first time, the enhancement in cloud albedo is directly measured on a cloud-by-cloud basis and linked to increasing aerosol concentrations by using multiple autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles to simultaneously observe the cloud microphysics, vertical aerosol distribution, and associated solar radiative fluxes. In the presence of long-range transport of dust and anthropogenic pollution, the trade cumuli have higher droplet concentrations and are on average brighter. Our observations suggest a higher sensitivity of radiative forcing by trade cumuli to increases in cloud droplet concentrations than previously reported owing to a constrained droplet radius such that increases in droplet concentrations also increase cloud liquid water content. This aerosol-cloud forcing efficiency is as much as −60 W m−2 per 100% percent cloud fraction for a doubling of droplet concentrations and associated increase of liquid water content. Finally, we develop a strategy for detecting aerosol–cloud interactions based on a nondimensional scaling analysis that relates the contribution of single clouds to albedo measurements and illustrates the significance of characterizing cloud morphology in resolving radiometric measurements. This study demonstrates that aerosol–cloud–albedo interactions can be directly observed by simultaneous observations below, in, and above the clouds. PMID:18499803

  15. Simultaneous observations of aerosol-cloud-albedo interactions with three stacked unmanned aerial vehicles.

    PubMed

    Roberts, G C; Ramana, M V; Corrigan, C; Kim, D; Ramanathan, V

    2008-05-27

    Aerosol impacts on climate change are still poorly understood, in part, because the few observations and methods for detecting their effects are not well established. For the first time, the enhancement in cloud albedo is directly measured on a cloud-by-cloud basis and linked to increasing aerosol concentrations by using multiple autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles to simultaneously observe the cloud microphysics, vertical aerosol distribution, and associated solar radiative fluxes. In the presence of long-range transport of dust and anthropogenic pollution, the trade cumuli have higher droplet concentrations and are on average brighter. Our observations suggest a higher sensitivity of radiative forcing by trade cumuli to increases in cloud droplet concentrations than previously reported owing to a constrained droplet radius such that increases in droplet concentrations also increase cloud liquid water content. This aerosol-cloud forcing efficiency is as much as -60 W m(-2) per 100% percent cloud fraction for a doubling of droplet concentrations and associated increase of liquid water content. Finally, we develop a strategy for detecting aerosol-cloud interactions based on a nondimensional scaling analysis that relates the contribution of single clouds to albedo measurements and illustrates the significance of characterizing cloud morphology in resolving radiometric measurements. This study demonstrates that aerosol-cloud-albedo interactions can be directly observed by simultaneous observations below, in, and above the clouds. PMID:18499803

  16. Conformational Preferences of π-π Stacking Between Ligand and Protein, Analysis Derived from Crystal Structure Data Geometric Preference of π-π Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Li, Jue; Gu, Hui; Wei, Dongqing; Xu, Yao-Chang; Fu, Wei; Yu, Zhengtian

    2015-09-01

    π-π Interaction is a direct attractive non-covalent interaction between aromatic moieties, playing an important role in DNA stabilization, drug intercalation, etc. Aromatic rings interact through several different conformations including face-to-face, T-shaped, and offset stacked conformation. Previous quantum calculations indicated that T-shaped and offset stacked conformations are preferred for their smaller electron repulsions. However, substitution group on aromatic ring could have a great impact on π-π interaction by changing electron repulsion force between two rings. To investigate π-π interaction between ligand and aromatic side chain of protein, Brookhaven Protein Data Bank was analyzed. We extracted isolated dimer pairs with the aim of excluding multiple π-π stacking effects and found that T-shaped conformation is prevalent among aromatic interaction between phenyl ring of ligand and protein, which corresponds with the phenomenon of Phe-Phe interactions in small peptide. Specifically, for the non-substitution model, both Phe-Phe and Phenyl-Phe exhibit a favored T-shaped conformation whose dihedral angle is around 50°-70° and centroid distance is between 5.0 and 5.6 Å. However, it could be changed by substituent effect. The hydroxyl group could contact in the case of Tyr-Tyr pairs, while they point away from phenyl plane in Phe-Tyr pairs. PMID:26370211

  17. Mesoscopic model parametrization of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions of RNA from melting temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Information about molecular interactions in DNA can be obtained from experimental melting temperature data by using mesoscopic statistical physics models. Here, we extend the technique to RNA and show that the new parameters correctly reproduce known properties such as the stronger hydrogen bonds of AU base pairs. We also were able to calculate a complete set of elastic constants for all 10 irreducible combinations of nearest neighbours (NNs). We believe that this is particularly useful as experimentally derived information about RNA elasticity is relatively scarce. The melting temperature prediction using the present model improves over those from traditional NN model, providing thus an alternative way to calculate these temperatures for RNA. Additionally, we calculated the site-dependent base pair oscillation to explain why RNA shows larger oscillation amplitudes despite having stronger AU hydrogen bonds. PMID:23087379

  18. Application of diffusion Monte Carlo to materials dominated by van der Waals interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Benali, Anouar; Shulenburger, Luke; Romero, Nichols; Kim, Jeongnim; Von Lilienfeld, Anatole

    2014-01-01

    Van der Waals forces are notoriously difficult to account for from first principles. We perform extensive calculation to assess the usefulness and validity of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo when applied to van der Waals forces. We present results for noble gas solids and clusters - archetypical van der Waals dominated assemblies, as well as a relevant pi-pi stacking supramolecular complex: DNA + intercalating anti-cancer drug Ellipticine.

  19. Application of Diffusion Monte Carlo to Materials Dominated by van der Waals Interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Benali, Anouar; Shulenburger, Luke; Romero, Nichols A.; Kim, Jeongnim; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2014-06-12

    Van der Waals forces are notoriously difficult to account for from first principles. We perform extensive calculation to assess the usefulness and validity of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo when applied to van der Waals forces. We present results for noble gas solids and clusters - archetypical van der Waals dominated assemblies, as well as a relevant pi-pi stacking supramolecular complex: DNA + intercalating anti-cancer drug Ellipticine.

  20. Light-emitting self-assembled peptide nucleic acids exhibit both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Or; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Grunwald, Assaf; Liebes-Peer, Yael; Bachar, Mor; Buzhansky, Ludmila; Mossou, Estelle; Forsyth, V. Trevor; Schwartz, Tal; Ebenstein, Yuval; Frolow, Felix; Shimon, Linda J. W.; Patolsky, Fernando; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-05-01

    The two main branches of bionanotechnology involve the self-assembly of either peptides or DNA. Peptide scaffolds offer chemical versatility, architectural flexibility and structural complexity, but they lack the precise base pairing and molecular recognition available with nucleic acid assemblies. Here, inspired by the ability of aromatic dipeptides to form ordered nanostructures with unique physical properties, we explore the assembly of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), which are short DNA mimics that have an amide backbone. All 16 combinations of the very short di-PNA building blocks were synthesized and assayed for their ability to self-associate. Only three guanine-containing di-PNAs—CG, GC and GG—could form ordered assemblies, as observed by electron microscopy, and these di-PNAs efficiently assembled into discrete architectures within a few minutes. The X-ray crystal structure of the GC di-PNA showed the occurrence of both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing. The assemblies were also found to exhibit optical properties including voltage-dependent electroluminescence and wide-range excitation-dependent fluorescence in the visible region.

  1. Effects of Low-k Stack Structure on Performance of Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Devices and Chip Package Interaction Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagami, Masayoshi; Inoue, Naoya; Ueki, Makoto; Narihiro, Mitsuru; Tada, Munehiro; Yamamoto, Hironori; Ito, Fuminori; Furutake, Naoya; Saito, Shinobu; Onodera, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Tsuneo; Hayashi, Yoshihiro

    2012-09-01

    Low capacitance and highly reliable Cu dual-damascene (DD) interconnects have been developed with self-organized “seamless low-k SiOCH stacks” (SEALS) structure. A carbon-rich sub-nano porous SiOCH (k=2.5) was directly stacked on an oxygen-rich porous SiOCH (k=2.7) in the SEALS structure, without a hard-mask (HM) and etch-stop (ES) layer of SiO2. The effective k-value (keff) of the Cu DD interconnect including the SiCN capping layer (k=4.9) was reduced to 2.9 compared to 3.4 on a conventional hybrid structure with SiO2-HM and ES, which had been used in 65-nm-node mass production. The interconnect delay of a 45-nm-node complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) ring oscillator (RO) was reduced by 15% referring to that of the conventional hybrid structure. Interconnect reliabilities, such as the interline time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) and thermal cycles, were unchanged from those of the conventional hybrid interconnects. No failure was detected for chip package interaction (CPI) during reliability tests in a plastic ball grid array (PBGA) package. SEALS is a promising structure for scaled down ultra large scale integrations (ULSIs) for highly reliable and high speed operation, and low power consumption.

  2. Branching fractions and CP asymmetries in B0-->pi0pi0, B+-->pi+pi0, and B+-->K+pi0 decays and isospin analysis of the B-->pipi system.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Thompson, J; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-05-13

    Based on a sample of 227 x 10(6) BB pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, we measure the branching fraction B(B0-->pi(0)pi(0))=(1.17+/-0.32+/-0.10)x10(-6), and the asymmetry Cpi(0)(pi(0))=-0.12+/-0.56+/-0.06. The B0-->pi(0)pi(0) signal has a significance of 5.0 sigma. We also measure B(B+-->pi(+)pi(0))=(5.8+/-0.6+/-0.4)x10(-6), B(B+-->K+pi(0))=(12.0+/-0.7+/-0.6)x10(-6), and the charge asymmetries Api(+)(pi(0))=-0.01+/-0.10+/-0.02 and AK+(pi(0))=0.06+/-0.06+/-0.01. Using isospin relations, we find an upper bound on the angle difference |alpha-alpha(eff)| of 35 degrees at the 90% C.L. PMID:15904359

  3. Observation of a J{sup PC}=1{sup -+} Exotic Resonance in Diffractive Dissociation of 190 GeV/c {pi}{sup -} into {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+}

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, M. G.; Colantoni, M.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Maggiora, A.; Alexakhin, V. Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Efremov, A.; Finger, M. Jr.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Ivanov, O.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Komissarov, E. V.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Maximov, A. N.; Nagaytsev, A.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Perevalova, E.; Peshekhonov, D. V.

    2010-06-18

    The COMPASS experiment at the CERN SPS has studied the diffractive dissociation of negative pions into the {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} final state using a 190 GeV/c pion beam hitting a lead target. A partial wave analysis has been performed on a sample of 420 000 events taken at values of the squared 4-momentum transfer t{sup '} between 0.1 and 1 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}. The well-known resonances a{sub 1}(1260), a{sub 2}(1320), and {pi}{sub 2}(1670) are clearly observed. In addition, the data show a significant natural-parity exchange production of a resonance with spin-exotic quantum numbers J{sup PC}=1{sup -+} at 1.66 GeV/c{sup 2} decaying to {rho}{pi}. The resonant nature of this wave is evident from the mass-dependent phase differences to the J{sup PC}=2{sup -+} and 1{sup ++} waves. From a mass-dependent fit a resonance mass of (1660{+-}10{sub -64}{sup +0}) MeV/c{sup 2} and a width of (269{+-}21{sub -64}{sup +42}) MeV/c{sup 2} are deduced, with an intensity of (1.7{+-}0.2)% of the total intensity.

  4. Stack filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, P. D.; Coyle, E. J.; Gallagher, N. C., Jr.

    1986-08-01

    A large class of easily implemented nonlinear filters called stack filters are discussed which includes the rank order operators in addition to the compositions of morphological operators. Techniques similar to those used to determine the root signal behavior of median filters are employed to study the convergence properties of the filters, and necessary conditions for a stack filter to preserve monotone regions or edges in signals, and the output distribution of the filters, are obtained. Among the stack filters of window width three are found asymmetric median filters in which one removes only positive going edges, the other removes only negative going edges, while the median filter removes impulses of both signs.

  5. Influence of Secondary Interactions at Graphene-Based Surfaces on the Dynamic and Mechanical Properties in Nanostructured Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmeri, Marc J.

    Graphene, a single atom thick sheet of densely packed carbon atoms, has gained significant interest in nanostructured materials because of its exceptional mechanical, electrical, thermal, and optical properties. Because graphene nanosheets and graphene-based nanoparticles present enormous surface areas relative to their volume, interfacial interactions at graphene-based surfaces yield a significant impact on the properties of nanostructured systems. In this dissertation, secondary interactions (e.g., pi-pi interactions and hydrogen-bonding) at graphene-based surfaces in composite systems and freestanding nanoparticle films were studied, with a focus on their influence over mechanical and dynamic properties. In polymer nanocomposite systems containing carbon nanotubes, the region of altered chain dynamics near nanotube surfaces was examined as a function of crosslink density by dynamic scanning calorimetry. Three mechanisms of altered dynamics were postulated in crosslinked systems, with diminished percolation of these effects at increasing crosslink densities due to restrictions in the length scale of chain rearrangements. In-depth fracture analysis of a polymer nanocomposite containing carbon nanofibers with a stacked-cup structure pointed to the first observation of sacrificialbonding behavior in the inorganic phase of composite systems. Either continuous unraveling or discrete splaying of the coiled graphene sheets were found to dissipate energy by overcoming the relatively weak pi-pi interactions between stacked layers, yielding significant toughening at low nanofiber contents. Incorporation of these nanofibers into carbon-fiber-reinforced composites yielded mechanical enhancements in matrix-dominated properties while improving transverse electrical conductivity. Finally, the formation mechanism of freestanding graphene oxide films (or papers) fabricated by vacuum-assisted filtration of aqueous colloidal suspensions was examined as a function of both film

  6. Measurements of charmless b-hadron decays at CDF; first evidence for the annihilation $B^0_s \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ decay mode.

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffini, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    This work of thesis will investigate the heavy flavor sector, involving decays of particles containing the most massive quarks. In particular, we will study the bhadrons, that means particles containing b-quarks. The topic of this work is the measurements of B and CP asymmetries of two-body charmless decays of neutral b-hadrons, (B0 (s) → h+h' - and Λ0 b →and ph -, where the h can be a pion or a kaon) collectively called B → h+h' -. Next sections describe the theoretical framework in which the b-hadrons are included. Firstly, it is necessary to introduce the CKM matrix describing the electroweak interactions between quarks and how the phenomenon of the CP violation manifests itself.

  7. Stacked and H-Bonded Cytosine Dimers. Analysis of the Intermolecular Interaction Energies by Parallel Quantum Chemistry and Polarizable Molecular Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Gresh, Nohad; Sponer, Judit E; Devereux, Mike; Gkionis, Konstantinos; de Courcy, Benoit; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Sponer, Jiri

    2015-07-30

    Until now, atomistic simulations of DNA and RNA and their complexes have been executed using well calibrated but conceptually simple pair-additive empirical potentials (force fields). Although such simulations provided many valuable results, it is well established that simple force fields also introduce errors into the description, underlying the need for development of alternative anisotropic, polarizable molecular mechanics (APMM) potentials. One of the most abundant forces in all kinds of nucleic acids topologies is base stacking. Intra- and interstrand stacking is assumed to be the most essential factor affecting local conformational variations of B-DNA. However, stacking also contributes to formation of all kinds of noncanonical nucleic acids structures, such as quadruplexes or folded RNAs. The present study focuses on 14 stacked cytosine (Cyt) dimers and the doubly H-bonded dimer. We evaluate the extent to which an APMM procedure, SIBFA, could account quantitatively for the results of high-level quantum chemistry (QC) on the total interaction energies, and the individual energy contributions and their nonisotropic behaviors. Good agreements are found at both uncorrelated HF and correlated DFT and CCSD(T) levels. Resorting in SIBFA to distributed QC multipoles and to an explicit representation of the lone pairs is essential to respectively account for the anisotropies of the Coulomb and of the exchange-repulsion QC contributions. PMID:26119247

  8. Cross Sections for the Reactions e+e to K+ K- pi+pi-, K+ K- pi0pi0, and K+ K- K+ K- Measured Using Initial-State Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-19

    We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}-{gamma}, K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, and K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{gamma}, where the photon is radiated from the initial state. About 84000, 8000, and 4200 fully reconstructed events, respectively, are selected from 454 fb{sup -1} of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy, so that the K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} data can be compared with direct measurements of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} reaction. No direct measurements exist for the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} or e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -} reactions, and we present an update of our previous result with doubled statistics. Studying the structure of these events, we find contributions from a number of intermediate states, and extract their cross sections. In particular, we perform a more detailed study of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{pi}{gamma} reaction, and confirm the presence of the Y (2175) resonance in the {phi}(1020)f{sub 0}(980) and K{sup +}K{sup -} f{sub 0}(980) modes. In the charmonium region, we observe the J/{psi} in all three final states and in several intermediate states, as well as the {phi}(2S) in some modes, and measure the corresponding branching fractions.

  9. Manifestation of π-π stacking interactions in luminescence properties and energy transfer in aromatically-derived Tb, Eu and Gd tris(pyrazolyl)borate complexes.

    PubMed

    Mikhalyova, Elena A; Yakovenko, Anastasiya V; Zeller, Matthias; Kiskin, Mikhail A; Kolomzarov, Yuriy V; Eremenko, Igor L; Addison, Anthony W; Pavlishchuk, Vitaly V

    2015-04-01

    The three new complexes Tp(Py)Ln(CH3CO2)2(H2O) (Ln = Eu (1), Gd(2), or Tb (3)) were prepared and characterized crystallographically. In the crystal lattices of these complexes, separate molecules are connected in infinite chains by π-stacking interactions. Complexes 1 and 3 display intense photoluminescence and triboluminescence (red and green respectively), while compound 3 exhibits electroluminescence commencing at 9 V in an ITO/PVK/3/Al device (ITO = indium-tin oxide, PVK = poly(N-vinylcarbazole)). A series of Eu/Tb-doped Gd compounds was prepared by cocrystallization from mixtures of 1 and 2 or 2 and 3, respectively. It was shown that π-stacking interactions are involved in increasing the efficiency of energy transfer from the gadolinium complex to emitting [Tp(Py)Eu](2+) or [Tp(Py)Tb](2+) centers, and this energy transfer occurs through hundreds of molecules, resembling the process of energy harvesting in chloroplast stacks. PMID:25797500

  10. Stacking Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Chimneys and stacks appear to be strong and indestructible, but chimneys begin to deteriorate from the moment they are built. Early on, no signs are apparent; but deterioration accelerates in subsequent years, and major repairs are soon needed instead of minor maintenance. With proper attention, most structures can be repaired and continue to…

  11. Stacking with No Planarity?

    PubMed

    Gunaydin, Hakan; Bartberger, Michael D

    2016-04-14

    This viewpoint describes the results obtained from matched molecular pair analyses and quantum mechanics calculations that show unsaturated rings found in drug-like molecules may be replaced with their saturated counterparts without losing potency even if they are engaged in stacking interactions with the side chains of aromatic residues. PMID:27096037

  12. Quantum-mechanical computations on the electronic structure of trans-resveratrol and trans-piceatannol: a theoretical study of the stacking interactions in trans-resveratrol dimers.

    PubMed

    Mikulski, Damian; Molski, Marcin

    2012-07-01

    Accurate quantum-chemical calculations based on the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation method (MP2) and density functional theory (DFT) were performed for the first time to investigate the electronic structures of trans-resveratrol and trans-piceatannol, as well as to study the stacking interaction between trans-resveratrol molecules. Ab initio MP2 calculations performed with using standard split-valence Pople basis sets led us to conclude that these compounds have structures that deviate strongly from planarity, whereas the DFT computations for the same basis sets revealed that the equilibrium geometries of these bioactive polyphenols are planar. Furthermore, the results obtained at the MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVTZ and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ levels indicated that the geometries of trans-resveratrol and trans-piceatannol are practically planar at their absolute energy minima. The relative energies of the equilibrium geometries of trans-resveratrol on its potential energy surface were computed at the MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVTZ level. According to the results obtained, a T-shaped (edge-to-phase) conformer of trans-resveratrol dimer is the most stable in vacuum. This T-shaped conformer is mainly stabilized by strong hydrogen bonding and weak C-H...π interactions. Stacked structures with parallel-displaced trans-stilbene skeletons were also found to be energetically stable. The vertical separation and twist angle dependencies of the stacking energy were investigated at the MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVTZ, B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ, and HF/aug-cc-pVTZ levels. The standard B3LYP functional and the Hartree-Fock method neglect long-range attractive dispersion interactions. The MP2 computations revealed that the London dispersion energy cannot be neglected at long or short distances. The stacked model considered here may be useful for predicting the quantum nature of the interactions in π-stacked systems of other naturally occurring stilbenoids, and can help to enhance our understanding of the

  13. Glucose-β-CD interaction assisted ACN field-amplified sample stacking in CZE for determination of trace amlodipine in beagle dog plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Li, You; Zhang, Wenting; Chen, Zhao; Fan, Guorong

    2013-06-01

    A simple, sensitive and low-cost method using CE coupled with glucose-β-CD interaction assisted ACN stacking technique has been developed for quantification of trace amlodipine in dog plasma. The plasma samples were extracted with methyl tert-butyl ether. The separation was performed at 25°C in a 31.2 cm × 75 μm fused-silica capillary with an applied voltage of 15 kV. The BGE was composed of 6.25 mM borate/25 mM phosphate (pH 2.5) and 5 mg/mL glucose-β-CD. The detection wavelength was 200 nm. Because CD could diminish the interaction between drugs and matrix, and derivation groups of CD play an important role in separation performance, the effects of β-CD, and its derivatives on the separation were studied at several concentrations (0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0 mg/mL). In this study, organic solvent field-amplified sample stacking technique in combination with glucose-β-CD enhanced the sensitivity about 60-70 folds and glucose-β-CD could effectively improve the peak shape. All the validation data, such as accuracy, precision extraction recovery, and stability, were within the required limits. The calibration curve was linear for amlodipine from 1 to 200 ng/mL. The method developed was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic studies of amlodipine besylate in beagle dogs. PMID:23495256

  14. Pressure-Induced Phase Transitions in Ammonium Squarate: A Supramolecular Structure Based on Hydrogen-Bonding and [pi]-Stacking Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shourui; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Mi; Li, Qian; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo

    2012-02-06

    We report the results of high-pressure Raman and X-ray diffraction measurements performed on ammonium squarate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}C{sub 4}O{sub 4}, AS), a representative supramolecular architecture based on hydrogen bonding and {pi}-stacking interactions, at various pressures up to 19 GPa. Two phase transitions at 2.7 GPa and in the pressure range of 11.1-13.6 GPa were observed. Both Raman and XRD results provide convincing evidence for these two phase transitions. The first phase transition is attributed to the rearrangements of hydrogen-bonding networks, resulting in the symmetry transformation from P2{sub 1}/c to P1. The second one, which is identified as an order-disorder phase transition, arises from significant modifications of squarate rings and random orientations of NH{sub 4}{sup +} cations. The cooperative effects between hydrogen-bonding and {pi}-stacking interactions, as well as mechanisms for the phase transitions, are discussed by virtue of the local structure of AS.

  15. Evolution and interaction of twins, dislocations and stacking faults in rolled α-brass during nanostructuring at sub-zero temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Barna; Kumar, Nand Kishor; Nambissan, Padinharu Madathil Gopalakrishnan; Das, Jayanta

    2014-06-01

    The effect of cryorolling (CR) strain at 153 K on the evolution of structural defects and their interaction in α-brass (Cu-30 wt.% Zn) during nanostructuring has been evaluated. Even though the lattice strain increases up to 2.1 × 10-3 at CR strain of 0.6 initially, but it remains constant upon further rolling. Whereas, the twin density (β) increases to a maximum value of 5.9 × 10-3 at a CR strain of 0.7 and reduces to 1.1 × 10-5 at 0.95. Accumulation of stacking faults (SFs) and lattice disorder at the twin boundaries causes dynamic recrystallization, promotes grain refinement and decreases the twin density by forming subgrains. Detailed investigations on the formation and interaction of defects have been done through resistivity, positron lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements in order to understand the micro-mechanism of nanostructuring at sub-zero temperatures.

  16. A Survey of Aspartate-Phenylalanine and Glutamate-Phenylalanine Interactions in the Protein Data Bank: Searching for Anion-pi Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Vivek M; Harris, Jason B; Adams, Rachel M; Nguyen, Don; Spiers, Jeremy D; Baudry, Jerome Y; Howell, Elizabeth E; Hinde, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Protein structures are stabilized using noncovalent interactions. In addition to the traditional noncovalent interactions, newer types of interactions are thought to be present in proteins. One such interaction, an anion-{pi} pair, in which the positively charged edge of an aromatic ring interacts with an anion, forming a favorable anion-quadrupole interaction, has been previously proposed [Jackson, M. R., et al. (2007) J. Phys. Chem. B111, 8242-8249]. To study the role of anion-{pi} interactions in stabilizing protein structure, we analyzed pairwise interactions between phenylalanine (Phe) and the anionic amino acids, aspartate (Asp) and glutamate (Glu). Particular emphasis was focused on identification of Phe-Asp or -Glu pairs separated by less than 7 {angstrom} in the high-resolution, nonredundant Protein Data Bank. Simplifying Phe to benzene and Asp or Glu to formate molecules facilitated in silico analysis of the pairs. Kitaura-Morokuma energy calculations were performed on roughly 19000 benzene-formate pairs and the resulting energies analyzed as a function of distance and angle. Edgewise interactions typically produced strongly stabilizing interaction energies (-2 to -7.3 kcal/mol), while interactions involving the ring face resulted in weakly stabilizing to repulsive interaction energies. The strongest, most stabilizing interactions were identified as preferentially occurring in buried residues. Anion-{pi} pairs are found throughout protein structures, in helices as well as {beta} strands. Numerous pairs also had nearby cation-{pi} interactions as well as potential {pi}-{pi} stacking. While more than 1000 structures did not contain an anion-{pi} pair, the 3134 remaining structures contained approximately 2.6 anion-{pi} pairs per protein, suggesting it is a reasonably common motif that could contribute to the overall structural stability of a protein.

  17. Resonant interaction of light with a stack of alternating layers of a cholesteric liquid crystal and an isotropic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorgyan, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Resonance properties of a stack consisting of a cholesteric liquid crystal and isotropic medium layers are investigated. Bragg's conditions for photonic band gaps are presented for the considered system. It is shown that a significant control of the system zone structure is possible in the case of a proper selection of the sublayer parameters. It is also shown that an effect of complete suppression of absorption is not usually observed in the case of anisotropic absorption in cholesteric liquid crystal sublayers. The possibility to achieve this effect in the considered system, imposing certain conditions on the thickness and the refraction index of the isotropic medium sublayers, is shown. Also, it is shown that in such conditions a large increase of the maximum of photonic density of states happens at the appropriate zone borders.

  18. Supramolecular self-assembly of a coumarine-based acylthiourea synthon directed by π-stacking interactions: Crystal structure and Hirshfeld surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Aamer; Ashraf, Saba; Flörke, Ulrich; Delgado Espinoza, Zuly Yuliana; Erben, Mauricio F.; Pérez, Hiram

    2016-05-01

    The structure of 1-(2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carbonyl)-3-(2-methoxy-phenyl)thiourea (1) has been determined by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. This compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c with a = 7.455 (2) Å, b = 12.744 (3) Å, c = 16.892 (4) Å, β = 90.203 (6)° and Z = 4. Both, the coumarin and the phenyl rings are nearly coplanar with the central 1-acylthiourea group, with the Cdbnd O and Cdbnd S bonds adopting an opposite orientation. Intramolecular N-H···O, C-H···O, and C-H···S hydrogen bonds are favored by the planar conformation. The molecules are packed through C-H···O, C-H···S and C-H···C hydrogen bonds, and two π···π interactions with offset arrangement. Inter-centroid distance of 3.490 (2) Å, slip angles of 18.5 and 20.9°, and vertical displacements of 1.10 and 1.24 Å are the stacking parameters corresponding to the stronger π···π interaction. Hirshfeld surface analysis was performed for visualizing, exploring and quantifying intermolecular interactions in the crystal lattice of compound 1, and compared with two closely related species. Shape index and Curvedness surfaces indicated π-stacking with different features in opposed sides of the molecule. Fingerprint plot showed C···C contacts with similar contributions to the crystal packing in comparison with those associated to hydrogen bonds. Enrichment ratios for H···H, O···H, S···H and C···C contacts revealed a high propensity to form in the crystal.

  19. π-Stacking attraction vs. electrostatic repulsion: competing supramolecular interactions in a tpphz-bridged Ru(ii)/Au(iii) complex.

    PubMed

    Sorsche, Dieter; Schaub, Markus; Heinemann, Frank W; Habermehl, Johannes; Kuhri, Susanne; Guldi, Dirk; Guthmuller, Julien; Rau, Sven

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a mixed metal ruthenium(ii)/gold(iii) complex bridged by tetrapyridophenazine (tpphz) are described. It is isostructural and isoelectronic to the well-known photocatalysts with palladium(ii) or platinum(ii). Concentration dependent (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and XRD studies show that the electrostatic repulsion between the gold(iii) moieties exceeds the attractive π-stacking interaction. Theoretical calculations based on the new structural data confirm an increased positive charge on the bridging ligand as well as significantly altered orbital symmetry as compared to the previously investigated palladium(ii) complex. This is the first example of a tpphz ruthenium(ii) complex where π-stacking is completely inhibited. The detailed investigation of the solid-state structure showed for the first time in bimetallic tpphz bridged complexes no significant torsion within the bridging ligand itself. Although catalytic performance for proton reduction by gold(iii) is naturally not observed, its photochemical decomposition in colloidal gold particles could be shown by TEM and DLS. PMID:27472004

  20. Bundled Stack Discotic Columnar Liquid Crystalline Phase with Inter Stack Electronic Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bin; Sun, Runkun; Gunbas, Duygu; Zhang, Hao; Grozema, Ferdinand; Xiao, Kai; Jin, Shi

    2015-01-01

    The first compound capable of forming a bundled stack discotic columnar liquid crystalline (BSDCLC) phase was designed and synthesized. The unique perylene anhydride inter stack interaction was found to be the key to the formation of the BSDCLC structure and inter stack electronic coupling (ISEC).

  1. A bundled-stack discotic columnar liquid crystalline phase with inter-stack electronic coupling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Bin; Sun, Runkun; Günbaş, Duygu D.; Zhang, Hao; Grozema, Ferdinand C.; Xiao, Kai; Jin, Shi

    2015-06-15

    The first compound proving to be capable of forming a bundled-stack discotic columnar liquid crystalline (BSDCLC) phase was designed and synthesized. Finally, the unique perylene anhydride inter-stack interaction was found to be the key to the formation of the BSDCLC structure and inter-stack electronic coupling (ISEC).

  2. Study of the Tau- to Pi- Pi+ Pi- Pi0 Nu/Tau And Tau- to Pi- Pi- Pi+ Eta Nu/Tau Decays Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sobie, Randall; /Victoria U.

    2007-11-14

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays have been studied with the BABAR detector. Preliminary branching fractions on the two modes are presented. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} mode is found to have a large contribution from the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is studied using the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode and the {tau}{sup -} f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is seen to be the primary source of these decays. A 90% confidence level upper limit is placed on the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay which proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of perfect isospin symmetry.

  3. Electrochemical cell stack assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2010-06-22

    Multiple stacks of tubular electrochemical cells having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films arranged in parallel on stamped conductive interconnect sheets or ferrules. The stack allows one or more electrochemical cell to malfunction without disabling the entire stack. Stack efficiency is enhanced through simplified gas manifolding, gas recycling, reduced operating temperature and improved heat distribution.

  4. Structural Studies on Porphyrin-PNA Conjugates in Parallel PNA:PNA Duplexes: Effect of Stacking Interactions on Helicity.

    PubMed

    Accetta, Alessandro; Petrovic, Ana G; Marchelli, Rosangela; Berova, Nina; Corradini, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Parallel PNA:PNA duplexes were synthesized and conjugated with meso-tris(pyridyl)phenylporphyrin carboxylic acid at the N-terminus. The introduction of one porphyrin unit was shown to affect slightly the stability of the PNA:PNA parallel duplex, whereas the presence of two porphyrin units at the same end resulted in a dramatic increase of the melting temperature, accompanied by hysteresis between melting and cooling curves. The circular dichroism (CD) profile of the Soret band and fluorescence quenching strongly support the occurrence of a face-to-face interaction between the two porphyrin units. Introduction of a L-lysine residue at the C-terminal of one strand of the parallel duplex induced a left-handed helical structure in the PNA:PNA duplex if the latter contains only one or no porphyrin moiety. The left-handed helicity was revealed by nucleobase CD profile at 240-280 nm and by the induced-CD observed in the presence of the DiSC2 (5) cyanine dye at ~500-550 nm. Surprisingly, the presence of two porphyrin units led to the disappearance of the nucleobase CD signal and the absence of CD exciton coupling within the Soret band region. In addition, a dramatic decrease of induced CD of DiSC2 (5) was observed. These results are in agreement with a model where the porphyrin-porphyrin interactions cause partial loss of chirality of the PNA:PNA parallel duplex, forcing it to adopt a ladder-like conformation. PMID:26412743

  5. Multiplet earthquake relocations and stacked waveform inversions in the Yellowstone volcanic field and implications for volcanic-tectonic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massin, F.; Farrell, J.; Smith, R. B.; Shelly, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Abnormally high earthquake rates and episodic crustal deformation suggest that the Yellowstone hotspot affects the tectonics of the western United States. However the relationship between the Yellowstone volcanic system and the surrounding tectonic regime remains poorly known. We study the structure and stress field for quantitative modeling of volcano-tectonic interactions using multiplet analysis. Our analysis shows that earthquake rates of Yellowstone are coincident with the uplift and subsidence episodes of the 0.64 Ma Yellowstone caldera: a relative decrease of multiplet activity accompanies each subsidence episode between 1997 and 2010. Our research focuses on the determination of crustal seismogenic structures and related stress perturbations that are responsible for the abnormally intense and cyclic earthquake activity. We consider each multiplet as a homogenous set of earthquakes produced by the same seismic source or fault. We integrate results from double-difference hypocenter relocations and source mechanism determinations to evaluate active fault properties. Hypocenters are constrained by a median of 50 P-wave and 12 S-wave differential arrival times (up to 4062 P-waves and 1187 S-waves). Composite focal mechanism solutions are determined for multiplets with 64 P-wave polarity observations or more. We compare multilinear regression planes of hypocenters of large multiplets and their composite focal mechanisms to choose fault planes and slip directions. We then develop detailed analysis of the largest earthquake swarms in Yellowstone, e.g. the Autumn 1985, the 2008 Yellowstone Lake and the 2010 Madison Plateau earthquake swarms to examine if swarm earthquakes occur on one continuous fault plane or on a network of independent segments with variable orientations. To independently confirm the interpreted fault plane we also invert for the moment tensors of the largest multiplets with a cumulative seismic moment over Mw3. The moment tensors are decomposed

  6. Three-body Final State Interaction in η→3π

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Peng; Danilkin, Igor V.; Schott, Diane; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Mathieu, V.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-09-11

    We present an unitary dispersive model for the $\\eta \\to 3 \\pi$ decay process based upon the Khuri-Treiman equations which are solved by means of the Pasquier inversion method. The description of the hadronic final-state interactions for the $\\eta \\to 3\\pi$ decay is essential to reproduce the available data and to understand the existing discrepancies between Dalitz plot parameters from experiment and chiral perturbation theory. Our approach incorporates substraction constants that are fixed by fitting the recent high-statistics WASA-at-COSY data for $\\eta \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$. Based on the parameters obtained we predict the slope parameter for the neutral channel to be $\\alpha=-0.022\\pm 0.004$. Through matching to next-to-leading order chiral perturbation theory we estimate the quark mass double ratio to be $Q=21.4 \\pm 0.4$.

  7. Three-body Final State Interaction in η→3π

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Guo, Peng; Danilkin, Igor V.; Schott, Diane; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Mathieu, V.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-09-11

    We present an unitary dispersive model for themore » $$\\eta \\to 3 \\pi$$ decay process based upon the Khuri-Treiman equations which are solved by means of the Pasquier inversion method. The description of the hadronic final-state interactions for the $$\\eta \\to 3\\pi$$ decay is essential to reproduce the available data and to understand the existing discrepancies between Dalitz plot parameters from experiment and chiral perturbation theory. Our approach incorporates substraction constants that are fixed by fitting the recent high-statistics WASA-at-COSY data for $$\\eta \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$$. Based on the parameters obtained we predict the slope parameter for the neutral channel to be $$\\alpha=-0.022\\pm 0.004$$. Through matching to next-to-leading order chiral perturbation theory we estimate the quark mass double ratio to be $$Q=21.4 \\pm 0.4$$.« less

  8. The polar 2e/12c bond in phenalenyl-azaphenalenyl hetero-dimers: Stronger stacking interaction and fascinating interlayer charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Rong-Lin; Xu, Hong-Liang; Li, Zhi-Ru

    2016-08-01

    An increasing number of chemists have focused on the two-electron/multicenter bond (2e/mc) that was first introduced to interpret the bonding mechanism of radical dimers. Herein, we report the polar two-electron/twelve center (2e/12c) bonding character in a series of phenalenyl-azaphenalenyl radical hetero-dimers. Interestingly, the bonding energy of weaker polar hetero-dimer (P-TAP) is dominated by the overlap of the two different singly occupied molecular orbital of radicals, while that of stronger polar hetero-dimer (P-HAP) is dominated by the electrostatic attraction. Results show that the difference between the electronegativity of the monomers plays a prominent role in the essential attribution of the polar 2e/12c bond. Correspondingly, a stronger stacking interaction in the hetero-dimer could be effectively achieved by increasing the difference of nitrogen atoms number between the monomers. It is worthy of note that an interesting interlayer charge transfer character is induced in the polar hetero-dimers, which is dependent on the difference between the electronegativity of the monomers. It is our expectation that the new knowledge about the bonding nature of radical hetero-dimers might provide important information for designing radical based functional materials with various applications.

  9. Unraveling Base Stacking Driving Forces in DNA.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chi H

    2016-07-01

    Base stacking is a key determinant of nucleic acid structures, but the precise origin of the thermodynamic driving force behind the stacking of nucleobases remains open. The rather mild stacking free energy measured experimentally, roughly a kcal/mol depending on the identity of the bases, is physiologically significant because while base stacking confers stability to the genome in its double helix form, the duplex also has to be unwound in order to be replicated or transcribed. A stacking free energy that is either too high or too low will over- or understabilize the genome, impacting the storage of genetic information and also its retrieval. While the molecular origin of stacking driving force has been attributed to many different sources including dispersion, electrostatics, and solvent hydrogen bonding, here we show via a systematic decomposition of the stacking free energy using large-scale computer simulations that the dominant driving force stabilizing base stacking is nonhydrophobic solvent entropy. Counteracting this is the conformational entropic penalty on the sugar-phosphate backbone against stacking, while solvent hydrogen-bonding, charge-charge interactions, and dispersive forces produce only secondary perturbations. Solvent entropic forces and DNA backbone conformational strains therefore work against each other, leading to a very mild composite stacking free energy in agreement with experiments. PMID:27045853

  10. Fifty years of stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashed, Mohamed

    2014-06-01

    Common-Mid-Point (CMP) stacking is a major process to enhance signal-to-noise ratio in seismic data. Since its appearance fifty years ago, CMP stacking has gone through different phases of prosperity and negligence within the geophysical community. During those times, CMP stacking developed from a simple process of averaging into a sophisticated process that involves complicated mathematics and state-of-the-art computation. This article summarizes the basic principles, assumptions, and violations related to the CMP stacking technique, presents a historical overview on the development stages of CMP stacking, and discusses its future potentiality.

  11. A series of Cd(II) complexes with π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions: Structural diversities by varying the ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuli; Zhang, Jinxia; Liu, Guocheng; Lin, Hongyan

    2011-02-01

    Seven new Cd(II) complexes consisting of different phenanthroline derivatives and organic acid ligands, formulated as [Cd(PIP) 2(dnba) 2] ( 1), [Cd(PIP)(ox)]·H 2O ( 2), [Cd(PIP)(1,4-bdc)(H 2O)]·4H 2O ( 3), [Cd(3-PIP) 2(H 2O) 2]·4H 2O ( 4), [Cd 2(3-PIP) 4(4,4'-bpdc)(H 2O) 2]·5H 2O ( 5), [Cd(3-PIP)(nip)(H 2O)]·H 2O ( 6), [Cd 2(TIP) 4(4,4'-bpdc)(H 2O) 2]·3H 2O ( 7) (PIP=2-phenylimidazo[4,5- f]1,10-phenanthroline, 3-PIP=2-(3-pyridyl)imidazo[4,5- f]1,10-phenanthroline, TIP=2-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5- f]1,10-phenanthroline, Hdnba=3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, H 2ox=oxalic acid, 1,4-H 2bdc=benzene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid, 4,4'-H 2bpdc=biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid, H 2nip=5-nitroisophthalic acid) have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Complexes 1 and 4 possess mononuclear structures; complexes 5 and 7 are isostructural and have dinuclear structures; complexes 2 and 3 feature 1D chain structures; complex 6 contains 1D double chain, which are further extended to a 3D supramolecular structure by π- π stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions. The N-donor ligands with extended π-system and organic acid ligands play a crucial role in the formation of the final supramolecular frameworks. Moreover, thermal properties and fluorescence of 1- 7 are also investigated.

  12. Stacking with stochastic cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspers, Fritz; Möhl, Dieter

    2004-10-01

    Accumulation of large stacks of antiprotons or ions with the aid of stochastic cooling is more delicate than cooling a constant intensity beam. Basically the difficulty stems from the fact that the optimized gain and the cooling rate are inversely proportional to the number of particles 'seen' by the cooling system. Therefore, to maintain fast stacking, the newly injected batch has to be strongly 'protected' from the Schottky noise of the stack. Vice versa the stack has to be efficiently 'shielded' against the high gain cooling system for the injected beam. In the antiproton accumulators with stacking ratios up to 105 the problem is solved by radial separation of the injection and the stack orbits in a region of large dispersion. An array of several tapered cooling systems with a matched gain profile provides a continuous particle flux towards the high-density stack core. Shielding of the different systems from each other is obtained both through the spatial separation and via the revolution frequencies (filters). In the 'old AA', where the antiproton collection and stacking was done in one single ring, the injected beam was further shielded during cooling by means of a movable shutter. The complexity of these systems is very high. For more modest stacking ratios, one might use azimuthal rather than radial separation of stack and injected beam. Schematically half of the circumference would be used to accept and cool new beam and the remainder to house the stack. Fast gating is then required between the high gain cooling of the injected beam and the low gain stack cooling. RF-gymnastics are used to merge the pre-cooled batch with the stack, to re-create free space for the next injection, and to capture the new batch. This scheme is less demanding for the storage ring lattice, but at the expense of some reduction in stacking rate. The talk reviews the 'radial' separation schemes and also gives some considerations to the 'azimuthal' schemes.

  13. Transformation from a 2D stacked layer to 3D interpenetrated framework by changing the spacer functionality: synthesis, structure, adsorption, and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Maji, Tapas Kumar; Ohba, Masaaki; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2005-12-12

    Two novel coordination polymers of Cu(II), viz. [Cu(bipy)(1,4-napdc)(H2O)2]n and {[Cu(bpe)1.5(1,4-napdc)](H2O)}n (bipy=4,4'-bipyridine; bpe=1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane; 1,4-napdc2-=1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate), have been synthesized and structurally characterized by changing only the pillar motifs. Both the compounds crystallize by slow evaporation from the ammoniacal solution of the as-synthesized solid. Framework 1 crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system, space group P2/n (No. 13), with a=11.028(19) A, b=11.16(3) A, c=7.678(13) A, beta=103.30(5) degrees, and Z=2. Framework 2 crystallizes in triclinic system, space group, P (No. 2), a=10.613(4) A, b=10.828(10) A, c=13.333(9) A, alpha=85.25(9) degrees, beta=82.59(6) degrees, gamma=60.37(5) degrees, and Z=2. The structure determination reveals that has a 2D network based on rectangular grids, where each Cu(II) is in 4+2 coordination mode. The 2D networks stacked in a staggered manner through the pi-pi interaction to form a 3D supramolecular network. In the case of, a {Cu(bpe)1.5}n ladder connected by 1,4-napdc2- results a 2D cuboidal bilayer network and each bilayer network is interlocked by two adjacent identical network (upper and lower) forming 3-fold interpenetrated 3D framework with small channel along the c-axis, which accommodates two water molecules. The TGA and XRPD measurements reveal that both the frameworks are stable after dehydration. Adsorption measurements (N2, CO2, and different solvents, like H2O, MeOH, etc.) were carried out for both frameworks. Framework shows type-II sorption profile with N2 in contrast to H2O and MeOH, which are chemisorbed in the framework. In case of, only H2O molecules can diffuse into the micropore, whereas N2, CO2, and MeOH cannot be adsorbed, as corroborated by the smaller channel aperture. The low-temperature (300-2 K) magnetic measurement of and reveals that both are weakly antiferromagnetically coupled (J=-1.85 cm-1, g=2.02; J=-0.153 cm-1, g=2.07), which is correlated

  14. Stacking Global Seismograms Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, P. M.; Buehler, J. S.; Denolle, M.; Fan, W.; Ma, Z.; Mancinelli, N. J.; Matoza, R. S.; Wang, W.; Wang, Y.; Zhan, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Over 20 years ago, stacks of global seismograms produced direct images of the global seismic wavefield highlighting the visibility, frequency content, and polarity of known seismic phases, and also identified a host of new phases associated with reflections and phase conversions from upper-mantle discontinuities. Two different stacking methods proved particularly useful: (1) STA/LTA-filtered stacks that describe the local signal-to-noise characteristics of the major seismic phases. These serve to image the entire wavefield in a uniform way for educational purposes and to show which phases are observed most clearly as a guide to future research. These stacks also resolve SH versus SV timing differences consistent with radial anisotropy. (2) Reference-phase stacks that preserve the polarity, amplitude, and timing of traces with respect to a specified target phase. These show a large number of top-side and bottom-side reflections and phase conversions from the 410- and 660-km discontinuities that create weak phases with a characteristic "railroad track" appearance both preceding and following many of the main seismic phases. Reference-phase stacking can also be used to produce coherent surface-wave stacks at very long periods, which directly show the dispersive character of the surface waves. Here we revisit and update these stacks by exploiting the vastly increased data now available from the IRIS DMC to produce greatly improved wavefield images. We present several examples of the different stacking approaches and point out their various features, including promising targets for future research.

  15. The effect of pi-stacking, h-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine-adenine, thymine-thymine and adenine-thymine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2009-09-02

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the ionized dimers of thymine and adenine, TT, AA, and AT, is presented. Adiabatic and vertical ionization energies(IEs) for monomers and dimers as well as thresholds for the appearance of the protonated species are reported and analyzed. Non-covalent interactions stronglyaffect the observed IEs. The magnitude and the nature of the effect is different for different isomers of the dimers. The computations reveal that for TT, the largestchanges in vertical IEs (0.4 eV) occur in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric pi- stacked isomers, whereas in the lowest-energy symmetric h-bonded dimer the shiftin IEs is much smaller (0.1 eV). The origin of the shift and the character of the ionized states is different in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric stacked isomers. Inthe former, the initial hole is localized on one of the fragments, and the shift is due to the electrostatic stabilization of the positive charge of the ionized fragment by thedipole moment of the neutral fragment. In the latter, the hole is delocalized, and the change in IE is proportional to the overlap of the fragments' MOs. The shifts in AAare much smaller due to a less effcient overlap and a smaller dipole moment. The ionization of the h-bonded dimers results in barrierless (or nearly barrierless) protontransfer, whereas the pi-stacked dimers relax to structures with the hole stabilized by the delocalization or electrostatic interactions.

  16. Observation of pi+ pi- pi+pi- photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisons at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV at the STAR Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Dunlop, J.; et al. STAR Collaboration

    2010-04-02

    We present a measurement of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} photonuclear production in ultraperipheral Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final states are observed at low transverse momentum and are accompanied by mutual nuclear excitation of the beam particles. The strong enhancement of the production cross section at low transverse momentum is consistent with coherent photoproduction. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} invariant mass spectrum of the coherent events exhibits a broad peak around 1540 {+-} 40 MeV/c{sup 2} with a width of 570 {+-} 60 MeV/c{sup 2}, in agreement with the photoproduction data for the {rho}{sup 0}(1700). We do not observe a corresponding peak in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final state and measure an upper limit for the ratio of the branching fractions of the {rho}{sup 0}(1700) to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} of 2.5% at 90% confidence level. The ratio of {rho}{sup 0}(1700) and {rho}{sup 0}(770) coherent production cross sections is measured to be 13.4 {+-} 0.8{sub stat.}{+-}4.4{sub syst.}%.

  17. Observation of pi+pi-pi+pi- photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV at the STAR detector

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    We present a measurement of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} photonuclear production in ultra-peripheral Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final states are observed at low transverse momentum and are accompanied by mutual nuclear excitation of the beam particles. The strong enhancement of the production cross section at low transverse momentum is consistent with coherent photoproduction. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} invariant mass spectrum of the coherent events exhibits a broad peak around 1540 {+-} 40 MeV/c{sup 2} with a width of 570 {+-} 60 MeV/c{sup 2}, in agreement with the photoproduction data for the {rho}{sup 0}(1700). We do not observe a corresponding peak in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final state and measure an upper limit for the ratio of the branching fractions of the {rho}{sup 0}(1700) to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} of 2.5% at 90% confidence level. The ratio of {rho}{sup 0}(1700) and {rho}{sup 0}(770) coherent production cross sections is measured to be 13.4 {+-} 0.8{sub stat.} {+-} 4.4{sub syst.}%.

  18. Stack gas treatment

    DOEpatents

    Reeves, Adam A.

    1977-04-12

    Hot stack gases transfer contained heat to a gravity flow of pebbles treated with a catalyst, cooled stacked gases and a sulfuric acid mist is withdrawn from the unit, and heat picked up by the pebbles is transferred to air for combustion or other process. The sulfuric acid (or sulfur, depending on the catalyst) is withdrawn in a recovery unit.

  19. Design and synthesis of organic semiconductors with strong noncovalent interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Neil Maxwell

    2008-10-01

    The development of organic molecules as active components of electronic and optoelectronic devices has seen unprecedented progress in the past decade. This attention is primarily due to the potential impact on large-area and low-cost fabrication of devices, integrated circuits, flexible displays, and in particular, organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). Organic semiconductors that pack face-to-face in the solid state are of particular interest since they are known to self-assemble into 1-D nanostructures due to strong pi-pi interactions. Engineering linear/planar molecules to pack face-to-face is challenging because the interacting forces between organic molecules are relatively weak. Three approaches were used to induce face-to-face packing in organic semiconductors: (1) several derivatives of hexaazatrinaphthylene, (HATNA), were designed which vary in their degree of hydrogen bonding, rigidity, and electron deficiency. Hydrogen bonded moieties induced strong interaction between cores that formed robust nanowires when subjected to nonpolar solvents. While no device data was measured for these materials, substituents location was found to have a profound effect on the electronic properties; (2) Inspired by S···S interactions found in tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and electrostatic interactions found in 1,2,5-thiadiazole derivatives, a hybrid of these two molecules was developed (BT-TTF-1). Short intermolecular S···S, S···N, and S···C contacts define the solid state structure of BT-TTF-1 single crystals which pi-stack along the [100]. Theoretical insight into the nature of the interactions revealed that the close contacts are electrostatic in origin rather than the result of London dispersion forces. Thermal evaporation yields a network of poorly connected crystals which significantly limits the mobility. Solvent-cast single-crystal nanowire transistors showed mobilities as large as 0.36 cm2/Vs with excellent device characteristics underscoring the

  20. Rare Nonleptonic Decays of the Omega Hyperon: Measurements of the Branching Ratios for Omega-+ --> Xi*0(1530) (anti-Xi*0(1530)) pi-+ and Omega-+ --> Xi-+ pi+- pi-+

    SciTech Connect

    Kamaev, Oleg; /IIT, Chicago

    2007-12-01

    A clean signal of 78 (24) events has been observed in the rare nonleptonic particle (antiparticle) decay modes {Omega}{sup {-+}} {yields} {Xi}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} using data collected with the HyperCP spectrometer during Fermilab's 1999 fixed-target run. We obtain B({Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = [4.32 {+-} 0.56(stat) {+-} 0.28(syst)] x 10{sup -4} and B({Omega}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 3.13 {+-} 0.71(stat) {+-} 0.20(syst) x 10{sup -4}. This is the first observation of the antiparticle mode. Our measurement for the particle mode agrees with the previous experimental result and has an order-of-magnitude better precision. We extract the contribution from the resonance decay mode {Omega}{sup {-+}} {yields} {Xi}*{sub 1530}{sup 0} ({ovr {Xi}*{sub 1530}{sup 0}}){pi}{sup {-+}} to the final state {Xi}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}. This the first actual measurement of the resonance-mode branching ratios, gives B({Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Xi}*{sub 1530}{sup 0} {pi}{sup -}) = [4.55 {+-} 2.33(stat) {+-} 0.38(syst)] x 10{sup -5}, B({Omega}{sup +} {yields} {ovr {Xi}*{sub 1530}{sup 0}}{pi}{sup +}) = [1.40 {+-} 2.83(stat) {+-} 0.12(syst)] x 10{sup -5} and disagrees with the current Particle Data Group review value, being {approx} 14 times smaller. Since the central value of the resonance-mode branching ratio is less than two standard deviations away from zero, we also calculate branching ratio upper limits at 90% confidence level: B({Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Xi}*{sub 1530}{sup 0} {pi}{sup -}) < 7.61 x 10{sup -5} and B({Omega}{sup +} {yields} {ovr {Xi}*{sub 1530}{sup 0}} {pi}{sup +}) < 5.61 x 10{sup -5}. This analysis provides new data on nonleptonic hyperon decays which allows studies of how weak interaction processes occur in the presence of strong interactions.

  1. PAM stack test utility

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-08-22

    The pamtest utility calls the normal PAM hooks using a service and username supplied on the command line. This allows an administratory to test any one of many configured PAM stacks as any existing user on the machine.

  2. D0 Vent Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J.D.; /Fermilab

    1988-01-22

    There are two nitrogen/argon exhaust headers in the D0 cryogenic piping system, one for the liquid argon dewar and another for the three argon calorimeters. These headers serve two functions, venting both nitrogen exhaust from the cooling loops and cold argon gas should any argon vessel blow a relief. These headers are vacuum jacketed until they exit the building. At that point, uninsulated exhaust stacks direct the flow into the atmosphere. This note deals with the these stacks.

  3. Study of the D0 ---> K+ K- pi+ pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Gobel, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P. /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2004-11-01

    Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, the authors present a new measurement for the Cabibbo-suppressed decay mode D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. They measure: {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.0295 {+-} 0.0011 {+-} 0.0008. An amplitude analysis has been performed in order to determine the resonant substructure of this decay mode. The dominant components are the decays D{sup 0} {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){sup +} K{sup -}, D{sup 0} {yields} K{sub 1}(1400){sup +}K{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{phi}(1020).

  4. Measurements of the branching fractions for B{sub (s)}{yields}D{sub (s)}{pi}{pi}{pi} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{pi}{pi}

    SciTech Connect

    Aaij, R.; Bauer, Th.; Beuzekom, M. van; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Coco, V.; van Eijk, D.; Farinelli, C.; Heijne, V.; Hulsbergen, W.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; van Leerdam, J.; Merk, M.; Mous, I.; Oggero, S.; Pellegrino, A.; du Pree, T.; Storaci, B.

    2011-11-01

    Branching fractions of the decays H{sub b}{yields}H{sub c}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} relative to H{sub b}{yields}H{sub c}{pi}{sup -} are presented, where H{sub b} (H{sub c}) represents B{sup 0} (D{sup +}), B{sup -} (D{sup 0}), B{sub s}{sup 0} (D{sub s}{sup +}), and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} ({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}). The measurements are performed with the LHCb detector using 35 pb{sup -1} of data collected at {radical}(s)=7 TeV. The ratios of branching fractions are measured to be [B(B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=2.38{+-}0.11{+-}0.21, [B(B{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -})]= 1.27{+-}0.06{+-}0.11, [B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=2.01{+-}0.37{+-}0.20, [B({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=1.43{+-}0.16{+-}0.13 We also report measurements of partial decay rates of these decays to excited charm hadrons. These results are of comparable or higher precision than existing measurements.

  5. Measurement of the Ratios of Branching Fractions B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi pi pi) and B(Bs -> Ds pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi)

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati /Taiwan, Inst. Phys.

    2006-10-01

    Using 355 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, they study the fully reconstructed hadronic decays B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub (s)}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub (s)}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. They present the first measurement of the ratio of branching fractions {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 1.05 {+-} 0.10(stat.) {+-} 0.22(syst.). They also update their measurement of {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) to 1.13 {+-} 0.08(stat.) {+-} 0.23(syst.) improving the statistical uncertainty by more than a factor of two. They find {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) = [3.8 {+-} 0.3(stat.) {+-} 1.3(syst.)] x 10{sup -3} and {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = [8.4 {+-} 0.8(stat.) {+-} 3.2(syst.)] x 10{sup -3}.

  6. Deconstruction and elastic {pi}{pi} scattering in Higgsless models

    SciTech Connect

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; He, Hong-Jian; Kurachi, Masafumi; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2007-02-01

    We study elastic pion-pion scattering in global linear moose models and apply the results to a variety of Higgsless models in flat and anti-de Sitter (AdS) space using the equivalence theorem. In order to connect the global moose to Higgsless models, we first introduce a block-spin transformation which corresponds, in the continuum, to the freedom to perform coordinate transformations in the Higgsless model. We show that it is possible to make an 'f-flat' deconstruction in which all of the f-constants f{sub j} of the linear moose model are identical; the phenomenologically relevant f-flat models are those in which the coupling constants of the groups at either end of the moose are small--corresponding to the global linear moose. In studying pion-pion scattering, we derive various sum rules, including one analogous to the Kawarabayashi-Suzuki-Riazuddin-Fayyazuddin (KSRF) relation, and use them in evaluating the low-energy and high-energy forms of the leading elastic partial-wave scattering amplitudes. We obtain elastic unitarity bounds as a function of the mass of the lightest KK mode and discuss their physical significance.

  7. Dalitz Plot Analysis of B- -> D+ pi- pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, : B.

    2009-01-29

    The author reports on a Dalitz plot analysis of B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} decays, based on a sample of about 383 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. They find the total branching fraction of the three-body decay: {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}) = (1.08 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -3}. the masses and widths of D*{sub 2}{sup 0} and D*{sub 0}{sup 0}, the 2{sup +} and 0{sup +} c{bar u} P-wave states decaying to D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, are measured: m{sub D*{sub 2}{sup 0}} = (2460.4 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 1.9) MeV/c{sup 2}, {Lambda}{sub D*{sub 2}{sup 0}} = (41.8 {+-} 2.5 {+-} 2.1 {+-} 2.0) MeV, m{sub D*{sub 0}{sup 0}} = (2297 {+-} 8 {+-} 5 {+-} 19) MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}{sub D*{sub 0}{sup 0}} = (273 {+-} 12 {+-} 17 {+-} 45) MeV. The stated errors reflect the statistical and systematic uncertainties, and the uncertainty related to the assumed composition of signal events and the theoretical model.

  8. Towards highly efficient red thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials by the control of intra-molecular π-π stacking interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunge; Zhang, Dongdong; Cai, Minghan; Li, Yilang; Zhang, Deqiang; Qiu, Yong; Duan, Lian

    2016-03-01

    Thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials have attracted much attention as they can achieve 100% theoretical internal quantum efficiency without using expensive noble metals. However, efficient red TADF emitters are hard to realize according to the energy gap law. Here, three donor-acceptor-donor type TADF emitters with the same acceptor of o-phthalodinitrile (PN) but different donors (9, 9-dimethyl-9, 10-dihydroacridine (DMAC), phenoxazine (PXZ), and phenothiazine (PTZ) for DMAC-PN, PXZ-PN, and PTZ-PN, respectively) have been synthesized, and it is observed that the performance of the emitters can be improved by reducing the intra-molecular π-π stacking. DMAC-PN with reduced intra-molecular π-π stacking shows a photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of 20.2% in degassed toluene solution, much higher than those of PXZ-PN, and PTZ-PN (0.8%, 0.2%, respectively). An organic light-emitting diode (OLED) employing DMAC-PN doped into 4,4‧-bis(9H-carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) as the emitting layer exhibits a maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 10.2% with the emission peak at 564 nm. Moreover, when DMAC-PN is doped into a polar host, bis[2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl] ether oxide (DPEPO), the OLED shows a large redshift of the emission maximum to 594 nm, while maintaining a peak EQE as high as 7.2%, indicating that efficient red TADF OLEDs can be fabricated by doping orange TADF emitters into hosts with proper polarity.

  9. Towards highly efficient red thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials by the control of intra-molecular π-π stacking interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunge; Zhang, Dongdong; Cai, Minghan; Li, Yilang; Zhang, Deqiang; Qiu, Yong; Duan, Lian

    2016-03-01

    Thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials have attracted much attention as they can achieve 100% theoretical internal quantum efficiency without using expensive noble metals. However, efficient red TADF emitters are hard to realize according to the energy gap law. Here, three donor-acceptor-donor type TADF emitters with the same acceptor of o-phthalodinitrile (PN) but different donors (9, 9-dimethyl-9, 10-dihydroacridine (DMAC), phenoxazine (PXZ), and phenothiazine (PTZ) for DMAC-PN, PXZ-PN, and PTZ-PN, respectively) have been synthesized, and it is observed that the performance of the emitters can be improved by reducing the intra-molecular π-π stacking. DMAC-PN with reduced intra-molecular π-π stacking shows a photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of 20.2% in degassed toluene solution, much higher than those of PXZ-PN, and PTZ-PN (0.8%, 0.2%, respectively). An organic light-emitting diode (OLED) employing DMAC-PN doped into 4,4'-bis(9H-carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) as the emitting layer exhibits a maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 10.2% with the emission peak at 564 nm. Moreover, when DMAC-PN is doped into a polar host, bis[2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl] ether oxide (DPEPO), the OLED shows a large redshift of the emission maximum to 594 nm, while maintaining a peak EQE as high as 7.2%, indicating that efficient red TADF OLEDs can be fabricated by doping orange TADF emitters into hosts with proper polarity. PMID:26821694

  10. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2004-12-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  11. Barrier RF Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-08

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  12. Barrier RF Stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver ±7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  13. Stack filter classifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Reid B; Hush, Don

    2009-01-01

    Just as linear models generalize the sample mean and weighted average, weighted order statistic models generalize the sample median and weighted median. This analogy can be continued informally to generalized additive modeels in the case of the mean, and Stack Filters in the case of the median. Both of these model classes have been extensively studied for signal and image processing but it is surprising to find that for pattern classification, their treatment has been significantly one sided. Generalized additive models are now a major tool in pattern classification and many different learning algorithms have been developed to fit model parameters to finite data. However Stack Filters remain largely confined to signal and image processing and learning algorithms for classification are yet to be seen. This paper is a step towards Stack Filter Classifiers and it shows that the approach is interesting from both a theoretical and a practical perspective.

  14. An atomic force microcopy study of the mechanical and electricalproperties of monolayer films of molecules with aromatic end groups

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liang; Park, J.Y.; Ma, H.; Jen, A.K.-Y.; Salmeron, M.

    2007-09-06

    The effect of intermolecular {pi}-{pi} stacking on the electrical and mechanical properties of monolayer films molecules containing aromatic groups was studied using atomic force microscopy. Two types of aromatic molecules, (4-mercaptophenyl) anthrylacetylene (MPAA) and (4-mercaptophenyl)-phenylacetylene (MPPA) were used as model systems with different {pi}-{pi} stacking strength. Monolayer films of these molecules on Au(111) surfaces exhibited conductivities differing by more than one order of magnitude, MPAA being the most conductive and MPPA the least conductive. The response to compressive loads by the AFM tip was also found to be very different for both molecules. In MPAA films distinct molecular conductivity changes are observed upon mechanical perturbation. This effect however was not observed on the MPPA film, where intermolecular {pi}-{pi} interactions are likely weaker.

  15. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, Edward I.

    1992-01-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter.

  16. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  17. The Search for Exotic Mesons in gamma p -> pi+pi+pi-n with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Bookwalter

    2011-12-01

    The {pi}{sub 1}(1600), a J{sup PC} = 1{sup {-+}} exotic meson has been observed by experiments using pion beams. Theorists predict that photon beams could produce gluonic hybrid mesons, of which the {pi}{sub 1}(1600) is a candidate, at enhanced levels relative to pion beams. The g12 rungroup at Jefferson Lab's CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) has recently acquired a large photoproduction dataset, using a liquid hydrogen target and tagged photons from a 5.71 GeV electron beam. A partial-wave analysis of 502K {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n events selected from the g12 dataset has been performed, and preliminary fit results show strong evidence for well-known states such as the a{sub 1}(1260), a{sub 2}(1320), and {pi}{sub 2}(1670). However, we observe no evidence for the production of the {pi}{sub 1}(1600) in either the partial-wave intensities or the relative complex phase between the 1{sup {-+}} and the 2{sup {-+}} (corresponding to the {pi}{sub 2}) partial waves.

  18. Measurement of CP Violation Parameters with a Dalitz Plot Analysis of B+- to D(pi+pi-pi0)K+-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-03-28

    We report the results of a CP violation analysis of the decay B{sup {+-}} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}}K{sup {+-}}, where D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}} indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, excluding K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. The analysis makes use of 324 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. By analyzing the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} Dalitz plot distribution and the B{sup {+-}} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}} K{sup {+-}} branching fraction and decay rate asymmetry, we calculate parameters related to the phase {gamma} of the CKM unitarity triangle. We also measure the magnitudes and phases of the components of the D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decay amplitude.

  19. Amplitude Analysis of the Decay $D_s^+ \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+$ in the Experiment E831/FOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Schilithz, Anderson Correa; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2005-01-01

    We present in this thesis the Dalitz Plot analysis of the D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decay, with the data of the E831/FOCUS, that took data in 1996 and 1997. The masses and widhts of f{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 0}(1370) are free parametres of the fit on Dalitz Plot, objectiving to study in detail these resonances. After this analysis we present the Spectator Model study on the S wave in this decay. For this study we used the formalism developed by M. Svec [2] for scattering. We present the comparison between the Isobar Model, frequently used in Dalitz Plot analysis, and this formalism.

  20. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Decay Rate Asymmetry of B to D_pi+ pi- pi0 K-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Oregon U. /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-06-10

    The authors report the observation of the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}}K{sup -}, where D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}} indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, excluding K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. This doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay chain can be used to measure the CKM phase {gamma}. Using about 229 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring, they measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup -}}) = (5.5 {+-} 1.0 (stat.) {+-} 0.7 (syst.)) x 10{sup -6} and the decay rate asymmetry A = -0.02 {+-} 0.16 (stat.) {+-} 0.03 (syst.) for the full decay chain.

  1. Search for D0--anti-D0 Mixing in the Decays D0 --> K+ pi- pi+ pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-26

    We present a search for D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing in the decays D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using 230.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. Assuming CP conservation, we measure the time-integrated mixing rate R{sub M} = (0.019{sub -0.015}{sup +0.016}(stat.) {+-} 0.002(syst.))%, and R{sub M} < 0.048% at the 95% confidence level. Using a frequentist method, we estimate that the data are consistent with no mixing at the 4.3% confidence level. We present results both with and without the assumption of CP conservation. By combining the value of R{sub M} from this analysis with that obtained from an analysis of the decays D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, we find R{sub M} = (0.020{sub -0.010}{sup +0.011})%, where the uncertainty is statistical only. We determine the upper limit R{sub M} < 0.042% at the 95% confidence level, and we find the combined data are consistent with the no-mixing hypothesis at the 2.1% confidence level.

  2. Observation of $\\Upsilon(4S) decays to$\\pi^+pi^-\\Upsilon(1S)$ and $\\pi^+pi^-\\Upsilon(1S)$

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-04-19

    The authors present the first measurement of {Upsilon}(4S) decays to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S) and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(2S) based on a sample of 230 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) mesons collected with the BABAR detector. They measure the product branching fractions {Beta}({Upsilon}(4S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S)) x {Beta}({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = (2.23 {+-} 0.25{sub stat} {+-} 0.27{sub sys}) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}({Upsilon}(4S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S)) x {Beta}({Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = (1.69 {+-} 0.26{sub stat} {+-} 0.20{sub sys}) x 10{sup -6}, from which they derive the partial widths {Lambda}({Upsilon}(4S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {Upsilon}(1S)) = (1.8 {+-} 0.4) keV and {Lambda}({Upsilon}(4S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S)) = (2.7 {+-} 0.8) keV.

  3. Gene stacking by recombinases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficient methods of stacking genes into plant genomes are needed to expedite transfer of multigenic traits into diverse crops grown in a variety of environments. Over two decades of research has identified several site-specific recombinases that carry out efficient cis and trans recombination betw...

  4. STACK GAS REHEAT EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of technical and economic evaluations of stack gas reheat (SGR) following wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) for coal-fired power plants. The evaluations were based on information from literature and a survey of FGD users, vendors, and architect/engineer ...

  5. 23. Brick coke quencher, brick stack, metal stack to right, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Brick coke quencher, brick stack, metal stack to right, coke gas pipe to left; in background, BOF building, limestone piles, Levy's Slag Dump. Looking north/northwest - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  6. Tuning of Supramolecular Architectures of l-Valine-Containing Dicyanoplatinum(II) 2,2'-Bipyridine Complexes by Metal-Metal, π-π Stacking, and Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions.

    PubMed

    Fu, Heidi Li-Ki; Po, Charlotte; He, Hexiang; Leung, Sammual Yu-Lut; Wong, Kam Sing; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2016-08-01

    A series of newly synthesized dicyanoplatinum(II) 2,2'-bipyridine complexes exhibits self-assembly properties in solution after the incorporation of the l-valine amino units appended with various hydrophobic motifs. These l-valine-derived substituents were found to have critical control over the aggregation behaviors of the complexes in the solution state. On one hand, one of the complexes was found to exhibit interesting circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) signals at low temperature due to the formation of chiral spherical aggregates in the temperature-dependent studies. On the other hand, systematic transformation from less uniform aggregates to well-defined fibrous and rod-like structures via Pt⋅⋅⋅Pt and π-π stacking interactions has also been observed in the mixed-solvent studies. These changes were monitored by UV/Vis absorption, emission, circular dichroism (CD), and CPL spectroscopies, and morphologies were studied by electron microscopy. PMID:27412571

  7. Nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, William B. (Inventor); Kontos, Karen B. (Inventor); Weir, Donald S. (Inventor); Nolcheff, Nick A. (Inventor); Gunaraj, John A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator vane having a characteristic curve that is characterized by a nonlinear sweep and a nonlinear lean is provided. The stator is in an axial fan or compressor turbomachinery stage that is comprised of a collection of vanes whose highly three-dimensional shape is selected to reduce rotor-stator and rotor-strut interaction noise while maintaining the aerodynamic and mechanical performance of the vane. The nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator vane reduces noise associated with the fan stage of turbomachinery to improve environmental compatibility.

  8. Energy Expenditure of Sport Stacking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Steven R.; Udermann, Brian E.; Reineke, David M.; Battista, Rebecca A.

    2009-01-01

    Sport stacking is an activity taught in many physical education programs. The activity, although very popular, has been studied minimally, and the energy expenditure for sport stacking is unknown. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to determine the energy expenditure of sport stacking in elementary school children and to compare that value…

  9. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  10. Thermoacoustic Refrigerator's Stack Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Fawal, Mawahib Hassan; Mohd-Ghazali, Normah; Yaacob, Mohd. Shafik; Darus, Amer Nordin

    2010-06-01

    The standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator, which uses sound generation to transfer heat, was developed rapidly during the past four decades. It was regarded as a new, promising and environmentally benign alternative to conventional compression vapor refrigerators, although it was not competitive regarding the coefficient of performance (COP) yet. Thus the aim of this paper is to enhance thermoacoustic refrigerator's stack performance through optimization. A computational optimization procedure of thermoacoustic stack design was fully developed. The procedure was designed to achieve optimal coefficient of performance based on most of the design and operating parameters. Cooling load and acoustic power governing equations were set assuming the linear thermoacoustic theory. Lagrange multipliers method was used as an optimization technique tool to solve the governing equations. Numerical analyses results of the developed design procedure are presented. The results showed that the stack design parameters are the most significant parameters for the optimal overall performance. The coefficient of performance obtained increases by about 48.8% from the published experimental optimization methods. The results are in good agreement with past established studies.