Sample records for pi-pi stacking interaction

  1. Hydrogen bond, pi-pi stacking, and van der Waals interactions investigated with density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yuan

    Weak bonds such as hydrogen bond, pi-pi stacking and van der Waals interaction are much weaker in the strength but play a more important role for the existence of various lives. For example, they are the major intermolecular interactions in the liquid and solid structure of water and determine the 3 dimensional structure of protein and DNA, which are the crucial organic molecules in lives. As a result, studying these weak bonds can lead to the better understanding of fundamental knowledge of lives. Kohn-Sham (K-S) Density Functional Theory (DFT) is an accurate and effect way to investigate the fundamental properties for many-body systems, in which, only the exchange-correlation energy as a functional of electron density need to be approximated. However, weak interaction system is still a challenge problem for KS-DFT. In this dissertation work, several standard density functionals are used to study these weak interactions in the solid state structure ice as long as nucleic bases molecules in the biologic system. It is found that the hydrogen bond can be well described by most semilocal functionals: the mismatch problem of ice Ih and AgI for GGA functional can be solved by using the higher level meta-GGA functionals and the binding length and energy between nucleic bases in DNA can be well described. However, the more accurate dispersion correction is strongly needed for van der Waals interactions and pi stacking for super-high pressure ice phases and large size biologic molecules, where van der Waals interaction takes major role. Finally, the basic structural properties of various phases of ice and DNA can be understood based on the investigation with appropriate functionals.

  2. pi-pi interaction amplitudes with chiral constraints

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Kaminski

    2000-01-01

    The pi-pi interaction amplitudes have been calculated using a three coupled channel model both with and without constraints imposed by chiral models. Roy's equations have been used to compare the amplitudes and to study the role played by chiral constraints in the pi-pi interaction.

  3. {pi}-{pi} Interactions and magnetic properties in a series of hybrid inorganic-organic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M.; Lemus-Santana, A.A. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Rodriguez-Hernandez, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales, Universidad de La Habana (Cuba); Knobel, M. [Instituto de Fisica 'Gleb Wataghin', Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Reguera, E., E-mail: edilso.reguera@gmail.com [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-01-15

    The series of hybrid inorganic-organic solids T(Im){sub 2}[Ni(CN){sub 4}] with T=Fe, Co, Ni and Im=imidazole were prepared by soft chemical routes from aqueous solutions of the involved building units: imidazole, T{sup 2+} metal and the [Ni(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} anionic block. The obtained samples were characterized from infrared and UV-vis spectroscopies, and thermogravimetric, X-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements. Anhydrous solids which crystallize with a monoclinic unit cell, in the I2/a space group with four formula units per cell (Z=4) were obtained. Their crystal structure was solved ab initio from the recorded X-ray powder patterns and then refined by the Rietveld method. The metal T is found with octahedral coordination to four N ends of CN groups and two imidazole molecules while the inner Ni atom preserves its planar coordination. The system of layers remains stacked in an ordered 3D structure through dipole-dipole and {pi}-{pi} interactions between imidazole rings from neighboring layers. In this way, a pillared structure is achieved without requiring the coordination of both nitrogen atoms from imidazole ring. The recorded magnetic data indicate the occurrence of a predominant ferromagnetic interaction at low temperature for Co and Ni but not for Fe. Such magnetic ordering is more favorable for Ni with transition temperature of 14.67 K, which was ascribed to the relatively high polarizing power for this metal. Within the considered T metals, to nickel the highest electron-withdrawing ability corresponds and this leads to an increase for the metal-ligand electron clouds overlapping and to a stronger {pi}-{pi} attractive interaction, two factors that result into a higher magnetic ordering temperature. - Graphical Abstract: Magnetic ordering through the {pi}-{pi} interaction between the imidazole rings. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid inorganic-organic solids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid inorganic-organic molecular based magnets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferromagnetic interaction through {pi}-{pi} stacking of imidazole rings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic pillars formed through {pi}-{pi} stacking.

  4. Use of. pi. p. --> pi pi. N reactions to study. pi pi. scattering in the elastic-interaction region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. A. Alekseeva; A. A. Kartamyshev; V. K. Makarin; K. N. Mukhin; O. O. Patarakin; M. M. Sulkovskaya; A. F. Sustavov; L. V. Surkova; L. A. Chernysheva

    1982-01-01

    pi pi.. scattering is investigated in the region where it can be regarded as elastic. Information is used on four different channels of a reaction of the type ..pi..p..--> pi pi..N. A single procedure is used to obtain for all the essential ..pi pi..-scattering phase shifts in the investigated region, deltaâ ° , deltaâ ² , deltaâÂ¹ , deltaâ °

  5. Conformational disorder in 4-(5,5'-dibromo-2'-chloro-4,4'-bipyridyl-2-yl)benzaldehyde: role of pi-pi and halogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Mohamed; Kadimi, Amal; Mamane, Victor; Aubert, Emmanuel

    2010-07-01

    The crystal packing of the title compound, C(17)H(9)Br(2)ClN(2)O, is governed by strong pi-pi stacking, where molecules are tightly bound within infinite (100) planes; these planes interact mainly through non-optimal pi-pi stacking where arene rings are noticeably displaced from perfect overlap, and also through halogen-halogen interactions. The aldehyde group shows conformational disorder, with a significant population difference between the two conformers; this difference is rationalized by the energetic analysis of the crystal packing using the PIXEL method, which also allows a decomposition of intermolecular interaction energy into Coulombic, polarization, dispersion and repulsion contributions. Using such an analysis, it is found that the main reason for this unequal population of the two conformers in the crystal is two hydrogen bonds that are present only for the major conformer. PMID:20603570

  6. Stabilizing the elusive ortho-quinone/copper(I) oxidation state combination through pi/pi interaction in an isolated complex.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sayak; Sarkar, Biprajit; Bubrin, Denis; Niemeyer, Mark; Zális, Stanislav; Lahiri, Goutam Kumar; Kaim, Wolfgang

    2008-11-19

    The heterodinuclear compound [(PhenQ)Cu(dppf)](BF4), PhenQ = 9,10-phenanthrenequinone and dppf = 1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene, was identified structurally and spectroscopically (NMR, IR, UV-vis) as a copper(I) complex of a completely unreduced ortho-quinone. Crystallographic and DFT calculation results suggest that this stabilization of a hitherto elusive arrangement is partially owed to intramolecular pi/pi interactions phenyl/PhenQ. Intermolecular PhenQ/PhenQ pi stacking is also observed in the crystal. According to DFT calculations, the pi interactions are responsible for the considerably distorted coordination geometry at CuI with one short and one longer Cu-O and Cu-P bond, respectively, and with bond angles at copper ranging from 99 degrees to 133 degrees. Electrochemical reduction proceeds reversibly at low temperatures to yield an EPR spectroscopically characterized semiquinone-copper(I) species. PMID:18954055

  7. Relevance of final state interactions in {eta}{sup '{yields}{eta}{pi}{pi}} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz-Cillero, J. J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN, Sezione di Bari, Via Orabona 4, I-70126 Bari (Italy)

    2011-05-23

    A study of the {eta}{sup '{yields}{eta}{pi}{pi}} Dalitz plot distribution is presented in this talk. The size of the branching ratio is properly understood within U(3) Chiral Perturbation Theory and Resonance Chiral Theory, in the framework of the 1/N{sub C} expansion. Nonetheless, unitarity effects must be incorporated in order to achieve an appropriate description of the Dalitz slope parameters. After taking the final state interactions into account, our predictions become now in agreement with the available experimental measurements, although some clear differences show up with respect to previous theoretical estimates.

  8. Test of charge conjugation invariance in the decay of the eta meson into pi(+)pi(-)pi(0)

    E-print Network

    M. Zielinski; P. Moskal

    2012-10-05

    In this work we present the preliminary results of the analysis of the pp->pp eta(->pp pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) reaction aiming to test the charge conjugation symmetry C in strong interactions. Based on approximately $10^5$ identified eta->pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) decay events we have extracted asymmetry parameters sensitive to C symmetry violation for different isospin values of the final state and we have established that all are consistent with zero within the obtained accuracy.

  9. Observation of eta_c(1S) and eta_c(2S) decays to K K-pi pi-pi0 in two-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, P.del Amo

    2011-05-20

    We study the processes {gamma}{gamma} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and {gamma}{gamma} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} using a data sample of 519.2 fb{sup -1} recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at center-of-mass energies near the {Upsilon}(nS) (n = 2, 3, 4) resonances. We observe the {eta}{sub c}(1S), {chi}{sub c0}(1P), {chi}{sub c2}(1P), and {eta}{sub c}(2S) resonances produced in two-photon interactions and decaying to K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, with significances of 18.1, 5.7, 5.2, and 5.3 standard deviations (including systematic errors), respectively. We measure the {eta}{sub c}(2S) mass and width in K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decays, m({eta}{sub c}(2S)) = 3638.5 {+-} 1.5 {+-} 0.8 MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}({eta}{sub c}(2S)) = 13.4 {+-} 4.6 {+-} 3.2 MeV, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We search for the Z(3930) resonance and find no significant signal. We also provide the two-photon width times branching fraction values for the observed resonances.

  10. Measurement of ratio R = (BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi}{pi}{pi})/BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi})) in {pi}{sup -}-Nucleus interactions at 500 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Solano Salinas, C. J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria (Peru); CINVESTAV Merida (Mexico); Paucarchuco, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria (Peru); Fernandez, A. [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico); Sheaff, M. [University of Wisconsin (United States)

    2007-10-26

    We report a very preliminary result on the measurement of the ratio of branching ratios, for two decays D{sup 0} meson, R = (BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi}{pi}{pi})/BR(D{sup 0}{yields}K{pi})), using data from the E791 experiment. We find R = 1.96{+-}0.0286 (stat){+-}0.06 (sys). This is in agreement with and of similar precision to the current PDG average value 1.97{+-}0.09.

  11. The pp -> pp pi pi pi reaction channels in the threshold region

    E-print Network

    CELSIUS-WASA Collaboration; :; C. Pauly; M. Jacewicz; I. Koch; M. Bashkanov; D. Bogoslawsky; H. Calén; F. Capellaro; H. Clement; L. Demirörs; C. Ekström; K. Fransson; L. Gustafsson; B. Höistad; G. Ivanov; E. Jiganov; T. Johansson; S. Keleta; S. Kullander; A. Kup??; A. Kuznetsov; P. Marciniewski; R. Meier; B. Morosov; W. Oelert; H. Pettersson; Y. Petukhov; A. Povtorejko; R. J. M. Y. Ruber; W. Scobel; K. Schönning; T. Skorodko; B. Shwartz; V. Sopov; J. Stepaniak; V. Tchernyshev; P. Thörngren Engblom; V. Tikhomirov; A. Turowiecki; G. J. Wagner; U. Wiedner; M. Wolke; A. Yamamoto; J. Zabierowski; J. Z?oma?czuk

    2007-01-15

    The cross section for prompt neutral and charged three pion production in pp interactions was measured at excess energies in the range 160 - 217 MeV. That comprises the first measurement of the pp->pp pi0pi0pi0 reaction and the comparison with the pp->pp pi+pi-pi0 reaction, in a very direct way. The experiment was performed above the eta meson production threshold and the cross section normalization was obtained from a concurrent measurement of the reaction pp->pp eta with the eta decaying into 3 pions. Since the same final states are selected, the measurement has a low systematical error. The measured cross section ratio sigma(pp->pp pi+pi-pi0)/sigma(pp->pp pi0\\pi0\\pi0) is compared to predictions of dominance of different isobars in the intermediate state.

  12. Role of multichannel pi pi scattering in decays of bottomia

    E-print Network

    Yurii S. Surovtsev; P. Bydzovsky; Thomas Gutsche; Robert Kaminski; Valery E. Lyubovitskij; Miroslav Nagy

    2015-02-18

    The effect of isoscalar S-wave multichannel pi pi -> pi pi, K antiK, eta eta scattering is considered in the analysis of decay data of the Upsilon-mesons. We show that when allowing for the final state interaction contribution to the decays Upsilon(mS) -> Upsilon(nS) pi pi (m>n, m=2,3, n=1,2) in our model-independent approach, we can explain the two-pion energetic spectra of these Upsilon transitions including the two-humped shape of the di-pion mass distribution in Upsilon(3S) -> Upsilon(1S) pi pi as the coupled-channel effect. It is shown also that the considered bottomia decay data do not offer new insights into the nature of the f0 mesons, which were not already deduced in our previous analyses of pseudoscalar meson scattering data.

  13. Diffractive Pion Dissociation into {pi}{sup -{pi}+{pi}-{pi}+{pi}-} at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Neubert, S. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str., D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-08-05

    At the COMPASS experiment a sample of {approx}380000 exclusive events of diffractive pion dissociation on a lead target into a {pi}{sup -{pi}+{pi}-{pi}+{pi}-} final state has been recorded in 2004. The 5{pi} invariant mass spectrum shows a momentum transfer dependent structure peaking around 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}. In the (4{pi}){sup 0} subsystem there is a clear signal for the f{sub 1}(1285) resonance decaying into 4 pions. In this note we describe the data sample and explore the physics potential of this final state.

  14. Observation of pi+pi-pi+pi- photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at sNN=200 GeV at the STAR detector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. I. Abelev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; L. S. Barnby; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; F. Benedosso; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; B. E. Bonner; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de La Barca Sánchez; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; S. U. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. de Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; M. Dephillips; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. J. Garcia-Solis; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; B. Grube; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; L.-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; R. S. Hollis; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; A. Iordanova; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; C. Jena; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; S. R. Klein; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; M. Kopytine; I. Koralt; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. Lapointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. Levine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; H. Okada; V. Okorokov; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; J. M. Rehberg; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; M. J. Russcher; R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; E. Wingfield; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. Wu; W. Xie; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I.-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu

    2010-01-01

    We present a measurement of pi+pi-pi+pi- photonuclear production in ultraperipheral Au-Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The pi+pi-pi+pi- final states are observed at low transverse momentum and are accompanied by mutual nuclear excitation of the beam particles. The strong enhancement of the production cross section at low transverse momentum is consistent with coherent photoproduction. The pi+pi-pi+pi- invariant

  15. X(3872) --> J/psi pi pi pi as a Three-Step Decay

    E-print Network

    Kunihiko Terasaki

    2014-11-27

    Rate for the X(3872) --> J/psi pi pi pi decay is studied by assuming that it proceeds as X(3872) --> J/psi omega --> J/psi pi rho --> J/psi pi pi pi. The result is compared with the X(3872) --> J/psi pi pi decay.

  16. The $e^+ e^-\\to 2(\\pi^+\\pi^-)\\pi^0$, 2(\\pi^+\\pi^-)\\eta$, $K^+ K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ and $K^+ K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-\\eta$ Cross Sections Measured with Initial-State Radiation

    E-print Network

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Graugès-Pous, E; López, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabé, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schröder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Foulkes, C; Buchanan S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Bquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Bailey, D; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L

    2007-01-01

    We study the processes $e^+ e^-\\to 2(\\pi^+\\pi^-)\\pi^0\\gamma$, $2(\\pi^+\\pi^-)\\eta\\gamma$, $K^+ K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0\\gamma$ and $K^+ K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-\\eta\\gamma$ with the hard photon radiated from the initial state. About 20000, 4300, 5500 and 375 fully reconstructed events, respectively, are selected from 232 fb$^{-1}$ of BaBar data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective $e^+ e^-$ center-of-mass energy, so that the obtained cross sections from the threshold to about 5 GeV can be compared with corresponding direct \\epem measurements, currently available only for the $\\eta\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $\\omega\\pi^+\\pi^-$ submodes of the $e^+ e^-\\to 2(\\pi^+\\pi^-)\\pi^0$ channel. Studying the structure of these events, we find contributions from a number of intermediate states, and we extract their cross sections where possible. In particular, we isolate the contribution from $e^+ e^-\\to\\omega(782)\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and study the $\\omega(1420)$ and $\\omega(1650)$ resonances. In the charmonium region, we observe ...

  17. Finite volume corrections to pi pi scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Ikuro; Bedaque, Paulo F.; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2006-01-13

    Lattice QCD studies of hadron-hadron interactions are performed by computing the energy levels of the system in a finite box. The shifts in energy levels proportional to inverse powers of the volume are related to scattering parameters in a model independent way. In addition, there are non-universal exponentially suppressed corrections that distort this relation. These terms are proportional to e-m{sub pi} L and become relevant as the chiral limit is approached. In this paper we report on a one-loop chiral perturbation theory calculation of the leading exponential corrections in the case of I=2 pi pi scattering near threshold.

  18. A coupled channel analysis of the centrally produced K+K- and pi+pi- final states in pp interactions at 450 GeV/c

    E-print Network

    The WA102 Collaboration; D. Barberis et al

    1999-07-28

    A coupled channel analysis of the centrally produced K+K- and pi+pi- final states has been performed in pp collisions at an incident beam momentum of 450 GeV/c. The pole positions and branching ratios to pipi and KK of the f0(980), f0(1370), f0(1500) and f0(1710) have been determined. A systematic study of the production properties of all the resonances observed in the pi+pi- and K+K- channels has been performed.

  19. The B -> pi pi, pi K Puzzles: Implications for Hadron Physics, New Physics and Rare Decays

    E-print Network

    Robert Fleischer

    2005-07-13

    The B-meson system is an interesting probe for the exploration of strong interactions, the quark-flavour sector of the Standard Model, and the search for new physics. In this programme, non-leptonic B decays, which are particularly challenging from the point of view of QCD, play a key role. After discussing strategies to deal with the corresponding hadronic matrix elements of four-quark operators and popular avenues for new physics to manifest itself in B decays, we focus on puzzling patterns in the B-factory data for B -> pi pi, pi K decays; we explore their implications for hadron physics, new physics and rare K and B decays.

  20. Novel nanoparticles generated by polymeric amphiphiles with pi-pi conjugated small molecules for anti-tumor drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Xu, Xianghui; Lai, Yusi; He, Bin; Gu, Zhongwei

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, the self-assembly polymeric nanoparticles are widely used for anti-tumor drug delivery. Multiple interactions such as hydrogen bonding, host-guest interaction, hydrophobic interaction and electrostatic interaction have been utilized to generate the nanoparticles. Herein, a new polymeric amphiphile with methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) as hydrophilic block and pi-pi conjugated small molecule N-(9-Fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl)-L-phenylalanines (Fmoc-Phe-OH) instead of hydrophobic polymer chain as lipophilic segment was synthesized. Anti-tumor drug doxorubicin (DOX) was trapped in the self-assembly nanoparticles via the dual hydrophobic and pi-pi stacking interactions. The synthesis and morphology of the self-assembly nanoparticles were studied. The interactions between drug and carrier, release profile, cellular uptake and in vitro anti-tumor efficiency of the drug loaded nanoparticles were investigated in details. The results showed that the amphiphiles self-assembled into spindle nanoparticles with the size around 200 nanometers. The pi-pi stacking interaction between DOX and Fmoc-Phe-OH achieved great performance for the efficient drug encapsulation. The DOX could be sustaingly released for 50 hours. The drug loaded nanoparticles were internalized in HepG2 cancer cells efficiently and exhibited good anti-tumor activity in vitro. The nanoparticles generated by mPEG-Phe-Fmoc amphiphiles provided a new strategy to fabricate polymeric nanoparticles for anti-tumor drug delivery. PMID:23926799

  1. The pi -> pi pi process in nuclei and the restoration of chiral symmetry

    E-print Network

    N. Grion; M. Bregant; P. Camerini; E. Fragiacomo; S. Piano; R. Rui; E. F. Gibson; G. Hofman; E. L. Mathie; R. Meier; M. E. Sevior; G. R. Smith; R. Tacik; for the CHAOS Collaboration

    2005-08-24

    The results of an extensive campaign of measurements of the pi -> pi pi process in the nucleon and nuclei at intermediate energies are presented. The measurements were motivated by the study of strong pi pi correlations in nuclei. The analysis relies on the composite ratio C_{pi pi}^A, which accounts for the clear effect of the nuclear medium on the (pi pi) system. The comparison of the C_{pi pi}^A distributions for the (pi pi)_{I=J=0} and (pi pi)_{I=0,J=2} systems to the model predictions indicates that the C_{pi pi}^A behavior in proximity of the 2m_pi threshold is explainable through the partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclei.

  2. Nitrogen-Doping Enables Covalent-Like pi-pi Bonding between Graphenes

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yong-Hui [Georgetown University; Huang, Jingsong [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Kertesz, Prof. Miklos [Georgetown University

    2015-01-01

    The neighboring layers in bi-layer (and few-layer) graphenes of both AA and AB stacking motifs are known to be separated at a distance corresponding to van der Waals (vdW) interactions. In this Letter, we present for the first time a new aspect of graphene chemistry in terms of a special chemical bonding between the giant graphene molecules . Through rigorous theoretical calculations, we demonstrate that the N-doped graphenes (NGPs) with various doping levels can form an unusual two-dimensional (2D) pi pi bonding in bi-layer NGPs bringing the neighboring NGPs to significantly reduced interlayer separations. The interlayer binding energies can be enhanced by up to 50% compared to the pristine graphene bi-layers that are characterized by only vdW interactions. Such an unusual chemical bonding arises from the pi pi overlap across the vdW gap while the individual layers maintain their in-plane pi-conjugation and are accordingly planar. The existence of the resulting interlayer covalent-like bonding is corroborated by electronic structure calculations and crystal orbital overlap population (COOP) analyses. In NGP-based graphite with the optimal doping level, the NGP layers are uniformly stacked and the 3D bulk exhibits metallic characteristics both in the in-plane and along the stacking directions.

  3. Dispersion relations with crossing symmetry for {pi}{pi} D- and F-wave amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, R. [Department of Theoretical Physics Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 31-342, Krakow (Poland)

    2011-04-01

    A set of once subtracted dispersion relations with imposed crossing symmetry condition for the {pi}{pi} D- and F-wave amplitudes is derived and analyzed. An example of numerical calculations in the effective two-pion mass range from the threshold to 1.1 GeV is presented. It is shown that these new dispersion relations impose quite strong constraints on the analyzed {pi}{pi} interactions and are very useful tools to test the {pi}{pi} amplitudes. One of the goals of this work is to provide a complete set of equations required for easy use. Full analytical expressions are presented. Along with the well-known dispersion relations successful in testing the {pi}{pi} S- and P-wave amplitudes, those presented here for the D and F waves give a complete set of tools for analyses of the {pi}{pi} interactions.

  4. A study of the $\\eta\\pi\\pi$ channel produced in central p p interactions at 450 GeV/c

    E-print Network

    Barberis, D

    2000-01-01

    The reaction pp -> pf (eta pi pi) ps has been studied at 450 GeV/c. There is clear evidence for an a2(1320)pi decay mode of the eta2(1645) and eta2(1870). In addition, there is evidence for an a0(980)pi$ decay mode of both resonances and an f2(1270)eta decay mode of the eta2(1870). No evidence is found for a JPC = 2++ a2(1320)pi wave.

  5. Hadron-Hadron Interactions from $N_f=2+1+1$ Lattice QCD: isospin-2 $\\pi\\pi$ scattering length

    E-print Network

    Helmes, C; Knippschild, B; Liu, C; Liu, J; Liu, L; Urbach, C; Ueding, M; Wang, Z; Werner, M

    2015-01-01

    We present results for the $I=2$ $\\pi\\pi$ scattering length using $N_f=2+1+1$ twisted mass lattice QCD for three values of the lattice spacing and a range of pion mass values. Due to the use of Laplacian Heaviside smearing our statistical errors are reduced compared to previous lattice studies. A detailed investigation of systematic effects such as discretisation effects, volume effects, and pollution of excited and thermal states is performed. After extrapolation to the physical point using chiral perturbation theory at NLO we obtain $M_\\pi a_0=-0.0442(2)_\\mathrm{stat}(^{+4}_{-0})_\\mathrm{sys}$.

  6. Dynamical coupled-channels study of {pi}N {right arrow} {pi pi}N reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Kamano, H.; Julia-Diaz, B.; Lee, T.-S. H.; Matsuyama, A.; Sato, T.; Physics; Jefferson Lab.; Univ. of Barcelona; Shizuoka Univ.; Osaka Univ.

    2009-02-24

    As a step toward performing a complete coupled-channels analysis of the world data of {pi}N,{gamma}*N {yields} {pi}N,{eta}N,{pi}{pi}N reactions, the {pi}N {yields} {pi}{pi}N reactions are investigated starting with the dynamical coupled-channels model developed in Phys. Rev. C 76, 065201 (2007). The channels included are {pi}N,{eta}N, and {pi}{pi}N which has {pi}{Delta},{rho}N, and {sigma}N resonant components. The nonresonant amplitudes are generated from solving a set of coupled-channels equations with the meson-baryon potentials defined by effective Lagrangians. The resonant amplitudes are generated from 16 bare excited nucleon (N*) states that are dressed by the nonresonant interactions as constrained by the unitarity condition. The data of total cross sections and {pi}N and {pi}{pi} invariant mass distributions of {pi} + p {yields} {pi} + {pi} + n, {pi} + {pi}0p and {pi} - p {yields} {pi} + {pi} - n, {pi} - {pi}0p,{pi}0{pi}0n reactions from threshold to the invariant mass W = 2 GeV can be described to a very large extent. We show the importance of the coupled-channels effects and the strong interference among the contributions from the {pi}{Delta},{sigma}N, and {rho}N channels. The large interference between the resonant and nonresonant amplitudes is also demonstrated. Possible future developments are discussed.

  7. Measurements of the Branching fractions for $B_{(s)} \\\\to D_{(s)}\\\\pi\\\\pi\\\\pi$ and $\\\\Lambda_b^0 \\\\to \\\\Lambda_c^+\\\\pi\\\\pi\\\\pi$

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Aaij; B Adeva; M Adinolfi; C Adrover; A Affolder; Z Ajaltouni; J Albrecht; F Alessio; M Alexander; G Alkhazov; P Alvarez Cartelle; A A Alves; S Amato; Y Amhis; J Anderson; R B Appleby; O Aquines Gutierrez; F Archilli; L Arrabito; A Artamonov; M Artuso; E Aslanides; G Auriemma; S Bachmann; J J Back; D S Bailey; V Balagura; W Baldini; R J Barlow; C Barschel; S Barsuk; W Barter; A Bates; C Bauer; Th Bauer; A Bay; I Bediaga; K Belous; I Belyaev; E Ben-Haim; M Benayoun; G Bencivenni; S Benson; J Benton; R Bernet; M-O Bettler; M van Beuzekom; A Bien; S Bifani; A Bizzeti; P M Bjørnstad; T Blake; F Blanc; C Blanks; J Blouw; S Blusk; A Bobrov; V Bocci; A Bondar; N Bondar; W Bonivento; S Borghi; A Borgia; T J V Bowcock; C Bozzi; T Brambach; J van den Brand; J Bressieux; D Brett; S Brisbane; M Britsch; T Britton; N H Brook; H Brown; A Büchler-Germann; I Burducea; A Bursche; J Buytaert; S Cadeddu; J M Caicedo Carvajal; O Callot; M Calvi; M Calvo Gomez; A Camboni; P Campana; A Carbone; G Carboni; R Cardinale; A Cardini; L Carson; K Carvalho Akiba; G Casse; M Cattaneo; M Charles; Ph Charpentier; N Chiapolini; K Ciba; X Cid Vidal; G Ciezarek; P E L Clarke; M Clemencic; H V Cliff; J Closier; C Coca; V Coco; J Cogan; P Collins; F Constantin; G Conti; A Contu; A Cook; M Coombes; G Corti; G A Cowan; R Currie; B D'Almagne; C D'Ambrosio; P David; I De Bonis; S De Capua; M De Cian; F De Lorenzi; J M De Miranda; L De Paula; P De Simone; D Decamp; M Deckenhoff; H Degaudenzi; M Deissenroth; L Del Buono; C Deplano; O Deschamps; F Dettori; J Dickens; H Dijkstra; P Diniz Batista; S Donleavy; A Dosil Suárez; D Dossett; A Dovbnya; F Dupertuis; R Dzhelyadin; C Eames; S Easo; U Egede; V Egorychev; S Eidelman; D van Eijk; F Eisele; S Eisenhardt; R Ekelhof; L Eklund; Ch Elsasser; D G d'Enterria; D Esperante Pereira; L Estéve; A Falabella; E Fanchini; C Färber; G Fardell; C Farinelli; S Farry; V Fave; V Fernandez Albor; M Ferro-Luzzi; S Filippov; C Fitzpatrick; M Fontana; F Fontanelli; R Forty; M Frank; C Frei; M Frosini; S Furcas; A Gallas Torreira; D Galli; M Gandelman; P Gandini; Y Gao; J-C Garnier; J Garofoli; J Garra Tico; L Garrido; C Gaspar; N Gauvin; M Gersabeck; T Gershon; Ph Ghez; V Gibson; V V Gligorov; C Göbel; D Golubkov; A Golutvin; A Gomes; H Gordon; M Grabalosa Gándara; R Graciani Diaz; L A Granado Cardoso; E Graugés; G Graziani; A Grecu; S Gregson; B Gui; E Gushchin; Yu Guz; T Gys; G Haefeli; C Haen; S C Haines; T Hampson; S Hansmann-Menzemer; R Harji; N Harnew; J Harrison; P F Harrison; J He; V Heijne; K Hennessy; P Henrard; J A Hernando Morata; E van Herwijnen; E Hicks; W Hofmann; K Holubyev; P Hopchev; W Hulsbergen; P Hunt; T Huse; R S Huston; D Hutchcroft; D Hynds; V Iakovenko; P Ilten; J Imong; R Jacobsson; A Jaeger; M Jahjah Hussein; E Jans; F Jansen; P Jaton; B Jean-Marie; F Jing; M John; D Johnson; C R Jones; B Jost; S Kandybei; M Karacson; T M Karbach; J Keaveney; U Kerzel; T Ketel; A Keune; B Khanji; Y M Kim; M Knecht; S Koblitz; P Koppenburg; A Kozlinskiy; L Kravchuk; K Kreplin; M Kreps; G Krocker; P Krokovny; F Kruse; K Kruzelecki; M Kucharczyk; S Kukulak; R Kumar; T Kvaratskheliya; V N La Thi; D Lacarrere; G Lafferty; A Lai; D Lambert; R W Lambert; E Lanciotti; G Lanfranchi; C Langenbruch; T Latham; R Le Gac; J van Leerdam; J-P Lees; R Lefévre; A Leflat; J Lefrançois; O Leroy; T Lesiak; L Li; L Li Gioi; M Lieng; M Liles; R Lindner; C Linn; B Liu; G Liu; J H Lopes; E Lopez Asamar; N Lopez-March; J Luisier; F Machefert; I V Machikhiliyan; F Maciuc; O Maev; J Magnin; S Malde; R M D Mamunur; G Manca; G Mancinelli; N Mangiafave; U Marconi; R Märki; J Marks; G Martellotti; A Martens; L Martin; A Martín Sánchez; D Martinez Santos; A Massafferri; Z Mathe; C Matteuzzi; M Matveev; E Maurice; B Maynard; A Mazurov; G McGregor; R McNulty; C Mclean; M Meissner; M Merk; J Merkel; R Messi; S Miglioranzi; D A Milanes; M-N Minard; S Monteil; D Moran; P Morawski; I Mous; F Muheim; K Müller; R Muresan; B Muryn; M Musy; J Mylroie-Smith; P Naik; T Nakada; R Nandakumar; J Nardulli; I Nasteva; M Nedos; M Needham; N Neufeld; C Nguyen-Mau; M Nicol; S Nies; V Niess; N Nikitin; A Oblakowska-Mucha; V Obraztsov; S Oggero; S Ogilvy; O Okhrimenko; R Oldeman; M Orlandea; J M Otalora Goicochea; P Owen; B Pal; J Palacios; M Palutan; J Panman; A Papanestis; M Pappagallo; C Parkes; C J Parkinson; G Passaleva; G D Patel; M Patel; S K Paterson; G N Patrick; C Patrignani; C Pavel-Nicorescu; A Pazos Alvarez; A Pellegrino; G Penso; M Pepe Altarelli; S Perazzini; D L Perego; E Perez Trigo; A Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo; P Perret; M Perrin-Terrin; G Pessina; A Petrella; A Petrolini; B Pie Valls; B Pietrzyk; T Pilar; D Pinci; R Plackett; S Playfer; M Plo Casasus; G Polok; A Poluektov; E Polycarpo; D Popov; B Popovici; C Potterat; A Powell; T du Pree; J Prisciandaro; V Pugatch; A Puig Navarro; W Qian; J H Rademacker; B Rakotomiaramanana; M S Rangel; I Raniuk; G Raven; S Redford

    2011-01-01

    Branching fractions of the decays $H_b\\\\to H_c\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ relative to $H_b\\\\to H_c\\\\pi^-$ are presented, where $H_b$ ($H_c$) represents $\\\\overline{B^0}$ ($D^+$), $B^-$ ($D^0$), $\\\\overline{B_s^0}$ ($D_s^+$) and $\\\\Lambda_b^0$ ($\\\\Lambda_c^+$). The measurements are performed with the LHCb detector using 35~${\\\\rm pb^{-1}}$ of data collected at $\\\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV. The ratios of branching fractions are measured to be \\\\begin{eqnarray*} {{\\\\cal{B}}(\\\\overline{B^0}\\\\to D^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-)\\\\over{\\\\cal{B}}(\\\\overline{B^0}\\\\to D^+\\\\pi^-)} = 2.38\\\\pm0.11\\\\pm0.21 \\\

  8. First observation of decay $B_c^+\\\\to J\\/\\\\psi \\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+$

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Aaij; C Abellan Beteta; B Adeva; M Adinolfi; C Adrover; A Affolder; Z Ajaltouni; J Albrecht; F Alessio; M Alexander; S Ali; G Alkhazov; P Alvarez Cartelle; A A Alves Jr; S Amato; Y Amhis; J Anderson; R B Appleby; O Aquines Gutierrez; F Archilli; A Artamonov; M Artuso; E Aslanides; G Auriemma; S Bachmann; J J Back; V Balagura; W Baldini; R J Barlow; C Barschel; S Barsuk; W Barter; A Bates; C Bauer; Th Bauer; A Bay; I Bediaga; S Belogurov; K Belous; I Belyaev; E Ben-Haim; M Benayoun; G Bencivenni; S Benson; J Benton; R Bernet; M-O Bettler; M van Beuzekom; A Bien; S Bifani; T Bird; A Bizzeti; P M Bjørnstad; T Blake; F Blanc; C Blanks; J Blouw; S Blusk; A Bobrov; V Bocci; A Bondar; N Bondar; W Bonivento; S Borghi; A Borgia; T J V Bowcock; C Bozzi; T Brambach; J van den Brand; J Bressieux; D Brett; M Britsch; T Britton; N H Brook; H Brown; A Büchler-Germann; I Burducea; A Bursche; J Buytaert; S Cadeddu; O Callot; M Calvi; M Calvo Gomez; A Camboni; P Campana; A Carbone; G Carboni; R Cardinale; A Cardini; L Carson; K Carvalho Akiba; G Casse; M Cattaneo; Ch Cauet; M Charles; Ph Charpentier; N Chiapolini; K Ciba; X Cid Vidal; G Ciezarek; P E L Clarke; M Clemencic; H V Cliff; J Closier; C Coca; V Coco; J Cogan; P Collins; A Comerma-Montells; A Contu; A Cook; M Coombes; G Corti; B Couturier; G A Cowan; R Currie; C D'Ambrosio; P David; I De Bonis; K De Bruyn; S De Capua; M De Cian; J M De Miranda; L De Paula; P De Simone; D Decamp; M Deckenhoff; H Degaudenzi; L Del Buono; C Deplano; D Derkach; O Deschamps; F Dettori; J Dickens; H Dijkstra; P Diniz Batista; F Domingo Bonal; S Donleavy; F Dordei; A Dosil Suárez; D Dossett; A Dovbnya; F Dupertuis; R Dzhelyadin; A Dziurda; S Easo; U Egede; V Egorychev; S Eidelman; D van Eijk; F Eisele; S Eisenhardt; R Ekelhof; L Eklund; Ch Elsasser; D Elsby; D Esperante Pereira; A Falabella; C Färber; G Fardell; C Farinelli; S Farry; V Fave; V Fernandez Albor; M Ferro-Luzzi; S Filippov; C Fitzpatrick; M Fontana; F Fontanelli; R Forty; O Francisco; M Frank; C Frei; M Frosini; S Furcas; A Gallas Torreira; D Galli; M Gandelman; P Gandini; Y Gao; J-C Garnier; J Garofoli; J Garra Tico; L Garrido; D Gascon; C Gaspar; R Gauld; N Gauvin; M Gersabeck; T Gershon; Ph Ghez; V Gibson; V V Gligorov; C Göbel; D Golubkov; A Golutvin; A Gomes; H Gordon; M Grabalosa Gándara; R Graciani Diaz; L A Granado Cardoso; E Graugés; G Graziani; A Grecu; E Greening; S Gregson; B Gui; E Gushchin; Yu Guz; T Gys; C Hadjivasiliou; G Haefeli; C Haen; S C Haines; T Hampson; S Hansmann-Menzemer; R Harji; N Harnew; J Harrison; P F Harrison; T Hartmann; J He; V Heijne; K Hennessy; P Henrard; J A Hernando Morata; E van Herwijnen; E Hicks; K Holubyev; P Hopchev; W Hulsbergen; P Hunt; T Huse; R S Huston; D Hutchcroft; D Hynds; V Iakovenko; P Ilten; J Imong; R Jacobsson; A Jaeger; M Jahjah Hussein; E Jans; F Jansen; P Jaton; B Jean-Marie; F Jing; M John; D Johnson; C R Jones; B Jost; M Kaballo; S Kandybei; M Karacson; T M Karbach; J Keaveney; I R Kenyon; U Kerzel; T Ketel; A Keune; B Khanji; Y M Kim; M Knecht; R F Koopman; P Koppenburg; M Korolev; A Kozlinskiy; L Kravchuk; K Kreplin; M Kreps; G Krocker; P Krokovny; F Kruse; K Kruzelecki; M Kucharczyk; V Kudryavtsev; T Kvaratskheliya; V N La Thi; D Lacarrere; G Lafferty; A Lai; D Lambert; R W Lambert; E Lanciotti; G Lanfranchi; C Langenbruch; T Latham; C Lazzeroni; R Le Gac; J van Leerdam; J-P Lees; R Lefèvre; A Leflat; J Lefrançois; O Leroy; T Lesiak; L Li; L Li Gioi; M Lieng; M Liles; R Lindner; C Linn; B Liu; G Liu; J von Loeben; J H Lopes; E Lopez Asamar; N Lopez-March; H Lu; J Luisier; F Machefert; I V Machikhiliyan; F Maciuc; O Maev; J Magnin; S Malde; R M D Mamunur; G Manca; G Mancinelli; N Mangiafave; U Marconi; R Märki; J Marks; G Martellotti; A Martens; L Martin; A Martín Sánchez; M Martinelli; D Martinez Santos; A Massafferri; Z Mathe; C Matteuzzi; M Matveev; E Maurice; B Maynard; A Mazurov; G McGregor; R McNulty; M Meissner; M Merk; J Merkel; S Miglioranzi; D A Milanes; M-N Minard; J Molina Rodriguez; S Monteil; D Moran; P Morawski; I Mous; F Muheim; K Müller; R Muresan; B Muryn; B Muster; J Mylroie-Smith; P Naik; T Nakada; R Nandakumar; I Nasteva; M Needham; N Neufeld; A D Nguyen; C Nguyen-Mau; M Nicol; V Niess; N Nikitin; T Nikodem; A Nomerotski; A Novoselov; A Oblakowska-Mucha; V Obraztsov; S Oggero; S Ogilvy; O Okhrimenko; R Oldeman; M Orlandea; J M Otalora Goicochea; P Owen; B K Pal; J Palacios; A Palano; M Palutan; J Panman; A Papanestis; M Pappagallo; C Parkes; C J Parkinson; G Passaleva; G D Patel; M Patel; S K Paterson; G N Patrick; C Patrignani; C Pavel-Nicorescu; A Pazos Alvarez; A Pellegrino; G Penso; M Pepe Altarelli; S Perazzini; D L Perego; E Perez Trigo; A Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo; P Perret; M Perrin-Terrin; G Pessina; A Petrolini; A Phan; E Picatoste Olloqui; B Pie Valls; B Pietrzyk; T Pila?; D Pinci; R Plackett; S Playfer; M Plo Casasus; G Polok; A Poluektov

    2012-01-01

    The decay $B_c^+\\\\to J\\/\\\\psi \\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+$ is observed for the first time, using 0.8 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions at $\\\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV collected by the LHCb experiment. The ratio of branching fractions ${\\\\cal B}(B_c^+\\\\to J\\/\\\\psi \\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+)\\/{\\\\cal B}(B_c^+\\\\to J\\/\\\\psi \\\\pi^+)$ is measured to be $2.41\\\\pm0.30\\\\pm0.33$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The result is in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  9. First Measurements of eta_c Decaying into K^+K^-2(pi^+pi^-) and 3(pi^+pi^-)

    E-print Network

    Ablikim, M; Ban, Y; Bian, J G; Cai, X; Chang, J F; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J C; Chen Jin; Chen Jun; Chen, M L; Chen, Y B; Chi, S P; Chu, Y P; Cui, X Z; Dai, H L; Dai, Y S; Deng, Z Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, Q F; Du, S X; Du, Z Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Fu, H Y; Gao, C S; Gao, Y N; Gong, M Y; Gong, W X; Gu, S D; Guo, Y N; Guo, Y Q; Guo, Z J; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, X; Heng, Y K; Hu, H M; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, X P; Huang, X T; Ji, X B; Jiang, C H; Jiang, X S; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jin, Y; Yi Jin; Lai, Y F; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H H; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, Q J; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X Q; Li, Y L; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Fang Liu; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, R G; Liu, Z A; Liu, Z X; Lu, F; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Luo, L X; Luo, X L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, J M; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, X B; Ma, X Y; Mao, Z P; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Nie, Z D; Olsen, S L; Peng, H P; Qi, N D; Qian, C D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, F; Shi, X; Sun, H S; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tao, N; Tian, Y R; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, J Z; Wang, K; Wang, L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S Z; Wang, W F; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Wand, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wei, C L; Wei, D H; Wu, N; Wu, Y M; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xin, B; Xu, G F; Xu, H; Xue, S T; Yan, M L; Yang, F; Yang, H X; Yang, J; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yi, L H; Yi, Z Y; Yu, C S; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, J M; Yuan, Y; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Yu; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X M; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Zahng, Yiyun; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Q; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J B; Zhao, J W; Zhao, M G; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, X J; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, L S; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, X C; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, G M; Zhou, L; Zhou, N F; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zhuang, X A; Zou, B S

    2006-01-01

    The decays of eta_c to K^+K^-2(pi^+pi^-) and 3(pi^+pi^-) are observed for the first time using a sample of 5.8X10^7 J/\\psi events collected by the BESII detector. The product branching fractions are determined to be B(J/\\psi-->gamma eta_c)*B(eta_c-->K^+K^-pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^-)=(1.21+-0.32+- 0.23)X10^{-4}$,B(J/\\psi-->gamma eta_c)*B(eta_c-->K^{*0}\\bar{K}^{*0}pi^+pi^-)= (1.29+-0.43+-0.32)X10^{-4}$, and (J/\\psi-->gamma eta_c)* B(eta_c-->pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^-)= (2.59+-0.32+-0.48)X10^{-4}. The upper limit for eta_c-->phi pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^- is also obtained as B(J/\\psi-->gamma eta_c)*B(eta_c--> phi pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^-)< 6.03 X10^{-5} at the 90% confidence level.

  10. Study of $B^{-}\\to DK^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $B^-\\to D\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays and determination of the CKM angle $\\gamma$

    E-print Network

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    We report a study of the suppressed $B^{-}\\to DK^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and favored $B^-\\to D\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays, where the neutral $D$ meson is detected through its decays to the $K^{\\mp}\\pi^{\\pm}$ and $CP$-even $K^+K^-$ and $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ final states. The measurement is carried out using a proton-proton collision data sample collected by the LHCb experiment, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$. We observe the first significant signals in the $CP$-even final states of the $D$ meson for both the suppressed $B^{-}\\to DK^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and favored $B^-\\to D\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ modes, as well as in the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed $D\\to K^+\\pi^-$ final state of the $B^-\\to D\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decay. Evidence for the ADS suppressed decay $B^{-}\\to DK^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$, with $D\\to K^+\\pi^-$, is also presented. From the observed yields in the $B^{-}\\to DK^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $B^-\\to D\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and their charge conjugate decay modes, we measure the value of the weak phase to be $\\gamma=(74^{+20}_{-18})^{\\rm o}$. Th...

  11. Search for D?-D?? mixing in D? --> K? [pi]? [pi]? [pi]? decays

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Yi, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    We present results of a search for D?-D?? mixing by analyzing D? --> K? [pi]? [pi]? [pi]? decays from events in 230.4 fb-1 e+e- data recorded by BABAR. Assuming CP conservation, we measure the time-integrated mixing rate ...

  12. Dynamical coupled-channels study of pi N --> pi pi N reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kamano, Hiroyuki; Julia Diaz, Bruno; Lee, Tsung-Shung; Matsuyama, Akihiko; Sato, Toru

    2009-01-01

    As a step toward performing a complete coupled-channels analysis of the world data of pi N, gamma^* N --> pi N, eta N, pi pi N reactions, the pi N --> pi pi N reactions are investigated starting with the dynamical coupled-channels model developed in Phys. Rev. C76, 065201 (2007). The channels included are pi N, eta N, and pi pi N which has pi Delta, rho N, and sigma N resonant components. The non-resonant amplitudes are generated from solving a set of coupled-channels equations with the meson-baryon potentials defined by effective Lagrangians. The resonant amplitudes are generated from 16 bare excited nucleon (N^*) states which are dressed by the non-resonant interactions as constrained by the unitarity condition. The available total cross section data of pi^+ p --> pi^+ pi^+ n, pi^+ pi^0 and pi^- p --> pi^+ pi^- n, pi^- pi^0 n, pi^0 pi^0 n can be reproduced to a very large extent both in magnitudes and energy-dependence. Possible improvements of the model are investigated, in p

  13. Violation of Generalized Bose-Einstein symmetry and quantum entanglement of pi(-)pi(+) isospin states in pion pair production piN->pi(-)pi(+)N

    E-print Network

    Miloslav Svec

    2007-10-30

    Generalized Bose-Einstein symmetry requires that J+I=even for two-pion angular states of spin J and total isospin I. We show that the symmetry predicts three linearly independent constraints on partial wave intensities with even spin for pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n, pi(-)p->pi(0)pi(0)n and pi(+)p->pi(+)pi(+)n. Available data violate all three constraints for S, D^0, D^U and D^N partial waves. The violations of the symmetry imply a presence of the symmetry violating contributions to transversity amplitudes in pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n and predict quantum entanglement of pi(-)pi(+) isospin states which is excluded by the symmetry. We derive approximate lower and upper bounds on entanglement amplitudes |a_S| and |a_A|. The bounds provide a clear evidence for entanglement of pi(-)pi(+) isospin states below 840 MeV and suggest the entanglement at higher dipion masses. The small values of |a_S| \\sim 0.10-0.20 below 840 MeV explain the puzzling differences between the S-wave intensities in pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n and pi(-)p->pi(0)pi(0)n and reveal a suppression of isospin I=0,2 contribution in the S-wave amplitudes in pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n. The large isospin I=1 contribution of rho^0(770) to both S- and P-wave amplitudes is due to large entanglement amplitude |a_A| \\sim 0.98-0.99. These findings confirm the predictions of a model of non-unitary dynamics of the pion creation processes arising from a CPT violating interaction of these processes with a quantum environment.

  14. First observation of the exclusive decays Lambda(+)(c)->Lambda pi(+)pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) and Lambda(+)(c)->Lambda omega pi(+)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Cronin-Hennessy; A. L. Lyon; C. S. Park; J. B. Thayer; E. H. Thorndike; T. E. Coan; Y. S. Gao; F. Liu; Y. Maravin; R. Stroynowski; M. Artuso; C. Boulahouache; S. Blusk; K. Bukin; E. Dambasuren; G. C. Moneti; H. Muramatsu; R. Nandakumar; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; A. H. Mahmood; S. E. Csorna; I. Danko; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; M. Dubrovin; S. McGee; A. Bornheim; E. Lipeles; S. P. Pappas; A. Shapiro; W. M. Sun; A. J. Weinstein; R. A. Briere; G. P. Chen; T. Ferguson; G. Tatishvili; H. Vogel; N. E. Adam; J. P. Alexander; K. Berkelman; V. Boisvert; D. G. Cassel; P. S. Drell; J. E. Duboscq; K. M. Ecklund; R. Ehrlich; R. S. Galik; L. Gibbons; B. Gittelman; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; L. Hsu; C. D. Jones; J. Kandaswamy; D. L. Kreinick; A. Magerkurth; H. Mahlke-Kruger; T. O. Meyer; N. B. Mistry; E. Nordberg; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; J. Pivarski; S. J. Richichi; D. Riley; A. J. Sadoff; H. Schwarthoff; M. R. Shepherd; J. G. Thayer; D. Urner; T. Wilksen; A. Warburton; M. Weinberger; S. B. Athar; P. Avery; L. Breva-Newell; V. Potlia; H. Stoeck; J. Yelton; K. Benslama; B. I. Eisenstein; G. D. Gollin; I. Karliner; N. Lowrey; C. Plager; C. Sedlack; M. Selen; J. J. Thaler; J. Williams; K. W. Edwards; R. Ammar; D. Besson; X. Zhao; S. Anderson; V. V. Frolov; D. T. Gong; Y. Kubota; S. Z. Li; R. Poling; A. Smith; C. J. Stepaniak; J. Urheim; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; P. Zweber; S. Ahmed; M. S. Alam; J. Ernst; L. Jian; M. Saleem; F. Wappler; K. Arms; E. Eckhart; K. K. Gan; C. Gwon; T. Hart; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; T. K. Pedlar; E. von Toerne; M. M. Zoeller; H. Severini; P. Skubic; S. A. Dytman; J. A. Mueller; S. Nam; V. Savinov; S. Chen; J. W. Hinson; J. Lee; D. H. Miller; V. Pavlunin; E. I. Shibata; I. P. J. Shipsey

    2003-01-01

    Using data collected by the CLEO III detector at CESR, we report on the first observation of the decays Lambda(c)(+)-->Lambdapi(+)pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) and Lambda(c)(+)-->Lambdaomegapi(+). The branching fractions are measured relative to the pK(-)pi(+) mode; we find B(Lambda(c)(+)-->Lambdapi(+)pi(+)pi(-)pi(0))\\/B(Lambda(c)(+)-->pK(-)pi(+))=0.36+\\/-0.09(stat)+\\/-0.09(syst) and B(Lambda(c)(+)-->Lambdaomegapi(+))\\/B(Lambda(c)(+)-->pK(-)pi(+))=0.24+\\/-0.06(stat)+\\/-0.06(syst). We also observe a small excess of events in Lambda(c)(+)-->Lambdaetapi(+), eta-->pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) from which we find B(Lambda(c)(+)-->Lambdaetapi(+))\\/B(Lambda(c)(+)-->pK(-)pi(+))=0.41+\\/-0.17+\\/-0.10 with a corresponding limit of <0.65% at

  15. Roy equation analysis of pi pi scattering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Ananthanarayan; G. Colangelo; J. Gasser; H. Leutwyler

    2000-01-01

    We analyze the Roy equations for the lowest partial waves of elastic pi pi\\u000ascattering and demonstrate that the two S-wave scattering lengths a_0^0 and\\u000aa_0^2 are the essential parameters in the low energy region: Once these are\\u000aknown, the available experimental information determines the behaviour near\\u000athreshold to within remarkably small uncertainties. An explicit numerical\\u000arepresentation for the energy

  16. Test for exotic isoscalar resonance dominating $D^0 \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$ decays

    E-print Network

    Gronau, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The decay $D^0 \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$ appears to be dominated by $\\rho \\pi$ states in a configuration of zero total isotopic spin. The spin $J$, parity $P$, and charge-conjugation eigenvalue $C$ of this final state are therefore $J^{PC} = 0^{--}$, which cannot be formed of a quark $q$ and antiquark $\\bar q$. If a resonance near $M(D^0)$ dominates the final state, it must be a {\\it hybrid} composed of a quark-antiquark pair and a constituent gluon, or a {\\it tetraquark} $q q \\bar q \\bar q$. A test for this resonance in electroproduction is proposed.

  17. Search for psi(2S)->eta(c)pi(+)pi(-)pi(0)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. K. Pedlar; D. Cronin-Hennessy; K. Y. Gao; D. T. Gong; J. Hietala; Y. Kubota; T. Klein; B. W. Lang; R. Poling; A. W. Scott; A. Smith; P. Zweber; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; J. Ernst; H. Severini; S. A. Dytman; W. Love; V. Savinov; O. Aquines; Z. Li; A. Lopez; S. Mehrabyan; H. Mendez; J. Ramirez; G. S. Huang; D. H. Miller; V. Pavlunin; B. Sanghi; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin; G. S. Adams; M. Anderson; J. P. Cummings; I. Danko; J. Napolitano; Q. He; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; E. H. Thorndike; F. Yang; T. E. Coan; Y. S. Gao; F. Liu; M. Artuso; S. Blusk; J. Butt; J. Li; N. Menaa; S. Nisar; K. Randrianarivony; R. Redjimi; R. Sia; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; K. Zhang; S. E. Csorna; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; M. Dubrovin; A. Lincoln; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; R. A. Briere; I. Brock; J. Chen; T. Ferguson; G. Tatishvili; H. Vogel; M. E. Watkins; J. L. Rosner; N. E. Adam; J. P. Alexander; K. Berkelman; D. G. Cassel; J. E. Duboscq; K. M. Ecklund; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; R. S. Galik; L. Gibbons; R. Gray; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; D. Hertz; C. D. Jones; J. Kandaswamy; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; H. Mahlke-Kruger; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; J. Pivarski; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; H. Schwarthoff; X. Shi; S. Stroiney; W. M. Sun; T. Wilksen; M. Weinberger; S. B. Athar; R. Patel; V. Potlia; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; C. Cawlfield; B. I. Eisenstein; I. Karliner; D. Kim; N. Lowrey; P. Naik; C. Sedlack; M. Selen; E. J. White; J. Wiss; M. R. Shepherd; D. Besson

    2007-01-01

    Using 5.63 pb(-1) of data accumulated at the psi(2S) resonance with the CLEO III and CLEO-c detectors corresponding to 3.08x10(6) psi(2S) decays, a search is performed for the decay psi(2S)->eta(c)pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) to test a theoretical prediction based upon the assumption that the cc pair in the psi(2S) does not annihilate directly into three gluons but rather survives before annihilating. No signal

  18. Inclusive Delta++ Production in pi+p and pp Interactions at 100 GeV\\/c and the Average Multiplicity of pi+pi- Scattering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Erwin; R. D. Kass; J. H. Klems; Winston Ko; R. L. Lander; D. E. Pellett; P. M. Yager; M. Alston-Garnjost

    1975-01-01

    Inclusive Delta++(1236) production in pi+p and pp interactions is consistent with one-pion exchange. The average charged multiplicity recoiling from the Delta++ is studied as a function of missing mass, M2, for both interactions.

  19. Search for the photoexcitation of exotic mesons in the pi+pi+pi- system.

    PubMed

    Nozar, M; Salgado, C; Weygand, D P; Guo, L; Adams, G; Li, Ji; Eugenio, P; Amaryan, M J; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Blaszczyk, L; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Casey, L; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cheng, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Crede, V; Cummings, J P; Dale, D; Dashyan, N; De Masi, R; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hardie, J; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Johnstone, J R; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kalantarians, N; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Krahn, Z; Kramer, L H; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Maccormick, M; Markov, N; Mattione, P; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Mueller, J; Munevar, E; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Anefalos Pereira, S; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Popa, I; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rubin, P D; Sabatié, F; Salamanca, J; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabian, Y G; Sharov, D; Shvedunov, N V; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Todor, L; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2009-03-13

    A search for exotic mesons in the pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-} system photoproduced by the charge exchange reaction gammap-->pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-}(n) was carried out by the CLAS Collaboration at Jefferson Lab. A tagged-photon beam with energies in the 4.8 to 5.4 GeV range, produced through bremsstrahlung from a 5.744 GeV electron beam, was incident on a liquid-hydrogen target. A partial wave analysis was performed on a sample of 83 000 events, the highest such statistics to date in this reaction at these energies. The main objective of this study was to look for the photoproduction of an exotic J;{PC}=1;{-+} resonant state in the 1 to 2 GeV mass range. Our partial wave analysis shows production of the a_{2}(1320) and the pi_{2}(1670) mesons, but no evidence for the a_{1}(1260), nor the pi_{1}(1600) exotic state at the expected levels. An upper limit of 13.5 nb is determined for the exotic pi_{1}(1600) cross section, less than 2% of the a_{2}(1320) production. PMID:19392105

  20. Search for the photo-excitation of exotic mesons in the pi+pi+pi- system

    E-print Network

    M. Nozar; C. Salgado; D. P. Weygand; L. Guo; the CLAS Collaboration

    2008-05-28

    A search for exotic mesons in the $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ system photoproduced by the charge exchange reaction $\\gamma p\\to \\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}(n)$ was carried out by the CLAS collaboration at Jefferson Lab. A tagged-photon beam with energies in the 4.8 to 5.4 GeV range, produced through bremsstrahlung from a 5.744 GeV electron beam, was incident on a liquid-hydrogen target. A Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) was performed on a sample of 83,000 events, the highest such statistics to date in this reaction at these energies. The main objective of this study was to look for the photoproduction of an exotic $J^{PC} = 1^{-+}$ resonant state in the 1 to 2 GeV mass range. Our PWA analysis, based on the isobar model, shows production of the $a_{2}(1320)$ and the $\\pi_{2}(1670)$ mesons, but no evidence for the $a_{1}(1260)$, nor the $\\pi_{1}(1600)$ exotic state at the expected levels. An upper limit of 13.5 nb is determined for the exotic $\\pi_1(1600)$ cross section, less than 2% of the $a_2(1320)$ production.

  1. Isospin Breaking in K -> Pi Pi Decays

    E-print Network

    V. Cirigliano; G. Ecker; H. Neufeld; A. Pich

    2004-01-07

    We perform a complete analysis of isospin breaking in K -> Pi Pi amplitudes in chiral perturbation theory, including both strong isospin violation and electromagnetic corrections to next-to-leading order in the low-energy expansion. The unknown chiral couplings are estimated at leading order in the 1/N_c expansion. We study the impact of isospin breaking on CP conserving amplitudes and rescattering phases. In particular, we extract the effective couplings g_8 and g_27 from a fit to K -> Pi Pi branching ratios, finding small deviations from the isospin-limit case. The ratio Re(A_0)/Re(A_2) measuring the Delta I=1/2 enhancement is found to decrese from 22.1 +/- 0.1 in the isospin limit to 20.3 +/- 0.5 in the presence of isospin breaking. We also analyse the effect of isospin violation on the CP violation parameter epsilon-prime, finding a destructive interference between three different sources of isospin violation. Within the uncertainties of large-N_c estimates for the low-energy constants, the isospin violating correction for epsilon-prime is below 15%.

  2. pi pi Phase shifts from K to 2 pi

    E-print Network

    V. Cirigliano; C. Gatti; M. Moulson; M. Palutan; for the FlaviaNet Kaon Working Group

    2008-07-31

    We update the numerical results for the s-wave pi pi scattering phase-shift difference delta_0^0 - delta_0^2 at s = m_K^2 from a previous study of isospin breaking in K to 2 pi amplitudes in chiral perturbation theory. We include recent data for the K_S to pi pi and K^+ to pi^+ pi^0 decay widths and include experimental correlations.

  3. A Fresh Look at B_{s,d} -> pi pi, pi K, K K Decays

    E-print Network

    Robert Fleischer; Robert Knegjens

    2010-12-03

    Using updated measurements and SU(3)-breaking form factors, we have a detailed look at the B_d -> pi^+ pi^-, B_s -> K^+ K^- and B_d -> pi^\\mp K^\\pm, B_s -> pi^\\pm K^\\mp systems. The corresponding decays are related to each other by the U-spin symmetry of strong interactions and offer determinations of the angle gamma of the unitarity triangle. In the former case, we obtain gamma=(68.3^{+4.8}_{-5.7}^{+5.0}_{-3.7}) deg, which is in excellent agreement with the Standard-Model fits of the unitarity triangle. The first errors correspond to experimental input uncertainties, while the latter are an estimate of U-spin-breaking effects. In view of this result, large CP-violating new-physics effects at the amplitude level are excluded. However, the effective B_s -> K^+ K^- lifetime and the mixing-induced CP violation in this channel offer interesting probes for New Physics in B^0_s-\\bar B^0_s mixing. In the case of the B_d -> \\pi^\\mp K^\\pm, B_s -> pi^\\pm K^\\mp system, using additional information from B^\\pm -> \\pi^\\pm K, we obtain a bound of gamma \\leq (71.8^{+5.4}_{-4.3}) deg, and the range 24 deg \\leq gamma \\leq 71 deg. We perform also tests of the U-spin symmetry and do not find any indication for large non-factorizable corrections.

  4. Experimental study of psi2S decays to K+K-pi+pi-pi0 final states

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Ablikim; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. G. Bian; X. Cai; H. F. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. X. Chen; J. C. Chen; Y. B. Chen; S. P. Chi; Y. P. Chu; X. Z. Cui; Y. S. Dai; L. Y. Diao; Z. Y. Deng; Q. F. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; C. D. Fu; C. S. Gao; Y. N. Gao; S. D. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. N. Guo; Y. Q. Guo; Z. J. Guo; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Y. K. Heng; H. M. Hu; T. Hu; G. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; X. B. Ji; X. S. Jiang; X. Y. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; Yi Jin; Y. F. Lai; G. Li; H. B. Li; H. H. Li; J. Li; R. Y. Li; S. M. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Y. L. Li; Y. F. Liang; H. B. Liao; B. J. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. Liu; Fang Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. P. Liu; Q. Liu; R. G. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Y. C. Lou; F. Lu; G. R. Lu; J. G. Lu; C. L. Luo; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; L. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; X. B. Ma; Z. P. Mao; X. H. Mo; J. Nie; S. L. Olsen; H. P. Peng; R. G. Ping; N. D. Qi; H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; Z. Y. Ren; G. Rong; L. Y. Shan; L. Shang; C. P. Shen; D. L. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; H. S. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. Q. Tan; X. Tang; G. L. Tong; G. S. Varner; D. Y. Wang; L. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; W. F. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; Zheng Wang; C. L. Wei; D. H. Wei; N. Wu; X. M. Xia; X. X. Xie; G. F. Xu; X. P. Xu; Y. Xu; M. L. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. X. Yang; M. H. Ye; Y. X. Ye; Z. Y. Yi; G. W. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; J. M. Yuan; Y. Yuan; S. L. Zang; Y. Zeng; Yu Zeng; B. X. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. Q. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. M. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Yiyun Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; D. X. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; M. G. Zhao; P. P. Zhao; W. R. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; H. Q. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; L. Zhou; N. F. Zhou; K. J. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Yingchun Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; B. A. Zhuang; X. A. Zhuang; B. S. Zou

    2006-01-01

    K+K-pi+pi-pi0 final states are studied using a sample of 14×106 psi(2S) decays collected with the Beijing Spectrometer (BESII) at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider. The branching fractions of psi(2S) decays to K+K-pi+pi-pi0, omegaK+K-, omegaf0(1710), K*(892)0K-pi+pi0+c.c., K*(892)+K-pi+pi-+c.c., K*(892)+K-rho0+c.c. and K*(892)0K-rho++c.c. are determined. The first two agree with previous measurements, and the last five are first measurements.

  5. Stacking interactions and DNA intercalation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dr. Shen [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Cooper, Valentino R [ORNL; Thonhauser, Prof. Timo [Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC; Lundqvist, Prof. Bengt I. [Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; Langreth, David C. [Rutgers University

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between stacking interactions and the intercalation of proflavine and ellipticine within DNA is investigated using a nonempirical van der Waals density functional for the correlation energy. Our results, employing a binary stack model, highlight fundamental, qualitative differences between base-pair base-pair interactions and that of the stacked intercalator base pair system. Most notable result is the paucity of torque which so distinctively defines the Twist of DNA. Surprisingly, this model, when combined with a constraint on the twist of the surrounding base-pair steps to match the observed unwinding of the sugar-phosphate backbone, was sufficient for explaining the experimentally observed proflavine intercalator configuration. Our extensive mapping of the potential energy surface of base-pair intercalator interactions can provide valuable information for future nonempirical studies of DNA intercalation dynamics.

  6. Photoproduction of {pi}{pi} Pairs off {sup 7}Li

    SciTech Connect

    Maghrbi, Yasser [Department of Physics, University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2011-10-21

    This paper reports on the quasi-free photoproduction of {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} and {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +/-} pairs from {sup 7}Li in view of the in-medium properties of hadrons. Measurements have been done using the CB/TAPS detector setup and the Glasgow photon tagging spectrometer for incident photon energies up to 820 MeV. At small invariant masses, an enhancement of the neutral invariant mass distributions is seen compared to the mixed charged channel and could be explained either by an in-medium modification of the {pi}{pi} interaction in the I = J = 0 channel or by effects related to the final state interactions.

  7. Search for $CP$ violation in $D^0\\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^0$ decays at LHCb

    E-print Network

    Chen, Shanzhen

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has recorded the world's largest sample of charmed meson decays. This paper presents a study of a $D^0$ meson decaying into a final state containing a neutral pion in LHCb. The search for $CP$ violation exploits a novel model-independent unbinned technique to assign a $p$-value for the no $CP$ violation hypothesis. With a data sample size exceeding that of previous measurements by almost an order of magnitude the world's best sensitivity is obtained. The $p$-value of no CP violation hypothesis given data of $D^0\\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^0$ decay analysed is found to be $(2.6 \\pm 0.5)\\times 10^-2$.

  8. The pi-pi mass spectrum in Y(4260) -> pi-pi-J/psi

    E-print Network

    D. V. Bugg

    2007-01-09

    Three ways of fitting the pi-pi mass spectrum in Y(4260) decays are studied. Data presented recently by Belle cannot be fitted by the pi-pi S-wave intensity for elastic scattering. They can be fitted by adding a rather arbitrary destructive interference with the sigma pole term. A better fit may be obtained with the decay sequence Y -> pi-H, H -> pi-J/psi, where H is a JPC=1-- c-cbar-q-qbar state peaking at 4.0 GeV with a width ~280 MeV. A third possibility, involving a triangle diagram due to Y(4260)-> DD_1(2420), D_1->D*(2007)-pi, DD*->pi-J/psi fails to fit the data. The first and second possibilities could be resolved by analysis of the Y(4260) Dalitz plot and pi-J/psi mass projection, not presently publicly available.

  9. pi-pi scattering amplitudes constrained by Roy's equations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Kaminski; L. Lesniak; B. Loiseau

    2005-01-01

    The scalar-isoscalar, scalar-isotensor and vector-isovector pi-pi amplitudes have been fitted simultaneously to experimental data and to to Roy's equations. Resulting pi-pi phase shifts up to 1600 MeV and near threshold observables have been analyzed. Only the amplitudes fitted to the \\

  10. Measurement of the Ratios of Branching Fractions B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi pi pi) and B(Bs -> Ds pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi)

    E-print Network

    CDF Collaboration

    2006-10-16

    Using 355 pb^-1 of data collected by the CDF II detector in \\ppbar collisions at sqrt{s} = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, we study the fully reconstructed hadronic decays B -> D pi and B -> D pi pi pi. We present the first measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi pi pi) = 1.05 pm 0.10 (stat) pm 0.22 (syst). We also update our measurement of B(Bs -> Ds pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi) to 1.13 pm 0.08 (stat) pm 0.23 (syst) improving the statistical uncertainty by more than a factor of two. We find B(Bs -> Ds pi) = [3.8 pm 0.3 (stat) pm 1.3 (syst)] \\times 10^{-3} and B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) = [8.4 pm 0.8 (stat) pm 3.2 (syst)] \\times 10^{-3}.

  11. Searches for CP violation and pi pi S wave in the Dalitz-plot analysis of D-0 ->pi(+)pi(-)pi(0)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Cronin-Hennessy; K. Y. Gao; D. T. Gong; J. Hietala; Y. Kubota; T. Klein; B. W. Lang; S. Z. Li; R. Poling; A. W. Scott; A. Smith; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; P. Zweber; J. Ernst; A. H. Mahmood; K. Arms; K. K. Gan; H. Severini; D. M. Asner; S. A. Dytman; W. Love; S. Mehrabyan; J. A. Mueller; V. Savinov; Z. Li; A. Lopez; H. Mendez; J. Ramirez; G. S. Huang; D. H. Miller; V. Pavlunin; B. Sanghi; I. P. J. Shipsey; G. S. Adams; M. Chasse; M. Cravey; J. P. Cummings; I. Danko; J. Napolitano; Q. He; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; E. H. Thorndike; T. E. Coan; Y. S. Gao; F. Liu; R. Stroynowski; M. Artuso; C. Boulahouache; S. Blusk; J. Butt; E. Dambasuren; O. Dorjkhaidav; J. Li; N. Menaa; R. Nandakumar; K. Randrianarivony; R. Redjimi; R. Sia; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; K. Zhang; S. E. Csorna; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; M. Dubrovin; A. Bornheim; S. P. Pappas; A. J. Weinstein; R. A. Briere; G. P. Chen; J. Chen; T. Ferguson; G. Tatishvili; H. Vogel; M. E. Watkins; J. L. Rosner; N. E. Adam; J. P. Alexander; K. Berkelman; D. G. Cassel; V. Crede; J. E. Duboscq; K. M. Ecklund; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; R. S. Galik; L. Gibbons; B. Gittelman; R. Gray; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; D. Hertz; L. Hsu; C. D. Jones; J. Kandaswamy; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; H. Mahlke-Kruger; T. O. Meyer; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; J. Pivarski; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; H. Schwarthoff; X. Shi; M. R. Shepherd; S. Stroiney; W. M. Sun; D. Urner; T. Wilksen; M. Weinberger; S. B. Athar; P. Avery; L. Breva-Newell; R. Patel; V. Potlia; H. Stoeck; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; C. Cawlfield; B. I. Eisenstein; G. D. Gollin; I. Karliner; D. Kim; N. Lowrey; P. Naik; C. Plager; C. Sedlack; M. Selen; J. Williams; J. Wiss; K. W. Edwards; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar

    2005-01-01

    In e(+)e(-) collisions recorded using the CLEO II.V detector we have studied the Cabibbo suppressed decay of D-0->pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) with the initial flavor of the D-0 tagged by the decay D*+-> D(0)pi(+). We use the Dalitz-plot analysis technique to measure the resonant substructure in this final state and observe rho pi and nonresonant contributions by fitting for their amplitudes and relative

  12. First observation of the decays $\\\\overline{B}^0 \\\\to D^+ K^- \\\\pi^+ \\\\pi^-$ and $B^- \\\\to D^0 K^- \\\\pi^+ \\\\pi^-$

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Aaij; C Abellan Beteta; B Adeva; M Adinolfi; C Adrover; A Affolder; Z Ajaltouni; J Albrecht; F Alessio; M Alexander; G Alkhazov; P Alvarez Cartelle; A A Alves; S Amato; Y Amhis; J Anderson; R B Appleby; O Aquines Gutierrez; F Archilli; L Arrabito; A Artamonov; M Artuso; E Aslanides; G Auriemma; S Bachmann; J J Back; D S Bailey; V Balagura; W Baldini; R J Barlow; C Barschel; S Barsuk; W Barter; A Bates; C Bauer; Th Bauer; A Bay; I Bediaga; S Belogurov; K Belous; I Belyaev; E Ben-Haim; M Benayoun; G Bencivenni; S Benson; J Benton; R Bernet; M-O Bettler; M van Beuzekom; A Bien; S Bifani; T Bird; A Bizzeti; P M Bjørnstad; T Blake; F Blanc; C Blanks; J Blouw; S Blusk; A Bobrov; V Bocci; A Bondar; N Bondar; W Bonivento; S Borghi; A Borgia; T J V Bowcock; C Bozzi; T Brambach; J van den Brand; J Bressieux; D Brett; M Britsch; T Britton; N H Brook; H Brown; A Büchler-Germann; I Burducea; A Bursche; J Buytaert; S Cadeddu; O Callot; M Calvi; M Calvo Gomez; A Camboni; P Campana; A Carbone; G Carboni; R Cardinale; A Cardini; L Carson; K Carvalho Akiba; G Casse; M Cattaneo; Ch Cauet; M Charles; Ph Charpentier; N Chiapolini; K Ciba; X Cid Vidal; G Ciezarek; P E L Clarke; M Clemencic; H V Cliff; J Closier; C Coca; V Coco; J Cogan; P Collins; A Comerma-Montells; F Constantin; A Contu; A Cook; M Coombes; G Corti; G A Cowan; R Currie; C D'Ambrosio; P David; I De Bonis; S De Capua; M De Cian; F De Lorenzi; J M De Miranda; L De Paula; P De Simone; D Decamp; M Deckenhoff; H Degaudenzi; L Del Buono; C Deplano; D Derkach; O Deschamps; F Dettori; J Dickens; H Dijkstra; P Diniz Batista; F Domingo Bonal; S Donleavy; F Dordei; A Dosil Suárez; D Dossett; A Dovbnya; F Dupertuis; R Dzhelyadin; A Dziurda; S Easo; U Egede; V Egorychev; S Eidelman; D van Eijk; F Eisele; S Eisenhardt; R Ekelhof; L Eklund; Ch Elsasser; D Elsby; D Esperante Pereira; L Estève; A Falabella; E Fanchini; C Färber; G Fardell; C Farinelli; S Farry; V Fave; V Fernandez Albor; M Ferro-Luzzi; S Filippov; C Fitzpatrick; M Fontana; F Fontanelli; R Forty; M Frank; C Frei; M Frosini; S Furcas; A Gallas Torreira; D Galli; M Gandelman; P Gandini; Y Gao; J-C Garnier; J Garofoli; J Garra Tico; L Garrido; D Gascon; C Gaspar; N Gauvin; M Gersabeck; T Gershon; Ph Ghez; V Gibson; V V Gligorov; C Göbel; D Golubkov; A Golutvin; A Gomes; H Gordon; M Grabalosa Gándara; R Graciani Diaz; L A Granado Cardoso; E Graugés; G Graziani; A Grecu; E Greening; S Gregson; B Gui; E Gushchin; Yu Guz; T Gys; G Haefeli; C Haen; S C Haines; T Hampson; S Hansmann-Menzemer; R Harji; N Harnew; J Harrison; P F Harrison; T Hartmann; J He; V Heijne; K Hennessy; P Henrard; J A Hernando Hernando Morata; E van Herwijnen; E Hicks; K Holubyev; P Hopchev; W Hulsbergen; P Hunt; T Huse; R S Huston; D Hutchcroft; D Hynds; V Iakovenko; P Ilten; J Imong; R Jacobsson; A Jaeger; M Jahjah Hussein; E Jans; F Jansen; P Jaton; B Jean-Marie; F Jing; M John; D Johnson; C R Jones; B Jost; M Kaballo; S Kandybei; M Karacson; T M Karbach; J Keaveney; I R Kenyon; U Kerzel; T Ketel; A Keune; B Khanji; Y M Kim; M Knecht; R Koopman; P Koppenburg; A Kozlinskiy; L Kravchuk; K Kreplin; M Kreps; G Krocker; P Krokovny; F Kruse; K Kruzelecki; M Kucharczyk; T Kvaratskheliya; V N La Thi; D Lacarrere; G Lafferty; A Lai; D Lambert; R W Lambert; E Lanciotti; G Lanfranchi; C Langenbruch; T Latham; C Lazzeroni; R Le Gac; J van Leerdam; J-P Lees; R Lefèvre; A Leflat; J Lefrançois; O Leroy; T Lesiak; L Li; L Li Gioi; M Lieng; M Liles; R Lindner; C Linn; B Liu; G Liu; J von Loeben; J H Lopes; E Lopez Asamar; N Lopez-March; H Lu; J Luisier; F Machefert; I V Machikhiliyan; F Maciuc; O Maev; J Magnin; S Malde; R M D Mamunur; G Manca; G Mancinelli; N Mangiafave; U Marconi; R Märki; J Marks; G Martellotti; A Martens; L Martin; A Martín Sánchez; D Martinez Santos; A Massafferri; Z Mathe; C Matteuzzi; M Matveev; E Maurice; B Maynard; A Mazurov; G McGregor; R McNulty; M Meissner; M Merk; J Merkel; R Messi; S Miglioranzi; D A Milanes; M-N Minard; J Molina Rodriguez; S Monteil; D Moran; P Morawski; I Mous; F Muheim; K Müller; R Muresan; B Muryn; B Muster; M Musy; J Mylroie-Smith; P Naik; T Nakada; R Nandakumar; I Nasteva; M Nedos; M Needham; N Neufeld; C Nguyen-Mau; M Nicol; V Niess; N Nikitin; A Nomerotski; A Novoselov; A Oblakowska-Mucha; V Obraztsov; S Oggero; S Ogilvy; O Okhrimenko; R Oldeman; M Orlandea; J M Otalora Goicochea; P Owen; K Pal; J Palacios; A Palano; M Palutan; J Panman; A Papanestis; M Pappagallo; C Parkes; C J Parkinson; G Passaleva; G D Patel; M Patel; S K Paterson; G N Patrick; C Patrignani; C Pavel-Nicorescu; A Pazos Alvarez; A Pellegrino; G Penso; M Pepe Altarelli; S Perazzini; D L Perego; E Perez Trigo; A Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo; P Perret; M Perrin-Terrin; G Pessina; A Petrella; A Petrolini; A Phan; E Picatoste Olloqui; B Pie Valls; B Pietrzyk; T Pila?; D Pinci; R Plackett; S Playfer; M Plo Casasus; G Polok; A Poluektov; E Polycarpo; D Popov

    2012-01-01

    First observations of the Cabibbo suppressed decays $\\\\bar{B}^0\\\\to D^+K^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ and $B^-\\\\to D^0K^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ are reported using 35~pb$^{-1}$ of data collected with the LHCb detector. Their branching fractions are measured with respect to the corresponding Cabibbo favored decays, from which we obtain ${\\\\cal{B}}(\\\\bar{B}^0\\\\to D^+K^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-)\\/{\\\\cal{B}}(\\\\bar{B}^0\\\\to D^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-)=(5.9\\\\pm1.1\\\\pm0.5)\\\\times10^{-2}$ and ${\\\\cal{B}}(B^-\\\\to D^0K^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-)\\/{\\\\cal{B}}(B^-\\\\to D^0\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-)=(9.4\\\\pm1.3\\\\pm0.9)\\\\times10^{-2}$, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The $B^-\\\\to D^0K^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ decay is

  13. Can the hybrid meta GGA and DFT-D methods describe the stacking interactions in conjugated polymers?

    PubMed

    Dkhissi, Ahmed; Ducéré, Jean Marie; Blossey, Ralf; Pouchan, Claude

    2009-06-01

    Newly developed hybrid meta density functionals and density functionals augmented by a classical London dispersion term have been systematically applied for the description of stacking energy and intermolecular distance of thiophene dimer and substituted thiophene dimer. The performance of the various approaches is compared with the benchmark ab-initio calculations done with CCSD(T) (Tsuzuki et al., JACS 2002, 124, 12200). Our results indicate that, contrary to the previous DFT methods which are not reliable, the new generation of DFT performs better the stacking interactions. These functionals, and especially those with an empirical correction, are suitable for general application in conducting polymers and, in particular, the modeling of solid state in which the overlap of Pi-Pi interactions between the conjugated chains is important. PMID:18785244

  14. Amplitude analyses of the decays chi_c1 -> eta pi+ pi- and chi_c1 -> eta' pi+ pi-

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. S. Adams; J. Napolitano; K. M. Ecklund; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; L. J. Pearson; E. H. Thorndike; S. Ricciardi; C. Thomas; M. Artuso; S. Blusk; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; L. M. Zhang; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; A. Lincoln; M. J. Smith; P. Zhou; J. Zhu; P. Naik; J. Rademacker; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; K. Randrianarivony; G. Tatishvili; R. A. Briere; H. Vogel; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. L. Rosner; J. P. Alexander; D. G. Cassel; S. Das; R. Ehrlich; L. Gibbons; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; X. Shi; W. M. Sun; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; N. Lowrey; S. Mehrabyan; M. Selen; J. Wiss; J. Libby; M. Kornicer; R. E. Mitchell; M. R. Shepherd; A. Szczepaniak; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; D. Cronin-Hennessy; J. Hietala; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; T. Xiao; L. Martin; A. Powell; G. Wilkinson; J. Y. Ge; D. H. Miller; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin

    2011-01-01

    Using a data sample of 2.59 x 10^7 psi(2S) decays obtained with the CLEO-c detector, we perform amplitude analyses of the complementary decay chains chi_c1 -> eta pi+ pi- and chi_c1 -> eta' pi+ pi-. We find evidence for a P-wave eta' pi scattering amplitude, which, if interpreted as a resonance, would have exotic J^PC = 1^-+ and parameters consistent

  15. Bioorganometallic chemistry. 8. The molecular recognition of aromatic and aliphatic amino acids and substituted aromatic and aliphatic carboxylic acid guests with supramolecular ({eta}{sup 5}-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)rhodium - nucleobase, nucleoside, and nucleotide cyclic trimer hosts via non-covalent {pi}-{pi} and hydrophobic interactions in water: Steric, electronic, and conformational parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Ogo, Seiji; Fish, R.H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-05-29

    Molecular recognition, via non-covalent processes such as hydrogen bonding, {pi}-{pi}, and hydrophobic interactions, is an important biological phenomenon for guests, such as drugs, proteins, and other important biological molecules with, for example, host DNA/RNA. We have studied a novel molecular recognition process using guests that encompass aromatic and aliphatic amino acids [L-alanine, L-glutamine (L-Gln), L-histidine, L-isoleucine(L-Ile), L-leucine(L-Leu), L-phenylalanine(L-Phe), L-proline, L-tryptophan(L-Trp), L-valine(L-Val)], substituted aromatic carboxylic acids o-, m-, p-aminobenzoic acids (G1-3), benzoic acid (G4), phenylacetic acid (G5), p-methoxyphenylacetic acid (G6), o-methyoxybenozoic acid (G9), o-nitrobenzoic acid (G10), and aliphatic carboxylic acids [cyclohexylacetic acid (G7), 1-adamantanecarboxylic acid (G8)] with supramolecular, bioorganometallic hosts, ({eta}{sup 5}-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)rhodium (Cp{sup *}Rh)-nucleobase, nucleoside, and nucleotide cyclic trimer complexes in aqueous solution at pH 7, utilizing {sup 1}H NMR, NOE, and molecular modeling techniques, and, as well, determining association constants (K{sub a}) and free energies of complexation ({Delta}{degree}G). The host-guest complexation occurs predominantly via non-covalent {pi}-{pi}, hydrophobic, and possible subtle H-bonding interactions, with steric, electronic, and molecular conformational parameters as important criteria. 8 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Effect of unitarization on the amplitudes for the decays K{sub 1}{sup 0} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}-} and K{sup +} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}+{pi}-}

    SciTech Connect

    Shabalin, E. P., E-mail: shabalin@itep.r [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2010-11-15

    The unitarization of the amplitude for the decay process K{sub 1}{sup 0} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}-} and allowance for the rescattering of final-state pions in the decay process K{sup +} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}+{pi}-} make it possible to evaluate, by using the parameters extracted from data on K {sup {yields}}2{pi} decays, the K{sup +} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}+{pi}-} decay width. The result agrees with the experimental width value at a level of a few percent. Allowance for corrections for higher order terms of the momentum expansion of the amplitude for the decay process K{sup +} {sup {yields} {pi}+{pi}+{pi}-} leads to the slope-parameter value of g{sub ++-}{sup th} = 0.2182, which agrees with its experimental counterpart, g{sub ++-}{sup exp} = 0.2154 {+-} 0.0035.

  17. K --> pi pi matrix elements from mixed action lattice QCD

    E-print Network

    Jack Laiho; Ruth S. Van de Water

    2010-11-19

    We present a new method for determining K --> pi pi matrix elements from lattice simulations that is less costly than direct simulations of K --> pi pi at physical kinematics. It improves, however, upon the traditional "indirect'' approach of constructing the K --> pi pi matrix elements using NLO SU(3) ChPT, which can lead to large higher-order chiral corrections. Using the explicit example of the Delta I =3/2 (27,1) operator to illustrate the method, we obtain a value for Re(A_2) that agrees with experiment and has a total uncertainty of ~20%. Although our simulations use domain-wall valence quarks on the MILC asqtad-improved gauge configurations, this method is more general and can be applied to calculations with any fermion formulation.

  18. Analytical {pi}{pi} scattering amplitude and the light scalars

    SciTech Connect

    Achasov, N. N. [Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Sobolev Institute for Mathematics, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kiselev, A. V. [Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Sobolev Institute for Mathematics, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-01

    In this work we construct the {pi}{pi} scattering amplitude T{sub 0}{sup 0} with regular analytical properties in the s complex plane, which describes simultaneously the data on the {pi}{pi} scattering, {phi}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}0{gamma} decay, and {pi}{pi}{yields}KK reaction. The chiral shielding of the {sigma}(600) meson and its mixing with the f{sub 0}(980) meson are also taken into account. The data agrees with the four-quark nature of the {sigma}(600) and f{sub 0}(980) mesons. The amplitude in the range -5m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}

  19. Dynamical coupled-channels study of {pi}N{yields}{pi}{pi}N reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kamano, H. [Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC), Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Julia-Diaz, B. [Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC), Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Department d'Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Lee, T.-S. H. [Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC), Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Matsuyama, A. [Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC), Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Department of Physics, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Sato, T. [Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC), Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2009-02-15

    As a step toward performing a complete coupled-channels analysis of the world data of {pi}N,{gamma}*N{yields}{pi}N,{eta}N,{pi}{pi}N reactions, the {pi}N{yields}{pi}{pi}N reactions are investigated starting with the dynamical coupled-channels model developed in Phys. Rev. C 76, 065201 (2007). The channels included are {pi}N,{eta}N, and {pi}{pi}N which has {pi}{delta},{rho}N, and {sigma}N resonant components. The nonresonant amplitudes are generated from solving a set of coupled-channels equations with the meson-baryon potentials defined by effective Lagrangians. The resonant amplitudes are generated from 16 bare excited nucleon (N*) states that are dressed by the nonresonant interactions as constrained by the unitarity condition. The data of total cross sections and {pi}N and {pi}{pi} invariant mass distributions of {pi}{sup +}p{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}n,{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}p and {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n,{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}p,{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}n reactions from threshold to the invariant mass W=2 GeV can be described to a very large extent. We show the importance of the coupled-channels effects and the strong interference among the contributions from the {pi}{delta},{sigma}N, and {rho}N channels. The large interference between the resonant and nonresonant amplitudes is also demonstrated. Possible future developments are discussed.

  20. Observation of the ${B^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\rho^0}$ decay from an amplitude analysis of ${B^0 \\to (\\pi^+\\pi^-)(\\pi^+\\pi^-)}$ decays

    E-print Network

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Proton-proton collision data recorded in 2011 and 2012 by the LHCb experiment, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$i, are analysed to search for the charmless ${B^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\rho^0}$ decay. More than 600 ${B^0 \\to (\\pi^+\\pi^-)(\\pi^+\\pi^-)}$ signal decays are selected and used to perform an amplitude analysis from which the ${B^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\rho^0}$ decay is observed for the first time with 7.1 standard deviations significance. The fraction of ${B^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\rho^0}$ decays yielding a longitudinally polarised final state is measured to be $fL = 0.745^{+0.048}_{-0.058} ({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.034 ({\\rm syst})$. The ${B^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\rho^0}$ branching fraction, using the ${B^0 \\to \\phi K^*(892)^{0}}$ decay as reference, is also reported as $\\mathcal B (B^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\rho^0) = (0.94 \\pm 0.17 ({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.09 ({\\rm syst}) \\pm 0.06 ({\\rm BF})) \\times 10^{-6}$.

  1. Localized direct CP violation in $B^\\pm\\rightarrow \\rho^0 (\\omega)\\pi^\\pm\\rightarrow \\pi^+ \\pi^-\\pi^\\pm$

    E-print Network

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Zhen-Yang; Guo, Xin-Heng

    2015-01-01

    We study the localized direct CP violation in the hadronic decays $B^\\pm\\rightarrow \\rho^0 (\\omega)\\pi^\\pm\\rightarrow\\pi^+ \\pi^-\\pi^\\pm$, including the effect caused by an interesting mechanism involving the charge symmetry violating mixing between $\\rho^0$ and $\\omega$. We calculate the localized integrated direct CP violation when the low invariant mass of $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ [$m(\\pi^+\\pi^-)_{low}$] is near $\\rho^0(770)$. For five models of form factors investigated, we find that the localized integrated direct CP violation varies from -0.0170 to -0.0860 in the ranges of parameters in our model when $0.750CP asymmetries in the regions $0.470pi^+\\pi^-)_{low}<0.770$\\,GeV and $0.770pi^+\\pi^-)_{low}<0.920$\\,GeV are positive and negative, respectively. We find that $\\rho$-$\\omeg...

  2. First Observation of Lambda_c^+arrowLambdapi^+pi^+pi^-pi^0 and Lambda_c^+arrowLambdaomegapi^+ using the CLEO III Detector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Blusk

    2003-01-01

    Using data collected by the CLEO III detector at CESR, we report on the first observation of the decays Lambda_c^+arrow Lambdapi^+pi^+pi^-pi^0 and Lambda_c^+arrow Lambdaomegapi^+. The branching fractions are measured relative to the pK^-pi^+ mode; we find B( Lambda_c^+arrow Lambdapi^+pi^+pi^-pi^0 ) \\/ B( Lambda_c^+arrow p K^-pi^+ ) = 0.36±0.09(stat.)±0.09(syst.) and B( Lambda_c^+arrow Lambdaomegapi^+ )\\/B( Lambda_c^+arrow p K^-pi^+ ) = 0.24±0.06(stat.)±0.06(syst.). We

  3. Constrain the UT angle gamma by CP violation parameters in B0 -> pi+ pi-

    E-print Network

    Qin, Qin; Lü, Cai-Dian; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the tree and penguin amplitudes in the $B^0\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decay channel employing the perturbative QCD factorization approach. Using the amplitudes as input with the theoretical uncertainties sufficiently considered, we constrain the UT angle $\\gamma$ to $51^\\circ\\leq\\gamma\\leq64^\\circ$, from the measurements of the CP violation parameters $C_{\\pi^+\\pi^-}$ and $S_{\\pi^+\\pi^-}$ in $B^0\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$. The U-spin breaking effect between $B^0\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $B_s^0\\to K^+K^-$ is estimated to be around 30\\%.

  4. Precise branching ratio measurements of the decays D0-->pi-pi+pi0 and D0-->K-K+pi0 relative to the D0-->K-pi+pi0 decay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. De Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence

    2006-01-01

    Using 232fb-1 of e+e- collision data recorded by the BABAR experiment, we measure the rates of three-body Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the D0 meson relative to the Cabibbo-favored decay, D0-->K-pi+pi0. We find: (B(D0-->pi-pi+pi0))\\/(B(D0-->K-pi+pi0))=(10.59±0.06±0.13)×10-2 and (B(D0-->K-K+pi0))\\/(B(D0-->K-pi+pi0))=(2.37±0.03±0.04)×10-2, where the errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. These measurements are significantly more precise than the current world average measurements.

  5. Search for $CP$ violation in $D^0\\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^0$ decays with the energy test

    E-print Network

    Chen, Shanzhen

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has recorded the world's largest sample of charmed meson decays. This contribution presents a study of a $D^0$ meson decaying into a final state containing a neutral pion in LHCb. The search for $CP$ violation exploits a novel model-independent unbinned technique to assign a $p$-value for the no $CP$ violation hypothesis. With a data sample size exceeding that of previous measurements by almost an order of magnitude the world's best sensitivity is obtained. The $p$-value of no $CP$ violation hypothesis given data of $D^0\\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^0$ decay analysed is found to be $(2.6 \\pm 0.5)\\times 10^{-2}$.

  6. Measurement of CP Violation Parameters with a Dalitz Plot Analysis of B±-->Dpi+pi-pi0K±

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; L. Zhang; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. S. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of a CP violation analysis of the decay B±-->Dpi+pi-pi0K±, where Dpi+pi-pi0 indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state pi+pi-pi0, excluding KS0pi0. The analysis makes use of 324×106 e+e--->BB¯ events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e+e- storage ring. Analyzing the pi+pi-pi0 Dalitz plot distribution and the B±-->Dpi+pi-pi0K± branching fraction and decay

  7. Determination of the D0-->K-pi+pi0 and D0-->K-pi+pi+pi- coherence factors and average strong-phase differences using quantum-correlated measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Lowrey; S. Mehrabyan; M. Selen; J. Wiss; R. E. Mitchell; M. R. Shepherd; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; D. Cronin-Hennessy; K. Y. Gao; J. Hietala; Y. Kubota; T. Klein; R. Poling; A. W. Scott; P. Zweber; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; B. J. Y. Tan; A. Tomaradze; J. Libby; L. Martin; N. Harnew; A. Powell; G. Wilkinson; H. Mendez; J. Y. Ge; D. H. Miller; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin; G. S. Adams; D. Hu; B. Moziak; J. Napolitano; K. M. Ecklund; Q. He; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; E. H. Thorndike; F. Yang; M. Artuso; S. Blusk; S. Khalil; J. Li; K. Randrianarivony; N. Sultana; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; L. M. Zhang; T. Gershon; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; M. Dubrovin; A. Lincoln; M. J. Smith; P. Zhou; J. Zhu; P. Naik; J. Rademacker; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; J. L. Rosner; A. N. Robichaud; G. Tatishvili; E. J. White; R. A. Briere; H. Vogel; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. P. Alexander; D. G. Cassel; J. E. Duboscq; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; L. Gibbons; R. Gray; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; D. Hertz; J. M. Hunt; J. Kandaswamy; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; J. Ledoux; H. Mahlke-Krüger; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; X. Shi; S. Stroiney; W. M. Sun; T. Wilksen; J. Yelton; P. Rubin

    2009-01-01

    The first measurements of the coherence factors (RKpipi0 and RK3pi) and the average strong-phase differences (deltaDKpipi0 and deltaDK3pi) for D0-->K-pi+pi0 and D0-->K-pi+pi+pi- are presented. These parameters can be used to improve the determination of the unitarity triangle angle gamma in B--->DK- decays, where D is a D0 or Dmacr 0 meson decaying to the same final state. The measurements are

  8. Pion Freeze-Out Time in Pb+Pb Collisions at 158 A GeV/c Studied via pi-/pi+ and K-/K+ Ratios

    E-print Network

    WA98 Collaboration

    2006-07-16

    The effect of the final state Coulomb interaction on particles produced in Pb+Pb collisions at 158 A GeV/c has been investigated in the WA98 experiment through the study of the pi-/pi+ and K-/K+ ratios measured as a function of transverse mass. While the ratio for kaons shows no significant transverse mass dependence, the pi-/pi+ ratio is enhanced at small transverse mass values with an enhancement that increases with centrality. A silicon pad detector located near the target is used to estimate the contribution of hyperon decays to the pi-/pi+ ratio. The comparison of results with predictions of the RQMD model in which the Coulomb interaction has been incorporated allows to place constraints on the time of the pion freeze-out.

  9. Analytical properties of the $\\\\pi\\\\pi$ scattering amplitude and the light scalar mesons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. N. Achasov; A. V. Kiselev

    2010-01-01

    The $\\\\pi\\\\pi$ scattering amplitude with regular analytical properties in the $s$ complex plane has been constructed. It describes simultaneously the data on the $\\\\pi\\\\pi$ scattering, $\\\\phi\\\\to\\\\pi^0\\\\pi^0\\\\gamma$ decay and $\\\\pi\\\\pi\\\\to K\\\\bar K$ reaction. The chiral shielding of the $\\\\sigma (600)$ meson and it's mixing with the $f_0(980)$ meson are taken into account also. The data agrees with the four-quark nature of

  10. The e+e--->3(pi+pi-), 2(pi+pi-pi0) and K+K-2(pi+pi-) cross sections at center-of-mass energies from production threshold to 4.5 GeV measured with initial-state radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. S. Best; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; C. T. Day; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; M. Fritsch; K. Goetzen; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; D. Del Re; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; M. Dickopp; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; R. Nogowski; S. Otto; A. Petzold; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; S. Schrenk; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; D. J. Bard; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; L. Piemontese; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. R. Gaillard; J. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; W. F. Mader; U. Mallik; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; T. C. Petersen; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; A. J. Bevan; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; F. Di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; C. L. Brown; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; M. G. Green; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; M. P. Kelly; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; D. Kovalskyi; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; S. Y. Willocq; R. Cowan; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; P. M. Patel; C. T. Potter; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. De Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; H. Bulten; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; T. Pulliam; A. M. Rahimi

    2006-01-01

    We study the processes e+e--->3(pi+pi-)gamma, 2(pi+pi-pi0)gamma and K+K-2(pi+pi-)gamma, with the photon radiated from the initial state. About 20 000, 33 000 and 4000 fully reconstructed events, respectively, have been selected from 232 fb-1 of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e+e- center-of-mass energy, so that these data can be compared with the corresponding

  11. Reconclining phi radiative decays with other data for a0(980), fo(980), pi-pi -> KK and pi-pi -> eta-eta

    E-print Network

    D. V. Bugg

    2006-08-27

    Data for phi -> gamma (eta-pizero) are analysed using the KK loop model and compared with parameters of a0(980) derived from Crystal Barrel data. The eta-pi mass spectrum agrees closely and the absolute normalisation lies just within errors. However, BES parameters for fo(980) predict a normalisation for phi -> gamma (pizero-pizero) at least a factor 2 lower than is observed. This discrepancy may be eliminated by including constructive interference between fo(980) and sigma. The magnitude required for sigma -> KK is consistent with data on pi-pi -> KK. A dispersion relation analysis by Buttiker, Descotes-Genon and Moussallam of pi-pi -> KK leads to a similar conclusion. Data on pi-pi -> eta-eta also require decays of sigma to eta-eta. Four sets of pi-pi -> KK data all require a small but definite fo(1370) signal.

  12. Study of the D0 \\to Pi Pi- Pi0 Decay at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspero, Mario; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2012-04-06

    The Dalitz-plot of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} measured by the BABAR collaboration shows the structure of a final state having quantum numbers I{sup G}J{sup PC} = 0{sup -}0{sup 2-}. An isospin analysis of this Dalitz-plot finds that the fraction of the I = 0 contribution is about 96%. This high I = 0 contribution is unexpected because the weak interaction violates the isospin.

  13. Determination of the S-wave pi pi scattering lengths from a study of K+- -> pi+- pi0 pi0 decays

    E-print Network

    NA48/2 Collaboration

    2009-12-11

    We report the results from a study of the full sample of ~ 6.031 10^7 K+- -> pi+- pi0 pi0 decays recorded by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS. As first observed in this experiment, the pi0 pi0 invariant mass M00 distribution shows a cusp-like anomaly in the region around M00 = 2m+, where m+ is the charged pion mass. This anomaly has been interpreted as an effect due mainly to the final state charge exchange scattering process pi+ pi- -> p0 p0 in K+- -> pi+- pi+ pi- decay. Fits to the M00 distribution using two different theoretical formulations provide the presently most precise determination of (a0 - a2), the difference between the pi pi S-wave scattering lengths in the isospin I=0 and I=2 states. Higher-order pi pi rescattering terms, included in the two formulations, allow also an independent, though less precise, determination of a2.

  14. Measurement of chicJ decays to 2(pi+pi-)pp¯ final states

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Ablikim; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. G. Bian; X. Cai; H. F. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. X. Chen; J. C. Chen; Y. B. Chen; S. P. Chi; Y. P. Chu; X. Z. Cui; Y. S. Dai; L. Y. Diao; Z. Y. Deng; Q. F. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; C. D. Fu; C. S. Gao; Y. N. Gao; S. D. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. N. Guo; Y. Q. Guo; Z. J. Guo; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Y. K. Heng; H. M. Hu; T. Hu; G. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; X. B. Ji; X. S. Jiang; X. Y. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; Yi Jin; Y. F. Lai; G. Li; H. B. Li; H. H. Li; J. Li; R. Y. Li; S. M. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Y. L. Li; Y. F. Liang; H. B. Liao; B. J. Liu; C. X. Liu; Fang Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. B. Liu; J. P. Liu; Q. Liu; R. G. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Y. C. Lou; F. Lu; G. R. Lu; J. G. Lu; C. L. Luo; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; L. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; X. B. Ma; Z. P. Mao; X. H. Mo; J. Nie; S. L. Olsen; H. P. Peng; R. G. Ping; N. D. Qi; H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; Z. Y. Ren; G. Rong; L. Y. Shan; L. Shang; C. P. Shen; D. L. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; H. S. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. Q. Tan; X. Tang; G. L. Tong; G. S. Varner; D. Y. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. L. Wang; W. F. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; Zheng Wang; C. L. Wei; D. H. Wei; N. Wu; X. M. Xia; X. X. Xie; G. F. Xu; X. P. Xu; Y. Xu; M. L. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. X. Yang; M. H. Ye; Y. X. Ye; Z. Y. Yi; G. W. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; J. M. Yuan; Y. Yuan; S. L. Zang; Y. Zeng; Yu Zeng; B. X. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. Q. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. M. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Yiyun Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; D. X. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; M. G. Zhao; P. P. Zhao; W. R. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; H. Q. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; L. Zhou; N. F. Zhou; K. J. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Yingchun Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; B. A. Zhuang; X. A. Zhuang; B. S. Zou

    2006-01-01

    Using chicJ-->2(pi+pi-)pp¯ decays from 14×106psi(2S) events accumulated by the BESII detector at the BEPC, the intermediate states Xi-Xi¯+, LambdaLambda¯pi+pi-, and KS0KS0pp¯ are studied, and their branching ratios or upper limits are measured.

  15. Boron- and Nitrogen-Doped Phenalenyls: Unexpected 2e/ and 4e/all-sites pi-pi Covalency and Genuine Pancake Double Bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yong-Hui [Georgetown University; Huang, Jingsong [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Phenalenyl is an important neutral pi-radical due to its capability to form unconventional pancake pi-pi bonding interactions, whereas its analogues with graphitic boron (B) or nitrogen (N)-doping have been regarded as closed-shell systems and therefore received much less attention. By using high-level quantum chemistry calculations, we show that the B- and N-doped closed-shell phenalenyls unexpectedly form open-shell singlet pi-dimers with diradicaloid character featuring 2e/all-sites double pi-pi bonding. Moreover, by proper substitutions, the doped phenalenyl derivatives can be made open-shell species that form closed shell singlet pi-dimers bound by stronger 4e/all-sites double pi-pi bonding. The covalent pi-pi bonding overlap is distributed on all of the atomic sites giving robust and genuine pancake-shaped pi-dimers which, depending on the number of electrons available in the bonding interactions, are equally or more stable than the pi-dimers of the pristine phenalenyl.

  16. Observation of anomalous upsilon(1S)pi+pi(-) and upsilon(2S)pi+pi(-) production near the upsilon(5S) resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, K-F; Hou, W-S; Shapkin, M; Sokolov, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Bay, A; Belous, K; Bhardwaj, V; Bitenc, U; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, W T; Chistov, R; Choi, Y; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Gabyshev, N; Golob, B; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Hoshi, Y; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Kah, D H; Kang, J H; Kapusta, P; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kichimi, H; Kim, H O; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kwon, Y-J; Lange, J S; Lee, J S; Lee, M J; Lesiak, T; Limosani, A; Lin, S-W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mitaroff, W; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Moloney, G R; Nakao, M; Natkaniec, Z; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Pestotnik, R; Piilonen, L E; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Schümann, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shiu, J-G; Shwartz, B; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Y; Varner, G; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wicht, J; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zupanc, A

    2008-03-21

    We report the first observation of e;{+}e;{-}-->Upsilon(1S)pi;{+}pi;{-}, Upsilon(2S)pi;{+}pi;{-}, and first evidence for e;{+}e;{-}-->Upsilon(3S)pi;{+}pi;{-}, Upsilon(1S)K+K-, near the peak of the Upsilon(5S) resonance at sqrt[s] approximately 10.87 GeV. The results are based on a data sample of 21.7 fb;{-1} collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB e;{+}e;{-} collider. Attributing the signals to the Upsilon(5S) resonance, the partial widths Gamma(Upsilon(5S)-->Upsilon(1S)pi;{+}pi;{-})=0.59+/-0.04(stat)+/-0.09(syst) MeV and Gamma(Upsilon(5S)-->Upsilon(2S)pi;{+}pi;{-})=0.85+/-0.07(stat)+/-0.16(syst) MeV are obtained from the observed cross sections. These values exceed by more than 2 orders of magnitude the previously measured partial widths for dipion transitions between lower Upsilon resonances. PMID:18517777

  17. Experimental study of X-b(2P)->pi pi X-b(1P)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Cawlfield; B. I. Eisenstein; I. Karliner; D. Kim; N. Lowrey; P. Naik; C. Sedlack; M. Selen; E. J. White; J. Williams; J. Wiss; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; D. Cronin-Hennessy; K. Y. Gao; D. T. Gong; J. Hietala; Y. Kubota; T. Klein; B. W. Lang; S. Z. Li; R. Poling; A. W. Scott; A. Smith; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; P. Zweber; J. Ernst; K. Arms; H. Severini; S. A. Dytman; W. Love; S. Mehrabyan; J. A. Mueller; V. Savinov; Z. Li; A. Lopez; H. Mendez; J. Ramirez; G. S. Huang; D. H. Miller; V. Pavlunin; B. Sanghi; I. P. J. Shipsey; G. S. Adams; M. Anderson; J. P. Cummings; I. Danko; J. Napolitano; Q. He; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; E. H. Thorndike; T. E. Coan; Y. S. Gao; F. Liu; M. Artuso; C. Boulahouache; S. Blusk; J. Butt; O. Dorjkhaidav; J. Li; N. Menaa; K. Randrianarivony; R. Redjimi; R. Sia; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; K. Zhang; S. E. Csorna; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; M. Dubrovin; A. Lincoln; A. Bornheim; S. P. Pappas; A. J. Weinstein; R. A. Briere; G. P. Chen; J. Chen; T. Ferguson; G. Tatishvili; H. Vogel; M. E. Watkins; J. L. Rosner; N. E. Adam; J. P. Alexander; K. Berkelman; D. G. Cassel; J. E. Duboscq; K. M. Ecklund; R. Ehrlich; T. Engelmore; L. Fields; R. S. Galik; L. Gibbons; R. Gray; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; D. Hertz; C. D. Jones; J. Kandaswamy; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; H. Mahlke-Kruger; T. O. Meyer; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; E. A. Phillips; J. Pivarski; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; H. Schwarthoff; X. Shi; M. R. Shepherd; S. Stroiney; W. M. Sun; K. M. Weaver; T. Wilksen; M. Weinberger; S. B. Athar; P. Avery; L. Breva-Newell; R. Patel; V. Potlia; H. Stoeck; J. Yelton; P. Rubin

    2006-01-01

    We have searched for the di-pion transition chi(b)(2P) -> pi pi chi(b)(1P) in the CLEO III sample of Upsilon(3S) decays in the exclusive decay chain: Upsilon(3S) -> gamma chi(b)(2P), chi(b)(2P) -> pi pi chi(b)(1P), chi(b)(1P) -> gamma Upsilon(1S), Upsilon(1S) -> l(+)l(-). Our studies include both pi(+)pi(-) and pi(0)pi(0), each analyzed both in fully-reconstructed events and in events with one pion

  18. The analytical $\\\\pi\\\\pi$ scattering amplitude and the light scalars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. N. Achasov; A. V. Kiselev

    2010-01-01

    In this work we construct the $\\\\pi\\\\pi$ scattering amplitude $T^0_0$ with\\u000aregular analytical properties in the $s$ complex plane, that describes\\u000asimultaneously the data on the $\\\\pi\\\\pi$ scattering, $\\\\phi\\\\to\\\\pi^0\\\\pi^0\\\\gamma$\\u000adecay and $\\\\pi\\\\pi\\\\to K\\\\bar K$ reaction. The chiral shielding of the $\\\\sigma\\u000a(600)$ meson and its mixing with the $f_0(980)$ meson are taken into account\\u000aalso. The data agrees with the

  19. Branching Ratio and CP Violation of B to pi pi Decays in Perturbative QCD Approach

    E-print Network

    C. D. Lu; K. Ukai; M. Z. Yang

    2000-11-08

    We calculate the branching ratios and CP asymmetries for B^0 to pi^+pi^-, B^+ to pi^+pi^0 and B^0 to pi^0pi^0 decays, in a perturbative QCD approach. In this approach, we calculate non-factorizable and annihilation type contributions, in addition to the usual factorizable contributions. We found that the annihilation diagram contributions are not very small as previous argument. Our result is in agreement with the measured branching ratio of B to pi^+pi^- by CLEO collaboration. With a non-negligible contribution from annihilation diagrams and a large strong phase, we predict a large direct CP asymmetry in B^0 to pi^+pi^-, and pi^0pi^0, which can be tested by the current running B factories.

  20. K --> $\\pi\\pi\\gamma$ decays a search for novel couplings in kaon decays

    E-print Network

    D'Ambrosio, G; Giancarlo D'Ambrosio; Gino Isidori

    1994-01-01

    We analyze K \\to \\pi\\pi\\gamma decays in the framework of Chiral Perturbation Theory. We study the different Dalitz plot distributions, trying to find regions where o(p^6) contributions could be more easily detected. To fulfill this program we compute all the the o(p^4) loop and counterterm contributions, finding a substantial agreement with the existing calculations and adding some small missing terms in K_S \\to \\pi\\pi\\gamma.

  1. Hadronic structure in the decay tau--->pi-pi0nutau

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Anderson; V. V. Frolov; Y. Kubota; S. J. Lee; R. Mahapatra; J. J. O'neill; R. Poling; T. Riehle; A. Smith; S. Ahmed; M. S. Alam; S. B. Athar; L. Jian; L. Ling; A. H. Mahmood; M. Saleem; S. Timm; F. Wappler; A. Anastassov; J. E. Duboscq; K. K. Gan; C. Gwon; T. Hart; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. Lorenc; H. Schwarthoff; E. von Toerne; M. M. Zoeller; S. J. Richichi; H. Severini; P. Skubic; A. Undrus; M. Bishai; S. Chen; J. Fast; J. W. Hinson; J. Lee; N. Menon; D. H. Miller; E. I. Shibata; I. P. Shipsey; Y. Kwon; A. L. Lyon; E. H. Thorndike; C. P. Jessop; H. Marsiske; M. L. Perl; V. Savinov; D. Ugolini; X. Zhou; T. E. Coan; V. Fadeyev; I. Korolkov; Y. Maravin; I. Narsky; R. Stroynowski; J. Ye; T. Wlodek; M. Artuso; R. Ayad; E. Dambasuren; S. Kopp; G. Majumder; G. C. Moneti; S. Schuh; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; A. Titov; G. Viehhauser; J. C. Wang; A. Wolf; J. Wu; S. E. Csorna; K. W. McLean; S. Marka; Z. Xu; R. Godang; K. Kinoshita; I. C. Lai; S. Schrenk; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; R. Greene; L. P. Perera; G. J. Zhou; S. Chan; G. Eigen; E. Lipeles; M. Schmidtler; A. Shapiro; W. M. Sun; J. Urheim; A. J. Weinstein; F. Würthwein; D. E. Jaffe; G. Masek; H. P. Paar; E. M. Potter; S. Prell; V. Sharma; D. M. Asner; A. Eppich; J. Gronberg; T. S. Hill; D. J. Lange; R. J. Morrison; T. K. Nelson; R. A. Briere; B. H. Behrens; W. T. Ford; A. Gritsan; H. Krieg; J. Roy; J. G. Smith; J. P. Alexander; R. Baker; C. Bebek; B. E. Berger; K. Berkelman; F. Blanc; V. Boisvert; D. G. Cassel; M. Dickson; P. S. Drell; K. M. Ecklund; R. Ehrlich; A. D. Foland; P. Gaidarev; R. S. Galik; L. Gibbons; B. Gittelman; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; P. I. Hopman; C. D. Jones; D. L. Kreinick; T. Lee; Y. Liu; T. O. Meyer; N. B. Mistry; C. R. Ng; E. Nordberg; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; J. G. Thayer; P. G. Thies; B. Valant-Spaight; A. Warburton; P. Avery; M. Lohner; C. Prescott; A. I. Rubiera; J. Yelton; J. Zheng; G. Brandenburg; A. Ershov; Y. S. Gao; D. Y.-J. Kim; R. Wilson; T. E. Browder; Y. Li; J. L. Rodriguez; H. Yamamoto; T. Bergfeld; B. I. Eisenstein; J. Ernst; G. E. Gladding; G. D. Gollin; R. M. Hans; E. Johnson; I. Karliner; M. A. Marsh; M. Palmer; C. Plager; C. Sedlack; M. Selen; J. J. Thaler; J. Williams; K. W. Edwards; R. Janicek; P. M. Patel; A. J. Sadoff; R. Ammar; P. Baringer; A. Bean; D. Besson; R. Davis; S. Kotov; I. Kravchenko; N. Kwak; X. Zhao

    2000-01-01

    We report on a study of the invariant mass spectrum of the hadronic system in the decay tau--->pi-pi0nutau. This study was performed with data obtained with the CLEO II detector operating at the CESR e+e- collider. We present fits to phenomenological models in which resonance parameters associated with the rho(770) and rho(1450) mesons are determined. The pi-pi0 spectral function inferred

  2. Evidence for the decay D-0 -> K-pi(+)pi(-)e(+)nu(e)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Artuso; S. Blusk; J. Butt; J. Li; N. Menaa; S. Nisar; K. Randrianarivony; R. Sia; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; K. Zhang; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; M. Dubrovin; A. Lincoln; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; P. Naik; R. A. Briere; T. Ferguson; G. Tatishvili; H. Vogel; M. E. Watkins; J. L. Rosner; N. E. Adam; J. P. Alexander; D. G. Cassel; J. E. Duboscq; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; R. S. Galik; L. Gibbons; R. Gray; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; D. Hertz; C. D. Jones; J. Kandaswamy; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; H. Mahlke-Kruger; D. Mohapatra; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; J. Pivarski; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; H. Schwarthoff; X. Shi; S. Stroiney; W. M. Sun; T. Wilksen; S. B. Athar; R. Patel; V. Potlia; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; C. Cawlfield; B. I. Eisenstein; I. Karliner; D. Kim; N. Lowrey; M. Selen; E. J. White; J. Wiss; R. E. Mitchell; M. R. Shepherd; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; D. Cronin-Hennessy; K. Y. Gao; J. Hietala; Y. Kubota; T. Klein; B. W. Lang; R. Poling; A. W. Scott; A. Smith; P. Zweber; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; J. Ernst; K. M. Ecklund; H. Severini; W. Love; V. Savinov; O. Aquines; A. Lopez; S. Mehrabyan; H. Mendez; J. Ramirez; G. S. Huang; D. H. Miller; V. Pavlunin; B. Sanghi; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin; G. S. Adams; M. Anderson; J. P. Cummings; I. Danko; D. Hu; B. Moziak; J. Napolitano; Q. He; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; E. H. Thorndike; F. Yang

    2007-01-01

    Using a 281 pb(-1) data sample collected at the psi(3770) with the CLEO-c detector, we present the first absolute branching fraction measurement of the decay D-0 -> K-pi(+)pi(-)e(+)nu(e) at a statistical significance of about 4.0 standard deviations. We find 10 candidates consistent with the decay D-0 -> K-pi(+)pi(-)e(+)nu(e). The probability that a background fluctuation accounts for this signal is less

  3. Study of CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0-->pi+pi- Decays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Abe; T. Abe; I. Adachi; Byoung Sup Ahn; H. Aihara; M. Akatsu; Y. Asano; T. Aso; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; Y. Ban; E. Banas; I. Bedny; S. Behari; P. K. Behera; A. Bondar; A. Bozek; M. Bracko; J. Brodzicka; T. E. Browder; B. C. Casey; P. Chang; Y. Chao; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; S.-K. Choi; Y. Choi; M. Danilov; L. Y. Dong; J. Dragic; A. Drutskoy; S. Eidelman; V. Eiges; Y. Enari; C. W. Everton; F. Fang; H. Fujii; C. Fukunaga; M. Fukushima; N. Gabyshev; A. Garmash; T. Gershon; B. Golob; A. Gordon; R. Guo; J. Haba; H. Hamasaki; K. Hanagaki; F. Handa; K. Hara; T. Hara; N. C. Hastings; H. Hayashii; M. Hazumi; E. M. Heenan; I. Higuchi; T. Higuchi; T. Hojo; T. Hokuue; Y. Hoshi; K. Hoshina; S. R. Hou; W.-S. Hou; S.-C. Hsu; H.-C. Huang; T. Igaki; Y. Igarashi; T. Iijima; H. Ikeda; K. Inami; A. Ishikawa; H. Ishino; R. Itoh; M. Iwamoto; H. Iwasaki; Y. Iwasaki; D. J. Jackson; P. Jalocha; H. K. Jang; J. H. Kang; J. S. Kang; P. Kapusta; N. Katayama; H. Kawai; N. Kawamura; T. Kawasaki; H. Kichimi; D. W. Kim; Heejong Kim; H. J. Kim; H. O. Kim; Hyunwoo Kim; S. K. Kim; T. H. Kim; K. Kinoshita; S. Koishi; H. Konishi; S. Korpar; P. Krizan; P. Krokovny; R. Kulasiri; S. Kumar; A. Kuzmin; Y.-J. Kwon; J. S. Lange; G. Leder; S. H. Lee; A. Limosani; D. Liventsev; R.-S. Lu; J. MacNaughton; G. Majumder; F. Mandl; D. Marlow; T. Matsuishi; S. Matsumoto; T. Matsumoto; Y. Mikami; W. Mitaroff; K. Miyabayashi; Y. Miyabayashi; H. Miyake; H. Miyata; G. R. Moloney; S. Mori; T. Mori; A. Murakami; T. Nagamine; Y. Nagasaka; T. Nakadaira; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; J. W. Nam; K. Neichi; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Noguchi; T. Nozaki; S. Ogawa; F. Ohno; T. Ohshima; T. Okabe; S. Okuno; S. L. Olsen; W. Ostrowicz; H. Ozaki; P. Pakhlov; H. Palka; C. W. Park; K. S. Park; L. S. Peak; J.-P. Perroud; M. Peters; L. E. Piilonen; E. Prebys; J. L. Rodriguez; F. J. Ronga; M. Rozanska; K. Rybicki; H. Sagawa; S. Saitoh; Y. Sakai; H. Sakamoto; M. Satapathy; A. Satpathy; O. Schneider; S. Schrenk; C. Schwanda; S. Semenov; K. Senyo; M. E. Sevior; H. Shibuya; B. Shwartz; V. Sidorov; J. B. Singh; S. Stanic; A. Sugi; A. Sugiyama; K. Sumisawa; T. Sumiyoshi; K. Suzuki; S. Suzuki; S. K. Swain; H. Tajima; T. Takahashi; F. Takasaki; M. Takita; K. Tamai; N. Tamura; J. Tanaka; M. Tanaka; G. N. Taylor; Y. Teramoto; S. Tokuda; M. Tomoto; T. Tomura; S. N. Tovey; K. Trabelsi; W. Trischuk; T. Tsuboyama; T. Tsukamoto; S. Uehara; K. Ueno; Y. Unno; S. Uno; Y. Ushiroda; K. E. Varvell; C. C. Wang; J. G. Wang; M.-Z. Wang; Y. Watanabe; E. Won; B. D. Yabsley; Y. Yamada; M. Yamaga; A. Yamaguchi; H. Yamamoto; Y. Yamashita; M. Yamauchi; J. Yashima; P. Yeh; M. Yokoyama; K. Yoshida; Y. Yuan; Y. Yusa; C. C. Zhang; J. Zhang; Y. Zheng; V. Zhilich; D. Zontar

    2002-01-01

    We present a measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in B0-->pi+pi- decays based on a 41.8 fb-1 data sample collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We fully reconstruct one neutral B meson as a B0-->pi+pi- CP eigenstate and identify the flavor of the accompanying B meson from its decay products. From the asymmetry

  4. Measurements of the branching fractions of charged B decays to K±pi-\\/+pi± final states

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; D. Boutigny; J.-M. Gaillard; A. Hicheur; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; P. Robbe; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; A. Palano; A. Pompili; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; A. W. Borgland; A. B. Breon; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; C. T. Day; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; J. F. Kral; G. Kukartsev; C. Leclerc; M. E. Levi; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; A. Romosan; M. T. Ronan; V. G. Shelkov; A. V. Telnov; W. A. Wenzel; K. Ford; T. J. Harrison; C. M. Hawkes; D. J. Knowles; S. E. Morgan; R. C. Penny; A. T. Watson; N. K. Watson; K. Goetzen; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; H. Schmuecker; M. Steinke; N. R. Barlow; J. T. Boyd; N. Chevalier; W. N. Cottingham; M. P. Kelly; T. E. Latham; C. Mackay; F. F. Wilson; K. Abe; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; D. Thiessen; P. Kyberd; A. K. McKemey; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. B. Golubev; V. N. Ivanchenko; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; A. N. Yushkov; D. Best; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; C. Buchanan; B. L. Hartfiel; B. C. Shen; D. del Re; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; D. B. Macfarlane; H. P. Paar; Sh. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; B. Dahmes; N. Kuznetsova; S. L. Levy; O. Long; A. Lu; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; W. Verkerke; T. W. Beck; J. Beringer; A. M. Eisner; C. A. Heusch; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; R. E. Schmitz; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. Turri; W. Walkowiak; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; S. Yang; S. Jayatilleke; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; T. Abe; F. Blanc; P. Bloom; S. Chen; P. J. Clark; W. T. Ford; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; P. Rankin; J. Roy; J. G. Smith; W. C. van Hoek; L. Zhang; J. L. Harton; T. Hu; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; J. Zhang; D. Altenburg; T. Brandt; J. Brose; T. Colberg; M. Dickopp; R. S. Dubitzky; A. Hauke; H. M. Lacker; E. Maly; R. Müller-Pfefferkorn; R. Nogowski; S. Otto; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; B. Spaan; L. Wilden; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; F. Brochard; J. Cohen-Tanugi; P. Grenier; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; A. Khan; D. Lavin; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; J. E. Swain; M. Andreotti; V. Azzolini; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; L. Piemontese; A. Sarti; E. Treadwell; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; M. Biasini; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; D. Falciai; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Pioppi; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; G. Crosetti; M. Lo Vetere; M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; S. Bailey; M. Morii; E. Won; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; I. Eschrich; J. R. Gaillard; G. W. Morton; J. A. Nash; P. Sanders; G. P. Taylor; G. J. Grenier; S.-J. Lee; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; J. Lamsa; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; J. Yi; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; S. Laplace; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; T. C. Petersen; S. Plaszczynski; M. H. Schune; L. Tantot; G. Wormser; V. Brigljevic; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; A. J. Bevan; J. P. Coleman; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; M. Kay; R. J. Parry; D. J. Payne; R. J. Sloane; C. Touramanis; J. J. Back; P. F. Harrison; H. W. Shorthouse; P. Strother; P. B. Vidal; C. L. Brown; G. Cowan; R. L. Flack; H. U. Flaecher; S. George; M. G. Green; A. Kurup; C. E. Marker; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; G. Vaitsas; M. A. Winter; D. Brown; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; R. J. Barlow; A. C. Forti; P. A. Hart; M. C. Hodgkinson; F. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; A. J. Lyon; J. H. Weatherall; J. C. Williams; A. Farbin; A. Jawahery; D. Kovalskyi; C. K. Lae; V. Lillard; D. A. Roberts; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; K. T. Flood; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; V. B. Koptchev; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; S. Willocq; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; D. J. Mangeol; P. M. Patel; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Cote-Ahern; C. Hast; P. Taras; H. Nicholson; C. Cartaro; N. Cavallo; G. De Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; J. M. Losecco; T. A. Gabriel; B. Brau; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; T. Pulliam; Q. K. Wong; J. Brau; R. Frey; C. T. Potter; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; F. Colecchia

    2004-01-01

    We present results of searches for B-meson decays to K+pi-pi+ with the BABAR detector. With a data sample of 61.6×106 BB¯ pairs, we measure the branching fractions and 90% confidence-level upper limits averaged over charge-conjugate states (the first error is statistical and the second is systematic): B[B+-->K*0(892)pi+]=(15.5±1.8+1.5-4.0)×10-6, B[B+-->f0(980)K+,f0-->pi+pi-]=(9.2±1.2+2.1-2.6)×10-6, B[B+-->D¯0pi+,D¯0-->K+pi-]=(184.6±3.2±9.7)×10-6, B[B+-->rho0(770)K+]<6.2×10-6 and B[B+-->K+pi-pi+ nonresonant]<17×10-6.

  5. K to pi pi Amplitudes at Unphysical Kinematics Using Domain Wall Fermions

    E-print Network

    Matthew Lightman

    2007-11-26

    The use of chiral perturbation theory in extracting physical K to pi pi matrix elements from matrix elements calculated at unphysical kinematics is outlined. In particular, the possibility of utilizing pions with non-zero momentum in the final state, and of using partial quenching is discussed. Preliminary (not physically normalized) Delta I=3/2 (27,1) K to pi pi matrix elements are calculated on the RBC/UKQCD $24^3 \\times 64$, $L_s=16$ lattices, using 2+1 dynamical flavors and domain wall fermions, with an inverse lattice spacing of $a^{-1}=1.729(28) GeV$. Effective mass plots are presented for a light sea quark mass of $m_l^{sea}=0.005$, and various valence quark masses. The plateaux are fit and $E_{\\pi\\pi}-m_K$ is extracted.

  6. Search for b-->u transitions in B>[K+pi-pi0]DK

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; Y. Zheng; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani

    2007-01-01

    We search for decays of a B meson into a neutral D meson and a charged kaon, with the D meson decaying into a charged kaon, a charged pion, and a neutral pion. This final state can be reached through the b-->c transition B--->D0K- followed by the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed D0-->K+pi-pi0, or the b-->u transition B--->D¯0K- followed by the Cabibbo-favored D¯0-->K+pi-pi0.

  7. Production of $\\sigma$ in $\\psi(2S)\\to \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}J/\\psi$

    E-print Network

    Ablikim, J M; Ban, Y; Cai, X; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J C; Jin, Chen; Chen, Y B; Chi, S P; Chu, Y P; Cui, X Z; Dai, Y S; Diao, L Y; Deng, Z Y; Dong, Q F; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Gao, C S; Gao, Y N; Gu, S D; Gu, Y T; Guo, Y N; Guo, Y Q; Guo, Z J; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; Heng, Y K; Hu, H M; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, X T; Ji, X B; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Yi, Jin; Lai, Y F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, H H; Li, J; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y L; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Fang, Liu; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, Q; Liu, R G; Liu, Z A; Lou, Y C; Lu, F; Lu, G R; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, X B; Mao, Z P; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Olsen, S L; Peng, H P; Ping, R G; Qi, N D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, C P; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Sun, H S; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tan, Z Q; Tang, X; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, L; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, W F; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Zhe Wang; Zheng Wang; Wei, C L; Wei, D H; Wu, N; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xu, G F; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Yan, M L; Yang, H X; Yang, Y X; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yi, Z Y; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, J M; Yuan, Y; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Yu, Zeng; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Q; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X M; Zhang, X Y; Yiyun, Zhang; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J W; Zhao, M G; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Z P; Zhou, L; Zhou, N F; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Ying Chun Zhu; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zhuang, X A; Zou, B S

    2007-01-01

    Using 14M $\\psi(2S)$ events accumulated by BESII at the BEPC, a Covariant Helicity Amplitude Analysis is performed for $\\psi(2S)\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-J/\\psi, J/\\psi\\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$. The $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ mass spectrum, distinctly different from phase space, suggests $\\sigma$ production in this process. Two different theoretical schemes are used in the global fit to the data. The results are consistent with the existence of the $\\sigma$. The $\\sigma$ pole position is determined to be $(552^{+84}_{-106})-i(232^{+81}_{-72})$~MeV/$c^2$.

  8. Study of CP-violating asymmetries in B0-->pi+pi-, K+pi- decays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; D. Boutigny; J.-M. Gaillard; A. Hicheur; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; P. Robbe; V. Tisserand; A. Palano; A. Pompili; G. P. Chen; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; A. W. Borgland; A. B. Breon; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; A. R. Clark; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; J. F. Kral; C. Leclerc; M. E. Levi; G. Lynch; P. J. Oddone; A. Perazzo; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; A. Romosan; M. T. Ronan; V. G. Shelkov; A. V. Telnov; W. A. Wenzel; P. G. Bright-Thomas; T. J. Harrison; C. M. Hawkes; D. J. Knowles; S. W. O'Neale; R. C. Penny; A. T. Watson; N. K. Watson; T. Deppermann; K. Goetzen; H. Koch; M. Kunze; B. Lewandowski; K. Peters; H. Schmuecker; M. Steinke; J. C. Andress; N. R. Barlow; W. Bhimji; N. Chevalier; P. J. Clark; W. N. Cottingham; N. Dyce; B. Foster; C. Mackay; D. Wallom; F. F. Wilson; K. Abe; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; D. Thiessen; S. Jolly; A. K. McKemey; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; D. A. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. B. Golubev; V. N. Ivanchenko; A. A. Korol; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; A. A. Salnikov; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; V. I. Telnov; A. N. Yushkov; D. Best; M. Chao; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; S. McMahon; D. P. Stoker; K. Arisaka; C. Buchanan; S. Chun; D. B. Macfarlane; S. Prell; Sh. Rahatlou; G. Raven; V. Sharma; C. Campagnari; B. Dahmes; P. A. Hart; N. Kuznetsova; S. L. Levy; O. Long; A. Lu; J. D. Richman; W. Verkerke; M. Witherell; S. Yellin; J. Beringer; D. E. Dorfan; A. M. Eisner; A. A. Grillo; M. Grothe; C. A. Heusch; R. P. Johnson; W. S. Lockman; T. Pulliam; H. Sadrozinski; T. Schalk; R. E. Schmitz; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. Turri; W. Walkowiak; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; S. Metzler; J. Oyang; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; M. Weaver; S. Yang; R. Y. Zhu; S. Devmal; T. L. Geld; S. Jayatilleke; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; T. Barillari; P. Bloom; M. O. Dima; S. Fahey; W. T. Ford; D. R. Johnson; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; P. Rankin; J. Roy; S. Sen; J. G. Smith; W. C. van Hoek; D. L. Wagner; J. Blouw; J. L. Harton; M. Krishnamurthy; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; J. Zhang; R. Aleksan; A. de Lesquen; S. Emery; A. Gaidot; S. F. Ganzhur; P.-F. Giraud; G. Hamel de Monchenault; W. Kozanecki; M. Langer; G. W. London; B. Mayer; B. Serfass; G. Vasseur; Ch. Yèche; M. Zito; T. Brandt; J. Brose; T. Colberg; M. Dickopp; R. S. Dubitzky; A. Hauke; E. Maly; R. Müller-Pfefferkorn; S. Otto; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; B. Spaan; L. Wilden; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; F. Brochard; J. Cohen-Tanugi; S. Ferrag; E. Roussot; S. T'Jampens; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; A. Anjomshoaa; R. Bernet; A. Khan; D. Lavin; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; J. E. Swain; J. Tinslay; M. Falbo; C. Borean; C. Bozzi; S. Dittongo; L. Piemontese; E. Treadwell; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; D. Falciai; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; Y. Xie; A. Zallo; S. Bagnasco; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; G. Crosetti; M. Lo Vetere; M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; F. C. Pastore; C. Patrignani; M. G. Pia; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; M. Morii; R. Bartoldus; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; P.-A. Fischer; J. Lamsa; W. T. Meyer; E. I. Rosenberg; G. Grosdidier; C. Hast; A. Höcker; H. M. Lacker; S. Laplace; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; S. Plaszczynski; M. H. Schune; S. Trincaz-Duvoid; G. Wormser; R. M. Bionta; V. Brigljevic; D. J. Lange; M. Mugge; K. van Bibber; D. M. Wright; M. Carroll; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; M. George; M. Kay; D. J. Payne; R. J. Sloane; C. Touramanis; M. L. Aspinwall; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; I. Eschrich; N. J. Gunawardane; J. A. Nash; P. Sanders; D. Smith; D. E. Azzopardi; J. J. Back; P. Dixon; P. F. Harrison; R. J. Potter; H. W. Shorthouse; P. Strother; P. B. Vidal; M. I. Williams; G. Cowan; S. George; M. G. Green; A. Kurup; C. E. Marker; P. McGrath; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; I. J. Scott; G. Vaitsas; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; R. J. Barlow; J. T. Boyd; A. C. Forti; J. Fullwood; F. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; N. Savvas; E. T. Simopoulos; J. H. Weatherall; A. Farbin; A. Jawahery; V. Lillard; J. Olsen; D. A. Roberts; J. R. Schieck; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; K. T. Flood; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; V. G. Koptchev; T. B. Moore; H. Staengle; S. Willocq; B. Brau; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Milek; P. M. Patel; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; J. P. Martin; J. Y. Nief; R. Seitz; P. Taras; V. Zacek; H. Nicholson; C. S. Sutton; C. Cartaro; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo

    2002-01-01

    We present a measurement of the time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in neutral B decays to the pi+pi-CP eigenstate, and an updated measurement of the charge asymmetry in B0-->K+pi- decays. In a sample of 33 million Upsilon(4S)-->BBbar decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric B factory, we find 65+12-11 pi+pi- and 217+\\/-18 K+pi- candidates and measure the asymmetry

  9. Precision Measurement of {pi}{pi} Scattering Lengths in K{sub e4} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Madigozhin, D. T. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Russia, 141980 Moscow region, Dubna, Joliot-Curie 6, JINR (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-23

    The measurement of the S-wave {pi}{pi} scattering lengths is a fundamental test of the validity of Chiral Perturbation Theory. We report on the final NA48/2 result, based on the full statistics data set of more than one million reconstructed K{sub e4}{sup {+-}} decays. From these events we have determined the decay form factors and {pi}{pi} scattering lengths a{sub 0}{sup 0} and a{sub 0}{sup 2}. The result is the currently most precise measurement of the scattering lengths and is in excellent agreement with the predictions of Chiral Perturbation Theory.

  10. Measurement of the D+-->pi+pi0 and D+-->K+pi0 branching fractions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; K. Goetzen; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; A. Petzold; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; D. J. Bard; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. R. Gaillard; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; C. M. Brown; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. S. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; M. P. Kelly; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; S. Y. Willocq; R. Cowan; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; D. Del Re; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; H. Bulten; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; T. Pulliam; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; C. T. Potter; R. Rahmat

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements of the branching fractions for the Cabbibo suppressed decays D+-->pi+pi0 and D+-->K+pi0 based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 124.3fb-1. The data were taken with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory operating on and near the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We find B(D+-->pi+pi0)=(1.25±0.10±0.09±0.04)×10-3 and B(D+-->K+pi0)=(2.52±0.47±0.25±0.08)×10-4, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second

  11. Penguin Zoology in $B\\to\\pi\\pi$ and the Extraction of the CKM Angle $\\alpha$

    E-print Network

    Fleischer, Robert; Fleischer, Robert; Mannel, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    We reanalyze the decay $B_d\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$ without assuming dominance of QCD penguins with internal top-quark exchanges. In that case the weak phase of the CKM angle $\\beta$. Nevertheless it is still possible to extract the CKM angle time-dependent CP-violating asymmetry of the transition $B_d\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$. Aside from that CP asymmetry this approach needs as an input only amplitudes of decays with branching ratios of order $10^{-5}$ and will thus be well within reach at future $B$-factories.

  12. K{yields}({pi}{pi}){sub I=2} decays and twisted boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C. H. [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Sachrajda, C. T. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-01

    We propose a new method to evaluate the Lellouch-Luescher factor which relates the {Delta}I=3/2 K{yields}{pi}{pi} matrix elements computed on a finite lattice to the physical (infinite-volume) decay amplitudes. The method relies on the use of partially twisted boundary conditions, which allow the s-wave {pi}{pi} phase shift to be computed as an almost continuous function of the center-of-mass relative momentum and hence for its derivative to be evaluated. We successfully demonstrate the feasibility of the technique in an exploratory computation.

  13. Observation of a Narrow Charmoniumlike State in Exclusive B±-->K±pi+pi-J\\/psi Decays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S.-K. Choi; S. L. Olsen; K. Abe; T. Abe; I. Adachi; Byoung Sup Ahn; H. Aihara; K. Akai; M. Akatsu; M. Akemoto; Y. Asano; T. Aso; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; Y. Ban; S. Banerjee; A. Bondar; A. Bozek; M. Bracko; J. Brodzicka; T. E. Browder; P. Chang; Y. Chao; K.-F. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; Y. Choi; M. Danilov; L. Y. Dong; A. Drutskoy; S. Eidelman; V. Eiges; J. Flanagan; C. Fukunaga; K. Furukawa; N. Gabyshev; T. Gershon; B. Golob; H. Guler; R. Guo; C. Hagner; F. Handa; T. Hara; N. C. Hastings; H. Hayashii; M. Hazumi; L. Hinz; Y. Hoshi; W.-S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; H.-C. Huang; T. Iijima; K. Inami; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; M. Iwasaki; Y. Iwasaki; J. H. Kang; S. U. Kataoka; N. Katayama; H. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; H. Kichimi; E. Kikutani; H. J. Kim; Hyunwoo Kim; J. H. Kim; S. K. Kim; K. Kinoshita; H. Koiso; P. Koppenburg; S. Korpar; P. Krizan; P. Krokovny; S. Kumar; A. Kuzmin; J. S. Lange; G. Leder; S. H. Lee; T. Lesiak; S.-W. Lin; D. Liventsev; J. MacNaughton; G. Majumder; F. Mandl; D. Marlow; T. Matsumoto; S. Michizono; T. Mimashi; W. Mitaroff; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyake; D. Mohapatra; G. R. Moloney; T. Nagamine; Y. Nagasaka; T. Nakadaira; T. T. Nakamura; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; T. Nozaki; S. Ogawa; Y. Ogawa; K. Ohmi; Y. Ohnishi; T. Ohshima; N. Ohuchi; K. Oide; T. Okabe; S. Okuno; W. Ostrowicz; H. Ozaki; H. Palka; N. Parslow; L. E. Piilonen; H. Sagawa; S. Saitoh; Y. Sakai; T. R. Sarangi; M. Satapathy; A. Satpathy; O. Schneider; A. J. Schwartz; S. Semenov; K. Senyo; R. Seuster; M. E. Sevior; H. Shibuya; T. Shidara; B. Shwartz; V. Sidorov; N. Soni; S. Stanic; M. Staric; A. Sugiyama; T. Sumiyoshi; S. Suzuki; F. Takasaki; K. Tamai; N. Tamura; M. Tanaka; M. Tawada; G. N. Taylor; Y. Teramoto; T. Tomura; K. Trabelsi; T. Tsukamoto; S. Uehara; K. Ueno; Y. Unno; S. Uno; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; C. C. Wang; J. G. Wang; Y. Watanabe; E. Won; B. D. Yabsley; Y. Yamada; A. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamashita; H. Yanai; Heyoung Yang; J. Ying; M. Yoshida; C. C. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; D. Zontar

    2003-01-01

    We report the observation of a narrow charmoniumlike state produced in the exclusive decay process B±-->K±pi+pi-J\\/psi. This state, which decays into pi+pi-J\\/psi, has a mass of 3872.0±0.6(stat)±0.5(syst) MeV, a value that is very near the MD0+MD*0 mass threshold. The results are based on an analysis of 152M B-B¯ events collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance in the Belle detector at the

  14. Study of the decay tau(-)->2 pi(-)pi(+)3 pi(0)nu(tau)

    E-print Network

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1997-11-01

    The decay tau(-) --> 2 pi(-)pi(+)3 pi(0) nu(tau) has been studied with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. The branching fraction is measured to be (2.85 +/- 0.56 +/- 0.51) x 10(-4). The result is ...

  15. Study of J/psi->eta phi pi+pi- at BESIII

    E-print Network

    M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; X. C. Ai; O. Albayrak; M. Albrecht; D. J. Ambrose; A. Amoroso; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; R. Baldini Ferroli; Y. Ban; D. W. Bennett; J. V. Bennett; M. Bertani; D. Bettoni; J. M. Bian; F. Bianchi; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; H. Cai; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. Y. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. Chen; X. R. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; X. K. Chu; G. Cibinetto; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; A. Dbeyssi; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; F. De Mori; Y. Ding; C. Dong; J. Dong; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; P. F. Duan; J. Z. Fan; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; X. Fang; Y. Fang; L. Fava; F. Feldbauer; G. Felici; C. Q. Feng; E. Fioravanti; M. Fritsch; C. D. Fu; Q. Gao; Y. Gao; I. Garzia; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; T. Guo; Y. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Z. Haddadi; A. Hafner; S. Han; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; C. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; Y. Hu G. M. Huang G. S. Huang; H. P. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. Huang; T. Hussain; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; L. W. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; T. Johansson; A. Julin; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; X. L. Kang; X. S. Kang; M. Kavatsyuk; B. C. Ke; R. Kliemt; B. Kloss; O. B. Kolcud; B. Kopf; M. Kornicer; W. Kuehn; A. Kupsc; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; M. Lara; P. Larin; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; Jin Li; K. Li; K. Li; P. R. Li; T. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. M. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; D. X. Lin; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. P. Liu; J. Y. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y. Liu; L. D. Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; X. X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; X. C. Loue; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; R. Q. Lu; Y. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; X. R. Lyu; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; L. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. N. Ma; X. Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; S. Marcello; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; Y. J. Mo; C. Morales Morales; K. Moriya; N. Yu. Muchnoia; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; F. Nerling; I. B. Nikolaeva; Z. Ning; S. Nisar; S. L. Niu; X. Y. Niu; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; Y. N. Pu; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; L. Q. Qin; N. Qin; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; C. F. Redmer; H. L. Ren; M. Ripka; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; V. Santoro; A. Sarantsev; M. Savrié; K. Schoenning; S. Schumann; W. Shan; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; P. X. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; W. M. Song; X. Y. Song; S. Sosio; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; M. Tiemens; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; I. Uman; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; B. L. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; W. Wang; X. F. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. H. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; T. Weber; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; S. P. Wen; U. Wiedner; M. Wolke; L. H. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Y. Xia; D. Xiao; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; G. F. Xu; L. Xu; Q. J. Xu; Q. N. Xu; X. P. Xu; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; W. C. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; L. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye J. H. Yin; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; W. L. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. Yuncug; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. J. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; K. Zhang; L. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Z. H. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; J. Y. Zhao; J. Z. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; Q. W. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugovh; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; W. J. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; L. Zhou; Li Zhou; X. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; X. Y. Zhou; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

    2014-12-17

    Based on a sample of $2.25\\times 10^{8} J/\\psi$ events taken with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we present the results of a study of the decay $J/\\psi\\to \\eta \\phi\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$. The $Y(2175)$ resonance is observed in the invariant mass spectrum of $\\phi f_{0}(980)$ with a statistical significance of greater than $10\\sigma$. The corresponding mass and width are determined to be $M=2200\\pm 6 \\mathrm{(stat.)} \\pm 5\\mathrm{(syst.)} \\mathrm{MeV}/c^{2}$ and $\\Gamma=104\\pm 15\\mathrm{(stat.)}\\pm 15\\mathrm{(syst.)}$ MeV, respectively, and the product branching fraction is measured to be $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to\\eta Y(2175)$, $Y(2175)\\to \\phi f_{0}(980)$, $f_{0}(980)\\to \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-})= (1.20\\pm 0.14\\mathrm{(stat.)}\\pm 0.37 \\mathrm{(syst.)})\\times 10^{-4}$. The results are consistent within errors with those of previous experiments. We also measure the branching fraction of $J/\\psi\\to \\phi f_1(1285)$ with $f_1(1285)\\to \\eta\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and set upper limits on the branching fractions for $J/\\psi\\to \\phi\\eta(1405)$/$\\phi X(1835)$/$\\phi X(1870)$ with $\\eta(1405)$/$X(1835)$/$X(1870)\\to \\eta\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ at the 90\\% confidence level.

  16. The role of the input in Roy's equations for pi -pi scattering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Wanders

    2000-01-01

    The Roy equations determine the S- and P-wave pi - pi phase shifts on a low energy interval. They allow the derivation of threshold parameters from experimental data. We examine the solutions of these equations that are in the neighborhood of a given solution by means of a linearization procedure. An updated survey of known results on the dimension of

  17. Edge-edge interactions in stacked graphene nanoplatelets

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz Silva, Eduardo [ORNL; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto [ORNL; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio [ORNL; Jia, Xiaoting [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Dresselhaus, M [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Meunier, V. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies show the dynamics of small graphene platelets on larger graphene layers. The platelets move nearly freely to eventually lock in at well-defined positions close to the edges of the larger underlying graphene sheet. While such movement is driven by a shallow potential energy surface described by an interplane interaction, the lock-in position occurs by via edge-edge interactions of the platelet and the graphene surface located underneath. Here we quantitatively study this behavior using van der Waals density functional calculations. Local interactions at the open edges are found to dictate stacking configurations that are different from Bernal (AB) stacking. These stacking configurations are known to be otherwise absent in edge-free two-dimensional (2D) graphene. The results explain the experimentally observed platelet dynamics and provide a detailed account of the new electronic properties of these combined systems.

  18. Determination of the S-Wave Pi Pi Scattering Lengths From a Study of K - to Pi - Pi0 Pi0 Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Batley, J.R.; Culling, A.J.; Kalmus, G.; /Cambridge U.; Lazzeroni, C.; /Cambridge U. /Birmingham U.; Munday, D.J.; /Cambridge U.; Slater, M.W.; /Cambridge U. /Birmingham U.; Wotton, S.A.; /Cambridge U.; Arcidiacono, R.; /CERN /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Bocquet, G.; /CERN; Cabibbo, N.; /CERN /Rome U. /INFN, Rome; Ceccucci, A.; /CERN; Cundy, D.; /CERN /Turin, Cosmo-Geofisica Lab; Falaleev, V.; Fidecaro, M.; Gatignon, L.; Gonidec, A.; Kubischta, W.; /CERN; Norton, A.; /CERN /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara; Maier, A.; Patel, M.; Peters, A.; /CERN /Dubna, JINR /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Birmingham U. /Dubna, JINR /CERN /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Sofiya U. /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /INFN, Perugia /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Northwestern U. /Dubna, JINR /Chicago U., EFI /Marseille, CPPM /Chicago U., EFI /Edinburgh U. /George Mason U. /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Florence /Modena U. /INFN, Florence /INFN, Florence /Urbino U. /INFN, Florence /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Bonn U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Northwestern U. /SLAC /Northwestern U. /Northwestern U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Northwestern U. /Northwestern U. /UCLA /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Frascati /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Barcelona, IFAE /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /CERN /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /Siegen U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Bern U. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /CERN /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Madrid, CIEMAT /Vienna, OAW

    2012-03-29

    We report the results from a study of the full sample of {approx}6.031 x 10{sup 7} K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} decays recorded by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS. As first observed in this experiment, the {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} invariant mass (M{sub 00}) distribution shows a cusp-like anomaly in the region around M{sub 00} = 2m{sub +}, where m{sub +} is the charged pion mass. This anomaly has been interpreted as an effect due mainly to the final state charge exchange scattering process {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} in K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay. Fits to the M{sub 00} distribution using two different theoretical formulations provide the presently most precise determination of a{sub 0} - a{sub 2}, the difference between the {pi}{pi} S-wave scattering lengths in the isospin I = 0 and I = 2 states. Higher-order {pi}{pi} rescattering terms, included in the two formulations, allow also an independent, though less precise, determination of a{sub 2}.

  19. Evidence for direct CP violation from Dalitz-plot analysis of B±-->K±pi-\\/+pi±

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; M. Bona; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; E. Prencipe; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; C. M. Hawkes; N. Soni; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; Z. Yasin; L. Zhang; V. Sharma; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; L. Wang; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; C. H. Cheng; D. A. Doll; B. Echenard; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; M. Karbach; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; S. Playfer; J. E. Watson; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; J. Firmino da Costa; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; K. E. Alwyn; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; G. Castelli; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; P. Del Amo Sanchez; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; G. Marchiori; M. Morganti; N. Neri; E. Paoloni; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; J. Biesiada; D. Lopes Pegna; C. Lu; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith

    2008-01-01

    We report a Dalitz-plot analysis of the charmless hadronic decays of charged B mesons to the final state K±pi-\\/+pi±. Using a sample of (383.2±4.2)×106 B Bmacr pairs collected by the BABAR detector, we measure CP-averaged branching fractions and direct CP asymmetries for intermediate resonant and nonresonant contributions. We find evidence for direct CP violation in the decay B±-->rho0(770)K±, with a

  20. Analysis and interpretation of new low-energy Pi-Pi scattering data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Descotes; N. H. Fuchs; L. Girlanda; J. Stern

    2001-01-01

    The recently published E865 data on charged K_e4 decays and Pi-Pi phases are reanalyzed to extract values of the two S-wave scattering lengths, of the subthreshold parameters alpha and beta, of the low-energy constants l3-bar and l4-bar as well as of the main two-flavour order parameters: and F_pi in the limit m_u = m_d = 0 taken at the physical

  1. Structure functions in the decay tau-\\/+-->pi-\\/+pi0pi0nutau

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. E. Browder; Y. Li; J. L. Rodriguez; H. Yamamoto; T. Bergfeld; B. I. Eisenstein; J. Ernst; G. E. Gladding; G. D. Gollin; R. M. Hans; E. Johnson; I. Karliner; M. A. Marsh; M. Palmer; C. Plager; C. Sedlack; M. Selen; J. J. Thaler; J. Williams; K. W. Edwards; R. Janicek; P. M. Patel; A. J. Sadoff; R. Ammar; P. Baringer; A. Bean; D. Besson; R. Davis; S. Kotov; I. Kravchenko; N. Kwak; X. Zhao; S. Anderson; V. V. Frolov; Y. Kubota; S. J. Lee; R. Mahapatra; J. J. O'neill; R. Poling; T. Riehle; A. Smith; S. Ahmed; M. S. Alam; S. B. Athar; L. Jian; L. Ling; A. H. Mahmood; M. Saleem; S. Timm; F. Wappler; A. Anastassov; J. E. Duboscq; K. K. Gan; C. Gwon; T. Hart; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. Lorenc; H. Schwarthoff; E. von Toerne; M. M. Zoeller; S. J. Richichi; H. Severini; P. Skubic; A. Undrus; M. Bishai; S. Chen; J. Fast; J. W. Hinson; J. Lee; N. Menon; D. H. Miller; E. I. Shibata; I. P. Shipsey; Y. Kwon; A. L. Lyon; E. H. Thorndike; C. P. Jessop; K. Lingel; H. Marsiske; M. L. Perl; V. Savinov; D. Ugolini; X. Zhou; T. E. Coan; V. Fadeyev; I. Korolkov; Y. Maravin; I. Narsky; R. Stroynowski; J. Ye; T. Wlodek; M. Artuso; R. Ayad; E. Dambasuren; S. Kopp; G. Majumder; G. C. Moneti; S. Schuh; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; A. Titov; G. Viehhauser; J. C. Wang; A. Wolf; J. Wu; S. E. Csorna; K. W. McLean; S. Marka; Z. Xu; R. Godang; K. Kinoshita; I. C. Lai; P. Pomianowski; S. Schrenk; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; R. Greene; L. P. Perera; G. J. Zhou; S. Chan; G. Eigen; E. Lipeles; M. Schmidtler; A. Shapiro; W. M. Sun; J. Urheim; A. J. Weinstein; F. Würthwein; D. E. Jaffe; G. Masek; H. P. Paar; E. M. Potter; S. Prell; V. Sharma; D. M. Asner; A. Eppich; J. Gronberg; T. S. Hill; D. J. Lange; R. J. Morrison; T. K. Nelson; J. D. Richman; R. A. Briere; B. H. Behrens; W. T. Ford; A. Gritsan; H. Krieg; J. Roy; J. G. Smith; J. P. Alexander; R. Baker; C. Bebek; B. E. Berger; K. Berkelman; F. Blanc; V. Boisvert; D. G. Cassel; M. Dickson; P. S. Drell; K. M. Ecklund; R. Ehrlich; A. D. Foland; P. Gaidarev; R. S. Galik; L. Gibbons; B. Gittelman; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; P. I. Hopman; C. D. Jones; D. L. Kreinick; T. Lee; Y. Liu; T. O. Meyer; N. B. Mistry; C. R. Ng; E. Nordberg; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; J. G. Thayer; P. G. Thies; B. Valant-Spaight; A. Warburton; P. Avery; M. Lohner; C. Prescott; A. I. Rubiera; J. Yelton; J. Zheng; G. Brandenburg; A. Ershov; Y. S. Gao; D. Y.-J. Kim; R. Wilson

    2000-01-01

    Using the CLEO II detector operating at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) e+e- collider, we have measured the structure functions in the decay tau-\\/+-->pi-\\/+pi0pi0nutau, based on a sample corresponding to 4×106 produced tau-pair events. We determine the integrated structure functions, which depend only on the three pion invariant mass, as well as the structure functions differential in the Dalitz

  2. Search for CP violation in D-0 -> K-S(0)pi(+)pi(-)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Asner; H. N. Nelson; R. A. Briere; G. P. Chen; T. Ferguson; G. Tatishvili; H. Vogel; N. E. Adam; J. P. Alexander; K. Berkelman; V. Boisvert; D. G. Cassel; J. E. Duboscq; K. M. Ecklund; R. Ehrlich; R. S. Galik; L. Gibbons; B. Gittelman; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; L. Hsu; C. D. Jones; J. Kandaswamy; D. L. Kreinick; A. Magerkurth; H. Mahlke-Kruger; T. O. Meyer; N. B. Mistry; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; J. Pivarski; S. J. Richichi; D. Riley; A. J. Sadoff; H. Schwarthoff; M. R. Shepherd; J. G. Thayer; D. Urner; T. Wilksen; A. Warburton; M. Weinberger; S. B. Athar; P. Avery; L. Breva-Newell; V. Potlia; H. Stoeck; J. Yelton; K. Benslama; C. Cawlfield; B. I. Eisenstein; G. D. Gollin; I. Karliner; N. Lowrey; C. Plager; C. Sedlack; M. Selen; J. J. Thaler; J. Williams; K. W. Edwards; D. Besson; X. Zhao; S. Anderson; V. V. Frolov; D. T. Gong; Y. Kubota; S. Z. Li; R. Poling; A. Smith; C. J. Stepaniak; J. Urheim; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; P. Zweber; S. Ahmed; M. S. Alam; J. Ernst; L. Jian; M. Saleem; F. Wappler; K. Arms; E. Eckhart; K. K. Gan; C. Gwon; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; T. K. Pedlar; E. von Toerne; M. M. Zoeller; H. Severini; P. Skubic; S. A. Dytman; J. A. Mueller; S. Nam; V. Savinov; J. W. Hinson; J. Lee; D. H. Miller; V. Pavlunin; B. Sanghi; E. I. Shibata; I. P. J. Shipsey; D. Cronin-Hennessy; A. L. Lyon; C. S. Park; J. B. Thayer; E. H. Thorndike; T. E. Coan; Y. S. Gao; F. Liu; Y. Maravin; R. Stroynowski; M. Artuso; C. Boulahouache; S. Blusk; E. Dambasuren; O. Dorjkhaidav; N. Horwitz; G. C. Moneti; H. Muramatsu; R. Nandakumar; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; A. H. Mahmood; S. E. Csorna; I. Danko; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; M. Dubrovin; S. McGee; A. Bornheim; E. Lipeles; S. P. Pappas; A. Shapiro; W. M. Sun; A. J. Weinstein

    2004-01-01

    We report on a search for CP violation in the decay of D-0 and D-0 to K(S)(0)pi(+)pi(-). The data come from an integrated luminosity of 9.0 fb(-1) of e(+)e(-) collisions at rootsapproximate to10 GeV recorded with the CLEO II.V detector. The resonance substructure of this decay is well described by ten quasi-two-body decay channels plus a small nonresonant component. We

  3. High-Statistics Study of the tau^- -> pi^- pi^0 nu_tau Decay

    E-print Network

    M. Fujikawa; H. Hayashii; S. Eidelman; for the Belle Collaboration

    2008-10-29

    We report a high-statistics measurement of the branching fraction for tau^- --> pi^- pi^0 nu_tau and the invariant mass spectrum of the produced pi^- pi^0 system using 72.2 fb^-1 of data recorded with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e^+ e^- collider. The branching fraction obtained is (25.24 +/- 0.01 +/- 0.39)%, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The unfolded pi^- pi^0 mass spectrum is used to determine resonance parameters for the rho(770), rho'(1450), and rho"(1700) mesons. We also use this spectrum to estimate the hadronic (2pi) contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon (a_{mu}^{pipi}). Our result for a_{mu}^{pipi} integrated over the mass range sqrt{s} = 2m_{pi} - 1.8 GeV/c^2 is a_{mu}^{pipi} = (523.5 +/- 1.5 (exp) +/- 2.6 (Br) +/- 2.5 (isospin))x 10^{-10}, where the first error is due to the experimental uncertainties, the second is due to the uncertainties in the branching fractions and the third is due to the uncertainties in the isospin-violating corrections.

  4. Theoretical study on the $\\bar{p} N ->\\bar{N}N\\pi\\pi$ reactions

    E-print Network

    Cao, Xu; Xu, Hu-Shan

    2010-01-01

    Based on our recent calculation of $pN \\to NN\\pi\\pi$ reactions, we give a full analysis on the $\\bar{p}N \\to \\bar{N}N\\pi\\pi$ channels for the anti-proton beam momenta below 3.0 GeV with an effective Lagrangian approach. We find that the $N^*(1440)$ is dominant at the energies close to the threshold for its allowed channels. At higher energies and in channels where $N^*(1440)$ is forbidden by the isospin conservation, we find large contributions from double-$\\Delta$, $\\Delta(1600) \\to N^*(1440)\\pi$, $\\Delta(1600) \\to \\Delta\\pi$ and $\\Delta(1620) \\to \\Delta\\pi$. In the near-threshold region, sizeable contributions from $\\Delta \\to \\Delta\\pi$, $\\Delta \\to N\\pi$, $N \\to \\Delta\\pi$ and nucleon pole are also indicated. Though these results are similar to that of $pN\\to NN\\pi\\pi$, the nucleon-antinucleon collisions are shown to be complementary to the nucleon-nucleon collisions and may even have advantages in some aspects. So PANDA/FAIR are suggested to be an excellent place for studying the properties of relevant r...

  5. Dalitz plot analysis of $B^0 \\to \\overline{D}^0 \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays

    E-print Network

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Belogurov, Sergey; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The resonant substructures of $B^0 \\to \\overline{D}^0 \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays are studied with the Dalitz plot technique. In this study a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions collected by the LHCb detector is used. The branching fraction of the $B^0 \\to \\overline{D}^0 \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decay in the region $m(\\overline{D}^0\\pi^{\\pm})>2.1$ GeV$/c^2$ is measured to be $(8.46 \\pm 0.14 \\pm 0.29 \\pm 0.40) \\times 10^{-4}$, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic and the last arises from the normalisation channel $B^0 \\to D^*(2010)^-\\pi^+$. The $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ S-wave components are modelled with the Isobar and K-matrix formalisms. Results of the Dalitz plot analyses using both models are presented. A resonant structure at $m(\\overline{D}^0\\pi^-) \\approx 2.8$ GeV$/c^{2}$ is confirmed and its spin-parity is determined for the first time as $J^P = 3^-$. The branching fraction, mass and width of this structure are determined together with those of the $D...

  6. Search for Light Gluinos via Decays Containing pi+pi- or pi0 from a Neutral Hadron Beam at Fermilab

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Alavi-Harati; I. F. Albuquerque; T. Alexopoulos; M. Arenton; K. Arisaka; S. Averitte; A. R. Barker; L. Bellantoni; A. Bellavance; J. Belz; R. Ben-David; D. R. Bergman; E. Blucher; G. J. Bock; C. Bown; J. D. Bricker; S. Bright; E. Cheu; S. Childress; R. Coleman; M. D. Corcoran; G. Corti; B. Cox; M. B. Crisler; A. R. Erwin; R. Ford; A. Golossanov; G. Graham; J. Graham; K. Hagan; E. Halkiadakis; K. Hanagaki; S. Hidaka; Y. B. Hsiung; V. Jejer; J. Jennings; D. A. Jensen; R. Kessler; H. G. Kobrak; J. Ladue; A. Lath; A. Ledovskoy; P. L. McBride; A. P. McManus; P. Mikelsons; E. Monnier; T. Nakaya; U. Nauenberg; K. S. Nelson; H. Nguyen; V. O'dell; M. Pang; R. Pordes; V. Prasad; C. Qiao; B. Quinn; E. J. Ramberg; R. E. Ray; A. Roodman; M. Sadamoto; S. Schnetzer; K. Senyo; P. Shanahan; P. S. Shawhan; W. Slater; N. Solomey; S. V. Somalwar; R. L. Stone; I. Suzuki; E. C. Swallow; R. A. Swanson; S. A. Taegar; R. J. Tesarek; G. B. Thomson; P. A. Toale; A. K. Tripathi; R. Tschirhart; Y. W. Wah; J. Wang; H. B. White; J. Whitmore; B. Winstein; R. Winston; J.-Y. Wu; T. Yamanaka; E. D. Zimmerman

    1999-01-01

    We report on two null searches, one for the spontaneous appearance of pi+pi- pairs, another for a single pi0, consistent with the decay of a long-lived neutral particle into hadrons and an unseen neutral particle. For the lowest level gluon-gluino bound state, known as the R0, we exclude the decays R0-->pi+pi-gamma~ and R0-->pi0gamma~ for the masses of R0 and gamma~

  7. Observation of Large CP Violation and Evidence for Direct CP Violation in B0-->pi+pi- Decays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Abe; N. Abe; T. Abe; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; K. Akai; M. Akatsu; M. Akemoto; Y. Asano; T. Aso; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; Y. Ban; S. Banerjee; A. Bay; I. Bedny; I. Bizjak; A. Bondar; A. Bozek; M. Bracko; T. E. Browder; Y. Chao; K.-F. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; S.-K. Choi; Y. Choi; A. Chuvikov; S. Cole; M. Danilov; J. Dragic; A. Drutskoy; S. Eidelman; V. Eiges; Y. Enari; D. Epifanov; J. Flanagan; K. Furukawa; N. Gabyshev; A. Garmash; T. Gershon; B. Golob; J. Haba; K. Hara; N. C. Hastings; H. Hayashii; M. Hazumi; L. Hinz; T. Hokuue; Y. B. Hsiung; W.-S. Hou; H.-C. Huang; T. Iijima; H. Ikeda; K. Inami; A. Ishikawa; H. Ishino; R. Itoh; H. Iwasaki; M. Iwasaki; Y. Iwasaki; H. Kakuno; T. Kamitani; J. H. Kang; J. S. Kang; P. Kapusta; S. U. Kataoka; N. Katayama; H. Kichimi; T. Kawasaki; A. Kibayashi; H. J. Kim; J. H. Kim; S. K. Kim; K. Kinoshita; P. Koppenburg; S. Korpar; P. Krizan; P. Krokovny; S. Kumar; A. Kuzmin; Y.-J. Kwon; J. S. Lange; G. Leder; S. H. Lee; Y.-J. Lee; T. Lesiak; J. Li; A. Limosani; S.-W. Lin; D. Liventsev; J. MacNaughton; F. Mandl; D. Marlow; H. Matsumoto; T. Matsumoto; A. Matyja; S. Michizono; T. Mimashi; W. Mitaroff; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyake; H. Miyata; D. Mohapatra; G. R. Moloney; A. Murakami; T. Nagamine; Y. Nagasaka; T. Nakadaira; T. T. Nakamura; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; H. Nakazawa; Z. Natkaniec; K. Neichi; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Noguchi; T. Nozaki; S. Ogawa; Y. Ogawa; K. Ohmi; T. Ohshima; N. Ohuchi; K. Oide; T. Okabe; S. Okuno; S. L. Olsen; W. Ostrowicz; H. Ozaki; P. Pakhlov; H. Palka; C. W. Park; N. Parslow; L. E. Piilonen; N. Root; M. Rozanska; H. Sagawa; Y. Sakai; O. Schneider; J. Schümann; C. Schwanda; A. J. Schwartz; S. Semenov; K. Senyo; H. Shibuya; T. Shidara; B. Shwartz; V. Sidorov; J. B. Singh; N. Soni; R. Stamen; S. Stanic; M. Staric; R. Sugahara; K. Sumisawa; T. Sumiyoshi; K. Suzuki; S. Suzuki; O. Tajima; F. Takasaki; K. Tamai; N. Tamura; M. Tanaka; M. Tawada; Y. Teramoto; T. Tomura; T. Tsuboyama; T. Tsukamoto; S. Uehara; T. Uglov; K. Ueno; Y. Unno; S. Uno; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; C. C. Wang; M.-Z. Wang; Y. Watanabe; B. D. Yabsley; Y. Yamada; A. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamashita; M. Yamauchi; H. Yanai; Heyoung Yang; J. Ying; M. Yokoyama; M. Yoshida; Y. Yusa; C. C. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; T. Ziegler; D. Zontar; D. Zürcher

    2004-01-01

    We report the first observation of CP violation in B0-->pi+pi- decays based on 152×106 upsilo(4S)-->BB¯ decays collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We reconstruct a B0-->pi+pi- CP eigenstate and identify the flavor of the accompanying B meson from its decay products. From the distribution of the time intervals between the two B meson decay points,

  8. Atomic-scale details of dislocation - stacking fault tetrahedra interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Rodney, David [Genie Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux; Bacon, David J [University of Liverpool

    2005-01-01

    Stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) are formed during irradiation of fcc. metals and alloys with low stacking fault energy. The high number density of SFTs observed suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, be taken into account when estimating mechanical property changes of irradiated materials. The key issue is to describe the interaction between a moving dislocation and an individual SFT, which is characterized by a small physical scale of about 100 nm. In this paper we present results of an atomistic simulation of edge and screw dislocations interacting with small SFTs at different temperatures and strain rates and present mechanisms which can explain the formation of defect-free channels observed experimentally.

  9. Resonances in $J\\/\\\\psi \\\\to \\\\phi \\\\pi ^+\\\\pi ^-$ and $\\\\phi K^+K^-$

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Ablikim; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. G. Bian; D. V. Bugg; X. Cai; J. F. Chang; H. F. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. X. Chen; J. C. Chen; Jin Chen; Jun Chen; M. L. Chen; Y. B. Chen; S. P. Chi; Y. P. Chu; X. Z. Cui; H. L. Dai; Y. S. Dai; Z. Y. Deng; L. Y. Dong; Q. F. Dong; Z. Z. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; C. D. Fu; H. Y. Fu; C. S. Gao; Y. N. Gao; M. Y. Gong; W. X. Gong; S. D. Gu; Y. N. Guo; Y. Q. Guo; Z. J. Guo; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; Y. K. Heng; H. M. Hu; T. Hu; G. S. Huang; X. P. Huang; X. T. Huang; X. B. Ji; C. H. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; Y. Jin; Y. F. Lai; F. Li; G. Li; H. H. Li; J. Li; Q. J. Li; R. Y. Li; S. M. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; Y. L. Li; Y. F. Liang; H. B. Liao; C. X. Liu; F. Liu; Fang Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. B. Liu; R. G. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Z. X. Liu; F. Lu; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; C. L. Luo; L. X. Luo; X. L. Luo; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; J. M. Ma; L. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; X. B. Ma; X. Y. Ma; Z. P. Mao; X. H. Mo; J. Nie; Z. D. Nie; S. L. Olsen; H. P. Peng; N. D. Qi; C. D. Qian; H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; Z. Y. Ren; G. Rong; L. Y. Shan; L. Shang; D. L. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; F. Shi; X. Shi; H. S. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; X. Tang; N. Tao; Y. R. Tian; G. L. Tong; G. S. Varner; D. Y. Wang; J. Z. Wang; K. Wang; L. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; S. Z. Wang; W. F. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; Zheng Wang; C. L. Wei; D. H. Wei; Y. M. Wu; X. M. Xia; X. X. Xie; B. Xin; G. F. Xu; H. Xu; S. T. Xue; M. L. Yan; F. Yang; H. X. Yang; J. Yang; Y. X. Yang; M. Ye; Y. X. Ye; L. H. Yi; Z. Y. Yi; C. S. Yu; G. W. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; J. M. Yuan; Y. Yuan; S. L. Zang; Y. Zeng; Yu Zeng; B. X. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; Q. J. Zhang; S. Q. Zhang; X. M. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Y. Zhang; Yiyun Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Q. Zhang; D. X. Zhao; J. B. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; M. G. Zhao; P. P. Zhao; W. R. Zhao; X. J. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; H. Q. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; L. S. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; X. C. Zhong; B. Q. Zhou; G. M. Zhou; L. Zhou; N. F. Zhou; K. J. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Yingchun Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; B. A. Zhuang; X. A. Zhuang; B. S. Zou

    2004-01-01

    A partial wave analysis is presented of $J\\/\\\\psi \\\\to \\\\phi \\\\pi ^+\\\\pi ^-$ and\\u000a$\\\\phi K^+K^-$ from a sample of 58M $J\\/\\\\psi$ events in the BES II detector. The\\u000a$f_0(980)$ is observed clearly in both sets of data, and parameters of the\\u000aFlatt\\\\' e formula are determined accurately: $M = 965 \\\\pm 8$ (stat) $\\\\pm 6$\\u000a(syst) MeV\\/c$^2$, $g_1 =

  10. Elimination of Ambiguities in pi-pi Amplitudes Using Roy's Equations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Kaminski; L. Lesniak; B. Loiseau

    2002-01-01

    Roy's equations are used to check if scalar-isoscalar pi-pi amplitudes fitted\\u000ato the ``up-flat'' and ``down-flat'' phase shift solutions fulfill crossing\\u000asymmetry below 1 GeV. It is shown that the amplitude fitted to the\\u000a``down-flat'' solution satisfies crossing symmetry while the ``up-flat'' one\\u000adoes not. In such a way the ``up-down'' ambiguity in the scalar-isoscalar phase\\u000ashifts is resolved in

  11. The pole structure of the unitary, crossing symmetric low energy $\\\\pi\\\\pi$ scattering amplitudes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Y. Zhou; G. Y. Qin; P. Zhang; Z. G. Xiao; H. Q. Zheng; N. Wu

    2004-01-01

    The pole structure of the low energy $\\\\pi\\\\pi$ scattering amplitudes is\\u000astudied using a proper chiral unitarization method combined with crossing\\u000asymmetry and the low energy phase shift data. It is found that the $\\\\sigma$\\u000apole position is at $M_\\\\sigma=470\\\\pm 50MeV$, $\\\\Gamma_\\\\sigma=570\\\\pm 50MeV$. The\\u000aexistence of the virtual state pole in the IJ=20 channel is reconfirmed.\\u000aVarious threshold parameters are

  12. Strong Isospin Breaking in CP-even and CP-odd K -> pi pi Decays

    E-print Network

    C. E. Wolfe; K. Maltman

    2000-07-06

    Complete next-to-leading (chiral) order (NLO) expressions for the strong isospin-breaking (IB) contributions in K -> pi pi are used to discuss (1) for CP-even, the impact on the magnitude of the Delta I=1/2 Rule, and (2) for CP-odd, the strong IB correction, Omega_st, for the gluonic penguin contribution to epsilon'/epsilon, with particular emphasis on the strong low-energy constant (LEC) and loop contributions, numerical values for which are model-independent at NLO.

  13. Nitrosubstituted aromatic molecules as universal nucleobases: Computational analysis of stacking interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, Craig A.; Dobrowolski, Sarah L.; Millen, Andrea L.; Wetmore, Stacey D.

    2006-09-01

    MP2 stacking interactions between nitrosubstituted rings (3-nitropyrrole, 5-nitroindole, 4-nitropyrazole, 4-nitroimidazole), the corresponding unsubstituted rings and natural nucleobases were investigated. Although the enhancement in stacking provided by the nitro group decreases with an increase in the size of the aromatic ring, the largest stacking interactions were found for 5-nitroindole dimers. Nevertheless, the stacking interactions of nitrosubstituted rings cannot compensate for the loss of hydrogen-bonding interactions upon incorporation into DNA. The calculated stacking energies help explain experimentally observed behaviors of these molecules, and suggest that ring composition and size, in addition to external substituents, should be considered when designing novel universal nucleobases.

  14. Rotation-tunneling analysis of the origin band in the tropolone pi(*)<--pi absorption system.

    PubMed

    Bracamonte, Alfredo E; Vaccaro, Patrick H

    2004-03-01

    The tunneling-split origin band of the tropolone A (1)B(2)-X (1)A(1) (pi(*)<--pi) absorption system was interrogated under ambient, bulk-gas conditions by exploiting high-resolution degenerate four-wave mixing techniques. The inherent complexity of this spectral region was alleviated by performing polarization-resolved measurements, with judicious selection of transverse characteristics for the incident and detected electromagnetic fields enabling rovibronic transitions to be discriminated according to their attendant changes in rotational angular momentum, DeltaJ. Quantitative simulation of recorded data sets showed the vibrationless level of the electronically excited state to be bifurcated by Delta(0) (A)=19.846(25) cm(-1), representing a factor of 20 increase in proton-transfer efficiency over the corresponding level of the ground electronic state. Spectroscopic parameters extracted for the 0(+) and 0(-) manifolds of A (1)B(2) tropolone yield unexpectedly large values of the inertial defect, DeltaI(0(+) ) (A)=-0.802(86) amu A(2) and DeltaI(0(-) ) (A)=-0.882(89) amu A(2), strongly suggesting that a loss of molecular planarity accompanies the pi(*)<--pi electron promotion. These results, as well as complementary information deduced for interloping hot-band resonances, are discussed in terms of the unique structural and dynamical properties exhibited by tropolone and related proton-transfer species. PMID:15267323

  15. Examination of tyrosine/adenine stacking interactions in protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kari L; Pellock, Samuel J; Cox, James R; Cafiero, Mauricio L; Tschumper, Gregory S

    2013-11-14

    The ?-stacking interactions between tyrosine amino acid side chains and adenine-bearing ligands are examined. Crystalline protein structures from the protein data bank (PDB) exhibiting face-to-face tyrosine/adenine arrangements were used to construct 20 unique 4-methylphenol/N9-methyladenine (p-cresol/9MeA) model systems. Full geometry optimization of the 20 crystal structures with the M06-2X density functional theory method identified 11 unique low-energy conformations. CCSD(T) complete basis set (CBS) limit interaction energies were estimated for all of the structures to determine the magnitude of the interaction between the two ring systems. CCSD(T) computations with double-? basis sets (e.g., 6-31G*(0.25) and aug-cc-pVDZ) indicate that the MP2 method overbinds by as much as 3.07 kcal mol(-1) for the crystal structures and 3.90 kcal mol(-1) for the optimized structures. In the 20 crystal structures, the estimated CCSD(T) CBS limit interaction energy ranges from -4.00 to -6.83 kcal mol(-1), with an average interaction energy of -5.47 kcal mol(-1), values remarkably similar to the corresponding data for phenylalanine/adenine stacking interactions. Geometry optimization significantly increases the interaction energies of the p-cresol/9MeA model systems. The average estimated CCSD(T) CBS limit interaction energy of the 11 optimized structures is 3.23 kcal mol(-1) larger than that for the 20 crystal structures. PMID:24171662

  16. The target asymmetry P_z in {gamma}p-->p{pi}^+{pi}^- with the CLAS spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sungkyun Park, CLAS Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    The study of baryon resonances provides a deeper understanding of the strong interaction because the dynamics and relevant degrees of freedom hidden within them are reflected by the properties of the excited states of baryons. Higher-lying excited states at and above 1.9 GeV/c{sup 2} are generally predicted to have strong couplings to the {pi}{pi}N final states via {pi}{Delta} or {rho}N intermediate states. Double-pion photoproduction is therefore important to find and investigate properties of highmass resonances. The CLAS g9a (FROST) experiment, as part of the N* spectroscopy program at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab), has accumulated photoproduction data using linearly- and circularly-polarized photons incident on a longitudinally-polarized butanol target in the photon energy range 0.3 to 2.4 GeV. In this contribution, the extraction of the target asymmetry for the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} will be described and preliminary results will be presented.

  17. Study of rare gluonic penguin decays B to phi K pi (pi) at BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yanyan

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes the elementary particles and interactions at an energy level around 100 GeV or less with unprecedented success. However, it is far from being conclusive, with some essential pieces not exactly understood. While the direct access to new physics beyond the Standard Model may be beyond the energy reach of the current operating accelerators, one can look for them in virtual transitions, such as the rare gluonic penguin decays B ? ?Kpi(pi). Furthermore, in the B ? ?(1020)K*(892) decay an interesting polarization puzzle which could indicate some new physics effects has been observed and thereby motivates this thesis. Three amplitude and angular analyses on decays B ? ? K*J are performed based on about 465 million or 384 million BB¯ pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. Twelve K*J resonances are included in four different final states K +pi-, K0Sp+ , K+pi0 and K+pi+pi-. Branching fractions, CP-violation parameters and polarizations measurements are made. The branching fractions of vector-scalar decays B 0 ? ? (Kp)*00 and B+/- ? ? (Kp)*+/-0 are measured to be (4.3 +/- 0.6 +/- 0.4) x 10 -6 and (7.0 +/- 1.3 +/- 0.9) x 10-6 , respectively. The branching fractions of vector-tensor decays B0 ? ? K*2 (1430)0 and B+ ? ? K*2 (1430)+ are measured to be (7.5 +/- 0.9 +/- 0.5) x 10-6 and (8.4 +/- 1.8 +/- 1.0) x 10-6, respectively. The longitudinal polarizations fL of vector-tensor decays B0 ? ? K*2 (1430)0 and B+ ? ? K*2 (1430)+ are measured to be 0.901+0.046-0.058 +/- 0.037 and 0.80+0.09-0.10 +/- 0.03, both consistent with the naive Standard Model prediction of fL ? 1. Vector-axial-vector decay B+/- ? ? K1(1270)+/- is observed for the first time with 5.0sigma significance. The branching fraction and the longitudinal polarization of this decay are measured to be (6.1 +/- 1.6 +/- 1.1) x 10-6 and 0.46+0.12+0.06-0.13-0.07 , respectively. This polarization measurement is not consistent with the naive standard model expectation, requiring the presence of a positive-helicity amplitude from a currently unknown source. Upper limits at 90% confidence level are placed on the branching fractions of decays B0 and B +/- to final states with ? and K*(1680) 0, K*3(1780)0,K *4(2045)0 and D¯0, and K 1(1400)+/-, K*(1410)+/- and K2(1770)+/- or K2(1820)+/- mesons.

  18. Consistency tests of rho^0(770)-f_0(980) mixing in pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n

    E-print Network

    Miloslav Svec

    2015-06-10

    Analytical solutions of the S-and P-wave subsystem in pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n and pi(+)p->pi(+)pi(-)p measured on polarized targets at CERN reveal evidence for rho^0(770)-f_0(980) spin mixing. We study the response of these analytical solutions to the presence of small D-wave amplitudes with helicity 0,1 (Response analysis A) and helicity 0,1,2 (Response analysis B) which contaminate the input data. In both Response analyses the rho^0(770)-f_0(980) spin mixing effect is clearly consistent with the presence of the D-wave amplitudes provided they are not too large below 750 MeV. We also show that the mixing is consistent with the isospin relations for the S-wave intensities measured in pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n, pi(-)p->pi(0)pi(0)n and pi(+)p->pi(+)pi(+)n processes. These results strengthen the experimental evidence for the rho^0(770)-f_0(980) spin mixing in pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n found in the analytical solutions and are in agreement with recent theoretical expectations. We present a survey of moduli of the S-wave amplitudes and S-wave intensities from all amplitude analyses of the five measurements of pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n and pi(+)n->pi(+)pi(-)p on polarized targets. All analyses are in a remarkable agreement that shows a clear evidence for a resonant structure at rho^0(770) mass in the S-wave moduli and intensities in a broad confirmation of the rho^0(770)-f_0(980) spin mixing. We comment on our recent elastic and joint pipi phase-shift analyses of the CERN pi(-)pi(+) and E852 pi(0)pi(0) data and their agreement with the 1997 and 2002 Cracow Solutions, respectively. Our key observation is that all these solutions for the phase shift delta^0_S are consistent with the evidence for rho^0(770)-f_0(980) mixing documented by our survey.

  19. Measurements of branching fractions for B --> K pi and B --> pi pi decays.

    PubMed

    Lin, S-W; Chang, P; Abe, K; Abe, K; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Anipko, D; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Barberio, E; Bedny, I; Bitenc, U; Bizjak, I; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Browder, T E; Chang, M-C; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K-F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Choi, S-K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Dalseno, J; Dash, M; Dragic, J; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Fratina, S; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Go, A; Golob, B; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y B; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Imoto, A; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Kaji, H; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kichimi, H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kulasiri, R; Kumar, R; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lee, M J; Lesiak, T; Liventsev, D; Macnaughton, J; Mandl, F; Matsumoto, T; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mitaroff, W; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Moloney, G R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Natkaniec, Z; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Onuki, Y; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Pestotnik, R; Piilonen, L E; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Satoyama, N; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schümann, J; Schwartz, A J; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shibuya, H; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Somov, A; Soni, N; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stoeck, H; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tian, X C; Tikhomirov, I; Tsukamoto, T; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Ushiroda, Y; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Villa, S; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Watanabe, Y; Wicht, J; Won, E; Xie, Q L; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zupanc, A

    2007-09-21

    We report measurements of branching fractions for B --> K pi and B --> pi pi decays based on a data sample of 449 x 10(6) BB[over] pairs collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) collider. We also measure the ratios of partial widths for B-->Kpi decays, namely R(c) identical with 2Gamma(B(+) --> K(+) pi(0))/Gamma(B(+) --> K(0) pi(+)) = 1.08+/-0.06+/-0.08 and R(n) identical with Gamma(B(0) --> K(+) pi(-))/2 Gamma(B(0) --> K(0) pi(0)) = 1.08+/-0.08+/-0.08, where the first and the second errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. These ratios are sensitive to enhanced electroweak penguin contributions from new physics; the new measurements are, however, consistent with standard model expectations. PMID:17930495

  20. Measuring the charged pion polarizability in the gamma gamma -> pi+pi- reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, David W. [JLAB; Miskimen, Rory A. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Mushkarenkov, Alexander Nikolaevich [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Smith, Elton S. [JLAB

    2013-08-01

    Development has begun of a new experiment to measure the charged pion polarizability $\\alpha_{\\pi}-\\beta_{\\pi}$. The charged pion polarizability ranks among the most important tests of low-energy QCD presently unresolved by experiment. Analogous to precision measurements of $\\pi^{\\circ}\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ that test the intrinsic odd-parity (anomalous) sector of QCD, the pion polarizability tests the intrinsic even-parity sector of QCD. The measurement will be performed using the $\\gamma\\gamma\\rightarrow\\pi^{+{}}\\pi^{-{}}$ cross section accessed via the Primakoff mechanism on nuclear targets using the GlueX detector in Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The linearly polarized photon source in Hall-D will be utilized to separate the Primakoff cross-section from coherent $\\rho^{\\circ}$ production.

  1. Precision measurement of {pi}{pi} scattering lengths at the NA48/2 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Venditti, Stefano [Universita di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2010-12-28

    The NA48/2 experiment at CERN [1] collected {approx}18{center_dot}10{sup 9} charged kaon decays during the years 2003/4. Along with the primary goals of the collaboration, i.e. the measurement of the CP-violating asymmetry in the K{sup {+-}}{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sup {+-}}{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} decays thanks to the simultaneous collection of K{sup +} and K{sup -} events, the collected data allowed to perform many other interesting analyses. In this paper two independent measurements of {pi}{pi} scattering lengths will be reviewed, using NA48/2 data from the K{sup {+-}}{yields}e{sup {+-}}{nu}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay and from the cusp effect in K{sup {+-}}{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} respectively.

  2. Observation of psi(3770)->pi pi J/psi and measurement of Gamma(ee)[psi(2S)

    E-print Network

    Besson, David Zeke

    2006-03-01

    +/- 20 +/- 20)x10(-5) (11.6 sigma) for X=pi(+)pi(-), (80 +/- 25 +/- 16)x10(-5) (3.4 sigma) for X=pi(0)pi(0), and (87 +/- 33 +/- 22)x10(-5) (3.5 sigma) for X=eta, where the errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The radiative return process e...

  3. Observation of CP Violation in B0 to K+pi- and B0 to pi+pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-03-14

    The authors report observations of CP violation in the decays B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} in a sample of 383 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events. They find 4372 {+-} 82 B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays and measure the direct Cp-violating charge asymmetry {Alpha}{sub K{pi}} = -0.107 {+-} 0.018(stat){sub -0.004}{sup +0.007}(syst), which excludes the CP-conserving hypothesis with a significance of 5.5 standard deviations. In the same sample they find 1139 {+-} 49 B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays and measure the CP-violating asymmetries S{sub {pi}{pi}} = -0.60 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst) and C{sub {pi}{pi}} = -0.21 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.02(syst). CP conservation in B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} (S{sub {pi}{pi}} = C{sub {pi}{pi}} = 0) is excluded at a confidence level 1-C.L. = 8 x 10{sup -8}, corresponding to 5.4 standard deviations.

  4. Observation of the ?(1[superscript 3]DJ) bottomonium state through decays to pi+pi-?(1S)

    E-print Network

    Cowan, Ray Franklin

    Based on 122×106?(3S) events collected with the BABAR detector, we have observed the ?(13DJ) bottomonium state through the ?(3S)????(13DJ)???pi+pi-?(1S) decay chain. The significance for the J=2 member of the ?(13DJ) triplet ...

  5. Theoretical calculations of base-base interactions in nucleic acids: II. Stacking interactions in polynucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G; Sasisekharan, V

    1978-01-01

    Base-base interactions were computed for single- and double stranded poly,ucleotides, for all possible base sequences. In each case, both right and left stacking arrangements are energetically possible. The preference of one over the other depends upon the base-sequence and the orientation of the bases with respect to helix-axis. Inverted stacking arrangement is also energetically possible for both single- and double-stranded polynucleotides. Finally, interacting energies of a regular duplex and the alternative structures were compared. It was found that the type II model is energetically more favourable than the rest. PMID:662698

  6. Scalar resonances in a unitary {pi}{pi} S-wave model for D{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup+}{pi}{sup-}{pi}{sup+}.

    SciTech Connect

    Boito, D. R.; Dedonder, J.-P.; El-Bennich, B.; Leitner, O.; Loiseau, B.; Physics; Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona; Univ. de Sao Paulo; Univ. Paris; Pl. Jussieu; Lab. Nazionali de Frascati

    2009-02-19

    We propose a model for D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays following experimental results which indicate that the two-pion interaction in the S wave is dominated by the scalar resonances f{sub 0}(600)/{sigma} and f{sub 0}(980). The weak decay amplitude for D{sup +} {yields} R{pi}{sup +}, where R is a resonance that subsequently decays into {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, is constructed in a factorization approach. In the S wave, we implement the strong decay R {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} by means of a scalar form factor. This provides a unitary description of the pion-pion interaction in the entire kinematically allowed mass range m{sub {pi}{pi}}{sup 2} from threshold to about 3 GeV{sup 2}. In order to reproduce the experimental Dalitz plot for D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, we include contributions beyond the S wave. For the P wave, dominated by the {rho}(770){sup 0}, we use a Breit-Wigner description. Higher waves are accounted for by using the usual isobar prescription for the f{sub 2}(1270) and {rho}(1450){sup 0}. The major achievement is a good reproduction of the experimental m{sub {pi}{pi}}{sup 2} distribution, and of the partial as well as the total D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} branching ratios. Our values are generally smaller than the experimental ones. We discuss this shortcoming and, as a by-product, we predict a value for the poorly known D {yields} {sigma} transition form factor at q{sup 2} = m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}.

  7. K{yields}{pi}{pi} Amplitudes from Lattice QCD with a Light Charm Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Giusti, L.; Pena, C. [Department of Physics, CERN, TH Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Hernandez, P. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Universidad de Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Laine, M. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bielefeld, D-33501 Bielefeld (Germany); Wennekers, J. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Wittig, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2007-02-23

    We compute the leading-order low-energy constants of the {delta}S=1 effective weak Hamiltonian in the quenched approximation of QCD with up, down, strange, and charm quarks degenerate and light. They are extracted by comparing the predictions of finite-volume chiral perturbation theory with lattice QCD computations of suitable correlation functions carried out with quark masses ranging from a few MeV up to half of the physical strange mass. We observe a {delta}I=1/2 enhancement in this corner of the parameter space of the theory. Although matching with the experimental result is not observed for the {delta}I=1/2 amplitude, our computation suggests large QCD contributions to the physical {delta}I=1/2 rule in the GIM limit, and represents the first step to quantify the role of the charm-quark mass in K{yields}{pi}{pi} amplitudes. The use of fermions with an exact chiral symmetry is an essential ingredient in our computation.

  8. Diffractive Dissociation into {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} Final States at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Florian [Physik Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen James Franck Str., D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-10-24

    QCD predicts gluonic excitations like hybrids to contribute to the meson spectrum in addition to qq-bar pair configurations. The most promising way to identify such states is the search for J{sup PC} quantum number combinations which are forbidden in the constituent quark model. The fixed target COMPASS experiment at CERN offers the opportunity to search for such states in the light quark sector with an unprecedented statistics.Diffractive reactions of 190 GeV/c pions on a lead target were studied by COMPASS during a pilot run in 2004. A Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) of the {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} final state with 42 waves including acceptance corrections through a phase-space Monte Carlo simulation of the spectrometer was performed. The exotic {pi}{sup 1}(1600) meson with quantum numbers J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} has been clearly established in the rho-pi decay channel with a mass of 1660{+-}10(stat) MeV/c{sup 2} and a width of 269{+-}21(stat) MeV/c{sup 2}. The improved detector performance in 2008 allows us to study this channel with significantly higher statistics. First results of the ongoing analysis of the 2008 data taking period, using a 190 GeV/c pion beam on a liquid hydrogen target are presented in this paper.

  9. Diffractive Dissociation into {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} Final States at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Florian [Physik Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen James Franck Str., D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-08-05

    QCD predicts gluonic excitations like hybrids to contribute to the meson spectrum in addition to qq-bar pair configurations. The most promising way to identify such states is the search for J{sup PC} quantum number combinations which are forbidden in the constituent quark model. The fixed target COMPASS experiment at CERN offers the opportunity to search for such states in the light quark sector with an unprecedented statistics.Diffractive reactions of 190 GeV/c pions on a lead target were studied by COMPASS during a pilot run in 2004. A Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) of the {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} final state with 42 waves including acceptance corrections through a phase-space Monte Carlo simulation of the spectrometer was performed. The exotic {pi}{sub 1}(1600) meson with quantum numbers J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} has been clearly established in the rho-pi decay channel with a mass of 1660{+-}10(stat) MeV/c{sup 2} and a width of 269{+-}21(stat) MeV/c{sup 2}. The improved detector performance in 2008 allows us to study this channel with significantly higher statistics. First results of the ongoing analysis of the 2008 data taking period, using a 190 GeV/c pion beam on a liquid hydrogen target are presented in this paper.

  10. Delta I = 3/2, K to Pi Pi Decays with a Nearly Physical Pion Mass

    E-print Network

    Elaine J Goode; Matthew Lightman

    2011-01-13

    The Delta I = 3/2 K to Pi Pi decay amplitude is calculated on RBC/UKQCD 32^3 x 64, L_s=32 dynamical lattices with 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions using the DSDR and Iwasaki gauge action. The calculation is performed with a single pion mass (m_pi=141.9(2.3) MeV, partially quenched) and kaon mass (m_K=507.4(8.5) MeV) which are nearly physical, and with nearly energy conserving kinematics. Antiperiodic boundary conditions in two spatial directions are used to give the two pions non-zero ground state momentum. Results for time separations of 20, 24, 28 and 32 between the kaon and two-pion sources are computed and an error weighted average is performed to reduce the error. We find prelimenary results for Re(A_2)=1.396(081)_stat(160)_sys x 10^(-8) GeV and Im(A_2) = -8.46(45)_stat(1.95)_sys x 10^(-13) GeV.

  11. Delta I=3/2 K to pi-pi decays with nearly physical kinematics

    E-print Network

    Elaine Goode; Matthew Lightman

    2011-11-21

    The \\Delta I = 3/2 K to pi pi decay amplitude is calculated on RBC/UKQCD 32^3 times 64, L_s=32 dynamical lattices with 2+1 flavours of domain wall fermions using the Dislocation Suppressing Determinant Ratio and Iwasaki gauge action. The calculation is performed close to the physical pion mass (m_pi = 142.9(1.1) MeV and with a single lattice spacing (a^-1= 1.375(9) GeV.) We find Re(A_2) = (1.436 \\pm 0.063_{stat} \\pm 0.258_{syst}) times 10^-8 GeV and Im(A_2) = (-6.29 \\pm 0.46_{stat} \\pm 1.20_{syst})\\times 10^{-13} GeV. These results are combined with the experimental result for epsilon'/epsilon to predict Im(A_0) = -5.32(64)_{stat}(71)_{syst}\\times 10^{-11} GeV within the Standard Model. We also perform a reweighting analysis to investigate the effects of partial quenching in the light-quark sector of our calculation. Following reweighting we find Re(A_2) = (1.52\\pm 0.14_{stat}) \\times 10^-8 GeV and Im(A_2) = (-6.47 \\pm 0.55_{stat})\\times 10^-13 GeV, which are consistent with our main results.

  12. {pi}{pi}-scattering lengths at O(p{sup 6}) revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Zhihui [Grup de Fisica Teorica and IFAE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona, Spain and Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sanz-Cillero, Juan Jose [Grup de Fisica Teorica and IFAE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-05-01

    This article completes a former work where part of the O(p{sup 6}) low-energy constants entering in the {pi}{pi} scattering were estimated. Some resonance contributions were missed in former calculations and slight differences appeared with respect to our outcome. Here, we provide the full results for all the contributing O(p{sup 6}) couplings. We also perform a reanalysis of the hadronic inputs used for the estimation (resonance masses, widths...). Their reliability was checked together with the impact of the input uncertainties on the determinations of the chiral couplings and the scattering lengths a{sub J}{sup I}. Our outcome is found to be in agreement with former works though with slightly larger errors. However, the effect in the final values of the a{sub J}{sup I} is negligible after combining them with the other uncertainties. Based on this consistency, we conclude that the previous scattering length determinations seem to be rather solid and reliable, with the O(p{sup 6}) low energy constants quite under control. Nevertheless, the uncertainties found in the present work point out the limitation on further improvements unless the precision of the O(p{sup 6}) couplings is properly increased.

  13. Isobar channels and nucleon resonances in pi+ pi- electroproduction on protons

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, Gleb; Burkert, Volker; Golovach, Evgeny; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Isupov, Evgeny; Ishkhanov, Boris; Mokeev, Viktor; Shvedunov, Nikolay

    2008-07-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1134/S1063778808070272
    A comprehensive set of differential cross sections for the reaction y v p--> pi - pi + p at the square of the photon 4-momentum in the range 0.2 < Q 2 < 0.6 GeV2 and the invariant mass of final-state hadrons in the range 1.3 < W < 1.6 GeV was first obtained with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory. An analysis of these data on the basis of the phenomenological model developed by physicists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics at Moscow State University (INP MSU) and Thomas Jefferson Laboratory (INP MSU-Hall B at Jefferson Lab Collaboration) made it possible to determine, for the first time, the contributions of all isobar channels to the differential cross sections in question. The possibility of extracting the Q 2 dependences of the electromagnetic form factors for the P 11(1440) and D 13(1520) resonances in a kinematical region that is the most sensitive to the contribution of the meson-baryon cloud to the str

  14. Energy dependence of the {rho} resonance in {pi} {pi} elastic scattering from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, Christopher Thomas

    2013-02-01

    We determine the energy-dependent amplitude for elastic {pi} {pi} P-wave scattering in isospin-1 by computing part of the discrete energy spectrum of QCD in finite cubic boxes. We observe a rapidly rising phase shift that can be well described by a single {rho} Resonance. The spectrum is obtained from hadron correlators computed using lattice QCD with light quark masses corresponding to m{sub {pi}}~400 MeV. Variational analyses are performed with large bases of hadron interpolating fields including, as well as fermion bilinears that resemble q{anti q} Constructions, also operators that look like pairs of pions with definite relative and total momentum. We compute the spectrum for a range of center-of-mass momenta and in various irreducible representations of the relevant symmetry group. Hence we determine more than thirty values of the isospin-1 P-wave scattering phase shift in the elastic region, mapping out its energy dependence in unprecedented detail.

  15. Measurement of CP-violation asymmetries in D0 to Ks pi+ pi-

    E-print Network

    CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; B. Alvarez Gonzalez; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; D. Bisello; I. Bizjak; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; C. Calancha; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; M. Campbell; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; S. Carron; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; F. Chlebana; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; W. H. Chung; Y. S. Chung; M. A. Ciocci; A. Clark; C. Clarke; G. Compostella; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; F. Crescioli; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; D. Dagenhart; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; M. Dell'Orso; L. Demortier; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. d'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donatig; P. Dong; M. Dorigo; T. Dorigo; K. Ebina; A. Elagin; A. Eppig; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; N. Ershaidat; R. Eusebi; S. Farrington; M. Feindt; J. P. Fernandez; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. J. Frank; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; Y. Funakoshi; I. Furic; M. Gallinaro; J. E. Garcia; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; P. Giannetti; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; N. Goldschmidt; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. Gonzalez; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; E. Halkiadakis; A. Hamaguchi; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; D. Hare; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; M. Heck; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; S. Hewamanage; A. Hocker; W. Hopkins; D. Horn; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; M. Hurwitz; U. Husemann; N. Hussain; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; V. Khotilovich; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; S. Klimenko; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; D. Krop; M. Kruse; V. Krutelyov; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; S. Kwang; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lami; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; R. L. Lander; K. Lannon; A. Lath; G. Latino; T. LeCompte; E. Lee; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. W. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; C. -J. Lin; M. Lindgren; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; D. O. Litvintsev; C. Liu; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; K. Maeshima; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; C. Marino; M. Martinez P. Mastrandrea; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; K. S. McFarland; P. McIntyre; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; M. N. Mondragon; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; J. Morlock; P. Movilla Fernandez; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; M. S. Neubauer; J. Nielsen; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; S. Pagan Griso; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; V. Papadimitriou; A. A. Paramonov; J. Patrick; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; D. E. Pellett; A. Penzo; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; A. Rahaman; V. Ramakrishnan; N. Ranjan; I. Redondo; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; T. Riddick; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodrigo; T. Rodriguez; E. Rogers; S. Rolli; R. Roser; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; A. Safonov; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; A. Schmidt; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; A. Scribano; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; P. Sinervo; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; A. Soha; V. Sorin; H. Song; P. Squillacioti; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis

    2012-09-06

    We report a measurement of time-integrated CP-violation asymmetries in the resonant substructure of the three-body decay D0 to Ks pi+ pi- using CDF II data corresponding to 6.0 invfb of integrated luminosity from Tevatron ppbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. The charm mesons used in this analysis come from D*+(2010) to D0 pi+ and D*-(2010) to D0bar pi-, where the production flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the accompanying pion. We apply a Dalitz-amplitude analysis for the description of the dynamic decay structure and use two complementary approaches, namely a full Dalitz-plot fit employing the isobar model for the contributing resonances and a model-independent bin-by-bin comparison of the D0 and D0bar Dalitz plots. We find no CP-violation effects and measure an asymmetry of ACP = (-0.05 +- 0.57 (stat) +- 0.54 (syst))% for the overall integrated CP-violation asymmetry, consistent with the standard model prediction.

  16. Dipion invariant mass spectrum in X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{pi}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taewon; Ko, P. [Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-02-01

    It is pointed out that dipion invariant mass spectrum in X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{pi} is a useful probe for the J{sup PC} quantum number of the X(3872), complementary to the angular distributions. If X(3872) is a {sup 1}P{sub 1} state, the dipion has a peak at a low m{sub {pi}}{sub {pi}} region, which is not in accordance with the preliminary Belle data. If X(3872) is a {sup 3}D{sub 2} or {sup 3}D{sub 3} state, the dipion spectrum shows a peak at a high m{sub {pi}}{sub {pi}} region, which is broader than the {rho} resonance that might come from the decay of a molecular state: (DD{sup )}(I=1){yields}J/{psi}{rho}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Better measurement of the m{sub {pi}}{sub {pi}} spectrum will shed light on the nature of X(3872)

  17. Influence of neutron skin thickness on $\\pi^{-}/\\pi^{+}$ ratio in Pb+Pb collisions

    E-print Network

    Wei, Gao-Feng; Xu, Jun; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Within an isospin and momentum dependent transport model IBUU11 using as an input nucleon density profiles from Hartree-Fock calculations based on a modified Skyrme-like (MSL) model, we study the influence of the uncertainty of the neutron skin thickness on the $\\pi^{-}/\\pi^{+}$ ratio in both central and peripheral Pb+Pb collisions at beam energies of 400 MeV/nucleon and 1000 MeV/nucleon. Within the current experimental uncertainty range of neutron skin in $^{208}$Pb, while the neutron skin effect on the \\rpi ratio is negligible in central reactions at both energies, it increases gradually with increasing impact parameter and becomes comparable with or even larger than the symmetry energy effect in peripheral collisions especially at 400 MeV/nucleon. Moreover, we found that while the \\rpi ratio is larger with a softer \\esym in central collisions, above certain impact parameters depending on the size of the neutron skin, a stiffer \\esym can lead to a larger \\rpi ratio as most of the pions are produced at densi...

  18. A breathing wormlike chain model on DNA denaturation and bubble: effects of stacking interactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Yeol; Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Sung, Wokyung

    2008-02-01

    DNA stably exists as a double-stranded structure due to hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions between bases. The stacking interactions are strengthened when DNA is paired, which results in great enhancement of bending rigidity. We study the effects of this stacking-induced stiffness difference on DNA denaturation and bubble formations. To this end, we model double-stranded DNA as a duplex of two semiflexible chains whose persistence length varies depending on the base-pair distance. Using this model, we perform the Langevin dynamics simulation to examine the characteristics of the denaturation transition and the statistics of the bubbles. We find that the inclusion of the stacking interactions causes the denaturation transition to be much sharper than otherwise. At physiological temperature, the stacking interactions prohibit the initiation of bubble formation but promote bubbles, once grown, to retain the large size. PMID:18266461

  19. Study of $\\\\gamma\\\\pi \\\\to \\\\pi\\\\pi$ below 1 GeV using Integral Equation Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tran N. Truong; Centre de Physique Theorique

    2001-01-01

    The scattering of $\\\\gamma \\\\pi \\\\to \\\\pi \\\\pi$ is studied using the axial\\u000aanomaly, elastic unitarity, analyticity and crossing symmetry. Using the\\u000atechnique to derive the Roy's equation, an integral equation for the P-wave\\u000aamplitude is obtained in terms of the strong P-wave pion pion phase shifts. Its\\u000asolution is obtained numerically by an iteration procedure using the starting\\u000apoint

  20. Analysis of the resonant components in $\\\\overline{B}^0_s \\\\to J\\/\\\\psi\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Aaij; C Abellan Beteta; B Adeva; M Adinolfi; C Adrover; A Affolder; Z Ajaltouni; J Albrecht; F Alessio; M Alexander; S Ali; G Alkhazov; P Alvarez Cartelle; A A Alves Jr; S Amato; Y Amhis; J Anderson; R B Appleby; O Aquines Gutierrez; F Archilli; A Artamonov; M Artuso; E Aslanides; G Auriemma; S Bachmann; J J Back; V Balagura; W Baldini; R J Barlow; C Barschel; S Barsuk; W Barter; A Bates; C Bauer; Th Bauer; A Bay; I Bediaga; S Belogurov; K Belous; I Belyaev; E Ben-Haim; M Benayoun; G Bencivenni; S Benson; J Benton; R Bernet; M-O Bettler; M van Beuzekom; A Bien; S Bifani; T Bird; A Bizzeti; P M Bjørnstad; T Blake; F Blanc; C Blanks; J Blouw; S Blusk; A Bobrov; V Bocci; A Bondar; N Bondar; W Bonivento; S Borghi; A Borgia; T J V Bowcock; C Bozzi; T Brambach; J van den Brand; J Bressieux; D Brett; M Britsch; T Britton; N H Brook; H Brown; A Büchler-Germann; I Burducea; A Bursche; J Buytaert; S Cadeddu; O Callot; M Calvi; M Calvo Gomez; A Camboni; P Campana; A Carbone; G Carboni; R Cardinale; A Cardini; L Carson; K Carvalho Akiba; G Casse; M Cattaneo; Ch Cauet; M Charles; Ph Charpentier; N Chiapolini; K Ciba; X Cid Vidal; G Ciezarek; P E L Clarke; M Clemencic; H V Cliff; J Closier; C Coca; V Coco; J Cogan; P Collins; A Comerma-Montells; A Contu; A Cook; M Coombes; G Corti; B Couturier; G A Cowan; R Currie; C D'Ambrosio; P David; I De Bonis; K De Bruyn; S De Capua; M De Cian; J M De Miranda; L De Paula; P De Simone; D Decamp; M Deckenhoff; H Degaudenzi; L Del Buono; C Deplano; D Derkach; O Deschamps; F Dettori; J Dickens; H Dijkstra; P Diniz Batista; F Domingo Bonal; S Donleavy; F Dordei; A Dosil Suárez; D Dossett; A Dovbnya; F Dupertuis; R Dzhelyadin; A Dziurda; S Easo; U Egede; V Egorychev; S Eidelman; D van Eijk; F Eisele; S Eisenhardt; R Ekelhof; L Eklund; Ch Elsasser; D Elsby; D Esperante Pereira; A Falabella; C Färber; G Fardell; C Farinelli; S Farry; V Fave; V Fernandez Albor; M Ferro-Luzzi; S Filippov; C Fitzpatrick; M Fontana; F Fontanelli; R Forty; O Francisco; M Frank; C Frei; M Frosini; S Furcas; A Gallas Torreira; D Galli; M Gandelman; P Gandini; Y Gao; J-C Garnier; J Garofoli; J Garra Tico; L Garrido; D Gascon; C Gaspar; R Gauld; N Gauvin; M Gersabeck; T Gershon; Ph Ghez; V Gibson; V V Gligorov; C Göbel; D Golubkov; A Golutvin; A Gomes; H Gordon; M Grabalosa Gándara; R Graciani Diaz; L A Granado Cardoso; E Graugés; G Graziani; A Grecu; E Greening; S Gregson; B Gui; E Gushchin; Yu Guz; T Gys; C Hadjivasiliou; G Haefeli; C Haen; S C Haines; T Hampson; S Hansmann-Menzemer; R Harji; N Harnew; J Harrison; P F Harrison; T Hartmann; J He; V Heijne; K Hennessy; P Henrard; J A Hernando Morata; E van Herwijnen; E Hicks; K Holubyev; P Hopchev; W Hulsbergen; P Hunt; T Huse; R S Huston; D Hutchcroft; D Hynds; V Iakovenko; P Ilten; J Imong; R Jacobsson; A Jaeger; M Jahjah Hussein; E Jans; F Jansen; P Jaton; B Jean-Marie; F Jing; M John; D Johnson; C R Jones; B Jost; M Kaballo; S Kandybei; M Karacson; T M Karbach; J Keaveney; I R Kenyon; U Kerzel; T Ketel; A Keune; B Khanji; Y M Kim; M Knecht; R F Koopman; P Koppenburg; M Korolev; A Kozlinskiy; L Kravchuk; K Kreplin; M Kreps; G Krocker; P Krokovny; F Kruse; K Kruzelecki; M Kucharczyk; V Kudryavtsev; T Kvaratskheliya; V N La Thi; D Lacarrere; G Lafferty; A Lai; D Lambert; R W Lambert; E Lanciotti; G Lanfranchi; C Langenbruch; T Latham; C Lazzeroni; R Le Gac; J van Leerdam; J-P Lees; R Lefèvre; A Leflat; J Lefrançois; O Leroy; T Lesiak; L Li; L Li Gioi; M Lieng; M Liles; R Lindner; C Linn; B Liu; G Liu; J von Loeben; J H Lopes; E Lopez Asamar; N Lopez-March; H Lu; J Luisier; F Machefert; I V Machikhiliyan; F Maciuc; O Maev; J Magnin; S Malde; R M D Mamunur; G Manca; G Mancinelli; N Mangiafave; U Marconi; R Märki; J Marks; G Martellotti; A Martens; L Martin; A Martín Sánchez; M Martinelli; D Martinez Santos; A Massafferri; Z Mathe; C Matteuzzi; M Matveev; E Maurice; B Maynard; A Mazurov; G McGregor; R McNulty; M Meissner; M Merk; J Merkel; S Miglioranzi; D A Milanes; M-N Minard; J Molina Rodriguez; S Monteil; D Moran; P Morawski; I Mous; F Muheim; K Müller; R Muresan; B Muryn; B Muster; J Mylroie-Smith; P Naik; T Nakada; R Nandakumar; I Nasteva; M Needham; N Neufeld; A D Nguyen; C Nguyen-Mau; M Nicol; V Niess; N Nikitin; T Nikodem; A Nomerotski; A Novoselov; A Oblakowska-Mucha; V Obraztsov; S Oggero; S Ogilvy; O Okhrimenko; R Oldeman; M Orlandea; J M Otalora Goicochea; P Owen; B K Pal; J Palacios; A Palano; M Palutan; J Panman; A Papanestis; M Pappagallo; C Parkes; C J Parkinson; G Passaleva; G D Patel; M Patel; S K Paterson; G N Patrick; C Patrignani; C Pavel-Nicorescu; A Pazos Alvarez; A Pellegrino; G Penso; M Pepe Altarelli; S Perazzini; D L Perego; E Perez Trigo; A Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo; P Perret; M Perrin-Terrin; G Pessina; A Petrolini; A Phan; E Picatoste Olloqui; B Pie Valls; B Pietrzyk; T Pila?; D Pinci; R Plackett; S Playfer; M Plo Casasus; G Polok; A Poluektov

    2012-01-01

    The decay $B^0_s \\\\to J\\/\\\\psi\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ can be exploited to study $CP$ violation. A detailed understanding of its structure is imperative in order to optimize its usefulness. An analysis of this three-body final state is performed using a 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ sample of data produced in 7 TeV $pp$ collisions at the LHC and collected by the LHCb experiment. A modified Dalitz

  1. Evidence for CP-violating asymmetries in B0-->pi+pi- decays and constraints on the CKM angle phi2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Abe; N. Abe; T. Abe; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; K. Akai; M. Akatsu; M. Akemoto; Y. Asano; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; Y. Ban; E. Banas; A. Bay; I. Bedny; P. K. Behera; I. Bizjak; A. Bondar; A. Bozek; M. Bracko; J. Brodzicka; T. E. Browder; B. C. Casey; P. Chang; K.-F. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; S.-K. Choi; Y. Choi; M. Danilov; J. Dragic; A. Drutskoy; S. Eidelman; V. Eiges; C. W. Everton; J. Flanagan; C. Fukunaga; K. Furukawa; N. Gabyshev; A. Garmash; T. Gershon; B. Golob; R. Guo; C. Hagner; K. Hara; N. C. Hastings; K. Hasuko; H. Hayashii; M. Hazumi; T. Higuchi; L. Hinz; T. Hojo; T. Hokuue; Y. Hoshi; W.-S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; H.-C. Huang; T. Igaki; Y. Igarashi; T. Iijima; H. Ikeda; K. Inami; A. Ishikawa; H. Ishino; R. Itoh; H. Iwasaki; Y. Iwasaki; H. K. Jang; J. S. Kang; P. Kapusta; S. U. Kataoka; N. Katayama; G. Katano; H. Kawai; N. Kawamura; T. Kawasaki; H. Kichimi; M. Kikuchi; D. W. Kim; H. J. Kim; H. O. Kim; Hyunwoo Kim; J. H. Kim; S. K. Kim; S. Kobayashi; S. Korpar; P. Krizan; P. Krokovny; T. Kubo; R. Kulasiri; S. Kumar; A. Kuzmin; Y.-J. Kwon; J. S. Lange; G. Leder; S. H. Lee; J. Li; S.-W. Lin; J. MacNaughton; F. Mandl; D. Marlow; S. Matsumoto; T. Matsumoto; S. Michizono; T. Mimashi; W. Mitaroff; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyake; H. Miyata; G. R. Moloney; T. Mori; A. Murakami; Y. Nagasaka; T. Nakadaira; T. T. Nakamura; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; H. Nakayama; J. W. Nam; K. Neichi; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Noguchi; T. Nozaki; S. Ogawa; Y. Ogawa; K. Ohmi; Y. Ohnishi; T. Ohshima; N. Ohuchi; T. Okabe; S. Okuno; S. L. Olsen; Y. Onuki; W. Ostrowicz; H. Ozaki; H. Palka; C. W. Park; K. S. Park; L. S. Peak; J.-P. Perroud; M. Peters; L. E. Piilonen; M. Rozanska; K. Rybicki; H. Sagawa; S. Saitoh; Y. Sakai; T. R. Sarangi; M. Satapathy; A. Satpathy; O. Schneider; S. Schrenk; J. Schümann; C. Schwanda; S. Semenov; K. Senyo; M. E. Sevior; H. Shibuya; T. Shidara; B. Shwartz; V. Sidorov; J. B. Singh; S. Stanic; M. Staric; R. Sugahara; A. Sugiyama; K. Sumisawa; T. Sumiyoshi; K. Suzuki; S. Suzuki; T. Takahashi; F. Takasaki; K. Tamai; N. Tamura; J. Tanaka; M. Tanaka; M. Tawada; G. N. Taylor; Y. Teramoto; S. Tokuda; T. Tomura; K. Trabelsi; T. Tsuboyama; T. Tsukamoto; S. Uehara; Y. Unno; S. Uno; N. Uozaki; S. E. Vahsen; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; C. C. Wang; J. G. Wang; M.-Z. Wang; Y. Watanabe; E. Won; B. D. Yabsley; Y. Yamada; A. Yamaguchi; H. Yamamoto; Y. Yamashita; M. Yamauchi; M. Yokoyama; M. Yoshida; C. C. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; D. Zontar

    2003-01-01

    We present an improved measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in B0-->pi+pi- decays based on a 78 fb-1 data sample collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We reconstruct one neutral B meson as a B0-->pi+pi- CP eigenstate and identify the flavor of the accompanying B meson from inclusive properties of its decay products.

  2. Phase behavior of symmetric disk-coil macromolecules with stacking interactions

    E-print Network

    Kim, YongJoo

    We investigate using Monte Carlo simulations in the NPT ensemble the self-assembly of disk-coil macromolecules with stacking interactions. The disk-coil molecules are composed of a planar disk that is covalently bonded to ...

  3. Study of the rare $B_s^0$ and $B^0$ decays into the $\\pi^+\\pi^-\\mu^+\\mu^-$ final state

    E-print Network

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Domenico, Antonio; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena

    2015-01-01

    A search for the rare decays $B_s^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $B^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\mu^+\\mu^-$ is performed in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb detector in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. Decay candidates with pion pairs that have invariant mass in the range 0.5-1.3 GeV/$c^2$ and with muon pairs that do not originate from a resonance are considered. The first observation of the decay $B_s^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and the first evidence of the decay $B^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\mu^+\\mu^-$ are obtained and the branching fractions are measured to be $\\mathcal{B}(B_s^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\mu^+\\mu^-)=(8.6\\pm 1.5\\,({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.7\\,({\\rm syst})\\pm 0.7\\,({\\rm norm}))\\times 10^{-8}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(B^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\mu^+\\mu^-)=(2.11\\pm 0.51\\,({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.15\\,({\\rm syst})\\pm 0.16\\,({\\rm norm}) )\\times 10^{-8}$, where the third uncertainty is due to the branching fraction of the decay $B^0\\to J/\\psi(\\to \\mu^+\\mu^-)K^*(890)...

  4. Study of the rare $B^{0}_{s}$ and $B^{0}$ decays into the $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ final state at LHCb

    E-print Network

    Komarov, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    A search for the rare decays B0s->pi pi mu mu and B0->pi pi mu mu is performed in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1 collected by the LHCb detector in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8TeV. Decay candidates with pion pairs that have invariant mass in the range 0.5--1.3 GeV/c2 and with muon pairs that do not originate from a resonance are considered. The first observation of the decay B0s->pi pi mu mu and the first evidence of the decay B0->pi pi mu mu are obtained and the branching fractions, restricted to the dipion-mass range considered, are measured to be Br(B0s->pi pi mu mu) = (8.6 +/- 1.5 (stat) +/- 0.7 (syst) +/- 0.7 (norm))*10^-8 and Br(B0->pi pi mu mu) = (2.11 +/- 0.51 (stat) +/- 0.15 (syst) +/- 0.16 (norm)) *10^-8, where the third uncertainty is due to the branching fraction of the decay B0->J/psi K*, used as a normalisation.

  5. Study of the reaction e^{+}e^{-}->psi(2S)pi^{-}pi^{-} via initial state radiation at BaBar

    E-print Network

    The BABAR Collaboration

    2012-11-28

    We study the process $e^+e^-\\to\\psi(2S)\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ with initial-state-radiation events produced at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy collider. The data were recorded with the \\BaBar detector at center-of-mass energies at and near the $\\Upsilon(\\mathrm{nS})$ (n = 2, 3, 4) resonances and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 520$fb^{-}$. We investigate the $\\psi(2S)\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ mass distribution from 3.95 to 5.95 $GeV/c^{2}$, and measure the center-of-mass energy dependence of the associated $e^+e^-\\to \\psi(2S)\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ cross section. The mass distribution exhibits evidence of two resonant structures. A fit to the $\\psi(2S)\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ mass distribution corresponding to the decay mode $\\psi(2S)\\to J/\\psi \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ yields a mass value of $4340 \\pm16$ (stat) $\\pm 9$ (syst) ${\\mathrm {MeV/c^{2}}}and a width of $94 \\pm 32$ (stat) $\\pm 13$ (syst) MeV for the first resonance, and for the second a mass value of $4669 \\pm 21$ (stat) $\\pm 3$ (syst) ${\\mathrm {MeV/c^{2}}}$ and a width of $104 \\pm 48$ (stat) $\\pm 10$ (syst) MeV. In addition, we show the $pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ mass distributions for these resonant regions.

  6. Search for resonances decaying to etac pi pi- in two-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

    2012-06-18

    We report a study of the process {gamma}{gamma} {yields} X {yields} {eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, where X stands for one of the resonances {chi}{sub c2}(1P), {eta}{sub c}(2S), X(3872), X(3915), or {chi}{sub c2}(2P). The analysis is performed with a data sample of 473.9 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy electron-positron collider. We do not observe a significant signal for any channel, and calculate 90% confidence-level upper limits on the products of branching fractions and two-photon widths {Lambda}{sub X{yields}{gamma}{gamma}} {Beta}(X {yields} {eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}): 15.7 eV for {chi}{sub c2}(1P), 133 eV for {eta}{sub c}(2S), 11.1 eV for X(3872) (assuming it to be a spin-2 state), 16 eV for X(3915) (assuming it to be a spin-2 state), and 19 eV for {chi}{sub c2}(2P). We also report upper limits on the ratios of branching fractions {Beta}({eta}{sub c}(2S) {yields} {eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}({eta}{sub c}(2S) {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 10.0 and {Beta}({chi}{sub c2}(1P) {yields} {eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}({chi}{sub c2}(1P) {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 32.9 at the 90% confidence level.

  7. Interaction of dopant atoms with stacking faults in silicon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yutaka Ohno; Yuki Tokumoto; Hiroto Taneichi; Ichiro Yonenaga; Kensuke Togase; Sigeto R. Nishitani

    The width of a stacking fault ribbon bound by a pair of partial dislocations in silicon crystals was unchanged when boron and gallium atoms of p-type dopant were agglomerated nearby the ribbon by annealing, even though the width increased when n-type dopant atoms were agglomerated as previously reported [Y. Ohno, Y. Tokumoto, I. Yonenaga, Thin Solid Films, accepted for publication].

  8. Measurement of CP Asymmetries and Branching Fractions in B0 -> pi+ pi-, B0 -> K+ pi-, B0 -> pi0 pi0, B0 -> K0 pi0 and Isospin Analysis of B -> pi pi Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-08-01

    The authors present preliminary results of improved measurements of the CP-violating asymmetries and branching fractions in the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. This update includes all data taken at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the asymmetric PEP-II B-meson factory at SLAC, corresponding to 467 {+-} 5 million B{bar B} pairs. They find S{sub {pi}{pi}} = -0.68 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.03, C{sub {pi}{pi}} = -0.25 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, {Alpha}{sub K{sub {pi}}} = -0.107 {+-} 0.016{sub -0.004},{sup +0.006}, C{sub {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}} = -0.43 {+-} 0.26 {+-} 0.05, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.83 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (10.1 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. They observe CP violation with a significance of 6.7{sigma} in B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -} and 6.1{sigma} in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Constraints on the Unitarity Triangle angle {alpha} are determined from the isospin relation between all B {yields} {pi}{pi} rates and asymmetries.

  9. Single Electron Detection for SLD Crid and Multi - Spectroscopy in Negative Kaon Proton Interactions at 11 Gev/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensing, Paul Elliot

    This thesis consists of two independent parts: development of single electron detectors and a pulse finding algorithm for the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD Detector at SLAC; and the analyses of unflavored, light quark meson systems using data from the LASS Spectrometer. The CRID sections describe the design, construction, and testing of the multi-wire-proportional chambers used to measure all three co-ordinates of the conversion of UV Cherenkov photons into single electrons in the CRID drift boxes. The detectors use charge division to measure one of the co-ordinates and were carefully designed and built to provide 1 mm resolution. The software algorithm used for CRID to determine the co-ordinates of signals in the digitized data is also described. The algorithm uses knowledge of the fixed pulse shape to deconvolve the amplifier shape from the data, providing good single pulse resolution and excellent double pulse separation. The spectroscopic analyses are based on data from a 4.1 (nb)^{-1} exposure of the LASS Spectrometer in K^-p interactions at 11 GeV/c. The channels Lambda pi^{+}pi^{-} and Lambdapi^{+ }pi^{-}pi^0 are studied in detail. Brief surveys of Lambda pi^{+}pi^{-} pi^{+}pi^{-} and Lambdapi^{+ }pi^{-}pi^{+ }pi^{-}pi^0 are presented. A partial wave analysis of the pi ^{+}pi^{-} system in the Lambdapi^{+ }pi^{-} channel provides evidence for a spin 1 resonance at about 1.3 GeV/c ^2. A fit of this new state, the rho(1300), gives a mass of 1290_sp {-30}{+20}MeV/c^2 and a width of 120_sp{-50} {+60}MeV/c^2. The elasticity of the rho(1300) is estimated as ~5%. Some evidence of rho(1690) production is seen in the pi^{+}pi^{-} system. A partial wave analysis of the pi ^{-}pi^{0} system produced against a backward-going Sigma ^+(1385) in Lambdapi ^{+}pi^{-}pi ^0 again shows evidence of rho (1300) production, with parameters consistent with the pi^{+}pi^ {-} analysis. The examinations of the 4 pion mass spectra in Lambdapi^{+}pi ^{-}pi^{+}pi ^{-} and Sigma^+ (1385)pi^{+}pi ^{-}pi^{-}pi ^0 do not provide any definite evidence of rho(1300) production. The upper limits on the 4pi to 2pi branching ratios are 3 for the neutral and 6 for the charged system. Data for the K_sp{rm S}{0}K^-, K^+K^-, and {| K}^0K ^{+/-}pi^mp modes previously analysed by LASS are presented with attention to possible contributions from rho(1300). No evidence of rho (1300) is seen.

  10. Search for CP Violation in the Decays D0-->K-K+ and D0-->pi-pi+

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; D. Bailey; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; Y. Zheng; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini

    2008-01-01

    We measure time-integrated CP-violating asymmetries of neutral charmed mesons in the modes D0-->K-K+ and D0-->pi-pi+ with the highest precision to date by using D0-->K-pi+ decays to correct detector asymmetries. An analysis of 385.8fb-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector yields values of aCPKK=(0.00±0.34(stat)±0.13(syst))% and aCPpipi=(-0.24±0.52(stat)±0.22(syst))%, which agree with standard model predictions.

  11. Observation of psi(3770)->pi pi J\\/psi and measurement of Gamma(ee)[psi(2S)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. E. Adam; J. P. Alexander; K. Berkelman; D. G. Cassel; V. Crede; J. E. Duboscq; K. M. Ecklund; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; R. S. Galik; L. Gibbons; B. Gittelman; R. Gray; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; D. Hertz; C. D. Jones; J. Kandaswamy; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; H. Mahlke-Kruger; T. O. Meyer; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; E. A. Phillips; J. Pivarski; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; H. Schwarthoff; X. Shi; M. R. Shepherd; S. Stroiney; W. M. Sun; D. Urner; T. Wilksen; K. M. Weaver; M. Weinberger; S. B. Athar; P. Avery; L. Breva-Newell; R. Patel; V. Potlia; H. Stoeck; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; C. Cawlfield; B. I. Eisenstein; G. D. Gollin; I. Karliner; D. Kim; N. Lowrey; P. Naik; C. Sedlack; M. Selen; E. J. White; J. Williams; J. Wiss; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; D. Cronin-Hennessy; K. Y. Gao; D. T. Gong; J. Hietala; Y. Kubota; T. Klein; B. W. Lang; S. Z. Li; R. Poling; A. W. Scott; A. Smith; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; P. Zweber; J. Ernst; H. Severini; S. A. Dytman; W. Love; S. Mehrabyan; J. A. Mueller; V. Savinov; Z. Li; A. Lopez; H. Mendez; J. Ramirez; G. S. Huang; D. H. Miller; V. Pavlunin; B. Sanghi; I. P. J. Shipsey; G. S. Adams; M. Anderson; J. P. Cummings; I. Danko; J. Napolitano; Q. He; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; E. H. Thorndike; T. E. Coan; Y. S. Gao; F. Liu; M. Artuso; C. Boulahouache; S. Blusk; J. Butt; O. Dorjkhaidav; J. Li; N. Menaa; R. Nandakumar; K. Randrianarivony; R. Redjimi; R. Sia; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; K. Zhang; S. E. Csorna; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; M. Dubrovin; R. A. Briere; G. P. Chen; J. Chen; T. Ferguson; G. Tatishvili; H. Vogel; M. E. Watkins; J. L. Rosner

    2006-01-01

    We observe signals for the decays psi(3770)-> XJ\\/psi from data acquired with the CLEO detector operating at the CESR e(+)e(-) collider with root s=3773 MeV. We measure the following branching fractions B(psi(3770)-> XJ\\/psi) and significances: (189 +\\/- 20 +\\/- 20)x10(-5) (11.6 sigma) for X=pi(+)pi(-), (80 +\\/- 25 +\\/- 16)x10(-5) (3.4 sigma) for X=pi(0)pi(0), and (87 +\\/- 33 +\\/- 22)x10(-5) (3.5

  12. Cabibbo-suppressed decays of D+->pi(+)pi(0),K+(K)over-bar(0),K+pi(0)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Arms; E. Eckhart; K. K. Gan; C. Gwon; K. Honscheid; R. Kass; H. Severini; P. Skubic; S. A. Dytman; J. A. Mueller; S. Nam; V. Savinov; G. S. Huang; J. Lee; D. H. Miller; V. Pavlunin; B. Sanghi; E. I. Shibata; I. P. J. Shipsey; D. Cronin-Hennessy; C. S. Park; J. B. Thayer; E. H. Thorndike; T. E. Coan; Y. S. Gao; F. Liu; R. Stroynowski; M. Artuso; C. Boulahouache; S. Blusk; E. Dambasuren; O. Dorjkhaidav; H. Muramatsu; R. Nandakumar; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; A. H. Mahmood; S. E. Csorna; I. Danko; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; M. Dubrovin; A. Bornheim; E. Lipeles; S. P. Pappas; A. Shapiro; W. M. Sun; A. J. Weinstein; R. A. Briere; G. P. Chen; T. Ferguson; G. Tatishvili; H. Vogel; M. E. Watkins; N. E. Adam; J. P. Alexander; K. Berkelman; V. Boisvert; D. G. Cassel; J. E. Duboscq; K. M. Ecklund; R. Ehrlich; R. S. Galik; L. Gibbons; B. Gittelman; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; L. Hsu; C. D. Jones; J. Kandaswamy; D. L. Kreinick; A. Magerkurth; H. Mahlke-Kruger; T. O. Meyer; N. B. Mistry; J. R. Patterson; T. K. Pedlar; D. Peterson; J. Pivarski; S. J. Richichi; D. Riley; A. J. Sadoff; H. Schwarthoff; M. R. Shepherd; J. G. Thayer; D. Urner; T. Wilksen; A. Warburton; M. Weinberger; S. B. Athar; P. Avery; L. Breva-Newell; V. Potlia; H. Stoeck; J. Yelton; B. I. Eisenstein; G. D. Gollin; I. Karliner; N. Lowrey; C. Plager; C. Sedlack; M. Selen; J. J. Thaler; J. Williams; K. W. Edwards; D. Besson; V. V. Frolov; K. Y. Gao; D. T. Gong; Y. Kubota; S. Z. Li; R. Poling; A. W. Scott; A. Smith; C. J. Stepaniak; J. Urheim; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; P. Zweber; J. Ernst

    2004-01-01

    Using a 13.7 fb(-1) data sample collected with the CLEO II and II.V detectors, we report new branching fraction measurements for two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes of the D+ meson: B(D+-->pi(+)pi(0))=(1.31+\\/-0.17+\\/-0.09+\\/-0.09)x10(-3) and B(D+-->K+(K) over bar (0))=(5.24+\\/-0.43+\\/-0.20+\\/-0.34)x10(-3) which are significant improvements over past measurements. The errors reflect statistical and systematical uncertainties as well as the uncertainty in the absolute D+ branching fraction

  13. Measurement of the e+e--->pi+pi-J\\/psi Cross Section Via Initial-State Radiation at Belle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Z. Yuan; C. P. Shen; P. Wang; S. McOnie; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; S. Bahinipati; V. Balagura; E. Barberio; I. Bedny; U. Bitenc; A. Bondar; A. Bozek; M. Bracko; J. Brodzicka; T. E. Browder; M.-C. Chang; P. Chang; A. Chen; K.-F. Chen; W. T. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; I.-S. Cho; Y. Choi; J. Dalseno; M. Danilov; M. Dash; S. Eidelman; S. Fratina; N. Gabyshev; B. Golob; H. Ha; J. Haba; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; M. Hazumi; D. Heffernan; T. Hokuue; Y. Hoshi; W.-S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; H. J. Hyun; T. Iijima; K. Ikado; K. Inami; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; D. H. Kah; H. Kaji; J. H. Kang; N. Katayama; H. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; H. Kichimi; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; S. Korpar; P. Krizan; P. Krokovny; R. Kumar; C. C. Kuo; A. Kuzmin; Y.-J. Kwon; S. E. Lee; T. Lesiak; S.-W. Lin; Y. Liu; D. Liventsev; F. Mandl; D. Marlow; A. Matyja; T. Medvedeva; W. Mitaroff; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyake; H. Miyata; Y. Miyazaki; R. Mizuk; T. Mori; Y. Nagasaka; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Ogawa; T. Ohshima; S. Okuno; S. L. Olsen; H. Ozaki; P. Pakhlov; G. Pakhlova; H. Palka; K. S. Park; L. S. Peak; L. E. Piilonen; Y. Sakai; O. Schneider; J. Schümann; R. Seidl; K. Senyo; M. E. Sevior; M. Shapkin; H. Shibuya; J.-G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; J. B. Singh; A. Sokolov; A. Somov; M. Staric; T. Sumiyoshi; F. Takasaki; M. Tanaka; G. N. Taylor; Y. Teramoto; I. Tikhomirov; S. Uehara; Y. Unno; S. Uno; Y. Usov; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; K. Vervink; S. Villa; A. Vinokurova; C. C. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Watanabe; E. Won; B. D. Yabsley; A. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamashita; C. C. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; V. Zhulanov; A. Zupanc

    2007-01-01

    The cross section for e+e--->pi+pi-J\\/psi between 3.8 and 5.5GeV\\/c2 is measured using a 548fb-1 data sample collected on or near the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at KEKB. A peak near 4.25GeV\\/c2, corresponding to the so called Y(4260), is observed. In addition, there is another cluster of events at around 4.05GeV\\/c2. A fit using two interfering Breit-Wigner shapes describes

  14. Amplitude analysis of e+e- => Y(nS)pi+pi- at sqrt(s)=10.865 GeV

    E-print Network

    A. Garmash; A. Bondar; A. Kuzmin; A. Abdesselam; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; S. Al Said; D. M. Asner; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; R. Ayad; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; V. Bhardwaj; A. Bobrov; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bracko; T. E. Browder; D. Cervenkov; V. Chekelian; A. Chen; B. G. Cheon; K. Chilikin; R. Chistov; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dalseno; Z. Dolezal; A. Drutskoy; D. Dutta; S. Eidelman; D. Epifanov; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; T. Ferber; A. Frey; O. Frost; V. Gaur; S. Ganguly; R. Gillard; R. Glattauer; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; T. Hara; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; X. H. He; Y. Hoshi; W. -S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; H. J. Hyun; T. Iijima; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; T. Iwashita; I. Jaegle; T. Julius; J. H. Kang; E. Kato; P. Katrenko; H. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; H. Kichimi; C. Kiesling; D. Y. Kim; J. B. Kim; J. H. Kim; K. T. Kim; M. J. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; J. Klucar; B. R. Ko; P. Kodys; S. Korpar; P. Krizan; P. Krokovny; T. Kuhr; Y. -J. Kwon; S. -H. Lee; Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; J. Libby; C. Liu; Z. Q. Liu; D. Liventsev; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; G. B. Mohanty; A. Moll; R. Mussa; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nayak; E. Nedelkovska; N. K. Nisar; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Okuno; W. Ostrowicz; P. Pakhlov; H. Park; H. K. Park; T. K. Pedlar; R. Pestotnik; M. Petric; L. E. Piilonen; E. Ribezl; M. Ritter; M. Rohrken; A. Rostomyan; S. Ryu; T. Saito; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; D. Santel; T. Sanuki; Y. Sato; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; A. J. Schwartz; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; M. E. Sevior; M. Shapkin; V. Shebalin; C. P. Shen; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; F. Simon; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; S. Stanic; M. Staric; M. Steder; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; K. Tanida; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; K. Trabelsi; M. Uchida; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; Y. Usov; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; A. Vinokurova; V. Vorobyev; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; P. Wang; X. L. Wang; M. Watanabe; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; H. Yamamoto; Y. Yamashita; S. Yashchenko; Y. Yook; C. Z. Yuan; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; A. Zupanc

    2014-03-05

    We report results on studies of the e+e- annihilation into three-body Y(nS)pi+pi- (n=1,2,3) final states including measurements of cross sections and the full amplitude analysis. The cross sections measured at sqrt(s)=10.865 GeV and corrected for the initial state radiation are sigma(e+e-=>Y(1S)pi+pi-)=(2.27+-0.12+-0.14) pb, sigma(e+e-=>Y(2S)pi+pi-)=(4.07+-0.16+-0.45) pb, and sigma(e+e-=>Y(3S)pi+pi-)=(1.46+-0.09+-0.16) pb. Amplitude analysis of the three-body Y(nS)pi+pi- final states strongly favors I^G(J^P)=1^+(1^+) quantum-number assignments for the two bottomonium-like Zb+- states, recently observed in the Y(nS)pi+- and hb(mP)pi+- (m=1,2) decay channels. The results are obtained with a $121.4 1/fb data sample collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

  15. Measurement of indirect CP asymmetries in $D^0 \\to K^-K^+$ and $D^0 \\to \\pi^-\\pi^+$ decays

    E-print Network

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Time-dependent $CP$ asymmetries in the decay rates of the singly Cabibbo-suppressed decays $D^0\\rightarrow K^-K^+$ and $D^0\\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^+$ are measured in $pp$ collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb experiment. The $D^0$ mesons are produced in semileptonic $b$-hadron decays, where the charge of the accompanying muon is used to determine the initial state as $D^0$ or $\\bar{D}^0$. The asymmetries in effective lifetimes between $D^0$ and $\\bar{D}^0$ decays, which are sensitive to indirect $CP$ violation, are determined to be \\begin{align*} A_{\\Gamma}(K^-K^+) = (-0.134 \\pm 0.077 \\; {}^{+0.026}_{-0.034})\\% \\ , \\\\ A_{\\Gamma}(\\pi^-\\pi^+) = (-0.092\\pm 0.145 \\; {}^{+0.025}_{-0.033})\\% \\ , \\end{align*} where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. This result is in agreement with previous measurements and with the hypothesis of no indirect $CP$ violation in $D^0$ decays.

  16. Study of {pi}{pi} phase shifts in {psi}(2S){yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}J/{psi}

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hong [School of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2009-08-01

    The {pi}{pi} S-wave phase shifts below 0.6 GeV are extracted out from the published data of the decay {psi}(2S){yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}J/{psi}. In fitting to the m{sub {pi}}{sub {pi}} distribution, several {pi}{pi} production mechanisms are modeled in the amplitude. The fit results show that the amplitude including the {pi}{pi} rescattering process with the minimal coupling g{sub 1}{epsilon}{sup '}{center_dot}{epsilon}* plus the direct nonresonant three-body decay process yields phase shifts consistent with those measured in scattering experiments and K{sub e4} decays. This result agrees with the expectation of the Watson theorem.

  17. Study of the D0 ---> pi- pi+ pi- pi+ decay

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; /UC, Davis; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /CINVESTAV, IPN /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, they present new measurements for the Cabbibo-suppressed decay mode D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. They measure the branching ratio {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.0914 {+-} 0.0018 {+-} 0.0022. An amplitude analysis has been performed, a first for this channel, in order to determine the resonant substructure of this decay mode. The dominant component is the decay D{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}(1260){sup +}{pi}{sup -}, accounting for 60% of the decay rate. The second most dominant contribution comes from the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{rho}(770){sup 0}, with a fraction of 25%. They also study the a{sub 1}(1260) line shape and resonant substructure. Using the helicity formalism for the angular distribution of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{rho}(770){sup 0}, they measure a longitudinal polarization of P{sub L} = (71 {+-} 4 {+-} 2)%.

  18. A Study of e+ e- -> pi+ pi- pi0 pi0 at 3.090 GeV Center of Mass Energy

    SciTech Connect

    McGowan, J

    2004-06-04

    The process {epsilon}{sup +}{epsilon}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is studied at a center of mass energy of 3.090 GeV, the J/{psi} center of mass energy, by the Mark III detector at SPEAR. The branching ratios for {psi} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} and several background processes are measured: {psi} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, {psi} {yields} K{sup {+-}}K{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and {phi} K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. Upper limits on e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} are derived. Evidence is presented that the isobar model of low-energy hadronic interactions may not apply to e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. Suggestions for further research are made.

  19. Improved Measurements of Direct CP Violation in B --> K+pi-, K+pi0 and pi+pi0 Decays

    E-print Network

    K. Abe; for the Belle Collaboration

    2005-07-11

    We report an improved measurement of direct CP violation in the decay B0 --> K+pi-, and a search for CP violation in the decays B+ --> K+pi0 and B+ --> pi+pi0. The measured CP violating asymmetries are Acp(K+pi-)=-0.113+-0.022(stat.)+-0.008(syst.), Acp(K+pi0)=0.04+-0.04(stat.)+-0.02(syst.) and Acp(pi+pi0)=0.02+-0.08(stat.)+-0.01(syst.), where the latter correspond to the intervals -0.03nergy e+e- collider. All of the results are preliminary.

  20. Determination of Re(. var epsilon. prime /. var epsilon. ) by the simultaneous detection of the four K sub L , S r arrow. pi. pi. decay modes

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.R.; Barker, A.; Briere, R.A.; Gibbons, L.K.; Makoff, G.; Papadimitriou, V.; Somalwar, S.; Wah, Y.W.; Winstein, B.; Winston, R.; Woods, M.; Yamamoto, H. (The Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (USA) The Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (USA)); Swallow, E. (Department of Physics, Elmhurst College, Elmhurst, Illinois 60126 (USA) Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (USA)); Bock, G.J.; Coleman, R.; Enagonio, J.; Hsiung, Y.B.; Stanfield, K.; Stefanski, R.; Yamanaka, T. (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (USA)); Blair, G.; Gollin, G.D.; Karlsson, M.; Okamitsu, J.K.; Tschirhart, R. (Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (USA)); Brisson, J.C.; Debu, P.; Peyaud, B.; Turlay, R.; Vallage, B. (Department de Physique des Particules Elementaires, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX,

    1990-03-26

    The E731 experiment at Fermilab has searched for direct {ital CP} violation in {ital K}{sup 0}{r arrow}{pi}{pi}, which is parametrized by {var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon}. For the first time all four of the {ital K}{sub {ital L},}{ital S}{r arrow}{pi}{pi} modes were collected simultaneously, which greatly facilitated studies of systematic uncertainty. We find Re({var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon})={minus}0.0004{plus minus}0.0014(stat){plus minus}0.0006(syst). The result provides no evidence for direct {ital CP} violation.

  1. Observation of the Decay B±-->pi±pi0, Study of B±-->K±pi0, and Search for B0-->pi0pi0

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; D. Boutigny; J.-M. Gaillard; A. Hicheur; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; P. Robbe; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; A. Palano; A. Pompili; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; A. W. Borgland; A. B. Breon; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; J. F. Kral; G. Kukartsev; C. Leclerc; M. E. Levi; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; A. Romosan; M. T. Ronan; V. G. Shelkov; A. V. Telnov; W. A. Wenzel; T. J. Harrison; C. M. Hawkes; D. J. Knowles; R. C. Penny; A. T. Watson; N. K. Watson; T. Deppermann; K. Goetzen; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; H. Schmuecker; M. Steinke; N. R. Barlow; W. Bhimji; J. T. Boyd; N. Chevalier; P. J. Clark; W. N. Cottingham; C. Mackay; F. F. Wilson; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; D. Thiessen; P. Kyberd; A. K. McKemey; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. B. Golubev; V. N. Ivanchenko; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; A. N. Yushkov; D. Best; M. Chao; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; S. McMahon; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; C. Buchanan; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; D. B. Macfarlane; H. P. Paar; Sh. Rahatlou; U. Schwanke; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; B. Dahmes; N. Kuznetsova; S. L. Levy; O. Long; A. Lu; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; W. Verkerke; J. Beringer; A. M. Eisner; C. A. Heusch; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; R. E. Schmitz; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. Turri; W. Walkowiak; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; S. Yang; S. Jayatilleke; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; T. Barillari; F. Blanc; P. Bloom; W. T. Ford; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; P. Rankin; J. Roy; J. G. Smith; W. C. van Hoek; L. Zhang; J. L. Harton; T. Hu; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; J. Zhang; D. Altenburg; T. Brandt; J. Brose; T. Colberg; M. Dickopp; R. S. Dubitzky; A. Hauke; H. M. Lacker; E. Maly; R. Müller-Pfefferkorn; R. Nogowski; S. Otto; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; B. Spaan; L. Wilden; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; F. Brochard; J. Cohen-Tanugi; S. T'jampens; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; R. Bernet; A. Khan; D. Lavin; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; J. E. Swain; J. Tinslay; C. Borean; C. Bozzi; L. Piemontese; A. Sarti; E. Treadwell; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; D. Falciai; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; G. Crosetti; M. Lo Vetere; M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; F. C. Pastore; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; S. Bailey; M. Morii; G. J. Grenier; S.-J. Lee; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; J. Lamsa; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; J. Yi; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; S. Laplace; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; T. C. Petersen; S. Plaszczynski; M. H. Schune; L. Tantot; G. Wormser; R. M. Bionta; V. Brigljevic; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; A. J. Bevan; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; M. Kay; D. J. Payne; R. J. Sloane; C. Touramanis; M. L. Aspinwall; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; I. Eschrich; G. W. Morton; J. A. Nash; P. Sanders; G. P. Taylor; J. J. Back; G. Bellodi; P. F. Harrison; H. W. Shorthouse; P. Strother; P. B. Vidal; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; S. George; M. G. Green; A. Kurup; C. E. Marker; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; G. Vaitsas; M. A. Winter; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; R. J. Barlow; A. C. Forti; P. A. Hart; F. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; A. J. Lyon; J. H. Weatherall; J. C. Williams; A. Farbin; A. Jawahery; D. Kovalskyi; C. K. Lae; V. Lillard; D. A. Roberts; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; K. T. Flood; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; V. B. Koptchev; T. B. Moore; H. Staengle; S. Willocq; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; D. J. Mangeol; M. Milek; P. M. Patel; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; C. Hast; P. Taras; H. Nicholson; C. Cartaro; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; J. M. Losecco; T. A. Gabriel; B. Brau; T. Pulliam; J. Brau; R. Frey; M. Iwasaki; C. T. Potter; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; F. Colecchia; A. Dorigo; F. Galeazzi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; G. Tiozzo; C. Voci; M. Benayoun; H. Briand; J. Chauveau; P. David; Ch. de La Vaissière; L. del Buono; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Ocariz; M. Pivk; L. Roos; J. Stark; P. F. Manfredi; V. Re; L. Gladney; Q. H. Guo; J. Panetta; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Bondioli

    2003-01-01

    We present results for the branching fractions and charge asymmetries in B±-->h±pi0 (where h±=pi±,K±) and a search for the decay B0-->pi0pi0 using a sample of approximately 88×106 BB¯ pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We measure B(B±-->pi±pi0)=(5.5+1.0-0.9±0.6)×10-6, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The B±-->pi±pi0 signal has

  2. Improved Evidence for Direct CP Violation in B0-->pi+pi- Decays and Model-Independent Constraints on varphi2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Abe; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; K. Arinstein; Y. Asano; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; Y. Ban; E. Barberio; M. Barbero; A. Bay; U. Bitenc; I. Bizjak; S. Blyth; A. Bondar; A. Bozek; M. Bracko; J. Brodzicka; T. E. Browder; P. Chang; Y. Chao; A. Chen; K.-F. Chen; W. T. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; S.-K. Choi; Y. Choi; A. Chuvikov; S. Cole; J. Dalseno; M. Dash; L. Y. Dong; A. Drutskoy; S. Eidelman; Y. Enari; F. Fang; S. Fratina; N. Gabyshev; A. Garmash; T. Gershon; G. Gokhroo; B. Golob; A. Gorisek; J. Haba; K. Hara; T. Hara; N. C. Hastings; H. Hayashii; M. Hazumi; L. Hinz; T. Hokuue; Y. Hoshi; S. Hou; W.-S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; T. Iijima; A. Imoto; K. Inami; A. Ishikawa; H. Ishino; R. Itoh; M. Iwasaki; Y. Iwasaki; H. Kakuno; J. H. Kang; J. S. Kang; P. Kapusta; N. Katayama; H. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; H. R. Khan; A. Kibayashi; H. Kichimi; S. M. Kim; K. Kinoshita; S. Korpar; P. Krizan; P. Krokovny; S. Kumar; C. C. Kuo; A. Kusaka; A. Kuzmin; Y.-J. Kwon; G. Leder; S. E. Lee; T. Lesiak; J. Li; S.-W. Lin; J. MacNaughton; G. Majumder; F. Mandl; D. Marlow; A. Matyja; Y. Mikami; W. Mitaroff; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyake; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; D. Mohapatra; A. Murakami; T. Nagamine; Y. Nagasaka; I. Nakamura; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; H. Nakazawa; Z. Natkaniec; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Noguchi; T. Nozaki; S. Ogawa; T. Ohshima; T. Okabe; S. Okuno; S. L. Olsen; Y. Onuki; W. Ostrowicz; H. Ozaki; P. Pakhlov; H. Palka; N. Parslow; L. S. Peak; R. Pestotnik; L. E. Piilonen; F. J. Ronga; M. Rozanska; H. Sagawa; Y. Sakai; N. Sato; T. Schietinger; O. Schneider; P. Schönmeier; J. Schümann; A. J. Schwartz; K. Senyo; M. E. Sevior; H. Shibuya; B. Shwartz; V. Sidorov; J. B. Singh; A. Somov; N. Soni; R. Stamen; S. Stanic; M. Staric; K. Sumisawa; T. Sumiyoshi; S. Suzuki; O. Tajima; F. Takasaki; K. Tamai; N. Tamura; M. Tanaka; Y. Teramoto; X. C. Tian; K. Trabelsi; T. Tsuboyama; T. Tsukamoto; S. Uehara; T. Uglov; K. Ueno; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; Y. Ushiroda; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; S. Villa; C. C. Wang; M.-Z. Wang; Y. Watanabe; Q. L. Xie; B. D. Yabsley; A. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamashita; M. Yamauchi; Heyoung Yang; J. Zhang; L. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; D. Zontar; D. Zürcher

    2005-01-01

    We present a new measurement of the time-dependent CP-violating parameters in B0-->pi+pi- decays with 275×106 BB¯ pairs collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider operating at the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We find 666±43 B0-->pi+pi- events and measure the CP-violating parameters: Spipi=-0.67±0.16(stat)±0.06(syst) and Apipi=+0.56±0.12(stat)±0.06(syst). We find evidence for large direct CP violation with a significance greater than 4

  3. Electrostatic studies of ?-? interaction for benzene stacking on a graphene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsun Su, Yen; Kai Wu, Yang; Tu, Sheng-Lung; Chang, Shoou-Jinn

    2011-10-01

    Recently, aromatic molecules have been stacked on graphene for applications in biosensors and chemical sensors, although the interaction between them is not well understood. In this paper, we use electrostatic model, double charge rings, and its image charges model to simulate the ?-? interaction between benzene and a graphene layer. Furthermore, the results of our model are confirmed by the numerical results from density functional theory and experimental reviews. This model has potential for use in predicting the interactions between aromatic molecules and graphene.

  4. On the nature of the pi --> pi* ionic excited states: the V state of ethene as a prototype.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Celestino

    2009-06-01

    This article addresses an analysis of the physical effects required for the correct description of the ionic pi --> pi* excited states in the frame of ab initio quantum chemistry, using the ionic V state of the ethene molecule as an example. The importance of the dynamic sigma polarization (absent in methods where the sigma skeleton is treated at a mean-field level) has been recognized by many authors in the past. In this article a new physical effect is described, i.e. the spatial contraction of the pi and pi* molecular orbitals (or of the local p atomic orbitals) originated from the reduction of the ionicity due to the dynamic sigma polarization. Such an effect is a second-order effect (it appears only as a consequence of the dynamic sigma polarization) but it cannot be ignored. Many of the difficulties found in the past in the calculation of the vertical excitation energy of the ionic states are attributed to an incomplete description of this contraction, while the few successes have been obtained when it has been fortuitously introduced by ad hoc procedures or when it is described in a brute force approach. Various strategies are proposed to allow for the spatial contraction of the p atomic orbitals. If this effect is considered at the orbital optimization step, it is shown that for the V state of ethene no Rydberg/valence mixing occurs and a simple perturbation correction (to the second order in the energy) on the pi --> pi* singly excited configuration gives stable results with respect to the computational parameters and in good agreement with the experimental findings and with the best theoretical calculations. Moreover, our results confirm the indication of Müller et al. (J Chem Phys 1999, 110, 7176) that the transition to the V state of ethene conforms to the Franck-Condon principle and that it is not necessary to appeal to a nonvertical transition to interpret the experimental data. The strategy reported in this article for ethene can be in principle generalized to the pi --> pi* ionic excited states of other molecules. PMID:19009592

  5. Interactions of point defects with stacking faults in oxygen-free phosphorus-containing copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunguo; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.

    2015-07-01

    The interactions of stacking faults and point defects in oxygen-free phosphorus-containing copper are investigated using ab initio methods. Although monovacancies can act as traps for H impurities or OH groups, the calculations show that two vacancies only weakly bind with each other and this interaction terminates at the third nearest-neighbor distance. An interstitial P tends to form a Cu-P dumbbell-like cluster around the lattice site and can readily combine with a vacancy to become a substitutional impurity. It is also found that the intrinsic stacking-fault energy of copper strongly depends on the temperature as well as on the presences of point defects. The intrinsic stacking-fault energy varies between 20 and 77 mJ/m2 depending on the presence of point defects in the faulted region. These point defects are also found to affect the unstable stacking-fault energy, but they always increase the twinning tendency of copper. Among them, the substitutional P is found to have the strongest effects, decreasing the intrinsic stacking-fault energy and increasing the twinnability.

  6. Search for CP Violation in the Decays D0 to K- K+and D0 to pi- pi+

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer,; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC,

    2007-09-24

    We measure CP-violating asymmetries of neutral charmed mesons in the modes D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup +} and D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} with the highest precision to date by using D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays to correct detector asymmetries. An analysis of 385.8 fb{sup -}1 of data collected with the BaBar detector yields values of a{sup KK}{sub CP} = (0.00 {+-} 0.34 (stat.) {+-} 0.13 (syst.))% and a{sup {pi}{pi}}{sub CP} = (-0.24 {+-} 0.52 (stat.) {+-} 0.22 (syst.))%, which agree with Standard Model predictions.

  7. Measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in the decay X(3872) [right arrow] J/ [psi] [pi]? [pi]? at the CDFII experiment

    E-print Network

    Rakitin, Alexander (Alexander Yurevich)

    2005-01-01

    We present a measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in the decay X(3872) [right arrow] J/ [psi] [pi]? [pi]? using a 360 pb-1 sample of pp collisions at av [square root]s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at ...

  8. Measurement of the CKM angle gammma with B-+ ->D^(*)[K0s pi- pi+]K^(*)-+ decays in BaBar

    E-print Network

    F. Martinez-Vidal

    2007-04-30

    We report on the measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle gamma through a Dalitz analysis of neutral D decays to K0s pi- pi+ in the processes B-+ -> D^(*) K-+ and B-+ -> D K^*-+, D^* -> D pi0, D gamma, with the Babar detector at the SLAC PEP-II e^+ e^- asymmetric-energy collider.

  9. Exploring CP Violation through Correlations in B --> pi K, B_d --> pi^+pi^-, B_s --> K^+K^- Observable Space

    E-print Network

    Robert Fleischer; Joaquim Matias

    2002-07-23

    We investigate allowed regions in observable space of B --> pi K, B_d --> pi^+pi^- and B_s --> K^+K^- decays, characterizing these modes in the Standard Model. After a discussion of a new kind of contour plots for the $B\\to\\pi K$ system, we focus on the mixing- induced and direct CP asymmetries of the decays B_d --> pi^+pi^- and B_s--> K^+K^-. Using experimental information on the CP-averaged B_d --> pi^{+/-}K^{+/-} and B_d --> pi^+pi^- branching ratios, the relevant hadronic penguin parameters can be constrained,implying certain allowed regions in observable space. In the case of B_d --> pi^+pi^-, an interesting situation arises now in view of the recent B-factory measurements of CP violation in this channel, allowing us to obtain new constraints on the CKM angle gamma as a function of the B^0_d--\\bar{B^0_d} mixing phase phi_d=2beta, which is fixed through A_{CP}^{mix}(B_d --> J/psi K_S) up to a twofold ambiguity. If we assume that A_{CP}^{mix}(B_d --> pi^+pi^-) is positive, as indicated by recent Belle data, and that phi_d is in agreement with the ``indirect'' fits of the unitarity triangle, also the corresponding values for gamma around 60 degrees can be accommodated. On the other hand, for the second solution of phi_d, we obtain a gap around gamma ~ 60 degrees. The allowed region in the space of A_{CP}^{mix}(B_s --> K^+K^-) and A_{CP}^{dir}(B_s --> K^+K^-) is very constrained in the Standard Model, thereby providing a narrow target range for run II of the Tevatron and the experiments of the LHC era.

  10. Closing the lid on DNA end-to-end stacking interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Li Li; Pabit, Suzette A.; Lamb, Jessica S.; Park, Hye Yoon; Pollack, Lois [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2008-06-02

    Recent experiments suggest that short DNA strands associate by end-to-end stacking. Here, we report interactions between DNAs with modified ends. DNA duplexes, 20 bp long, were capped with short T{sub 4} loops at 2, 1 or 0 ends, and were placed in solutions containing 20 mM Mg{sup 2+}. Association was observed only in constructs with one or more uncapped ends. DNA-DNA interactions were characterized by measuring variations in small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) curves at the lowest scattering angles. Second virial coefficients were computed from the SAXS data. Our results confirm that end-to-end stacking plays an important role in short strand DNA-DNA interactions.

  11. Multiple Exciton Interaction in Condensates of Excitons at a Stacking Fault Interface in Bii 3

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Tanji; I. Akai; T. Karasawa

    2002-01-01

    Photoinduced high-density phase of exciton masses excited at a two-dimensional stacking fault interface in BiI 3 has been studied by measuring the energy spectra of the degenerate four-wave-mixing (DFWM) signals and their excitation spectra using a nano-second laser with a very narrow line width. An energy splitting structure on the'DFWM spectra shows a repulsive interaction between excitons. Furthermore, multiple fine

  12. Effect of interlayer interaction on domain structure of CoPt stacked films with perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, H.; Hayakawa, K.; Nomiya, N.; Sugita, R.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of interlayer magnetostatic interaction on the domain structure of CoPt (3 nm)/Pt (?Pt nm)/CoPt (10 nm) stacked films having perpendicular anisotropy is investigated. The domain structure of the demagnetized CoPt stacked films is observed using magnetic force microscope. The Co80Pt20 stacked films with Pt interlayer thickness ?Pt less than about 20 nm have the maze domain similar to that of the film with ?Pt of 0 nm. This is because the top and bottom layers are connected by the magnetostatic interaction and the magnetization distribution of both layers is integrated. The domain structure of the films with ?Pt around 25 nm is mixture of the maze and irregular domains. For the films with ?Pt over about 30 nm, because the interaction between the top and bottom layers decreases, the irregular domain which is observed in the 3 nm thick CoPt single layer film appears. In the region where the domain structure changes from the maze domain to the irregular one, domain size steeply increases with increase of ?Pt.

  13. Delta I=3/2, K to Pi Pi Decays with Light, Non-Zero Momentum Pions

    E-print Network

    Matthew Lightman; Elaine Goode

    2009-12-09

    Delta I=3/2, K to Pi Pi matrix elements are calculated on 68 configurations of quenched 24^3 x 64 lattices using the DBW2 action, and domain wall fermions with L_s=16. The lattice spacing is a^(-1)=1.3 GeV, corresponding to a physical volume of (3.6 fm)^3, which allows us to simulate a pion mass of m_Pi=227.6(6) MeV and a kaon mass of m_K=564(2) MeV. Twisted boundary conditions are used to give the two pions momentum. One twist corresponds to a pion momentum of p=Pi/L=170 MeV, which represents a decay that is nearly on-shell. Results for time separations of 20, 24, 28, and 32 between the kaon and the two pions are computed and an error weighted average is performed to reduced the error. The matrix elements are then found to have errors of order 3-4% for momentum 0 and Pi/L, 7% for momentum sqrt(2)*Pi/L, and 15% for momentum sqrt(3)*Pi/L.

  14. Study of the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and its intermediate states

    E-print Network

    Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Vetere, M Lo; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Diberder, F Le; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Biassoni, P; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Anulli, F; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Voß, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Vasseur, G; Y\\`, Ch; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Sevilla, M Franco; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Puccio, E M T; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Zambito, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Villanueva-Perez, P; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2013-01-01

    We study the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$, reconstructing the \\Lambda_{c}^{+} baryon in the $p K^{-}\\pi^{+}$ mode, using a data sample of $467\\times 10^{6}$ $B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-2 storage rings at SLAC. We measure branching fractions for decays with intermediate $\\Sigma_{c}$ baryons to be ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(21.3 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 5.5) \\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(11.5\\pm 1.0 \\pm 0.5 \\pm 3.0)\\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]=(9.1 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 2.4)\\times10^{-5}$, and ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]= (2.2 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.1\\pm 0.6) \\times 10^{-5}$, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty on the $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\rightarrow\\proton\\Km\\pi^{+}$ branching fraction, respectively. For decays without $\\Sig...

  15. Effect of Z Prime -mediated flavor-changing neutral current on B {yields} {pi}{pi} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, S., E-mail: sukadevsahoo@yahoo.com [National Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (India); Das, C. K. [Trident Academy of Technology, Department of Physics (India); Maharana, L. [Krupajal Engineering College, Department of Physics (India)

    2011-07-15

    We study the effect of Z Prime -mediated flavor-changing neutral current on the B {yields} {pi}{pi} decays. The branching ratios of these decays can be enhanced remarkably in the nonuniversal Z Prime model. Our estimated branching ratios B(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) are enhanced significantly from their standard model (SM) value. For g Prime /g = 1, the branching ratios B(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) are very close to the recently observed experimental values and for higher values of g Prime /g branching ratios are more. Our calculated branching ratios B(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) and B(B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}) are also enhanced from the SM value as well as the recently observed experimental values. These enhancements of branching ratios from their SM value give the possibility of new physics.

  16. Calculation of $K \\to \\pi\\pi$ decay amplitudes with improved Wilson fermion action in lattice QCD

    E-print Network

    Ishizuka, N; Ukawa, A; Yoshié, T

    2015-01-01

    We present our results for the $K\\to\\pi\\pi$ decay amplitudes for both the $\\Delta I=1/2$ and $3/2$ channels. Calculations are carried out with $N_f=2+1$ gauge configurations generated with the Iwasaki gauge action and non-perturbatively $O(a)$-improved Wilson fermion action at $a=0.091\\,{\\rm fm}$, $m_\\pi=280\\,{\\rm MeV}$ and $m_K=580\\,{\\rm MeV}$ on a $32^3\\times 64$ ($La=2.9\\,{\\rm fm}$) lattice. For the quark loops in the penguin and disconnected contributions in the $I=0$ channel, the combined hopping parameter expansion and truncated solver method work very well for variance reduction. We obtain, for the first time with a Wilson-type fermion action, that ${\\rm Re}A_0 = 60(36) \\times10^{ -8}\\,{\\rm GeV}$ and ${\\rm Im}A_0 =-67(56) \\times10^{-12}\\,{\\rm GeV}$ for a matching scale $q^* =1/a$. The dependence on the matching scale $q^*$ for these values is weak.

  17. Measurement of the E+ E- to Pi+ Pi- (Gamma) Cross Section with the ISR Method with BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Davier, Michel; /Orsay, LAL

    2011-11-30

    A precision measurement of the cross section for the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}({gamma}) is presented with the radiative return method with the high statistics data accumulated by BaBar at the {Upsilon}(4S). The luminosity is determined from the study of the corresponding leptonic process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}({gamma}), thus cancelling several factors and reducing the overall systematic uncertainty. Trigger, tracking, particle identification, and kinematic-fit {chi}{sup 2} efficiencies are evaluated from data in the same environment. Additional radiation from the initial and the final states is studied in both processes. The analysis covers the mass range between threshold and 5 GeV. Preliminary results are presented here between 0.5 and 3 GeV, with data samples of 513183 pion events and 445631 muon events. The systematic uncertainty in the main {rho} resonance region is 5.6 x 10{sup -3}. The measured mass dependent pion-pair cross section is compared with measurements from earlier experiments and used to compute the hadronic vacuum polarization contribution from the dominant {pi}{pi} channel to the muon magnetic anomaly.

  18. Orientation dependent elastic interaction between a truncated stacking fault tetrahedron and a glissile dislocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratani, M.; Bulatov, V. V.; Zbib, H. M.

    2004-08-01

    The orientation dependence of elastic interaction between a stacking fault tetrahedron (SFT) and mobile dislocations is investigated for the possibility of unfaulting and subsequent absorption of the SFT. The obtained result indicates that 60° dislocations have stronger interaction with the spontaneously truncated SFT than pure screws or edges. Due to the high activation energy, the collapse and absorption of the SFTs seems to be limited to the cases where the approaching dislocations along <1 1 0> directly cut the SFTs symmetrically. The anisotropic energetics can contribute to the spatially limited growth of defect-cleared channels observed in the irradiated materials.

  19. Folic acid-polydopamine nanofibers show enhanced ordered-stacking via ?-? interactions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hailong; Yu, Xiang; Liu, Yang; Shi, Zujin; Liu, Huihui; Nie, Zongxiu; Wu, Decheng; Jin, Zhaoxia

    2015-06-01

    Recent research has indicated that polydopamine and synthetic eumelanins are optoelectronic biomaterials in which one-dimensional aggregates composed of ordered-stacking oligomers have been proposed as unique organic semiconductors. However, improving the ordered-stacking of oligomers in polydopamine nanostructures is a big challenge. Herein, we first demonstrate how folic acid molecules influence the morphology and nanostructure of polydopamine via tuning the ?-? interactions of oligomers. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry reveals that porphyrin-like tetramers are characteristic of folic acid-polydopamine (FA-PDA) nanofibers. X-ray diffraction combined with simulation studies indicate that these oligomers favour aggregation into graphite-like ordered nanostructures via strong ?-? interactions. High-resolution TEM characterization of carbonized FA-PDA hybrids show that in FA-PDA nanofibers the size of the graphite-like domains is over 100 nm. The addition of folic acid in polydopamine enhances the ordered stacking of oligomers in its nanostructure. Our study steps forward to discover the mystery of the structure-property relationship of FA-PDA hybrids. It paves a way to optimize the properties of PDA through the design and selection of oligomer structures. PMID:25959650

  20. Nuclear structure of {sup 10}B studied with (e,e{prime}), ({pi},{pi}{prime}) and ({gamma},{pi}) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, T.; Odagawa, N.; Ohtsubo, H. [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Lee, T.S.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The authors studied nuclear structure of {sup 10}B using (e,e{prime}),({pi},{pi}{prime}) and ({gamma},{pi}) reactions under the distorted wave impulse approximation (DWIA). For this purpose the off-shell dependence of the amplitude was taken into account in the momentum space DWIA. They used the off-shell elementary amplitude of ({pi},{pi}) and ({gamma},{pi}) by the model of Nozawa, Blankleider and Lee. The first order core polarization effects were incorporated with the p-shell wave functions of Cohen and Kurath and Hauge and Maripuu. It was shown that the core-polarization effects greatly improve the agreement with the experimental data and that the simultaneous study of these reactions is useful to probe the spin structure of p-shell nuclei.

  1. Scalar mesons in the decays {eta}' {sup {yields}}3{pi}{sup 0} and {eta}' {sup {yields} {pi}0{pi}+{pi}-}

    SciTech Connect

    Likhoded, A. K., E-mail: Anatolii.Likhoded@ihep.ru; Luchinsky, A. V., E-mail: Alexey.Luchinsky@ihep.ru; Samoylenko, V. D. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-15

    The decays {eta} {sup {yields}}3{pi}{sup 0} and {eta} {sup {yields} {pi}0{pi}+{pi}-} are considered within the isobar model. It is shown that, in order to explain the branching ratio and the shape of the Dalitz plot for the decay {eta}' {sup {yields}}3{pi}{sup 0}, it is sufficient to take into account the contributions of the {sigma} and a{sub 0} mesons. The inclusion of the {sigma} meson is necessary for reproducing the shape of the distribution over the Dalitz plot. The branching ratio for the decay {eta}' {sup {yields} {pi}0{pi}+{pi}-} is obtained. The predictions for the distributions over the Dalitz plot for this decay are presented. These predictions depend strongly on model parameters.

  2. Improved measurements of the branching fractions for B0-->pi+pi- and B0-->K+pi-, and a search for B0-->K+K-

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of the branching fractions for the charmless two-body decays B0-->pi+pi- and B0-->K+pi-, and a search for the decay B0-->K+K-. We include the effects of final-state radiation from the daughter mesons for the first time, and quote branching fractions for the inclusive processes B0-->h+h'-ngamma, where h and h' are pions or kaons. The maximum value of the sum

  3. Measurement of the CP-violating phase $\\\\phi_s$ in $\\\\overline{B}^0_s \\\\to J\\/\\\\psi\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ decays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Aaij; C Abellan Beteta; B Adeva; M Adinolfi; C Adrover; A Affolder; Z Ajaltouni; J Albrecht; F Alessio; M Alexander; S Ali; G Alkhazov; P Alvarez Cartelle; A A Alves Jr; S Amato; Y Amhis; J Anderson; R B Appleby; O Aquines Gutierrez; F Archilli; A Artamonov; M Artuso; E Aslanides; G Auriemma; S Bachmann; J J Back; V Balagura; W Baldini; R J Barlow; C Barschel; S Barsuk; W Barter; A Bates; C Bauer; Th Bauer; A Bay; I Bediaga; S Belogurov; K Belous; I Belyaev; E Ben-Haim; M Benayoun; G Bencivenni; S Benson; J Benton; R Bernet; M-O Bettler; M van Beuzekom; A Bien; S Bifani; T Bird; A Bizzeti; P M Bjørnstad; T Blake; F Blanc; C Blanks; J Blouw; S Blusk; A Bobrov; V Bocci; A Bondar; N Bondar; W Bonivento; S Borghi; A Borgia; T J V Bowcock; C Bozzi; T Brambach; J van den Brand; J Bressieux; D Brett; M Britsch; T Britton; N H Brook; H Brown; A Büchler-Germann; I Burducea; A Bursche; J Buytaert; S Cadeddu; O Callot; M Calvi; M Calvo Gomez; A Camboni; P Campana; A Carbone; G Carboni; R Cardinale; A Cardini; L Carson; K Carvalho Akiba; G Casse; M Cattaneo; Ch Cauet; M Charles; Ph Charpentier; N Chiapolini; K Ciba; X Cid Vidal; G Ciezarek; P E L Clarke; M Clemencic; H V Cliff; J Closier; C Coca; V Coco; J Cogan; P Collins; A Comerma-Montells; A Contu; A Cook; M Coombes; G Corti; B Couturier; G A Cowan; R Currie; C D'Ambrosio; P David; I De Bonis; K De Bruyn; S De Capua; M De Cian; J M De Miranda; L De Paula; P De Simone; D Decamp; M Deckenhoff; H Degaudenzi; L Del Buono; C Deplano; D Derkach; O Deschamps; F Dettori; J Dickens; H Dijkstra; P Diniz Batista; F Domingo Bonal; S Donleavy; F Dordei; A Dosil Suárez; D Dossett; A Dovbnya; F Dupertuis; R Dzhelyadin; A Dziurda; S Easo; U Egede; V Egorychev; S Eidelman; D van Eijk; F Eisele; S Eisenhardt; R Ekelhof; L Eklund; Ch Elsasser; D Elsby; D Esperante Pereira; A Falabella; C Färber; G Fardell; C Farinelli; S Farry; V Fave; V Fernandez Albor; M Ferro-Luzzi; S Filippov; C Fitzpatrick; M Fontana; F Fontanelli; R Forty; O Francisco; M Frank; C Frei; M Frosini; S Furcas; A Gallas Torreira; D Galli; M Gandelman; P Gandini; Y Gao; J-C Garnier; J Garofoli; J Garra Tico; L Garrido; D Gascon; C Gaspar; R Gauld; N Gauvin; M Gersabeck; T Gershon; Ph Ghez; V Gibson; V V Gligorov; C Göbel; D Golubkov; A Golutvin; A Gomes; H Gordon; M Grabalosa Gándara; R Graciani Diaz; L A Granado Cardoso; E Graugés; G Graziani; A Grecu; E Greening; S Gregson; B Gui; E Gushchin; Yu Guz; T Gys; C Hadjivasiliou; G Haefeli; C Haen; S C Haines; T Hampson; S Hansmann-Menzemer; R Harji; N Harnew; J Harrison; P F Harrison; T Hartmann; J He; V Heijne; K Hennessy; P Henrard; J A Hernando Morata; E van Herwijnen; E Hicks; K Holubyev; P Hopchev; W Hulsbergen; P Hunt; T Huse; R S Huston; D Hutchcroft; D Hynds; V Iakovenko; P Ilten; J Imong; R Jacobsson; A Jaeger; M Jahjah Hussein; E Jans; F Jansen; P Jaton; B Jean-Marie; F Jing; M John; D Johnson; C R Jones; B Jost; M Kaballo; S Kandybei; M Karacson; T M Karbach; J Keaveney; I R Kenyon; U Kerzel; T Ketel; A Keune; B Khanji; Y M Kim; M Knecht; R F Koopman; P Koppenburg; M Korolev; A Kozlinskiy; L Kravchuk; K Kreplin; M Kreps; G Krocker; P Krokovny; F Kruse; K Kruzelecki; M Kucharczyk; V Kudryavtsev; T Kvaratskheliya; V N La Thi; D Lacarrere; G Lafferty; A Lai; D Lambert; R W Lambert; E Lanciotti; G Lanfranchi; C Langenbruch; T Latham; C Lazzeroni; R Le Gac; J van Leerdam; J-P Lees; R Lefèvre; A Leflat; J Lefrançois; O Leroy; T Lesiak; L Li; L Li Gioi; M Lieng; M Liles; R Lindner; C Linn; B Liu; G Liu; J von Loeben; J H Lopes; E Lopez Asamar; N Lopez-March; H Lu; J Luisier; F Machefert; I V Machikhiliyan; F Maciuc; O Maev; J Magnin; S Malde; R M D Mamunur; G Manca; G Mancinelli; N Mangiafave; U Marconi; R Märki; J Marks; G Martellotti; A Martens; L Martin; A Martín Sánchez; M Martinelli; D Martinez Santos; A Massafferri; Z Mathe; C Matteuzzi; M Matveev; E Maurice; B Maynard; A Mazurov; G McGregor; R McNulty; M Meissner; M Merk; J Merkel; S Miglioranzi; D A Milanes; M-N Minard; J Molina Rodriguez; S Monteil; D Moran; P Morawski; I Mous; F Muheim; K Müller; R Muresan; B Muryn; B Muster; J Mylroie-Smith; P Naik; T Nakada; R Nandakumar; I Nasteva; M Needham; N Neufeld; A D Nguyen; C Nguyen-Mau; M Nicol; V Niess; N Nikitin; T Nikodem; A Nomerotski; A Novoselov; A Oblakowska-Mucha; V Obraztsov; S Oggero; S Ogilvy; O Okhrimenko; R Oldeman; M Orlandea; J M Otalora Goicochea; P Owen; B K Pal; J Palacios; A Palano; M Palutan; J Panman; A Papanestis; M Pappagallo; C Parkes; C J Parkinson; G Passaleva; G D Patel; M Patel; S K Paterson; G N Patrick; C Patrignani; C Pavel-Nicorescu; A Pazos Alvarez; A Pellegrino; G Penso; M Pepe Altarelli; S Perazzini; D L Perego; E Perez Trigo; A Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo; P Perret; M Perrin-Terrin; G Pessina; A Petrolini; A Phan; E Picatoste Olloqui; B Pie Valls; B Pietrzyk; T Pila?; D Pinci; R Plackett; S Playfer; M Plo Casasus; G Polok; A Poluektov

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of the mixing-induced $CP$-violating phase $\\\\phi_s$ in $B^0_s$ decays is of prime importance in probing new physics. Here $7421 \\\\pm 105$ signal events from the dominantly $CP$-odd final state $J\\/\\\\psi\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ are selected in 1 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data collected at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV with the LHCb detector. A time-dependent fit to the data yields a value of

  4. Search for D-0(D)over-bar(0) mixing in the Dalitz plot analysis of D-0 -> K-S(0)pi(+)pi(-)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Asner; S. A. Dytman; W. Love; S. Mehrabyan; J. A. Mueller; V. Savinov; Z. Li; A. Lopez; H. Mendez; J. Ramirez; G. S. Huang; D. H. Miller; V. Pavlunin; B. Sanghi; E. I. Shibata; I. P. J. Shipsey; G. S. Adams; M. Chasse; M. Cravey; J. P. Cummings; I. Danko; J. Napolitano; Q. He; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; E. H. Thorndike; T. E. Coan; Y. S. Gao; F. Liu; R. Stroynowski; M. Artuso; C. Boulahouache; S. Blusk; J. Butt; E. Dambasuren; O. Dorjkhaidav; N. Horwitz; J. Li; N. Menaa; R. Nandakumar; R. Redjimi; R. Sia; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; K. Zhang; S. E. Csorna; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; M. Dubrovin; A. Bornheim; S. P. Pappas; A. J. Weinstein; H. N. Nelson; R. A. Briere; G. P. Chen; J. Chen; T. Ferguson; G. Tatishvili; H. Vogel; M. E. Watkins; J. L. Rosner; N. E. Adam; J. P. Alexander; K. Berkelman; D. G. Cassel; V. Crede; J. E. Duboscq; K. M. Ecklund; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; L. Gibbons; B. Gittelman; R. Gray; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; D. Hertz; L. Hsu; C. D. Jones; J. Kandaswamy; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; H. Mahlke-Kruger; T. O. Meyer; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; J. Pivarski; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; H. Schwarthoff; M. R. Shepherd; S. Stroiney; W. M. Sun; D. Urner; T. Wilksen; M. Weinberger; S. B. Athar; P. Avery; L. Breva-Newell; R. Patel; V. Potlia; H. Stoeck; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; C. Cawlfield; B. I. Eisenstein; G. D. Gollin; I. Karliner; D. Kim; N. Lowrey; P. Naik; C. Sedlack; M. Selen; J. Williams; J. Wiss; K. W. Edwards; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; D. Cronin-Hennessy; K. Y. Gao; D. T. Gong; Y. Kubota; T. Klein; B. W. Lang; S. Z. Li; R. Poling; A. W. Scott; A. Smith; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; P. Zweber; J. Ernst; A. H. Mahmood; K. Arms; K. K. Gan; H. Severini

    2005-01-01

    The resonant substructure in D-0-> K(S)(0)pi(+)pi(-) decays is described by a combination of ten quasi two-body intermediate states which include both CP-even and CP-odd eigenstates and one doubly Cabibbo suppressed channel. We present a formalism that connects the variation in D-0 decay time over the Dalitz plot with the mixing parameters, x and y, that describe off-shell and on-shell D-0-(D)

  5. Observation of a charged charmoniumlike structure in e+e- to pi+pi-J/psi at \\sqrt{s}=4.26 GeV

    E-print Network

    BESIII Collaboration; M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; X. C. Ai; O. Albayrak; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; R. Baldini Ferroli; Y. Ban; J. Becker; J. V. Bennett; M. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; H. Cai; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; W. M. Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; L. Fava; C. Q. Feng; P. Friedel; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; O. Fuks; Q. Gao; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; T. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; C. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; G. M. Huang; G. S. Huang; J. S. Huang; L. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; B. Kopf; M. Kornicer; W. Kühn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; M. Lara; P. Larin; M. Leyhe; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; Q. J. Li; S. L. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; D. Lin; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y. Liu; Kai Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; X. C. Lou; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; Y. J. Mo; H. Moeini; C. Morales Morales; K. Moriya; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; C. Nicholson; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; E. Prencipe; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; L. Q. Qin; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; B. D. Schaefer; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; W. M. Song; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; I. Uman; G. S. Varner; B. Q. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. F. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; M. Werner; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; S. X. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Y. X Xia; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; Q. J. Xu; Q. N. Xu; X. P. Xu; Z. R. Xu; F. Xue; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; S. L. Zang; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; LiLi Zhang; R. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; Zhenghao Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; K. X. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. M. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

    2013-05-07

    We study the process e+e- to pi+pi-J/psi at a center-of-mass energy of 4.260 GeV using a 525 pb^{-1} data sample collected with the BESIII detector operating at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider. The Born cross section is measured to be (62.9\\pm 1.9\\pm 3.7) pb, consistent with the production of the Y(4260). We observe a structure at around 3.9 GeV/c^2 in the \\pi^\\pm J/psi mass spectrum, which we refer to as the Z_c(3900). If interpreted as a new particle, it is unusual in that it carries an electric charge and couples to charmonium. A fit to the \\pi^\\pm J/psi invariant mass spectrum, neglecting interference, results in a mass of (3899.0\\pm 3.6\\pm 4.9) MeV/c^2 and a width of (46\\pm 10\\pm 20) MeV. Its production ratio is measured to be R=\\frac{\\sigma(e+e- to \\pi^\\pm Z_c(3900)^\\mp to pi+pi-J/psi))} {\\sigma(e+e- to pi+pi-J/psi)}=(21.5\\pm 3.3\\pm 7.5)%. In all measurements the first errors are statistical and the second are systematic.

  6. Interlayer-interaction dependence of latent heat in the Heisenberg model on a stacked triangular lattice with competing interactions.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Ryo; Tanaka, Shu

    2013-11-01

    We study the phase transition behavior of a frustrated Heisenberg model on a stacked triangular lattice by Monte Carlo simulations. The model has three types of interactions: the ferromagnetic nearest-neighbor interaction J(1) and antiferromagnetic third nearest-neighbor interaction J(3) in each triangular layer and the ferromagnetic interlayer interaction J([perpendicular]). Frustration comes from the intralayer interactions J(1) and J(3). We focus on the case that the order parameter space is SO(3)×C(3). We find that the model exhibits a first-order phase transition with breaking of the SO(3) and C(3) symmetries at finite temperature. We also discover that the transition temperature increases but the latent heat decreases as J([perpendicular])/J(1) increases, which is opposite to the behavior observed in typical unfrustrated three-dimensional systems. PMID:24329245

  7. Molecular dynamics study of the interactions between dislocation and imperfect stacking fault tetrahedron in Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saintoyant, Lucie; Lee, Hyon-Jee; Wirth, Brian D.

    2007-04-01

    The microstructure of irradiated face centered cubic alloys with low stacking fault energy is distinguished by the formation of a high number density of nanometer size stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). A recent transmission electron microscopy investigation of high-energy proton irradiated copper [16] has shown that nearly 50% of the visible SFT population are not perfect SFTs, but rather consist of truncated SFT and/or groups of overlapping SFT. This paper presents the results of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the interaction between gliding dislocations, of either edge or screw character, and truncated SFT or overlapping SFT. The most common result of the edge dislocation interaction with a truncated SFT is defect shearing, ultimately leading to complete separation into two smaller defect clusters. Partial absorption of the truncated SFT is the most common result of the interaction with a screw dislocation, resulting in the formation of super-jog (or helical) segments as the defect is absorbed into the dislocation core. The resulting non-planar screw dislocation is self-pinned with reduced mobility and is re-emitted as a similar truncated SFT as the applied shear stress is increased. The re-emitted truncated SFT is often rotated and translated relative to the original position. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that shearing (decreased defect cluster size) and dislocation dragging of the defect clusters by partial absorption into the dislocation core contributes to the formation of defect-free channels.

  8. Extracting Drug-Drug Interaction from the Biomedical Literature Using a Stacked Generalization-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    He, Linna; Yang, Zhihao; Zhao, Zhehuan; Lin, Hongfei; Li, Yanpeng

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) detection is particularly important for patient safety. However, the amount of biomedical literature regarding drug interactions is increasing rapidly. Therefore, there is a need to develop an effective approach for the automatic extraction of DDI information from the biomedical literature. In this paper, we present a Stacked Generalization-based approach for automatic DDI extraction. The approach combines the feature-based, graph and tree kernels and, therefore, reduces the risk of missing important features. In addition, it introduces some domain knowledge based features (the keyword, semantic type, and DrugBank features) into the feature-based kernel, which contribute to the performance improvement. More specifically, the approach applies Stacked generalization to automatically learn the weights from the training data and assign them to three individual kernels to achieve a much better performance than each individual kernel. The experimental results show that our approach can achieve a better performance of 69.24% in F-score compared with other systems in the DDI Extraction 2011 challenge task. PMID:23785452

  9. Dislocation?stacking fault tetrahedron interaction: what can we learn from atomic-scale modelling*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osetsky, Yu. N.; Stoller, R. E.; Matsukawa, Y.

    2004-08-01

    The high number density of stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) observed in irradiated fcc metals suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, taken into account when estimating mechanical properties changes of irradiated materials. The central issue is describing the individual interaction between a moving dislocation and an SFT, which is characterized by a very fine size scale, ˜100 nm. This scale is amenable to both in situ TEM experiments and large-scale atomic modelling. In this paper we present results of an atomistic simulation of dislocation-SFT interactions using molecular dynamics (MD). The results are compared with observations from in situ deformation experiments. It is demonstrated that in some cases the simulations and experimental observations are quite similar, suggesting a reasonable interpretation of experimental observations.

  10. Urea destabilizes RNA by forming stacking interactions and multiple hydrogen bonds with nucleic acid bases

    E-print Network

    U. Deva Priyakumar; Changbong Hyeon; D. Thirumalai; Alexander D. MacKerell Jr

    2009-12-07

    Urea titration of RNA by urea is an effective approach to investigate the forces stabilizing this biologically important molecule. We used all atom molecular dynamics simulations using two urea force fields and two RNA constructs to elucidate in atomic detail the destabilization mechanism of folded RNA in aqueous urea solutions. Urea denatures RNA by forming multiple hydrogen bonds with the RNA bases and has little influence on the phosphodiester backbone. Most significantly we discovered that urea engages in stacking interactions with the bases. We also estimate, for the first time, m-value for RNA, which is a measure of the strength of urea-RNA interactions. Our work provides a conceptual understanding of the mechanism by which urea enhances RNA folding rates.

  11. Urea destabilizes RNA by forming stacking interactions and multiple hydrogen bonds with nucleic acid bases

    E-print Network

    Priyakumar, U Deva; Thirumalai, D; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2009-01-01

    Urea titration of RNA by urea is an effective approach to investigate the forces stabilizing this biologically important molecule. We used all atom molecular dynamics simulations using two urea force fields and two RNA constructs to elucidate in atomic detail the destabilization mechanism of folded RNA in aqueous urea solutions. Urea denatures RNA by forming multiple hydrogen bonds with the RNA bases and has little influence on the phosphodiester backbone. Most significantly we discovered that urea engages in stacking interactions with the bases. We also estimate, for the first time, m-value for RNA, which is a measure of the strength of urea-RNA interactions. Our work provides a conceptual understanding of the mechanism by which urea enhances RNA folding rates.

  12. Dislocation-stacking fault tetrahedron interaction: what can we learn from atomic scale modelling.

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Matsukawa, Yoshitaka [ORNL

    2004-01-01

    The high number density of stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) observed in irradiated fcc metals suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, taken into account when estimating mechanical properties changes of irradiated materials. The central issue is describing the individual interaction between a moving dislocation and an SFT, which is characterized by a very fine size scale, {approx}100 nm. This scale is amenable to both in situ TEM experiments and large-scale atomic modelling. In this paper we present results of an atomistic simulation of dislocation-SFT interactions using molecular dynamics (MD). The results are compared with observations from in situ deformation experiments. It is demonstrated that in some cases the simulations and experimental observations are quite similar, suggesting a reasonable interpretation of experimental observations.

  13. Evidence of ?-stacking Interactions in the Self-Assembly of hIAPP22–29†

    PubMed Central

    Profit, Adam A.; Felsen, Valentina; Chinwong, Justina; Mojica, Elmer-Rico E.; Desamero, Ruel Z. B.

    2012-01-01

    The role aromatic amino acids play in the formation of amyloid is a subject of controversy. In an effort to clarify the contribution of aromaticity to the self-assembly of hIAPP22–29, peptide analogs containing electron donating groups (EDGs) or electron withdrawing groups (EWGs) as substituents on the aromatic ring of Phe-23 at the para position have been synthesized and characterized using turbidity measurements in conjunction with Raman, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Results indicate the incorporation of EDGs on the aromatic ring of Phe-23 virtually abolish the ability of hIAPP22–29 to form amyloid. Peptides containing EWGs were still capable of forming aggregates. These aggregates were found to be rich in ?-sheet secondary structure. TEM images of the aggregates confirm the presence of amyloid fibrils. The observed difference in amyloidogenic propensity between peptides containing EDGs and those with EWGs appears not to be based on differences in peptide hydrophobicity. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopic investigations reveal that the environment surrounding the aromatic ring becomes more hydrophobic and ordered upon aggregation. Furthermore, Raman measurements of peptide analogs containing EWGs, conclusively demonstrate a distinct downshift in the -C=C- ring mode (ca. 1600 cm?1) upon aggregation that has previously been shown to be indicative of ?-stacking. While previous work has demonstrated that ?-stacking is not an absolute requirement for fibrillization, our findings indicate that Phe-23 also contributes to fibril formation through ?-stacking interactions and that it is not only the hydrophobic nature of this residue that is relevant in the self-assembly of hIAPP22–29. PMID:23229921

  14. Self-induced uniaxial strain in MoS2 monolayers with local van der Waals-stacked interlayer interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kenan; Hu, Shuhong; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Tianning; Zhou, Xiaohao; Sun, Yan; Li, Tian-Xin; Fan, Hong Jin; Shen, Guozhen; Chen, Xin; Dai, Ning

    2015-03-24

    Strain engineering is an effective method to tune the properties of electrons and phonons in semiconductor materials, including two-dimensional (2D) layered materials (e.g., MoS2 or graphene). External artificial stress (ExAS) or heterostructure stacking is generally required to induce strains for modulating semiconductor bandgaps and optoelectronic functions. For layered materials, the van der Waals-stacked interlayer interaction (vdW-SI) has been considered to dominate the interlayer stacking and intralayer bonding. Here, we demonstrate self-induced uniaxial strain in the MoS2 monolayer without the assistance of ExAS or heterostructure stacking processes. The uniaxial strain occurring in local monolayer regions is manifested by the Raman split of the in-plane vibration modes E2g(1) and is essentially caused by local vdW-SI within the single layer MoS2 due to a unique symmetric bilayer stacking. The local stacked configuration and the self-induced uniaxial strain may provide improved understanding of the fundamental interlayer interactions and alternative routes for strain engineering of layered structures. PMID:25716291

  15. Determination of base binding strength and base stacking interaction of DNA duplex using atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-biao; Zhang, Chang-lin; Dong, Zai-li; Guan, Yi-fu

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most crucial properties of DNA, the structural stability and the mechanical strength are attracting a great attention. Here, we take advantage of high force resolution and high special resolution of Atom Force Microscope and investigate the mechanical force of DNA duplexes. To evaluate the base pair hydrogen bond strength and base stacking force in DNA strands, we designed two modes (unzipping and stretching) for the measurement rupture forces. Employing k-means clustering algorithm, the ruptured force are clustered and the mean values are estimated. We assessed the influence of experimental parameters and performed the force evaluation for DNA duplexes of pure dG/dC and dA/dT base pairs. The base binding strength of single dG/dC and single dA/dT were estimated to be 20.0 ± 0.2 pN and 14.0 ± 0.3 pN, respectively, and the base stacking interaction was estimated to be 2.0 ± 0.1 pN. Our results provide valuable information about the quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of the DNA duplexes. PMID:25772017

  16. Observation of Direct CP-Violation in B0 --> pi+pi- Decays and Model-Independent Constraints on phi2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Abe; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; D. Anipko; K. Arinstein; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; E. Barberio; M. Barbero; I. Bedny; U. Bitenc; I. Bizjak; S. Blyth; A. Bozek; T. E. Browder; M.-C. Chang; P. Chang; Y. Chao; A. Chen; K.-F. Chen; W. T. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; Y. Choi; S. Cole; J. Dalseno; M. Dash; A. Drutskoy; S. Eidelman; S. Fratina; T. Gershon; G. Gokhroo; B. Golob; H. Ha; J. Haba; K. Hara; K. Hayasaka; M. Hazumi; D. Heffernan; T. Hokuue; Y. Hoshi; S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; T. Iijima; A. Imoto; K. Inami; A. Ishikawa; Y. Iwasaki; J. H. Kang; P. Kapusta; N. Katayama; H. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; H. R. Khan; A. Kibayashi; H. Kichimi; K. Kinoshita; S. Korpar; P. Krokovny; R. Kulasiri; R. Kumar; C. C. Kuo; A. Kusaka; A. Kuzmin; Y.-J. Kwon; M. J. Lee; S. E. Lee; T. Lesiak; A. Limosani; S.-W. Lin; J. MacNaughton; F. Mandl; D. Marlow; T. Matsumoto; A. Matyja; S. McOnie; W. Mitaroff; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyake; H. Miyata; Y. Miyazaki; R. Mizuk; D. Mohapatra; Y. Nagasaka; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; T. Nozaki; S. Ogawa; T. Ohshima; S. L. Olsen; Y. Onuki; H. Ozaki; P. Pakhlov; G. Pakhlova; R. Pestotnik; L. E. Piilonen; H. Sahoo; Y. Sakai; N. Satoyama; T. Schietinger; O. Schneider; J. Schumann; C. Schwanda; A. J. Schwartz; R. Seidl; K. Senyo; M. E. Sevior; H. Shibuya; B. Shwartz; A. Somov; N. Soni; H. Stoeck; K. Sumisawa; T. Sumiyoshi; S. Y. Suzuki; O. Tajima; F. Takasaki; K. Tamai; N. Tamura; M. Tanaka; Y. Teramoto; X. C. Tian; K. Trabelsi; T. Tsukamoto; S. Uehara; K. Ueno; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; Y. Ushiroda; Y. Usov; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; S. Villa; C. H. Wang; Z. Wang; Y. Watanabe; E. Won; C.-H. Wu; Q. L. Xie; B. D. Yabsley; A. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamashita; M. Yamauchi; L. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; A. Zupanc

    2006-01-01

    We present a new measurement of the time-dependent CP-violating parameters in\\u000aB0 -> pi+pi- decays using a data sample that contains 535M BBbar pairs\\u000acollected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider\\u000aoperating at the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We reconstruct one neutral B meson as a\\u000api+pi- CP eigenstate and identify the flavor of the accompanying B meson

  17. Search for D0-D¯0 Mixing and Branching-Ratio Measurement in the Decay D0-->K+pi-pi0

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube

    2006-01-01

    We analyze 230.4fb-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider at SLAC to search for evidence of D0-D¯0 mixing using regions of phase space in the decay D0-->K+pi-pi0. We measure the time-integrated mixing rate RM=(0.023-0.014+0.018(stat.)±0.004(syst.))%, and RM<0.054% at the 95% confidence level, assuming CP invariance. The data are consistent with no mixing at the 4.5%

  18. Limits on D0-D¯0 Mixing and CP Violation from the Ratio of Lifetimes for Decay to K-pi+, K-K+, and pi-pi+

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; D. Boutigny; J.-M. Gaillard; A. Hicheur; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; P. Robbe; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; A. Palano; A. Pompili; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; A. W. Borgland; A. B. Breon; D. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; C. T. Day; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; J. F. Kral; G. Kukartsev; C. Leclerc; M. E. Levi; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; A. Romosan; M. T. Ronan; V. G. Shelkov; A. V. Telnov; W. A. Wenzel; K. Ford; T. J. Harrison; C. M. Hawkes; D. J. Knowles; S. E. Morgan; R. C. Penny; A. T. Watson; N. K. Watson; T. Deppermann; K. Goetzen; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; H. Schmuecker; M. Steinke; N. R. Barlow; J. T. Boyd; N. Chevalier; W. N. Cottingham; M. P. Kelly; T. E. Latham; C. Mackay; F. F. Wilson; K. Abe; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; D. Thiessen; P. Kyberd; A. K. McKemey; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. B. Golubev; V. N. Ivanchenko; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; A. N. Yushkov; D. Best; M. Chao; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; S. McMahon; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; C. Buchanan; D. del Re; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; D. B. Macfarlane; H. P. Paar; Sh. Rahatlou; U. Schwanke; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; B. Dahmes; N. Kuznetsova; S. L. Levy; O. Long; A. Lu; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; W. Verkerke; T. W. Beck; J. Beringer; A. M. Eisner; M. Grothe; C. A. Heusch; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; R. E. Schmitz; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. Turri; W. Walkowiak; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; S. Yang; S. Jayatilleke; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; T. Abe; T. Barillari; F. Blanc; P. Bloom; P. J. Clark; W. T. Ford; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; P. Rankin; J. Roy; J. G. Smith; W. C. van Hoek; L. Zhang; J. L. Harton; T. Hu; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; J. Zhang; D. Altenburg; T. Brandt; J. Brose; T. Colberg; M. Dickopp; R. S. Dubitzky; A. Hauke; H. M. Lacker; E. Maly; R. Müller-Pfefferkorn; R. Nogowski; S. Otto; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; B. Spaan; L. Wilden; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; F. Brochard; J. Cohen-Tanugi; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; A. Khan; D. Lavin; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; J. E. Swain; J. Tinslay; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; L. Piemontese; A. Sarti; E. Treadwell; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; D. Falciai; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; G. Crosetti; M. Lo Vetere; M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; F. C. Pastore; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; S. Bailey; M. Morii; M. L. Aspinwall; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; I. Eschrich; G. W. Morton; J. A. Nash; P. Sanders; G. P. Taylor; G. J. Grenier; S.-J. Lee; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; J. Lamsa; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; J. Yi; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; S. Laplace; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; T. C. Petersen; S. Plaszczynski; M. H. Schune; L. Tantot; G. Wormser; V. Brigljevic; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; A. J. Bevan; J. P. Coleman; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; M. Kay; R. J. Parry; D. J. Payne; R. J. Sloane; C. Touramanis; J. J. Back; P. F. Harrison; H. W. Shorthouse; P. Strother; P. B. Vidal; C. L. Brown; G. Cowan; R. L. Flack; H. U. Flaecher; S. George; M. G. Green; A. Kurup; C. E. Marker; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; G. Vaitsas; M. A. Winter; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; R. J. Barlow; A. C. Forti; P. A. Hart; F. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; A. J. Lyon; J. H. Weatherall; J. C. Williams; A. Farbin; A. Jawahery; D. Kovalskyi; C. K. Lae; V. Lillard; D. A. Roberts; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; K. T. Flood; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; V. B. Koptchev; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; S. Willocq; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; D. J. Mangeol; M. Milek; P. M. Patel; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; C. Hast; P. Taras; H. Nicholson; C. Cartaro; N. Cavallo; G. De Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; J. M. Losecco; T. A. Gabriel; B. Brau; T. Pulliam; J. Brau; R. Frey; C. T. Potter; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; F. Colecchia; A. Dorigo; F. Galeazzi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; G. Tiozzo; C. Voci; M. Benayoun; H. Briand

    2003-01-01

    We present a measurement of D0-D¯0 mixing parameters using the ratios of lifetimes extracted from samples of D0 mesons decaying to K-pi+, K-K+, and pi-pi+. Using 91 fb-1 of data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory, we obtain a value Y=[0.8±0.4(stat.)+0.5\\/-0.4(syst.)]%, which, in the limit of CP conservation, corresponds to the mixing parameter y=DeltaGamma\\/2Gamma. Using

  19. Atomic-Scale Study of Dislocation-Stacking Fault Tetrahedron Interactions. Part I: Mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Rodney, David [Genie Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux; Bacon, David J [University of Liverpool

    2006-01-01

    Stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) are formed under irradiation in fcc metals and alloys. The high number density of SFTs observed suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, be taken into account when estimating mechanical property changes of irradiated materials. The key issue in this is to describe the interaction between a moving dislocation and an individual SFT, which is distinguished by a small physical size of the order of {approx}1-10 nm. We have performed atomistic simulations of edge and screw dislocations interacting with SFTs of different sizes at different temperatures and strain rates. Five possible interaction outcomes have been identified, involving either partial absorption, or shearing or restoration of SFTs. The mechanisms that give rise to these processes are described and their dependence on interaction parameters, such as SFT size, dislocation-SFT geometry, temperature and stress/strain rate are determined. Mechanisms that help to explain the formation of defect-free channels cleared by gliding dislocations, as observed experimentally, are also discussed. Hardening due to the various mechanisms and their dependence on loading conditions will be presented in a following paper (Part II).

  20. Pyrene-modified PNAs: Stacking interactions and selective excimer emission in PNA2DNA triplexes

    PubMed Central

    Guidi, Lucia; Ghidini, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Summary Pyrene derivatives can be incorporated into nucleic acid analogs in order to obtain switchable probes or supramolecular architectures. In this paper, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) containing 1 to 3 1-pyreneacetic acid units (PNA1–6) with a sequence with prevalence of pyrimidine bases, complementary to cystic fibrosis W1282X point mutation were synthesized. These compounds showed sequence-selective switch-on of pyrene excimer emission in the presence of target DNA, due to PNA2DNA triplex formation, with stability depending on the number and positioning of the pyrene units along the chain. An increase in triplex stability and a very high mismatch-selectivity, derived from combined stacking and base-pairing interactions, were found for PNA2, bearing two distant pyrene units. PMID:25161706

  1. Long-range atomic ordering and variable interlayer interactions in two overlapping graphene lattices with stacking misorientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Taisuke; Beechem, Thomas E.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Kellogg, G. L.

    2012-02-01

    The low-energy electronic dispersion of graphene is extremely sensitive to the nearest layer interaction and thus the stacking sequence. Here, we report a method to examine the effect of stacking misorientation in bilayer graphene by transferring chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene onto monolithic graphene epitaxially grown on silicon carbide (SiC) (0001). The resulting hybrid bilayer graphene displays long-range Moiré diffraction patterns having various misorientations even as it exhibits electron reflectivity spectra nearly identical to epitaxial bilayer graphene grown directly on SiC. These varying twist angles affect the 2D (G’)-band shape of the Raman spectrum, indicating regions of both a monolayer-like single ? state and Bernal-like split ? states brought about by the differing interlayer interactions. This hybrid bilayer graphene fabricated via a transfer process therefore offers a way to systematically study the electronic properties of bilayer graphene films as a function of stacking misorientation angle.

  2. Measurement of D^0-\\bar{D^0} Mixing From a Time-Dependent Amplitude Analysis of D^0\\ -> K^+\\pi^-\\pi0 Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-08-04

    The authors present evidence of D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} in a data sample of 384 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. Assuming CP conservation, they measure the mixing parameters x{prime}{sub K{pi}{pi}{sup 0}} = [2.61{sub -0.68}{sup +0.57}(stat.) {+-} 0.39(syst.)]%, y{prime}{sub K{pi}{pi}{sup 0}} = [-0.06{sub -0.64}{sup +0.55}(stat.) {+-} 0.34(syst.)]%. The confidence level for the data to be consistent with the no-mixing hypothesis is 0.1%, including systematic uncertainties. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. They find no evidence of CP violation in mixing.

  3. Stacking Water

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this lesson, students become familiar with how ocean water forms density-stratified layers in many places. They design and carry out a series of tests to show how water masses of four different densities interact, using clear straws to stack colored water of different salinities. Temperature is varied to increase the differences in density of each water sample.

  4. NONWATER QUALITY IMPACTS OF CLOSED-CYCLE COOLING SYSTEMS AND THE INTERACTION OF STACK GAS AND COOLING TOWER PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a literature survey of the nonwater quality impacts of closed-cycle cooling systems. Following discussions of cooling tower and stack gas plumes, interactions of these plumes are considered. For cooling tower plumes, plume types, behavior, salt drift g...

  5. Equatorial ?-stacking interactions in diruthenium (II,III) tetracarboxylate complexes containing extended ?-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, Natasha F.; Ronaldson, Michael; Stanley Cameron, T.; Wang, Ruiyao; Aquino, Manuel A. S.

    2013-11-01

    The synthesis of three new valent-averaged tetracarboxylatodiruthenium (II,III) complexes, [Ru2(1-naphthylacetate)4(H2O)2](PF6)?4THF, 1?4THF, [Ru2(2-naphthoate)4(THF)2](PF6)?3THF, 2?3THF, and [Ru2(coumarin-3-carboxylate)4(MeOH)2](PF6)?MeOH?H2O, 3?MeOH?H2O, was accomplished using a well documented carboxylate exchange reaction. All three complexes were thoroughly characterized using infrared and UV-Vis spectroscopies, elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction. Due to the extended ?-systems present, two of the complexes, 2?3THF and 3?MeOH?H2O, display extensive ?-stacking in two dimensions, with similar interactions notably absent in 1?4THF due to the perpendicular orientation of the naphthyl rings. Modest H-bonding is seen in complexes 1?4THF and 3?MeOH?H2O. As these types of complexes are noted secondary building units (SBU's) in the construction of metal-organic frameworks (MOF's), the significance of these interactions in stabilizing even larger, supramolecular structures, are noted.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of the interactions between dislocation and imperfect stacking fault tetrahedron in Cu

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucie Saintoyant; Hyon-Jee Lee; Brian D. Wirth

    2007-01-01

    The microstructure of irradiated face centered cubic alloys with low stacking fault energy is distinguished by the formation of a high number density of nanometer size stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). A recent transmission electron microscopy investigation of high-energy proton irradiated copper [16] has shown that nearly 50% of the visible SFT population are not perfect SFTs, but rather consist of

  7. Energetic salts with ?-stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions lead the way to future energetic materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaheng; Zhang, Qinghua; Vo, Thao T; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2015-02-01

    Among energetic materials, there are two significant challenges facing researchers: 1) to develop ionic CHNO explosives with higher densities than their parent nonionic molecules and (2) to achieve a fine balance between high detonation performance and low sensitivity. We report a surprising energetic salt, hydroxylammonium 3-dinitromethanide-1,2,4-triazolone, that exhibits exceptional properties, viz., higher density, superior detonation performance, and improved thermal, impact, and friction stabilities, then those of its precursor, 3-dinitromethyl-1,2,4-triazolone. The solid-state structure features of the new energetic salt were investigated with X-ray diffraction which showed ?-stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions that contribute to closer packing and higher density. According to the experimental results and theoretical analysis, the newly designed energetic salt also gives rise to a workable compromise in high detonation properties and desirable stabilities. These findings will enhance the future prospects for rational energetic materials design and commence a new chapter in this field. PMID:25565429

  8. Measurement of the e+e- -->pi+pi- J/psi cross section via initial-state radiation at Belle.

    PubMed

    Yuan, C Z; Shen, C P; Wang, P; McOnie, S; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Bahinipati, S; Balagura, V; Barberio, E; Bedny, I; Bitenc, U; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, M-C; Chang, P; Chen, A; Chen, K-F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Cho, I-S; Choi, Y; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Eidelman, S; Fratina, S; Gabyshev, N; Golob, B; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Kah, D H; Kaji, H; Kang, J H; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kichimi, H; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Lin, S-W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; Matyja, A; Medvedeva, T; Mitaroff, W; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mori, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakao, M; Natkaniec, Z; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, H; Park, K S; Peak, L S; Piilonen, L E; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Schümann, J; Seidl, R; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shibuya, H; Shiu, J-G; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Somov, A; Staric, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Takasaki, F; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Uehara, S; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Vinokurova, A; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, X L; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2007-11-01

    The cross section for e(+)e(-)-->pi(+)pi(-)J/psi between 3.8 and 5.5 GeV/c(2) is measured using a 548 fb(-1) data sample collected on or near the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at KEKB. A peak near 4.25 GeV/c(2), corresponding to the so called Y(4260), is observed. In addition, there is another cluster of events at around 4.05 GeV/c(2). A fit using two interfering Breit-Wigner shapes describes the data better than one that uses only the Y(4260), especially for the lower-mass side of the 4.25 GeV enhancement. PMID:17995399

  9. Measurements of Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0-->pi+pi-, K+pi-, K+K- Decays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; D. Boutigny; J.-M. Gaillard; A. Hicheur; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; P. Robbe; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; A. Palano; A. Pompili; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; A. W. Borgland; A. B. Breon; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; J. F. Kral; C. Leclerc; M. E. Levi; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; A. Romosan; M. T. Ronan; V. G. Shelkov; A. V. Telnov; W. A. Wenzel; T. J. Harrison; C. M. Hawkes; D. J. Knowles; S. W. O'Neale; R. C. Penny; A. T. Watson; N. K. Watson; T. Deppermann; K. Goetzen; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; K. Peters; H. Schmuecker; M. Steinke; N. R. Barlow; W. Bhimji; J. T. Boyd; N. Chevalier; P. J. Clark; W. N. Cottingham; C. Mackay; F. F. Wilson; K. Abe; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; D. Thiessen; S. Jolly; A. K. McKemey; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. B. Golubev; V. N. Ivanchenko; A. A. Korol; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; A. N. Yushkov; D. Best; M. Chao; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; S. McMahon; D. P. Stoker; C. Buchanan; S. Chun; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; D. B. Macfarlane; H. Paar; S. Prell; Sh. Rahatlou; G. Raven; U. Schwanke; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; B. Dahmes; P. A. Hart; N. Kuznetsova; S. L. Levy; O. Long; A. Lu; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; W. Verkerke; J. Beringer; A. M. Eisner; M. Grothe; C. A. Heusch; W. S. Lockman; T. Pulliam; T. Schalk; R. E. Schmitz; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. Turri; W. Walkowiak; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; S. Yang; S. Jayatilleke; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; T. Barillari; P. Bloom; W. T. Ford; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; P. Rankin; J. Roy; J. G. Smith; W. C. van Hoek; L. Zhang; J. L. Harton; T. Hu; M. Krishnamurthy; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; J. Zhang; D. Altenburg; T. Brandt; J. Brose; T. Colberg; M. Dickopp; R. S. Dubitzky; A. Hauke; E. Maly; R. Müller-Pfefferkorn; S. Otto; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; B. Spaan; L. Wilden; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; F. Brochard; J. Cohen-Tanugi; S. Ferrag; S. T'jampens; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; A. Anjomshoaa; R. Bernet; A. Khan; D. Lavin; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; J. E. Swain; J. Tinslay; M. Falbo; C. Borean; C. Bozzi; L. Piemontese; A. Sarti; E. Treadwell; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; D. Falciai; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; A. Zallo; S. Bagnasco; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; G. Crosetti; M. Lo Vetere; M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; F. C. Pastore; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; S. Bailey; M. Morii; R. Bartoldus; G. J. Grenier; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; J. Lamsa; W. T. Meyer; E. I. Rosenberg; J. Yi; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; H. M. Lacker; S. Laplace; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; T. C. Petersen; S. Plaszczynski; M. H. Schune; L. Tantot; S. Trincaz-Duvoid; G. Wormser; R. M. Bionta; V. Brigljevic; D. J. Lange; K. van Bibber; D. M. Wright; A. J. Bevan; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; M. George; M. Kay; D. J. Payne; R. J. Sloane; C. Touramanis; M. L. Aspinwall; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; I. Eschrich; G. W. Morton; J. A. Nash; P. Sanders; D. Smith; G. P. Taylor; J. J. Back; G. Bellodi; P. Dixon; P. F. Harrison; R. J. Potter; H. W. Shorthouse; P. Strother; P. B. Vidal; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; S. George; M. G. Green; A. Kurup; C. E. Marker; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; G. Vaitsas; M. A. Winter; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; R. J. Barlow; A. C. Forti; F. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; A. J. Lyon; N. Savvas; J. H. Weatherall; J. C. Williams; A. Farbin; A. Jawahery; V. Lillard; D. A. Roberts; J. R. Schieck; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; K. T. Flood; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; V. B. Koptchev; T. B. Moore; H. Staengle; S. Willocq; B. Brau; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Milek; P. M. Patel; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; C. Hast; P. Taras; H. Nicholson; C. Cartaro; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; J. M. Losecco; J. R. Alsmiller; T. A. Gabriel; J. Brau; R. Frey; M. Iwasaki; C. T. Potter; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; F. Colecchia; A. Dorigo; F. Galeazzi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; M. Benayoun; H. Briand; J. Chauveau; P. David; Ch. de La Vaissière; L. del Buono; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Ocariz; M. Pivk; L. Roos; J. Stark; P. F. Manfredi; V. Re; V. Speziali; L. Gladney; Q. H. Guo

    2002-01-01

    We present measurements of branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries for two-body neutral B¯ meson decays to charged pions and kaons based on a sample of about 88×106 Upsilon(4S)-->BB¯ decays. From a time-independent fit we measure the charge-averaged branching fractions B(B0-->pi+pi- )=(4.7±0.6±0.2)×10-6, B(B0-->K+pi- )=(17.9±0.9±0.7)×10-6, and the direct CP-violating charge asymmetry AKpi=-0.102±0.050±0.016 [-0.188,-0.016], where the ranges in square brackets indicate the 90%

  10. Branching fraction measurements of charged B decays to K*+K+K-, K*+pi+K-, K*+K+pi- and K*+pi+pi- final states

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. De Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; A. Gaz

    2006-01-01

    Branching fraction and asymmetry measurements of charmless B+-->K*+h1+h2- (where h1,2=K, pi) decays are presented, using a data sample of 232×106 Upsilon(4S)-->BB¯ decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. Using a maximum likelihood fit, the following branching fraction results were obtained: B(B+-->K*+K+K-)=(36.2±3.3±3.6)×10-6 and B(B+-->K*+pi+pi-)=(75.3±6.0±8.1)×10-6. Upper limits were set for B(B+-->K*+pi+K-)<11.8×10-6 and B(B+-->K*+K+pi-)<6.1×10-6 at 90% confidence

  11. Precise Measurement of the e+ e- to pi+ pi- (gamma) Cross Section with the Initial State Radiation Method at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wen-Feng; /Notre Dame U. /SLAC

    2010-08-11

    A precise measurement of the cross section of the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}({gamma}) from threshold to an energy of 3 GeV is obtained with the initial state radiation (ISR) method using 232 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV. The ISR luminosity is determined from a study of the leptonic process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{gamma}({gamma}). The leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon magnetic anomaly calculated using the {pi}{pi} cross section measured from threshold to 1.8 GeV is (514.1 {+-} 2.2(stat) {+-} 3.1(syst)) x 10{sup -10}.

  12. Doping Dependence of the $(\\pi,\\pi)$ Shadow Band in La-Based Cuprates Studied by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z. X.

    2011-08-15

    The ({pi},{pi}) shadow band (SB) in La-based cuprate family (La214) was studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) over a wide doping range from x = 0.01 to x = 0.25. Unlike the well-studied case of the Bi-based cuprate family, an overall strong, monotonic doping dependence of the SB intensity at the Fermi level (E{sub F}) was observed. In contrast to a previous report for the presence of the SB only close to x = 1/8, we found it exists in a wide doping range, associated with a doping-independent ({pi},{pi}) wave vector but strongly doping-dependent intensity: It is the strongest at x {approx} 0.03 and systematically diminishes as the doping increases until it becomes negligible in the overdoped regime. This SB with the observed doping dependence of intensity can in principle be caused by the antiferromagnetic fluctuations or a particular form of low-temperature orthorhombic lattice distortion known to persist up to x {approx} 0.21 in the system, with both being weakened with increasing doping. However, a detailed binding energy dependent analysis of the SB at x = 0.07 does not appear to support the former interpretation, leaving the latter as a more plausible candidate, despite a challenge in quantitatively linking the doping dependences of the SB intensity and the magnitude of the lattice distortion. Our finding highlights the necessity of a careful and global consideration of the inherent structural complications for correctly understanding the cuprate Fermiology and its microscopic implication.

  13. Synthetic spectroscopic models related to coenzymes and base pairs. VII. Stacking interactions in tRNA; the "bend" at dimethylguanosine.

    PubMed

    Iwamura, H; Leonard, N J; Eisinger, J

    1970-04-01

    We have examined the stacking interactions of N(2)-dimethyl-guanosine with the nucleosides, e.g., adenosine and cytidine, found adjacent to it in certain tRNA's, by the use of model compounds in which the trimethylene bridge was substituted for the ribose-phosphate-ribose linkage. From the hypochromism exhibited by synthetic 9-[3-(aden-9-yl)propyl]-2-dimethylaminopurine-6-one (IV) and by 9-[3-(cytos-1-yl)propyl]2-dimethylaminopurin-6-one in aqueous solution (VI) it is appearent that the interaction is at least as great between the N(2)-dimethylguanine moiety and adenine or cytosine as between guanine and these two bases. The fluorescence and phosphorescence emission spectra were obtained in ethylene glycol-water glass at 80 degrees K. The exciplex fluorescence observed for both bi-molecules (IV and VI) containing the N(2)-dimethylguanine unit provides further evidence for stacked chromophores. PMID:5266146

  14. Synthetic Spectroscopic Models Related to Coenzymes and Base Pairs, VII. Stacking Interactions in tRNA; the „Bend” at Dimethylguanosine*†

    PubMed Central

    Iwamura, Hajime; Leonard, Nelson J.; Eisinger, Josef

    1970-01-01

    We have examined the stacking interactions of N2-dimethyl-guanosine with the nucleosides, e.g., adenosine and cytidine, found adjacent to it in certain tRNA's, by the use of model compounds in which the trimethylene bridge was substituted for the ribose-phosphate-ribose linkage. From the hypochromism exhibited by synthetic 9-[3-(aden-9-yl)propyl]-2-dimethylaminopurine-6-one (IV) and by 9-[3-(cytos-1-yl)propyl]2-dimethylaminopurin-6-one in aqueous solution (VI) it is appearent that the interaction is at least as great between the N2-dimethylguanine moiety and adenine or cytosine as between guanine and these two bases. The fluorescence and phosphorescence emission spectra were obtained in ethylene glycol-water glass at 80°K. The exciplex fluorescence observed for both bi-molecules (IV and VI) containing the N2-dimethylguanine unit provides further evidence for stacked chromophores. PMID:5266146

  15. Measurement of central exclusive pi+pi- production in p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 0.9 and 1.96 TeV at CDF

    E-print Network

    CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; D. Lontkovskyi; A. Lucà; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; I. Makarenko; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida; G. B. Yu; I. Yu; A. M. Zanetti; Y. Zeng; C. Zhou

    2015-06-11

    We measure exclusive $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ production in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9 and 1.96 TeV in the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We select events with two oppositely charged particles, assumed to be pions, with pseudorapidity $|\\eta| < 1.3$ and with no other particles detected in $|\\eta| < 5.9$. We require the $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ system to have rapidity $|y|<$ 1.0. The production mechanism of these events is expected to be dominated by double pomeron exchange, which constrains the quantum numbers of the central state. The data are potentially valuable for isoscalar meson spectroscopy and for understanding the pomeron in a region of transition between nonperturbative and perturbative quantum chromodynamics. The data extend up to dipion mass $M(\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ = 5000 MeV/$c^2$ and show resonance structures attributed to $f_0$ and $f_2(1270)$ mesons. From the $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $K^+K^-$ spectra, we place upper limits on exclusive $\\chi_{c0}(3415)$ production.

  16. Quantum-mechanical evaluation of ?-? versus substituent-? interactions in ? stacking: direct evidence for the Wheeler-Houk picture.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Robert M; Sherrill, C David

    2014-12-17

    The influence of substituents on ?-stacking interactions has previously been explained by two competing hypotheses: a nonlocal effect in which tuning of the ? density by the substituent alters the interaction (the Hunter-Sanders picture) or a local effect in which the direct interaction of the added substituent and changed polarity of the phenyl-substituent ? bond alter the interaction (the Wheeler-Houk picture). In this work, we applied the recently developed functional-group partition of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (F-SAPT) to directly quantify these two effects in situ. The results show that both pictures contribute to the change in interaction energy but that the Wheeler-Houk picture is usually dominant. PMID:25423285

  17. The collapse of stacking fault tetrahedra by interactions with gliding dislocations.

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukawa, Yoshitaka [ORNL; Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    The collapse of stacking-fault tetrahedra (SFT) by gliding dislocations was observed in in situ straining experiments in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). A stacking-fault tetrahedron was collapsed by intersection with a gliding perfect dislocation: only the base portion divided by the gliding plane of the dislocation annihilated, while the apex portion remained intact. As a result of analysis on evolution of atom configuration induced by intersection with perfect dislocation in SFT, it was found that an unusual atom configuration inevitably appeared in one of the ledges formed on stacking-fault planes, which is traditionally called I-ledge: the atoms on adjacent (111) planes were overlapping each other. The overlapping configuration provides a strong repulsive force, being a conceivable driving force to induce a chain reaction of atom displacements that collapses the SFT base portion.

  18. The Soil Stack: An Interactive Computer Program Describing Basic Soil Science and Soil Degradation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cattle, S. R.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A computer program dealing with numerous aspects of soil degradation has a target audience of high school and university students (16-20 year olds), and is presented in a series of cards grouped together as stacks. Describes use of the software in Australia. (LZ)

  19. Magnetic domain structure and dynamics in interacting ferromagnetic stacks with perpendicular anisotropy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Wiebel; J.-P. Jamet; N. Vernier; A. Mougin; J. Ferré; V. Baltz; B. Rodmacq; B. Dieny

    2006-01-01

    The time and field dependence of the magnetic domain structure at magnetization reversal were investigated by Kerr microscopy in a structure consisting of a hard and a soft ferromagnetic Co\\/Pt multilayer stack with perpendicular anisotropy, separated by a thicker nonmagnetic Pt spacer layer. Large local inhomogeneous magnetostatic stray fields appear as soon as a nonuniform magnetic area exists within one

  20. Measurement of pi0pi0 Production in the Nuclear Medium by pi- Interactions at 0.408 GeV\\/c

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Starostin; H. M. Staudenmaier; C. E. Allgower; V. Bekrenev; E. Berger; W. J. Briscoe; M. Clajus; J. R. Comfort; K. Craig; D. Grosnick; D. Isenhower; N. Knecht; D. Koetke; A. Koulbardis; N. Kozlenko; S. Kruglov; T. Kycia; G. Lolos; I. Lopatin; D. M. Manley; B. Manweiler; A. MarusiC; S. McDonald; B. M. Nefkens; J. Olmsted; Z. Papandreou; D. Peaslee; R. J. Peterson; N. Phaisangittisakul; S. Prakhov; M. Pulver; A. F. Ramirez; M. Sadler; A. Shafi; I. Slaus; H. Spinka; S. Stanislaus; I. Supek; W. B. Tippens

    2000-01-01

    We report on an investigation of the \\\\(pi-,pi0pi0\\\\) reaction by means of measurements of the pi0pi0 invariant mass distributions from pi- interactions on H, D, C, Al, and Cu targets at ppi- = 0.408 GeV\\/c. The sharp, strong peak in the pi+pi- invariant mass near 2mpi reported by the CHAOS Collaboration is not seen in our pi0pi0 data. However, we

  1. Symmetry potential of $\\Delta(1232)$ resonance and its effects on the $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ ratio in heavy-ion collisions near the pion production threshold

    E-print Network

    Li, Bao-An

    2015-01-01

    Effects of the completely unknown symmetry (isovector) potential of the \\D on the total and differential \\rpi in heavy-ion collisions at beam energies from 100 to 1000 MeV/A are explored within an isospin-dependent transport model IBUU. The effects are found to be negligible at beam energies above the pion production threshold due to the very short lifetimes of less than 2 fm/c for $\\Delta$ resonances with masses around $m_{\\Delta}=1232$ MeV, leaving the $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ ratios of especially the energetic pions still a reliable probe of the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy $E_{sym}(\\rho)$. However, as the beam energy becomes deeply sub-threshold for pion production, effects of the $\\Delta$ symmetry potential becomes appreciable especially on the \\rpi of low-energy pions from the decays of low-mass $\\Delta$ resonances which have lived long enough to be affected by their mean-field potentials, providing a useful tool to study the symmetry potential and spectroscopy of $\\Delta$ resonances in neutron...

  2. Examining the base stacking interaction in a dinucleotide context via reversible cyclobutane dimer analogue formation under UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Degang; Li, Lei

    2013-11-14

    Substituted tolyl groups are considered as close isosteres of the thymine (T) residue. They can be recognized by DNA polymerases as if they were thymine. Although these toluene derivatives are relatively inert toward radical additions, our recent finding suggests that the dinucleotide analogue TpTo (To = 2'-deoxy-1-(3-tolyl)-?-D-ribofuranose) supports an ortho photocycloaddition reaction upon UV irradiation, producing two cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) analogues 2 and 3. Our report here further shows that formation of these CPD species is reversible under UVC irradiation, resembling the photochemical property of the CPD species formed between two Ts. Analyzing the stability of these CPD analogues suggests that one (2) is more stable than the other (3). The TpTo conformer responsible for 2 formation is also more stable than that responsible for 3 formation, as indicated by the Gibbs free energy change calculated from the constructed Bordwell thermodynamic cycle. These different stabilities are not due to the varying photochemical properties, as proved by quantum yields determined from the corresponding photoreactions. Instead, they are ascribed to the different stacking interaction between the T and the To rings both in the TpTo dinucleotide as well as in the formed CPD analogues. Factors contributing to the ring stacking interactions are also discussed. Our proof-of-concept approach suggests that a carefully designed Bordwell cycle coupled with reversible CPD formations under UV irradiation can be very useful in studying DNA base interactions. PMID:24223299

  3. Examining the base stacking interaction in a dinucleotide context via reversible cyclobutane dimer analogue formation under UV irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Degang; Li, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Substituted tolyl groups are considered as close isosteres of the thymine (T) residue. They can be recognized by DNA polymerases as if they were thymine. Although these toluene derivatives are relatively inert toward radical additions, our recent finding suggests that the dinucleotide analogue TpTo (To = 2'-deoxy-1-(3-tolyl)-?-D-ribofuranose) supports an ortho photocycloaddition reaction upon UV irradiation, producing two cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) analogues 2 and 3. Our report here further shows that formation of these CPD species is reversible under UVC irradiation, resembling the photochemical property of the CPD species formed between two Ts. Analyzing the stability of these CPD analogues suggests that one (2) is more stable than the other (3). The TpTo conformer responsible for 2 formation is also more stable than that responsible for 3 formation, as indicated by the Gibbs free energy change calculated from the constructed Bordwell thermodynamic cycle. These different stabilities are not due to the varying photochemical properties, as proved by quantum yields determined from the corresponding photoreactions. Instead, they are ascribed to the different stacking interaction between the T and the To rings both in the TpTo dinucleotide as well as in the formed CPD analogues. Factors contributing to the ring stacking interactions are also discussed. Our proof-of-concept approach suggests that a carefully designed Bordwell cycle coupled with reversible CPD formations under UV irradiation can be very useful in studying DNA base interactions. PMID:24223299

  4. Effect of stacking interactions on the spectra of the monomer of PFBT: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Jiande; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2009-09-24

    Conjugated polymers (CPs) contain one pi-conjugated backbone and functional groups that could be ionized in high dielectric media. These materials combine the semiconducting and photon harvesting properties of electronically delocalized polymers with the charge-mediated behavior of polyelectrolytes. CPs can be used as highly responsive optical sensors for chemical and biological targets. The density functional theory (DFT) and the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) approach were employed to simulate the absorption and emission spectra of poly[9,9'-bis(6''-N,N,N-trimethylammonium)hexyl]fluorene-co-alt-4,7-(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole) dibromide] (PFBT) in the present study. The influences on the spectra of the monomer unit F(BT)F due to stacking with the fluorene (F) and 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BT) units have been explored. The results suggest that stacking lowers the excitation and emission energy, facilitating detections of the polymers. PMID:19711936

  5. Influence of carbonaceous particles on the interaction of coal combustion stack ash with organic matter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wayne H. Griest; Bruce A. Tomkins

    1986-01-01

    Stack ash samples were fractionated by aerodynamic size, and the largest particle size fraction was separated into constituent particle type subfractions. Comparison of the mineral, magnetic, and carbonaceous particles showed that coked coal is responsible for the sorptivity of the large particle size fraction for carbon-14 labeled benzo(a)pyrene ((¹⁴C)BaP) and for low solvent extraction recoveries. Elevated levels of organic matter

  6. CDF Grid computing and the decay X(3872) ---> J/psi pi+ pi- with J/psi ---> e+ e-

    SciTech Connect

    Kerzel, Ulrich; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2005-11-01

    The main aim of physics research is to obtain a consistent description of nature leading to a detailed understanding of the phenomena observed in experiments. The field of particle physics focuses on the discovery and understanding of the fundamental particles and the forces by which they interact with each other. Using methods from group theory, the present knowledge can be mathematically described by the so-called ''Standard Model'', which interprets the fundamental particles (quarks and leptons) as quantum-mechanical fields interacting via the electromagnetic, weak and strong force. These interactions are mediated via gauge particles such as the photon (for the electromagnetic force), W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} (for the weak force) and gluons (for the strong force). Gravitation is not yet included in this description as it presently cannot be formulated in a way to be incorporated in the Standard Model. However, the gravitational force is negligibly small on microscopic levels. The validity of this mathematical approach is tested experimentally by accelerating particles such as electrons and protons, as well as their antiparticles, to high energies and observing the reactions as these particles collide using sophisticated detectors. Due to the high energy of the particles involved, these detectors need to be as big as a small house to allow for precision measurements. Comparing the predictions from theory with the analyzed reactions observed in these collisions, the Standard Model has been established as a well-founded theory. Precision measurements from the four experiments (Aleph, Delphi, Opal, L3) the Large Electron Positron collider (LEP), operated at CERN during the years 1989-2000, allow the determination of the Standard Model parameters with enormous accuracy.

  7. Evidence of a Broad Structure at an Invariant Mass of 4.32GeV\\/c2 in the Reaction e+e--->pi+pi-psi(2S) Measured at BABAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence

    2007-01-01

    We present a measurement of the cross section of the process e+e--->pi+pi-psi(2S) from threshold up to 8 GeV center-of-mass energy using events containing initial-state radiation, produced at the SLAC PEP-II e+e- storage rings. The study is based on 298fb-1 of data recorded with the BABAR detector. A structure is observed in the cross section not far above threshold, near 4.32

  8. Bose-Einstein correlations of pi-pi- pairs in central Pb+Pb collisions at 20A,30A,40A,80A, and 158A GeV

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Alt; T. Anticic; B. Baatar; D. Barna; J. Bartke; L. Betev; H. Bialkowska; C. Blume; B. Boimska; M. Botje; J. Bracinik; R. Bramm; P. Buncic; V. Cerny; P. Christakoglou; P. Chung; O. Chvala; J. G. Cramer; P. Csató; P. Dinkelaker; V. Eckardt; D. Flierl; Z. Fodor; P. Foka; V. Friese; J. Gál; M. Gazdzicki; V. Genchev; G. Georgopoulos; E. Gladysz; K. Grebieszkow; S. Hegyi; C. Höhne; K. Kadija; A. Karev; D. Kikola; M. Kliemant; S. Kniege; V. I. Kolesnikov; E. Kornas; R. Korus; M. Kowalski; I. Kraus; M. Kreps; A. Laszlo; R. Lacey; M. van Leeuwen; P. Lévai; L. Litov; B. Lungwitz; M. Makariev; A. I. Malakhov; M. Mateev; G. L. Melkumov; A. Mischke; M. Mitrovski; J. Molnár; V. Nicolic; G. Pálla; A. D. Panagiotou; D. Panayotov; A. Petridis; W. Peryt; M. Pikna; J. Pluta; D. Prindle; F. Pühlhofer; R. Renfordt; C. Roland; G. Roland; M. Rybczynski; A. Rybicki; A. Sandoval; N. Schmitz; T. Schuster; P. Seyboth; F. Siklér; B. Sitar; E. Skrzypczak; M. Slodkowski; G. Stefanek; R. Stock; C. Strabel; H. Ströbele; T. Susa; I. Szentpétery; J. Sziklai; M. Szuba; P. Szymanski; V. Trubnikov; D. Varga; M. Vassiliou; G. I. Veres; G. Vesztergombi; D. Vranic; A. Wetzler; Z. Wlodarczyk; A. Wojtaszek; I. K. Yoo; J. Zimányi

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of Bose-Einstein correlations of pi-pi- pairs in central Pb+Pb collisions were performed with the NA49 detector at the CERN Super Proton Synchroton for beam energies of 20A,30A,40A,80A, and 158A GeV. Correlation functions were measured in the longitudinally comoving ``out-side-long'' reference frame as a function of rapidity and transverse momentum in the forward hemisphere of the reaction. Radius and correlation

  9. Minimalist synthetic host with stacked guanidinium ions mimics the weakened hydration shells of protein-protein interaction interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing; Post, Joshua; Hore, Dennis K; Hof, Fraser

    2014-01-01

    Protein surfaces are complex solutes, and protein-protein interactions are specifically mediated by surface motifs that modulate solvation shells in poorly understood ways. We report herein a supramolecular host that is designed to mimic one of the most important recognition motifs that drives protein-protein interactions, the stacked arginine side chain. We show that it binds its guests and displays good selectivity in the highly competitive medium of pure, buffered water. We use a combination of experimental studies of binding and molecular dynamics simulations to build a cohesive picture of how this biomimetic host achieves the feat. The presence of the stacking element next to the guanidinium groups causes a decrease in the number of host-water hydrogen bonds, a decrease in the density of water around the host, and a decrease in water-water hydrogen bonds near the host. Experimental data using mixed organic/aqueous solvent systems confirm that this host relies on the hydrophobic effect in a way that the two control hosts do not. Our simulations and analysis provide detailed information on the linkage between (de)hydration and binding events in water in a way that could be applied to many aqueous supramolecular systems. PMID:24328280

  10. Stretching single-stranded DNA: interplay of electrostatic, base-pairing, and base-pair stacking interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Zhou, H; Ou-Yang, Z C

    2001-01-01

    Recent single-macromolecule observations revealed that the force/extension characteristics of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) are closely related to solution ionic concentration and DNA sequence composition. To understand this, we studied the elastic property of ssDNA through the Monte Carlo implementation of a modified freely jointed chain (FJC), with electrostatic, base-pairing, and base-pair stacking interactions all incorporated. The simulated force-extension profiles for both random and designed sequences have attained quantitative agreements with the experimental data. In low-salt solution, electrostatic interaction dominates, and at low forces, the molecule can be more easily aligned than an unmodified FJC. In high-salt solution, secondary hairpin structure appears in ssDNA by the formation of base pairs between complementary bases, and external stretching causes a hairpin-coil structural transition, which is continuous for ssDNA made of random sequences. In designed sequences such as poly(dA-dT) and poly(dG-dC), the stacking potential between base pairs encourages the aggregation of base pairs into bulk hairpins and makes the hairpin-coil transition a discontinuous (first-order) process. The sensitivity of elongation to the base-pairing rule is also investigated. The comparison of modeling calculations and the experimental data suggests that the base pairing of single-stranded polynucleotide molecules tends to form a nested and independent planar hairpin structure rather than a random intersecting pattern. PMID:11463654

  11. Measurement of central exclusive pi+pi- production in p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 0.9 and 1.96 TeV at CDF

    E-print Network

    CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; D. Lontkovskyi; A. Lucà; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; I. Makarenko; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida; G. B. Yu; I. Yu; A. M. Zanetti; Y. Zeng; C. Zhou

    2015-02-09

    We measure exclusive $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ production in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9 and 1.96 TeV in the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We select events with two oppositely-charged particles, assumed to be pions, with pseudorapidity $|\\eta| < 1.3$ and with no other particles detected in $|\\eta| < 5.9$. We require the \\pipi system to have rapidity $|y|<$ 1.0. The production mechanism of these events is expected to be dominated by double pomeron exchange, which constrains the quantum numbers of the central state. The data are potentially valuable for isoscalar meson spectroscopy, and for understanding the pomeron in a region of transition between nonperturbative and perturbative quantum chromodynamics. The data extend up to dipion mass $M(\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ = 5000 MeV/$c^2$, and show resonance structures attributed to $f_0$ and $f_2(1270)$ mesons. From the $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $K^+K^-$ spectra we place upper limits on exclusive $\\chi_{c0}(3415)$ production.

  12. Cross Sections for the Reactions e+e- --> K+ K- pi+pi-, K+ K- pi0pi0, and K+ K- K+ K- Measured Using Initial-State Radiation Events

    E-print Network

    The BABAR Collaboration; J. P. Lees

    2012-08-21

    We study the processes e+e- --> K+ K- pi+pi-gamma, K+ K- pi0pi0gamma, and K+ K- K+ K-gamma, where the photon is radiated from the initial state. About 84000, 8000, and 4200 fully reconstructed events, respectively, are selected from 454 fb-1 of BaBar data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the \\epem center-of-mass energy, so that the K+ K- pi+pi- data can be compared with direct measurements of the e+e- --> K+ K- pi+pi- reaction. No direct measurements exist for the e+e- --> K+ K-pi0pi0 or e+e- --> K+ K-K+ K- reactions, and we present an update of our previous result with doubled statistics. Studying the structure of these events, we find contributions from a number of intermediate states, and extract their cross sections. In particular, we perform a more detailed study of the e+e- --> phi(1020)pipigamma reaction, and confirm the presence of the Y(2175) resonance in the phi(1020) f0(980) and K+K-f0(980) modes. In the charmonium region, we observe the J/psi in all three final states and in several intermediate states, as well as the psi(2S) in some modes, and measure the corresponding product of branching fraction and electron width.

  13. Catalysis with Gold Complexes Immobilised on Carbon Nanotubes by ?-? Stacking Interactions: Heterogeneous Catalysis versus the Boomerang Effect.

    PubMed

    Vriamont, Charles; Devillers, Michel; Riant, Olivier; Hermans, Sophie

    2013-09-01

    A new pyrene-tagged gold(I) complex has been synthesised and tested as a homogeneous catalyst. First, a simple 1,6-enyne was chosen as a model substrate for cyclisation by using different solvents to optimise the reaction conditions. The non-covalent immobilisation of our pyrene-tagged gold complex onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes through ?-? stacking interactions was then explored to obtain a supported homogeneous catalyst. The heterogenised catalyst and its homogeneous counterpart exhibited similar activity in a range of enyne cyclisation reactions. Bearing in mind that ?-? interactions are affected by temperature and solvent polarity, the reuse and robustness of the supported homogeneous catalyst was tested to explore the scope and limitations of the recyclability of this catalyst. Under the optimised conditions, recyclability was observed by using the concept of the boomerang effect. PMID:23861243

  14. Dalitz Plot Analysis of Ds+->pi+pi-pi+

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, R.N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-01-26

    A Dalitz plot analysis of {approx} 13, 000 D{sub s}{sup +} decays to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} has been performed. A 384 fb{sup -1} data sample, recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring running at center of mass energies near 10.6 GeV, is used. Amplitudes and phases of the intermediate resonances which contribute to this final state are measured. A high precision measurement of the ratio: {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.199 {+-} 0.004 {+-} 0.006 is performed. Using a model independent partial wave analysis the amplitude and phase of the S-wave have been measured.

  15. Effects of Low-k Stack Structure on Performance of Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Devices and Chip Package Interaction Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagami, Masayoshi; Inoue, Naoya; Ueki, Makoto; Narihiro, Mitsuru; Tada, Munehiro; Yamamoto, Hironori; Ito, Fuminori; Furutake, Naoya; Saito, Shinobu; Onodera, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Tsuneo; Hayashi, Yoshihiro

    2012-09-01

    Low capacitance and highly reliable Cu dual-damascene (DD) interconnects have been developed with self-organized “seamless low-k SiOCH stacks” (SEALS) structure. A carbon-rich sub-nano porous SiOCH (k=2.5) was directly stacked on an oxygen-rich porous SiOCH (k=2.7) in the SEALS structure, without a hard-mask (HM) and etch-stop (ES) layer of SiO2. The effective k-value (keff) of the Cu DD interconnect including the SiCN capping layer (k=4.9) was reduced to 2.9 compared to 3.4 on a conventional hybrid structure with SiO2-HM and ES, which had been used in 65-nm-node mass production. The interconnect delay of a 45-nm-node complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) ring oscillator (RO) was reduced by 15% referring to that of the conventional hybrid structure. Interconnect reliabilities, such as the interline time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) and thermal cycles, were unchanged from those of the conventional hybrid interconnects. No failure was detected for chip package interaction (CPI) during reliability tests in a plastic ball grid array (PBGA) package. SEALS is a promising structure for scaled down ultra large scale integrations (ULSIs) for highly reliable and high speed operation, and low power consumption.

  16. Stacking interactions between carbohydrate and protein quantified by combination of theoretical and experimental methods.

    PubMed

    Wimmerová, Michaela; Kozmon, Stanislav; Ne?asová, Ivona; Mishra, Sushil Kumar; Komárek, Jan; Ko?a, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate-receptor interactions are an integral part of biological events. They play an important role in many cellular processes, such as cell-cell adhesion, cell differentiation and in-cell signaling. Carbohydrates can interact with a receptor by using several types of intermolecular interactions. One of the most important is the interaction of a carbohydrate's apolar part with aromatic amino acid residues, known as dispersion interaction or CH/? interaction. In the study presented here, we attempted for the first time to quantify how the CH/? interaction contributes to a more general carbohydrate-protein interaction. We used a combined experimental approach, creating single and double point mutants with high level computational methods, and applied both to Ralstonia solanacearum (RSL) lectin complexes with ?-L-Me-fucoside. Experimentally measured binding affinities were compared with computed carbohydrate-aromatic amino acid residue interaction energies. Experimental binding affinities for the RSL wild type, phenylalanine and alanine mutants were -8.5, -7.1 and -4.1 kcal x mol(-1), respectively. These affinities agree with the computed dispersion interaction energy between carbohydrate and aromatic amino acid residues for RSL wild type and phenylalanine, with values -8.8, -7.9 kcal x mol(-1), excluding the alanine mutant where the interaction energy was -0.9 kcal x mol(-1). Molecular dynamics simulations show that discrepancy can be caused by creation of a new hydrogen bond between the ?-L-Me-fucoside and RSL. Observed results suggest that in this and similar cases the carbohydrate-receptor interaction can be driven mainly by a dispersion interaction. PMID:23056230

  17. Stacking Interactions between Carbohydrate and Protein Quantified by Combination of Theoretical and Experimental Methods

    PubMed Central

    Ne?asová, Ivona; Mishra, Sushil Kumar; Komárek, Jan; Ko?a, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate – receptor interactions are an integral part of biological events. They play an important role in many cellular processes, such as cell-cell adhesion, cell differentiation and in-cell signaling. Carbohydrates can interact with a receptor by using several types of intermolecular interactions. One of the most important is the interaction of a carbohydrate's apolar part with aromatic amino acid residues, known as dispersion interaction or CH/? interaction. In the study presented here, we attempted for the first time to quantify how the CH/? interaction contributes to a more general carbohydrate - protein interaction. We used a combined experimental approach, creating single and double point mutants with high level computational methods, and applied both to Ralstonia solanacearum (RSL) lectin complexes with ?-l-Me-fucoside. Experimentally measured binding affinities were compared with computed carbohydrate-aromatic amino acid residue interaction energies. Experimental binding affinities for the RSL wild type, phenylalanine and alanine mutants were ?8.5, ?7.1 and ?4.1 kcal.mol?1, respectively. These affinities agree with the computed dispersion interaction energy between carbohydrate and aromatic amino acid residues for RSL wild type and phenylalanine, with values ?8.8, ?7.9 kcal.mol?1, excluding the alanine mutant where the interaction energy was ?0.9 kcal.mol?1. Molecular dynamics simulations show that discrepancy can be caused by creation of a new hydrogen bond between the ?-l-Me-fucoside and RSL. Observed results suggest that in this and similar cases the carbohydrate-receptor interaction can be driven mainly by a dispersion interaction. PMID:23056230

  18. Intrinsic and substrate induced spin-orbit interaction in chirally stacked trilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormányos, Andor; Burkard, Guido

    2013-01-01

    We present a combined group-theoretical and tight-binding approach to calculate the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in ABC stacked trilayer graphene. We find that compared to monolayer graphene (S. Konschuh, M. Gmitra, and J. Fabian [Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.82.245412 82, 245412 (2010)]), a larger set of d orbitals (in particular the dz2 orbital) needs to be taken into account. We also consider the intrinsic SOC in bilayer graphene, because the comparison between our tight-binding bilayer results and the density functional computations of S. Konschuh, M. Gmitra, D. Kochan, and J. Fabian [Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.85.115423 85, 115423 (2012)] allows us to estimate the values of the trilayer SOC parameters as well. We also discuss the situation when a substrate or adatoms induce strong SOC in only one of the layers of bilayer or ABC trilayer graphene. Both for the case of intrinsic and externally induced SOC we derive effective Hamiltonians which describe the low-energy spin-orbit physics. We find that at the K point of the Brillouin zone the effect of Bychkov-Rashba type SOC is suppressed in bilayer and ABC trilayer graphene compared to monolayer graphene.

  19. Theoretical analysis of direct $CP$ violation and differential decay width in $D^\\pm\\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^+\\pi^-$ in phase space around the resonances $\\rho^0(770)$ and $f_0(500)$

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Su, Yu-Mo; Lü, Gang; Zheng, Bo

    2015-01-01

    We perform a theoretical study on direct $CP$ violation in $D^\\pm\\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^+\\pi^-$ in phase space around the intermediate states $\\rho^0(770)$ and $f_0(500)$. The possible interference between the amplitudes corresponding to the two resonances is taken into account, and the relative strong phase of the two amplitudes is treated as a free parameter. Our analysis shows that by properly chosen the strong phase, both the $CP$ violation strength and differential decay width accommodate to the experimental results.

  20. Three-State, Conformational Probe for Hydrophobic, -Stacking Interactions in Aqueous and Mixed Aqueous Solvent Systems

    E-print Network

    Cammers, Arthur

    2O. With fluoroalkanol as cosolvent, the conformer (C) that hides the most hydrogen atom SASA is the most stable. With alkanol as cosolvent, the conformer (F) that exposes the most hydrogen atom SASA of aromatic rings, perturbations by cosolvent, and exalted hydrophobic interactions between aqueous solvent

  1. Extracting Stacking Interaction Parameters for RNA from the Data Set of Native Structures

    E-print Network

    Thirumalai, Devarajan

    of the three-dimensional native structures of RNA is the prediction of their secondary structures, which are stable independent of the tertiary fold. Accurate prediction of the secondary structure requires context to tertiary interactions, secondary structures are more independently stable in RNA. As a result, RNA folding

  2. Quinone-Bodipy H-bonding interaction over ?-stacking in toluene.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Animesh; Mula, Soumyaditya; Ghosh, Kalyan; Chaudhuri, Tandrima; Shivran, Neelam; Banerjee, Manas; Chattopadhyay, Subrata

    2015-06-01

    Quinone type compounds (o-chloranil, p-chloranil and DDQ) demonstrate excellent H-bonding interactions with a meso-phenol Bodipy dye () in both ground and excited state in a non-polar toluene medium. The spectroscopic detection of isosbestic absorption occurs with both quinones and fullerenes, but only quinones form isoemissive complexes with dye . (1)H NMR study and Monte Carlo global minima searching justified the above mentioned results with efficiency. PMID:26006323

  3. Simultaneous observations of aerosol–cloud–albedo interactions with three stacked unmanned aerial vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, G. C.; Ramana, M. V.; Corrigan, C.; Kim, D.; Ramanathan, V.

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol impacts on climate change are still poorly understood, in part, because the few observations and methods for detecting their effects are not well established. For the first time, the enhancement in cloud albedo is directly measured on a cloud-by-cloud basis and linked to increasing aerosol concentrations by using multiple autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles to simultaneously observe the cloud microphysics, vertical aerosol distribution, and associated solar radiative fluxes. In the presence of long-range transport of dust and anthropogenic pollution, the trade cumuli have higher droplet concentrations and are on average brighter. Our observations suggest a higher sensitivity of radiative forcing by trade cumuli to increases in cloud droplet concentrations than previously reported owing to a constrained droplet radius such that increases in droplet concentrations also increase cloud liquid water content. This aerosol-cloud forcing efficiency is as much as ?60 W m?2 per 100% percent cloud fraction for a doubling of droplet concentrations and associated increase of liquid water content. Finally, we develop a strategy for detecting aerosol–cloud interactions based on a nondimensional scaling analysis that relates the contribution of single clouds to albedo measurements and illustrates the significance of characterizing cloud morphology in resolving radiometric measurements. This study demonstrates that aerosol–cloud–albedo interactions can be directly observed by simultaneous observations below, in, and above the clouds. PMID:18499803

  4. Simultaneous observations of aerosol-cloud-albedo interactions with three stacked unmanned aerial vehicles.

    PubMed

    Roberts, G C; Ramana, M V; Corrigan, C; Kim, D; Ramanathan, V

    2008-05-27

    Aerosol impacts on climate change are still poorly understood, in part, because the few observations and methods for detecting their effects are not well established. For the first time, the enhancement in cloud albedo is directly measured on a cloud-by-cloud basis and linked to increasing aerosol concentrations by using multiple autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles to simultaneously observe the cloud microphysics, vertical aerosol distribution, and associated solar radiative fluxes. In the presence of long-range transport of dust and anthropogenic pollution, the trade cumuli have higher droplet concentrations and are on average brighter. Our observations suggest a higher sensitivity of radiative forcing by trade cumuli to increases in cloud droplet concentrations than previously reported owing to a constrained droplet radius such that increases in droplet concentrations also increase cloud liquid water content. This aerosol-cloud forcing efficiency is as much as -60 W m(-2) per 100% percent cloud fraction for a doubling of droplet concentrations and associated increase of liquid water content. Finally, we develop a strategy for detecting aerosol-cloud interactions based on a nondimensional scaling analysis that relates the contribution of single clouds to albedo measurements and illustrates the significance of characterizing cloud morphology in resolving radiometric measurements. This study demonstrates that aerosol-cloud-albedo interactions can be directly observed by simultaneous observations below, in, and above the clouds. PMID:18499803

  5. Light-emitting self-assembled peptide nucleic acids exhibit both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing.

    PubMed

    Berger, Or; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Grunwald, Assaf; Liebes-Peer, Yael; Bachar, Mor; Buzhansky, Ludmila; Mossou, Estelle; Forsyth, V Trevor; Schwartz, Tal; Ebenstein, Yuval; Frolow, Felix; Shimon, Linda J W; Patolsky, Fernando; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-04-01

    The two main branches of bionanotechnology involve the self-assembly of either peptides or DNA. Peptide scaffolds offer chemical versatility, architectural flexibility and structural complexity, but they lack the precise base pairing and molecular recognition available with nucleic acid assemblies. Here, inspired by the ability of aromatic dipeptides to form ordered nanostructures with unique physical properties, we explore the assembly of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), which are short DNA mimics that have an amide backbone. All 16 combinations of the very short di-PNA building blocks were synthesized and assayed for their ability to self-associate. Only three guanine-containing di-PNAs-CG, GC and GG-could form ordered assemblies, as observed by electron microscopy, and these di-PNAs efficiently assembled into discrete architectures within a few minutes. The X-ray crystal structure of the GC di-PNA showed the occurrence of both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing. The assemblies were also found to exhibit optical properties including voltage-dependent electroluminescence and wide-range excitation-dependent fluorescence in the visible region. PMID:25775151

  6. A selective recognition mode of a nucleic acid base by an aromatic amino acid: L-phenylalanine-7-methylguanosine 5'-monophosphate stacking interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, T; Doi, M; Inoue, M

    1988-01-01

    The conformation of 7-methylguanosine 5'-monophosphate (m7GMP) and its interaction with L-phenylalanine (Phe) have been investigated by X-ray crystallographic, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance, and energy calculation methods. The N(7) methylation of the guanine base shifts m7GMP toward an anti--gauche, gauche conformation about the glycosyl and exocyclic C(4')-C(5') bonds, respectively. The prominent stacking observed between the benzene ring of Phe and guanine base of m7GMP is primarily due to the N(7) guarternization of the guanine base. The formation of a hydrogen bonding pair between the anionic carboxyl group and the guanine base further stabilizes this stacking interaction. The present results imply the importance of aromatic amino acids as a hallmark for the selective recognition of a nucleic acid base. PMID:3399389

  7. Metal ion clip: fine-tuning aromatic stacking interactions in the multistep formation of carbazole-bridged zinc(ii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Imai, Yuki; Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Yuasa, Junpei

    2015-06-25

    A carbazole-based triple bridging ligand (LH) consisting of two imidazole moieties at 3,6 positions with a diketone unit at the carbazole nitrogen forms carbazole-bridged zinc(ii) complexes with structures of [(L(-))4(Zn(2+))n] (n = 2-6), where the strength of aromatic stacking interactions between the carbazole rings increases with an increase in the number of Zn(2+) ions bridged by the imidazole moieties. PMID:25980767

  8. Application of diffusion Monte Carlo to materials dominated by van der Waals interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Benali, Anouar [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Shulenburger, Luke [Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); Romero, Nichols [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kim, Jeongnim [ORNL; Von Lilienfeld, Anatole [University of Basel

    2014-01-01

    Van der Waals forces are notoriously difficult to account for from first principles. We perform extensive calculation to assess the usefulness and validity of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo when applied to van der Waals forces. We present results for noble gas solids and clusters - archetypical van der Waals dominated assemblies, as well as a relevant pi-pi stacking supramolecular complex: DNA + intercalating anti-cancer drug Ellipticine.

  9. The influence of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions of azo dyes on the dynamics of photo-induced anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Yu-An

    In a previous study the orientation dynamics of an o-derivitized methyl red monolayer (o-dMR ML) was found to exhibit unusual sub-diffusive behavior caused by molecular interactions. From our prior study of the cis to trans thermal relaxation rate of o-dMR in solution-based experiments, we discovered an unexpected behavior that appeared to be associated with the hydrogen bonding properties of the solvents. The objective was to further investigate the influence of hydrogen bonding on cis to trans thermal relaxation and to possibly connect it to the orientational dynamic of the monolayer. The o-methylated_dMR, which has the hydrogen on the amide group of o-dMR methylated, was synthesized. The influence of the hydrogen bonding on o-dMR and o-methylated_dMR was studied through solution experiment: UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, the measurement of the cis-trans thermal relaxation rate, and the quantum mechanical modeling. The surface characterization of the conformity, thickness and the volume density for o-dMR and o-methylated_dMR ML were done through atomic force microscopy and angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effect of intermolecular interactions within the MLs was studied through the UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, the measurement of the cis-trans thermal relaxation rate and the measurement of the birefringence of the MLs. The solution study indicated that the competition between intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bond leads to the decrease of the cis-trans thermal relaxation rate. By contrast, the intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the electron-withdrawing group of o-dMR and the hydrogen-bond donor solvent molecules increases the cis-trans thermal relaxation rate of o-dMR. The monolayer study of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and thermal relaxation measurement indicates that the transition and excited state of the molecules are affected by intermolecular hydrogen interactions and pi-pi stacking interactions. However, the result of the birefringence study implied that the unusual sub-diffusion kinetics of the o-dMR ML is mainly caused by the pi-pi stacking interactions rather than the hydrogen bonding interactions. The o-dMR ML develops a better photo-induced anisotropic layer than the o-methylated_dMR ML, which is mainly contributed by a faster thermal relaxation rate and a higher volume density of the o-dMR ML.

  10. Communication Stack Customization for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fadila Khadar; David Simplot-Ryl

    Communication in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) is a big issue. Designing an energy-efficient networking stack requires expertise, as the programmer must carefully design each layer of the stack and their interactions. This paper describes our on-going research on networking stack cus- tomization for WSN. We present an architecture which aims at simplifying the process of building an application by pro-

  11. Constraints on the CKM angle gamma in B[superscript 0]-->D[over-bar][superscript 0]K[superscript *0] and B[superscript 0]-->D[superscript 0]K[superscript *0] from a Dalitz analysis of D[superscript 0] and D[over-bar][superscript 0] decays to K[subscript S] pi+ pi-

    E-print Network

    Yamamoto, R. K.

    We present constraints on the angle gamma of the unitarity triangle with a Dalitz analysis of neutral D decays to K[subscript S]pi+pi- from the processes B0-->D[over-bar] 0K*0 (B[over-bar] 0-->D0K[over-bar] *0) and ...

  12. Contribution of Partial Charge Interactions and Base Stacking to the Efficiency of Primer Extension at and beyond Abasic Sites in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Shuangluo; Vashishtha, Ashwani; Bulkley, David; Eom, Soo Hyun; Wang, Jimin; Konigsberg, William H. (Yale); (Gwangju)

    2012-08-31

    During DNA synthesis, base stacking and Watson-Crick (WC) hydrogen bonding increase the stability of nascent base pairs when they are in a ternary complex. To evaluate the contribution of base stacking to the incorporation efficiency of dNTPs when a DNA polymerase encounters an abasic site, we varied the penultimate base pairs (PBs) adjacent to the abasic site using all 16 possible combinations. We then determined pre-steady-state kinetic parameters with an RB69 DNA polymerase variant and solved nine structures of the corresponding ternary complexes. The efficiency of incorporation for incoming dNTPs opposite an abasic site varied between 2- and 210-fold depending on the identity of the PB. We propose that the A rule can be extended to encompass the fact that DNA polymerase can bypass dA/abasic sites more efficiently than other dN/abasic sites. Crystal structures of the ternary complexes show that the surface of the incoming base was stacked against the PB's interface and that the kinetic parameters for dNMP incorporation were consistent with specific features of base stacking, such as surface area and partial charge-charge interactions between the incoming base and the PB. Without a templating nucleotide residue, an incoming dNTP has no base with which it can hydrogen bond and cannot be desolvated, so that these surrounding water molecules become ordered and remain on the PB's surface in the ternary complex. When these water molecules are on top of a hydrophobic patch on the PB, they destabilize the ternary complex, and the incorporation efficiency of incoming dNTPs is reduced.

  13. Glucose-?-CD interaction assisted ACN field-amplified sample stacking in CZE for determination of trace amlodipine in beagle dog plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Li, You; Zhang, Wenting; Chen, Zhao; Fan, Guorong

    2013-06-01

    A simple, sensitive and low-cost method using CE coupled with glucose-?-CD interaction assisted ACN stacking technique has been developed for quantification of trace amlodipine in dog plasma. The plasma samples were extracted with methyl tert-butyl ether. The separation was performed at 25°C in a 31.2 cm × 75 ?m fused-silica capillary with an applied voltage of 15 kV. The BGE was composed of 6.25 mM borate/25 mM phosphate (pH 2.5) and 5 mg/mL glucose-?-CD. The detection wavelength was 200 nm. Because CD could diminish the interaction between drugs and matrix, and derivation groups of CD play an important role in separation performance, the effects of ?-CD, and its derivatives on the separation were studied at several concentrations (0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0 mg/mL). In this study, organic solvent field-amplified sample stacking technique in combination with glucose-?-CD enhanced the sensitivity about 60-70 folds and glucose-?-CD could effectively improve the peak shape. All the validation data, such as accuracy, precision extraction recovery, and stability, were within the required limits. The calibration curve was linear for amlodipine from 1 to 200 ng/mL. The method developed was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic studies of amlodipine besylate in beagle dogs. PMID:23495256

  14. A bundled-stack discotic columnar liquid crystalline phase with inter-stack electronic coupling.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Sun, R; Günba?, D D; Zhang, H; Grozema, F C; Xiao, K; Jin, S

    2015-07-01

    The first compound capable of forming a bundled-stack discotic columnar liquid crystalline (BSDCLC) phase was designed and synthesized. The unique perylene anhydride inter-stack interaction was found to be the key to the formation of the BSDCLC structure and inter-stack electronic coupling (ISEC). PMID:26108235

  15. Intermolecular interactions between imidazole derivatives intercalated in layered solids. Substituent group effect

    SciTech Connect

    González, M.; Lemus-Santana, A.A. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico); Rodríguez-Hernández, J. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico); Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales, Universidad de La Habana, Havana (Cuba); Aguirre-Velez, C.I. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico); Knobel, M. [Institute of Physics “Gleb Wataghin”, UNICAMP, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Reguera, E., E-mail: edilso.reguera@gmail.com [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico)

    2013-08-15

    This study sheds light on the intermolecular interactions between imidazole derive molecules (2-methyl-imidazole, 2-ethyl-imidazole and benzimidazole) intercalated in T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layers to form a solid of formula unit T(ImD){sub 2}[Ni(CN){sub 4}]. These hybrid inorganic–organic solids were prepared by soft chemical routes and their crystal structures solved and refined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The involved imidazole derivative molecules were found coordinated through the pyridinic N atom to the axial positions for the metal T in the T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layer. In the interlayers region ligand molecules from neighboring layers remain stacked in a face-to-face configuration through dipole–dipole and quadrupole–quadrupole interactions. These intermolecular interactions show a pronounced dependence on the substituent group and are responsible for an ImD-pillaring concatenation of adjacent layers. This is supported by the structural information and the recorded magnetic data in the 2–300 K temperature range. The samples containing Co and Ni are characterized by presence of spin–orbit coupling and pronounced temperature dependence for the effective magnetic moment except for 2-ethyl-imidazole related to the local distortion for the metal coordination environment. For this last one ligand a weak ferromagnetic ordering ascribed to a super-exchange interaction between T metals from neighboring layers through the ligands ?–? interaction was detected. - Graphical abstract: In the interlayers region imidazole derivative molecules are oriented according to their dipolar and quadrupolar interactions and minimizing the steric impediment. Highlights: • Imidazole derivatives intercalation compounds. • Intermolecular interaction between intercalated imidazole derivatives. • Hybrid inorganic–organic solids. • Pi–pi interactions and ferromagnetic coupling. • Dipolar and quadrupolar interactions between intercalated imidazole derivatives.

  16. Segregation of Solute Atoms to Stacking Faults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hideji Suzuki

    1962-01-01

    An experimental evidence was given for the segregation of solute atoms to stacking faults in alpha-brass. The stacking fault energy in an alpha-phase solid solution with face-centered cubic structure usually decreases continuously with the increasing concentration of solute atoms. The solute atoms in that alloy tend to segregate to the stacking faults due to chemical interaction. A simple calculation indicates

  17. Electrochemical cell stack assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2010-06-22

    Multiple stacks of tubular electrochemical cells having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films arranged in parallel on stamped conductive interconnect sheets or ferrules. The stack allows one or more electrochemical cell to malfunction without disabling the entire stack. Stack efficiency is enhanced through simplified gas manifolding, gas recycling, reduced operating temperature and improved heat distribution.

  18. Synthetic spectroscopic models related to coenzymes and base pairs. IV. Stacking interactions in tRNA; the anticodon-adjacent base.

    PubMed

    Leonard, N J; Iwamura, H; Eisinger, J

    1969-09-01

    In order to test the Fuller and Hodgson hypothesis that modification of the anticodon-adjacent base in certain tRNA's not only prevents mRNA base-pairing at that site but also increases the stabilization of a stacked conformation in the anticodon loop, we have examined the interaction between adenosine and its N(6)-isopentenyl derivative by means of model compounds. The synthetic 9-[3-(aden-9-yl)propyl]-6-(3-methyl-2-butenylamino)purine, Ad-C(3)-iPAd (IV), in which the adenine and N(6)-substituted adenine moieties are joined at the 9 and 9' positions by a trimethylene chain, served as a useful spectroscopic model for assessing the base-base interaction free from the complicating features of the carbohydrate and phosphodiester groupings. The hypochromism for the model, which was determined in dilute aqueous solution and represents the decrease in integrated ultraviolet absorption intensity of Ad-C(3)-iPAd (IV) compared with equimolar 9-propyladenine (Ad-C(3)) and 6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl-amino)-9-propylpurine (V, iPAd-C(3)), was 17.9 per cent in neutral solution, 8.4 per cent in 0.1 N HCl, and 18.5 per cent in 0.1 N NaOH. Comparison with the per cent hypochromism calculated for the simple model Ad-C(3)-Ad (e.g., 16.5% in neutral solution) confirms the strong interaction in IV observed between uncharged plane-parallel adenine and N(6)-substituted adenine rings. The cause for changes in the absorption spectrum of Ad-C(3)-iPAd are discussed. The fluorescence and phosphorescence emission spectra of Ad-C(3)-iPAd in ethylene glycol-water glass at 80 degrees K add considerable weight to the conclusion that there is a strong tendency for adenine and N(6)-(Delta(2)-isopentenyl)adenosine (I) to stack if this is permitted by steric considerations. PMID:5263017

  19. The post-SCF quantum chemistry characteristics of inter- and intra-strand stacking interactions in d(CpG) and d(GpC) steps found in B-DNA, A-DNA and Z-DNA crystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Piotr Cysewski

    2009-01-01

    The energies of intra- and inter-strand stacking interactions in model d(GpC) and d(CpG) two-base-pair steps were estimated\\u000a by MP2\\/aug-cc-pVDZ single point calculations corrected for basis superposition errors. The stacked two-nucleobase pairs were\\u000a constructed using experimental values of base pair and base step parameters taken from Nucleic Acid Database (http:\\/\\/ndbserver.rutgers.edu\\/). Three distinct polymorphic forms were analysed, namely A-, B- and Z-DNA.

  20. Mapping the interaction between GRASP65 and GM130, components of a protein complex involved in the stacking of Golgi cisternae.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, F A; Nakamura, N; Warren, G

    1998-01-01

    The nature of the complex containing GRASP65, a membrane protein involved in establishing the stacked structure of the Golgi apparatus, and GM130, a putative Golgi matrix protein and vesicle docking receptor, was investigated. Gel filtration revealed that GRASP65 and GM130 interact in detergent extracts of Golgi membranes under both interphase and mitotic conditions, and that this complex can bind to the vesicle docking protein p115. Using in vitro translation and site-directed mutagenesis in conjunction with immunoprecipitation, the binding site for GRASP65 on GM130 was mapped to the sequence xxNDxxxIMVI-COOH at the C-terminus of GM130, a region known to be required for its localization to the Golgi apparatus. The same approach was used to show that the binding site for GM130 on GRASP65 maps to amino acids 189-201, a region conserved in the mammalian and yeast proteins and reminiscent of PDZ domains. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged reporter constructs, it was shown that one essential function of the interaction between GRASP65 and GM130 is in the correct targeting of the two proteins to the Golgi apparatus. PMID:9628863

  1. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Imaging Reveals Differential Interactions of N-Glycan Processing Enzymes across the Golgi Stack in Planta1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Schoberer, Jennifer; Liebminger, Eva; Botchway, Stanley W.; Strasser, Richard; Hawes, Chris

    2013-01-01

    N-Glycan processing is one of the most important cellular protein modifications in plants and as such is essential for plant development and defense mechanisms. The accuracy of Golgi-located processing steps is governed by the strict intra-Golgi localization of sequentially acting glycosidases and glycosyltransferases. Their differential distribution goes hand in hand with the compartmentalization of the Golgi stack into cis-, medial-, and trans-cisternae, which separate early from late processing steps. The mechanisms that direct differential enzyme concentration are still unknown, but the formation of multienzyme complexes is considered a feasible Golgi protein localization strategy. In this study, we used two-photon excitation-Förster resonance energy transfer-fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to determine the interaction of N-glycan processing enzymes with differential intra-Golgi locations. Following the coexpression of fluorescent protein-tagged amino-terminal Golgi-targeting sequences (cytoplasmic-transmembrane-stem [CTS] region) of enzyme pairs in leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana spp.), we observed that all tested cis- and medial-Golgi enzymes, namely Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Golgi ?-mannosidase I, Nicotiana tabacum ?1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I, Arabidopsis Golgi ?-mannosidase II (GMII), and Arabidopsis ?1,2-xylosyltransferase, form homodimers and heterodimers, whereas among the late-acting enzymes Arabidopsis ?1,3-galactosyltransferase1 (GALT1), Arabidopsis ?1,4-fucosyltransferase, and Rattus norvegicus ?2,6-sialyltransferase (a nonplant Golgi marker), only GALT1 and medial-Golgi GMII were found to form a heterodimer. Furthermore, the efficiency of energy transfer indicating the formation of interactions decreased considerably in a cis-to-trans fashion. The comparative fluorescence lifetime imaging of several full-length cis- and medial-Golgi enzymes and their respective catalytic domain-deleted CTS clones further suggested that the formation of protein-protein interactions can occur through their amino-terminal CTS region. PMID:23400704

  2. Recognition of O6-benzyl-2?-deoxyguanosine by a perimidinone-derived synthetic nucleoside: a DNA interstrand stacking interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kowal, Ewa A.; Lad, Rahul R.; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Dhummakupt, Elizabeth; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Egli, Martin; Sturla, Shana J.; Stone, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    The 2?-deoxynucleoside containing the synthetic base 1-[(2R,4S,5R)-4-hydroxy-5-(hydroxymethyl)-tetrahydrofuran-2-yl)-1H-perimidin-2(3H)-one] (dPer) recognizes in DNA the O6-benzyl-2?-deoxyguanosine nucleoside (O6-Bn-dG), formed by exposure to N-benzylmethylnitrosamine. Herein, we show how dPer distinguishes between O6-Bn-dG and dG in DNA. The structure of the modified Dickerson–Drew dodecamer (DDD) in which guanine at position G4 has been replaced by O6-Bn-dG and cytosine C9 has been replaced with dPer to form the modified O6-Bn-dG:dPer (DDD-XY) duplex [5?-d(C1G2C3X4A5A6T7T8Y9G10C11G12)-3?]2 (X = O6-Bn-dG, Y = dPer) reveals that dPer intercalates into the duplex and adopts the syn conformation about the glycosyl bond. This provides a binding pocket that allows the benzyl group of O6-Bn-dG to intercalate between Per and thymine of the 3?-neighbor A:T base pair. Nuclear magnetic resonance data suggest that a similar intercalative recognition mechanism applies in this sequence in solution. However, in solution, the benzyl ring of O6-Bn-dG undergoes rotation on the nuclear magnetic resonance time scale. In contrast, the structure of the modified DDD in which cytosine at position C9 is replaced with dPer to form the dG:dPer (DDD-GY) [5?-d(C1G2C3G4A5A6T7T8Y9G10C11G12)-3?]2 duplex (Y = dPer) reveals that dPer adopts the anti conformation about the glycosyl bond and forms a less stable wobble pairing interaction with guanine. PMID:23748954

  3. Stacking textures and singularities in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mele, Eugene

    2014-03-01

    Multilayer graphenes feature special functionalities that microscopically arise from the atomic registry when graphene sheets are stacked. These depend on relative lateral translations, rotations and layer symmetry breaking that can occur spontaneously or be induced. This talk will focus on bilayer graphenes (BLG) in which the stacking arrangement varies in space. We examine domain walls where the local stacking order switches from local AB to BA registry, and study the electronic modes at the boundary by analyzing their valley-projected four band continuum models augmented by numerical calculations on a lattice. We then consider the more general family of two dimensional strain-minimizing BLG stacking textures, finding that they are twisted textures of the interlayer displacement field. We study the interactions and composition rules for these elementary textures which permit a unified treatment of stacking point defects, domain walls and twisted graphenes. Collaborators: Z. Addison, X. Gong, A.H. MacDonald and Fan Zhang

  4. Interaction of La0.58Sr0.40Co0.20Fe0.80O3-? cathode with volatile Cr in a stack test - Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzler, Norbert H.; Sebold, Doris; Wessel, Egbert

    2014-05-01

    Anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells with special thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes made by sol-gel technology were operated in a short stack sequentially for about 1300 h at temperatures of 700 °C and subsequently for 1200 h at 600 °C, respectively. The stack was operated galvanostatically at a constant current density of 500 mA cm-2. After operation, the stack was dismantled and the cells were analyzed with respect to Cr interaction with the LSCF cathode. Chemical analysis revealed typical overall Cr amounts of several tenths ?g cm-2 cathode area depending on the operation time. SEM cross sections showed less SrCrO4 formation at the typical sites for LSCF (top side of cathode) but there was evidence of chromate formation at the border between the cathode and barrier (electrolyte) layer. This location of foreign phase formation was unexpected. Additional TEM characterizations were therefore conducted. The TEM investigation verified the presence of Cr-containing crystals and revealed pore formation in the barrier layer. The formation of SrCrO4 at this borderline and pore formation were found for the first time after SOFC stack operation.

  5. A spin analysis of the $4\\pi$ channels produced in central pp interactions at 450 GeV/c

    E-print Network

    Barberis, D; Close, Francis Edwin; Danielsen, K M; Donskov, S V; Earl, B C; Evans, D; French, Bernard R; Hino, T; Inaba, S; Jacholkowski, A; Jacobsen, T; Khaustov, G V; Kinson, J B; Kirk, A; Kondashov, A A; Lednev, A A; Lenti, V; Minashvili, I A; Peigneux, J P; Romanovsky, V I; Rusakovitch, N A; Semenov, A A; Shagin, P M; Shimizu, H; Singovsky, A V; Sobol, A E; Stassinaki, M; Stroot, Jean-Pierre; Takamatsu, K; Tsuru, T; Villalobos Baillie, O; Votruba, M F; Yasu, Y

    2000-01-01

    The reactions pp -> pf (X0) ps, where X0 is observed decaying to pi0pi0pi0pi0, pi+pi-pi0pi0 and pi+pi-pi+pi-, have been studied at 450 GeV/c. There is evidence for an a2(1320)pi decay mode of the eta2(1645) and eta2(1870) in the pi+pi-pi0pi0 and pi+pi-pi+pi- final states. The f2(1950) is consistent with being a single resonance with a dominant f2(1270)pipi decay mode. The f0(1370) is found to decay dominantly to rho-rho while the f0(1500) is found to decay to rho-rho and sigma-sigma.

  6. Nature and Magnitude of Aromatic Stacking of Nucleic Acid Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Sponer, Jiri; Riley, Kevin E.; Hobza, Pavel

    2008-04-07

    This review summarises recent advances in quantum chemical calculations of base-stacking forces in nucleic acids. We explain in detail the very complex relationship between the gas-phase basestacking energies, as revealed by quantum chemical (QM) calculations, and the highly variable roles of these interactions in nucleic acids. This issue is rarely discussed in quantum chemical and physical chemistry literature. We further extensively discuss methods that are available for basestacking studies, complexity of comparison of stacking calculations with gas phase experiments, balance of forces in stacked complexes of nucleic acid bases, and the relation between QM and force field descriptions. We also review all recent calculations on base-stacking systems, including details analysis of the B-DNA stacking. Specific attention is paid to the highest accuracy QM calculations, to the decomposition of the interactions, and development of dispersion-balanced DFT methods. Future prospects of computational studies of base stacking are discussed.

  7. A precise new KLOE measurement of |F{sub {pi}}|{sup 2} with ISR events and determination of {pi}{pi} contribution to a{sub {mu}} for 0.592

    SciTech Connect

    Venanzoni, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell'INFN, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2009-12-17

    The KLOE experiment at the DA{phi}NE {phi}-factory has performed a new precise measurement of the pion form factor using Initial State Radiation events, with photons emitted at small polar angle. Results based on an integrated luminosity of 240 pb{sup -1} and extraction of the {pi}{pi} contribution to a{sub {mu}} in the mass range 0.35

  8. Final state interactions in the decays J/psi->VPP

    E-print Network

    Liu, Bochao; Guo, Feng-Kun; Hanhart, Christoph; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the interplay between crossed channel final state interactions and the constraints from two--particle unitarity for the reactions J/psi->V pi pi and VK\\bar K, where V is either omega or phi. Using a model where the parameters are largely constrained by other sources, we find that, although small, crossed channel final state interaction can influence the amplitudes considerably, in special areas of phase space. These results cast doubt on the inapplicability of unitarity constraints on production amplitudes as recently claimed in the literature.

  9. Stack filter classifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hush, Don [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Just as linear models generalize the sample mean and weighted average, weighted order statistic models generalize the sample median and weighted median. This analogy can be continued informally to generalized additive modeels in the case of the mean, and Stack Filters in the case of the median. Both of these model classes have been extensively studied for signal and image processing but it is surprising to find that for pattern classification, their treatment has been significantly one sided. Generalized additive models are now a major tool in pattern classification and many different learning algorithms have been developed to fit model parameters to finite data. However Stack Filters remain largely confined to signal and image processing and learning algorithms for classification are yet to be seen. This paper is a step towards Stack Filter Classifiers and it shows that the approach is interesting from both a theoretical and a practical perspective.

  10. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  11. 23. Brick coke quencher, brick stack, metal stack to right, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Brick coke quencher, brick stack, metal stack to right, coke gas pipe to left; in background, BOF building, limestone piles, Levy's Slag Dump. Looking north/northwest - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, Wayne County, MI

  12. Thermoacoustic Refrigerator's Stack Optimization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mawahib Hassan El-Fawal; Normah Mohd-Ghazali; Mohd. Shafik Yaacob; Amer Nordin Darus

    2010-01-01

    The standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator, which uses sound generation to transfer heat, was developed rapidly during the past four decades. It was regarded as a new, promising and environmentally benign alternative to conventional compression vapor refrigerators, although it was not competitive regarding the coefficient of performance (COP) yet. Thus the aim of this paper is to enhance thermoacoustic refrigerator's stack

  13. STACK GAS REHEAT EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of technical and economic evaluations of stack gas reheat (SGR) following wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) for coal-fired power plants. The evaluations were based on information from literature and a survey of FGD users, vendors, and architect/engineer ...

  14. Inertia Coin Stack Challenge

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-07-08

    In this activity, learners experiment with inertia by performing an easy and hands-on investigation with a playing card and a stack of coins. The activity includes an accompanying Mr. O video which explores Newton's First Law of Motion and inertia in greater detail. Suggestions for extra challenge: add more coins, try different cards.

  15. Adaptive SOA Solution Stack

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Krzysztof Zielinnski; Tomasz Szydlo; Robert Szymacha; Jacek Kosinski; Joanna Kosinska; Marcin Jarzab

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of an Adaptive SOA Solution Stack (AS3). It is an extension of the S3 model, implemented via uniform application of the AS3 element pattern across different layers of the model. The pattern consists of components constituting an adaptation loop. The functionality of each component is specified in a generic way. Aspects of these patterns are

  16. Insulin stacking for capillary electrophoresis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. K Shihabi; M Friedberg

    1998-01-01

    Stacking methods are very important in overcoming the poor detection limits in capillary electrophoresis. Human insulin, a polypeptide, was concentrated on the capillary (stacked) based on three different and simple treatment methods to the sample: dilute buffers, high salt content, and acetonitrile (66%) were added to the sample to induce stacking. A dilute buffer in the sample caused a limited

  17. Online Stacked Graphical Learning Zhenzhen Kou

    E-print Network

    Cohen, William W.

    Online Stacked Graphical Learning Zhenzhen Kou Machine Learning Department Carnegie Mellon is still expensive during training. Online Stacked Graphical Learning In this paper, we propose online stacked graphical learning. The novel online scheme for stacked graphical learning is based

  18. 30 CFR 77.302 - Bypass stacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.302 Bypass stacks. Thermal dryer systems shall include a bypass stack, relief stack or individual discharge stack provided...

  19. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  20. Thermoacoustic Refrigerator's Stack Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Fawal, Mawahib Hassan; Mohd-Ghazali, Normah; Yaacob, Mohd. Shafik; Darus, Amer Nordin

    2010-06-01

    The standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator, which uses sound generation to transfer heat, was developed rapidly during the past four decades. It was regarded as a new, promising and environmentally benign alternative to conventional compression vapor refrigerators, although it was not competitive regarding the coefficient of performance (COP) yet. Thus the aim of this paper is to enhance thermoacoustic refrigerator's stack performance through optimization. A computational optimization procedure of thermoacoustic stack design was fully developed. The procedure was designed to achieve optimal coefficient of performance based on most of the design and operating parameters. Cooling load and acoustic power governing equations were set assuming the linear thermoacoustic theory. Lagrange multipliers method was used as an optimization technique tool to solve the governing equations. Numerical analyses results of the developed design procedure are presented. The results showed that the stack design parameters are the most significant parameters for the optimal overall performance. The coefficient of performance obtained increases by about 48.8% from the published experimental optimization methods. The results are in good agreement with past established studies.

  1. Stacking fault energy of cryogenic austenitic steels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dai Qi-Xun; Luo Xin-Min

    2002-01-01

    Stacking fault energy and stacking fault nucleation energy are defined in terms of the physical nature of stacking faults and stacking fault energy and the measuring basis for stacking fault energy. Large quantities of experimental results are processed with the aid of a computer and an expression for calculating stacking fault energy has been obtained as ?300SF (mJ m-2) =

  2. Interaction potential for indium phosphide: a molecular dynamics and first-principles study of the elastic constants, generalized stacking fault and surface energies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paulo Sergio Branicio; José Pedro Rino; Chee Kwan Gan; Hélio Tsuzuki

    2009-01-01

    Indium phosphide is investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density-functional theory calculations. MD simulations use a proposed effective interaction potential for InP fitted to a selected experimental dataset of properties. The potential consists of two- and three-body terms that represent atomic-size effects, charge-charge, charge-dipole and dipole-dipole interactions as well as covalent bond bending and stretching. Predictions are made for

  3. Interaction potential for indium phosphide: a molecular dynamics and first-principles study of the elastic constants, generalized stacking fault and surface energies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paulo Sergio Branicio; José Pedro Rino; Chee Kwan Gan; Hélio Tsuzuki

    2009-01-01

    Indium phosphide is investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density-functional theory calculations. MD simulations use a proposed effective interaction potential for InP fitted to a selected experimental dataset of properties. The potential consists of two- and three-body terms that represent atomic-size effects, charge–charge, charge–dipole and dipole–dipole interactions as well as covalent bond bending and stretching. Predictions are made for

  4. Observation of pi(+)pi(-)pi(+)pi(-) photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV at the STAR detector 

    E-print Network

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Han, L. -X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Rehberg, J. M.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.

    2010-01-01

    ,20 P. Yepes,36 K. Yip,3 I.-K. Yoo,34 Q. Yue,44 M. Zawisza,48 H. Zbroszczyk,48 W. Zhan,20 S. Zhang,40 W. M. Zhang,18 X. P. Zhang,21 Y. Zhang,21 Z. P. Zhang,38 J. Zhao,40 C. Zhong,40 J. Zhou,36 W. Zhou,39 X. Zhu,44 Y. H. Zhu,40 R. Zoulkarneev,17 and Y...

  5. Observation of pi(+)pi(-)pi(+)pi(-) photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV at the STAR detector

    E-print Network

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Han, L. -X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Rehberg, J. M.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.

    2010-01-01

    ,20 P. Yepes,36 K. Yip,3 I.-K. Yoo,34 Q. Yue,44 M. Zawisza,48 H. Zbroszczyk,48 W. Zhan,20 S. Zhang,40 W. M. Zhang,18 X. P. Zhang,21 Y. Zhang,21 Z. P. Zhang,38 J. Zhao,40 C. Zhong,40 J. Zhou,36 W. Zhou,39 X. Zhu,44 Y. H. Zhu,40 R. Zoulkarneev,17 and Y.... Anderson,18 D. Arkhipkin,3 G. S. Averichev,17 J. Balewski,22 L. S. Barnby,2 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,27 M. J. Betancourt,22 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,16 A. K. Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,11 B. Biritz,6...

  6. Observation of pi+pi-pi+pi- photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV at the STAR detector

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    We present a measurement of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} photonuclear production in ultra-peripheral Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final states are observed at low transverse momentum and are accompanied by mutual nuclear excitation of the beam particles. The strong enhancement of the production cross section at low transverse momentum is consistent with coherent photoproduction. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} invariant mass spectrum of the coherent events exhibits a broad peak around 1540 {+-} 40 MeV/c{sup 2} with a width of 570 {+-} 60 MeV/c{sup 2}, in agreement with the photoproduction data for the {rho}{sup 0}(1700). We do not observe a corresponding peak in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final state and measure an upper limit for the ratio of the branching fractions of the {rho}{sup 0}(1700) to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} of 2.5% at 90% confidence level. The ratio of {rho}{sup 0}(1700) and {rho}{sup 0}(770) coherent production cross sections is measured to be 13.4 {+-} 0.8{sub stat.} {+-} 4.4{sub syst.}%.

  7. Observation of pi+ pi- pi+pi- photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisons at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV at the STAR Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Dunlop, J.; et al. STAR Collaboration

    2010-04-02

    We present a measurement of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} photonuclear production in ultraperipheral Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final states are observed at low transverse momentum and are accompanied by mutual nuclear excitation of the beam particles. The strong enhancement of the production cross section at low transverse momentum is consistent with coherent photoproduction. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} invariant mass spectrum of the coherent events exhibits a broad peak around 1540 {+-} 40 MeV/c{sup 2} with a width of 570 {+-} 60 MeV/c{sup 2}, in agreement with the photoproduction data for the {rho}{sup 0}(1700). We do not observe a corresponding peak in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final state and measure an upper limit for the ratio of the branching fractions of the {rho}{sup 0}(1700) to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} of 2.5% at 90% confidence level. The ratio of {rho}{sup 0}(1700) and {rho}{sup 0}(770) coherent production cross sections is measured to be 13.4 {+-} 0.8{sub stat.}{+-}4.4{sub syst.}%.

  8. Observation of pi+pi-pi+pi- photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV at the STAR detector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. I. Abelev; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; B. D. Anderson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; L. S. Barnby; S. Baumgart; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; F. Benedosso; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcikova; B. Biritz; L. C. Bland; B. E. Bonner; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. Bridgeman; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; O. Catu; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; Z. Chajecki; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; K. E. Choi; W. Christie; P. Chung; S. U. Chung; R. F. Clarke; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; D. Das; S. Dash; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; M. DePhillips; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; S. M. Dogra; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; J. C. Dunlop; M. R. Dutta Mazumdar; L. G. Efimov; E. Elhalhuli; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; B. Erazmus; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; P. Fachini; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; M. S. Ganti; E. J. Garcia-Solis; A. Geromitsos; F. Geurts; V. Ghazikhanian; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; B. Grube; S. M. Guertin; A. Gupta; N. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; T. J. Hallman; A. Hamed; L.-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; M. Heinz; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; E. Hjort; A. M. Hoffman; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; R. S. Hollis; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; A. Iordanova; P. Jacobs; W. W. Jacobs; P. Jakl; C. Jena; F. Jin; C. L. Jones; P. G. Jones; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. R. Klein; K. Kajimoto; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; A. G. Knospe; A. Kocoloski; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; M. Kopytine; I. Koralt; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; V. Kouchpil; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; M. Krus; L. Kumar; P. Kurnadi; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; C.-H. Lee; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; N. Li; W. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. Li; G. Lin; S. J. Lindenbaum; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; H. Liu; J. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; W. A. Love; Y. Lu; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; L. K. Mangotra; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; Yu. A. Matulenko; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; A. Mischke; M. K. Mitrovski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; B. K. Nandi; C. Nattrass; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; P. K. Netrakanti; M. J. Ng; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; H. Okada; V. Okorokov; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; T. Peitzmann; V. Perevoztchikov; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; S. C. Phatak; P. Pile; M. Planinic; M. A. Ploskon; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; A. M. Poskanzer; B. V. K. S. Potukuchi; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; J. M. Rehberg; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; A. Rose; C. Roy; L. Ruan; M. J. Russcher; R. Sahoo; S. Sakai; I. Sakrejda; T. Sakuma; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; P. Sorensen; J. Sowinski; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; D. Staszak; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; N. L. Subba; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; S. Timoshenko; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; V. N. Tram; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; O. D. Tsai; J. Ulery; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; S. A. Voloshin; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten; H. Wieman; E. Wingfield; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. Wu; W. Xie; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I.-K. Yoo; Q. Yue; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; J. Zhou; W. Zhou; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; R. Zoulkarneev; Y. Zoulkarneeva

    2010-01-01

    We present a measurement of {sup +}{sup +} photonuclear production in ultra-peripheral Au-Au collisions at s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The {sup +}{sup +} final states are observed at low transverse momentum and are accompanied by mutual nuclear excitation of the beam particles. The strong enhancement of the production cross section at low transverse momentum is

  9. An atomic force microcopy study of the mechanical and electricalproperties of monolayer films of molecules with aromatic end groups

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liang; Park, J.Y.; Ma, H.; Jen, A.K.-Y.; Salmeron, M.

    2007-09-06

    The effect of intermolecular {pi}-{pi} stacking on the electrical and mechanical properties of monolayer films molecules containing aromatic groups was studied using atomic force microscopy. Two types of aromatic molecules, (4-mercaptophenyl) anthrylacetylene (MPAA) and (4-mercaptophenyl)-phenylacetylene (MPPA) were used as model systems with different {pi}-{pi} stacking strength. Monolayer films of these molecules on Au(111) surfaces exhibited conductivities differing by more than one order of magnitude, MPAA being the most conductive and MPPA the least conductive. The response to compressive loads by the AFM tip was also found to be very different for both molecules. In MPAA films distinct molecular conductivity changes are observed upon mechanical perturbation. This effect however was not observed on the MPPA film, where intermolecular {pi}-{pi} interactions are likely weaker.

  10. On the interactions between dislocations and a near-S=3 grain boundary in a low stacking-fault energy metal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Couzinié; B. Decamps; L. Priester

    2003-01-01

    The interactions of dissociated lattice dislocations with a near-Sigma = 3 grain boundary (GB) in copper have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy using the weak-beam technique combined with bright-field image matching. From our observations, Shockley partials are required to recombine when entering the GB to form an absorbed perfect lattice dislocation. Then, decomposition of the latter into two displacement

  11. Stacked Extreme Learning Machines.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongming; Huang, Guang-Bin; Lin, Zhiping; Wang, Han; Soh, Yeng Chai

    2014-10-28

    Extreme learning machine (ELM) has recently attracted many researchers' interest due to its very fast learning speed, good generalization ability, and ease of implementation. It provides a unified solution that can be used directly to solve regression, binary, and multiclass classification problems. In this paper, we propose a stacked ELMs (S-ELMs) that is specially designed for solving large and complex data problems. The S-ELMs divides a single large ELM network into multiple stacked small ELMs which are serially connected. The S-ELMs can approximate a very large ELM network with small memory requirement. To further improve the testing accuracy on big data problems, the ELM autoencoder can be implemented during each iteration of the S-ELMs algorithm. The simulation results show that the S-ELMs even with random hidden nodes can achieve similar testing accuracy to support vector machine (SVM) while having low memory requirements. With the help of ELM autoencoder, the S-ELMs can achieve much better testing accuracy than SVM and slightly better accuracy than deep belief network (DBN) with much faster training speed. PMID:25361517

  12. Asymmetric Flexible Supercapacitor Stack

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Electrical double layer supercapacitor is very significant in the field of electrical energy storage which can be the solution for the current revolution in the electronic devices like mobile phones, camera flashes which needs flexible and miniaturized energy storage device with all non-aqueous components. The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique over hydrogen decrepitated Mischmetal (Mm) based AB3alloy hydride. The polymer dispersed MWNTs have been obtained by insitu polymerization and the metal oxide/MWNTs were synthesized by sol-gel method. Morphological characterizations of polymer dispersed MWNTs have been carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM and HRTEM). An assymetric double supercapacitor stack has been fabricated using polymer/MWNTs and metal oxide/MWNTs coated over flexible carbon fabric as electrodes and nafion®membrane as a solid electrolyte. Electrochemical performance of the supercapacitor stack has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  13. Thermoacoustic pin stacks. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Keolian, R.M.

    1994-07-06

    The construction and testing of a new stack geometry for thermoacoustic engines, called a pin stack, has been started. The stack is at the heart of a class of heat engines that use sound to deliver refrigeration, or use a temperature difference to generate sound. Calculations show that the pin stack should make useful improvements in engine efficiency. About 2000 wires will be hand sewn in a hexagonal lattice between the hot and cold heat exchangers in a sound source using low pressure neon gas between 300 K and 77 K. Thermoacoustics, Refrigeration, Acoustic source, Heat pump.

  14. IAS Stacking Library in IDL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavouzet, Nicolas; Beelen, Alexandre; Bethermin, Matthieu; Dole, Herve; Ponthieu, Nicolas

    2013-02-01

    This IDL library is designed to be used on astronomical images. Its main aim is to stack data to allow a statistical detection of faint signal, using a prior. For instance, you can stack 160um data using the positions of galaxies detected at 24um or 3.6um, or use WMAP sources to stack Planck data. It can estimate error bars using bootstrap, and it can perform photometry (aperture photometry, or PSF fitting, or other that you can plug). The IAS Stacking Library works with gnomonic projections (RA---TAN), and also with HEALPIX projection.

  15. Stacked insulator induction accelerator gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.I.; Westenskow, G.A.; Kim, J.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Vanecek, D.

    1997-05-01

    Stacked insulators, with alternating layers of insulating material and conducting film, have been shown to support high surface electrical field stresses. We have investigated the application of the stacked insulator technology to the design of induction accelerator modules for the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator program. The rf properties of the accelerating gaps using stacked insulators, particularly the impedance at frequencies above the beam pipe cutoff frequency, are investigated. Low impedance is critical for Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator applications where a high current, bunched beam is trsnsported through many accelerating gaps. An induction accelerator module designs using a stacked insulator is presented.

  16. Theoretical investigation of (111) stacking faults in aluminium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan F. Wright; Murray S. Daw; C. Y. Fong

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated (111) stacking faults in aluminium using the Kohn-Sham formulation of density-functional theory (DFT) along with plane-wave expansions for the Kohn-Sham functions and pseudopotentials to describe the interactions between the Kohn-Sham functions and the ions. We find that the energies of the intrinsic, extrinsic and twin stacking faults are 161, 151 and 74 mJ m- respectively. These values

  17. Preparation and Characterization of [pi]-Stacking Quinodimethane Oligothiophenes. Predicting Semiconductor Behavior and Bandwidths from Crystal Structures and Molecular Orbital Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Janzen, Daron E.; Burand, Michael W.; Ewbank, Paul C.; Pappenfus, Ted M.; Higuchi, Hiroyuki; da Silva, Demetrio A.; Young, Victor G.; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Mann, Kent R. (GIT); (Minnesota); (Toyama)

    2010-11-16

    A series of new quinodimethane-substituted terthiophene and quaterthiophene oligomers has been investigated for comparison with a previously studied quinoid oligothiophene that has demonstrated high mobilities and ambipolar transport behavior in thin-film transistor devices. Each new quinoidal thiophene derivative shows a reversible one-electron oxidation between 0.85 and 1.32 V, a quasi-reversible one-electron second oxidation between 1.37 and 1.96 V, and a reversible two-electron reduction between -0.05 and -0.23 V. The solution UV-vis-NIR spectrum of each compound is dominated by an intense epsilon congruent with 100,000 M{sup -1} cm{sup -1} low energy pi-pi transition that has a lambda(max) ranging between 648 and 790 nm. All X-ray crystal structures exhibit very planar quinoidal backbones and short intermolecular pi-stacking distances (3.335-3.492 A). Structures exhibit a single pi-stacking distance with parallel cofacial stacking (sulfur atoms of equivalent rings pointed in the same direction) or with alternating distances and antiparallel cofacial stacking (sulfur atoms of equivalent rings pointed in the opposite direction). Examples of the layered and herringbone-packing motifs are observed for both the parallel and the antiparallel cofacial stacking. Analysis of the X-ray structures and molecular orbital calculations indicates that all of these compounds have one-dimensional electronic band structures as a result of the pi-stacking. For structures with a unique pi-stacking distance, a simple geometric overlap parameter calculated from the shape of the molecule and the slip from perfect registry in the pi-stack correlates well with the transfer integrals (t) calculated using molecular orbital theory. The calculated valence (633 meV) and conduction (834 meV) bandwidths for a quinoid quaterthiophene structure are similar to those calculated for the benchmark pentacene and indicate that both hole and electron mobilities could be significant.

  18. Zigzag stacks and m-regular linear stacks.

    PubMed

    Chen, William Y C; Guo, Qiang-Hui; Sun, Lisa H; Wang, Jian

    2014-12-01

    The contact map of a protein fold is a graph that represents the patterns of contacts in the fold. It is known that the contact map can be decomposed into stacks and queues. RNA secondary structures are special stacks in which the degree of each vertex is at most one and each arc has length of at least two. Waterman and Smith derived a formula for the number of RNA secondary structures of length n with exactly k arcs. Höner zu Siederdissen et al. developed a folding algorithm for extended RNA secondary structures in which each vertex has maximum degree two. An equation for the generating function of extended RNA secondary structures was obtained by Müller and Nebel by using a context-free grammar approach, which leads to an asymptotic formula. In this article, we consider m-regular linear stacks, where each arc has length at least m and the degree of each vertex is bounded by two. Extended RNA secondary structures are exactly 2-regular linear stacks. For any m ? 2, we obtain an equation for the generating function of the m-regular linear stacks. For given m, we deduce a recurrence relation and an asymptotic formula for the number of m-regular linear stacks on n vertices. To establish the equation, we use the reduction operation of Chen, Deng, and Du to transform an m-regular linear stack to an m-reduced zigzag (or alternating) stack. Then we find an equation for m-reduced zigzag stacks leading to an equation for m-regular linear stacks. PMID:25455155

  19. Story of stacking fault tetrahedra

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Kiritani

    1997-01-01

    Stacking fault tetrahedra, although they have a peculiar structure, are the most general type of vacancy clustered defects in f.c.c. metals and alloys. Placing these stacking fault tetrahedra at the center, the story of point defect reaction is told. The structure of the defect and the energy relation are first described. Various experimental treatments which lead to the formation of

  20. Assessing Elementary Algebra with STACK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sangwin, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper concerns computer aided assessment (CAA) of mathematics in which a computer algebra system (CAS) is used to help assess students' responses to elementary algebra questions. Using a methodology of documentary analysis, we examine what is taught in elementary algebra. The STACK CAA system, http://www.stack.bham.ac.uk/, which uses the CAS…

  1. Stacking disorder in ice I.

    PubMed

    Malkin, Tamsin L; Murray, Benjamin J; Salzmann, Christoph G; Molinero, Valeria; Pickering, Steven J; Whale, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, ice I was considered to exist in two well-defined crystalline forms at ambient pressure: stable hexagonal ice (ice Ih) and metastable cubic ice (ice Ic). However, it is becoming increasingly evident that what has been called cubic ice in the past does not have a structure consistent with the cubic crystal system. Instead, it is a stacking-disordered material containing cubic sequences interlaced with hexagonal sequences, which is termed stacking-disordered ice (ice Isd). In this article, we summarise previous work on ice with stacking disorder including ice that was called cubic ice in the past. We also present new experimental data which shows that ice which crystallises after heterogeneous nucleation in water droplets containing solid inclusions also contains stacking disorder even at freezing temperatures of around -15 °C. This supports the results from molecular simulations, that the structure of ice that crystallises initially from supercooled water is always stacking-disordered and that this metastable ice can transform to the stable hexagonal phase subject to the kinetics of recrystallization. We also show that stacking disorder in ice which forms from water droplets is quantitatively distinct from ice made via other routes. The emerging picture of ice I is that of a very complex material which frequently contains stacking disorder and this stacking disorder can vary in complexity depending on the route of formation and thermal history. PMID:25380218

  2. Stacking boundaries and transport in bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    San-Jose, P; Gorbachev, R V; Geim, A K; Novoselov, K S; Guinea, F

    2014-01-01

    Pristine bilayer graphene behaves in some instances as an insulator with a transport gap of a few millielectronvolts. This behavior has been interpreted as the result of an intrinsic electronic instability induced by many-body correlations. Intriguingly, however, some samples of similar mobility exhibit good metallic properties with a minimal conductivity of the order of 2e(2)/h. Here, we propose an explanation for this dichotomy, which is unrelated to electron interactions and based instead on the reversible formation of boundaries between stacking domains ("solitons"). We argue, using a numerical analysis, that the hallmark features of the previously inferred many-body insulating state can be explained by scattering on boundaries between domains with different stacking order (AB and BA). We furthermore present experimental evidence, reinforcing our interpretation, of reversible switching between a metallic and an insulating regime in suspended bilayers when subjected to thermal cycling or high current annealing. PMID:24605877

  3. Structural Consequences of Anionic Host-Cationic Guest Interactions in a Supramolecular Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael D.; Johnson, Darren W.; Szigethy, Geza; Davis, Anna V.; Teat, Simon J.; Oliver, Allen G.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-07-09

    The molecular structure of the self-assembled supramolecular assembly [M{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} has been explored with different metals (M = Ga{sup III}, Fe{sup III}, Ti{sup IV}) and different encapsulated guests (NEt{sub 4}{sup +}, BnNMe{sub 3}{sup +}, Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +}, Cp*{sub 2}Co{sup +}) by X-ray crystallography. While the identity of the metal ions at the vertices of the M{sub 4}L{sub 6} structure is found to have little effect on the assembly structure, encapsulated guests significantly distort the size and shape of the interior cavity of the assembly. Cations on the exterior of the assembly are found to interact with the assembly through either {pi}-{pi}, cation-{pi}, or CH-{pi} interactions. In some cases, the exterior guests interact with only one assembly, but cations with the ability to form multiple {pi}-{pi} interactions are able to interact with adjacent assemblies in the crystal lattice. The solvent accessible cavity of the assembly is modeled using the rolling probe method and found to range from 253-434 {angstrom}{sup 3}, depending on the encapsulated guest. Based on the volume of the guest and the volume of the cavity, the packing coefficient for each host-guest complex is found to range from 0.47-0.67.

  4. Seismic qualification of ventilation stack

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.W.; Huang, S.N.; Lindquist, M.R.

    1993-10-01

    This paper describes the method to be used to qualify the 105 K ventilation stack at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington, under seismic and wind loadings. The stack stands at 175 ft (53.34 m), with a diameter tapering from 22 ft (6.71 m) at the foundation to 12.83 ft (3.91 m) at the top. Although the stack is classified as Safety Class 3 (low hazard), it is treated as a Safety Class 1 (high hazard) component, as failure could damage a Safety Class 1 facility (the irradiated fuel storage basin). The evaluation used U.S. Department of Energy criteria specified in UCRL 15910 (1990). The seismic responses of the stack under earthquake loading were obtained from modal analyses with response spectrum input that used the ANSYS (1989) finite-element computer code. The moments and shear forces from the results of seismic analysis were used to qualify the reinforcement capacity of the stack structure by the ultimate-strength method. The wind forces acting on the stack in both along-wind and crosswind directions were also calculated. Presented are evaluations of the soil bearing pressure, the moment, and the shear capacity of the stack foundation.

  5. Measurement of the Ratios of Branching Fractions B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi pi pi) and B(Bs -> Ds pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi)

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; /Illinois U., Urbana; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U.; Affolder, T.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, M.G.; /Fermilab; Ambrose, D.; /Fermilab; Amerio, S.; /Padua U.; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Anikeev, K.; /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati /Taiwan, Inst. Phys.

    2006-10-01

    Using 355 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, they study the fully reconstructed hadronic decays B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub (s)}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub (s)}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. They present the first measurement of the ratio of branching fractions {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 1.05 {+-} 0.10(stat.) {+-} 0.22(syst.). They also update their measurement of {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) to 1.13 {+-} 0.08(stat.) {+-} 0.23(syst.) improving the statistical uncertainty by more than a factor of two. They find {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) = [3.8 {+-} 0.3(stat.) {+-} 1.3(syst.)] x 10{sup -3} and {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = [8.4 {+-} 0.8(stat.) {+-} 3.2(syst.)] x 10{sup -3}.

  6. Dalitz Plot Analysis of B- -> D+ pi- pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, : B.

    2009-01-29

    The author reports on a Dalitz plot analysis of B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} decays, based on a sample of about 383 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. They find the total branching fraction of the three-body decay: {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}) = (1.08 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -3}. the masses and widths of D*{sub 2}{sup 0} and D*{sub 0}{sup 0}, the 2{sup +} and 0{sup +} c{bar u} P-wave states decaying to D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, are measured: m{sub D*{sub 2}{sup 0}} = (2460.4 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 1.9) MeV/c{sup 2}, {Lambda}{sub D*{sub 2}{sup 0}} = (41.8 {+-} 2.5 {+-} 2.1 {+-} 2.0) MeV, m{sub D*{sub 0}{sup 0}} = (2297 {+-} 8 {+-} 5 {+-} 19) MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}{sub D*{sub 0}{sup 0}} = (273 {+-} 12 {+-} 17 {+-} 45) MeV. The stated errors reflect the statistical and systematic uncertainties, and the uncertainty related to the assumed composition of signal events and the theoretical model.

  7. pi-pi scattering: theory is ahead of experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Leutwyler

    2002-01-01

    I draw attention to a recent breakthrough in the field of low energy pion\\u000aphysics: the consequences of the hidden symmetry of the QCD Hamiltonian have\\u000asuccessfully been incorporated in the general dispersive framework for the\\u000api-pi scattering amplitude, which is due to Roy. The meagre experimental\\u000ainformation about the imaginary parts at and above 0.8 GeV suffices to\\u000aunambiguously

  8. Measurements of the branching fractions for B{sub (s)}{yields}D{sub (s)}{pi}{pi}{pi} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{pi}{pi}

    SciTech Connect

    Aaij, R.; Bauer, Th.; Beuzekom, M. van; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Coco, V.; van Eijk, D.; Farinelli, C.; Heijne, V.; Hulsbergen, W.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; van Leerdam, J.; Merk, M.; Mous, I.; Oggero, S.; Pellegrino, A.; du Pree, T.; Storaci, B. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-11-01

    Branching fractions of the decays H{sub b}{yields}H{sub c}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} relative to H{sub b}{yields}H{sub c}{pi}{sup -} are presented, where H{sub b} (H{sub c}) represents B{sup 0} (D{sup +}), B{sup -} (D{sup 0}), B{sub s}{sup 0} (D{sub s}{sup +}), and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} ({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}). The measurements are performed with the LHCb detector using 35 pb{sup -1} of data collected at {radical}(s)=7 TeV. The ratios of branching fractions are measured to be [B(B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=2.38{+-}0.11{+-}0.21, [B(B{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -})]= 1.27{+-}0.06{+-}0.11, [B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=2.01{+-}0.37{+-}0.20, [B({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=1.43{+-}0.16{+-}0.13 We also report measurements of partial decay rates of these decays to excited charm hadrons. These results are of comparable or higher precision than existing measurements.

  9. On the dispersion theory of {pi}{pi} scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Leutwyler, H. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, Sidlerstr. 5, CH-3012 (Switzerland)

    2007-02-27

    Recent developments in low energy pion physics are reviewed, emphasizing the strength of dispersion theory in this context. As an illustration of the method, I discuss some consequences of the forward dispersion relation obeyed by the isoscalar component of the scattering amplitude.

  10. Simulation of stack plume opacity.

    PubMed

    Meng, R Z; Karamchandani, P; Seigneur, C

    2000-05-01

    The visual impact of primary particles emitted from stacks is regulated according to stack opacity criteria. In-stack monitoring of the flue gas opacity allows plant operators to ensure that the plant meets U.S. Environmental Protection Agency opacity regulations. However, the emission of condensable gases such as SO3 (that hydrolyzes to H2SO4), HCl, and NH3, which may lead to particle formation after their release from the stack, makes the prediction of stack plume opacity more difficult. We present here a computer simulation model that calculates the opacity due to both primary particles emitted from the stack and secondary particles formed in the atmosphere after the release of condensable gases from the stack. A comprehensive treatment of the plume rise due to buoyancy and momentum is used to calculate the location at which the condensed water plume has evaporated (i.e., where opacity regulations apply). Conversion of H2SO4 to particulate sulfate occurs through nucleation and condensation on primary particles. A thermodynamic aerosol equilibrium model is used to calculate the amount of ammonium, chloride, and water present in the particulate phase with the condensed sulfate. The model calculates the stack plume opacity due to both primary and secondary particles. Examples of model simulations are presented for three scenarios that differ by the emission control equipment installed at the power plant: (1) electrostatic precipitators (ESP), (2) ESP and flue gas desulfurization, and (3) ESP and selective catalytic reduction. The calculated opacity is most sensitive to the primary particulate emissions. For the conditions considered here, SO3 emissions showed only a small effect, except if one assumes that most H2SO4 condenses on primary particles. Condensation of NH4Cl occurs only at high NH3 emission rates (about 25 ppm stack concentration). PMID:10842950

  11. Hydrogenmaleato bridged supramolecular double chains via ?-? stacking interactions: syntheses, crystal structures and magnetic properties of ?1[Cu(phen)X(HL) 2/2] with X=Cl - ( 1), NO 3- ( 2) and H 2L=maleic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yue-Qing; Sun, Jie; Lin, Jian-Li

    2003-05-01

    Two novel hydrogen maleato (HL) bridged Cu(II) complexes ?1[Cu(phen)Cl(HL) 2/2] 1 and ?1[Cu(phen)(NO 3)(HL) 2/2] 2 were obtained from reactions of 1,10-phenanthroline, maleic acid with CuCl 2·2H 2O and Cu(NO 3) 2·3H 2O, respectively, in CH 3OH/H 2O (1:1 v/v) at pH=2.0 and the crystal structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Both complexes crystallize isostructurally in the monoclinic space group P2 1/n with cell dimensions: 1a=8.639(2) Å, b=15.614(3) Å, c=11.326(2) Å, ?=94.67(3)°, Z=4, D calc=1.720 g/cm 3 and 2a=8.544(1) Å, b=15.517(2) Å, c=12.160(1) Å, ?=90.84(8)°, Z=4, D calc=1.734 g/cm 3. In both complexes, the square pyramidally coordinated Cu atoms are bridged by hydrogen maleato ligands into 1D chains with the coordinating phen ligands parallel on one side. Interdigitation of the chelating phen ligands of two neighbouring chains via ?-? stacking interactions forms supramolecular double chains, which are then arranged in the crystal structures according to pseudo 1D close packing patterns. Both complexes exhibit similar paramagnetic behavior obeying Curie-Weiss laws ? m(T-?)=0.414 cm 3 mol -1 K with the Weiss constants ?=-1.45, -1.0 K for 1 and 2, respectively.

  12. Amplitude Analysis of the Decay $D_s^+ \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+$ in the Experiment E831/FOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Schilithz, Anderson Correa; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; ,

    2005-01-01

    We present in this thesis the Dalitz Plot analysis of the D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decay, with the data of the E831/FOCUS, that took data in 1996 and 1997. The masses and widhts of f{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 0}(1370) are free parametres of the fit on Dalitz Plot, objectiving to study in detail these resonances. After this analysis we present the Spectator Model study on the S wave in this decay. For this study we used the formalism developed by M. Svec [2] for scattering. We present the comparison between the Isobar Model, frequently used in Dalitz Plot analysis, and this formalism.

  13. Measurement of CP Violation Parameters with a Dalitz Plot Analysis of B+- to D(pi+pi-pi0)K+-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-03-28

    We report the results of a CP violation analysis of the decay B{sup {+-}} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}}K{sup {+-}}, where D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}} indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, excluding K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. The analysis makes use of 324 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. By analyzing the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} Dalitz plot distribution and the B{sup {+-}} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}} K{sup {+-}} branching fraction and decay rate asymmetry, we calculate parameters related to the phase {gamma} of the CKM unitarity triangle. We also measure the magnitudes and phases of the components of the D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decay amplitude.

  14. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Decay Rate Asymmetry of B to D_pi+ pi- pi0 K-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-06-10

    The authors report the observation of the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}}K{sup -}, where D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}} indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, excluding K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. This doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay chain can be used to measure the CKM phase {gamma}. Using about 229 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring, they measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup -}}) = (5.5 {+-} 1.0 (stat.) {+-} 0.7 (syst.)) x 10{sup -6} and the decay rate asymmetry A = -0.02 {+-} 0.16 (stat.) {+-} 0.03 (syst.) for the full decay chain.

  15. The Search for Exotic Mesons in gamma p -> pi+pi+pi-n with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Bookwalter

    2011-12-01

    The {pi}{sub 1}(1600), a J{sup PC} = 1{sup {-+}} exotic meson has been observed by experiments using pion beams. Theorists predict that photon beams could produce gluonic hybrid mesons, of which the {pi}{sub 1}(1600) is a candidate, at enhanced levels relative to pion beams. The g12 rungroup at Jefferson Lab's CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) has recently acquired a large photoproduction dataset, using a liquid hydrogen target and tagged photons from a 5.71 GeV electron beam. A partial-wave analysis of 502K {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n events selected from the g12 dataset has been performed, and preliminary fit results show strong evidence for well-known states such as the a{sub 1}(1260), a{sub 2}(1320), and {pi}{sub 2}(1670). However, we observe no evidence for the production of the {pi}{sub 1}(1600) in either the partial-wave intensities or the relative complex phase between the 1{sup {-+}} and the 2{sup {-+}} (corresponding to the {pi}{sub 2}) partial waves.

  16. Search for D0--anti-D0 Mixing in the Decays D0 --> K+ pi- pi+ pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-26

    We present a search for D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing in the decays D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using 230.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. Assuming CP conservation, we measure the time-integrated mixing rate R{sub M} = (0.019{sub -0.015}{sup +0.016}(stat.) {+-} 0.002(syst.))%, and R{sub M} < 0.048% at the 95% confidence level. Using a frequentist method, we estimate that the data are consistent with no mixing at the 4.3% confidence level. We present results both with and without the assumption of CP conservation. By combining the value of R{sub M} from this analysis with that obtained from an analysis of the decays D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, we find R{sub M} = (0.020{sub -0.010}{sup +0.011})%, where the uncertainty is statistical only. We determine the upper limit R{sub M} < 0.042% at the 95% confidence level, and we find the combined data are consistent with the no-mixing hypothesis at the 2.1% confidence level.

  17. Stacked complementary metasurfaces for ultraslow microwave metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Cía, M.; Aznabet, M.; Beruete, M.; Falcone, F.; El Mrabet, O.; Sorolla, M.; Essaaidi, M.

    2010-04-01

    We have experimentally realized at microwaves a dual-band ultraslow regime by constructing a metamaterial based upon the alternative stack of conventional- and complementary-split-ring-resonators-surfaces. The group delay reaches values larger than two orders of magnitude than those obtained when the electromagnetic wave propagates the same thickness in free-space. The ultraslow waves have been initially predicted by a numerical eigenmode analysis and finite-integration frequency domain simulations. Such ultraslow modes can be integrated into free-space technology for spatial delay lines, and traveling wave amplifier as well as sensors due to the enhanced interaction between different beams or radiation and matter.

  18. Slippage in stacking of graphene nanofragments induced by spin polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yanyu; Jiang, Wanrun; Dai, Xing; Song, Ruixia; Wang, Bo; Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Spin polarization and stacking are interesting effects in complex molecular systems and are both presented in graphene-based materials. Their possible combination may provide a new perspective in understanding the intermolecular force. The nanoscale graphene structures with zigzag edges could possess spin-polarized ground states. However, the mechanical effect of spin polarization in stacking of graphene nanofragments is not clear. Here we demonstrate the displacement between two stacked rhombic graphene nanofragments induced by spin polarization, using first-principles density-functional methods. We found that, in stacking of two rhombic graphene nanofragments, a spin-polarized stacked conformation with zero total spin is energetically more favorable than the closed-shell stacking. The spin-polarized conformation gives a further horizontal interlayer displacement within 1 angstrom compared with the closed-shell structure. This result highlights that, besides the well-known phenomenologically interpreted van der Waals forces, a specific mechanism dependent on the monomeric spin polarization may lead to obvious mechanical effects in some intermolecular interactions. PMID:26078005

  19. Slippage in stacking of graphene nanofragments induced by spin polarization.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yanyu; Jiang, Wanrun; Dai, Xing; Song, Ruixia; Wang, Bo; Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Spin polarization and stacking are interesting effects in complex molecular systems and are both presented in graphene-based materials. Their possible combination may provide a new perspective in understanding the intermolecular force. The nanoscale graphene structures with zigzag edges could possess spin-polarized ground states. However, the mechanical effect of spin polarization in stacking of graphene nanofragments is not clear. Here we demonstrate the displacement between two stacked rhombic graphene nanofragments induced by spin polarization, using first-principles density-functional methods. We found that, in stacking of two rhombic graphene nanofragments, a spin-polarized stacked conformation with zero total spin is energetically more favorable than the closed-shell stacking. The spin-polarized conformation gives a further horizontal interlayer displacement within 1 angstrom compared with the closed-shell structure. This result highlights that, besides the well-known phenomenologically interpreted van der Waals forces, a specific mechanism dependent on the monomeric spin polarization may lead to obvious mechanical effects in some intermolecular interactions. PMID:26078005

  20. Supramolecular Chemistry of 4,4'-Bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide in Transition Metal Complexes: A Rich Diversity of Co-ordinate, Hydrogen-Bond and Aromatic Stacking Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Junhua; Hubberstey, Peter; Champness, Neil R.; Schröder, Martin

    4,4'-Bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide (L1) has enormous flexibility as a supramolecular linker since it can be involved not only in co-ordinate and hydrogen bonds via its N,N'-dioxide oxygen centres, but the pyridine-N-oxide rings can also form aromatic ?-? stacking interactions. Thus, L1 can bridge between, or act as a pendant ligand to metal centres and can support hydrogen-bonds within a lattice in a site remote from the metal centre. Of the structurally characterised transition metal complexes abstracted from the literature for this review, 26 form molecular compounds, 14 form 1D chains, 9 form 2D sheets of either 36, 44 or 63 topology, while 5 form 3D networks with either 41263 (?-Po type) or 48668 topology. To target multidimensional architectures it has been found to be necessary to avoid aqueous solutions and strongly co-ordinating anions, and consequently the synthesis of multidimensional L1-bridged transition metal co-ordination polymers has usually involved reaction of L1 with metal salts of weakly co-ordinating anions in low molecular weight alcohols. Of the 98 distinct molecules of L1 reported for complexes in the literature, 42 are bridging, 36 pendant and 20 are non-co-ordinated hydrogen-bonded molecules. Approximately 75% of the bridging L1 molecules adopt an anti-conformation, while the remainder adopt a syn-conformation. This prevalence of the anti-conformation contrasts markedly with the situation observed for lanthanide compounds, for which approximately 75% adopt a syn-conformation. A number of trends in the co-ordination behaviour of L1 with transition metals can be identified. Co-ordination to metal centres is based on sp 2 hybridised oxygen donors, but the ?-interaction between the oxygen p z orbital and the aromatic ring is sufficiently weak that the oxygen lone pairs are normally twisted out of the plane of the pyridine-N-oxide by a steric clash between the metal centre and the ?-hydrogen of the pyridine ring. As a result of this steric hindrance,

  1. Fuel cell stack compressive loading system

    DOEpatents

    Fahle, Ronald W. (Manchester, CT); Reiser, Carl A. (Glastonbury, CT)

    1982-01-01

    A fuel cell module comprising a stack of fuel cells with reactant gas manifolds sealed against the external surfaces of the stack includes a constraint system for providing a compressive load on the stack wherein the constraint system maintains the stack at a constant height (after thermal expansion) and allows the compressive load to decrease with time as a result of the creep characteristics of the stack. Relative motion between the manifold sealing edges and the stack surface is virtually eliminated by this constraint system; however it can only be used with a stack having considerable resiliency and appropriate thermal expansion and creep characteristics.

  2. Measurement of the ratios of the branching fractions [Beta](B?[sigma] --> D?[sigma][pi]? [pi]?[pi]?)/[Beta](B? --> D?[pi]? [pi]?[pi]?) and [Beta](B?[sigma] --> D?[sigma][pi]?)/[Beta](B? --> D?[pi]? [pi]?[pi]?).

    E-print Network

    Bolshov, Arkadiy

    2007-01-01

    We present the measurement of the ratios of branching fractions B... to B..., and B... to B... We analyze data taken with the CDF II detector that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 355 pb - 1 in pp collisions at ...

  3. Stack effect in tall buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Lovatt, J.E.; Wilson, A.G. [Morrison Hershfield Ltd. Consulting Engineers, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Building Science Services

    1994-12-31

    Buoyancy forces due to the density difference between cold outdoor air and warm indoor air are known to cause problems in tall buildings in cold climates. Such problems as elevator doors that do not close and prevent the car from moving, unbalanced ventilation and exhaust airflows in vertical shafts, lobby entrance doors that are difficult to open in cold weather, and discomfort on lower floors due to large quantities of cold infiltrating air are usually a direct result of buoyancy forces acting on these elements of the building during cold weather. The ASHRAE Task Group on Tall Buildings commissioned Research Project 661, ``Field Verification of Problems Caused by Stack Effect in Tall Buildings,`` with the objectives of measuring the magnitude of specific problems related to stack effect in a tall building exposed to cold weather and testing the effect of modifications to the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system designed to reduce these problems. The measurements indicated that stack effect caused few observable problems in the specific building measured. Simulations showed that these problems were strongly dependent on the envelope air leakage area. Stack-induced pressures across fire exit doors in leaky tall buildings could exceed the limits for force required to open the doors. Maintaining an airtight envelope above the lobby level minimizes all the problems related to stack effect. Differential pressurization of floors to counteract stack effect was found to be inappropriate for the great majority of buildings. Airtight vestibules around entrance, elevator, and stairwell doors or automatic door openers can reduce door-opening problems due to high stack pressures where envelope leakage is difficult to address.

  4. Nature and magnitude of aromatic base stacking in DNA and RNA: Quantum chemistry, molecular mechanics, and experiment.

    PubMed

    Sponer, Ji?í; Sponer, Judit E; Mládek, Arnošt; Jure?ka, Petr; Banáš, Pavel; Otyepka, Michal

    2013-12-01

    Base stacking is a major interaction shaping up and stabilizing nucleic acids. During the last decades, base stacking has been extensively studied by experimental and theoretical methods. Advanced quantum-chemical calculations clarified that base stacking is a common interaction, which in the first approximation can be described as combination of the three most basic contributions to molecular interactions, namely, electrostatic interaction, London dispersion attraction and short-range repulsion. There is not any specific ?-? energy term associated with the delocalized ? electrons of the aromatic rings that cannot be described by the mentioned contributions. The base stacking can be rather reasonably approximated by simple molecular simulation methods based on well-calibrated common force fields although the force fields do not include nonadditivity of stacking, anisotropy of dispersion interactions, and some other effects. However, description of stacking association in condensed phase and understanding of the stacking role in biomolecules remain a difficult problem, as the net base stacking forces always act in a complex and context-specific environment. Moreover, the stacking forces are balanced with many other energy contributions. Differences in definition of stacking in experimental and theoretical studies are explained. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 99: 978-988, 2013. PMID:23784745

  5. Doping effects on the stability of stacking faults in silicon crystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Ohno; Y. Tokumoto; I. Yonenaga

    In silicon crystals annealed at 1173K, n-type dopant atoms segregate nearby a stacking fault ribbon bound by a pair of partial dislocations and the width of the ribbon is increased. The origin of the width increase is the reduction of the stacking fault energy due to an electronic interaction between the ribbon and the dopant atoms segregating at the ribbon,

  6. Exotic ion H <Stack> 3 ++ Stack> in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Vieyra, Juan C.; Turbiner, Alexander V.; Guevara, Nicolais L.

    2007-04-01

    1. The exotic system H <Stack> 3 ++ Stack> (which does not exist without magnetic field) exists in strong magnetic fields: (a) In triangular configuration for B?108 1011 G (under specific external conditions) (b) In linear configuration for B>1010 G 2. In the linear configuration the positive z-parity states 1? g , 1? u , 1? g are bound states 3. In the linear configuration the negative z-parity states 1? u , 1? g , 1? u are repulsive states 4. The H <Stack> 3 ++ Stack> molecular ion is the most bound one-electron system made from protons at B>3×1013 G Possible application: The H <Stack> 3 ++ Stack> molecular ion may appear as a component of a neutron star atmosphere under a strong surface magnetic field B=1012 1013 G.

  7. Mutual coupling of stacked UHF RFID antennas in NFC applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaosheng Chen; Feng Lu; Terry T. Ye

    2009-01-01

    As RFID deployment moves from pallet level to item level, UHF RFID has gained more and more momentum in NFC (near field communication) applications recently. Similar to HF RFID tags, UHF RFID tags in NFC also use inductive coupling antennas to interact with the readers. However, in item-level deployment, items with UHF RFID tags are often stacked closely and interrogated

  8. Formation mechanism of wide stacking faults in nanocrystalline Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, X. Z.; Srinivasan, S. G.; Zhao, Y. H.; Baskes, M. I.; Zhu, Y. T.; Zhou, F.; Lavernia, E. J.; Xu, H. F.

    2004-05-01

    A full dislocation often dissociates into two partial dislocations enclosing a stacking fault (SF) ribbon. The SF width significantly affects the mechanical behavior of metals. Al has very high stacking fault energy and, consequently, very narrow SF width in its coarse-grained state. We have found that some SFs in nanocrystalline Al are surprisingly 1.4-6.8 nm wide, which is 1.5-11 times higher than the reported experimental value in single crystal Al. Our analytical model shows that such wide SFs are formed due to the small grain size and possibly also to the interaction of SF ribbons with high density of dislocations.

  9. Modular fuel-cell stack assembly

    DOEpatents

    Patel, Pinakin (Danbury, CT); Urko, Willam (West Granby, CT)

    2008-01-29

    A modular multi-stack fuel-cell assembly in which the fuel-cell stacks are situated within a containment structure and in which a gas distributor is provided in the structure and distributes received fuel and oxidant gases to the stacks and receives exhausted fuel and oxidant gas from the stacks so as to realize a desired gas flow distribution and gas pressure differential through the stacks. The gas distributor is centrally and symmetrically arranged relative to the stacks so that it itself promotes realization of the desired gas flow distribution and pressure differential.

  10. Production of J\\/psi via psi' and chi decay in 300 GeV\\/c proton- and pi+\\/nucleon interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Antoniazzi; M. Arenton; Z. Cao; T. Chen; S. Conetti; B. Cox; S. Delchamps; L. Fortney; K. Guffey; M. Haire; P. Ioannou; C. M. Jenkins; D. J. Judd; C. Kourkoumelis; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; J. Kuzminski; T. Lecompte; A. Marchionni; M. He; P. O. Mazur; C. T. Murphy; P. Pramantiotis; R. Rameika; L. K. Resvanis; M. Rosati; J. Rosen; C. Shen; Q. Shen; A. Simard; R. P. Smith; L. Spiegel; D. G. Stairs; Y. Tan; R. J. Tesarek; T. Turkington; L. Turnbull; F. Turkot; S. Tzamarias; G. Voulgaris; D. E. Wagoner; C. Wang; W. Yang; N. Yao; N. Zhang; X. Zhang; G. Zioulas; B. Zou

    1993-01-01

    The production of the chi1 and chi2 states of charmonium has been observed in 300 GeV\\/c pi+\\/-N and pN interactions. The fraction of the total inclusive J\\/psi production due to radiative chi decay has been determined to be 0.40+\\/-0.04, 0.37+\\/-0.03, and 0.30+\\/-0.04 for the pi+, pi-, and proton data, respectively. Total cross sections have been obtained of 131+\\/-18+\\/-14 and 188+\\/-30+\\/-21

  11. Rhythmic ring–ring stacking drives the circadian oscillator clockwise

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yong-Gang; Tseng, Roger; Kuo, Nai-Wei; LiWang, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The oscillator of the circadian clock of cyanobacteria is composed of three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, which together generate a self-sustained ?24-h rhythm of phosphorylation of KaiC. The mechanism propelling this oscillator has remained elusive, however. We show that stacking interactions between the CI and CII rings of KaiC drive the transition from the phosphorylation-specific KaiC–KaiA interaction to the dephosphorylation-specific KaiC–KaiB interaction. We have identified the KaiB-binding site, which is on the CI domain. This site is hidden when CI domains are associated as a hexameric ring. However, stacking of the CI and CII rings exposes the KaiB-binding site. Because the clock output protein SasA also binds to CI and competes with KaiB for binding, ring stacking likely regulates clock output. We demonstrate that ADP can expose the KaiB-binding site in the absence of ring stacking, providing an explanation for how it can reset the clock. PMID:22967510

  12. Magneto-optical properties of ABC-stacked trilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Ping; Lin, Chiun-Yan; Ho, Yen-Hung; Do, Thi-Nga; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2015-06-28

    The generalized tight-binding model is developed to investigate the magneto-optical absorption spectra of ABC-stacked trilayer graphene. The absorption peaks can be classified into nine categories of inter-Landau-level optical excitations, including three intra-group and six inter-group ones. Most of them belong to the twin-peak structures because of the asymmetric Landau level spectrum. The threshold absorption peak alone comes from a certain excitation channel, and its frequency is associated with a specific interlayer atomic interaction. The Landau-level anticrossings cause extra absorption peaks. Moreover, a simple relationship between the absorption frequency and the field strength is absent. The magneto-optical properties of ABC-stacked trilayer graphene are totally different from those of AAA- and ABA-stacked ones, such as the number, intensity and frequency of absorption peaks. PMID:26020611

  13. Calculated state densities of aperiodic nucleotide base stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yuan-Jie; Chen, Run-Shen; Martinez, Alberto; Otto, Peter; Ladik, Janos

    2000-05-01

    Electronic density of states (DOS) histograms and of the nucleotide base stack regions of a segment of human oncogene (both single and double stranded, in B conformation) and of single-stranded random DNA base stack (also in B conformation), were calculated. The computations were performed with the help of the ab initio matrix block negative factor counting (NFC) method for the DOSs. The neglected effects of the sugar-phosphate chain and the water environment (with the counterions) were assessed on the basis of previous ab initio band structure calculations. Further, in the calculation of single nucleotide base stacks also basis set and correlation effects have been investigated. In the case of a single strand the level spacing widths of the allowed regions and the fundamental gap were calculated also with Clementi's double ? basis and corrected for correlation at the MP2 level. The inverse interaction method was applied for the study of Anderson localization.

  14. Stacking fault energies in aluminium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Hammer; K. W. Jacobsen; V. Milman; M. C. Payne

    1992-01-01

    The twin, intrinsic and extrinsic stacking fault energies together with the FCC-HCP structural energy difference are calculated for Al by means of the total energy pseudopotential method. The influence of supercell geometry is controlled by extrapolating the calculated data to infinite cell size. All calculations include full interplanar relaxations and the final inter-planar separations are presented and shown to vary

  15. POLYMERIC INTERFACES FOR STACK MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research has been performed on the use of polymeric interfaces for in situ continuous stack monitoring of gaseous pollutants. Permeabilities of candidate interface materials to SO2 were measured at temperatures from ambient to 200C, and the results were used to design interfaces ...

  16. THE OPEN SOURCE MANUFACTURING STACK

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pierce Kuhnell; Amit Deshpande

    Manufacturing is plagued by communication issues due to proprietar y and closed architecture systems. In this paper, we outline the var ious methods, utilizing open source applications, to create Open Source Manufacturing Stack (OS MS) for use in the manufacturing sector. These open source applications include Ubuntu, Li nuxCNC, MTConnect, and Firefox. The OSMS has been implemented as part of

  17. Stack-Based Genetic Programming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy Perkis

    1994-01-01

    Some recent work in the field of Genetic Programming (GP) has been concerned with finding optimum representations for evolvable and efficient computer programs. In this paper, I describe a new GP system in which target programs run on a stack-based virtual machine. The system is shown to have certain advantages in terms of efficiency and simplicity of implementatio n, and

  18. Multilayer Piezoelectric Stack Actuator Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Jones, Christopher M.; Aldrich, Jack B.; Blodget, Chad; Bao, Xioaqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2008-01-01

    Future NASA missions are increasingly seeking to use actuators for precision positioning to accuracies of the order of fractions of a nanometer. For this purpose, multilayer piezoelectric stacks are being considered as actuators for driving these precision mechanisms. In this study, sets of commercial PZT stacks were tested in various AC and DC conditions at both nominal and extreme temperatures and voltages. AC signal testing included impedance, capacitance and dielectric loss factor of each actuator as a function of the small-signal driving sinusoidal frequency, and the ambient temperature. DC signal testing includes leakage current and displacement as a function of the applied DC voltage. The applied DC voltage was increased to over eight times the manufacturers' specifications to investigate the correlation between leakage current and breakdown voltage. Resonance characterization as a function of temperature was done over a temperature range of -180C to +200C which generally exceeded the manufacturers' specifications. In order to study the lifetime performance of these stacks, five actuators from one manufacturer were driven by a 60volt, 2 kHz sine-wave for ten billion cycles. The tests were performed using a Lab-View controlled automated data acquisition system that monitored the waveform of the stack electrical current and voltage. The measurements included the displacement, impedance, capacitance and leakage current and the analysis of the experimental results will be presented.

  19. Progress Update: Stack Project Complete

    ScienceCinema

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

  20. Thermoacoustics in pin-array stacks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. W. Swift; R. M. Keolian

    1993-01-01

    A new thermoacoustic stack geometry, the pin array, is described. Analytical expressions for velocity and temperature in the pin array are derived, and potential advantages of the pin stack are demonstrated. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Thermoacoustics in pin-array stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Keolian, R.M. (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States))

    1993-08-01

    A new thermoacoustic stack geometry, the pin array, is described. Analytical expressions for velocity and temperature in the pin array are derived, and potential advantages of the pin stack are demonstrated. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Effects of pi-stacking interactions on the near carbon K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure: a theoretical study of the ethylene pentamer and the phthalocyanine dimer.

    PubMed

    Linares, Mathieu; Stafström, Sven; Norman, Patrick

    2009-03-14

    X-ray absorption spectra have been determined for ethylene and free base phthalocyanine at the carbon K-edge with use of the complex polarization propagator method combined with Kohn-Sham density functional theory and the Coulomb attenuated method B3LYP exchange-correlation functional. Apart from isolated molecules, the study includes pi-stacked systems of the phthalocyanine dimer and the ethylene dimer, trimer, tetramer, and pentamer. For ethylene, pi-stacking involves a reduction in transition energy of the valence pi( *)-band by some 70 meV and large spectral changes (regarding also shape and intensity) of the Rydberg bands. For phthalocyanine, there are large spectral changes in the entire valence pi( *)-part of the spectrum. PMID:19292532

  3. Do Stack Traces Help Developers Fix Bugs?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rahul Premraj; Adrian Schröter; Nicolas Bettenburg

    2010-01-01

    A widely shared belief in the software engineering community is that stack traces are much sought after by developers to support them in debugging. But limited empirical evidence is available to confirm the value of stack traces to developers. In this paper, we seek to provide such evidence by conducting an empirical study on the usage of stack traces by

  4. Tritium Extraction Facility Stack Height Determination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simpkins

    1998-01-01

    A good engineering practice (GEP) stack height has been determined for the Tritium Extraction Facility. Stack heights between 50 and 120 ft were analyzed to determine if there were any increased concentrations downwind due to building wake effects. Using EPAs `2 1\\/2 times rule`, a stack height of 100 ft was determined to be in accordance with GEP. Further detailed

  5. Dislocation and Stacking Fault Core Fields in FCC Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Hoagland, Richard G.

    2005-12-21

    Atomistic models were used to determine the properties of dislocation core fields and stacking fault fields in Al and Cu using embedded atom method (EAM) potentials. Long-range, linear elastic displacement fields due to nonlinear behavior within dislocation cores, the core field, for relevant combinations of Shockley partial dislocations for edge, screw, and mixed (60? and 30?) geometries were obtained. Displacement fields of stacking faults were obtained separately and used to partition the core field of dissociated dislocations into core fields of partial dislocations and a stacking fault expansion field. Core field stresses were derived from which the total force, including the Volterra field plus core field, between dislocations for several dislocation configurations was determined. The Volterra field dominates when the distance between dislocations exceeds about 50b but forces due to core fields are important for smaller separation distances and were found to affect the equilibrium angle of edge dislocation dipoles and to contribute to the force between otherwise non-interacting edge and screw dislocations. Interactions among the components of a dissociated dislocation modify the equilibrium separation for Shockley partials suggesting that methods that determine stacking fault energies using measurements of separation distances should include core fields.

  6. Stacked triangular lattice: Percolation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrenk, K. J.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2013-03-01

    The stacked triangular lattice has the shape of a triangular prism. In spite of being considered frequently in solid-state physics and materials science, its percolation properties have received little attention. We investigate several nonuniversal percolation properties on this lattice using Monte Carlo simulation. We show that the percolation threshold is pcbond=0.18602±0.00002 for bonds and pcsite=0.26240±0.00005 for sites. The number of clusters at the threshold per site is ncbond=0.28458±0.00005 and ncsite=0.03998±0.00005. The stacked triangular lattice is a convenient choice to study the RGB model [Schrenk , Sci. Rep.10.1038/srep00751 2, 751 (2012)]. We present results on this model and its scaling behavior at the percolation threshold.

  7. Precision Cosmography with Stacked Voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavaux, Guilhem; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2012-08-01

    We present a purely geometrical method for probing the expansion history of the universe from the observation of the shape of stacked voids in spectroscopic redshift surveys. Our method is an Alcock-Paczy?ski (AP) test based on the average sphericity of voids posited on the local isotropy of the universe. It works by comparing the temporal extent of cosmic voids along the line of sight with their angular, spatial extent. We describe the algorithm that we use to detect and stack voids in redshift shells on the light cone and test it on mock light cones produced from N-body simulations. We establish a robust statistical model for estimating the average stretching of voids in redshift space and quantify the contamination by peculiar velocities. Finally, assuming that the void statistics that we derive from N-body simulations is preserved when considering galaxy surveys, we assess the capability of this approach to constrain dark energy parameters. We report this assessment in terms of the figure of merit (FoM) of the dark energy task force and in particular of the proposed Euclid mission which is particularly suited for this technique since it is a spectroscopic survey. The FoM due to stacked voids from the Euclid wide survey may double that of all other dark energy probes derived from Euclid data alone (combined with Planck priors). In particular, voids seem to outperform baryon acoustic oscillations by an order of magnitude. This result is consistent with simple estimates based on mode counting. The AP test based on stacked voids may be a significant addition to the portfolio of major dark energy probes and its potentialities must be studied in detail.

  8. Feature-Weighted Linear Stacking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Sill; Gábor Takács; Lester Mackey; David Lin

    2009-01-01

    Ensemble methods, such as stacking, are designed to boost predictive accuracy\\u000aby blending the predictions of multiple machine learning models. Recent work\\u000ahas shown that the use of meta-features, additional inputs describing each\\u000aexample in a dataset, can boost the performance of ensemble methods, but the\\u000agreatest reported gains have come from nonlinear procedures requiring\\u000asignificant tuning and training time.

  9. Removal of stacking-fault tetrahedra by twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals.

    PubMed

    Yu, K Y; Bufford, D; Sun, C; Liu, Y; Wang, H; Kirk, M A; Li, M; Zhang, X

    2013-01-01

    Stacking-fault tetrahedra are detrimental defects in neutron- or proton-irradiated structural metals with face-centered cubic structures. Their removal is very challenging and typically requires annealing at very high temperatures, incorporation of interstitials or interaction with mobile dislocations. Here we present an alternative solution to remove stacking-fault tetrahedra discovered during room temperature, in situ Kr ion irradiation of epitaxial nanotwinned Ag with an average twin spacing of ~8 nm. A large number of stacking-fault tetrahedra were removed during their interactions with abundant coherent twin boundaries. Consequently the density of stacking-fault tetrahedra in irradiated nanotwinned Ag was much lower than that in its bulk counterpart. Two fundamental interaction mechanisms were identified, and compared with predictions by molecular dynamics simulations. In situ studies also revealed a new phenomenon: radiation-induced frequent migration of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries. Potential migration mechanisms are discussed. PMID:23340417

  10. Hexaquacobalt(II) bis(5-hydroxy-7-methoxy-4-oxo-2-phenyl-4H-chromene-6-sulfonate) tetrahydrate.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu-Wu; Zhang, Zun-Ting

    2008-04-01

    The title compound, [Co(H(2)O)(6)](C(16)H(11)O(7)S)(2) x 4 H(2)O, with cobalt(II) at the centre of symmetry, exhibits alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. Hydrophilic regions are generated by O-H...O hydrogen bonds among sulfonate groups, involving solvent water molecules and coordinated water molecules; pi-pi stacking interactions assemble the flavone skeletons into columns which form the hydrophobic regions. A three-dimensional network is built up from an extensive array of hydrogen bonds, pi-pi stacking interactions and electrostatic interactions between the cation and anion. As a salt of the sulfonated derivative of naturally occurring tectochrysin (5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone), this compound offers enhanced solubility and potential biological activity over the natural product. PMID:18391382

  11. The propargylbenzene dimer: C-H···? assisted ?-? stacking.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Aniket; Sen, Saumik; Patwari, G Naresh

    2015-04-14

    The propargylbenzene dimer was investigated using mass selected electronic and infrared spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations. The IR spectrum in the acetylenic C-H stretching region indicates that the two propargylbenzene units in the dimer are in an almost identical environment. The stabilization energies calculated at various levels of theory predict that the anti-parallel structure is the most stable isomer. The observed spectra are assigned to ?-stacked structures which incorporate C-H···? interaction. The symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) based energy decomposition analysis reveals that electrostatics contributes around 35% while the rest is due to dispersion. Comparison with the phenylacetylene and toluene dimers indicates that the higher stabilization energy of the PrBz dimer can be attributed to the synergy between the ?-? stacking and C-H···? interactions. PMID:25758455

  12. Calculated stacking-fault energies in ?-Al2O3

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. R. Kenway

    1993-01-01

    Atomistic lattice simulation was used to calculate the energies of stacking faults in the aluminium sublattice of ?-Al2O3. Three potentials were employed. The first two were derived by first ascribing formal charges to aluminium and oxygen (3.0 + and 2.0– respectively), and then by using two different methods to determine a short-range two-body interaction; the third was extracted from ab

  13. Multi-Pion Systems in Lattice QCD and the Three-Pion Interaction

    E-print Network

    Silas R. Beane; William Detmold; Thomas C. Luu; Kostas Orginos; Martin J. Savage; Aaron Torok

    2007-10-09

    The ground-state energies of 2, 3, 4 and 5 \\pi^+'s in a spatial volume V (2.5 fm)^3 are computed with lattice QCD. By eliminating the leading contribution from three-\\pi^+ interactions, particular combinations of these n-\\pi^+ ground-state energies provide precise extractions of the \\pi^+\\pi^+ scattering length in agreement with that obtained from calculations involving only two \\pi^+'s. The three-\\pi^+ interaction can be isolated by forming other combinations of the n-\\pi^+ ground-state energies. We find a result that is consistent with a repulsive three-\\pi^+ interaction for m_\\pi < 352 MeV.

  14. Stacking in RNA: NMR of Four Tetramers Benchmark Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for RNA tetramers r(AAAA), r(CAAU), r(GACC), and r(UUUU) are benchmarked against 1H–1H NOESY distances and 3J scalar couplings to test effects of RNA torsion parametrizations. Four different starting structures were used for r(AAAA), r(CAAU), and r(GACC), while five starting structures were used for r(UUUU). On the basis of X-ray structures, criteria are reported for quantifying stacking. The force fields, AMBER ff99, parmbsc0, parm99?_Yil, ff10, and parmTor, all predict experimentally unobserved stacks and intercalations, e.g., base 1 stacked between bases 3 and 4, and incorrect ?, ?, and sugar pucker populations. The intercalated structures are particularly stable, often lasting several microseconds. Parmbsc0, parm99?_Yil, and ff10 give similar agreement with NMR, but the best agreement is only 46%. Experimentally unobserved intercalations typically are associated with reduced solvent accessible surface area along with amino and hydroxyl hydrogen bonds to phosphate nonbridging oxygens. Results from an extensive set of MD simulations suggest that recent force field parametrizations improve predictions, but further improvements are necessary to provide reasonable agreement with NMR. In particular, intramolecular stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions may not be well balanced with the TIP3P water model. NMR data and the scoring method presented here provide rigorous benchmarks for future changes in force fields and MD methods. PMID:26082675

  15. A High Volume Stack Sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boubel, Richard W.

    1971-01-01

    The stack sampler described in this paper has been developed to overcome the difficulties of particulate sampling with presently available equipment. Its use on emissions from hog fuel fired boilers, back-fired incinerators, wigwam burners, asphalt plants, and seed cleaning cyclones is reported. The results indicate that the sampler is rapid and reliable in its use. It is relatively simple and inexpensive to operate. For most sources it should be considered over the more complicated and expensive sampling trains being used and specified.

  16. The role of charge-transfer interactions and delocalization in annelated nitronyl nitroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, Brynn Mary

    The design and synthesis of stable organic radicals with delocalized spin density distribution and low energy optical and redox processes is central to the development of magneto-conducting materials. Towards this end, a generalized synthetic methodology has been developed allowing for the synthesis of a series of annelated benzonitronyl nitroxide (BNN) radicals. The BNN radicals exhibited remarkably low reduction potentials (~0.0 V vs SCE) and a near-infrared absorption attributed to a HOMO--SOMO charge-transfer excitation. The annelated BNN radicals were found to be less stable than the closely related tetramethyl nitronyl nitroxide radicals, particularly in solution. A series of pi-delocalized and heteroaromatic radicals were synthesized to determine if the instability was due to the delocalization of electron density onto the carbon skeleton or the low reduction potential. DFT calculations with the EPR-II basis gave rise to calculated electronic structures that were consistent with EPR spectroscopy and suggested changes in spin density distribution are occurring with perturbation of the annelated ring. Cyclic voltammetry revealed the heteroaromatic and pi-delocalized radicals had reduction potentials lower than BNN, with some systems reducing at potentials of 0.2 V vs SCE, comparable to that of 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane. The distribution of spin throughout the molecular framework and the low reduction potential of the annelated nitronyl nitroxide radicals were both found to contribute to the lowered stability of the annelated nitronyl nitroxides relative to the far less redox active tetramethyl nitronyl nitroxides. The low reduction potential of the BNN radicals suggested that incorporation into acceptor--donor (A--D) systems would allow for investigation of the role of charge transfer interactions on the electronic structure and properties of neutral open-shell A--D radicals. Two D--A--D radicals were prepared using metal catalyzed coupling and furoxan condensation methodologies which resulted in incorporation of a second donor in the C5 position of the BNN moiety. The radical D1--A--D2 triads, where D1 = thiophene and D2 = thiophene or phenyl, exhibited three intramolecular charge-transfer excitations (lambdamax = 550, 580 and 1000 nm) that were investigated by variable temperature absorption spectroscopy. Structural characterization of the triads in the solid state by single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction revealed slipped pi stacks that arise from intermolecular pi-- pi and D--A interactions, providing pathways for antiferromagnetic (AFM) and ferromagnetic (FM) exchange. While the phenyl substituted triad (Th--BNN--Ph) exhibited antiferromagnetic interactions and a room temperature conductivity of sigmaRT = 10-7 S cm-1, the thienyl substituted derivative (Th--BNN--Th) exhibited short-range FM interactions and increased conductivity (sigmaRT = 10-5 S cm-1), giving rise to an organic semiconductor exhibiting FM exchange. The differences in conductivity and magnetic behavior were rationalized by the degree of slippage dictated by an interplay between pi-- pi and intermolecular D--A interactions. Finally, a series of BNN--D radicals were investigated where the donor ability of D was systematically varied from Eox = 2.30 V vs SCE (benzene) to 0.32 V vs SCE (tetrathiafulvalene). Calculations of the near-infrared charge transfer excitation suggested that the HOMO--SOMO gap could be significantly decreased with increasing donor ability, consistent with charge transfer theory. A subset of the series of BNN--D radicals with D = anisole, benzo[b]thiophene, N-methylindole, N-ethylcarbazole, and N,N-diphenylaniline were synthesized. Solution state spectroscopic studies of the series by EPR and electronic absorption spectroscopy revealed spin-delocalized structures with extremely low reduction potentials (~0 V vs SCE). The solid state properties of the BNN--D radicals were investigated by magnetometry and room temperature conductivity measurements. Due to primarily steric interactions, weak D--A coupling was observ

  17. Refractive index sensing utilizing photonic crystal nano-beam cavity with slotted stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peipeng; Yao, Kaiyuan; Zheng, Jiajiu; Guan, Xiaowei; Shi, Yaocheng

    2014-03-01

    Two types of optical sensor based on one-dimensional Photonic Crystal (PhC) stack nanobeam cavity has been designed, fabricated and characterized. One-dimensional PhC stack nanobeam cavity with measured Q-factors up to 27000 and a sensitivity of 270nm/RIU has been demonstrated. Then, we introduce a finite width slot between two periodic arrays of the dielectric stacks. Thus, the majority of optical field distributes in the slotted low-index area and the light matter interaction with the analytes has been enhanced. A sensitivity of 410nm/RIU has been achieved while maintaining the Q-factors near 104.

  18. Manifold seal for fuel cell stack assembly

    DOEpatents

    Schmitten, Phillip F. (N. Huntingdon, PA); Wright, Maynard K. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1989-01-01

    An assembly for sealing a manifold to a stack of fuel cells includes a first resilient member for providing a first sealing barrier between the manifold and the stack. A second resilient member provides a second sealing barrier between the manifold and the stack. The first and second resilient members are retained in such a manner as to define an area therebetween adapted for retaining a sealing composition.

  19. Stacking Fault Energies of Tetrahedrally Coordinated Crystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Takeuchi; K. Suzuki

    1999-01-01

    The energies of the intrinsic stacking fault in 20 tetrahedrally coordinated crystals, determined by electron microscopy from the widths of extended dislocations, range from a few mJ\\/m2 to 300 mJ\\/m2. The reduced stacking fault energy (RSFE: stacking fault energy per bond perpendicular to the fault plane) has been found to have correlations with the effective charge, the charge redistribution index

  20. Closely stacked oligo(phenylene ethynylene)s: effect of ?-stacking on the electronic properties of conjugated chromophores.

    PubMed

    Jagtap, Subodh P; Mukhopadhyay, Sukrit; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Brizius, Glen L; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Collard, David M

    2012-04-25

    In this work, a bicyclo[4.4.1]undecane scaffold is used to hold oligo(phenylene ethynylene) units in a cofacially stacked arrangement along the entire length of the conjugated units. We study the impact that the resulting strong interchain interactions have on the photophysical properties. The length of the individual oligomer branches was varied from three to five rings to investigate the effect of conjugation on the electronic properties of the stacked segments. Absorption and fluorescence spectra were recorded and compared to those of the corresponding unstacked analogues. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations were carried out and helped to rationalize the low-energy features present in the fluorescence spectra of the stacked systems. The calculations indicate that the low-energy emissions are due to the presence of excimer-like states. The stronger intensity of the low-energy fluorescence band observed in the five-ring stacked system compared to the three-ring analogue is attributed to the smaller activation barrier that separates the local intrachain state and the excimer-like state in the former compound. PMID:22455756

  1. Self-Adjusting Stack Machines

    E-print Network

    Hammer, Matthew A; Chen, Yan; Acar, Umut A

    2011-01-01

    Self-adjusting computation offers a language-based approach to writing programs that automatically respond to dynamically changing data. Recent work made significant progress in developing sound semantics and associated implementations of self-adjusting computation for high-level, functional languages. These techniques, however, do not address issues that arise for low-level languages, i.e., stack-based imperative languages that lack strong type systems and automatic memory management. In this paper, we describe techniques for self-adjusting computation which are suitable for low-level languages. Necessarily, we take a different approach than previous work: instead of starting with a high-level language with additional primitives to support self-adjusting computation, we start with a low-level intermediate language, whose semantics is given by a stack-based abstract machine. We prove that this semantics is sound: it always updates computations in a way that is consistent with full reevaluation. We give a comp...

  2. Flexible interconnects for fuel cell stacks

    DOEpatents

    Lenz, David J.; Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc

    2004-11-09

    An interconnect that facilitates electrical connection and mechanical support with minimal mechanical stress for fuel cell stacks. The interconnects are flexible and provide mechanically robust fuel cell stacks with higher stack performance at lower cost. The flexible interconnects replace the prior rigid rib interconnects with flexible "fingers" or contact pads which will accommodate the imperfect flatness of the ceramic fuel cells. Also, the mechanical stress of stacked fuel cells will be smaller due to the flexibility of the fingers. The interconnects can be one-sided or double-sided.

  3. Density functional theory investigations of titanium ?-surfaces and stacking faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Magali; Tarrat, Nathalie; Morillo, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Bulk properties of hcp-Ti, relevant for the description of dislocations, such as elastic constants, stacking faults and ?-surface, are computed using density functional theory (DFT) and two central force embedded atom interaction models (Zope and Mishin 2003 Phys. Rev. B 68 024102, Hammerschmidt et al 2005 Phys. Rev. B 71 205409). The results are compared with previously published calculations, except pair potential calculations, which are not appropriate for the description of the metallic bond. The comparison includes N-body central force (NB-CF) and N-body angular (NB-A) empirical potentials, tight-binding approximation to the electronic structure (TB), DFT pseudopotential (DFT-P) and all electron (DFT-A) calculations. None of the considered interaction models are fully satisfactory for the description of these properties. In particular, NB-CF, NB-A and TB interaction models are unable to describe the softening of the easy prismatic ?-surface leading to the appearance of a metastable stacking fault, as evidenced in all the DFT calculations. Most often, when the basal stacking fault excess energy is underevaluated, this leads to an inversion of the energetic stability between the I2 basal and the prismatic easy stacking faults. Even the DFT-pseudopotential calculations need to be improved regarding the description of the shear elastic constants. The implications of these results on the core structure and gliding properties of the a/3\\,\\langle1 1\\, \\bar{2}\\, 0\\rangle screw dislocation are analyzed. The calculated dissociation lengths into Shockley partials in both the basal and prismatic planes for the different models compare well with the measured ones in the corresponding simulations of the dislocation core structure when available. Finally, the Peierls stress is also evaluated using the Peierls-Nabarro model and compared with the experimentally measured one.

  4. Four different tricks to bypass StackShield and StackGuard protection

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Xiangyu

    Four different tricks to bypass StackShield and StackGuard protection Gerardo Richarte Core have been developed to protect programs against exploitation of stack based buffer overflows. Among different types of protections, we can separate two major groups. Those that modify the environment where

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of DNA-Functionalized Carbon Nanotube Chemical Sensors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Johnson; Michael Klein; Alan Johnson

    2006-01-01

    We have conducted all-atom classical molecular dynamics simulations onDNA-functionalized carbon nanotube chemical sensors, including the presence of water. Our simulations verify that single stranded DNA (ssDNA) binds to a single-wall carbon nanotube (swCN) via a pi-pi stacking interaction. Preliminary simulations of a partially hydrated system also suggest that the ssDNA conformation about a swCN exhibits nanoscale pockets that can result

  6. Stacked vapor fed AMTEC modules

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, R.K.

    1989-02-28

    The present invention pertains to a stacked AMTEC module. The invention includes a tubular member which has an interior. The member is comprised of a ion conductor that substantially conducts ions relative to electrons, preferably a beta -alumina solid electrolyte, positioned about the interior. A porous electrode for conducting electrons and allowing sodium ions to pass therethrough, and wherein electrons and sodium ions recombine to form sodium is positioned about the beta -alumina solid electrolyte. The electrode is operated at a temperature and a pressure that allows the recombined sodium to vaporize. Additionally, an outer current collector grid for distributing electrons throughout the porous electrode is positioned about and contacts the porous electrode. Also included in the invention is transporting means for transporting liquid sodium to the beta -alumina solid electrolyte of the tubular member.

  7. Protecting privacy with protocol stack virtualization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janne Lindqvist; Juha-matti Tapio

    2008-01-01

    Existing approaches for providing privacy without infrastructure have proposed to use pseudorandom or disposable identifiers on some or all layers of the protocol stack. These approaches either require changes to all hosts partic- ipating in the communication or do not provide privacy for the whole protocol stack. An alternative approach for providing privacy could be to implement an operating system

  8. Resolving Lithospheric Interfaces Using SS Waveform Stacks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. A. Rychert; P. M. Shearer

    2009-01-01

    We image lithospheric interfaces globally using variations in the character of SS waveform stacks. The variations are caused by reflected phases, i.e., underside reflections (SS precursors) and topside multiples (SS reverberations), created at discontinuities near the midpoint of the SS raypath. Stacks from continental versus oceanic bouncepoint regions produce distinctly different SS waveforms, consistent with the large continent\\/ocean difference in

  9. Dislocations and Stacking Faults in Aluminum Nitride

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Delavignette; H. B. Kirkpatrick; S. Amelinckx

    1961-01-01

    Dislocations in thin platelets of aluminum nitride grown from the vapor phase appear to be of two types. Some are dissociated into partials of the Shockley type; others are undissociated. A model is given for both types. The stacking fault associated with the dissociated dislocations consists of one lamella of the sphalerite structure. The stacking fault energy is deduced from

  10. Stack Gas Desulfurization by Seawater in Shanghai

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. N. Zhang; Q. Z. Chen; Y. X. Zhao; Y. Maeda; Y. Tsujino

    2001-01-01

    There are a series of advantages in use of seawater as absorbent to remove SO2 in stack gas. Use of seawater for stack gas desulfurization is the first choice method for thermal power plant located on seaside. A study on the possibility of desulfurization by seawater of the East China Sea has be done by our institute. The qualities of

  11. Effective Stack Design in Air Pollution Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, John H.

    1968-01-01

    Stack design problems fall into two general caterories--(1) those of building re-entry, and (2) those of general area pollution. Extensive research has developed adequate information, available in the literature, to permit effective stack design. A major roadblock to effective design has been the strong belief by architects and engineers that high…

  12. Modular fuel-cell stack assembly

    DOEpatents

    Patel, Pinakin (Danbury, CT)

    2010-07-13

    A fuel cell assembly having a plurality of fuel cells arranged in a stack. An end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at an end of said stack. The end plate assembly has an inlet area adapted to receive an exhaust gas from the stack, an outlet area and a passage connecting the inlet area and outlet area and adapted to carry the exhaust gas received at the inlet area from the inlet area to the outlet area. A further end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at a further opposing end of the stack. The further end plate assembly has a further inlet area adapted to receive a further exhaust gas from the stack, a further outlet area and a further passage connecting the further inlet area and further outlet area and adapted to carry the further exhaust gas received at the further inlet area from the further inlet area to the further outlet area.

  13. Luminescence from stacking faults in gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R.; Bell, A.; Ponce, F. A.; Chen, C. Q.; Yang, J. W.; Khan, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    A direct correlation has been established between stacking faults in a-plane GaN epilayers and luminescence peaks in the 3.29-3.41 eV range. The structural features of the stacking faults were determined by diffraction-contrast transmission electron microscopy, while the optical emission characteristics were observed by highly spatially resolved monochromatic cathodoluminescence. The studies were performed in the exact same regions of thinned foils. We find that stacking faults on the basal plane are responsible for the strong emission at ˜3.14eV. Luminescence peaks at ˜3.33 and ˜3.29eV are associated with the presence of stacking faults on prismatic a planes and partial dislocations at the stacking fault boundaries, respectively.

  14. 40 CFR 52.345 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.345 Section...PLANS Colorado § 52.345 Stack height regulations. The State of Colorado has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  15. 40 CFR 52.345 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.345 Section...PLANS Colorado § 52.345 Stack height regulations. The State of Colorado has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  16. 40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2347 Section...CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  17. 40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2347 Section...CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  18. 40 CFR 52.1388 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.1388 Section...CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1388 Stack height regulations. The State of Montana has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  19. 40 CFR 52.1388 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.1388 Section...CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1388 Stack height regulations. The State of Montana has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  20. 40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2347 Section...CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  1. 40 CFR 52.1388 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.1388 Section...CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1388 Stack height regulations. The State of Montana has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  2. 40 CFR 52.1388 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.1388 Section...CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1388 Stack height regulations. The State of Montana has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  3. 40 CFR 52.1388 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.1388 Section...CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1388 Stack height regulations. The State of Montana has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  4. 40 CFR 52.345 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.345 Section...PLANS Colorado § 52.345 Stack height regulations. The State of Colorado has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  5. 40 CFR 52.345 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.345 Section...PLANS Colorado § 52.345 Stack height regulations. The State of Colorado has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  6. 40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2347 Section...CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  7. 40 CFR 52.345 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.345 Section...PLANS Colorado § 52.345 Stack height regulations. The State of Colorado has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  8. 40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2347 Section...CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  9. Asymmetric noncovalent synthesis of self-assembled one-dimensional stacks by a chiral supramolecular auxiliary approach.

    PubMed

    George, Subi J; de Bruijn, Robin; Tomovi?, Željko; Van Averbeke, Bernard; Beljonne, David; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Schenning, Albertus P H J; Meijer, E W

    2012-10-24

    Stereoselective noncovalent synthesis of one-dimensional helical self-assembled stacks of achiral oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) ureidotriazine (AOPV3) monomers is obtained by a chiral supramolecular auxiliary approach. The racemic mixture of helical stacks of achiral AOPV3 molecules is converted into homochiral helical stacks, as shown by both spectroscopic measurements and molecular modeling simulations. The conversion is promoted by an orthogonal two-point ion-pair interaction with the chiral auxiliary dibenzoyl tartaric acid (D- or L-TA) molecules, which biases the angle population distribution and thereby the stack helicity. The induced preferred helicity is maintained by the OPV stacks even after the removal of the chiral auxiliary by extraction with ethylenediamine (EDA), due to the kinetic stability of the OPV stacks at room temperature. Spectroscopic probing of the helical self-assembly and the racemization process of these ?-conjugated OPV chromophores shed further light into the mechanistic pathways of this chiral asymmetric noncovalent synthesis and the kinetic stability of the stacks produced. The racemization of the stacks follows first-order kinetics and no switch in mechanism is observed as a result of a temperature change; therefore, a racemization via disassembly assembly is proposed. Remarkably, the preferred helicity of the stacks of achiral AOPV3 can be retained almost completely after a heating-cooling cycle where the stacks first partially depolymerize and then polymerize again with the still existing stacks being the seeds for self-assembly of achiral AOPV3. Only after a fully dissociated state is obtained at high temperatures, the optical activity of the supramolecular stack self-assembled at room temperature is lost. PMID:23030496

  10. Singlet exciton fission in polycrystalline thin films of a slip-stacked perylenediimide.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Samuel W; Shoer, Leah E; Karlen, Steven D; Dyar, Scott M; Margulies, Eric A; Veldkamp, Brad S; Ramanan, Charusheela; Hartzler, Daniel A; Savikhin, Sergei; Marks, Tobin J; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2013-10-01

    The crystal structure of N,N-bis(n-octyl)-2,5,8,11-tetraphenylperylene-3,4:9,10-bis(dicarboximide), 1, obtained by X-ray diffraction reveals that 1 has a nearly planar perylene core and ?-? stacks at a 3.5 Å interplanar distance in well-separated slip-stacked columns. Theory predicts that slip-stacked, ?-?-stacked structures should enhance interchromophore electronic coupling and thus favor singlet exciton fission. Photoexcitation of vapor-deposited polycrystalline 188 nm thick films of 1 results in a 140 ± 20% yield of triplet excitons ((3*)1) in ?(SF) = 180 ± 10 ps. These results illustrate a design strategy for producing perylenediimide and related rylene derivatives that have the optimized interchromophore electronic interactions which promote high-yield singlet exciton fission for potentially enhancing organic solar cell performance and charge separation in systems for artificial photosynthesis. PMID:24011336

  11. Mechanically-stacked multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The results of experiments to simulate the performance of mechanically-stacked, multijunction solar cells are reported. The simulation consisted of stacking an AlGaAs optical filter on top of a silicon cell and measuring the silicon cell's output. Analysis of the experimental results was able to quantify the various mechanisms (absorption and reflection) that resulted in the loss of silicon cell output. Calculations were also performed to compare the relative merits of two different types of silicon cells and an InGaAs cell for stacked cell applications.

  12. Dynamical stability of slip-stacking particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-09-01

    We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

  13. Dynamic stability of stacked disk type flywheels

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, F.C.

    1981-04-01

    A dynamic analysis of a flywheel assembly formed from adhesively bonded stacked fiber-composite disks was performed to determine the stiffness and rigidity of the assembly required to prevent uncontrolled growth in the deformations due to centrifugal force. The analysis shows that stacked disk type flywheels will become unstable when the speed exceeds a critical value. This critical value of speed depends upon the stiffness of the bonded attachments between the disks. Elastomeric bonds do not appear to provide adequate stiffness to insure dynamic stability for high speed stacked disk type flywheels. (LCL)

  14. Anisotropy of ?-Plasmon Dispersion Relation of AA-Stacked Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chih-Wei; Shyu, Feng-Lin; Lin, Ming-Fa; Gumbs, Godfrey; Roslyak, Oleksiy

    2012-10-01

    The dispersion relation of the high energy optical ?-plasmons of simple hexagonal intrinsic graphite was calculated within the self-consistent-field approximation. The plasmon frequency ?p is determined as functions of the transferred momentum q\\| along the hexagonal plane in the Brillouin zone and its perpendicular component qz. These plasmons are isotropic within the plane in the long wavelength limit. As the in-plane transferred momentum is increased, the plasmon frequency strongly depends on its magnitude and direction (?). With increasing angle, the dispersion relation within the hexagonal plane is gradually changed from quadratic to nearly linear form. There are many significant differences for the ?-plasmon dispersion relations between two-dimensional (2D) graphene and three-dimensional (3D) AA-stacked graphite. They include q\\|- and ?-dependence and ?-plasmon bandwidth. This result reveals that interlayer interaction could enhance anisotropy of in-plane ?-plasmons. For chosen q\\|, we also obtain the plasmon frequency as a function of qz and show that there is an upper bound on qz for plasmons to exist in graphite. Additionally, the group velocity for plasmon propagation along the perpendicular direction may be positive or negative depending on the choice of q\\|. Consequently, the forward and backward propagation of ?-plasmons in AA-stacked graphite in which the energy flow is respectively parallel or antiparallel to the transferred momentum, can be realized. The backward flowing resonance is an intrinsic property of AA-stacked graphite, arising from the energy band structure and the interlayer coupling.

  15. StackOverview 2.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

    E-print Network

    Tanaka, Jiro

    17 Web #12;Web Web 81% Web Web Web Web StackOverview #12;1 1 2 Web 3 2.2.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3 Web 6 3.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3

  16. Characterization of Piezoelectric Stacks for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Jones, Christopher; Aldrich, Jack; Blodget, Chad; Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2008-01-01

    Future NASA missions are increasingly seeking to actuate mechanisms to precision levels in the nanometer range and below. Co-fired multilayer piezoelectric stacks offer the required actuation precision that is needed for such mechanisms. To obtain performance statistics and determine reliability for extended use, sets of commercial PZT stacks were tested in various AC and DC conditions at both nominal and high temperatures and voltages. In order to study the lifetime performance of these stacks, five actuators were driven sinusoidally for up to ten billion cycles. An automated data acquisition system was developed and implemented to monitor each stack's electrical current and voltage waveforms over the life of the test. As part of the monitoring tests, the displacement, impedance, capacitance and leakage current were measured to assess the operation degradation. This paper presents some of the results of this effort.

  17. Chalcogen-height dependent magnetic interactions and magnetic order switching in FeSexTe1-x.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chang-Youn; Choi, Hyoung Joon

    2010-02-01

    Magnetic properties of iron chalcogenide superconducting materials are investigated using density-functional calculations. We find that the stability of magnetic phases is very sensitive to the height of chalcogen species from the Fe plane: while FeTe with optimized Te height has the double-stripe (pi, 0) magnetic ordering, the single-stripe (pi, pi) ordering becomes the ground state when Te is lowered below a critical height by, e.g., Se doping. This behavior is understood by opposite Te-height dependences of the superexchange interaction and a longer range magnetic interaction mediated by itinerant electrons. We also demonstrate a linear temperature dependence of the macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in the single-stripe phase in contrast with the constant behavior in the double-stripe phase. Our findings provide a comprehensive and unified view on the magnetism in FeSexTe1-x and iron pnictide superconductors. PMID:20366787

  18. Dynamic behaviour of SOFC short stacks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michele Molinelli; Diego Larrain; Nordahl Autissier; Raphaël Ihringer; Joseph Sfeir; Nicolas Badel; Olivier Bucheli; Jan Van herle

    2006-01-01

    Electrical output behaviour obtained on solid oxide fuel cell stacks, based on planar anode supported cells (50 or 100cm2 active area) and metallic interconnects, is reported. Stacks (1–12 cells) have been operated with cathode air and anode hydrogen flows between 750 and 800°C operating temperature. At first polarisation, an activation phase (increase in power density) is typically observed, ascribed to

  19. PAH emission from various industrial stacks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hsi-Hsien Yang; Wen-Jhy Lee; Shui-Jen Chen; Soon-Onn Lai

    1998-01-01

    The emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from various industrial stacks (blast furnace, basic oxygen furnace, coke oven, electric arc furnace, heavy oil plant, power plant and cement plant) in southern Taiwan were investigated. PAH concentrations (?g\\/N m3) and PAH emission factors (?g\\/kg feedstock) were determined. In addition to these eight stationary industrial stacks, an industrial waste incinerator, a diesel

  20. Stacked vapor fed amtec modules

    DOEpatents

    Sievers, Robert K. (North Huntingdon, PA)

    1989-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a stacked AMTEC module. The invention includes a tubular member which has an interior. The member is comprised of a ion conductor that substantially conducts ions relative to electrons, preferably a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, positioned about the interior. A porous electrode for conducting electrons and allowing sodium ions to pass therethrough, and wherein electrons and sodium ions recombine to form sodium is positioned about the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte. The electrode is operated at a temperature and a pressure that allows the recombined sodium to vaporize. Additionally, an outer current collector grid for distributing electrons throughout the porous electrode is positioned about and contacts the porous electrode. Also included in the invention is transporting means for transporting liquid sodium to the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte of the tubular member. A transition piece is positioned about the interior of the member and contacts the transporting means. The transition piece divides the member into a first cell and a second cell such that each first and second cell has a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, a first and second porous electrode and a grid. The transition piece conducts electrons from the interior of the tubular member. There is supply means for supplying sodium to the transporting means. Preferably the supply means is a shell which surrounds the tubular member and is operated at a temperature such that the vaporized sodium condenses thereon. Returning means for returning the condensed sodium from the shell to the transporting means provides a continuous supply of liquid sodium to the transporting means. Also, there are first conducting means for conducting electric current from the transition piece which extends through the shell, and second conducting means for conducting electric current to the grid of the first cell which extends through the shell.

  1. Instabilities of the AA-stacked graphene bilayer.

    PubMed

    Rakhmanov, A L; Rozhkov, A V; Sboychakov, A O; Nori, Franco

    2012-11-16

    Tight-binding calculations predict that the AA-stacked bilayer graphene has one electron and one hole conducting band, and that the Fermi surfaces of these bands coincide. We demonstrate that as a result of this degeneracy, the bilayer becomes unstable with respect to a set of spontaneous symmetry violations. Which of the symmetries is broken depends on the microscopic details of the system. For strong on-site Coulomb interaction we find that antiferromagnetism is the most stable order parameter. For an on-site repulsion energy typical for graphene systems, the antiferromagnetic gap can exist up to room temperature. PMID:23215515

  2. Energy level alignment in Au/pentacene/PTCDA trilayer stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehati, P.; Braun, S.; Fahlman, M.

    2013-09-01

    Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy is used to investigate the energy level alignment and molecular orientation at the interfaces in Au/pentacene/PTCDA trilayer stacks. We deduced a standing orientation for pentacene grown on Au while we conclude a flat lying geometry for PTCDA grown onto pentacene. We propose that the rough surface of polycrystalline Au induces the standing geometry in pentacene. It is further shown that in situ deposition of PTCDA on pentacene can influence the orientation of the surface pentacene layer, flipping part of the surface pentacene molecules into a flat lying geometry, maximizing the orbital interaction across the pentacene-PTCDA heterojunction.

  3. Neutral-ionic transitions in organic mixed-stack compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruinsma, R.; Bak, Per; Torrance, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Torrance et al. have made the interesting observation that several mixed-stack organic compounds undergo transitions from neutral states to ionic states as the temperature or pressure is varied. We examine a simple model of such transitions including Coulomb interaction and hybridization of neutral and ionic states. In the limit of weak hybridization and long-range repulsive interaction between ionic planes, it is proven that there is a complete devil's staircase where the degree of ionicity assumes an infinity of rational values. For attractive interactions between ionic planes, the neutral-ionic transition is shown to be first order for weak hybridization. Comparison with experiment indicates that this situation applies to tetrathiafulvalene chloranil. For strong hybridization the transition is continuous but goes through a metallic phase. It is shown, for the first time, that the spectrum of the charge-transfer Hamiltonian contains both a bound spectrum, the observed charge-transfer excitations, and a continuum.

  4. Inherent Driving Force for Charge Separation in Curved Stacks of Oligothiophenes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qin

    2015-06-18

    Coexistence of high local charge mobility and an energy gradient can lead to efficient free charge carrier generation from geminate charge transfer states at the donor-acceptor interface in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaics. It is, however, not clear what polymer microstructures can support such coexistence. Using recent methods from density functional theory, we propose that a stack of similarly curved oligothiophene chains can deliver the requirements for efficient charge separation. Curved stacks are stable because of the polymer's strong ?-stacking ability and because backbone torsions are flexible in neutral chains. However, energy of a charge in a polymer chain has remarkably stronger dependence on torsions. The trend of increasing planarity in curved stacks effectively creates an energy gradient that drives charge in one direction. The curvature of these partially ordered stacks is found to beneficially interact with fullerenes for charge separation. The curved stacks, therefore, are identified as possible building blocks for interfacial structures that lead to efficient free carrier generation in high-performing organic photovoltaic systems. PMID:25608709

  5. Manifold gasket accommodating differential movement of fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, Dana A. (New Milford, CT); Farooque, Mohammad (Danbury, CT)

    2007-11-13

    A gasket for use in a fuel cell system having at least one externally manifolded fuel cell stack, for sealing the manifold edge and the stack face. In accordance with the present invention, the gasket accommodates differential movement between the stack and manifold by promoting slippage at interfaces between the gasket and the dielectric and between the gasket and the stack face.

  6. Measurement of CP Parameters in B- --> D(pi+pi-pi0)K- and Study of the X(3872) in B --> J/psi pi+ pi- K with the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Winklmeier, Frank; /SLAC

    2006-09-18

    This dissertation presents two analyses performed on data collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric-energy B Factory. First, a Dalitz analysis is shown that performs the first measurement of CP violation parameters in the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}}K{sup -} using the decay rate asymmetry and D{sup 0} - {bar D}{sup 0} interference. The results can be used to further constrain the value of the CKM angle {gamma}. The second analysis studies the properties of the X(3872) in neutral and charged B {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}K decays. Measurements of the branching ratio and mass are presented as well as the search for additional resonances at higher masses.

  7. Study of the tau- ---> pi- pi- pi+ pi0 pi0 nu/tau and tau- --> 3h- 2h+ nu/tau Decays Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sobie, R.; /Victoria U.

    2005-06-21

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -} 2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decays have been studied using the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. Preliminary branching fractions are given for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and to the sub-channels {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}(782){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}. A preliminary upper limit is given on the branching fraction for the {phi}(1020){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} mode. In addition a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -}2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay (h = {pi}, K) is presented.

  8. Aromatic stacking between nucleobase and enzyme promotes phosphate ester hydrolysis in dUTPase

    PubMed Central

    Pecsi, Ildiko; Leveles, Ibolya; Harmat, Veronika; Vertessy, Beata G.; Toth, Judit

    2010-01-01

    Aromatic interactions are well-known players in molecular recognition but their catalytic role in biological systems is less documented. Here, we report that a conserved aromatic stacking interaction between dUTPase and its nucleotide substrate largely contributes to the stabilization of the associative type transition state of the nucleotide hydrolysis reaction. The effect of the aromatic stacking on catalysis is peculiar in that uracil, the aromatic moiety influenced by the aromatic interaction is relatively distant from the site of hydrolysis at the alpha-phosphate group. Using crystallographic, kinetics, optical spectroscopy and thermodynamics calculation approaches we delineate a possible mechanism by which rate acceleration is achieved through the remote ?–? interaction. The abundance of similarly positioned aromatic interactions in various nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes (e.g. most families of ATPases) raises the possibility of the reported phenomenon being a general component of the enzymatic catalysis of phosphate ester hydrolysis. PMID:20601405

  9. Guanine base stacking in G-quadruplex nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Lech, Christopher Jacques; Heddi, Brahim; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2013-01-01

    G-quadruplexes constitute a class of nucleic acid structures defined by stacked guanine tetrads (or G-tetrads) with guanine bases from neighboring tetrads stacking with one another within the G-tetrad core. Individual G-quadruplexes can also stack with one another at their G-tetrad interface leading to higher-order structures as observed in telomeric repeat-containing DNA and RNA. In this study, we investigate how guanine base stacking influences the stability of G-quadruplexes and their stacked higher-order structures. A structural survey of the Protein Data Bank is conducted to characterize experimentally observed guanine base stacking geometries within the core of G-quadruplexes and at the interface between stacked G-quadruplex structures. We couple this survey with a systematic computational examination of stacked G-tetrad energy landscapes using quantum mechanical computations. Energy calculations of stacked G-tetrads reveal large energy differences of up to 12 kcal/mol between experimentally observed geometries at the interface of stacked G-quadruplexes. Energy landscapes are also computed using an AMBER molecular mechanics description of stacking energy and are shown to agree quite well with quantum mechanical calculated landscapes. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a structural explanation for the experimentally observed preference of parallel G-quadruplexes to stack in a 5?–5? manner based on different accessible tetrad stacking modes at the stacking interfaces of 5?–5? and 3?–3? stacked G-quadruplexes. PMID:23268444

  10. Technical description of Stack 296-B-5

    SciTech Connect

    Ridge, T.M.

    1994-11-15

    Of particular concern to facilities on the Hanford site is Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 40, Part 61, Subpart H, ``National emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities.`` Assessments of facility stacks and potential radionuclide emissions determined whether these stacks would be subject to the sampling and monitoring requirements of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H. Stack 296-B-5 exhausts 221-BB building which houses tanks containing B Plant steam condensate and B Plant process condensate from the operation of the low-level waste concentrator. The assessment of potential radionuclide emissions from the 296-B-5 stack resulted in an effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual of less than 0.1 millirem per year. Therefore, the stack is not subject to the sampling and monitoring requirements of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H. However, the sampling and monitoring system must be in compliance with the Environmental Compliance Manual, WHC-CM-7-5. Currently, 296-B-5 is sampled continuously with a record sampler and continuous air monitor (CAM).

  11. Stacking faults in a layered cobalt tellurium phosphate oxochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Iwan; Johnsson, Mats

    2015-02-01

    The new compound Co2Te3(PO4)O6Cl was synthesized by chemical reactions in a sealed and evacuated silica tube. The crystal structure was solved from single crystal diffraction data and is made up by charge neutral layers. Within the layers two types of chains are made up by edge sharing [CoO6] and [CoO5Cl] polyhedra respectively. The chains are separated by tellurium oxide and phosphate building blocks. There are only weak Van der Waals interactions in between the layers and severe diffuse scattering is observed due to faulted stacking of the layers. Structure solutions in a P-1 triclinic cell and a larger monoclinic cell in P21/c are discussed and compared to a computer generated model. The reasons for the stacking faults may be due to that there are two positions available for each layer that results in similar connectivity to the next layer in addition to the relatively wide channels in between the layers that reduce the Van der Waals interactions in between them.

  12. Density Functional Theory investigations of titanium gamma-surfaces and stacking faults

    E-print Network

    Benoit, Magali; Morillo, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Properties of hcp-Ti such as elastic constants, stacking faults and gamma-surfaces are computed using Density Functional Theory (DFT) and two central force Embedded Atom interaction Models (EAM). The results are compared to previously published calculations and to predicting models. Their implications on the plastic properties of hcp-Ti are discussed.

  13. Stacked Deck: An Effective, School-Based Program for the Prevention of Problem Gambling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert J.; Wood, Robert T.; Currie, Shawn R.

    2010-01-01

    School-based prevention programs are an important component of problem gambling prevention, but empirically effective programs are lacking. Stacked Deck is a set of 5-6 interactive lessons that teach about the history of gambling; the true odds and "house edge"; gambling fallacies; signs, risk factors, and causes of problem gambling; and skills…

  14. Intelligent Control System of Stack-boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Li; Jingxia, Niu; Jianhua, Lang; Shaofeng, Li; Zhi, Li

    Boiler combustion control system's basic task is to make fuel burn calories adapt to the needs of the water temperature and ensure the economical combustion and the safe operation. In the foundations which have analyzed the stack-boiler's work process and control system structure, the system designed by using the self-learning and self-optimizing fuzzy control system of the PC to make air/coal ratio achieve the best and realize the optimized combustion; through PLC to accelerate the speed of response to the boiler, and speed up the PC to optimize the speed and realize the double loop control system for stack-boiler. The control system in premise of the stack-boiler reaches the goal of the load to achieve the highest efficiency of the boiler combustion.

  15. High frequency model of stacked film capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbert, T.; Joubert, C.; Daude, N.; Glaize, C.

    2001-11-01

    Polypropylene metallized capacitors are of general use in power electronics because of their reliability, their self-healing capabilities, and their low price. Though the behavior of metallized coiled capacitors has been discussed, no work has been carried out on stacked and flattened metallized capacitors. The purpose of this article is to suggest an analytical model of resonance frequency, stray inductance and impedance of stacked capacitors. We first solve the equation of propagation of the magnetic potential vector (A) in the dielectric of an homogeneous material. Then, we suggest an original method of resolution, like the one used for resonant cavities, in order to present an analytical solution of the problem. Finally, we give some experimental results proving that the physical knowledge of the parameters of the capacitor (dimension of the component, and material constants), enables us to calculate an analytical model of resonance frequency, stray inductance and impedance of stacked capacitors.

  16. Nonlinear impedances of thermoacoustic stacks with ordered and disordered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Huan; Fan, Li; Xia, Jie; Zhang, Shu-Yi; Tao, Sha; Yang, Yue-Tao; Zhang, Hui

    2014-07-01

    Nonlinear impedances of two thermoacoustic stacks with ordered structures (plate-type and pipe-type) and one with a disordered structure (copper mesh) are studied. The linear resistances, nonlinear coefficients and effective acoustic masses of the stacks are extracted from the experimental results based on an analogical model of nonlinear impedances of porous materials. The resistance and nonlinear coefficient of the disordered stack are found to be much larger than those of the ordered stacks, which have similar volume porosities. In the ordered stacks, the resistance is only marginally influenced by the length of the stack, while in the disordered stack, the resistance increases significantly with the length. These characteristics of the impedances of ordered and disordered stacks are explained with the minor loss theory and the tortuosity of a stack.

  17. Analysis of stacking overlap in nucleic acid structures: algorithm and application.

    PubMed

    Pingali, Pavan Kumar; Halder, Sukanya; Mukherjee, Debasish; Basu, Sankar; Banerjee, Rahul; Choudhury, Devapriya; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2014-08-01

    RNA contains different secondary structural motifs like pseudo-helices, hairpin loops, internal loops, etc. in addition to anti-parallel double helices and random coils. The secondary structures are mainly stabilized by base-pairing and stacking interactions between the planar aromatic bases. The hydrogen bonding strength and geometries of base pairs are characterized by six intra-base pair parameters. Similarly, stacking can be represented by six local doublet parameters. These dinucleotide step parameters can describe the quality of stacking between Watson-Crick base pairs very effectively. However, it is quite difficult to understand the stacking pattern for dinucleotides consisting of non canonical base pairs from these parameters. Stacking interaction is a manifestation of the interaction between two aromatic bases or base pairs and thus can be estimated best by the overlap area between the planar aromatic moieties. We have calculated base pair overlap between two consecutive base pairs as the buried van der Waals surface between them. In general, overlap values show normal distribution for the Watson-Crick base pairs in most double helices within a range from 45 to 50 Å(2) irrespective of base sequence. The dinucleotide steps with non-canonical base pairs also are seen to have high overlap value, although their twist and few other parameters are rather unusual. We have analyzed hairpin loops of different length, bulges within double helical structures and pseudo-continuous helices using our algorithm. The overlap area analyses indicate good stacking between few looped out bases especially in GNRA tetraloop, which was difficult to quantitatively characterise from analysis of the base pair or dinucleotide step parameters. This parameter is also seen to be capable to distinguish pseudo-continuous helices from kinked helix junctions. PMID:24990628

  18. Exotic and qq-bar resonances in the pi+pi-pi- system produced in pi-p collisions at 18 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    S. U. Chung; K. Danyo; R. W. Hackenburg; C. Olchanski; J. S. Suh; H. J. Willutzki; S. P. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; V. V. Lipaev; A. V. Popov; D. I. Ryabchikov; Z. Bar-Yam; J. P. Dowd; P. Eugenio; M. Hayek; W. Kern; E. King; N. Shenhav; V. A. Bodyagin; O. L. Kodolova; V. L. Korotkikh; M. A. Kostin; A. I. Ostrovidov; L. I. Sarycheva; I. N. Vardanyan; A. A. Yershov; D. S. Brown; X. L. Fan; D. Joffe; T. K. Pedlar; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; T. Adams; J. M. Bishop; N. M. Cason; E. I. Ivanov; J. M. LoSecco; J. J. Manak; W. D. Shephard; D. L. Stienike; S. A. Taegar; G. S. Adams; J. P. Cummings; J. Hu; J. Kuhn; M. Lu; J. Napolitano; D. B. White; M. Witkowski; M. Nozar; X. Shen; D. P. Weygand

    2002-03-01

    A partial-wave analysis of the reaction pi{sup -}p-->pi{sup +}pi{sup -}pi{sup -}p at 18 GeV/c has been performed on a data sample of 250 000 events obtained in the Brookhaven experiment E852. The well-known a{sub 1}(1260), a{sub 2}(1320) and pi{sub 2}(1670) resonant states are observed. The existence of the pi(1800), a{sub 1}(1700) and a{sub 4}(2040) states is confirmed. The a{sub 3}(1874) state is also observed. The exotic 1{sup -+} pi{sub 1}(1600) state produced in the natural parity exchange process is found to decay in the rho(770)pi{sup -} channel. A mass-dependent fit results in a resonance mass of 1593{+-}8{sub -47}{sup +29} MeV/c{sup 2} and a width of 168{+-}20{sub -12}{sup +150} MeV/c{sup 2}.

  19. Study of charmonium resonances in the gg -> K0SK pi- and gg -> K K-pi pi-pi0 processes

    SciTech Connect

    Biassoni, Pietro; /U. Milan, Dept. Phys.

    2012-02-22

    This thesis reports the analysis of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} processes using the final dataset of the BABAR experiment located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. From previous measurements, the K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} final state is known to show a clear signal from the {eta}{sub c}(2S) particle. This c{bar c} state escaped detection for almost twenty years and its properties are still not well established on the experimental ground, while accurate predictions exist on the theoretical side. The e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} process is first studied in this thesis. An accurate determination of the {eta}{sub c}(2S) properties is obtained in the K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay mode. We also report the first observation of {eta}{sub c}(2S) and other charmonium states to the K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} final state. The results of this thesis have been published in Physical Review D, and will be useful to test theoretical models describing the charmonium system. The thesis is organized in four chapters. The first one gives a brief introduction of the theoretical models used to describe the charmonium system. The second one discuss the current status of conventional and exotic charmonium spectroscopy, reporting recent experimental results and their interpretation. The third Chapter is devoted to describe the BABAR experiment. The analysis technique and results are described in Chapter 4. Finally, conclusions from this analysis are drawn.

  20. First Observation of the Cabibbo-suppressed Decays Xi+(c) ---> Sigma+ pi- pi+ and Xi+(c) ---> Sigma- pi+ pi+ and Measurement of their Branching Ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Engelfried, J.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Akgun, U.; /Iowa U.; Alkhazov, Georgiy; /St. Petersburg, INP; Amaro-Reyes, J.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Ayan, Ahmet Sedat; /Iowa U.; Balatz, M.Y.; /Moscow, ITEP; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Bondar, N.F.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Cooper, Peter S.; /Fermilab /Michigan U., Flint

    2008-04-01

    The authors report the first observation of two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. They observe 56 {+-} 13 over a background of 21, and 23 {+-} 7 over a background of 12 events, respectively, for the signals. The data were accumulated using the SELEX spectrometer during the 1996-1997 fixed target run at Fermilab, chiefly from a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratios of the decays relative to the Cabibbo-favored {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} are measured to be B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/B({xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.50 {+-} 0.20, and B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.23 {+-} 0.11, respectively. They also report branching ratios for the same decay modes of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}.

  1. Branching Ratio Measurements of B ---> J/psi eta K and B+- ---> D0 K+- with D0 ---> pi+ pi- pi0

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Qinglin; /Colorado State U.

    2006-03-08

    Results are presented for the decays of B {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K and B{sup {+-}} {yields} DK{sup {+-}}, respectively, with experimental data collected with BABAR detector at PEP-II, located at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). With 90 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, we obtained branching fractions of {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sup {+-}}) = [10.8 {+-} 2.3(stat) {+-} 2.4(syst)] x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sub S}{sup 0}) = [8.4 {+-} 2.6(stat) {+-} 2.7(syst)] x 10{sup -5}; and we set an upper limit of {Beta}[B{sup {+-}} {yields} X(3872)K{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sup {+-}}] < 7.7 x 10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. The branching fraction of decay chain {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} DK{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}) = [5.5 {+-} 1.0(stat) {+-} 0.7(syst)] x 10{sup -6} with 229 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events at {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, here D represents the neutral D meson. The decay rate asymmetry is A = 0.02 {+-} 0.16(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst) for this full decay chain. This decay can be used to extract the unitarity angle {gamma}, a weak CP violation phase, through the interference of decay production of D{sup 0} and {bar D}{sup 0} to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}.

  2. Measurement of the branching fraction ${\\mathcal{B}}(\\Lambda^0_b\\rightarrow \\Lambda^+_c\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2011-12-01

    We report an analysis of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay in a data sample collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron corresponding to 2.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. We reconstruct the currently largest samples of the decay modes {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +}{pi}{sup -} (with {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +}{pi}{sup -} (with {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} (with {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}), and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455)0{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} (with {Sigma}{sub c}(2455)0 {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) and measure the branching fractions relative to the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} branching fraction. We measure the ratio {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/ {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=3.04 {+-} 0.33(stat){sub -0.55}{sup +0.70}(syst) which is used to derive {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=(26.8{sub -11.2}{sup +11.9}) x 10{sup -3}.

  3. Three wafer stacking for 3D integration.

    SciTech Connect

    Greth, K. Douglas; Ford, Christine L.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Timon, Robert P.; Bauer, Todd M.; Hetherington, Dale Laird; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony

    2011-11-01

    Vertical wafer stacking will enable a wide variety of new system architectures by enabling the integration of dissimilar technologies in one small form factor package. With this LDRD, we explored the combination of processes and integration techniques required to achieve stacking of three or more layers. The specific topics that we investigated include design and layout of a reticle set for use as a process development vehicle, through silicon via formation, bonding media, wafer thinning, dielectric deposition for via isolation on the wafer backside, and pad formation.

  4. Characterization of stacked-crystal PET detector designs for measurement of both TOF and DOI.

    PubMed

    Schmall, Jeffrey P; Surti, Suleman; Karp, Joel S

    2015-05-01

    A PET detector with good timing resolution and two-level depth-of-interaction (DOI) discrimination can be constructed using a single-ended readout of scintillator stacks of Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), with various Cerium dopant concentrations, including pure Cerium Bromide (CeBr3). The stacked crystal geometry creates a unique signal shape for interactions occurring in each layer, which can be used to identify the DOI, while retaining the inherently good timing properties of LaBr3 and CeBr3. In this work, single pixel elements are used to optimize the choice of scintillator, coupling of layers, and type of photodetector, evaluating the performance using a fast, single-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a single 4 × 4?mm(2) silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). We also introduce a method to quantify and evaluate the DOI discrimination accuracy. From signal shape measurements using fast waveform sampling, we found that in addition to differences in signal rise times, between crystal layers, there were also differences in the signal fall times. A DOI accuracy of 98% was achieved using our classification method for a stacked crystal pair, consisting of a 15?mm long LaBr3(Ce:20%) crystal on top of a 15?mm long CeBr3 crystal, readout using a PMT. A DOI accuracy of 95% was measured with a stack of two, identical, 12?mm long, CeBr3 crystals. The DOI accuracy of this crystal pair was reduced to 91% when using a SiPM for readout. For the stack of two, 12?mm long, CeBr3 crystals, a coincidence timing resolution (average of timing results from the top and bottom layer) of 199?ps was measured using a PMT, and this was improved to 153?ps when using a SiPM. These results show that with stacked LaBr3/CeBr3 scintillators and fast waveform sampling nearly perfect DOI accuracy can be achieved with excellent timing resolution-timing resolution that is only minimally degraded compared to results from a single CeBr3 crystal of comparable length to the stacked crystals. The interface in the stacked crystal geometry itself plays a major role in creating the differences in signal shape and this can be used to construct stacked DOI detectors using the same scintillator type, thereby simplifying and broadening the application of this technique. PMID:25860172

  5. Dynamic observation of the collapse process of a stacking fault tetrahedron by moving dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukawa, Yoshitaka; Zinkle, Steven J.

    2004-08-01

    Dynamic observation of the microstructure of quenched gold during deformation in a transmission electron microscope revealed that stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) having perfect pyramid structure were collapsed by direct interaction with moving screw dislocations. Although a recent molecular dynamics computer simulation study found that truncation of SFT before interaction with moving dislocations is a necessary condition for the SFT collapse, the present experimental results clearly show that truncation of SFT is not a crucial factor for the collapse mechanism.

  6. Entropy and biological systems: experimentally-investigated entropy-driven stacking of plant photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Husen; Liggins, John R; Chow, Wah Soon

    2014-01-01

    According to the Second Law of Thermodynamics, an overall increase of entropy contributes to the driving force for any physicochemical process, but entropy has seldom been investigated in biological systems. Here, for the first time, we apply Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) to investigate the Mg(2+)-induced spontaneous stacking of photosynthetic membranes isolated from spinach leaves. After subtracting a large endothermic interaction of MgCl? with membranes, unrelated to stacking, we demonstrate that the enthalpy change (heat change at constant pressure) is zero or marginally positive or negative. This first direct experimental evidence strongly suggests that an entropy increase significantly drives membrane stacking in this ordered biological structure. Possible mechanisms for the entropy increase include: (i) the attraction between discrete oppositely-charged areas, releasing counterions; (ii) the release of loosely-bound water molecules from the inter-membrane gap; (iii) the increased orientational freedom of previously-aligned water dipoles; and (iv) the lateral rearrangement of membrane components. PMID:24561561

  7. Libsafe: Protecting Critical Elements of Stacks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arash Baratloo; Timothy Tsai; Navjot Singh

    1999-01-01

    The exploitation of buffer overflow vulnerabilities in proc ess stacks constitutes a significant portion of security attacks. We present a new method to detect and handle such attacks. In contrast to previous methods, this new method works with any existing pre-compiled executable and can be used transparently, even on a system-wide basis. The method intercepts all calls to library functions

  8. Average Transmission Probability of a Random Stack

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Yin; Miniatura, Christian; Englert, Berthold-Georg

    2010-01-01

    The transmission through a stack of identical slabs that are separated by gaps with random widths is usually treated by calculating the average of the logarithm of the transmission probability. We show how to calculate the average of the transmission probability itself with the aid of a recurrence relation and derive analytical upper and lower…

  9. Thermoacoustic Refrigerator’s Stack Optimization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mawahib Hassan El-Fawal; Normah Mohd-Ghazali; Mohd. Shafik Yaacob; Amer Nordin Darus

    2010-01-01

    The standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator, which uses sound generation to transfer heat, was developed rapidly during the past four decades. It was regarded as a new, promising and environmentally benign alternative to conventional compression vapor refrigerators, although it was not competitive regarding the coefficient of performance (COP) yet. Thus the aim of this paper is to enhance thermoacoustic refrigerator’s stack

  10. Stacking fault and twinning in nanocrystalline metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Xiaozhou; Zhao, Y. (Yonghao); Srivilliputhur, S. G. (Srinivasan G.); Zhou, F. (Fei); Lavernia, E. J.; Baskes, M. I. (Michael I.); Zhu, Y. T. (Yuntian Theodore); Xu, H. F. (Huifang)

    2004-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Al processed by cryogenic ball-milling and nanocrystalline Cu processed by high-pressure torsion at a very low strain rate and at room temperature were investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. For nanocrystalline Al, we observed partial dislocation emission from grain boundaries, which consequently resulted in deformation stacking faults and twinning. We also observed deformation twins formed via two other mechanisms recently predicted by molecular dynamic simulations. These results are surprising because (1) partial dislocation emission from grain boundaries has not been experimentally observed although it has been predicted by simulations and (2) deformation stacking faults and twinning have not been reported in Al due to its high stacking fault energy. For nanocrystalline Cu, we found that twinning becomes a major deformation mechanism, which contrasts with the literature reports that deformation twinning in coarse-grained Cu occurs only under high strain rate and/or low temperature conditions and that reducing grain sizes suppresses deformation twinning. The investigation of the twinning morphology suggests that twins and stacking faults in nanocrystalline Cu were formed through partial dislocation emissions from grain boundaries. This mechanism differs from the pole mechanism operating in coarse-grained Cu.

  11. Stacks in canonical RNA pseudoknot structures.

    PubMed

    Han, Hillary S W; Reidys, Christian M

    2009-05-01

    In this paper we study the distribution of stacks/loops in k-non-crossing, tau-canonical RNA pseudoknot structures (k,tau-structures). Here, an RNA structure is called k-non-crossing if it has no more than k-1 mutually crossing arcs and tau-canonical if each arc is contained in a stack of length at least tau. Based on the ordinary generating function of k,tau-structures [G. Ma, C.M. Reidys, Canonical RNA pseudoknot structures, J. Comput. Biol. 15 (10) (2008) 1257] we derive the bivariate generating function T(k, tau)(x, u) = Sigma(n>or=0)Sigma(0stacks and study its singularities. We show that for a specific parametrization of the variable u, T(k, tau)(x, u) exhibits a unique, dominant singularity. The particular shift of this singularity parametrized by u implies a central limit theorem for the distribution of stack-numbers. Our results are of importance for understanding the 'language' of minimum-free energy RNA pseudoknot structures, generated by computer folding algorithms. PMID:19402214

  12. Arrays of stacked metal coordination compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bulkowski, J.E.

    1986-10-21

    A process is disclosed for preparing novel arrays of metal coordination compounds characterized by arrangement of the metal ions, separated by a linking agent, in stacked order one above the other. The process permits great flexibility in the design of the array. For example, layers of different composition can be added to the array at will. 3 figs.

  13. High frequency model of stacked film capacitors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Talbert; C. Joubert; N. Daude; C. Glaize

    2001-01-01

    Polypropylene metallized capacitors are of general use in power electronics because of their reliability, their self-healing capabilities, and their low price. Though the behavior of metallized coiled capacitors has been discussed, no work has been carried out on stacked and flattened metallized capacitors. The purpose of this article is to suggest an analytical model of resonance frequency, stray inductance and

  14. Internal manifolded molten carbonate fuel cell stack

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. G. Marianowski; R. J. Petri

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a generally rectangular molten carbonate fuel cell stack. It comprises: a molten carbonate fuel cell units, each the fuel cell unit comprising an anode and a cathode, an alkali metal carbonates electrolyte in contact with one side of the anode and an alkali metal carbonates electrolyte in contact with an opposite facing side of

  15. HBT pion interferometry with phenomenological mean field interaction

    E-print Network

    Koichi Hattori

    2010-11-28

    To extract information on hadron production dynamics in the ultrarelativistic heavy ion collision, the space-time structure of the hadron source has been measured using Hanbury Brown and Twiss interferometry. We study the distortion of the source images due to the effect of a final state interaction. We describe the interaction, taking place during penetrating through a cloud formed by evaporating particles, in terms of a one-body mean field potential localized in the vicinity of the source region. By adopting the semiclassical method, the modification of the propagation of an emitted particle is examined. In analogy to the optical model applied to nuclear reactions, our phenomenological model has an imaginary part of the potential, which describes the absorption in the cloud. In this work, we focus on the pion interferometry and mean field interaction obtained using a phenomenological $\\pi\\pi$ forward scattering amplitude in the elastic channels. The p-wave scattering with $\\rho$ meson resonance leads to an attractive mean field interaction, and the presence of the absorptive part is mainly attributed to the formation of this resonance. We also incorporate a simple time dependence of the potential reflecting the dynamics of the evaporating source. Using the obtained potential, we examine how and to what extent the so-called HBT Gaussian radius is varied by the modification of the propagation.

  16. Project W-420 Stack Monitoring system upgrades conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    TUCK, J.A.

    1998-11-06

    This document describes the scope, justification, conceptual design, and performance of Project W-420 stack monitoring system upgrades on six NESHAP-designated, Hanford Tank Farms ventilation exhaust stacks.

  17. VIEW OF STACK WITH AUTOMOBILE AND TRACTOR REPAIR SHOP TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF STACK WITH AUTOMOBILE AND TRACTOR REPAIR SHOP TO THE FAR RIGHT. WAREHOUSE WITH ITS RIDGELINE ROTARY VENTS TO RIGHT OF STACK. VIEW FROM THE WEST - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  18. Promoting RNA helical stacking via A-minor junctions

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Cody; Chworos, Arkadiusz; Jaeger, Luc

    2011-01-01

    RNA molecules take advantage of prevalent structural motifs to fold and assemble into well-defined 3D architectures. The A-minor junction is a class of RNA motifs that specifically controls coaxial stacking of helices in natural RNAs. A sensitive self-assembling supra-molecular system was used as an assay to compare several natural and previously unidentified A-minor junctions by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy. This class of modular motifs follows a topological rule that can accommodate a variety of interchangeable A-minor interactions with distinct local structural motifs. Overall, two different types of A-minor junctions can be distinguished based on their functional self-assembling behavior: one group makes use of triloops or GNRA and GNRA-like loops assembling with helices, while the other takes advantage of more complex tertiary receptors specific for the loop to gain higher stability. This study demonstrates how different structural motifs of RNA can contribute to the formation of topologically equivalent helical stacks. It also exemplifies the need of classifying RNA motifs based on their tertiary structural features rather than secondary structural features. The A-minor junction rule can be used to facilitate tertiary structure prediction of RNAs and rational design of RNA parts for nanobiotechnology and synthetic biology. PMID:20876687

  19. Multi-energy, single-isotope imaging using stacked detectors

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, B.S.; Shokouhi, S.; Barrett, H.H.; Peterson, T.E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated a scheme for concurrently detecting low- and high-energy emissions from 123I with a stacked silicon double-sided strip detector (DSSD) and modular scintillation camera (Modcam) from the FastSPECT II design. We sequentially acquired both low- and high-energy emission images of an 123I object with a prototype DSSD and a Modcam. A sandwich aperture increases spatial resolution in the low-magnification DSSD image via a smaller pinhole diameter and allows a higher magnification image on the Modcam. Molybdenum, the insert material, efficiently stops 20–30 keV photons due to its ?20 keV K-edge. Theoretically, less than 10% of 159 keV photons interact in 0.035 cm thick sheet of molybdenum, while this thickness stops virtually all ?30 keV photons. Thus, photons from both energy regions will be incident upon their respective detectors with little cross talk. With a multi-pinhole collimator, we can decode multiplexed images on the Modcam by making use of the lower-magnification DSSD image. This approach can provide an increase in system sensitivity compared to single-detector configurations. Using MCNP5 we examined the potential benefits and drawbacks of stacked detectors and the sandwich aperture for small-animal pinhole SPECT via the synthetic-collimator method. Simulation results encourage us to construct the novel aperture and use it with our new DSSDs designed for mounting in a transmission configuration. PMID:19081759

  20. Stacked Polymer nanofiber array for high-performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiren; Qiu, Jenny

    2015-03-01

    The vertically aligned polyaniline (PANI) nanowires arrays and monolayer graphene sheets were layer-by-layered deposited to specific substrate for tailored structures. Driven by external voltage, aniline molecules and graphene oxide were alternatively assembled for hierarchical porous three-dimensional nanostructures while graphene oxide was in-situ reduced to graphene during the assembly process. As-produced stacked arrays were used as the electrodes of an ultra-capacitor, and an unusual electrochemical behavior was discovered. The capacitance increases as the stack of nanowire arrays increases, resulting in high energy density and high power density at same time. Further analysis found that the distinctive electrochemical behavior originates from the electrode/electrolyte interactions and the dependence on the diffusion and charge transferring process. The specific energy density was as high as 137 Wh/Kg while power density is in excess of 2000 W/Kg. This work pointed a simple pathway to tailor polymer structure and electrochemistry for robust design of high-performance ultra-capacitor at a limited lateral size. National Science Foundation.

  1. Effect of nitrogen on generalized stacking fault energy and stacking fault widths in high nitrogen steels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Kibey; J. B. Liu; M. J. Curtis; D. D. Johnson; H. Sehitoglu

    2006-01-01

    We use a generalized Peierls–Nabarro model fitted to generalized stacking fault energies (GSFE) calculated from ab initio density functional theory to study the effect of interstitial nitrogen content on stacking faults (SF) in {111} plane of face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe–N alloys. These simplified systems are reliable representatives of fcc Fe–Mn–N steels, for example, as Mn acts to stabilize fcc relative

  2. To Gardner (MAIN) Stacks Level C Moffitt Reference Collection

    E-print Network

    Walker, Matthew P.

    08.29.2014 340 BCNM Classroom ENTRANCE 101­106 Classrooms To Gardner (MAIN) Stacks Level C Moffitt­106 Classrooms To Gardner (MAIN) Stacks Level C Moffitt Reference Collection Staff Offices 302 Free Speech (MAIN) Stacks Level C Moffitt Reference Collection Staff Offices 302 Free Speech Movement (FSM) Cafe

  3. 1/30/2004 1 Reliable Return Address Stack

    E-print Network

    Kaeli, David R.

    · Original version: >90% correct · With some repair mechanisms: 99% correct ­ Captures the common case]; strcpy(b, s); ...... } main( ) auto variables return addr of main( ) frame ptr of main( ) Stack ptr Frame will be executed upon return main( ) auto variables 0x0012ff12 0x0012ff12 Stack ptr Frame ptr Stack grows Buffer

  4. Stacking fault widths, energies and dislocation core structures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Esterling; A. R. McGurn; I. M. Boswarva; R. J. Arsenault

    1984-01-01

    In light of the present distinction between the theoretical stacking fault energy and a similar parameter employed to indicate the experimental stacking fault width, the theoretical stacking fault energy in fcc lattices is shown to (1) have little value as a fitting parameter for empirical interatomic potential, and (2) to be of limited value as a guide to dislocation core

  5. A reconsideration of the measurements with the O ring stack

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, B. T.; Rowley, J.K.

    1996-09-01

    The measurements made this year of Rn entry to the O ring stack were interpreted to be diffusion through the urethane O rings; however the alternative hypothesis is that Rn was mainly entering the stack by leakage through a small hole. This note presents a calculation of diffusion from first principles and rederives the diffusion constant for the O ring stack measurements.

  6. Take It From The Top: How Does This Stack Up?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    In this activity, learners explore center of gravity, or balance point, of stacked blocks. Simple wooden blocks can be stacked so that the top block extends completely past the end of the bottom block, seemingly in a dramatic defiance of gravity. A mathematical pattern can be noted in the stacking.

  7. 40 CFR 52.2085 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.2085 Section 52.2085... Rhode Island § 52.2085 Stack height review. The State of Rhode Island...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  8. 40 CFR 52.2534 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.2534 Section 52.2534... West Virginia § 52.2534 Stack height review. The State of West Virginia...power plant, have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  9. 40 CFR 52.383 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.383 Section 52.383...PLANS Connecticut § 52.383 Stack height review. The State of Connecticut...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  10. 40 CFR 52.2384 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.2384 Section 52.2384...CONTINUED) Vermont § 52.2384 Stack height review. The State of Vermont has...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  11. 40 CFR 52.2633 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2633 Section 52...CONTINUED) Wyoming § 52.2633 Stack height regulations. In a letter dated...the State committed to conduct stack height evaluations in accordance with...

  12. 40 CFR 52.383 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.383 Section 52.383...PLANS Connecticut § 52.383 Stack height review. The State of Connecticut...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  13. 40 CFR 52.2384 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.2384 Section 52.2384...CONTINUED) Vermont § 52.2384 Stack height review. The State of Vermont has...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  14. 40 CFR 52.2085 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.2085 Section 52.2085... Rhode Island § 52.2085 Stack height review. The State of Rhode Island...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  15. 40 CFR 51.164 - Stack height procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack height procedures. 51.164 Section 51...and Modifications § 51.164 Stack height procedures. Such procedures must...affected by so much of any source's stack height that exceeds good engineering...

  16. 40 CFR 52.2534 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.2534 Section 52.2534... West Virginia § 52.2534 Stack height review. The State of West Virginia...power plant, have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  17. 40 CFR 52.2384 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.2384 Section 52.2384...CONTINUED) Vermont § 52.2384 Stack height review. The State of Vermont has...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  18. 40 CFR 51.118 - Stack height provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height provisions. 51.118 Section 51... Control Strategy § 51.118 Stack height provisions. (a) The plan must...affected by so much of any source's stack height that exceeds good engineering...

  19. 40 CFR 51.118 - Stack height provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack height provisions. 51.118 Section 51... Control Strategy § 51.118 Stack height provisions. (a) The plan must...affected by so much of any source's stack height that exceeds good engineering...

  20. 40 CFR 52.2633 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2633 Section 52...CONTINUED) Wyoming § 52.2633 Stack height regulations. In a letter dated...the State committed to conduct stack height evaluations in accordance with...

  1. 40 CFR 52.2180 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2180 Section...South Dakota § 52.2180 Stack height regulations. The State of South Dakota has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  2. 40 CFR 52.1532 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.1532 Section 52.1532... New Hampshire § 52.1532 Stack height review. The State of New Hampshire...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  3. 40 CFR 51.164 - Stack height procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height procedures. 51.164 Section 51...and Modifications § 51.164 Stack height procedures. Such procedures must...affected by so much of any source's stack height that exceeds good engineering...

  4. 40 CFR 52.2180 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2180 Section...South Dakota § 52.2180 Stack height regulations. The State of South Dakota has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  5. 40 CFR 52.2180 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2180 Section...South Dakota § 52.2180 Stack height regulations. The State of South Dakota has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  6. 40 CFR 51.164 - Stack height procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height procedures. 51.164 Section 51...and Modifications § 51.164 Stack height procedures. Such procedures must...affected by so much of any source's stack height that exceeds good engineering...

  7. 40 CFR 52.2384 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.2384 Section 52.2384...CONTINUED) Vermont § 52.2384 Stack height review. The State of Vermont has...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  8. 40 CFR 52.1532 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.1532 Section 52.1532... New Hampshire § 52.1532 Stack height review. The State of New Hampshire...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  9. 40 CFR 52.1532 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.1532 Section 52.1532... New Hampshire § 52.1532 Stack height review. The State of New Hampshire...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1532 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.1532 Section 52.1532... New Hampshire § 52.1532 Stack height review. The State of New Hampshire...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  11. 40 CFR 51.118 - Stack height provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height provisions. 51.118 Section 51... Control Strategy § 51.118 Stack height provisions. (a) The plan must...affected by so much of any source's stack height that exceeds good engineering...

  12. 40 CFR 52.383 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.383 Section 52.383...PLANS Connecticut § 52.383 Stack height review. The State of Connecticut...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  13. 40 CFR 52.2633 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2633 Section 52...CONTINUED) Wyoming § 52.2633 Stack height regulations. In a letter dated...the State committed to conduct stack height evaluations in accordance with...

  14. 40 CFR 52.2085 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.2085 Section 52.2085... Rhode Island § 52.2085 Stack height review. The State of Rhode Island...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  15. 40 CFR 52.2534 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.2534 Section 52.2534... West Virginia § 52.2534 Stack height review. The State of West Virginia...power plant, have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  16. 40 CFR 51.118 - Stack height provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height provisions. 51.118 Section 51... Control Strategy § 51.118 Stack height provisions. (a) The plan must...affected by so much of any source's stack height that exceeds good engineering...

  17. 40 CFR 52.1532 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.1532 Section 52.1532... New Hampshire § 52.1532 Stack height review. The State of New Hampshire...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  18. 40 CFR 52.383 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.383 Section 52.383...PLANS Connecticut § 52.383 Stack height review. The State of Connecticut...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  19. 40 CFR 51.164 - Stack height procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height procedures. 51.164 Section 51...and Modifications § 51.164 Stack height procedures. Such procedures must...affected by so much of any source's stack height that exceeds good engineering...

  20. 40 CFR 52.2534 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.2534 Section 52.2534... West Virginia § 52.2534 Stack height review. The State of West Virginia...power plant, have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  1. 40 CFR 52.2534 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.2534 Section 52.2534... West Virginia § 52.2534 Stack height review. The State of West Virginia...power plant, have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  2. 40 CFR 52.2085 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.2085 Section 52.2085... Rhode Island § 52.2085 Stack height review. The State of Rhode Island...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  3. 40 CFR 52.2633 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2633 Section 52...CONTINUED) Wyoming § 52.2633 Stack height regulations. In a letter dated...the State committed to conduct stack height evaluations in accordance with...

  4. 40 CFR 52.2180 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2180 Section...South Dakota § 52.2180 Stack height regulations. The State of South Dakota has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  5. 40 CFR 52.2180 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2180 Section...South Dakota § 52.2180 Stack height regulations. The State of South Dakota has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

  6. 40 CFR 51.164 - Stack height procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack height procedures. 51.164 Section 51...and Modifications § 51.164 Stack height procedures. Such procedures must...affected by so much of any source's stack height that exceeds good engineering...

  7. 40 CFR 52.383 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.383 Section 52.383...PLANS Connecticut § 52.383 Stack height review. The State of Connecticut...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  8. 40 CFR 52.2085 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.2085 Section 52.2085... Rhode Island § 52.2085 Stack height review. The State of Rhode Island...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  9. 40 CFR 52.1034 - Stack height review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack height review. 52.1034 Section 52.1034...CONTINUED) Maine § 52.1034 Stack height review. The State of Maine has declared...limitations have been affected by stack height credits greater than good...

  10. 40 CFR 52.2633 - Stack height regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2633 Section 52...CONTINUED) Wyoming § 52.2633 Stack height regulations. In a letter dated...the State committed to conduct stack height evaluations in accordance with...

  11. Erosion of a Sea Stack Over 100 Years

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Park Snavely

    This United States Geological Survey (USGS) publication shows photographs exhibiting the demise of Jump-off Joe, a sea stack at Nye Beach, Newport, Oregon. In 1890, the sea stack was composed of middle Miocene concretionary sandstone of the Astoria Formation. The photos continue through 1990 when the sea stack is entirely gone.

  12. On Sloane's Generalization of NonSquashing Stacks of Boxes

    E-print Network

    Sellers, James A.

    On Sloane's Generalization of Non­Squashing Stacks of Boxes George E. Andrews and James A. Sellers and Sellers solved a certain box stacking problem related to non­ squashing partitions. These are defined. Sloane has also hinted at a generalized box stacking problem which is closely related to gener- alized

  13. Process for adding electrolyte to a fuel cell stack

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grevstad

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a process for adding electrolyte to a fuel cell stack such that the stack has a desired operating volume and concentration of electrolyte. The stack consists of elements defining a plurality of fuel cell units disposed one atop the other abutting relationship, the units defining a substantially flat, vertically extending external face. Each unit includes a cell

  14. Apparatus for supplying electrolyte to fuel cell stacks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Spurrier

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a fuel cell module having at least two fuel cell stacks, each fuel cell stack consists of fuel cells each fuel cell including in a horizaontal orientation an anode electrode, a cathode electrode, a porous matrix sandwiched between the electrodes, a top bipolar plate and a bottom bipolar plate, each fuel cell stack further has a fuel

  15. Learning algorithms for stack filter classifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hush, Don [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zimmer, Beate G [TEXAS A& M

    2009-01-01

    Stack Filters define a large class of increasing filter that is used widely in image and signal processing. The motivations for using an increasing filter instead of an unconstrained filter have been described as: (1) fast and efficient implementation, (2) the relationship to mathematical morphology and (3) more precise estimation with finite sample data. This last motivation is related to methods developed in machine learning and the relationship was explored in an earlier paper. In this paper we investigate this relationship by applying Stack Filters directly to classification problems. This provides a new perspective on how monotonicity constraints can help control estimation and approximation errors, and also suggests several new learning algorithms for Boolean function classifiers when they are applied to real-valued inputs.

  16. Multistage Force Amplification of Piezoelectric Stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Zuo, Lei (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the disclosure include an apparatus and methods for using a piezoelectric device, that includes an outer flextensional casing, a first cell and a last cell serially coupled to each other and coupled to the outer flextensional casing such that each cell having a flextensional cell structure and each cell receives an input force and provides an output force that is amplified based on the input force. The apparatus further includes a piezoelectric stack coupled to each cell such that the piezoelectric stack of each cell provides piezoelectric energy based on the output force for each cell. Further, the last cell receives an input force that is the output force from the first cell and the last cell provides an output apparatus force In addition, the piezoelectric energy harvested is based on the output apparatus force. Moreover, the apparatus provides displacement based on the output apparatus force.

  17. System for inspection of stacked cargo containers

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen (Pinole, CA)

    2011-08-16

    The present invention relates to a system for inspection of stacked cargo containers. One embodiment of the invention generally comprises a plurality of stacked cargo containers arranged in rows or tiers, each container having a top, a bottom a first side, a second side, a front end, and a back end; a plurality of spacers arranged in rows or tiers; one or more mobile inspection devices for inspecting the cargo containers, wherein the one or more inspection devices are removeably disposed within the spacers, the inspection means configured to move through the spacers to detect radiation within the containers. The invented system can also be configured to inspect the cargo containers for a variety of other potentially hazardous materials including but not limited to explosive and chemical threats.

  18. Annular feed air breathing fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A stack of polymer electrolyte fuel cells is formed from a plurality of unit cells where each unit cell includes fuel cell components defining a periphery and distributed along a common axis, where the fuel cell components include a polymer electrolyte membrane, an anode and a cathode contacting opposite sides of the membrane, and fuel and oxygen flow fields contacting the anode and the cathode, respectively, wherein the components define an annular region therethrough along the axis. A fuel distribution manifold within the annular region is connected to deliver fuel to the fuel flow field in each of the unit cells. In a particular embodiment, a single bolt through the annular region clamps the unit cells together. In another embodiment, separator plates between individual unit cells have an extended radial dimension to function as cooling fins for maintaining the operating temperature of the fuel cell stack.

  19. Exhaust gas deflector for truck exhaust stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, C.I.; Krah, R.W.

    1990-11-20

    This patent describes an improved exhaust gas deflector for the top of a vertical truck exhaust stack. It comprises: a vertical tubular member having an upper and a lower end; means to attach the tubular member lower end to the top of a truck exhaust stack; a deflector body affixed to the tubular member at the upper end thereof, the deflector body having a forward and a rearward end and a passageway therethrough communicating with the tubular member; an upwardly inclined air scoop means at the forward end of the deflector body having a rearward edge, the rearward edge extending above and over the tubular member; and an upwardly inclined deflector means at the rearward end of the deflector body.

  20. Radiation-Tolerant Intelligent Memory Stack - RTIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Tak-kwong; Herath, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation provides reconfigurable circuitry and 2-Gb of error-corrected or 1-Gb of triple-redundant digital memory in a small package. RTIMS uses circuit stacking of heterogeneous components and radiation shielding technologies. A reprogrammable field-programmable gate array (FPGA), six synchronous dynamic random access memories, linear regulator, and the radiation mitigation circuits are stacked into a module of 42.7 42.7 13 mm. Triple module redundancy, current limiting, configuration scrubbing, and single- event function interrupt detection are employed to mitigate radiation effects. The novel self-scrubbing and single event functional interrupt (SEFI) detection allows a relatively soft FPGA to become radiation tolerant without external scrubbing and monitoring hardware