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1

A series of Cd(II) complexes with {pi}-{pi} stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions: Structural diversities by varying the ligands  

SciTech Connect

Seven new Cd(II) complexes consisting of different phenanthroline derivatives and organic acid ligands, formulated as [Cd(PIP){sub 2}(dnba){sub 2}] (1), [Cd(PIP)(ox)].H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd(PIP)(1,4-bdc)(H{sub 2}O)].4H{sub 2}O (3), [Cd(3-PIP){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].4H{sub 2}O (4), [Cd{sub 2}(3-PIP){sub 4}(4,4'-bpdc)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].5H{sub 2}O (5), [Cd(3-PIP)(nip)(H{sub 2}O)].H{sub 2}O (6), [Cd{sub 2}(TIP){sub 4}(4,4'-bpdc)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O (7) (PIP=2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, 3-PIP=2-(3-pyridyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, TIP=2-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline, Hdnba=3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, H{sub 2}ox=oxalic acid, 1,4-H{sub 2}bdc=benzene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid, 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpdc=biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid, H{sub 2}nip=5-nitroisophthalic acid) have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Complexes 1 and 4 possess mononuclear structures; complexes 5 and 7 are isostructural and have dinuclear structures; complexes 2 and 3 feature 1D chain structures; complex 6 contains 1D double chain, which are further extended to a 3D supramolecular structure by {pi}-{pi} stacking and hydrogen bonding interactions. The N-donor ligands with extended {pi}-system and organic acid ligands play a crucial role in the formation of the final supramolecular frameworks. Moreover, thermal properties and fluorescence of 1-7 are also investigated. -- Graphical abstract: Seven new supramolecular architectures have been successfully isolated under hydrothermal conditions by reactions of different phen derivatives and Cd(II) salts together with organic carboxylate anions auxiliary ligands. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Complexes 1-7 are 0D or 1D polymeric structure, the {pi}-{pi} stacking and H-bonding interactions extend the complexes into 3D supramolecular network. To our knowledge, systematic study on {pi}-{pi} stacking and H-bonding interactions in cadmium(II) complexes are still limited. {yields} The structural differences among the title complexes indicate the importance of N-donor chelating ligands for the creation of molecular architectures. {yields} The thermal and fluorescence properties of title complexes have also been reported.

Wang Xiuli, E-mail: wangxiuli@bhu.edu.c [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Zhang Jinxia; Liu Guocheng; Lin Hongyan [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121000 (China)

2011-02-15

2

A trinuclear Pt(II) compound with short Pt-Pt-Pt contacts. An analysis of the influence of pi-pi stacking interactions on the strength and length of the Pt-Pt bond.  

PubMed

In this work we report the first example of a trinuclear Pt(II) complex with Pt-Pt-Pt bonds that are not facilitated by direct intervention of bridging ligands but are partially held by the attractive pi-pi stacking interaction between the phenyl units of the 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridyl ligands. The effect of the pi-pi stacking interactions on the strength and length of the Pt-Pt bond has been discussed using reduced models of the interacting moieties in which the aromatic rings have been removed. The nature of the Pt-Pt bonds has been studied through energy decomposition and atoms-in-molecules analyses. The results indicate that the relatively strong (about 40 kcal mol(-1)) Pt-Pt metallic bond has similar covalent and ionic contributions. PMID:16482356

Poater, Albert; Moradell, Silvia; Pinilla, Elena; Poater, Jordi; Solà, Miquel; Martínez, M Angeles; Llobet, Antoni

2006-03-01

3

Intracomplex {pi}-{pi} stacking interaction between adjacent phenanthroline molecules in complexes with rare-earth nitrates: Crystal and molecular structures of bis(1,10-Phenanthroline)trinitratoytterbium and bis(1,10-Phenanthroline)trinitratolanthanum  

SciTech Connect

Crystals of the compounds Yb(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(Phen){sub 2} and La(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(Phen){sub 2} (Phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) are investigated using X-ray diffraction. It is established that there exist two different crystalline modifications: the main modification (phase 1) is characteristic of all members of the isostructural series, and the second modification (phase 2) is observed only for the Eu, Er, and Yb elements. It is assumed that the stability and universality of main phase 1 are associated with the occurrence of the nonbonded {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions between the adjacent phenanthroline ligands in the complexes. The indication of the interactions is a distortion of the planar shape of the Phen molecule (the folding of the metallocycle along the N-N line with a folding angle of 11{sup o}-13{sup o} and its 'boomerang' distortion). The assumption regarding the {pi}-{pi} stacking interaction is very consistent with the shape of the ellipsoids of atomic thermal vibrations, as well as with the data obtained from thermography and IR spectroscopy. An analysis of the structures of a number of rare-earth compounds has demonstrated that the intracomplex {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions directly contribute to the formation of supramolecular associates in the crystals, such as molecular dimers, supramolecules, chain and layered ensembles, and framework systems.

Sadikov, G. G., E-mail: sadgg@igic.ras.ru; Antsyshkina, A. S.; Rodnikova, M. N.; Solonina, I. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation)

2009-01-15

4

Working group on $\\\\pi\\\\pi$ and $\\\\pi$N interactions - Summary  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the summary of the working group on $\\\\pi\\\\pi$ and $\\\\pi$N interactions\\u000aof the Chiral Dynamics Workshop in Mainz, September 1-5, 1997. Each talk is\\u000arepresented by an extended one page abstract. Some additional remarks by the\\u000aconvenors are added

Ulf-G. Meißner; Martin Sevior; A. Badertscher; B. Borasoy; P. Büttiker; G. Höhler; M. Knecht; O. Krehl; J. Lowe; M. Mojzis; G. Müller; O. Patarakin; M. Pavan; A. Rusetsky; M. E. Sainio; J. Schacher; G. Smith; S. Steininger; V. Vereshagin

1997-01-01

5

Test of charge conjugation invariance in the decay of the eta meson into pi(+)pi(-)pi(0)  

E-print Network

In this work we present the preliminary results of the analysis of the pp->pp eta(->pp pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) reaction aiming to test the charge conjugation symmetry C in strong interactions. Based on approximately $10^5$ identified eta->pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) decay events we have extracted asymmetry parameters sensitive to C symmetry violation for different isospin values of the final state and we have established that all are consistent with zero within the obtained accuracy.

M. Zielinski; P. Moskal

2012-10-05

6

Observation of eta_c(1S) and eta_c(2S) decays to K K-pi pi-pi0 in two-photon interactions  

SciTech Connect

We study the processes {gamma}{gamma} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and {gamma}{gamma} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} using a data sample of 519.2 fb{sup -1} recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at center-of-mass energies near the {Upsilon}(nS) (n = 2, 3, 4) resonances. We observe the {eta}{sub c}(1S), {chi}{sub c0}(1P), {chi}{sub c2}(1P), and {eta}{sub c}(2S) resonances produced in two-photon interactions and decaying to K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, with significances of 18.1, 5.7, 5.2, and 5.3 standard deviations (including systematic errors), respectively. We measure the {eta}{sub c}(2S) mass and width in K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decays, m({eta}{sub c}(2S)) = 3638.5 {+-} 1.5 {+-} 0.8 MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}({eta}{sub c}(2S)) = 13.4 {+-} 4.6 {+-} 3.2 MeV, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We search for the Z(3930) resonance and find no significant signal. We also provide the two-photon width times branching fraction values for the observed resonances.

Sanchez, P.del Amo

2011-05-20

7

Analysis of correlation data of pi^+pi^- pair in p + Ta reaction using Coulomb wave function including momentum resolution and strong interaction effect  

E-print Network

We have proposed a new method for the Coulomb wave function correction which includes the momentum resolution for charged hadron pairs and applied it to the precise data on pi^+pi^- correlations obtained in p + Ta reaction at 70 GeV/c. It is found that interaction regions of this reaction (assuming Gaussian source function) are 9.8+-5.8 fm and 7.7+-4.8 fm for the thicknesses of the target 8 micro m and 1.4 micro m, respectively. We have also analyzed the data by the formula including strong interaction effect. The physical picture of the source size obtained in this way is discussed.

T. Mizoguchi; M. Biyajima; I. V. Andreev; G. Wilk

1999-01-18

8

The e+e--->2(pi+pi-)pi0, 2(pi+pi-)eta, K+K-pi+pi-pi0 and K+K-pi+pi-eta cross sections measured with initial-state radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the processes e+e--->2(pi+pi-)pi0gamma, 2(pi+pi-)etagamma, K+K-pi+pi-pi0gamma and K+K-pi+pi-etagamma with the hard photon radiated from the initial state. About 20 000, 4300, 5500, and 375 fully reconstructed events, respectively, are selected from 232fb-1 of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e+e- center-of-mass energy, so that the obtained cross sections from the threshold to

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; D. Bailey; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; Y. Zheng; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini

2007-01-01

9

Observation of pi+pi-pi+pi- photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at [sqrt]sNN=200 GeV at the STAR detector  

E-print Network

We present a measurement of pi+pi-pi+pi-photonuclear production in ultraperipheral Au-Au collisions at [sqrt]sNN=200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The pi+pi-pi+pi- final states are observed at low transverse momentum and ...

Surrow, Bernd

10

The pi -> pi pi process in nuclei and the restoration of chiral symmetry  

E-print Network

The results of an extensive campaign of measurements of the pi -> pi pi process in the nucleon and nuclei at intermediate energies are presented. The measurements were motivated by the study of strong pi pi correlations in nuclei. The analysis relies on the composite ratio C_{pi pi}^A, which accounts for the clear effect of the nuclear medium on the (pi pi) system. The comparison of the C_{pi pi}^A distributions for the (pi pi)_{I=J=0} and (pi pi)_{I=0,J=2} systems to the model predictions indicates that the C_{pi pi}^A behavior in proximity of the 2m_pi threshold is explainable through the partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclei.

N. Grion; M. Bregant; P. Camerini; E. Fragiacomo; S. Piano; R. Rui; E. F. Gibson; G. Hofman; E. L. Mathie; R. Meier; M. E. Sevior; G. R. Smith; R. Tacik; for the CHAOS Collaboration

2005-08-24

11

Measurement of the Wrong-Sign Decay D0 -> K+ pi- pi+ pi-  

E-print Network

A measurement of the rate for the "wrong-sign" decay D0 -> K+ pi- pi+ pi- relative to that for the "right-sign" decay D0 -> K- pi+ pi+ pi- is presented. Using 791 fb-1 of data collected with the Belle detector, we obtain a branching fraction ratio of R_WS = [0.324 +- 0.008 (stat) +- 0.007 (sys)]%. Multiplying this ratio by the world average value for the branching fraction B(D0 -> K- pi+ pi+ pi-) gives a branching fraction B(D0 -> K+ pi- pi+ pi-) = (2.61 +- 0.06 +0.09 -0.08) x 10-4.

Belle Collaboration; E. White; A. J. Schwartz; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; D. M. Asner; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; V. Bhardwaj; B. Bhuyan; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; J. Brodzicka; T. E. Browder; V. Chekelian; A. Chen; P. Chen; B. G. Cheon; K. Chilikin; R. Chistov; I. -S. Cho; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dingfelder; Z. Doležal; Z. Drásal; D. Dutta; S. Eidelman; D. Epifanov; S. Esen; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; M. Feindt; T. Ferber; A. Frey; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; S. Ganguly; R. Gillard; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; T. Hara; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; Y. Hoshi; W. -S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; H. J. Hyun; T. Iijima; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; T. Iwashita; I. Jaegle; T. Julius; D. H. Kah; J. H. Kang; E. Kato; C. Kiesling; D. Y. Kim; H. O. Kim; J. B. Kim; J. H. Kim; M. J. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; J. Klucar; B. R. Ko; P. Kodyš; S. Korpar; P. Križan; P. Krokovny; B. Kronenbitter; T. Kuhr; T. Kumita; A. Kuzmin; Y. -J. Kwon; J. S. Lange; S. -H. Lee; J. Li; Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; J. Libby; C. Liu; Y. Liu; D. Liventsev; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; G. B. Mohanty; A. Moll; R. Mussa; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nayak; E. Nedelkovska; C. Ng; N. K. Nisar; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Ogawa; S. Okuno; C. Oswald; P. Pakhlov; G. Pakhlova; H. Park; H. K. Park; R. Pestotnik; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; M. Ritter; M. Röhrken; A. Rostomyan; S. Ryu; H. Sahoo; T. Saito; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; Y. Sato; V. Savinov; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; C. Schwanda; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; O. Seon; M. E. Sevior; M. Shapkin; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; A. Sibidanov; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; S. Stani?; M. Stari?; M. Steder; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; M. Uchida; S. Uehara; Y. Unno; S. Uno; S. E. Vahsen; C. Van Hulse; G. Varner; V. Vorobyev; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; M. -Z. Wang; P. Wang; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; Y. Yamashita; S. Yashchenko; Y. Yusa; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; V. Zhulanov; A. Zupanc

2013-07-23

12

Experimental Evidence for a Light and Broad Scalar Resonance in D+ --> pi-pi+pi+ Decay  

Microsoft Academic Search

From a sample of 1172+\\/-61 D+-->pi-pi+pi+ decays, we find gamma\\\\(D+-->pi- pi+pi+\\\\)\\/gamma\\\\(D+-->K-pi+pi+\\\\) = 0.0311+\\/-0.0018+0.0016-0.0026. Using a coherent amplitude analysis to fit the Dalitz plot of these decays, we find strong evidence that a scalar resonance of mass 478+24-23+\\/-17 MeV\\/c2 and width 324+42-40+\\/-21 MeV\\/c2 accounts for approximately half of all decays.

E. M. Aitala; S. Amato; J. C. Anjos; J. A. Appel; D. Ashery; S. Banerjee; I. Bediaga; G. Blaylock; S. B. Bracker; P. R. Burchat; R. A. Burnstein; T. Carter; H. S. Carvalho; N. K. Copty; L. M. Cremaldi; C. Darling; K. Denisenko; S. Devmal; A. Fernandez; G. F. Fox; P. Gagnon; C. Gobel; K. Gounder; A. M. Halling; G. Herrera; G. Hurvits; C. James; P. A. Kasper; S. Kwan; D. C. Langs; J. Leslie; B. Lundberg; J. Magnin; A. Massafferri; S. Maytal-Beck; B. Meadows; J. R. de Mello Neto; D. Mihalcea; R. H. Milburn; J. M. de Miranda; A. Napier; A. Nguyen; A. B. D'Oliveira; K. O'Shaughnessy; K. C. Peng; L. P. Perera; M. V. Purohit; B. Quinn; S. Radeztsky; A. Rafatian; N. W. Reay; J. J. Reidy; A. C. Dos Reis; H. A. Rubin; D. A. Sanders; A. K. Santha; A. F. Santoro; A. J. Schwartz; M. Sheaff; R. A. Sidwell; A. J. Slaughter; M. D. Sokoloff; J. Solano; N. R. Stanton; R. J. Stefanski; K. Stenson; D. J. Summers; S. Takach; K. Thorne; A. K. Tripathi; S. Watanabe; R. Weiss-Babai; J. Wiener; N. Witchey; E. Wolin; S. M. Yang; D. Yi; S. Yoshida; R. Zaliznyak; C. Zhang

2001-01-01

13

Measurements of the Branching fractions for $B_{(s)} \\\\to D_{(s)}\\\\pi\\\\pi\\\\pi$ and $\\\\Lambda_b^0 \\\\to \\\\Lambda_c^+\\\\pi\\\\pi\\\\pi$  

Microsoft Academic Search

Branching fractions of the decays $H_b\\\\to H_c\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ relative to $H_b\\\\to H_c\\\\pi^-$ are presented, where $H_b$ ($H_c$) represents $\\\\overline{B^0}$ ($D^+$), $B^-$ ($D^0$), $\\\\overline{B_s^0}$ ($D_s^+$) and $\\\\Lambda_b^0$ ($\\\\Lambda_c^+$). The measurements are performed with the LHCb detector using 35~${\\\\rm pb^{-1}}$ of data collected at $\\\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV. The ratios of branching fractions are measured to be \\\\begin{eqnarray*} {{\\\\cal{B}}(\\\\overline{B^0}\\\\to D^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-)\\\\over{\\\\cal{B}}(\\\\overline{B^0}\\\\to D^+\\\\pi^-)} = 2.38\\\\pm0.11\\\\pm0.21 \\\

R Aaij; B Adeva; M Adinolfi; C Adrover; A Affolder; Z Ajaltouni; J Albrecht; F Alessio; M Alexander; G Alkhazov; P Alvarez Cartelle; A A Alves; S Amato; Y Amhis; J Anderson; R B Appleby; O Aquines Gutierrez; F Archilli; L Arrabito; A Artamonov; M Artuso; E Aslanides; G Auriemma; S Bachmann; J J Back; D S Bailey; V Balagura; W Baldini; R J Barlow; C Barschel; S Barsuk; W Barter; A Bates; C Bauer; Th Bauer; A Bay; I Bediaga; K Belous; I Belyaev; E Ben-Haim; M Benayoun; G Bencivenni; S Benson; J Benton; R Bernet; M-O Bettler; M van Beuzekom; A Bien; S Bifani; A Bizzeti; P M Bjørnstad; T Blake; F Blanc; C Blanks; J Blouw; S Blusk; A Bobrov; V Bocci; A Bondar; N Bondar; W Bonivento; S Borghi; A Borgia; T J V Bowcock; C Bozzi; T Brambach; J van den Brand; J Bressieux; D Brett; S Brisbane; M Britsch; T Britton; N H Brook; H Brown; A Büchler-Germann; I Burducea; A Bursche; J Buytaert; S Cadeddu; J M Caicedo Carvajal; O Callot; M Calvi; M Calvo Gomez; A Camboni; P Campana; A Carbone; G Carboni; R Cardinale; A Cardini; L Carson; K Carvalho Akiba; G Casse; M Cattaneo; M Charles; Ph Charpentier; N Chiapolini; K Ciba; X Cid Vidal; G Ciezarek; P E L Clarke; M Clemencic; H V Cliff; J Closier; C Coca; V Coco; J Cogan; P Collins; F Constantin; G Conti; A Contu; A Cook; M Coombes; G Corti; G A Cowan; R Currie; B D'Almagne; C D'Ambrosio; P David; I De Bonis; S De Capua; M De Cian; F De Lorenzi; J M De Miranda; L De Paula; P De Simone; D Decamp; M Deckenhoff; H Degaudenzi; M Deissenroth; L Del Buono; C Deplano; O Deschamps; F Dettori; J Dickens; H Dijkstra; P Diniz Batista; S Donleavy; A Dosil Suárez; D Dossett; A Dovbnya; F Dupertuis; R Dzhelyadin; C Eames; S Easo; U Egede; V Egorychev; S Eidelman; D van Eijk; F Eisele; S Eisenhardt; R Ekelhof; L Eklund; Ch Elsasser; D G d'Enterria; D Esperante Pereira; L Estéve; A Falabella; E Fanchini; C Färber; G Fardell; C Farinelli; S Farry; V Fave; V Fernandez Albor; M Ferro-Luzzi; S Filippov; C Fitzpatrick; M Fontana; F Fontanelli; R Forty; M Frank; C Frei; M Frosini; S Furcas; A Gallas Torreira; D Galli; M Gandelman; P Gandini; Y Gao; J-C Garnier; J Garofoli; J Garra Tico; L Garrido; C Gaspar; N Gauvin; M Gersabeck; T Gershon; Ph Ghez; V Gibson; V V Gligorov; C Göbel; D Golubkov; A Golutvin; A Gomes; H Gordon; M Grabalosa Gándara; R Graciani Diaz; L A Granado Cardoso; E Graugés; G Graziani; A Grecu; S Gregson; B Gui; E Gushchin; Yu Guz; T Gys; G Haefeli; C Haen; S C Haines; T Hampson; S Hansmann-Menzemer; R Harji; N Harnew; J Harrison; P F Harrison; J He; V Heijne; K Hennessy; P Henrard; J A Hernando Morata; E van Herwijnen; E Hicks; W Hofmann; K Holubyev; P Hopchev; W Hulsbergen; P Hunt; T Huse; R S Huston; D Hutchcroft; D Hynds; V Iakovenko; P Ilten; J Imong; R Jacobsson; A Jaeger; M Jahjah Hussein; E Jans; F Jansen; P Jaton; B Jean-Marie; F Jing; M John; D Johnson; C R Jones; B Jost; S Kandybei; M Karacson; T M Karbach; J Keaveney; U Kerzel; T Ketel; A Keune; B Khanji; Y M Kim; M Knecht; S Koblitz; P Koppenburg; A Kozlinskiy; L Kravchuk; K Kreplin; M Kreps; G Krocker; P Krokovny; F Kruse; K Kruzelecki; M Kucharczyk; S Kukulak; R Kumar; T Kvaratskheliya; V N La Thi; D Lacarrere; G Lafferty; A Lai; D Lambert; R W Lambert; E Lanciotti; G Lanfranchi; C Langenbruch; T Latham; R Le Gac; J van Leerdam; J-P Lees; R Lefévre; A Leflat; J Lefrançois; O Leroy; T Lesiak; L Li; L Li Gioi; M Lieng; M Liles; R Lindner; C Linn; B Liu; G Liu; J H Lopes; E Lopez Asamar; N Lopez-March; J Luisier; F Machefert; I V Machikhiliyan; F Maciuc; O Maev; J Magnin; S Malde; R M D Mamunur; G Manca; G Mancinelli; N Mangiafave; U Marconi; R Märki; J Marks; G Martellotti; A Martens; L Martin; A Martín Sánchez; D Martinez Santos; A Massafferri; Z Mathe; C Matteuzzi; M Matveev; E Maurice; B Maynard; A Mazurov; G McGregor; R McNulty; C Mclean; M Meissner; M Merk; J Merkel; R Messi; S Miglioranzi; D A Milanes; M-N Minard; S Monteil; D Moran; P Morawski; I Mous; F Muheim; K Müller; R Muresan; B Muryn; M Musy; J Mylroie-Smith; P Naik; T Nakada; R Nandakumar; J Nardulli; I Nasteva; M Nedos; M Needham; N Neufeld; C Nguyen-Mau; M Nicol; S Nies; V Niess; N Nikitin; A Oblakowska-Mucha; V Obraztsov; S Oggero; S Ogilvy; O Okhrimenko; R Oldeman; M Orlandea; J M Otalora Goicochea; P Owen; B Pal; J Palacios; M Palutan; J Panman; A Papanestis; M Pappagallo; C Parkes; C J Parkinson; G Passaleva; G D Patel; M Patel; S K Paterson; G N Patrick; C Patrignani; C Pavel-Nicorescu; A Pazos Alvarez; A Pellegrino; G Penso; M Pepe Altarelli; S Perazzini; D L Perego; E Perez Trigo; A Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo; P Perret; M Perrin-Terrin; G Pessina; A Petrella; A Petrolini; B Pie Valls; B Pietrzyk; T Pilar; D Pinci; R Plackett; S Playfer; M Plo Casasus; G Polok; A Poluektov; E Polycarpo; D Popov; B Popovici; C Potterat; A Powell; T du Pree; J Prisciandaro; V Pugatch; A Puig Navarro; W Qian; J H Rademacker; B Rakotomiaramanana; M S Rangel; I Raniuk; G Raven; S Redford

2011-01-01

14

Measurement of the Wrong-Sign Decays D0-->K+pi-pi0 and D0-->K+pi-pi+pi-, and Search for CP Violation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using 281fb-1 of data from the Belle experiment recorded at or near the Upsilon(4S) resonance, we have measured the rates of the ``wrong-sign'' decays D0-->K+pi-pi0 and D0-->K+pi-pi+pi- relative to those of the Cabibbo-favored decays D0-->K-pi+pi0 and D0-->K-pi+pi+pi-. These wrong-sign decays proceed via a doubly Cabibbo-suppressed amplitude or via D0- Dmacr 0 mixing; the latter has not yet been observed. We

X. C. Tian; Y. Ban; K. Abe; H. Aihara; K. Arinstein; Y. Asano; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; S. Banerjee; E. Barberio; M. Barbero; A. Bay; I. Bedny; U. Bitenc; I. Bizjak; S. Blyth; A. Bondar; A. Bozek; M. Bracko; J. Brodzicka; T. E. Browder; P. Chang; Y. Chao; A. Chen; K.-F. Chen; W. T. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; S.-K. Choi; Y. Choi; A. Chuvikov; J. Dalseno; M. Danilov; M. Dash; L. Y. Dong; A. Drutskoy; S. Eidelman; Y. Enari; F. Fang; S. Fratina; N. Gabyshev; T. Gershon; G. Gokhroo; B. Golob; A. Gorisek; J. Haba; T. Hokuue; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; M. Hazumi; Y. Hoshi; S. Hou; W.-S. Hou; T. Iijima; K. Ikado; A. Imoto; K. Inami; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; J. H. Kang; J. S. Kang; P. Kapusta; N. Katayama; H. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; H. R. Khan; H. Kichimi; S. K. Kim; S. M. Kim; K. Kinoshita; S. Korpar; P. Krizan; P. Krokovny; R. Kulasiri; C. C. Kuo; A. Kuzmin; Y.-J. Kwon; G. Leder; S. E. Lee; T. Lesiak; J. Li; S.-W. Lin; D. Liventsev; F. Mandl; T. Matsumoto; A. Matyja; W. Mitaroff; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyake; H. Miyata; Y. Miyazaki; R. Mizuk; G. R. Moloney; T. Mori; T. Nagamine; Y. Nagasaka; E. Nakano; H. Nakazawa; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Ogawa; T. Ohshima; T. Okabe; S. Okuno; S. L. Olsen; Y. Onuki; H. Ozaki; H. Palka; C. W. Park; R. Pestotnik; L. E. Piilonen; Y. Sakai; N. Sato; N. Satoyama; K. Sayeed; T. Schietinger; O. Schneider; C. Schwanda; A. J. Schwartz; M. E. Sevior; H. Shibuya; B. Shwartz; V. Sidorov; J. B. Singh; A. Somov; N. Soni; S. Stanic; M. Staric; T. Sumiyoshi; S. Suzuki; F. Takasaki; K. Tamai; N. Tamura; M. Tanaka; G. N. Taylor; Y. Teramoto; T. Tsukamoto; S. Uehara; T. Uglov; K. Ueno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; S. Villa; C. C. Wang; M.-Z. Wang; Q. L. Xie; B. D. Yabsley; A. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamashita; M. Yamauchi; J. Ying; Y. Yuan; C. C. Zhang; L. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang

2005-01-01

15

Measurement of the decay tau(-) -> pi(-) pi(+) pi(-) 2pi(0)nu-tau  

E-print Network

The decay tau- --> pi-pi+pi-2pi0nu(tau) has been observed in e+e- annihilation using the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. In a data sample collected at square-root s is similar to 10.6 GeV, 668 +/- ...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

1993-09-01

16

Search for D?-D?? mixing in D? --> K? [pi]? [pi]? [pi]? decays  

E-print Network

We present results of a search for D?-D?? mixing by analyzing D? --> K? [pi]? [pi]? [pi]? decays from events in 230.4 fb-1 e+e- data recorded by BABAR. Assuming CP conservation, we measure the time-integrated mixing rate ...

Zheng, Yi, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01

17

Theory of the pi+ pi- atom  

E-print Network

The relativistic perturbative approach based on the Bethe-Salpeter (BS) equation is developed for the study of the characteristics of the hadronic pi+ pi- atom. The general expression for the atom lifetime is derived. Lowest-order corrections to the relativistic Deser-type formula for the atom lifetime are evaluated within the Chiral Perturbation Theory. The lifetime of the pi+ pi- atom in the two-loop order of the Chiral Perturbation Theory is predicted to be tau_1=(3.03\\pm 0.10)\\times 10^{-15}~s.

M. A. Ivanov; V. E. Lyubovitskij; E. Z. Lipartia; A. G. Rusetsky

1998-10-27

18

Observation of the CP-conserving Ks -> pi+pi-pi0 decay amplitude  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interference between CP-conserving KS and KL -> pi+pi-pi0 decay amplitudes was observed by studying the decay rate asymmetries between initial K0 and K0 separately for the phase space regions ECM (pi+) > ECM (pi-) andECM (pi+) < ECM (pi-). For the parameter lambda we found Re(lambda) = 0.036 +\\/- 0.010(stat.)+0.002-0.003(syst.) and Im(lambda) consistent with zero, leading to a branching

R. Adler; T. Alhalel; A. Angelopoulos; A. Apostolakis; E. Aslanides; G. Backenstoss; C. P. Bee; O. Behnke; A. Benelli; J. Bennet; V. Bertin; J. K. Bienlein; F. Blanc; P. Bloch; C. Bula; P. Carlson; M. Carroll; J. Carvalho; E. Cawley; S. Charalambous; M. Chardalas; G. Chardin; M. B. Chertok; A. Cody; M. Danielsson; S. Dedoussis; M. Dejardin; J. Derre; M. Dodgson; J. Duclos; A. Ealet; B. Eckart; C. Eleftheriadis; I. Evangelou; L. Faravel; P. Fassnacht; J. L. Faure; C. Felder; R. Ferreira-Marques; W. Fetscher; M. Fidecaro; A. FilipciC; D. Francis; J. Fry; C. Fuglesang; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. Garreta; T. Geralis; H.-J. Gerber; A. Go; P. Gumplinger; C. Guyot; P. F. Harrison; A. Haselden; P. J. Hayman; F. Henry-Couannier; W. G. Heyes; R. W. Hollander; E. Hubert; K. Jansson; H. U. Johner; P.-R. Kettle; C. Kochowski; P. Kokkas; R. Kreuger; T. Lawry; R. Le Gac; F. Leimgruber; A. Liolios; E. Machado; P. Maley; I. Mandic; N. Manthos; G. Marel; M. Mikuz; J. Miller; F. Montanet; T. Nakada; A. Onofre; B. Pagels; I. Papadopoulos; P. Pavlopoulos; F. Pelucchi; J. Pinto da Cunha; A. Policarpo; G. Polivka; H. Postma; R. Rickenbach; B. L. Roberts; E. Rozaki; T. Ruf; L. Sacks; L. Sakeliou; P. Sanders; C. Santoni; K. Sarigiannis; M. Schäfer; L. A. Schaller; T. Schietinger; A. Schopper; P. Schune; A. Soares; L. Tauscher; C. Thibault; F. Touchard; C. Touramanis; F. Triantis; D. A. Tröster; E. van Beveren; C. W. E. van Eijk; G. Varner; S. Vlachos; P. Weber; O. Wigger; C. Witzig; M. Wolter; C. Yeche; D. Zavrtanik; D. Zimmerman

1996-01-01

19

Face-to-face and Edge-to-face Pi-Pi Interactions in a Synthetic DNA with a Stilbenediether Linker  

SciTech Connect

Synthetic conjugates possessing bis(2-hydroxyethyl)stilbene-4,4'-diether linkers (Sd2) form the most stable DNA hairpins reported to date. Factors that affect stability are length and flexibility of the linkers and {pi}-stacking of the stilbene moiety on the adjacent base pair. The crystal structure of the hairpin d(GT{sub 4}G)-Sd2-d(CA{sub 4}C) was determined at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution. The conformations of the two molecules in the asymmetric unit differ both in the linker and the stem portions. One of them shows a planar stilbene that is stacked on the adjacent G:C base pair. The other displays considerable rotation between the phenyl rings and an unprecedented edge-to-face orientation of stilbene and base pair. The observation of considerable variations in the conformation of the Sd moiety in the crystal structure allows us to exclude restriction of motion as the reason for the absence of Sd photoisomerization in the hairpins. Conformational differences in the stem portion of the two hairpin molecules go along with different Mg{sup 2+} binding modes. Most remarkable among them is the sequence-specific coordination of a metal ion in the narrow A-tract minor groove. The crystal structure provides unequivocal evidence that a fully hydrated Mg{sup 2+} ion can penetrate the narrow A-tract minor groove, causing the groove to further contract. Overall, the structural data provide a better understanding of the origins of hairpin stability and their photochemical behavior in solution.

Egli, M.; Tereshko, V.; Murshudov, G.N.; Sanishvili, R.; Liu, X.; Lewis, F.D.

2010-03-05

20

Chiral symmetry and pi-pi scattering in the Covariant Spectator Theory  

E-print Network

The pi-pi scattering amplitude calculated with a model for the quark-antiquark interaction in the framework of the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST) is shown to satisfy the Adler zero constraint imposed by chiral symmetry. The CST formalism is established in Minkowski space and our calculations are performed in momentum space. We prove that the axial-vector Ward-Takahashi identity is satisfied by our model. Then we show that, similarly to what happens within the Bethe-Salpeter formalism, application of the axial-vector Ward-Takahashi identity to the CST pi-pi scattering amplitude allows us to sum the intermediate quark-quark interactions to all orders. The Adler self-consistency zero for pi-pi scattering in the chiral limit emerges as the result for this sum.

Elmar P. Biernat; M. T. Peña; J. E. Ribeiro; Alfred Stadler; Franz Gross

2014-08-07

21

Chiral symmetry and pi-pi scattering in the Covariant Spectator Theory  

E-print Network

The pi-pi scattering amplitude calculated with a model for the quark-antiquark interaction in the framework of the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST) is shown to satisfy the Adler zero constraint imposed by chiral symmetry. The CST formalism is established in Minkowski space and our calculations are performed in momentum space. We prove that the axial-vector Ward-Takahashi identity is satisfied by our model. Then we show that, similarly to what happens within the Bethe-Salpeter formalism, application of the axial-vector Ward-Takahashi identity to the CST pi-pi scattering amplitude allows us to sum the intermediate quark-quark interactions to all orders. The Adler self-consistency zero for pi-pi scattering in the chiral limit emerges as the result for this sum.

Biernat, Elmar P; Ribeiro, J E; Stadler, Alfred; Gross, Franz

2014-01-01

22

Observation of pi(+)pi(-)pi(+)pi(-) photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV at the STAR detector  

E-print Network

is the So?ding interference term of the two [31]. range from 500 to 1100 MeV/c2. The ?2 per degree of freedom of the maximum likelihood fit is 115/36, which mainly reflects the fact that the fit function does not reproduce well either the high mass tail.... The thick solid line shows the fit of a modified S-wave Breit-Wigner [cf. Eq. (5)] with parameters fixed to the values extracted from the fit of the pi+pi?pi+pi? invariant mass distribution on top of an S-wave Breit-Wigner that describes the tail...

Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Han, L. -X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Rehberg, J. M.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.

2010-01-01

23

Assessment of Standard Force Field Models against High-Quality ab initio Potential Curves for Prototypes of pi-pi, CH/pi, and SH/pi Interactions  

SciTech Connect

Several popular force fields, namely, CHARMM, AMBER, OPLS-AA, and MM3, have been tested for their ability to reproduce highly accurate quantum mechani- cal potential energy curves for noncovalent interactions in the benzene dimer, the benzene-CH4 complex, and the benzene-H2S complex. All of the force fields are semi-quantitatively correct, but none of them is consistently reliable quantitatively. Re-optimization of Lennard-Jones parameters and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory analysis for the benzene dimer suggests that better agreement cannot be expected unless more flexible functional forms (particularly for the electrostatic contributions)are employed for the empirical force fields.

Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Sherrill, David [Georgia Institute of Technology; Sinnokrot, Mutasem O [University of Jordan; Marshall, Michael S. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Hohenstein, Edward G. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Walker, Ross [San Diego Supercomputer Center; Gould, Ian R [ORNL

2009-01-01

24

Results of two scattering processes:. pi pi. -->. phi phi and. pi pi. -->. K anti K  

SciTech Connect

An analysis is presented of 6658 events of the reaction ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. phi phi n at 22 GeV/c. This data is well represented by three resonances, all with quantum numbers I/sup G/J/sup PC/ = 0/sup +/2/sup + +/. In a second analysis, which consists of 40494 new events of the reaction ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. K/sub s//sup 0/K/sub s//sup 0/n at 22 GeV/c, we obtain the S/sub 0/, D/sub 0/ and G/sub 0/ Argand amplitudes for ..pi pi.. ..-->.. K anti K. The theta (1690) is shown to decay into ..pi pi.. by less than 4% and only is required in J/psi radiative decay experiments.

Longacre, R.S.; Chan, C.S.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Kramer, M.A.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.

1986-01-01

25

Measurement of the ratios of branching fractions B(B0s --> Ds- pi+ pi+ pi-)/B(B0-->D- pi+ pi+ pi-) and B(B0s --> Ds- pi+)/B(B0-->D- pi+).  

PubMed

Using 355 pb;{-1} of data collected by the CDF II detector in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, we study the fully reconstructed hadronic decays B_{(s)};{0}-->D_{(s)};{-}pi;{+} and B_{(s)};{0}-->D_{(s)};{-}pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-}. We present the first measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(B_{s};{0}-->D_{s};{-}pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-})/B(B;{0}-->D;{-}pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-})=1.05+/-0.10(stat)+/-0.22(syst). We also update our measurement of B(B_{s};{0}-->D_{s};{-}pi;{+})/B(B;{0}-->D;{-}pi;{+}) to 1.13+/-0.08(stat)+/-0.23(syst), improving the statistical uncertainty by more than a factor of 2. We find B(B_{s};{0}-->D_{s};{-}pi;{+})=[3.8+/-0.3(stat)+/-1.3(syst)]x10;{-3} and B(B_{s};{0}-->D_{s};{-}pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-})=[8.4+/-0.8(stat)+/-3.2(syst)]x10;{-3}. PMID:17358931

Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Budroni, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Dituro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I

2007-02-01

26

K -> pi pi Phenomenology in the Presence of Electromagnetism  

E-print Network

We describe the influence of electromagnetism on the phenomenology of K -> pi pi decays. This is required because the present data were analyzed without inclusion of electromagnetic radiative corrections, and hence contain several ambiguities and uncertainties which we describe in detail. Our presentation includes a full description of the infrared effects needed for a new experimental analysis. It also describes the general treatment of final state interaction phases, needed because Watson's theorem is no longer valid in the presence of electromagnetism. The phase of the isospin-two amplitude A_2 may be modified by 50% -> 100%. We provide a tentative analysis using present data in order to illustrate the sensitivity to electromagnetic effects, and also discuss how the standard treatment of epsilon'/epsilon is modified.

Vincenzo Cirigliano; John F. Donoghue; Eugene Golowich

2000-08-28

27

Electroweak Penguin Hunting Through B -> pi pi, pi K and Rare K and B Decays  

E-print Network

The $B\\to\\pi K$ decays with significant electroweak penguin contributions show a puzzling pattern. We explore this "$B\\to\\pi K$ puzzle" through a systematic strategy. The starting point, which is essentially unaffected by electroweak penguins, is the determination of the angle $\\gamma$ of the unitarity triangle through the CP-violating $B^0_d\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $B^0_d\\to\\pi^-K^+$ asymmetries, yielding $\\gamma=(73.9^{+5.8}_{-6.5})^\\circ$, and the extraction of hadronic parameters through the measured $B\\to\\pi\\pi$ branching ratios. Using arguments related to the SU(3) flavour symmetry, we convert the hadronic $B\\to\\pi\\pi$ parameters into their $B\\to\\pi K$ counterparts, allowing us to predict the $B\\to\\pi K$ observables in the Standard Model. We find agreement with the data for those quantities that are only marginally affected by electroweak penguins, while this is not the case for the observables with sizeable electroweak penguin contributions. Since we may also perform a couple of internal consistency checks of our working assumptions, which are nicely satisfied for the current data, and find a small sensitivity of our results to large non-factorizable SU(3)-breaking corrections, the "$B\\to\\pi K$" puzzle may be due to new physics in the electroweak penguin sector. We show that it can indeed be resolved through such a kind of new physics with a large CP-violating phase. Further insights into the electroweak penguins are provided by the $B^+\\to\\pi^0K^+$ and $B_d^0\\to\\pi^0K_{\\rm S}$ CP asymmetries, and in particular through correlations with various rare $K$ and B decays.

Andrzej J. Buras; Robert Fleischer; Stefan Recksiegel; Felix Schwab

2005-12-05

28

Exclusive Central pi+pi- production in CDF  

SciTech Connect

Using the Collider Detector at Fermilab, CDF, we have measured exclusive pi+pi- production at sqrt(s) = 900 GeV and 1960 GeV. The pi+pi- pair is central, |y| < 1.0, and there are no other particles detected in |eta| < 5.9. We discuss the mass spectrum, showing f0(980) and f2(1270) resonances, s-dependence, pT-dependence, and angular distributions.

Albrow, Michael; Swiech, Artur [Jagellonian University, Cracow, Poland; Zurek, Maria [Jagellonian University, Cracow, Poland

2013-10-14

29

Study of the psi(2S) decay to p pbar pi+ pi-  

E-print Network

The branching ratios of psi(2S)-->p pbar Pi+ pi- and psi(2S)-->p pbar omega, omega--> pi+ pi- pi0 are measured and the pi+ pi- invariant mass distribution in the first decay is discussed by analyzing 14 million produced psi(2S) events collected by the BESII detector at the BEPC.

J. G. Bian

2006-06-06

30

Study of the pipi mass spectra in the process e+e--->pi+pi-pi0 at (s)~=1020 MeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

The invariant mass spectra of the pi+pi- and pi+\\/-pi0 pairs in the process e+e--->pi+pi-pi0 were studied in the Spherical Neutral Detector experiment at the VEPP-2M collider in the energy region (s)~=1020 MeV. These studies were based on about 0.5×106 events. The spectra were analyzed in the framework of the vector meson dominance model. It was found that the experimental data

M. N. Achasov; V. M. Aulchenko; K. I. Beloborodov; A. V. Berdyugin; A. G. Bogdanchikov; A. V. Bozhenok; A. D. Bukin; D. A. Bukin; S. V. Burdin; T. V. Dimova; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; V. N. Ivanchenko; P. M. Ivanov; A. A. Korol; M. S. Korostelev; S. V. Koshuba; A. V. Otboev; E. V. Pakhtusova; E. A. Perevedentsev; A. A. Salnikov; S. I. Serednyakov; V. V. Shary; Yu. M. Shatunov; V. A. Sidorov; Z. K. Silagadze; A. V. Vasiljev; Yu. S. Velikzhanin

2002-01-01

31

Stacking interactions and DNA intercalation  

SciTech Connect

The relationship between stacking interactions and the intercalation of proflavine and ellipticine within DNA is investigated using a nonempirical van der Waals density functional for the correlation energy. Our results, employing a binary stack model, highlight fundamental, qualitative differences between base-pair base-pair interactions and that of the stacked intercalator base pair system. Most notable result is the paucity of torque which so distinctively defines the Twist of DNA. Surprisingly, this model, when combined with a constraint on the twist of the surrounding base-pair steps to match the observed unwinding of the sugar-phosphate backbone, was sufficient for explaining the experimentally observed proflavine intercalator configuration. Our extensive mapping of the potential energy surface of base-pair intercalator interactions can provide valuable information for future nonempirical studies of DNA intercalation dynamics.

Li, Dr. Shen [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Cooper, Valentino R [ORNL; Thonhauser, Prof. Timo [Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC; Lundqvist, Prof. Bengt I. [Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; Langreth, David C. [Rutgers University

2009-01-01

32

K --> pi pi matrix elements from mixed action lattice QCD  

E-print Network

We present a new method for determining K --> pi pi matrix elements from lattice simulations that is less costly than direct simulations of K --> pi pi at physical kinematics. It improves, however, upon the traditional "indirect'' approach of constructing the K --> pi pi matrix elements using NLO SU(3) ChPT, which can lead to large higher-order chiral corrections. Using the explicit example of the Delta I =3/2 (27,1) operator to illustrate the method, we obtain a value for Re(A_2) that agrees with experiment and has a total uncertainty of ~20%. Although our simulations use domain-wall valence quarks on the MILC asqtad-improved gauge configurations, this method is more general and can be applied to calculations with any fermion formulation.

Jack Laiho; Ruth S. Van de Water

2010-11-19

33

Study of B¯0-->D0pi+pi- decays  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the results of a study of neutral B meson decays to the D0pi+pi- final state, where the D0 is fully reconstructed. The results are obtained from an event sample containing 388×106 BB¯-meson pairs collected in the Belle experiment at the KEKB e+e- collider. The total branching fraction of the three-body decay B(B¯0-->D0pi+pi-)=(8.4±0.4(stat)±0.8(syst))×10-4 has been measured. The intermediate resonant

A. Kuzmin; K. Abe; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; D. Anipko; K. Arinstein; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; S. Bahinipati; A. M. Bakich; V. Balagura; E. Barberio; M. Barbero; A. Bay; I. Bedny; K. Belous; U. Bitenc; I. Bizjak; S. Blyth; A. Bondar; A. Bozek; M. Bracko; T. E. Browder; M.-C. Chang; Y. Chao; A. Chen; K.-F. Chen; W. T. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; Y. Choi; J. Dalseno; M. Dash; A. Drutskoy; S. Eidelman; D. Epifanov; N. Gabyshev; A. Garmash; T. Gershon; A. Go; G. Gokhroo; B. Golob; H. Ha; J. Haba; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; M. Hazumi; D. Heffernan; T. Hokuue; Y. Hoshi; S. Hou; W.-S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; T. Iijima; K. Ikado; A. Imoto; K. Inami; A. Ishikawa; H. Ishino; R. Itoh; M. Iwasaki; Y. Iwasaki; J. H. Kang; P. Kapusta; H. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; H. Kichimi; H. J. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; P. Krizan; P. Krokovny; R. Kulasiri; R. Kumar; C. C. Kuo; Y.-J. Kwon; S. E. Lee; T. Lesiak; S.-W. Lin; G. Majumder; F. Mandl; T. Matsumoto; S. McOnie; W. Mitaroff; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyake; H. Miyata; Y. Miyazaki; R. Mizuk; G. R. Moloney; Y. Nagasaka; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Noguchi; T. Ohshima; S. Okuno; S. L. Olsen; Y. Onuki; P. Pakhlov; G. Pakhlova; L. S. Peak; R. Pestotnik; L. E. Piilonen; A. Poluektov; H. Sahoo; Y. Sakai; N. Satoyama; T. Schietinger; O. Schneider; J. Schümann; C. Schwanda; A. J. Schwartz; K. Senyo; M. Shapkin; H. Shibuya; B. Shwartz; V. Sidorov; A. Sokolov; A. Somov; S. Stanic; M. Staric; H. Stoeck; K. Sumisawa; T. Sumiyoshi; S. Y. Suzuki; F. Takasaki; K. Tamai; N. Tamura; M. Tanaka; G. N. Taylor; Y. Teramoto; X. C. Tian; K. Trabelsi; T. Tsuboyama; T. Tsukamoto; S. Uehara; T. Uglov; K. Ueno; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; Y. Usov; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; S. Villa; C. H. Wang; M.-Z. Wang; Y. Watanabe; E. Won; C.-H. Wu; Q. L. Xie; B. D. Yabsley; A. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamashita; M. Yamauchi; L. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; A. Zupanc

2007-01-01

34

D{sup +{yields}}K{sup -{pi}+{pi}+}: three-body FSI  

SciTech Connect

Even with the important advances of the last decade, charmed meson decays are still poorly understood theoretically. We do not understand, for example, why the kappa scalar resonance is responsible for 70% of the fit in the D{sup +{yields}}K{sup -{pi}+{pi}+} decay, as observed by the E791 (2002) experiment and confirmed by different collaborations. The fact that quark c can neither be considered soft nor heavy prevents the direct use of known theoretical results in the description of D. This scenario indicates two big gaps in the knowledge of D{sup +{yields}{pi}+{pi}+}K{sup -} decay. The first concerns the weak vertex, still not suitably treated in literature. The second is the three-body final state interaction (FSI) of the pseudoscalar mesons, until now considered in the literature as a quasi two-body interaction . This investigation aims at calculating the D{sup +{yields}{pi}+{pi}+}K{sup -} decay considering 3 body FSI.

Magalhaes, P. C.; Robilotta, M. R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2010-11-12

35

Amplitude analyses of the decays chi_c1 -> eta pi+ pi- and chi_c1 -> eta' pi+ pi-  

E-print Network

Using a data sample of 2.59 x 10^7 psi(2S) decays obtained with the CLEO-c detector, we perform amplitude analyses of the complementary decay chains chi_c1 -> eta pi+ pi- and chi_c1 -> eta' pi+ pi-. We find evidence for a P-wave eta' pi scattering amplitude, which, if interpreted as a resonance, would have exotic J^PC = 1^-+ and parameters consistent with the pi_1(1600) state reported in other production mechanisms. We also make the first observation of the decay a_0(980) -> eta' pi and measure the ratio of branching fractions B(a_0(980) -> eta' pi)/B(a_0(980) -> eta pi) = 0.064 +- 0.014 +- 0.014. The pi pi spectrum produced with a recoiling eta is compared to that with eta' recoil.

CLEO Collaboration; G. S. Adams; J. Napolitano; K. M. Ecklund; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; L. J. Pearson; E. H. Thorndike; S. Ricciardi; C. Thomas; M. Artuso; S. Blusk; R. Mountain; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; L. M. Zhang; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; A. Lincoln; M. J. Smith; P. Zhou; J. Zhu; P. Naik; J. Rademacker; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; K. Randrianarivony; G. Tatishvili; R. A. Briere; H. Vogel; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. L. Rosner; J. P. Alexander; D. G. Cassel; S. Das; R. Ehrlich; L. Gibbons; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; X. Shi; W. M. Sun; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; N. Lowrey; S. Mehrabyan; M. Selen; J. Wiss; J. Libby; M. Kornicer; R. E. Mitchell; M. R. Shepherd; A. Szczepaniak; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; D. Cronin-Hennessy; J. Hietala; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; T. Xiao; L. Martin; A. Powell; G. Wilkinson; J. Y. Ge; D. H. Miller; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin

2011-09-27

36

(Pi+Pi-) Atom in Chiral Perturbation Theory  

E-print Network

Hadronic (Pi+Pi-) atom is studied in the relativistic perturbative approach based on the Bethe-Salpeter equation. The general expression for the atom lifetime is derived. Lowest-order corrections to the relativistic Deser-type formula for the atom lifetime are evaluated within the Chiral Perturbation Theory.

M. A. Ivanov; V. E. Lyubovitskij; E. Z. Lipartia; A. G. Rusetsky

1998-05-18

37

e+e- -> pi+pi-e+e-: a potential background for sigma(e+e- -> pi+pi-) measurement via radiative return method  

E-print Network

A Monte Carlo generator (EKHARA) has been constructed to simulate the reaction e+e- -> pi+pi-e+e- based on initial and final state emission of a e+e- pair from e+e- -> pi+pi- production diagram.A detailed study of the process, as a potential background for sigma(e+e- -> pi+pi-) measurement via radiative return method, is presented for phi- and B- factory energies.

Henryk Czyz; Elzbieta Nowak

2003-10-29

38

eta, eta-prime -> pi^+ pi^- gamma with coupled channels  

E-print Network

The decays eta, eta-prime -> pi^+ pi^- gamma are investigated within an approach that combines one-loop chiral perturbation theory with a coupled channel Bethe-Salpeter equation which satisfies unitarity constraints and generates vector mesons dynamically from composite states of two pseudoscalar mesons. It is furthermore shown that the inclusion of the eta-prime as a dynamical degree of freedom does not renormalize the Wess-Zumino-Witten term.

B. Borasoy; R. Nissler

2004-05-05

39

Amplitude analysis of D0->K+K-pi+pi-  

E-print Network

The first flavor-tagged amplitude analysis of the decay D0 to the self-conjugate final state K+K-pi+pi- is presented. Data from the CLEO II.V, CLEO III, and CLEO-c detectors are used, from which around 3000 signal decays are selected. The three most significant amplitudes, which contribute to the model that best fits the data, are phirho0, K1(1270)+-K-+, and non-resonant K+K-pi+pi-. Separate amplitude analyses of D0 and D0-bar candidates indicate no CP violation among the amplitudes at the level of 5% to 30% depending on the mode. In addition, the sensitivity to the CP-violating parameter gamma/phi3 of a sample of 2000 B+ -> D0-tilde(K+K-pi+pi-)K+ decays, where D0-tilde is a D0 or D0-bar, collected at LHCb or a future flavor facility, is estimated to be (11.3 +/- 0.3) degrees using the favored model.

M. Artuso; S. Blusk; R. Mountain; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; L. M. Zhang; T. Gershon; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; A. Lincoln; M. J. Smith; P. Zhou; J. Zhu; P. Naik; J. Rademacker; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; K. Randrianarivony; G. Tatishvili; R. A. Briere; H. Vogel; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. L. Rosner; J. P. Alexander; D. G. Cassel; S. Das; R. Ehrlich; L. Gibbons; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; X. Shi; W. M. Sun; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; N. Lowrey; S. Mehrabyan; M. Selen; J. Wiss; J. Libby; M. Kornicer; R. E. Mitchell; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; D. Cronin-Hennessy; J. Hietala; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; T. Xiao; L. Martin; A. Powell; P. Spradlin; G. Wilkinson; J. Y. Ge; D. H. Miller; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin; G. S. Adams; J. Napolitano; K. M. Ecklund; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; L. J. Pearson; E. H. Thorndike; S. Ricciardi; C. Thomas

2012-01-27

40

Precise branching ratio measurements of the decays D0-->pi-pi+pi0 and D0-->K-K+pi0 relative to the D0-->K-pi+pi0 decay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using 232fb-1 of e+e- collision data recorded by the BABAR experiment, we measure the rates of three-body Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the D0 meson relative to the Cabibbo-favored decay, D0-->K-pi+pi0. We find: (B(D0-->pi-pi+pi0))\\/(B(D0-->K-pi+pi0))=(10.59±0.06±0.13)×10-2 and (B(D0-->K-K+pi0))\\/(B(D0-->K-pi+pi0))=(2.37±0.03±0.04)×10-2, where the errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. These measurements are significantly more precise than the current world average measurements.

B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. De Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence

2006-01-01

41

Search for $CP$ violation in $D^0\\to \\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^0$ decays with the energy test  

E-print Network

A search for time-integrated CP violation in the Cabibbo-suppressed decay $D^0\\to\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^0$ is performed using for the first time an unbinned model-independent technique known as the energy test. Using proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.0 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb detector at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV, the world's best sensitivity to CP violation in this decay is obtained. The data are found to be consistent with the hypothesis of CP symmetry with a $p$-value of (2.6$\\pm$ 0.5)$\\%$

Aaij, Roel; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Helena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia

2014-01-01

42

Measurement of the branching fractions of psi(2S) -> 3(pi+pi-) and J/psi -> 2(pi+pi-)  

E-print Network

Using data samples collected at sqrt(s) = 3.686GeV and 3.650GeV by the BESII detector at the BEPC, the branching fraction of psi(2S) -> 3(pi+pi-) is measured to be [4.83 +- 0.38(stat) +- 0.69(syst)] x 10^-4, and the relative branching fraction of J/psi -> 2(pi+pi-) to that of J/psi -> mu+mu- is measured to be [5.86 +- 0.19(stat) +- 0.39(syst)]% via psi(2S) -> (pi+pi-)J/psi, J/psi -> 2(pi+pi-). The electromagnetic form factor of 3(pi+pi-) is determined to be 0.21 +- 0.02 and 0.20 +- 0.01 at sqrt(s) = 3.686GeV and 3.650GeV, respectively.

M. Ablikim; for the BES Collaboration

2005-03-23

43

Study of the $\\\\pi\\\\pi$ mass spectra in the process $e^+e^- \\\\to \\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^0$ at $\\\\sqrt[]{s} \\\\simeq 1020$ MeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

The invariant mass spectra of the $\\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-$ and $\\\\pi^\\\\pm\\\\pi^0$ pairs in\\u000athe process $e^+e^- \\\\to \\\\pi^+\\\\pi^-\\\\pi^0$ were studied in the SND experiment at\\u000athe VEPP-2M collider in the energy region $\\\\sqrt[]{s} \\\\simeq 1020$ MeV. These\\u000astudies were based on about $0.5 \\\\times 10^6$ experimental events. The spectra\\u000awere analyzed in the framework of the vector meson dominance model. It was

M. N. Achasov; V. M. Aulchenko; K. I. Beloborodov; A. V. Berdyugin; A. G. Bogdanchikov; A. V. Bozhenok; A. D. Bukin; D. A. Bukin; S. V. Burdin; T. V. Dimova; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; V. N. Ivanchenko; P. M. Ivanov; A. A. Korol; M. S. Korostelev; S. V. Koshuba; A. V. Otboev; E. V. Pakhtusova; E. A. Perevedentsev; A. A. Salnikov; S. I. Serednyakov; V. V. Shary; Yu. M. Shatunov; V. A. Sidorov; Z. K. Silagadze; A. V. Vasiljev; Yu. S. Velikzhanin

2001-01-01

44

Nonlocal chiral quark models with wavefunction renormalization: Sigma properties and {pi}-{pi} scattering parameters  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the sigma meson mass and width together with the pion-pion scattering parameters in the context of nonlocal chiral quark models with wave function renormalization (WFR). We consider both nonlocal interactions based on the frequently used exponential form factor, and on fits to the quark mass and renormalization functions obtained in lattice calculations. In the case of the sigma properties, we obtain results which are less dependent on the parametrization than in the standard local Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, and which are in reasonable agreement with the recently reported empirical values. We also show that the inclusion of the WFR tend to improve the description of the {pi}-{pi} scattering parameters, with the lattice inspired parametrization providing the best overall results. Finally, we analyze the connection of the nonlocal quark models discussed here with chiral perturbation theory, and present the model predictions for the low-energy constants relevant for {pi}-{pi} scattering to O(4) in the chiral expansion.

Noguera, S. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, E-46100 Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain); Scoccola, N. N. [CONICET, Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Physics Department, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Favaloro, Solis 453, 1078 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2008-12-01

45

Study of the D0 \\to Pi Pi- Pi0 Decay at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

The Dalitz-plot of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} measured by the BABAR collaboration shows the structure of a final state having quantum numbers I{sup G}J{sup PC} = 0{sup -}0{sup 2-}. An isospin analysis of this Dalitz-plot finds that the fraction of the I = 0 contribution is about 96%. This high I = 0 contribution is unexpected because the weak interaction violates the isospin.

Gaspero, Mario; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

2012-04-06

46

Stacking interactions in PUF?RNA complexes  

SciTech Connect

Stacking interactions between amino acids and bases are common in RNA-protein interactions. Many proteins that regulate mRNAs interact with single-stranded RNA elements in the 3' UTR (3'-untranslated region) of their targets. PUF proteins are exemplary. Here we focus on complexes formed between a Caenorhabditis elegans PUF protein, FBF, and its cognate RNAs. Stacking interactions are particularly prominent and involve every RNA base in the recognition element. To assess the contribution of stacking interactions to formation of the RNA-protein complex, we combine in vivo selection experiments with site-directed mutagenesis, biochemistry, and structural analysis. Our results reveal that the identities of stacking amino acids in FBF affect both the affinity and specificity of the RNA-protein interaction. Substitutions in amino acid side chains can restrict or broaden RNA specificity. We conclude that the identities of stacking residues are important in achieving the natural specificities of PUF proteins. Similarly, in PUF proteins engineered to bind new RNA sequences, the identity of stacking residues may contribute to 'target' versus 'off-target' interactions, and thus be an important consideration in the design of proteins with new specificities.

Yiling Koh, Yvonne; Wang, Yeming; Qiu, Chen; Opperman, Laura; Gross, Leah; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wickens, Marvin (NIH); (UW)

2012-07-02

47

Highly congested nondistorted diheteroarylnaphthalenes: model compounds for the investigation of intramolecular pi-stacking interactions.  

PubMed

[structure: see text] The rigid, highly congested structure of 1,8-diacridylnaphthalenes has been studied in solution and in the solid state. The unique geometry of these compounds forces the acridyl rings to undergo face-to-face interactions while rendering T-shaped orientations and face-to-edge interactions impossible. Crystallographic analysis shows that splaying between the heteroaryl rings decreases while twisting between the cofacial rings increases as the acridyl nitrogens of the 1,8-diacridylnaphthalene framework are subsequently oxidized. The peri-acridyl rings are slightly splayed but remain perfectly planar in all cases. The significant decrease in splaying indicates enhanced pi-pi-attraction between the electron-rich acridyl N-oxide moieties, which is in agreement with recently reported symmetry-adapted perturbation theory calculations. The pi-stacking and the molecular geometry between the acridyl rings observed in the solid state have been confirmed through in-solution studies showing characteristic proton NMR upfield shifts and optical properties indicative of static intramolecular arene-arene interactions. Acridyl protons located directly above the adjacent aryl moiety as a consequence of twisting between the heteroaryl rings were identified by COSY NMR measurements and found to intrude into the pi-cloud and diamagnetic ring current of the neighboring acridine. Different shapes and strong red shifts of the fluorescence emission maxima of the diacridylnaphthalenes in comparison to parental acridyl monomers have been attributed to static excimer emission. PMID:15760218

Mei, Xuefeng; Wolf, Christian

2005-03-18

48

Two-dimensional iron(II) spin crossover complex constructed of bifurcated NH...O- hydrogen bonds and pi-pi interactions: [FeII(HLH,Me)2](ClO4)2.1.5MeCN (HLH,Me = imidazol-4-yl-methylidene-8-amino-2-methylquinoline).  

PubMed

A 2D iron(II) spin crossover complex, [FeII(HLH,Me)2](ClO4)2.1.5MeCN (1), was synthesized, where HLH,Me = imidazol-4-yl-methylidene-8-amino-2-methylquinoline. 1 showed a gradual spin transition between the HS (S = 2) and LS (S = 0) states from 180 to 325 K within the first warming run from 5 to 350 K, in which 1.5MeCN is removed, and there was an abrupt spin transition at T1/2 downward arrow = 174 K in the first cooling run from 350 to 5 K. Following the first cycle, the compound showed an abrupt spin transition at T1/2 upward arrow = 185 K and T1/2 downward arrow = 174 K with 11 K wide hysteresis in the second cycle. The crystal structures of 1 were determined at 296 (an intermediate between the HS and LS states) and 150 K (LS state). The structure consists of a 2D extended structure constructed of both the bifurcated NH...O- hydrogen bonds between two ClO4- ions and two neighboring imidazole NH groups of the [FeII(HLH,Me)2]2+ cations and the pi-pi interactions between the two quinolyl rings of the two adjacent cations. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that solvent molecules are gradually eliminated even at room temperature and completely removed at 369 K. Desolvated complex 1' showed an abrupt spin transition at T1/2 upward arrow = 180 K and T1/2 downward arrow = 174 K with 6 K wide hysteresis. PMID:17361997

Hagiwara, Hiroaki; Hashimoto, Shingo; Matsumoto, Naohide; Iijima, Seiichiro

2007-04-16

49

Branching fraction and charge asymmetry measurements in B to J/psi pi pi decays  

E-print Network

We study the decays B0 to J/psi pi+pi- and B+ to J/psi pi+pi0, including intermediate resonances, using a sample of 382 million BBbar pairs recorded by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II e+e- B factory. We measure the branching fractions B(B0 ->J/psi rho0) = (2.7 +/- 0.3 +/- 0.17) x 10-5 and B(B+ ->J/psi rho+) = (5.0 +/- 0.7 +/-0.31) x 10-5. We also set the following upper limits at the 90% confidence level: B(B0 -> J/psi pi+ \\pi- non-resonant) J/psi f_2(1270)) J/psi pi+ pi0 non-resonant) psi rho to be -0.11 +/- 0.12 +/- 0.08.

The BABAR collaboration; B. Aubert

2007-04-10

50

Penguin Zoology in $B\\to\\pi\\pi$ and the Extraction of the CKM Angle $\\alpha$  

E-print Network

We reanalyze the decay $B_d\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$ without assuming dominance of QCD penguins with internal top-quark exchanges. In that case the weak phase of the CKM angle $\\beta$. Nevertheless it is still possible to extract the CKM angle time-dependent CP-violating asymmetry of the transition $B_d\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$. Aside from that CP asymmetry this approach needs as an input only amplitudes of decays with branching ratios of order $10^{-5}$ and will thus be well within reach at future $B$-factories.

Fleischer, Robert; Fleischer, Robert; Mannel, Thomas

1996-01-01

51

Search for b-->u transitions in B>[K+pi-pi0]DK  

Microsoft Academic Search

We search for decays of a B meson into a neutral D meson and a charged kaon, with the D meson decaying into a charged kaon, a charged pion, and a neutral pion. This final state can be reached through the b-->c transition B--->D0K- followed by the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed D0-->K+pi-pi0, or the b-->u transition B--->D¯0K- followed by the Cabibbo-favored D¯0-->K+pi-pi0.

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; Y. Zheng; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani

2007-01-01

52

Empirical parameterization of the K+- -> pi+- pi0 pi0 decay Dalitz plot  

E-print Network

As first observed by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS, the $\\p0p0$ invariant mass (M00) distribution from $\\kcnn$ decay shows a cusp-like anomaly at M00=2m+, where m+ is the charged pion mass. An analysis to extract the pi pi scattering lengths in the isospin I=0 and I=2 states, a0 and a2, respectively, has been recently reported. In the present work the Dalitz plot of this decay is fitted to a new empirical parameterization suitable for practical purposes, such as Monte Carlo simulations of K+- -> pi+- pi0 pi0 decays.

J. R. Batley; A. J. Culling; G. Kalmus; C. Lazzeroni; D. J. Munday; M. W. Slater; S. A. Wotton; R. Arcidiacono; G. Bocquet; N. Cabibbo; A. Ceccucci; D. Cundy; V. Falaleev; M. Fidecaro; L. Gatignon; A. Gonidec; W. Kubischta; A. Norton; A. Maier; M. Patel; A. Peters; S. Balev; P. L. Frabetti; E. Goudzovski; P. Hristov; V. Kekelidze; V. Kozhuharov; L. Litov; D. Madigozhin; E. Marinova; N. Molokanova; I. Polenkevich; Yu. Potrebenikov; S. Stoynev; A. Zinchenko; E. Monnier; E. Swallow; R. Winston; P. Rubin; A. Walker; W. Baldini; A. Cotta Ramusino; P. Dalpiaz; C. Damiani; M. Fiorini; A. Gianoli; M. Martini; F. Petrucci; M. Savrié; M. Scarpa; H. Wahl; M. Calvetti; E. Iacopini; G. Ruggiero; A. Bizzeti; M. Lenti; M. Veltri; M. Behler; K. Eppard; K. Kleinknecht; P. Marouelli; L. Masetti; U. Moosbrugger; C. Morales Morales; B. Renk; M. Wache; R. Wanke; A. Winhart; D. Coward; A. Dabrowski; T. Fonseca Martin; M. Shieh; M. Szleper; M. Velasco; M. D. Wood; G. Anzivino; E. Imbergamo; A. Nappi; M. Piccini; M. Raggi; M. Valdata-Nappi; P. Cenci; M. Pepe; M. C. Petrucci; C. Cerri; R. Fantechi; G. Collazuol; L. DiLella; G. Lamanna; I. Mannelli; A. Michetti; F. Costantini; N. Doble; L. Fiorini; S. Giudici; G. Pierazzini; M. Sozzi; S. Venditti; B. Bloch-Devaux; C. Cheshkov; J. B. Chèze; M. De Beer; J. Derré; G. Marel; E. Mazzucato; B. Peyaud; B. Vallage; M. Holder; M. Ziolkowski; C. Biino; N. Cartiglia; F. Marchetto; S. Bifani; M. Clemencic; S. Goy Lopez; H. Dibon; M. Jeitler; M. Markytan; I. Mikulec; G. Neuhofer; L. Widhalm

2010-04-07

53

Study of CP-violating asymmetries in B0-->pi+pi-, K+pi- decays  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a measurement of the time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in neutral B decays to the pi+pi-CP eigenstate, and an updated measurement of the charge asymmetry in B0-->K+pi- decays. In a sample of 33 million Upsilon(4S)-->BBbar decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric B factory, we find 65+12-11 pi+pi- and 217+\\/-18 K+pi- candidates and measure the asymmetry

B. Aubert; D. Boutigny; J.-M. Gaillard; A. Hicheur; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; P. Robbe; V. Tisserand; A. Palano; A. Pompili; G. P. Chen; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; A. W. Borgland; A. B. Breon; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; A. R. Clark; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; J. F. Kral; C. Leclerc; M. E. Levi; G. Lynch; P. J. Oddone; A. Perazzo; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; A. Romosan; M. T. Ronan; V. G. Shelkov; A. V. Telnov; W. A. Wenzel; P. G. Bright-Thomas; T. J. Harrison; C. M. Hawkes; D. J. Knowles; S. W. O'Neale; R. C. Penny; A. T. Watson; N. K. Watson; T. Deppermann; K. Goetzen; H. Koch; M. Kunze; B. Lewandowski; K. Peters; H. Schmuecker; M. Steinke; J. C. Andress; N. R. Barlow; W. Bhimji; N. Chevalier; P. J. Clark; W. N. Cottingham; N. Dyce; B. Foster; C. Mackay; D. Wallom; F. F. Wilson; K. Abe; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; D. Thiessen; S. Jolly; A. K. McKemey; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; D. A. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. B. Golubev; V. N. Ivanchenko; A. A. Korol; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; A. A. Salnikov; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; V. I. Telnov; A. N. Yushkov; D. Best; M. Chao; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; S. McMahon; D. P. Stoker; K. Arisaka; C. Buchanan; S. Chun; D. B. Macfarlane; S. Prell; Sh. Rahatlou; G. Raven; V. Sharma; C. Campagnari; B. Dahmes; P. A. Hart; N. Kuznetsova; S. L. Levy; O. Long; A. Lu; J. D. Richman; W. Verkerke; M. Witherell; S. Yellin; J. Beringer; D. E. Dorfan; A. M. Eisner; A. A. Grillo; M. Grothe; C. A. Heusch; R. P. Johnson; W. S. Lockman; T. Pulliam; H. Sadrozinski; T. Schalk; R. E. Schmitz; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. Turri; W. Walkowiak; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; S. Metzler; J. Oyang; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; M. Weaver; S. Yang; R. Y. Zhu; S. Devmal; T. L. Geld; S. Jayatilleke; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; T. Barillari; P. Bloom; M. O. Dima; S. Fahey; W. T. Ford; D. R. Johnson; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; P. Rankin; J. Roy; S. Sen; J. G. Smith; W. C. van Hoek; D. L. Wagner; J. Blouw; J. L. Harton; M. Krishnamurthy; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; J. Zhang; R. Aleksan; A. de Lesquen; S. Emery; A. Gaidot; S. F. Ganzhur; P.-F. Giraud; G. Hamel de Monchenault; W. Kozanecki; M. Langer; G. W. London; B. Mayer; B. Serfass; G. Vasseur; Ch. Yèche; M. Zito; T. Brandt; J. Brose; T. Colberg; M. Dickopp; R. S. Dubitzky; A. Hauke; E. Maly; R. Müller-Pfefferkorn; S. Otto; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; B. Spaan; L. Wilden; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; F. Brochard; J. Cohen-Tanugi; S. Ferrag; E. Roussot; S. T'Jampens; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; A. Anjomshoaa; R. Bernet; A. Khan; D. Lavin; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; J. E. Swain; J. Tinslay; M. Falbo; C. Borean; C. Bozzi; S. Dittongo; L. Piemontese; E. Treadwell; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; D. Falciai; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; Y. Xie; A. Zallo; S. Bagnasco; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; G. Crosetti; M. Lo Vetere; M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; F. C. Pastore; C. Patrignani; M. G. Pia; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; M. Morii; R. Bartoldus; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; P.-A. Fischer; J. Lamsa; W. T. Meyer; E. I. Rosenberg; G. Grosdidier; C. Hast; A. Höcker; H. M. Lacker; S. Laplace; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; S. Plaszczynski; M. H. Schune; S. Trincaz-Duvoid; G. Wormser; R. M. Bionta; V. Brigljevic; D. J. Lange; M. Mugge; K. van Bibber; D. M. Wright; M. Carroll; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; M. George; M. Kay; D. J. Payne; R. J. Sloane; C. Touramanis; M. L. Aspinwall; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; I. Eschrich; N. J. Gunawardane; J. A. Nash; P. Sanders; D. Smith; D. E. Azzopardi; J. J. Back; P. Dixon; P. F. Harrison; R. J. Potter; H. W. Shorthouse; P. Strother; P. B. Vidal; M. I. Williams; G. Cowan; S. George; M. G. Green; A. Kurup; C. E. Marker; P. McGrath; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; I. J. Scott; G. Vaitsas; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; R. J. Barlow; J. T. Boyd; A. C. Forti; J. Fullwood; F. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; N. Savvas; E. T. Simopoulos; J. H. Weatherall; A. Farbin; A. Jawahery; V. Lillard; J. Olsen; D. A. Roberts; J. R. Schieck; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; K. T. Flood; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; V. G. Koptchev; T. B. Moore; H. Staengle; S. Willocq; B. Brau; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Milek; P. M. Patel; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; J. P. Martin; J. Y. Nief; R. Seitz; P. Taras; V. Zacek; H. Nicholson; C. S. Sutton; C. Cartaro; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo

2002-01-01

54

Dispersion relations with crossing symmetry for {pi}{pi}D- and F1-wave amplitudes  

SciTech Connect

Results of implementation of dispersion relations with imposed crossing symmetry condition to description of {pi}{pi}D and F1 wave amplitudes are presented. We use relations with only one subtraction what leads to small uncertainties of results and to strong constraints for tested {pi}{pi} amplitudes. Presented equations are similar to those with one subtraction (so called GKPY equations) and to those with two subtractions (the Roy's equations) for the S and P waves. Numerical calculations are done with the S and P wave input amplitudes tested already with use of the Roy's and GKPY equations.

Kaminski, R. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, Krakow (Poland)

2011-05-23

55

Dispersive analysis of the new Belle {gamma}{gamma}{yields}{pi}{pi} results with chiral constraints  

SciTech Connect

We present an analysis of the recent high-statistics {gamma}{gamma}{yields}{pi}{pi} data from the Belle collaboration, based on the method of matching dispersive Muskhelishvili-Omnes type equations and chiral expansion formulas, extended beyond the region of {pi}{pi} elastic scattering. Chiral constraints which derive from the knowledge of all of the p{sup 4} and one of the relevant p{sup 6} coupling constants are implemented. Values of the pion dipole as well as quadrupole polarizabilities are deduced.

Garcia-Martin, R. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica II, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Moussallam, B. [Groupe de Physique Theorique, Institut de Physique Nucleaire Universite Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay (France)

2011-05-23

56

Precise analysis of {pi}{pi} scattering data from Roy equations and forward dispersion relations  

SciTech Connect

We review our recent analysis of {pi}{pi} scattering data in terms of Roy equations and Forward Dispersion Relations, and present some preliminary results in terms of a new set of once-subtracted coupled equations for partial waves. The first analysis consists of independent fits to the different {pi}{pi} channels that satisfies rather well the dispersive representation. In the second analysis we constrain the fit with the dispersion relations. The latter provides a very precise and model independent description of data using just analyticity, causality and crossing.

Pelaez, J. R.; Martin, R. Garci [Departamento de Fisica Teorica II, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040, Madrid (Spain); Kaminski, R. [Department of Theoretical Physics Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 31-342, Krakow (Poland); Yndurain, F. J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, C-XI, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Canto Blanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

2008-08-31

57

Measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in X(3872)-> J\\/psi pi(+)pi(-) decays  

Microsoft Academic Search

We measure the dipion mass spectrum in X(3872) -> J\\/psi pi(+)pi(-) decays using 360 pb(-1) of (p) over barp collisions at root s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. The spectrum is fit with predictions for odd C-parity (S-3(1), P-1(1), and D-3(J)) charmonia decaying to J\\/psi pi(+)pi(-), as well as even C-parity states in which the pions

A. Abulencia; D. Acosta; J. Adelman; T. Affolder; T. Akimoto; M. G. Albrow; D. Ambrose; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; K. Anikeev; A. Annovi; J. Antos; M. Aoki; G. Apollinari; J. F. Arguin; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; W. Ashmanskas; A. Attal; F. Azfar; P. Azzi-Bacchetta; P. Azzurri; N. Bacchetta; H. Bachacou; W. Badgett; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; S. Baroiant; V. Bartsch; G. Bauer; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; S. Belforte; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; A. Belloni; E. Ben Haim; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; J. Beringer; T. Berry; A. Bhatti; M. Binkley; D. Bisello; M. Bishai; R. E. Blair; C. Blocker; K. Bloom; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; V. Boisvert; G. Bolla; A. Bolshov; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; S. Bourov; A. Boveia; B. Brau; C. Bromberg; E. Brubaker; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; K. L. Byrum; S. Cabrera; M. Campanelli; M. Campbell; F. Canelli; A. Canepa; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carron; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; S. H. Chang; J. Chapman; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; F. Chlebana; I. Cho; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; J. P. Chou; P. H. Chu; S. H. Chuang; K. Chung; W. H. Chung; Y. S. Chung; M. Ciljak; C. I. Ciobanu; M. A. Ciocci; A. Clark; D. Clark; M. Coca; A. Connolly; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; B. Cooper; K. Copic; M. Cordelli; G. Cortiana; A. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; D. Cyr; S. DaRonco; S. DAuria; M. Donofrio; D. Dagenhart; P. de Barbaro; S. De Cecco; A. Deisher; G. De Lentdecker; M. DellOrso; S. Demers; L. Demortier; J. Deng; M. Deninno; D. De Pedis; P. F. Derwent; C. Dionisi; J. R. Dittmann; P. DiTuro; C. Dorr; A. Dominguez; S. Donati; M. Donega; P. Dong; J. Donini; T. Dorigo; S. Dube; K. Ebina; J. Efron; J. Ehlers; R. Erbacher; D. Errede; S. Errede; R. Eusebi; H. C. Fang; S. Farrington; I. Fedorko; W. T. Fedorko; R. G. Feild; M. Feindt; J. P. Fernandez; R. Field; G. Flanagan; L. R. Flores-Castillo; A. Foland; S. Forrester; G. W. Foster; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; Y. Fujii; I. Furic; A. Gajjar; M. Gallinaro; J. Galyardt; J. E. Garcia; M. G. Sciveres; A. F. Garfinkel; C. Gay; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; D. Gerdes; S. Giagu; G. P. di Giovanni; P. Giannetti; A. Gibson; K. Gibson; C. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; K. Giolo; M. Giordani; M. Giunta; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; N. Goldschmidt; J. Goldstein; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. Gonzalez; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; Y. Gotra; K. Goulianos; A. Gresele; M. Griffiths; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; U. Grundler; J. G. da Costa; C. Haber; S. R. Hahn; K. Hahn; E. Halkiadakis; B. Y. Han; R. Handler; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; S. Harper; R. F. Harr; R. M. Harris; K. Hatakeyama; J. Hauser; C. Hays; H. Hayward; A. Heijboer; B. Heinemann; J. Heinrich; M. Hennecke; M. Herndon; J. Heuser; D. Hidas; C. S. Hill; D. Hirschbuehl; A. Hocker; A. Holloway; S. Hou; M. Houlden; S. C. Hsu; B. T. Huffman; R. E. Hughes; J. Huston; K. Ikado; J. Incandela; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; Y. Ishizawa; A. Ivanov; B. Iyutin; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; D. Jeans; H. Jensen; E. J. Jeon; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; T. Kamon; J. Kang; M. Karagoz-Unel; P. E. Karchin; Y. Kato; Y. Kemp; R. Kephart; U. Kerzel; V. Khotilovich; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; M. Kirby; L. Kirsch; S. Klimenko; M. Klute; B. Knuteson; B. R. Ko; H. Kobayashi; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; K. Kordas; A. Korytov; A. V. Kotwal; A. Kovalev; J. Kraus; I. Kravchenko; M. Kreps; A. Kreymer; J. Kroll; N. Krumnack; M. Kruse; V. Krutelyov; S. E. Kuhlmann; Y. Kusakabe; S. Kwang; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lai; S. Lami; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; R. L. Lander; K. Lannon; A. Lath; G. Latino; I. Lazzizzera; C. Lecci; T. LeCompte; J. Lee; S. W. Lee; R. Lefevre; N. Leonardo; S. Leone; S. Levy; J. D. Lewis; K. Li; C. Lin; M. Lindgren; E. Lipeles; T. M. Liss; A. Lister; D. O. Litvintsev; T. Liu; Y. Liu; N. S. Lockyer; A. Loginov; M. Loreti; P. Loverre; R. S. Lu; D. Lucchesi; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; L. Lyons; J. Lys; R. Lysak; E. Lytken; P. Mack; D. MacQueen; R. Madrak; K. Maeshima; P. Maksimovic; G. Manca; F. Margaroli; R. Marginean; C. Marino; A. Martin; M. Martin; V. Martin; M. Martinez; T. Maruyama; H. Matsunaga; M. E. Mattson; R. Mazini; P. Mazzanti; K. S. McFarland; D. McGivern; P. McIntyre; P. McNamara; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; S. Menzemer; A. Menzione; P. Merkel; C. Mesropian; A. Messina; M. von der Mey; T. Miao; N. Miladinovic; J. Miles; R. Miller; J. S. Miller; C. Mills; M. Milnik; R. Miquel; S. Miscetti; G. Mitselmakher; A. Miyamoto; N. Moggi; B. Mohr; R. Moore; M. Morello; P. M. Fernandez; J. Mulmenstadt; A. Mukherjee; M. Mulhearn; T. Muller; R. Mumford; P. Murat; J. Nachtman; S. Nahn; I. Nakano; A. Napier; D. Naumov; V. Necula; C. Neu; M. S. Neubauer; J. Nielsen

2006-01-01

58

2013 Research Opportunity Seed Fund Awards PI PI Dept, College CoPI(s) CoPI Dept, College Title  

E-print Network

Engineering, ENG Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and amyloid fibrillization 2013 Research Opportunity Seed Fund Awards PI PI Dept, College CoPI(s) CoPI Dept, College Title Opportunity Seed Fund Awards PI PI Dept, College CoPI(s) CoPI Dept, College Title Approved Budget Maupin

Wu, Dapeng Oliver

59

Hunting the CKM weak phase with time-integrated Dalitz analyses of Bs -> K pi pi decays  

E-print Network

We present a new technique to extract information on the Unitarity Triangle from the study of Bs -> K pi pi Dalitz plot. Using isospin symmetry and the possibility to access the decay amplitudes from Dalitz analyses, we propose a new strategy to extract the weak phase gamma from Bs to K pi pi.

M. Ciuchini; M. Pierini; L. Silvestrini

2006-02-22

60

Measurement of the decay K^+ rightarrow pi^+pi^-mu^+nu  

Microsoft Academic Search

The NA48\\/2 experiment at CERN created great opportunities to analyze rare charged kaon decays. A large part of the 2003 year data was acquired with a newly introduced kaon spectrometer. Along with magnet spectrometer, calorimeters and muon detector systems a precise reconstruction of kaon decays became possible. Particularly, the decay $K^{+} \\\\rightarrow \\\\pi^{+}\\\\pi^{-}\\\\mu^{+}\\\

Andrey Belkin; Burkhard Renk

2006-01-01

61

Determination of the S-Wave Pi Pi Scattering Lengths From a Study of K - to Pi - Pi0 Pi0 Decays  

SciTech Connect

We report the results from a study of the full sample of {approx}6.031 x 10{sup 7} K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} decays recorded by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS. As first observed in this experiment, the {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} invariant mass (M{sub 00}) distribution shows a cusp-like anomaly in the region around M{sub 00} = 2m{sub +}, where m{sub +} is the charged pion mass. This anomaly has been interpreted as an effect due mainly to the final state charge exchange scattering process {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} in K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay. Fits to the M{sub 00} distribution using two different theoretical formulations provide the presently most precise determination of a{sub 0} - a{sub 2}, the difference between the {pi}{pi} S-wave scattering lengths in the isospin I = 0 and I = 2 states. Higher-order {pi}{pi} rescattering terms, included in the two formulations, allow also an independent, though less precise, determination of a{sub 2}.

Batley, J.R.; Culling, A.J.; Kalmus, G.; /Cambridge U.; Lazzeroni, C.; /Cambridge U. /Birmingham U.; Munday, D.J.; /Cambridge U.; Slater, M.W.; /Cambridge U. /Birmingham U.; Wotton, S.A.; /Cambridge U.; Arcidiacono, R.; /CERN /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Bocquet, G.; /CERN; Cabibbo, N.; /CERN /Rome U. /INFN, Rome; Ceccucci, A.; /CERN; Cundy, D.; /CERN /Turin, Cosmo-Geofisica Lab; Falaleev, V.; Fidecaro, M.; Gatignon, L.; Gonidec, A.; Kubischta, W.; /CERN; Norton, A.; /CERN /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara; Maier, A.; Patel, M.; Peters, A.; /CERN /Dubna, JINR /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Birmingham U. /Dubna, JINR /CERN /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Sofiya U. /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /INFN, Perugia /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Northwestern U. /Dubna, JINR /Chicago U., EFI /Marseille, CPPM /Chicago U., EFI /Edinburgh U. /George Mason U. /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Florence /Modena U. /INFN, Florence /INFN, Florence /Urbino U. /INFN, Florence /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Bonn U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Northwestern U. /SLAC /Northwestern U. /Northwestern U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Northwestern U. /Northwestern U. /UCLA /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Frascati /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Barcelona, IFAE /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /CERN /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /Siegen U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Bern U. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /CERN /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Madrid, CIEMAT /Vienna, OAW

2012-03-29

62

Radiative return via electron pair production: Monte Carlo simulation of the process e+ e- --> pi+ pi- e+ e-  

E-print Network

Contributions from the reaction e+e- --> pi+pi- e+e- to the pion form factor measurement via radiative return method are discussed basing on the results of a Monte Carlo generator (EKHARA). The generator contains contributions from the initial and final state emission of a e+e- pair from e+e- --> pi+pi- production diagrams and the pi+pi- pair production from space-like and time-like Bhabha diagrams. A detailed study is performed for the Phi- factory energy. Tests of the generation procedure are also presented.

Henryk Czyz; Elzbieta Nowak-Kubat

2005-10-21

63

Observation of CP Violation in B0-->K+pi- and B0-->pi+pi-  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report observations of CP violation in the decays B0-->K+pi- and B0-->pi+pi- in a sample of 383×106 Upsilon(4S)-->BB¯ events. We find 4372±82 B0-->K+pi- decays and measure the direct CP-violating charge asymmetry AKpi=-0.107±0.018(stat)-0.004+0.007(syst), which excludes the CP-conserving hypothesis with a significance of 5.5 standard deviations. In the same sample, we find 1139±49 B0-->pi+pi- decays and measure the CP-violating asymmetries Spipi=-0.60±0.11(stat)±0.03(syst) and

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. S. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; P. H. Fisher; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; B. L. Hartfiel; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès

2007-01-01

64

Measurement of the branching fraction for $D^{+} K^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}$  

E-print Network

Using the CLEO-II detector at CESR we have measured the ratio of branching fractions, {\\cal B}(D^+\\rightarrow K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^+)/{\\cal B}(D^0 \\rightarrow K^-\\pi^+) = 2.35 \\pm 0.16 \\pm 0.16. Our recent measurement of {\\cal B}(D^0 \\rightarrow K^-\\pi^+) then gives {\\cal B}(D^+\\rightarrow K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^+) = (9.3 \\pm 0.6 \\pm 0.8)\\%. hardcopies with figures can be obtained by writing to to: Pam Morehouse preprint secretary Newman Lab Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853 or by sending mail to: preprints@lns62.lns.cornell.edu A postscript version is available through World-Wide-Web.

Balest, R; Cho, K; Daoudi, M; Ford, W T; Johnson, D R; Lingel, K; Lohner, M; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Bebek, C; Berkelman, K; Bloom, K; Browder, T E; Cassel, D G; Cho, H A; Coffman, D M; Drell, P S; Ehrlich, R; Gaiderev, P; García-Sciveres, M; Geiser, B; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Jones, C D; Jones, S L; Kandaswamy, J; Katayama, N; Kim, P C; Kreinick, D L; Ludwig, G S; Masui, J; Mevissen, J; Mistry, N B; Ng, C R; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Salman, S; Sapper, M; Würthwein, F; Avery, P; Freyberger, A; Rodríguez, J; Stephens, R; Yang, S; Yelton, J; Cinabro, D; Henderson, S; Liu, T; Saulnier, M; Wilson, R; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G; Ong, B; Palmer, M; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Ball, S; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Besson, D; Coppage, D; Copty, N; Davis, R; Hancock, N; Kelly, M; Kwak, N; Lam, H; Kubota, Y; Lattery, M; Nelson, J K; Patton, S; Perticone, D; Poling, R A; Savinov, V; Schrenk, S; Wang, R; Alam, M S; Kim, I J; Nemati, B; O'Neill, J J; Severini, H; Sun, C R; Zoeller, M M; Crawford, G; Daubenmier, C M; Fulton, R; Fujino, D; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Lee, J; Malchow, R; Skovpen, Y; Sung, M; White, C; Butler, F; Fu, X; Kalbfleisch, G; Ross, W R; Skubic, P L; Snow, J; Wang, P L; Wood, M; Brown, D N; Fast, J; McIlwain, R L; Miao, T; Miller, D H; Modesitt, M; Payne, D; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Wang, P N; Battle, M; Ernst, J; Kwon, Y; Roberts, S; Thorndike, E H; Wang, C H; Dominick, J; Lambrecht, M; Sanghera, S; Shelkov, V; Skwarnicki, T; Stroynowski, R; Volobuev, I P; Wei, G; Zadorozhny, P; Artuso, M; Goldberg, M; He, D; Horwitz, N; Kennett, R; Mountain, R; Moneti, G C; Muheim, F; Mukhin, Y; Playfer, S; Rozen, Y; Stone, S; Thulasidas, M; Vasseur, G; Zhu, G; Bartelt, J; Csorna, S E; Egyed, Z; Jain, V; Kinoshita, K; Edwards, K W; Ogg, M; Britton, D I; Hyatt, E R F; MacFarlane, D B; Patel, P M; Akerib, D S; Barish, B; Chadha, M; Chan, S; Cowen, D F; Eigen, G; Miller, J S; O'Grady, C; Urheim, J; Weinstein, A J; Acosta, D; Athanas, M; Masek, G; Paar, H P; Gronberg, J; Kutschke, R; Menary, S; Morrison, R J; Nakanishi, S; Nelson, H N; Nelson, T K; Qiao, C; Richman, J D; Ryd, A; Tajima, H; Sperka, D; Witherell, M S; Procario, M

1994-01-01

65

Dalitz plot analysis of the decay B0( Bmacr 0)-->K±pi-\\/+pi0  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a Dalitz-plot analysis of the charmless hadronic decays of neutral B mesons to K±pi-\\/+pi0. With a sample of (231.8±2.6)×106Upsilon(4S)-->B Bmacr decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, we measure the magnitudes and phases of the intermediate resonant and nonresonant amplitudes for B0 and Bmacr 0 decays and determine the corresponding CP-averaged

B. Aubert; M. Bona; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; T. J. Orimoto; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; N. Soni; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; B. Echenard; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; R. Ayad; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; R. Cenci; A. Cervelli

2008-01-01

66

Physical matrix elements for Delta I = 3/2 channel K to pi pi decays  

E-print Network

K to pi pi matrix elements of the electroweak operator Q_(27,1)^Delta I=3/2 are calculated on the RBC/UKQCD 32^3 x 64, L_s=16 lattices, using 2+1 dynamical flavors and domain wall fermions, with an inverse lattice spacing of a^(-1)=2.42(4) GeV. Data is interpolated or extrapolated to energy conserving kinematics and a preliminary calculation of the experimental parameter |A_2| is performed.

Matthew Lightman; for the RBC; UKQCD collaborations

2009-06-10

67

An alternative interpretation of Belle data on \\gamma-\\gamma -> \\eta'-\\pi^+-\\pi^-  

E-print Network

Belle data on gamma-gamma -> eta'-pi-pi are refitted using a broad J^{PC}=0^(-+) signal peaking in the mass range 2250-2300 MeV, but without \\eta (1760). There is the possibility that this broad 0^(-+) signal may be identified with the 0^(-+) glueball predicted originally by Morningstar and Peardon. The X(1835) is confirmed to have a resonant phase variation.

Bugg, D V

2012-01-01

68

Can one see the number of colors in eta, eta-prime --> pi^+ pi^- gamma?  

E-print Network

We investigate the decays eta, eta-prime --> pi^+ pi^- gamma up to next-to-leading order in the framework of the combined 1/N_c and chiral expansions. Counter terms of unnatural parity at next-to-leading order with unknown couplings are important to acommodate the results both to the experimental decay width and the photon spectrum. The presence of these coefficients does not allow for a determination of the number of colors from these decays.

B. Borasoy; E. Lipartia

2004-10-10

69

High-Statistics Study of the tau^- -> pi^- pi^0 nu_tau Decay  

E-print Network

We report a high-statistics measurement of the branching fraction for tau^- --> pi^- pi^0 nu_tau and the invariant mass spectrum of the produced pi^- pi^0 system using 72.2 fb^-1 of data recorded with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e^+ e^- collider. The branching fraction obtained is (25.24 +/- 0.01 +/- 0.39)%, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The unfolded pi^- pi^0 mass spectrum is used to determine resonance parameters for the rho(770), rho'(1450), and rho"(1700) mesons. We also use this spectrum to estimate the hadronic (2pi) contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon (a_{mu}^{pipi}). Our result for a_{mu}^{pipi} integrated over the mass range sqrt{s} = 2m_{pi} - 1.8 GeV/c^2 is a_{mu}^{pipi} = (523.5 +/- 1.5 (exp) +/- 2.6 (Br) +/- 2.5 (isospin))x 10^{-10}, where the first error is due to the experimental uncertainties, the second is due to the uncertainties in the branching fractions and the third is due to the uncertainties in the isospin-violating corrections.

M. Fujikawa; H. Hayashii; S. Eidelman; for the Belle Collaboration

2008-05-24

70

Reaction {pi}N {yields} {pi}{pi}N near threshold  

SciTech Connect

The LAMPF E1179 experiment used the {pi}{sup 0} spectrometer and an array of charged particle range counters to detect and record {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, {pi}{sup 0}p, and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}p coincidences following the reaction {pi}{sup +}p {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}p near threshold. The total cross sections for single pion production were measured at the incident pion kinetic energies 190, 200, 220, 240, and 260 MeV. Absolute normalizations were fixed by measuring {pi}{sup +}p elastic scattering at 260 MeV. A detailed analysis of the {pi}{sup 0} detection efficiency was performed using cosmic ray calibrations and pion single charge exchange measurements with a 30 MeV {pi}{sup {minus}} beam. All published data on {pi}N {yields} {pi}{pi}N, including our results, are simultaneously fitted to yield a common chiral symmetry breaking parameter {xi} ={minus}0.25{plus_minus}0.10. The threshold matrix element {vert_bar}{alpha}{sub 0}({pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}p){vert_bar} determined by linear extrapolation yields the value of the s-wave isospin-2 {pi}{pi} scattering length {alpha}{sub 0}{sup 2}({pi}{pi}) = {minus}0.041{plus_minus}0.003 m{sub {pi}}{sup {minus}1}, within the framework of soft-pion theory.

Frlez, E.

1993-11-01

71

Probing CP violation in $B^0_s \\rightarrow K^{0}_{\\rm S} \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ decays  

E-print Network

The three-body charmless hadronic decay $B^0_s \\rightarrow K^{0}_{\\rm S} \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ provides a number of novel possibilities to search for CP violation effects and test the Standard Model of particle physics. These include fits to the Dalitz-plot distributions of the decay-time-integrated final state, decay-time-dependent (but without initial state flavour tagging) fits to the Dalitz-plot distribution, as well as full decay-time-dependent and flavour tagged fits. The relative sensitivities of these different approaches are investigated.

Gershon, Tim; Coutinho, Rafael Silva

2014-01-01

72

Renormalization group equations in resonance chiral theory: the pi pi vector form-factor  

E-print Network

The use of the equations of motion and meson field redefinitions allows the simplification of the subleading operators required in the one-loop resonance chiral theory calculation of the pi pi vector form-factor. The study of the renormalization group equations of the relevant parameters shows the existence of an infrared fixed point for all the couplings. It is important to remark that this result does not rely on the high-energy form-factor constraints, which are often considered in other works. The possibility of developing a perturbative 1/Nc expansion in the slow running region around the fixed point is shown here.

J. J. Sanz-Cillero

2009-10-14

73

Dalitz analysis of three-body charmless B0-->K0pi+pi- decay  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report results of a Dalitz plot analysis of the three-body charmless B0-->K0pi+pi- decay. The analysis is performed with a data sample that contains 388×106 BB¯ pairs collected near the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. Measurements of branching fractions for the quasi-two-body decays B0-->rho(770)0K0, B0-->f0(980)K0, B0-->K*(892)+pi-, B0-->K*(1430)+pi-, and upper limits on several other

A. Garmash; K. Abe; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; D. Anipko; K. Arinstein; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; S. Bahinipati; A. M. Bakich; V. Balagura; E. Barberio; M. Barbero; A. Bay; I. Bedny; K. Belous; U. Bitenc; I. Bizjak; S. Blyth; A. Bondar; A. Bozek; M. Bracko; T. E. Browder; M.-C. Chang; Y. Chao; A. Chen; K.-F. Chen; W. T. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; Y. Choi; S. Cole; J. Dalseno; M. Dash; J. Dragic; A. Drutskoy; S. Eidelman; D. Epifanov; N. Gabyshev; T. Gershon; A. Go; G. Gokhroo; B. Golob; H. Ha; J. Haba; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; M. Hazumi; D. Heffernan; T. Hokuue; Y. Hoshi; S. Hou; W.-S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; T. Iijima; K. Ikado; A. Imoto; K. Inami; A. Ishikawa; H. Ishino; R. Itoh; M. Iwasaki; Y. Iwasaki; J. H. Kang; P. Kapusta; H. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; H. Kichimi; H. J. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; P. Krizan; P. Krokovny; R. Kulasiri; R. Kumar; C. C. Kuo; A. Kuzmin; Y.-J. Kwon; S. E. Lee; T. Lesiak; J. Li; S.-W. Lin; Y. Liu; G. Majumder; F. Mandl; T. Matsumoto; S. McOnie; W. Mitaroff; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyake; H. Miyata; Y. Miyazaki; R. Mizuk; D. Mohapatra; G. R. Moloney; Y. Nagasaka; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Noguchi; T. Ohshima; S. Okuno; S. L. Olsen; Y. Onuki; P. Pakhlov; G. Pakhlova; L. S. Peak; R. Pestotnik; L. E. Piilonen; A. Poluektov; H. Sahoo; Y. Sakai; N. Satoyama; T. Schietinger; O. Schneider; J. Schümann; C. Schwanda; A. J. Schwartz; K. Senyo; M. Shapkin; H. Shibuya; B. Shwartz; V. Sidorov; A. Sokolov; A. Somov; S. Stanic; M. Staric; H. Stoeck; K. Sumisawa; T. Sumiyoshi; S. Y. Suzuki; F. Takasaki; K. Tamai; M. Tanaka; G. N. Taylor; Y. Teramoto; X. C. Tian; K. Trabelsi; T. Tsukamoto; S. Uehara; T. Uglov; K. Ueno; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; Y. Ushiroda; Y. Usov; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; S. Villa; C. H. Wang; M.-Z. Wang; Y. Watanabe; E. Won; C.-H. Wu; Q. L. Xie; B. D. Yabsley; A. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamashita; M. Yamauchi; C. C. Zhang; L. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; A. Zupanc

2007-01-01

74

Asymmetry observables in e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{pi}+{pi}-{gamma}} in the {phi} region within a chiral unitary approach  

SciTech Connect

We make a theoretical study of the charge and forward-backward pion asymmetries in the e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{pi}+{pi}-{gamma}} process on and off the {phi} resonance energy. These observables are rather sensitive to the inner details of the theoretical models to describe the reaction. In addition to the standard implementation of the initial state radiation and the bremsstrahlung contribution to the final state radiation, we use the techniques of the chiral unitary approach to evaluate the contribution from the mechanisms of {phi} decay into {pi}{sup +{pi}-{gamma}}. This contribution involves the implementation of final state interaction from direct chiral loops, the exchange of vector and axial-vector resonances and the final state interaction through the consideration of the meson-meson unitarized amplitudes, which were found important in a previous work describing the {phi}{yields}{pi}{pi}{gamma}. We find a good reproduction of the experimental data from KLOE for the forward-backward asymmetry, both at the {phi} peak and away from it. We also make predictions for the angular distributions of the charge asymmetry and show that this observable is very sensitive to the chiral loops involved in {phi} radiative decay.

Roca, L.; Oset, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, E-30071, Murcia (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Apartado 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain)

2010-01-01

75

The target asymmetry P_z in {gamma}p-->p{pi}^+{pi}^- with the CLAS spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The study of baryon resonances provides a deeper understanding of the strong interaction because the dynamics and relevant degrees of freedom hidden within them are reflected by the properties of the excited states of baryons. Higher-lying excited states at and above 1.9 GeV/c{sup 2} are generally predicted to have strong couplings to the {pi}{pi}N final states via {pi}{Delta} or {rho}N intermediate states. Double-pion photoproduction is therefore important to find and investigate properties of highmass resonances. The CLAS g9a (FROST) experiment, as part of the N* spectroscopy program at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab), has accumulated photoproduction data using linearly- and circularly-polarized photons incident on a longitudinally-polarized butanol target in the photon energy range 0.3 to 2.4 GeV. In this contribution, the extraction of the target asymmetry for the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} will be described and preliminary results will be presented.

Sungkyun Park, CLAS Collaboration

2012-04-01

76

Spin mixing mechanism in amplitude analysis of pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n and a new view of dark matter  

E-print Network

We present the first amplitude analysis of the CERN data on pi(-)p->pi(-)pi(+)n on polarized target at 17.2 GeV/c for dipion masses 580-1080 MeV at low momentum transfer using spin mixing mechanism. The analysis of the S- and P-wave subsystem determines a unique solution for the spin mixing transversity amplitudes S_tau, L_tau, the corresponding S-matrix amplitudes S^0_tau, L^0_tau and the rho^0(770)-f_0(980) spin mixing parameters. The spin mixing mechanism allows to extract D-wave observables from the CERN data. Analysis of the full D-wave subsystem for transversity tau=u reveals rho^0(770) mixing in the amplitudes |D^U_u|^2 and |D^N_u|^2 and a violation of a cosine condition by the amplitudes D^2U_u and D^2N_u. We determine spin mixing and S-matrix helicity amplitudes from which we calculate pipi phase-shifts delta^0_S and delta_P below KKbar threshold. The spin mixing and the violation of the cosine condition arise from a non-standard pure dephasing interaction of the produced final S-matrix state rho_f(S...

Svec, Miloslav

2014-01-01

77

Measurement of the decay K^+ rightarrow pi^+pi^-mu^+nu  

Microsoft Academic Search

The NA48\\/2 experiment at CERN created great opportunities to analyze\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009rare charged kaon decays. A large part of the 2003 year data was\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009acquired with a newly introduced kaon spectrometer. Along with magnet\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009spectrometer, calorimeters and muon detector systems a precise reconstruction\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009of kaon decays became possible. Particularly, the decay $K^{+} \\\\rightarrow\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009\\\\pi^{+}\\\\pi^{-}\\\\mu^{+}\\\

Andrey Belkin; Burkhard Renk

2006-01-01

78

An upper limit for the tau neutrino mass from tau -> 5pi(pi0)nutau decays  

Microsoft Academic Search

From a sample of 152,000 tau decays collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP an upper limit of 24 MeV at 95% CL on the tau neutrino mass has been determined. The limit is obtained using a two dimensional likelihood fit of the visible energy and the invariant mass distribution of 25 tau -> 5pi(pi0)nutau events.

Damir Buskulic; David William Casper; I. de Bonis; D. Decamp; P. Ghez; C. Goy; J.-P. Lees; M.-N. Minard; P. Odier; B. Pietrzyk; F. Ariztizabal; M. Chmeissani; J. M. Crespo; I. Efthymiopoulos; E. Fernandez; M. Fernandez-Bosman; V. Gaitan; Ll. Garrido; M. Martinez; S. Orteu; A. Pacheco; C. Padilla; Fabrizio Palla; A. Pascual; J. A. Perlas; F. Sanchez; F. Teubert; D. Creanza; M. de Palma; A. Farilla; Giuseppe Iaselli; G. Maggi; N. Marinelli; S. Natali; S. Nuzzo; A. Ranieri; G. Raso; F. Romano; F. Ruggieri; G. Selvaggi; L. Silvestris; P. Tempesta; G. Zito; X. Huang; J. Lin; Q. Ouyang; T. Wang; Y. Xie; R. Xu; S. Xue; J. Zhang; L. Zhang; W. Zhao; G. Bonvicini; David G Cassel; M. Cattaneo; P. Comas; P. Coyle; H. Drevermann; A. Engelhardt; Roger W Forty; M. Frank; G. Ganis; M. Girone; R. Hagelberg; J. Harvey; R. Jacobsen; P. Janot; B. Jost; J. Knobloch; Ivan Lehraus; M. Maggi; C. Markou; E. B. Martin; P. Mato; H. Meinhard; Adolf G Minten; R. Miquel; K. Moffeit; P. Palazzi; J. R. Pater; P. Perrodo; J.-F. Pusztaszeri; F. Ranjard; Luigi Rolandi; D. Schlatter; M. Schmelling; W. Tejessy; I. R. Tomalin; R. Veenhof; A. Venturi; H W Wachsmuth; W. Wiedenmann; T. Wildish; W. Witzeling; J. Wotschack; Ziad J Ajaltouni; Maria Bardadin-Otwinowska; A. Barres; C. Boyer; A. Falvard; P. Gay; C. Guicheney; P. Henrard; J. Jousset; B. Michel; S. Monteil; J.-C. Montret; D. Pallin; P. Perret; F. Podlyski; J. Proriol; J.-M. Rossignol; F. Saadi; Tom Fearnley; J. B. Hansen; J. D. Hansen; P. H. Hansen; S. D. Johnson; B. S. Nilsson; A. Kyriakis; Errietta Simopoulou; I. Siotis; Anna Vayaki; K. Zachariadou; A. Blondel; G R Bonneaud; J. C. Brient; P. Bourdon; L. Passalacqua; A. Rougé; M. Rumpf; R. Tanaka; Andrea Valassi; M. Verderi; H L Videau; D. J. Candlin; M. I. Parsons; E. Veitch; E. Focardi; G. Parrini; M. Corden; M C Delfino; C H Georgiopoulos; D. E. Jaffe; A. Antonelli; G. Bencivenni; G. Bologna; F. Bossi; P. Campana; G. Capon; F. Cerutti; V. Chiarella; G. Felici; P. Laurelli; G. Mannocchi; F. Murtas; G. P. Murtas; M. Pepe-Altarelli; S. Salomone; P. Colrain; I. Ten Have; I. G. Knowles; J. G. Lynch; W J Maitland; W. T. Morton; C. Raine; P. Reeves; J. M. Scarr; K. Smith; M. G. Smith; A. S. Thompson; S. Thorn; R. M. Turnbull; U. Becker; O. Braun; C. Geweniger; G. Graefe; P. Hanke; V. Hepp; E. E. Kluge; A. Putzer; B. Rensch; M. Schmidt; J. Sommer; H. Stenzel; K. Tittel; M. Wunsch; R. Beuselinck; David M Binnie; W. Cameron; D. J. Colling; Peter J Dornan; N P Konstantinidis; L. Moneta; A. Moutoussi; J. Nash; G. San Martin; J. K. Sedgbeer; A. M. Stacey; G. Dissertori; P. Girtler; E. Kneringer; D. Kuhn; G. Rudolph; C. K. Bowdery; T. J. Brodbeck; A. J. Finch; F. Foster; G. Hughes; D. Jackson; N. R. Keemer; M. Nuttall; A D Patel; Terence Sloan; S. W. Snow; E. P. Whelan; A. Galla; A. M. Greene; K. Kleinknecht; J. Raab; B. Renk; H.-G. Sander; H. Schmidt; S. M. Walther; R. Wanke; B. Wolf; Jean-Jacques Aubert; A. M. Bencheikh; C. Benchouk; A. Bonissent; G. Bujosa; D. Calvet; J. Carr; C A Diaconu; F. Etienne; M. Thulasidas; D. Nicod; P. Payre; D. Rousseau; M. Talby; I. Abt; R W Assmann; C. Bauer; Walter Blum; D. Brown; H. Dietl; Friedrich Dydak; C. Gotzhein; A. W. Halley; K. Jakobs; H. Kroha; G. Lütjens; Gerhard Lutz; W. Männer; H.-G. Moser; R H Richter; A. Rosado-Schlosser; A. S. Schwarz; Ronald Settles; H C J Seywerd; U. Stierlin; R. St. Denis; G. Wolf; R. Alemany; J. Boucrot; O. Callot; A. Cordier; F. Courault; M. Davier; L. Duflot; J.-F. Grivaz; Ph. Heusse; M. Jacquet; D. W. Kim; F R Le Diberder; J. Lefrançois; A.-M. Lutz; G. Musolino; I A Nikolic; H. J. Park; I. C. Park; M.-H. Schune; S. Simion; J.-J. Veillet; I. Videau; P. Azzurri; D. Abbaneo; G. Bagliesi; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; U. Bottigli; C. Bozzi; G. Calderini; M. Carpinelli; M. A. Ciocci; V. Ciulli; R. dell'Orso; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. Foà; F. Forti; A. Giassi; M. A. Giorgi; A. Gregorio; F. Ligabue; A. Lusiani; P. S. Marrocchesi; A. Messineo; G. Rizzo; G. Sanguinetti; A. Sciabà; P. Spagnolo; Jack Steinberger; Roberto Tenchini; G. Tonelli; G. Triggiani; C. Vannini; P. G. Verdini; J. Walsh; A. P. Betteridge; G. A. Blair; L. M. Bryant; Y. S. Gao; M. G. Green; D. L. Johnson; T. Medcalf; Ll. M. Mir; J. A. Strong; V. Bertin; David R Botterill; R. W. Clifft; T. R. Edgecock; S. Haywood; M. Edwards; P. Maley; P. R. Norton; J. C. Thompson; B. Bloch-Devaux; P. Colas; H. Duarte; S. Emery; Witold Kozanecki; E. Lançon; M. C. Lemaire; E. Locci; B. Marx; P. Perez; J. Rander; J.-F. Renardy; A. Rosowsky; A. Roussarie; J.-P. Schuller; J. Schwindling; D. Si Mohand; A. Trabelsi; B. Vallage; R. P. Johnson; A. M. Litke; G. Taylor; J. Wear; A. Beddall; C. N. Booth; R. Boswell; S L Cartwright; F. Combley; I. Dawson; A. Koksal; M H Lehto; W. M. Newton; C. Rankin; L. F. Thompson; A. Böhrer; S. Brandt; G D Cowan; E. Feigl; Claus Grupen; G. Lutters

1995-01-01

79

Measurement of CP Asymmetries and Branching Fractions in B to pi pi and B to K pi Decays.  

SciTech Connect

The authors present preliminary measurements of the Cp asymmetries and branching fractions for B {yields} {pi}{pi} and B {yields} K{pi} decays. A total of 347 million B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC are used for these results.

Aubert, B

2006-09-26

80

Double Pancake Bonds: Pushing the Limits of Strong ?-? Stacking Interactions  

PubMed Central

The concept of a double-bonded pancake bonding mechanism is introduced to explain the extremely short ?–? stacking contacts in dimers of dithiatriazines. While ordinary single pancake bonds occur between radicals and already display significantly shorter interatomic distances in comparison to van der Waals (vdW) contacts, the double-bonded pancake dimer is based on diradicaloid or antiaromatic molecules and exhibits even shorter and stronger intermolecular bonds that breach into the range of extremely stretched single bonds in terms of bond distances and binding energies. These properties give rise to promising possibilities in the design of new materials with high electrical conductivity and for the field of spintronics. The analysis of the double pancake bond is based on cutting edge electron correlation theory combining multireference (nondynamical) effects and dispersion (dynamical) contributions in a balanced way providing accurate interaction energies and distributions of unpaired spins. It is also shown that the present examples do not stand isolated but that similar mechanisms operate in several analogous nonradical molecular systems to form double-bonded ?-stacking pancake dimers. We report on the amazing properties of a new type of stacking interaction mechanism between ? conjugated molecules in the form of a “double pancake bond” which breaks the record for short intermolecular distances and provides formidable strength for some ?–? stacking interactions. PMID:25203200

2014-01-01

81

Double Pancake Bonds: Pushing the Limits of Strong ?-? Stacking Interactions.  

PubMed

The concept of a double-bonded pancake bonding mechanism is introduced to explain the extremely short ?-? stacking contacts in dimers of dithiatriazines. While ordinary single pancake bonds occur between radicals and already display significantly shorter interatomic distances in comparison to van der Waals (vdW) contacts, the double-bonded pancake dimer is based on diradicaloid or antiaromatic molecules and exhibits even shorter and stronger intermolecular bonds that breach into the range of extremely stretched single bonds in terms of bond distances and binding energies. These properties give rise to promising possibilities in the design of new materials with high electrical conductivity and for the field of spintronics. The analysis of the double pancake bond is based on cutting edge electron correlation theory combining multireference (nondynamical) effects and dispersion (dynamical) contributions in a balanced way providing accurate interaction energies and distributions of unpaired spins. It is also shown that the present examples do not stand isolated but that similar mechanisms operate in several analogous nonradical molecular systems to form double-bonded ?-stacking pancake dimers. We report on the amazing properties of a new type of stacking interaction mechanism between ? conjugated molecules in the form of a "double pancake bond" which breaks the record for short intermolecular distances and provides formidable strength for some ?-? stacking interactions. PMID:25203200

Cui, Zhong-Hua; Lischka, Hans; Beneberu, Habtamu Z; Kertesz, Miklos

2014-09-17

82

New Insights into Hydrogen Bonding and Stacking Interactions in Cellulose  

SciTech Connect

In this quantum chemical study, we explore hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) and stacking interactions in different crystalline cellulose allomorphs, namely cellulose I and cellulose IIII. We consider a model system representing a cellulose crystalline core, made from six cellobiose units arranged in three layers with two chains per layer. We calculate the contributions of intrasheet and intersheet interactions to the structure and stability in both cellulose I and cellulose IIII crystalline cores. Reference structures for this study were generated from molecular dynamics simulations of water-solvated cellulose I and IIII fibrils. A systematic analysis of various conformations describing different mutual orientations of cellobiose units is performed using the hybrid density functional theory (DFT) with the M06-2X with 6-31+G (d, p) basis sets. We dissect the nature of the forces that stabilize the cellulose I and cellulose IIII crystalline cores and quantify the relative strength of H-bonding and stacking interactions. Our calculations demonstrate that individual H-bonding interactions are stronger in cellulose I than in cellulose IIII. We also observe a significant contribution from cooperative stacking interactions to the stabilization of cellulose I . In addition, the theory of atoms-in-molecules (AIM) has been employed to characterize and quantify these intermolecular interactions. AIM analyses highlight the role of nonconventional CH O H-bonding in the cellulose assemblies. Finally, we calculate molecular electrostatic potential maps for the cellulose allomorphs that capture the differences in chemical reactivity of the systems considered in our study.

Langan, Paul [ORNL

2011-01-01

83

Stacked stem cell sheets enhance cell-matrix interactions.  

PubMed

Cell sheet engineering has enabled the production of confluent cell sheets stacked together for use as a cardiac patch to increase cell survival rate and engraftment after transplantation, thereby providing a promising strategy for high density stem cell delivery for cardiac repair. One key challenge in using cell sheet technology is the difficulty of cell sheet handling due to its weak mechanical properties. A single-layer cell sheet is generally very fragile and tends to break or clump during harvest. Effective transfer and stacking methods are needed to move cell sheet technology into widespread clinical applications. In this study, we developed a simple and effective micropipette based method to aid cell sheet transfer and stacking. The cell viability after transfer was tested and multi-layer stem cell sheets were fabricated using the developed method. Furthermore, we examined the interactions between stacked stem cell sheets and fibrin matrix. Our results have shown that the preserved ECM associated with the detached cell sheet greatly facilitates its adherence to fibrin matrix and enhances the cell sheet-matrix interactions. Accelerated fibrin degradation caused by attached cell sheets was also observed. PMID:24769850

Patel, Nikul G; Zhang, Ge

2014-01-01

84

Stacked stem cell sheets enhance cell-matrix interactions  

PubMed Central

Cell sheet engineering has enabled the production of confluent cell sheets stacked together for use as a cardiac patch to increase cell survival rate and engraftment after transplantation, thereby providing a promising strategy for high density stem cell delivery for cardiac repair. One key challenge in using cell sheet technology is the difficulty of cell sheet handling due to its weak mechanical properties. A single-layer cell sheet is generally very fragile and tends to break or clump during harvest. Effective transfer and stacking methods are needed to move cell sheet technology into widespread clinical applications. In this study, we developed a simple and effective micropipette based method to aid cell sheet transfer and stacking. The cell viability after transfer was tested and multi-layer stem cell sheets were fabricated using the developed method. Furthermore, we examined the interactions between stacked stem cell sheets and fibrin matrix. Our results have shown that the preserved ECM associated with the detached cell sheet greatly facilitates its adherence to fibrin matrix and enhances the cell sheet-matrix interactions. Accelerated fibrin degradation caused by attached cell sheets was also observed. PMID:24769850

Patel, Nikul G; Zhang, Ge

2014-01-01

85

Scalar resonances in a unitary {pi}{pi} S-wave model for D{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup+}{pi}{sup-}{pi}{sup+}.  

SciTech Connect

We propose a model for D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays following experimental results which indicate that the two-pion interaction in the S wave is dominated by the scalar resonances f{sub 0}(600)/{sigma} and f{sub 0}(980). The weak decay amplitude for D{sup +} {yields} R{pi}{sup +}, where R is a resonance that subsequently decays into {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, is constructed in a factorization approach. In the S wave, we implement the strong decay R {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} by means of a scalar form factor. This provides a unitary description of the pion-pion interaction in the entire kinematically allowed mass range m{sub {pi}{pi}}{sup 2} from threshold to about 3 GeV{sup 2}. In order to reproduce the experimental Dalitz plot for D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, we include contributions beyond the S wave. For the P wave, dominated by the {rho}(770){sup 0}, we use a Breit-Wigner description. Higher waves are accounted for by using the usual isobar prescription for the f{sub 2}(1270) and {rho}(1450){sup 0}. The major achievement is a good reproduction of the experimental m{sub {pi}{pi}}{sup 2} distribution, and of the partial as well as the total D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} branching ratios. Our values are generally smaller than the experimental ones. We discuss this shortcoming and, as a by-product, we predict a value for the poorly known D {yields} {sigma} transition form factor at q{sup 2} = m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}.

Boito, D. R.; Dedonder, J.-P.; El-Bennich, B.; Leitner, O.; Loiseau, B.; Physics; Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona; Univ. de Sao Paulo; Univ. Paris; Pl. Jussieu; Lab. Nazionali de Frascati

2009-02-19

86

Atomic-scale details of dislocation - stacking fault tetrahedra interaction.  

SciTech Connect

Stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) are formed during irradiation of fcc. metals and alloys with low stacking fault energy. The high number density of SFTs observed suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, be taken into account when estimating mechanical property changes of irradiated materials. The key issue is to describe the interaction between a moving dislocation and an individual SFT, which is characterized by a small physical scale of about 100 nm. In this paper we present results of an atomistic simulation of edge and screw dislocations interacting with small SFTs at different temperatures and strain rates and present mechanisms which can explain the formation of defect-free channels observed experimentally.

Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Rodney, David [Genie Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux; Bacon, David J [University of Liverpool

2005-01-01

87

The reaction pi-p --> ppi+pi-pi- at 13 and 20 GeV\\/c  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from the reaction pi-p --> ppi+pi-pi- at 13 and 20 GeV\\/c are analyzed and compared with the predictions of the Wolf calculation of the one-pion-exchange model (OPEM). We observe strong production of the N*++(1236) isobar and varrhoo meson as well as some fo meson production. In the ppi- system, there is evidence of the N*o(1236) and the N*o(1688) isobars

G. W. Brandenburg; A. E. Brenner; M. L. Ioffredo; W. H. Johnson; J. K. Kim; M. E. Law; J. E. Mueller; B. M. Salzberg; J. H. Scharenguivel; L. K. Sisterson; J. J. Szymanski

1970-01-01

88

Experimental study of {chi}{sub b}(2P){yields}{pi}{pi}{chi}{sub b}(1P)  

SciTech Connect

We have searched for the di-pion transition {chi}{sub b}(2P){yields}{pi}{pi}{chi}{sub b}(1P) in the CLEO III sample of {upsilon}(3S) decays in the exclusive decay chain: {upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub b}(2P), {chi}{sub b}(2P){yields}{pi}{pi}{chi}{sub b}(1P), {chi}{sub b}(1P){yields}{gamma}{upsilon}(1S), {upsilon}(1S){yields}l{sup +}l{sup -}. Our studies include both {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, each analyzed both in fully-reconstructed events and in events with one pion undetected. We show that the null hypothesis is not substantiated. Under reasonable assumptions, we find the partial decay width to be {gamma}({chi}{sub b}(2P){yields}{pi}{pi}{chi}{sub b}(1P))=(0.83{+-}0.22{+-}0.08{+-}0.19) keV, with the uncertainties being statistical, internal CLEO systematics, and common systematics from outside sources.

Cawlfield, C.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Karliner, I. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois 61801 (United States)] (and others)

2006-01-01

89

Study of B0 --> J/psiK(*)0pi(+)pi(-) decays with the collider detector at Fermilab.  

PubMed

We report a study of the decays B0 --> J/psiK(*)0pi(+)pi(-), which involve the creation of a uu or dd quark pair in addition to a b -->c(cs) decay. The data sample consists of 110 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root[s] = 1.8 TeV collected by the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider during 1992-1995. We measure the branching fractions to be B(B0 --> J/psiK(*0)pi(+)pi(-)) = (6.6 +/- 1.9 +/- 1.1)x10(-4) and B(B0 --> J/psiK0pi(+)pi(-)) = (10.3 +/- 3.3 +/- 1.5)x10(-4). Evidence is seen for contributions from psi(2S)K(*)0, J/psiK0rho(0), J/psiK(*+)pi(-), and J/psiK1(1270). PMID:11863882

Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Akopian, A; Albrow, M G; Amaral, P; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berge, J P; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bokhari, W; Bolla, G; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; van den Brink, S; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Buckley-Geer, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Colijn, A P; Connolly, A; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Cropp, R; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Done, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Elias, J E; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Fang, H-C; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Giannetti, P; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Grim, G; Gris, P; Groer, L; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hoffman, K D; Holck, C; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karr, K; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, A M; Lee, K; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, A; Matthews, J A J; Mayer, J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McKigney, E; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Popovic, M; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Robinson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sato, H; Savard, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Segler, S; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, C; Snider, F D; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Sphicas, P; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J

2002-02-18

90

On how once subtracted dispersion relations lead to a precise determination of {pi}{pi} scattering and the f{sub 0}(600) parameters  

SciTech Connect

We present and compare once and twice subtracted dispersion relations including crossing symmetry constraints in order to test the S- and P-wave {pi}{pi} amplitudes below 1100 MeV. We show that twice subtracted dispersion relations provide stringent constraints on the {pi}{pi} amplitudes below about 400 MeV than those with one subtraction. Above this energy GKPY eqs. become, however, a more demanding test of {pi}{pi} amplitudes, thus providing a new tool for the precise determination of {pi}{pi} scattering. We also show that due to strong constraints imposed by the GKPY eqs. they are useful for the determination of the f{sub (600)} pole position with high accuracy.

Kaminski, Robert [Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Garcia-Martin, R. [Dpto. Fisica Teorica II, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain and Groupe de Physique Theorique, Institut de Physique Nucleaire (IN2P3-CNRS), Orsay (France); Pelaez, J. [Dpto. Fisica Teorica II, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Yndurain, F. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

2010-08-05

91

First observations of Y(1S)->gamma pi(+)pi(-) and Y(1S)->gamma pi(0)pi(0)  

E-print Network

S) --> gamma pi(0)pi(0). For the dipion mass regime m(pi pi) > 1.0 GeV, we obtain N(Y(1S) --> gamma pi(+)pi(-)) = (6.3 +/- 1.2 +/- 1.3) x 10(-5) and B(Y(1S) --> gamma pi(0)pi(0)) = (1.7 +/- 0.6 +/- 0.3) x 10(-5)....

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

1999-01-01

92

Observation of the $B^0_{s}\\to\\psi{(2\\mathrm{S})}\\eta$ and $B^0_{(s)}\\to\\psi{(2\\mathrm{S})}\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays  

E-print Network

First observations of the $B^0_s \\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\eta$, $B^0 \\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ and $B^0_s \\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ decays are made using a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 $fb^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV. The ratios of the branching fractions of each of the $\\psi(2S)$ modes with respect to the corresponding $J/\\psi$ decays are \\[ \\frac{\\mathcal{B}(B^0_s \\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\eta) }{\\mathcal{B}(B^0_s \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\eta)} =0.83\\pm0.14\\,(stat)\\pm0.12\\,(syst)\\pm0.02\\,(\\mathcal{B}), \\] \\[ \\frac{\\mathcal{B}(B^0 \\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\pi^+ \\pi^-)}{\\mathcal{B}(B^0 \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\pi^+ \\pi^-)} =0.56\\pm0.07\\,(stat)\\pm0.05\\,(syst)\\pm0.01\\,(\\mathcal{B}), \\] \\[ \\frac{\\mathcal{B}(B^0_s \\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\pi^+ \\pi^-)}{\\mathcal{B}(B^0_s \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\pi^+ \\pi^-)} =0.34\\pm0.04\\,(stat)\\pm0.03\\,(syst)\\pm0.01\\,(\\mathcal{B}), \\] where the third uncertainty corresponds to the ...

Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Oyanguren Campos, M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lohn, S; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Mcnab, A; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V

2013-01-01

93

Search for resonances decaying to etac pi pi- in two-photon interactions  

SciTech Connect

We report a study of the process {gamma}{gamma} {yields} X {yields} {eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, where X stands for one of the resonances {chi}{sub c2}(1P), {eta}{sub c}(2S), X(3872), X(3915), or {chi}{sub c2}(2P). The analysis is performed with a data sample of 473.9 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy electron-positron collider. We do not observe a significant signal for any channel, and calculate 90% confidence-level upper limits on the products of branching fractions and two-photon widths {Lambda}{sub X{yields}{gamma}{gamma}} {Beta}(X {yields} {eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}): 15.7 eV for {chi}{sub c2}(1P), 133 eV for {eta}{sub c}(2S), 11.1 eV for X(3872) (assuming it to be a spin-2 state), 16 eV for X(3915) (assuming it to be a spin-2 state), and 19 eV for {chi}{sub c2}(2P). We also report upper limits on the ratios of branching fractions {Beta}({eta}{sub c}(2S) {yields} {eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}({eta}{sub c}(2S) {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 10.0 and {Beta}({chi}{sub c2}(1P) {yields} {eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}({chi}{sub c2}(1P) {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 32.9 at the 90% confidence level.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

2012-06-18

94

A global fit of $\\pi\\pi$ and $\\pi K$ elastic scattering in ChPT with dispersion relations  

E-print Network

We apply the one-loop results of the $SU(3)_L\\times SU(3)_R$ ChPT suplemented with the inverse amplitude method to fit the available experimental data on $\\pi\\pi$ and $\\pi K$ scattering. With esentially only three parameters we describe accurately data corresponding to six different channels, namely $(I,J)=(0,0), (2,0), (1,1), (1/2,0), (3/2,0)$ and $(1/2,1)$. In addition we reproduce the first resonances of the $(1,1)$ and $(1/2,1)$ channel with the right mass corresponding to the $\\rho$ and the $K^*(892)$ particles.

Dobado, A

1993-01-01

95

A global fit of $\\\\pi\\\\pi$ and $\\\\pi K$ elastic scattering in ChPT with dispersion relations  

Microsoft Academic Search

We apply the one-loop results of the $SU(3)_L\\\\times SU(3)_R$ ChPT suplemented\\u000awith the inverse amplitude method to fit the available experimental data on\\u000a$\\\\pi\\\\pi$ and $\\\\pi K$ scattering. With esentially only three parameters we\\u000adescribe accurately data corresponding to six different channels, namely\\u000a$(I,J)=(0,0), (2,0), (1,1), (1\\/2,0), (3\\/2,0)$ and $(1\\/2,1)$. In addition we\\u000areproduce the first resonances of the $(1,1)$

A. Dobado; J. R. Pelaez

1993-01-01

96

Search for CP Violation in the Decays D0-->K-K+ and D0-->pi-pi+  

Microsoft Academic Search

We measure time-integrated CP-violating asymmetries of neutral charmed mesons in the modes D0-->K-K+ and D0-->pi-pi+ with the highest precision to date by using D0-->K-pi+ decays to correct detector asymmetries. An analysis of 385.8fb-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector yields values of aCPKK=(0.00±0.34(stat)±0.13(syst))% and aCPpipi=(-0.24±0.52(stat)±0.22(syst))%, which agree with standard model predictions.

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; D. Bailey; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; Y. Zheng; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini

2008-01-01

97

Modulating the Light Switch by [superscript 3]MLCT-[superscript 3]pi pi* State Interconversion  

SciTech Connect

The spectroscopic, electronic, and DNA-binding characteristics of two novel ruthenium complexes based on the dialkynyl ligands 2,3-bis(phenylethynyl)-1,4,8,9-tetraaza-triphenylene (bptt, 1) and 2,3-bis(4-tert-butyl-phenylethynyl)-1,4,8,9-tetraaza-triphenylene (tbptt, 2) have been investigated. Electronic structure calculations of bptt reveal that the frontier molecular orbitals are localized on the pyrazine-dialkynyl portion of the free ligand, a property that is reflected in a red shift of the lowest energy electronic transition (1: {lambda}{sub max} = 393 nm) upon substitution at the terminal phenyl groups (2: {lambda}{sub max} = 398 nm). Upon coordination to ruthenium, the low-energy ligand-centered transitions of 1 and 2 are retained, and metal-to-ligand charge transfer transitions (MLCT) centered at {lambda}{sub max} = 450 nm are observed for [Ru(phen){sub 2}bptt]{sup 2+}(3) and [Ru(phen){sub 2}tbptt]{sup 2+}(4). The photophysical characteristics of 3 and 4 in ethanol closely parallel those observed for [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} and [Ru(phen){sub 3}]{sup 2+}, indicating that the MLCT excited state is primarily localized within the [Ru(phen){sub 3}]{sup 2+} manifold of 3 and 4, and is only sparingly affected by the extended conjugation of the bptt framework. In an aqueous environment, 3 and 4 possess notably small luminescence quantum yields (3: {phi}H{sub 2}O = 0.005, 4: {phi}H{sub 2}O = 0.011) and biexponential decay kinetics (3: {tau}{sub 1} = 40 ns, {tau}{sub 2} = 230 ns; 4: {tau}{sub 1} {approx} 26 ns, {tau}{sub 2} = 150 ns). Addition of CT-DNA to an aqueous solution of 3 causes a significant increase in the luminescence quantum yield ({phi}DNA = 0.045), while the quantum yield of 4 is relatively unaffected ({phi}DNA = 0.013). The differential behavior demonstrates that tert-butyl substitution on the terminal phenyl groups inhibits the ability of 4 to intercalate with DNA. Such changes in intrinsic luminescence demonstrate that 3 binds to DNA via intercalation (K{sub b} = 3.3 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1}). The origin of this light switch behavior involves two competing {sup 3}MLCT states similar to that of the extensively studied light switch molecule [Ru(phen){sub 2}dppz]{sup 2+}. The solvent- and temperature-dependence of the luminescence of 3 reveal that the extended ligand aromaticity lowers the energy of the {sup 3}{pi}{pi}* excited state into competition with the emitting {sup 3}MLCT state. Interconversion between these two states plays a significant role in the observed photophysics and is responsible for the dual emission in aqueous environments.

Spencer, Brigitte R.; Kraft, Brian J.; Hughes, Chris G.; Pink, Maren; Zaleski, Jeffrey M. (Indiana)

2012-01-20

98

Partial wave analyses of J/psi to gamma pi^+ pi^- and gamma pi^0 pi^0  

E-print Network

Results are presented on J/psi radiative decays to pi^+pi^- and pi^0pi^0 based on a sample of 58M J/psi events taken with the BESII detector. Partial wave analyses are carried out using the relativistic covariant tensor amplitude method in the 1.0 to 2.3 GeV/c^2 pipi mass range. There are conspicuous peaks due to the f_2(1270) and two 0^++ states in the 1.45 and 1.75 GeV/c^2 mass regions. The first 0^++ state has a mass of 1466\\pm 6\\pm 20 MeV/c^2, a width of 108^{+14}_{-11}\\pm 25 MeV/c^2, and a branching fraction B(J/psi \\to \\gamma f_0(1500) \\to\\gamma \\pi^+\\pi^-) = (0.67\\pm0.02\\pm0.30) \\times 10^{-4}. Spin 0 is strongly preferred over spin 2. The second 0^++ state peaks at 1765^{+4}_{-3}\\pm 13 MeV/c^2 with a width of 145\\pm8\\pm69 MeV/c^2. If this 0^++ is interpreted as coming from f_0(1710), the ratio of its branching fractions to pipi and K\\bar K is 0.41^{+0.11}_{-0.17}.

M. Ablikim

2006-03-23

99

Amplitude analysis of e+e- => Y(nS)pi+pi- at sqrt(s)=10.865 GeV  

E-print Network

We report results on studies of the e+e- annihilation into three-body Y(nS)pi+pi- (n=1,2,3) final states including measurements of cross sections and the full amplitude analysis. The cross sections measured at sqrt(s)=10.865 GeV and corrected for the initial state radiation are sigma(e+e-=>Y(1S)pi+pi-)=(2.27+-0.12+-0.14) pb, sigma(e+e-=>Y(2S)pi+pi-)=(4.07+-0.16+-0.45) pb, and sigma(e+e-=>Y(3S)pi+pi-)=(1.46+-0.09+-0.16) pb. Amplitude analysis of the three-body Y(nS)pi+pi- final states strongly favors I^G(J^P)=1^+(1^+) quantum-number assignments for the two bottomonium-like Zb+- states, recently observed in the Y(nS)pi+- and hb(mP)pi+- (m=1,2) decay channels. The results are obtained with a $121.4 1/fb data sample collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

Garmash, A; Kuzmin, A; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Said, S Al; Asner, D M; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Bhardwaj, V; Bobrov, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Browder, T E; Cervenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Dolezal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Frey, A; Frost, O; Gaur, V; Ganguly, S; Gillard, R; Glattauer, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W -S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Iwashita, T; Jaegle, I; Julius, T; Kang, J H; Kato, E; Katrenko, P; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kichimi, H; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Klucar, J; Ko, B R; Kodys, P; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kwon, Y -J; Lee, S -H; Li, Y; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Liu, C; Liu, Z Q; Liventsev, D; Lukin, P; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Nedelkovska, E; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Okuno, S; Ostrowicz, W; Pakhlov, P; Park, H; Park, H K; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petric, M; Piilonen, L E; Ribezl, E; Ritter, M; Rohrken, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Saito, T; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santel, D; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwartz, A J; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Steder, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tanida, K; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Y; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamamoto, H; Yamashita, Y; Yashchenko, S; Yook, Y; Yuan, C Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zupanc, A

2014-01-01

100

Amplitude analysis of e+e- => Y(nS)pi+pi- at sqrt(s)=10.865 GeV  

E-print Network

We report results on studies of the e+e- annihilation into three-body Y(nS)pi+pi- (n=1,2,3) final states including measurements of cross sections and the full amplitude analysis. The cross sections measured at sqrt(s)=10.865 GeV and corrected for the initial state radiation are sigma(e+e-=>Y(1S)pi+pi-)=(2.27+-0.12+-0.14) pb, sigma(e+e-=>Y(2S)pi+pi-)=(4.07+-0.16+-0.45) pb, and sigma(e+e-=>Y(3S)pi+pi-)=(1.46+-0.09+-0.16) pb. Amplitude analysis of the three-body Y(nS)pi+pi- final states strongly favors I^G(J^P)=1^+(1^+) quantum-number assignments for the two bottomonium-like Zb+- states, recently observed in the Y(nS)pi+- and hb(mP)pi+- (m=1,2) decay channels. The results are obtained with a $121.4 1/fb data sample collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

A. Garmash; A. Bondar; A. Kuzmin; A. Abdesselam; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; S. Al Said; D. M. Asner; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; R. Ayad; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; V. Bhardwaj; A. Bobrov; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bracko; T. E. Browder; D. Cervenkov; V. Chekelian; A. Chen; B. G. Cheon; K. Chilikin; R. Chistov; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dalseno; Z. Dolezal; A. Drutskoy; D. Dutta; S. Eidelman; D. Epifanov; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; T. Ferber; A. Frey; O. Frost; V. Gaur; S. Ganguly; R. Gillard; R. Glattauer; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; T. Hara; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; X. H. He; Y. Hoshi; W. -S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; H. J. Hyun; T. Iijima; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; T. Iwashita; I. Jaegle; T. Julius; J. H. Kang; E. Kato; P. Katrenko; H. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; H. Kichimi; C. Kiesling; D. Y. Kim; J. B. Kim; J. H. Kim; K. T. Kim; M. J. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; J. Klucar; B. R. Ko; P. Kodys; S. Korpar; P. Krizan; P. Krokovny; T. Kuhr; Y. -J. Kwon; S. -H. Lee; Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; J. Libby; C. Liu; Z. Q. Liu; D. Liventsev; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; G. B. Mohanty; A. Moll; R. Mussa; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nayak; E. Nedelkovska; N. K. Nisar; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Okuno; W. Ostrowicz; P. Pakhlov; H. Park; H. K. Park; T. K. Pedlar; R. Pestotnik; M. Petric; L. E. Piilonen; E. Ribezl; M. Ritter; M. Rohrken; A. Rostomyan; S. Ryu; T. Saito; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; D. Santel; T. Sanuki; Y. Sato; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; A. J. Schwartz; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; M. E. Sevior; M. Shapkin; V. Shebalin; C. P. Shen; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; F. Simon; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; S. Stanic; M. Staric; M. Steder; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; K. Tanida; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; K. Trabelsi; M. Uchida; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; Y. Usov; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; A. Vinokurova; V. Vorobyev; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; P. Wang; X. L. Wang; M. Watanabe; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; H. Yamamoto; Y. Yamashita; S. Yashchenko; Y. Yook; C. Z. Yuan; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; A. Zupanc

2014-03-05

101

Measurement of the ratio B(Bc+/- to J/psi pi+/- pi+/- pi-/+)/B(Bc+/- to J/psi pi+/-) and the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc+/- to J/psi pi+/- and B+/- to J/psi K+/- in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV  

E-print Network

The Bc+/- to J/psi pi+/- and Bc+/- to J/psi pi+/- pi+/- pi-/+ decay modes are studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Bc+/- mesons with transverse momentum pt > 15 GeV and rapidity abs(y) psi pi+/- pi+/- pi-/+)/B(Bc+/- to J/psi pi+/-) is measured to be 2.55 +/- 0.80 (stat) +/- 0.33 (syst) +0.04/-0.01 (tau[Bc+]). The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (sigma(Bc+) B(Bc+ to J/psi pi+))/ (sigma(B+) B(B+ to J/psi K+)) is determined to be [0.48 +/- 0.05 (stat) +/- 0.03 (syst) +/- 0.05 (tau_{Bc})]%

CMS Collaboration

2014-10-21

102

Effects of sugar functional groups, hydrophobicity, and fluorination on carbohydrate-DNA stacking interactions in water.  

PubMed

Carbohydrate-aromatic interactions are highly relevant for many biological processes. Nevertheless, experimental data in aqueous solution relating structure and energetics for sugar-arene stacking interactions are very scarce. Here, we evaluate how structural variations in a monosaccharide including carboxyl, N-acetyl, fluorine, and methyl groups affect stacking interactions with aromatic DNA bases. We find small differences on stacking interaction among the natural carbohydrates examined. The presence of fluorine atoms within the pyranose ring slightly increases the interaction with the C-G DNA base pair. Carbohydrate hydrophobicity is the most determinant factor. However, gradual increase in hydrophobicity of the carbohydrate does not translate directly into a steady growth in stacking interaction. The energetics correlates better with the amount of apolar surface buried upon sugar stacking on top of the aromatic DNA base pair. PMID:24552250

Lucas, Ricardo; Peñalver, Pablo; Gómez-Pinto, Irene; Vengut-Climent, Empar; Mtashobya, Lewis; Cousin, Jonathan; Maldonado, Olivia S; Perez, Violaine; Reynes, Virginie; Aviñó, Anna; Eritja, Ramón; González, Carlos; Linclau, Bruno; Morales, Juan C

2014-03-21

103

Study of the D0 ---> pi- pi+ pi- pi+ decay  

SciTech Connect

Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, they present new measurements for the Cabbibo-suppressed decay mode D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. They measure the branching ratio {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.0914 {+-} 0.0018 {+-} 0.0022. An amplitude analysis has been performed, a first for this channel, in order to determine the resonant substructure of this decay mode. The dominant component is the decay D{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}(1260){sup +}{pi}{sup -}, accounting for 60% of the decay rate. The second most dominant contribution comes from the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{rho}(770){sup 0}, with a fraction of 25%. They also study the a{sub 1}(1260) line shape and resonant substructure. Using the helicity formalism for the angular distribution of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{rho}(770){sup 0}, they measure a longitudinal polarization of P{sub L} = (71 {+-} 4 {+-} 2)%.

Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; /UC, Davis; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /CINVESTAV, IPN /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U.

2007-01-01

104

Two-Dimensional Partial-Wave Analysis of Exclusive 190 GeV $\\pi^- p$ Scattering into the $\\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+$ Final State at COMPASS (CERN)}  

E-print Network

The dynamics of strong interaction in the regime of low energies, i.e. large distances, is still not understood. Given its simplicity the non-relativistic simple quark model (SQM) describes successfully the observed hadronic spectra. QCD-inspired models, however, predict hadronic states where the gluonic content contributes to the hadron quantum numbers. These so-called hybrids cannot be explained within the SQM. A solid experimental proof of the existence of such systems would be the observation of spin-exotic states, with spin-parity quantum numbers, not allowed in the SQM. The study of mesons, the simplest hadrons, permits to gain insight into the realm of strong interaction where hadrons are the relevant degrees of freedom. The most promising spin-exotic meson candidate is the $\\pi_1(1600)$, which was claimed in several experiments and in particular in data taken during a previous hadron campaign of the COMPASS experiment. The hadron spectroscopy program of the COMPASS experiment at CER...

Haas, Florian

2014-02-19

105

Effects of pion potential and nuclear symmetry energy on the $\\pi^{-}/\\pi^{+}$ ratio in heavy-ion collisions at beam energies around the pion production threshold  

E-print Network

Within the framework of an isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck(IBUU) transport model, we studied the effects of the pion potential and the symmetry energy on the pion production in the central $^{197}Au+^{197}Au$ collisions around the pion production threshold. It is found that the pion potential affects the value of $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ ratio around the Coulomb peak and also in the high energy region of pion mesons. The effect of the pion potential on the $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ ratio becomes large in heavy-ion collisions at beam energies below the pion production threshold. And at beam energies below the pion production threshold, with the pion potential, the effect of the symmetry energy on the $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ ratio becomes quite small compared with that above the pion production threshold.

Guo, Wen-Mei; Liu, Hang; Zuo, Wei

2014-01-01

106

e+e--->K+K-pi+pi-, K+K-pi0pi0 and K+K-K+K- cross sections measured with initial-state radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the processes e+e--->K+K-pi+pi-gamma, K+K-pi0pi0gamma and K+K-K+K-gamma, where the photon is radiated from the initial state. About 34 600, 4400 and 2300 fully reconstructed events, respectively, are selected from 232fb-1 of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e+e- center-of-mass energy, so that the K+K-pi+pi-gamma data can be compared with direct measurements of

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; T. Brandt; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. S. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; P. H. Fisher; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni; C. Angelini

2007-01-01

107

Measurement of D0- Dmacr 0 mixing using the ratio of lifetimes for the decays D0-->K-pi+, K-K+, and pi-pi+  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a measurement of D0- Dmacr 0 mixing parameters using the ratios of lifetimes extracted from a sample of D0 mesons produced through the process D*+-->D0pi+, which decay to K-pi+, K-K+, or pi-pi+. The lifetimes of the CP-even, Cabibbo-suppressed modes K-K+ and pi-pi+ are compared with that of the CP-mixed, Cabibbo-favored mode K-pi+ to obtain a measurement of yCP,

B. Aubert; M. Bona; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; N. Soni; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; D. A. Doll; B. Echenard; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; J. Firmino da Costa; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; G. Castelli; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; R. Cenci; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; G. Marchiori; M. A. Mazur; M. Morganti; N. Neri

2008-01-01

108

Observation of the Decay B±-->pi±pi0, Study of B±-->K±pi0, and Search for B0-->pi0pi0  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present results for the branching fractions and charge asymmetries in B±-->h±pi0 (where h±=pi±,K±) and a search for the decay B0-->pi0pi0 using a sample of approximately 88×106 BB¯ pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We measure B(B±-->pi±pi0)=(5.5+1.0-0.9±0.6)×10-6, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The B±-->pi±pi0 signal has

B. Aubert; R. Barate; D. Boutigny; J.-M. Gaillard; A. Hicheur; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; P. Robbe; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; A. Palano; A. Pompili; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; A. W. Borgland; A. B. Breon; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; J. F. Kral; G. Kukartsev; C. Leclerc; M. E. Levi; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; A. Romosan; M. T. Ronan; V. G. Shelkov; A. V. Telnov; W. A. Wenzel; T. J. Harrison; C. M. Hawkes; D. J. Knowles; R. C. Penny; A. T. Watson; N. K. Watson; T. Deppermann; K. Goetzen; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; H. Schmuecker; M. Steinke; N. R. Barlow; W. Bhimji; J. T. Boyd; N. Chevalier; P. J. Clark; W. N. Cottingham; C. Mackay; F. F. Wilson; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; D. Thiessen; P. Kyberd; A. K. McKemey; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. B. Golubev; V. N. Ivanchenko; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; A. N. Yushkov; D. Best; M. Chao; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; S. McMahon; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; C. Buchanan; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; D. B. Macfarlane; H. P. Paar; Sh. Rahatlou; U. Schwanke; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; B. Dahmes; N. Kuznetsova; S. L. Levy; O. Long; A. Lu; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; W. Verkerke; J. Beringer; A. M. Eisner; C. A. Heusch; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; R. E. Schmitz; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. Turri; W. Walkowiak; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; S. Yang; S. Jayatilleke; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; T. Barillari; F. Blanc; P. Bloom; W. T. Ford; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; P. Rankin; J. Roy; J. G. Smith; W. C. van Hoek; L. Zhang; J. L. Harton; T. Hu; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; J. Zhang; D. Altenburg; T. Brandt; J. Brose; T. Colberg; M. Dickopp; R. S. Dubitzky; A. Hauke; H. M. Lacker; E. Maly; R. Müller-Pfefferkorn; R. Nogowski; S. Otto; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; B. Spaan; L. Wilden; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; F. Brochard; J. Cohen-Tanugi; S. T'jampens; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; R. Bernet; A. Khan; D. Lavin; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; J. E. Swain; J. Tinslay; C. Borean; C. Bozzi; L. Piemontese; A. Sarti; E. Treadwell; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; D. Falciai; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; G. Crosetti; M. Lo Vetere; M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; F. C. Pastore; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; S. Bailey; M. Morii; G. J. Grenier; S.-J. Lee; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; J. Lamsa; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; J. Yi; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; S. Laplace; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; T. C. Petersen; S. Plaszczynski; M. H. Schune; L. Tantot; G. Wormser; R. M. Bionta; V. Brigljevic; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; A. J. Bevan; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; M. Kay; D. J. Payne; R. J. Sloane; C. Touramanis; M. L. Aspinwall; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; I. Eschrich; G. W. Morton; J. A. Nash; P. Sanders; G. P. Taylor; J. J. Back; G. Bellodi; P. F. Harrison; H. W. Shorthouse; P. Strother; P. B. Vidal; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; S. George; M. G. Green; A. Kurup; C. E. Marker; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; G. Vaitsas; M. A. Winter; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; R. J. Barlow; A. C. Forti; P. A. Hart; F. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; A. J. Lyon; J. H. Weatherall; J. C. Williams; A. Farbin; A. Jawahery; D. Kovalskyi; C. K. Lae; V. Lillard; D. A. Roberts; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; K. T. Flood; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; V. B. Koptchev; T. B. Moore; H. Staengle; S. Willocq; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; D. J. Mangeol; M. Milek; P. M. Patel; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; C. Hast; P. Taras; H. Nicholson; C. Cartaro; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; J. M. Losecco; T. A. Gabriel; B. Brau; T. Pulliam; J. Brau; R. Frey; M. Iwasaki; C. T. Potter; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; F. Colecchia; A. Dorigo; F. Galeazzi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; G. Tiozzo; C. Voci; M. Benayoun; H. Briand; J. Chauveau; P. David; Ch. de La Vaissière; L. del Buono; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Ocariz; M. Pivk; L. Roos; J. Stark; P. F. Manfredi; V. Re; L. Gladney; Q. H. Guo; J. Panetta; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Bondioli

2003-01-01

109

Measurement of Partial Widths and Search for Direct CP Violation in D0 Meson Decays to K-K+ and pi-pi+  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a measurement of relative partial widths and decay rate CP asymmetries in K-K+ and pi-pi+ decays of D0 mesons produced in pp¯ collisions at &surd;(s)=1.96 TeV. We use a sample of 2×105 D*+-->D0pi+ (and charge conjugate) decays with the D0 decaying to K-pi+, K-K+, and pi-pi+, corresponding to 123 pb-1 of data collected by the Collider Detector at

D. Acosta; T. Affolder; T. Akimoto; M. G. Albrow; D. Ambrose; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; K. Anikeev; A. Annovi; J. Antos; M. Aoki; G. Apollinari; T. Arisawa; J.-F. Arguin; A. Artikov; W. Ashmanskas; A. Attal; F. Azfar; P. Azzi-Bacchetta; N. Bacchetta; H. Bachacou; W. Badgett; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; G. J. Barker; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; S. Baroiant; M. Barone; G. Bauer; F. Bedeschi; S. Belforte; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; M. Binkley; D. Bisello; M. Bishai; R. E. Blair; C. Blocker; K. Bloom; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; G. Bolla; A. Bolshov; P. S. L. Booth; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; S. Bourov; C. Bromberg; E. Brubaker; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; K. L. Byrum; S. Cabrera; P. Calafiura; M. Campanelli; M. Campbell; A. Canepa; M. Casarsa; D. Carlsmith; S. Carron; R. Carosi; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; A. Cerri; C. Cerri; L. Cerrito; J. Chapman; C. Chen; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; F. Chlebana; I. Cho; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; M. L. Chu; S. Chuang; J. Y. Chung; W.-H. Chung; Y. S. Chung; C. I. Ciobanu; M. A. Ciocci; A. G. Clark; D. Clark; M. Coca; A. Connolly; M. Convery; J. Cranshaw; B. Cooper; M. Cordelli; G. Cortiana; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; C. Currat; D. Cyr; D. Dagenhart; S. da Ronco; S. D'Auria; P. de Barbaro; S. de Cecco; G. de Lentdecker; S. dell'Agnello; M. dell'Orso; S. Demers; L. Demortier; M. Deninno; D. de Pedis; P. F. Derwent; C. Dionisi; J. R. Dittmann; P. Doksus; A. Dominguez; S. Donati; M. Donega; J. Donini; M. D'Onofrio; T. Dorigo; V. Drollinger; K. Ebina; N. Eddy; R. Ely; R. Erbacher; M. Erdmann; D. Errede; S. Errede; R. Eusebi; H.-C. Fang; S. Farrington; I. Fedorko; R. G. Feild; M. Feindt; J. P. Fernandez; C. Ferretti; R. D. Field; I. Fiori; G. Flanagan; B. Flaugher; A. Foland; S. Forrester; G. W. Foster; M. Franklin; J. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Fujii; I. Furic; A. Gajjar; A. Gallas; J. Galyardt; M. Gallinaro; M. Garcia-Sciveres; A. F. Garfinkel; C. Gay; H. Gerberich; D. W. Gerdes; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; P. Giannetti; A. Gibson; K. Gibson; C. Ginsburg; K. Giolo; M. Giordani; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; N. Goldschmidt; D. Goldstein; J. Goldstein; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; Y. Gotra; K. Goulianos; A. Gresele; M. Griffiths; C. Grosso-Pilcher; M. Guenther; J. Guimaraes da Costa; C. Haber; K. Hahn; S. R. Hahn; E. Halkiadakis; R. Handler; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; R. M. Harris; F. Hartmann; K. Hatakeyama; J. Hauser; C. Hays; H. Hayward; E. Heider; B. Heinemann; J. Heinrich; M. Hennecke; M. Herndon; C. Hill; D. Hirschbuehl; A. Hocker; K. D. Hoffman; A. Holloway; S. Hou; M. A. Houlden; B. T. Huffman; Y. Huang; R. E. Hughes; J. Huston; K. Ikado; J. Incandela; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; Y. Ishizawa; C. Issever; A. Ivanov; Y. Iwata; B. Iyutin; E. James; D. Jang; J. Jarrell; D. Jeans; H. Jensen; E. J. Jeon; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Jun; T. Junk; T. Kamon; J. Kang; M. Karagoz Unel; P. E. Karchin; S. Kartal; Y. Kato; Y. Kemp; R. Kephart; U. Kerzel; V. Khotilovich; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; T. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; B. T. King; M. Kirby; L. Kirsch; S. Klimenko; B. Knuteson; B. R. Ko; H. Kobayashi; P. Koehn; D. J. Kong; K. Kondo; J. Konigsberg; K. Kordas; A. Korn; A. Korytov; K. Kotelnikov; A. V. Kotwal; A. Kovalev; J. Kraus; I. Kravchenko; A. Kreymer; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; V. Krutelyov; S. E. Kuhlmann; N. Kuznetsova; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lai; S. Lami; S. Lammel; J. Lancaster; M. Lancaster; R. Lander; K. Lannon; A. Lath; G. Latino; R. Lauhakangas; I. Lazzizzera; Y. Le; C. Lecci; T. Lecompte; J. Lee; S. W. Lee; N. Leonardo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; K. Li; C. Lin; M. Lindgren; T. M. Liss; D. O. Litvintsev; T. Liu; Y. Liu; N. S. Lockyer; A. Loginov; M. Loreti; P. Loverre; R.-S. Lu; D. Lucchesi; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; L. Lyons; J. Lys; R. Lysak; D. MacQueen; R. Madrak; K. Maeshima; P. Maksimovic; L. Malferrari; G. Manca; R. Marginean; M. Martin; A. Martin; V. Martin; M. Martínez; T. Maruyama; H. Matsunaga; M. Mattson; P. Mazzanti; K. S. McFarland; D. McGivern; P. M. McIntyre; P. McNamara; R. Ncnulty; S. Menzemer; A. Menzione; P. Merkel; C. Mesropian; A. Messina; T. Miao; N. Miladinovic; L. Miller; R. Miller; J. S. Miller; R. Miquel; S. Miscetti; G. Mitselmakher; A. Miyamoto; Y. Miyazaki; N. Moggi; B. Mohr; R. Moore; M. Morello; A. Mukherjee; M. Mulhearn; T. Muller; R. Mumford; A. Munar; P. Murat; J. Nachtman; S. Nahn; I. Nakamura; I. Nakano; A. Napier; R. Napora; D. Naumov; V. Necula; F. Niell; J. Nielsen; C. Nelson; T. Nelson; C. Neu; M. S. Neubauer; C. Newman-Holmes; A.-S. Nicollerat; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; O. Norniella; K. Oesterberg; T. Ogawa; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; T. Ohsugi; T. Okusawa; R. Oldeman; R. Orava; W. Orejudos; C. Pagliarone

2005-01-01

110

Improved Evidence for Direct CP Violation in B0-->pi+pi- Decays and Model-Independent Constraints on varphi2  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a new measurement of the time-dependent CP-violating parameters in B0-->pi+pi- decays with 275×106 BB¯ pairs collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider operating at the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We find 666±43 B0-->pi+pi- events and measure the CP-violating parameters: Spipi=-0.67±0.16(stat)±0.06(syst) and Apipi=+0.56±0.12(stat)±0.06(syst). We find evidence for large direct CP violation with a significance greater than 4

K. Abe; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; K. Arinstein; Y. Asano; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; Y. Ban; E. Barberio; M. Barbero; A. Bay; U. Bitenc; I. Bizjak; S. Blyth; A. Bondar; A. Bozek; M. Bracko; J. Brodzicka; T. E. Browder; P. Chang; Y. Chao; A. Chen; K.-F. Chen; W. T. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; S.-K. Choi; Y. Choi; A. Chuvikov; S. Cole; J. Dalseno; M. Dash; L. Y. Dong; A. Drutskoy; S. Eidelman; Y. Enari; F. Fang; S. Fratina; N. Gabyshev; A. Garmash; T. Gershon; G. Gokhroo; B. Golob; A. Gorisek; J. Haba; K. Hara; T. Hara; N. C. Hastings; H. Hayashii; M. Hazumi; L. Hinz; T. Hokuue; Y. Hoshi; S. Hou; W.-S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; T. Iijima; A. Imoto; K. Inami; A. Ishikawa; H. Ishino; R. Itoh; M. Iwasaki; Y. Iwasaki; H. Kakuno; J. H. Kang; J. S. Kang; P. Kapusta; N. Katayama; H. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; H. R. Khan; A. Kibayashi; H. Kichimi; S. M. Kim; K. Kinoshita; S. Korpar; P. Krizan; P. Krokovny; S. Kumar; C. C. Kuo; A. Kusaka; A. Kuzmin; Y.-J. Kwon; G. Leder; S. E. Lee; T. Lesiak; J. Li; S.-W. Lin; J. MacNaughton; G. Majumder; F. Mandl; D. Marlow; A. Matyja; Y. Mikami; W. Mitaroff; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyake; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; D. Mohapatra; A. Murakami; T. Nagamine; Y. Nagasaka; I. Nakamura; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; H. Nakazawa; Z. Natkaniec; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Noguchi; T. Nozaki; S. Ogawa; T. Ohshima; T. Okabe; S. Okuno; S. L. Olsen; Y. Onuki; W. Ostrowicz; H. Ozaki; P. Pakhlov; H. Palka; N. Parslow; L. S. Peak; R. Pestotnik; L. E. Piilonen; F. J. Ronga; M. Rozanska; H. Sagawa; Y. Sakai; N. Sato; T. Schietinger; O. Schneider; P. Schönmeier; J. Schümann; A. J. Schwartz; K. Senyo; M. E. Sevior; H. Shibuya; B. Shwartz; V. Sidorov; J. B. Singh; A. Somov; N. Soni; R. Stamen; S. Stanic; M. Staric; K. Sumisawa; T. Sumiyoshi; S. Suzuki; O. Tajima; F. Takasaki; K. Tamai; N. Tamura; M. Tanaka; Y. Teramoto; X. C. Tian; K. Trabelsi; T. Tsuboyama; T. Tsukamoto; S. Uehara; T. Uglov; K. Ueno; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; Y. Ushiroda; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; S. Villa; C. C. Wang; M.-Z. Wang; Y. Watanabe; Q. L. Xie; B. D. Yabsley; A. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamashita; M. Yamauchi; Heyoung Yang; J. Zhang; L. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; D. Zontar; D. Zürcher

2005-01-01

111

Measurement of the direct CP-violating parameter A_CP in the decay D+ -> K- pi+ pi+  

E-print Network

We measure the direct CP-violating parameter A_CP for the decay of the charged charm meson, D+ -> K-pi+pi+ (and charge conjugate), using the full 10.4 fb-1 sample of ppbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We extract the raw reconstructed charge asymmetry by fitting the invariant mass distributions for the sum and difference of charge-specific samples. This quantity is then corrected for detector-related asymmetries using data-driven methods and for possible physics asymmetries (from B -> D processes) using input from Monte Carlo simulation. We measure A_CP = [-0.16 +- 0.15 (stat.) +- 0.09 (syst.)]%, which is consistent with zero, as expected from the standard model prediction of CP conservation, and is the most precise measurement of this quantity to date

D0 Collaboration

2014-08-28

112

Observation of psi(3770)--> pi pi J/psi and Measurement of Gamma_{ee}[psi(2S)  

E-print Network

We observe signals for the decays psi(3770)--> X J/psi from data acquired with the CLEO detector operating at the CESR e^+e^- collider with sqrt{s}=3773 MeV. We measure the following branching fractions B(psi(3770)--> XJ/psi) and significances: (189 +- 20 +- 20) x 10^-5 (11.6sigma) for X=pi^+pi^-, (80 +- 25 +- 16) x 10^-5 (3.4sigma) for X=pi^0pi^0, and (87 +- 33 +- 22) x 10^-5 (3.5sigma) for X=eta, where the errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The radiative return process e^+e^- -->gamma psi(2S) populates the same event sample and is used to measure Gamma_{ee}[psi(2S)]=(2.54 +- 0.03 +- 0.11) keV.

N. E. Adam; CLEO Collaboration

2005-08-09

113

The reaction e+e- --> e+e-pi+pi- and the pion form factor measurements via the radiative return method  

E-print Network

The role of the reaction e+e- --> e+ e-pi+pi- in the pion form factor measurements via radiative return method without photon tagging is studied in detail. The analysis is based on the developed Monte Carlo program EKHARA, which ingredients are also presented.

Henryk Czyz; Elzbieta Nowak-Kubat

2006-01-20

114

EKHARA Monte Carlo generator for e+e- to e+e-pi0 and e+e- to e+e- pi+pi- processes  

E-print Network

We present EKHARA Monte Carlo event generator of reactions e+e- to e+e- pi0 and e+e- to e+e- pi+pi-. The newly added channel (e+e- to e+e-pi0) is important for gamma*gamma* physics and can be used for the pion transition form factor studies at meson factories.

Henryk Czyz; Sergiy Ivashyn

2010-09-09

115

Spectator Scattering and Annihilation Contributions as a Solution to the ${\\pi}K$ and ${\\pi}{\\pi}$ Puzzles within QCD Factorization Approach  

E-print Network

The large branching ratios for pure annihilation $\\bar{B}_s^0$ $\\to$ $\\pi^+ \\pi^-$ and $\\bar{B}_d^0$ $\\to$ $K^+ K^-$ decays reported by CDF and LHCb collaborations recently and the so-called ${\\pi}K$ and ${\\pi}{\\pi}$ puzzles indicate that spectator scattering and annihilation contributions are important to the penguin-dominated, color-suppressed tree dominated, and pure annihilation nonleptonic $B$ decays. Combining the available experimental data for $B_{u,d}$ ${\\to}$ $\\pi \\pi$, ${\\pi}K$ and $K \\bar{K}$ decays, we do a global fit on the spectator scattering and annihilation parameters $X_H({\\rho}_H$, ${\\phi}_H)$, $X_A^i({\\rho}_A^{i},{\\phi}_A^{i})$ and $X_A^f({\\rho}_A^{f},{\\phi}_A^{f})$, which are used to parameterize the endpoint singularity in amplitudes of spectator scattering, nonfactorizable and factorizable annihilation topologies within the QCD factorization framework, in three scenarios for different purpose. Numerically, in scenario II, we get $({\\rho}_A^{i},{\\phi}_A^{i}[^{\\circ}])=(2.88^{+1.52}_{-1....

Chang, Qin; Yang, Yueling; Li, Xiaonan

2014-01-01

116

Rate measurement of D0 -> K+pi-pi 0 and constraints on D-0 D(0)over-bar mixing  

E-print Network

We present an observation and time-integrated rate measurement of the decay D-0-->K(+)pi (-)pi (0) produced in 9 fb(-1) of e(+)e(-) collisions near the Y(4S) resonance. The signal is inconsistent with an upward fluctuation of the background by 4.9...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Zhao, X.

2001-08-01

117

Measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in the decay X(3872) [right arrow] J/ [psi] [pi]? [pi]? at the CDFII experiment  

E-print Network

We present a measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in the decay X(3872) [right arrow] J/ [psi] [pi]? [pi]? using a 360 pb-1 sample of pp collisions at av [square root]s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at ...

Rakitin, Alexander (Alexander Yurevich)

2005-01-01

118

Photoproduction of pi+ pi- pairs in a model with tensor-pomeron and vector-odderon exchange  

E-print Network

We consider the reaction (gamma p) to (pi+ pi- p) at high energies. Our description includes dipion production via the resonances rho, omega, rho-prime and f2, and via non-resonant mechanisms. The calculation is based on a model of high energy scattering with the exchanges of photon, pomeron, odderon and reggeons. The pomeron and the C=+1 reggeons are described as effective tensor exchanges, the odderon and the C=-1 reggeons as effective vector exchanges. We obtain a gauge-invariant version of the Drell-Soeding mechanism which produces the skewing of the rho-meson shape. Starting from the explicit formulae for the matrix element for dipion production we construct an event generator which comprises all contributions mentioned above and includes all interference terms. We give examples of total and differential cross sections and discuss asymmetries which are due to interference of C=+1 and C=-1 exchange contributions. These asymmetries can be used to search for odderon effects. Our model is intended to provide...

Bolz, Arthur; Maniatis, Markos; Nachtmann, Otto; Sauter, Michel; Schoning, Andre

2014-01-01

119

Photoproduction of pi+ pi- pairs in a model with tensor-pomeron and vector-odderon exchange  

E-print Network

We consider the reaction (gamma p) to (pi+ pi- p) at high energies. Our description includes dipion production via the resonances rho, omega, rho-prime and f2, and via non-resonant mechanisms. The calculation is based on a model of high energy scattering with the exchanges of photon, pomeron, odderon and reggeons. The pomeron and the C=+1 reggeons are described as effective tensor exchanges, the odderon and the C=-1 reggeons as effective vector exchanges. We obtain a gauge-invariant version of the Drell-Soeding mechanism which produces the skewing of the rho-meson shape. Starting from the explicit formulae for the matrix element for dipion production we construct an event generator which comprises all contributions mentioned above and includes all interference terms. We give examples of total and differential cross sections and discuss asymmetries which are due to interference of C=+1 and C=-1 exchange contributions. These asymmetries can be used to search for odderon effects. Our model is intended to provide all necessary theoretical tools for a detailed experimental analysis of elastic dipion production for which data exist from fixed target experiments, from HERA, and are now being collected by LHC experiments.

Arthur Bolz; Carlo Ewerz; Markos Maniatis; Otto Nachtmann; Michel Sauter; Andre Schoning

2014-09-30

120

First measurement of phi_3 with a binned model-independent Dalitz plot analysis of B->DK, D->Ks pi+pi- decay  

E-print Network

We present the first measurement of the angle phi_3 of the unitarity triangle using a binned model-independent Dalitz plot analysis technique of B->DK, D->Ks pi+pi- decay chain. The method is based on the measurement of parameters related to the strong phase of D->Ks pi+ pi- amplitude performed by the CLEO collaboration. The analysis uses full data set of 772x10^6 BBbar pairs collected by the Belle experiment at Upsilon(4S) resonance. We obtain phi3 = (77.3^{+15.1}_{-14.9} +- 4.2 +- 4.3) degree and the suppressed amplitude ratio rB = 0.145 +- 0.030 +- 0.011 +- 0.011. Here the first error is statistical, the second is experimental systematic uncertainty, and the third is the error due to precision of strong phase parameters obtained by CLEO. This result is preliminary.

Belle Collaboration; I. Adachi; K. Adamczyk; H. Aihara

2011-06-20

121

Study of B0-->pi0pi0, B±-->pi±pi0, and B±-->K±pi0 decays, and isospin analysis of B>pipi decays  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present updated measurements of the branching fractions and CP asymmetries for B0-->pi0pi0, B±-->pi±pi0, and B±-->K±pi0. Based on a sample of 383×106 Upsilon(4S)-->BB¯ decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC, we measure B(B0-->pi0pi0)=(1.47±0.25±0.12)×10-6, B(B±-->pi±pi0)=(5.02±0.46±0.29)×10-6, and B(B±-->K±pi0)=(13.6±0.6±0.7)×10-6. We also measure the CP asymmetries Cpi0pi0=-0.49±0.35±0.05, Api±pi0=0.03±0.08±0.01, and AK±pi0=0.030±0.039±0.010. Finally, we present bounds on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; M. Pelizaeus; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; Y. Zheng; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki

2007-01-01

122

Study of the B>J\\/psiK-pi+pi- decay and measurement of the B>X(3872)K- branching fraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the decay B--->J\\/psiK-pi+pi- using 117×106 BB¯ events collected at the Y(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- asymmetric-energy storage ring. We measure the branching fractions B (B--->J\\/psiK-pi+pi-)=(116±7(stat.)±9(syst.))×10-5 and B (B--->X(3872)K-)× B (X(3872)-->J\\/psipi+pi-)=(1.28±0.41)×10-5 and find the mass of the X(3872) to be 3873.4±1.4 MeV\\/c2. We search for the hc narrow state in the decay B--->hcK-, hc-->J\\/psipi+pi-

B. Aubert; R. Barate; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; J.-M. Gaillard; A. Hicheur; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; A. Palano; A. Pompili; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; A. W. Borgland; A. B. Breon; D. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; C. T. Day; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; C. Leclerc; G. Lynch; A. M. Merchant; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; V. G. Shelkov; W. A. Wenzel; K. Ford; T. J. Harrison; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; M. Fritsch; K. Goetzen; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; N. Chevalier; W. N. Cottingham; M. P. Kelly; T. E. Latham; F. F. Wilson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; D. Thiessen; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; V. N. Ivanchenko; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; A. N. Yushkov; D. Best; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; C. Buchanan; B. L. Hartfiel; J. W. Gary; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; D. del Re; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; D. B. Macfarlane; H. P. Paar; Sh. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; B. Dahmes; S. L. Levy; O. Long; A. Lu; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; W. Verkerke; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. A. Heusch; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; R. E. Schmitz; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; S. Yang; S. Jayatilleke; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; T. Abe; F. Blanc; P. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; P. Rankin; J. G. Smith; J. Zhang; L. Zhang; A. Chen; J. L. Harton; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; Q. L. Zeng; D. Altenburg; T. Brandt; J. Brose; T. Colberg; M. Dickopp; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. M. Lacker; E. Maly; R. Müller-Pfefferkorn; R. Nogowski; S. Otto; A. Petzold; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; B. Spaan; J. E. Sundermann; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; F. Brochard; P. Grenier; S. Schrenk; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; D. J. Bard; P. J. Clark; D. Lavin; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; V. Azzolini; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; L. Piemontese; A. Sarti; E. Treadwell; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; M. Piccolo; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; G. Crosetti; M. Lo Vetere; M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; S. Bailey; G. Brandenburg; M. Morii; E. Won; R. S. Dubitzky; U. Langenegger; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; J. R. Gaillard; G. W. Morton; J. A. Nash; G. P. Taylor; G. J. Grenier; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; J. Lamsa; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; J. Yi; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; S. Laplace; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; T. C. Petersen; S. Plaszczynski; M. H. Schune; L. Tantot; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; M. C. Simani; D. M. Wright; A. J. Bevan; J. P. Coleman; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; R. J. Parry; D. J. Payne; R. J. Sloane; C. Touramanis; J. J. Back; C. M. Cormack; P. F. Harrison; G. B. Mohanty; C. L. Brown; G. Cowan; R. L. Flack; H. U. Flaecher; M. G. Green; C. E. Marker; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; G. Vaitsas; M. A. Winter; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; P. A. Hart; M. C. Hodgkinson; G. D. Lafferty; A. J. Lyon; J. C. Williams; A. Farbin; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; D. Kovalskyi; C. K. Lae; V. Lillard; D. A. Roberts; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; K. T. Flood; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; V. B. Koptchev; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; S. Willocq; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; D. J. Mangeol; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; P. Taras; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; H. Bulten; G. Raven; L. Wilden; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. A. Gabriel; T. Allmendinger; B. Brau; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; T. Pulliam; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; C. T. Potter; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; F. Colecchia; A. Dorigo; F. Galeazzi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto

2005-01-01

123

Dalitz Plot Analysis of the Decay D+-->K- pi+pi+ and Indication of a Low-Mass Scalar Kpi Resonance  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the Dalitz plot of the decay D+-->K-pi+pi+ with a sample of 15090 events from Fermilab experiment E791. Modeling the decay amplitude as the coherent sum of known Kpi resonances and a uniform nonresonant term, we do not obtain an acceptable fit. If we allow the mass and width of the K*0(1430) to float, we obtain values consistent with

E. M. Aitala; S. Amato; J. C. Anjos; J. A. Appel; D. Ashery; S. Banerjee; I. Bediaga; G. Blaylock; S. B. Bracker; P. R. Burchat; R. A. Burnstein; T. Carter; H. S. Carvalho; N. K. Copty; L. M. Cremaldi; C. Darling; K. Denisenko; S. Devmal; A. Fernandez; G. F. Fox; P. Gagnon; C. Göbel; K. Gounder; A. M. Halling; G. Herrera; G. Hurvits; C. James; P. A. Kasper; S. Kwan; D. C. Langs; J. Leslie; B. Lundberg; J. Magnin; A. Massafferri; S. Maytal-Beck; B. Meadows; J. R. de Mello Neto; D. Mihalcea; R. H. Milburn; J. M. de Miranda; A. Napier; A. Nguyen; A. B. D'Oliveira; K. O'Shaughnessy; K. C. Peng; L. P. Perera; M. V. Purohit; B. Quinn; S. Radeztsky; A. Rafatian; N. W. Reay; J. J. Reidy; A. C. Dos Reis; H. A. Rubin; D. A. Sanders; A. K. Santha; A. F. Santoro; A. J. Schwartz; M. Sheaff; R. A. Sidwell; A. J. Slaughter; M. D. Sokoloff; C. J. Salinas; N. R. Stanton; R. J. Stefanski; K. Stenson; D. J. Summers; S. Takach; K. Thorne; A. K. Tripathi; S. Watanabe; R. Weiss-Babai; J. Wiener; N. Witchey; E. Wolin; S. M. Yang; D. Yi; S. Yoshida; R. Zaliznyak; C. Zhang

2002-01-01

124

Improved measurements of the branching fractions for B0-->pi+pi- and B0-->K+pi-, and a search for B0-->K+K-  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present measurements of the branching fractions for the charmless two-body decays B0-->pi+pi- and B0-->K+pi-, and a search for the decay B0-->K+K-. We include the effects of final-state radiation from the daughter mesons for the first time, and quote branching fractions for the inclusive processes B0-->h+h'-ngamma, where h and h' are pions or kaons. The maximum value of the sum

B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube

2007-01-01

125

Observation of a pbar p mass threshold enhancement in Psi' --> pi+pi- J\\/Psi(J\\/Psi --> gamma pbar p) decay  

Microsoft Academic Search

The decay channel Psi' --> pi+pi- J\\/Psi(J\\/Psi --> gammapbar p) is studied using a sample of 1.06 × 108 Psi' events collected by the BESIII experiment at BEPCII. A strong enhancement at threshold is observed in the pbar p invariant mass spectrum. The enhancement can be fitted with an S-wave Breit-Wigner resonance function with a resulting peak mass of M

M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; L. An; Q. An; Z. H. An; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; N. Berger; J. M. Bian; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; X. Cai; G. F. Cao; X. X. Cao; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; L. P. Chen; M. L. Chen; P. Chen; S. J. Chen; Y. B. Chen; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; M. Y. Duan; J. Fang; C. Q. Feng; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; M. Greco; S. Grishin; Y. T. Gu; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; Y. P. Guo; S. Q. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; X. W. Hu; B. Huang; G. M. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. P. Huang; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. K. Jia; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; S. Komamiya; W. Kuehn; S. Lange; J. K. C. Leung; C. Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; Lik J; J. C. Li; L. Li; Q. J. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Y. X. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; T. R. Liang; Y. Y. Liang; Y. F. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. Y. Liu; F. H. Liu; G. C. Liu; H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. Liu; K. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. H. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Y. F. Liu; Y. W. Liu; Z. A. Liu; G. R. Lu; J. G. Lü; Q. W. Lü; X. R. Lü; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; X. Ma; M. Maggiora; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. Min; X. H. Mo; N. Yu. Muchnoi; Y. Nefedov; F. P. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; C. S. J. Pun; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; J. F. Qiu; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; S. Sonoda; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; X. D. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; H. L. Tian; D. Toth; G. S. Varner; X. Wan; B. Q. Wang; J. K. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; P. Wang; Q. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. D. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; S. P. Wen; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; Y. M. Wu; Z. Wu; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; H. Xu; M. Xu; X. P. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Z. Xu; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; M. Yang; P. Yang; S. M. Yang; Y. X. Yang; M. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; L. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; L. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; C. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; L. Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; B. Zhong; J. Zhong; L. Zhou; Z. L. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; Q. M. Zhu; X. W. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou; J. X. Zuo; P. Zweber

2010-01-01

126

Observation of a charged charmoniumlike structure in e+e- to pi+pi-J/psi at \\sqrt{s}=4.26 GeV  

E-print Network

We study the process e+e- to pi+pi-J/psi at a center-of-mass energy of 4.260 GeV using a 525 pb^{-1} data sample collected with the BESIII detector operating at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider. The Born cross section is measured to be (62.9\\pm 1.9\\pm 3.7) pb, consistent with the production of the Y(4260). We observe a structure at around 3.9 GeV/c^2 in the \\pi^\\pm J/psi mass spectrum, which we refer to as the Z_c(3900). If interpreted as a new particle, it is unusual in that it carries an electric charge and couples to charmonium. A fit to the \\pi^\\pm J/psi invariant mass spectrum, neglecting interference, results in a mass of (3899.0\\pm 3.6\\pm 4.9) MeV/c^2 and a width of (46\\pm 10\\pm 20) MeV. Its production ratio is measured to be R=\\frac{\\sigma(e+e- to \\pi^\\pm Z_c(3900)^\\mp to pi+pi-J/psi))} {\\sigma(e+e- to pi+pi-J/psi)}=(21.5\\pm 3.3\\pm 7.5)%. In all measurements the first errors are statistical and the second are systematic.

BESIII Collaboration; M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; X. C. Ai; O. Albayrak; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; R. Baldini Ferroli; Y. Ban; J. Becker; J. V. Bennett; M. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; H. Cai; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; W. M. Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; L. Fava; C. Q. Feng; P. Friedel; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; O. Fuks; Q. Gao; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; T. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; C. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; G. M. Huang; G. S. Huang; J. S. Huang; L. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; B. Kopf; M. Kornicer; W. Kühn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; M. Lara; P. Larin; M. Leyhe; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; Q. J. Li; S. L. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; D. Lin; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y. Liu; Kai Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; X. C. Lou; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; Y. J. Mo; H. Moeini; C. Morales Morales; K. Moriya; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; C. Nicholson; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; E. Prencipe; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; L. Q. Qin; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; B. D. Schaefer; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; W. M. Song; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; I. Uman; G. S. Varner; B. Q. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. F. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; M. Werner; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; S. X. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Y. X Xia; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; Q. J. Xu; Q. N. Xu; X. P. Xu; Z. R. Xu; F. Xue; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; S. L. Zang; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; LiLi Zhang; R. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; Zhenghao Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; K. X. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. M. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

2013-03-24

127

Effect of external electric field on H-bonding and ?-stacking interactions in guanine aggregates.  

PubMed

The structure and electronic properties of guanine oligomers and ? stacks of guanine quartets (G-quartets) with circulene are investigated under an external field through first-principles calculations. An electric field induces nonplanarity in the guanine aggregates and also leads to an increase in the H-bond distances. The calculations reveal that the binding energy of the circulenes with G-quartets increases on application of an electric field along the stacking direction. The HOMO-LUMO gap decreases substantially under the influence of an external field. The contribution of a simple dipole-dipole interaction to the stability of the stacked system is also analyzed. The electric field along the perpendicular axis increases the dipole moments of the guanine dimer, trimer, and quartet. Such an increase in the dipole moment facilitates stacking with circulenes. The stability of G-quartet-circulene ? stacks depends on the phase of the dipole moment (in-phase or out-of-phase) induced by an external electric field. The stability of stacks of bowl-shaped circulenes with G-quartets depends on the direction of the applied field. PMID:23065813

Jissy, Akkarapattiakal K; Datta, Ayan

2012-12-21

128

Observation of Direct CP-Violation in B0 --> pi+pi- Decays and Model-Independent Constraints on phi2  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a new measurement of the time-dependent CP-violating parameters in\\u000aB0 -> pi+pi- decays using a data sample that contains 535M BBbar pairs\\u000acollected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider\\u000aoperating at the Upsilon(4S) resonance. We reconstruct one neutral B meson as a\\u000api+pi- CP eigenstate and identify the flavor of the accompanying B meson

K. Abe; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; D. Anipko; K. Arinstein; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; E. Barberio; M. Barbero; I. Bedny; U. Bitenc; I. Bizjak; S. Blyth; A. Bozek; T. E. Browder; M.-C. Chang; P. Chang; Y. Chao; A. Chen; K.-F. Chen; W. T. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; Y. Choi; S. Cole; J. Dalseno; M. Dash; A. Drutskoy; S. Eidelman; S. Fratina; T. Gershon; G. Gokhroo; B. Golob; H. Ha; J. Haba; K. Hara; K. Hayasaka; M. Hazumi; D. Heffernan; T. Hokuue; Y. Hoshi; S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; T. Iijima; A. Imoto; K. Inami; A. Ishikawa; Y. Iwasaki; J. H. Kang; P. Kapusta; N. Katayama; H. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; H. R. Khan; A. Kibayashi; H. Kichimi; K. Kinoshita; S. Korpar; P. Krokovny; R. Kulasiri; R. Kumar; C. C. Kuo; A. Kusaka; A. Kuzmin; Y.-J. Kwon; M. J. Lee; S. E. Lee; T. Lesiak; A. Limosani; S.-W. Lin; J. MacNaughton; F. Mandl; D. Marlow; T. Matsumoto; A. Matyja; S. McOnie; W. Mitaroff; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyake; H. Miyata; Y. Miyazaki; R. Mizuk; D. Mohapatra; Y. Nagasaka; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; T. Nozaki; S. Ogawa; T. Ohshima; S. L. Olsen; Y. Onuki; H. Ozaki; P. Pakhlov; G. Pakhlova; R. Pestotnik; L. E. Piilonen; H. Sahoo; Y. Sakai; N. Satoyama; T. Schietinger; O. Schneider; J. Schumann; C. Schwanda; A. J. Schwartz; R. Seidl; K. Senyo; M. E. Sevior; H. Shibuya; B. Shwartz; A. Somov; N. Soni; H. Stoeck; K. Sumisawa; T. Sumiyoshi; S. Y. Suzuki; O. Tajima; F. Takasaki; K. Tamai; N. Tamura; M. Tanaka; Y. Teramoto; X. C. Tian; K. Trabelsi; T. Tsukamoto; S. Uehara; K. Ueno; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; Y. Ushiroda; Y. Usov; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; S. Villa; C. H. Wang; Z. Wang; Y. Watanabe; E. Won; C.-H. Wu; Q. L. Xie; B. D. Yabsley; A. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamashita; M. Yamauchi; L. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; A. Zupanc

2006-01-01

129

Limits on D0-D¯0 Mixing and CP Violation from the Ratio of Lifetimes for Decay to K-pi+, K-K+, and pi-pi+  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a measurement of D0-D¯0 mixing parameters using the ratios of lifetimes extracted from samples of D0 mesons decaying to K-pi+, K-K+, and pi-pi+. Using 91 fb-1 of data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory, we obtain a value Y=[0.8±0.4(stat.)+0.5\\/-0.4(syst.)]%, which, in the limit of CP conservation, corresponds to the mixing parameter y=DeltaGamma\\/2Gamma. Using

B. Aubert; R. Barate; D. Boutigny; J.-M. Gaillard; A. Hicheur; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; P. Robbe; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; A. Palano; A. Pompili; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; A. W. Borgland; A. B. Breon; D. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; C. T. Day; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; J. F. Kral; G. Kukartsev; C. Leclerc; M. E. Levi; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; A. Romosan; M. T. Ronan; V. G. Shelkov; A. V. Telnov; W. A. Wenzel; K. Ford; T. J. Harrison; C. M. Hawkes; D. J. Knowles; S. E. Morgan; R. C. Penny; A. T. Watson; N. K. Watson; T. Deppermann; K. Goetzen; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; H. Schmuecker; M. Steinke; N. R. Barlow; J. T. Boyd; N. Chevalier; W. N. Cottingham; M. P. Kelly; T. E. Latham; C. Mackay; F. F. Wilson; K. Abe; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; D. Thiessen; P. Kyberd; A. K. McKemey; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. B. Golubev; V. N. Ivanchenko; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; A. N. Yushkov; D. Best; M. Chao; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; S. McMahon; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; C. Buchanan; D. del Re; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; D. B. Macfarlane; H. P. Paar; Sh. Rahatlou; U. Schwanke; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; B. Dahmes; N. Kuznetsova; S. L. Levy; O. Long; A. Lu; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; W. Verkerke; T. W. Beck; J. Beringer; A. M. Eisner; M. Grothe; C. A. Heusch; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; R. E. Schmitz; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. Turri; W. Walkowiak; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; S. Yang; S. Jayatilleke; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; T. Abe; T. Barillari; F. Blanc; P. Bloom; P. J. Clark; W. T. Ford; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; P. Rankin; J. Roy; J. G. Smith; W. C. van Hoek; L. Zhang; J. L. Harton; T. Hu; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; J. Zhang; D. Altenburg; T. Brandt; J. Brose; T. Colberg; M. Dickopp; R. S. Dubitzky; A. Hauke; H. M. Lacker; E. Maly; R. Müller-Pfefferkorn; R. Nogowski; S. Otto; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; B. Spaan; L. Wilden; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; F. Brochard; J. Cohen-Tanugi; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; A. Khan; D. Lavin; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; J. E. Swain; J. Tinslay; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; L. Piemontese; A. Sarti; E. Treadwell; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; D. Falciai; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; G. Crosetti; M. Lo Vetere; M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; F. C. Pastore; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; S. Bailey; M. Morii; M. L. Aspinwall; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; I. Eschrich; G. W. Morton; J. A. Nash; P. Sanders; G. P. Taylor; G. J. Grenier; S.-J. Lee; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; J. Lamsa; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; J. Yi; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; S. Laplace; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; T. C. Petersen; S. Plaszczynski; M. H. Schune; L. Tantot; G. Wormser; V. Brigljevic; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; A. J. Bevan; J. P. Coleman; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; M. Kay; R. J. Parry; D. J. Payne; R. J. Sloane; C. Touramanis; J. J. Back; P. F. Harrison; H. W. Shorthouse; P. Strother; P. B. Vidal; C. L. Brown; G. Cowan; R. L. Flack; H. U. Flaecher; S. George; M. G. Green; A. Kurup; C. E. Marker; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; G. Vaitsas; M. A. Winter; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; R. J. Barlow; A. C. Forti; P. A. Hart; F. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; A. J. Lyon; J. H. Weatherall; J. C. Williams; A. Farbin; A. Jawahery; D. Kovalskyi; C. K. Lae; V. Lillard; D. A. Roberts; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; K. T. Flood; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; V. B. Koptchev; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; S. Willocq; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; D. J. Mangeol; M. Milek; P. M. Patel; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; C. Hast; P. Taras; H. Nicholson; C. Cartaro; N. Cavallo; G. De Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; J. M. Losecco; T. A. Gabriel; B. Brau; T. Pulliam; J. Brau; R. Frey; C. T. Potter; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; F. Colecchia; A. Dorigo; F. Galeazzi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; G. Tiozzo; C. Voci; M. Benayoun; H. Briand

2003-01-01

130

Search for D0-D¯0 Mixing and Branching-Ratio Measurement in the Decay D0-->K+pi-pi0  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyze 230.4fb-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider at SLAC to search for evidence of D0-D¯0 mixing using regions of phase space in the decay D0-->K+pi-pi0. We measure the time-integrated mixing rate RM=(0.023-0.014+0.018(stat.)±0.004(syst.))%, and RM<0.054% at the 95% confidence level, assuming CP invariance. The data are consistent with no mixing at the 4.5%

B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube

2006-01-01

131

f{sub 0}(600) and f{sub 0}(980) pole positions from a dispersive {pi}{pi} scattering data analysis  

SciTech Connect

We show how the new precise data on kaon decays together with forward dispersion relations, sum rules and once- and twice-subtracted Roy equations allow for a precise analysis of {pi}{pi} scattering. The once subtracted Roy equations provide a more stringent consistency check for the parametrizations of the S0-wave data in the region from 450 to 1100 MeV that allows us to present a preliminary determination of the f{sub 0}(600) and f{sub 0}(980) poles from the constrained dispersive data analysis.

Ruiz e Elvira, J.; Martin, R. Garcia; Pelaez, J. R. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica II, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kaminski, R. [Department of Theoretical Physics, H. Niewodniczanski Insitute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 31-342 Krakow (Poland)

2011-05-23

132

The influence of arene-ring size on stacking interaction with canonical base pairs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stacking interactions between aromatic molecules (benzene, p-cymene, biphenyl, and di- and tetra-hydrogen anthracene) and G.C and A.T canonical Watson-Crick (WC) base pairs are explored. Two functionals with dispersion corrections: ?-B97XD and B3LYP-D3 are used. For a comparison also the MP2 and B3LYP-D3/PCM methods were used for the most stable p-cymene…WC geometries. It was found that the stacking interaction increases with the size of ?-conjugation system. Its extent is in agreement with experimental finding on anticancer activity of Ru(II) piano-stool complexes where intercalation of these aromatic molecules should play an important role. The explored structures are considered as ternary system so that decomposition of the interaction energy to pairwise and non-additivity contributions is also examined.

Formánek, Martin; Burda, Jaroslav V.

2014-04-01

133

Face-to-face stacks of trinuclear gold(I) trihalides with benzene, hexafluorobenzene, and borazine: impact of aromaticity on stacking interactions.  

PubMed

The interplay of electrostatics, charge transfer, and dispersion forces contributing to the interaction energies in 1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 binary stacks of the c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3) (X = F, Cl, Br, I) clusters with benzene, hexafluorobenzene, or borazine were investigated by employing a multitude of electronic structure computational techniques. The molecular and electronic structures, stabilities, bonding features, and magnetotropicity of [c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](n)(L)(m) (X = halide; L = C(6)H(6), C(6)F(6), B(3)N(3)H(6); n, m ? 2) columnar binary stacks have been investigated by DFT calculations employing the M05-2X functional. The novel binary stacks could be considered as the building blocks of extended columnar supramolecular assemblies formulated as {[c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](C(6)H(6))}(?), {[c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](2)(C(6)F(6))}(?), and {[c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](B(3)N(3)H(6))(2)}(?). In all binary stacks, with a few exceptions, the plane of the alternating c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3) and L (C(6)H(6), C(6)F(6), B(3)N(3)H(6)) stacking participants adopt an almost parallel face-to-face (pff) orientation. The observed trends in the intermolecular distances R in the [c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](n)(L)(m) (X = halide; L = C(6)H(6), C(6)F(6), B(3)N(3)H(6); n, m ? 2) columnar binary stacks are explained by the diverse intermolecular interactions characterizing the stacks, since the three ligands L and the c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3) cyclic trinuclear clusters (CTCs) exhibit diverse physical properties being important determinants of the intermolecular interactions (consisting of covalent, electrostatic, and dispersion forces). The properties considered are the zz tensor components of quadrupole moment, Q(zz), polarizability, ?(zz), nucleus-independent chemical shift, NICS(zz)(1), along with the molecular electrostatic potential, MEP(0), and surface area (S). Energy decomposition analysis (EDA) at the revPBE-D3/TZ2P level revealed that the dominant term in the stacking interactions arises mainly from dispersion and electrostatic forces, while the contribution of covalent interactions are predicted to be small. On the other hand, charge decomposition analysis (CDA) illustrated very small charge transfer from the L stacking participants toward the c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3) clusters. Excellent linear correlations of the interaction energy, ?E(int), and its components (?E(disp), ?E(elstat), ?E(orb), and ?E(Pauli)) with calculated physical properties related to dispersion, covalent, and electrostatic forces have been established. The most important finding is the excellent linear relationship between ?E(int) and the NICS(zz)(1) magnetic criterion of aromaticity, indicating that ?E(int) is also affected by the coupling of the induced magnetic fields of the interacting stacking participants. The magnetotropicity of the binary stacks evaluated by the NICS(zz)-scan curves indicated an enhancement of the diatropicity in the space between the interacting inorganic and organic rings, probably due to the superposition of the diamagnetic ring currents of the interacting ring systems. The energy splitting in dimer (ESID) model was employed to estimate the charge transport of electrons and holes between the ligands L and the [c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)] clusters in [c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](L) 1:1 binary stacks. PMID:23270385

Tsipis, Athanassios C; Stalikas, Alexandros V

2013-01-18

134

Observation of the suppressed ADS modes $B^\\pm \\to [\\pi^\\pm K^\\mp \\pi^+\\pi^-]_D K^\\pm$ and $B^\\pm \\to [\\pi^\\pm K^\\mp \\pi^+\\pi^-]_D \\pi^\\pm$  

E-print Network

An analysis of $B^{\\pm}\\to DK^{\\pm}$ and $B^{\\pm}\\to D\\pi^{\\pm}$ decays is presented where the $D$ meson is reconstructed in the four-body final state $K^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp} \\pi^+ \\pi^-$. Using LHCb data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $1.0{\\rm \\,fb}^{-1}$, first observations are made of the suppressed ADS modes $B^{\\pm}\\to [\\pi^{\\pm} K^{\\mp}\\pi^+\\pi^-]_D K^{\\pm}$ and $B^{\\pm}\\to [\\pi^{\\pm} K^{\\mp} \\pi^+\\pi^- ]_D\\pi^{\\pm}$ with a significance of $5.1\\sigma$ and greater than $10\\sigma$, respectively. Measurements of $CP$ asymmetries and $CP$-conserving ratios of partial widths from this family of decays are also performed. The magnitude of the ratio between the suppressed and favoured $B^{\\pm}\\to DK^{\\pm}$ amplitudes is determined to be $r^K_B = 0.097 \\pm{0.011}$.

Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Oyanguren Campos, M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lohn, S; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Mcnab, A; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V

2013-01-01

135

Local electron correlation descriptions of the intermolecular stacking interactions between aromatic intercalators and nucleic acids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Interaction energies for the binding of three intercalators to nucleic acid base pairs and base-pair steps are presented. Density fitting (DF) and local (L) correlation methods are employed, allowing use of basis sets appropriate for description of non-covalent interactions. In common with previous studies of stacking interactions, DF-LMP2 overestimates binding by as much as 50%. However, spin-component scaling (SCS) corrects for this effect, resulting in binding energies that support literature data obtained with small basis sets and/or density functional theory. The efficiency of this approach allows intercalators within base-pair steps to be studied, revealing substantial many body terms.

Grant Hill, J.; Platts, James A.

2009-09-01

136

Measurement of D^0-\\bar{D^0} Mixing From a Time-Dependent Amplitude Analysis of D^0\\ -> K^+\\pi^-\\pi0 Decays  

SciTech Connect

The authors present evidence of D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} in a data sample of 384 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. Assuming CP conservation, they measure the mixing parameters x{prime}{sub K{pi}{pi}{sup 0}} = [2.61{sub -0.68}{sup +0.57}(stat.) {+-} 0.39(syst.)]%, y{prime}{sub K{pi}{pi}{sup 0}} = [-0.06{sub -0.64}{sup +0.55}(stat.) {+-} 0.34(syst.)]%. The confidence level for the data to be consistent with the no-mixing hypothesis is 0.1%, including systematic uncertainties. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. They find no evidence of CP violation in mixing.

Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2008-08-04

137

Observation of a charged charmoniumlike structure Z_c(4020) and search for the Z_c(3900) in e+e- to pi+pi-h_c  

E-print Network

We study e+e- --> pi+pi-h_c at center-of-mass energies from 3.90 GeV to 4.42 GeV using data samples collected with the BESIII detector operating at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider. The Born cross sections are measured at 13 energies, and are found to be of the same order of magnitude as those of e+e- --> pi+pi-J/psi but with a different line shape. In the \\pi^\\pm h_c mass spectrum, a distinct structure, referred to as Z_c(4020), is observed at 4.02 GeV/c^2. The Z_c(4020) carries an electric charge and couples to charmonium. A fit to the \\pi^\\pm h_c invariant mass spectrum, neglecting possible interferences, results in a mass of (4022.9\\pm 0.8\\pm 2.7) MeV/c^2 and a width of (7.9\\pm 2.7\\pm 2.6) MeV for the Z_c(4020), where the first errors are statistical and the second systematic. No significant Z_c(3900) signal is observed, and upper limits on the Z_c(3900) production cross sections in \\pi^\\pm h_c at center-of-mass energies of 4.23 and 4.26 GeV are set.

BESIII Collaboration; M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; O. Albayrak; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; R. Baldini Ferroli; Y. Ban; J. Becker; J. V. Bennett; M. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; S. Braun; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; H. Cai; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. R. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; X. K. Chu; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; W. M. Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; L. Fava; C. Q. Feng; P. Friedel; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; O. Fuks; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; T. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; C. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; G. M. Huang; G. S. Huang; J. S. Huang; L. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; B. Kloss; B. Kopf; M. Kornicer; W. Kuehn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; M. Lara; P. Larin; M. Leyhe; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. L. Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; N. Li; P. R. Li; Q. J. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; D. X. Lin; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y. Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; X. C. Lou; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; H. Moeini; C. Morales Morales; K. Moriya; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. Nisa; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; E. Prencipe; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; L. Q. Qin; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; C. F. Redmer; M. Ripka; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; S. Schumann; W. Shan; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; W. M. Song; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; I. Uman; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. F. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. H. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; M. Werner; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; S. X. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Y. X Xia; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; Q. J. Xu; Q. N. Xu; X. P. Xu; Z. R. Xu; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; W. C Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; Y. Z. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; W. L. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; S. L. Zang; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. B Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; LiLi Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; Zhenghao Zhang; G. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

2013-09-07

138

Measurement of indirect CP-violating asymmetries in $D^0\\to K^+K^-$ and $D^0\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays at CDF  

E-print Network

We report a measurement of the indirect CP-violating asymmetries ($A_{\\Gamma}$) between effective lifetimes of anticharm and charm mesons reconstructed in $D^0\\to K^+ K^-$ and $D^0\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays. We use the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab experiment and corresponding to $9.7$~fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. The strong decay $D^{*+}\\to D^0\\pi^+$ is used to identify the meson at production as $D^0$ or $\\overline{D}^0$. We statistically subtract $D^0$ and $\\overline{D}^0$ mesons originating from $b$-hadron decays and measure the yield asymmetry between anticharm and charm decays as a function of decay time. We measure $A_\\Gamma (K^+K^-) = (-0.19 \\pm 0.15 (stat) \\pm 0.04 (syst))\\%$ and $A_\\Gamma (\\pi^+\\pi^-)= (-0.01 \\pm 0.18 (stat) \\pm 0.03 (syst))\\%$. The results are consistent with the hypothesis of CP symmetry and their combination yields $A_\\Gamma = (-0.12 \\pm 0.12)\\%$.

Aaltonen, T; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Marchese, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; D'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Ramos, J P Fernández; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; López, O González; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucà, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Fernández, I Redondo; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; Denis, R St; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W -M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

2014-01-01

139

Measurement of the CP-violating phase $\\beta$ in $B^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays and limits on penguin effects  

E-print Network

Time-dependent CP violation is measured in the $B^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\pi^+\\pi^-$ channel for each $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ resonant final state using data collected with an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ in $pp$ collisions using the LHCb detector. The final state with the largest rate, $J/\\psi\\rho^0(770)$, is used to measure the CP-violating angle $2\\beta^{\\rm eff}$ to be $(41.7\\pm 9.6_{-6.3}^{+2.8})^{\\circ}$. This result can be used to limit the size of penguin amplitude contributions to CP violation measurements in, for example, $B_s^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\phi$ decays. Assuming approximate SU(3) flavour symmetry and neglecting higher order diagrams, the shift in the CP-violating phase $\\phi_s$ is limited to be within the interval [$-1.05^\\circ$, +$1.18^\\circ$] at 95% confidence level. Changes to the limit due to SU(3) symmetry breaking effects are also discussed.

Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew Christopher; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Domenico, Antonio; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Helena; Graziani, Giacomo

2014-01-01

140

Measurement of the tau--->etapi-pi+pi-nutau branching fraction and a search for a second-class current in the tau--->eta'(958)pi-nutau decay  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tau--->etapi-pi+pi-nutau decay with the eta-->gammagamma mode is studied using 384fb-1 of data collected by the BABAR detector. The branching fraction is measured to be (1.60±0.05±0.11)×10-4. It is found that tau--->f1(1285)pi-nutau-->etapi-pi+pi-nutau is the dominant decay mode with a branching fraction of (1.11±0.06±0.05)×10-4. The first error on the branching fractions is statistical and the second systematic. Note that no particle identification

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; David Nathan Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; L. Wang; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; Y. Zheng; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni

2008-01-01

141

Measurement of D{0}-D[-over]{0} mixing from a time-dependent amplitude analysis of D{0}-->K+pi{-}pi{0} decays.  

PubMed

We present evidence of D{0}-D[-over ]{0} mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D{0}-->K+pi{-}pi;{0} in a data sample of 384 fb{-1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e{-} collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Assuming CP conservation, we measure the mixing parameters x{Kpipi{0}}{'}=[2.61{-0.68}{+0.57}(stat)+/-0.39(syst)]%, y{Kpipi;{0}}{'}=[-0.06{-0.64}{+0.55}(stat)+/-0.34(syst)]%. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. We find no evidence of CP violation in mixing. PMID:20366027

Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Vazquez, W Panduro; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Sanchez, P del Amo; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Esteve, L; Ganzhur, S F

2009-11-20

142

Precise measurement of the e+e- --> pi+pi-(gamma) cross section with the initial state radiation method at BABAR.  

PubMed

A precise measurement of the cross section of the process e(+)e(-) --> pi(+)pi(-)(gamma) from threshold to an energy of 3 GeV is obtained with the initial state radiation (ISR) method using 232 fb(-1) of data collected with the BABAR detector at e(+)e(-) center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV. The ISR luminosity is determined from a study of the leptonic process e(+)e(-) --> mu(+)mu(-)gamma(gamma). The leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon magnetic anomaly calculated using the pipi cross section measured from threshold to 1.8 GeV is (514.1 +/- 2.2(stat) +/- 3.1(syst)) x 10(-10). PMID:20366141

Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L L; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B

2009-12-01

143

Branching fraction measurements of charged B decays to K*+K+K-, K*+pi+K-, K*+K+pi- and K*+pi+pi- final states  

Microsoft Academic Search

Branching fraction and asymmetry measurements of charmless B+-->K*+h1+h2- (where h1,2=K, pi) decays are presented, using a data sample of 232×106 Upsilon(4S)-->BB¯ decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. Using a maximum likelihood fit, the following branching fraction results were obtained: B(B+-->K*+K+K-)=(36.2±3.3±3.6)×10-6 and B(B+-->K*+pi+pi-)=(75.3±6.0±8.1)×10-6. Upper limits were set for B(B+-->K*+pi+K-)<11.8×10-6 and B(B+-->K*+K+pi-)<6.1×10-6 at 90% confidence

B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. De Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; A. Gaz

2006-01-01

144

Measurements of Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0-->pi+pi-, K+pi-, K+K- Decays  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present measurements of branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries for two-body neutral B¯ meson decays to charged pions and kaons based on a sample of about 88×106 Upsilon(4S)-->BB¯ decays. From a time-independent fit we measure the charge-averaged branching fractions B(B0-->pi+pi- )=(4.7±0.6±0.2)×10-6, B(B0-->K+pi- )=(17.9±0.9±0.7)×10-6, and the direct CP-violating charge asymmetry AKpi=-0.102±0.050±0.016 [-0.188,-0.016], where the ranges in square brackets indicate the 90%

B. Aubert; D. Boutigny; J.-M. Gaillard; A. Hicheur; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; P. Robbe; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; A. Palano; A. Pompili; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; A. W. Borgland; A. B. Breon; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; A. V. Gritsan; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; R. W. Kadel; J. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; J. F. Kral; C. Leclerc; M. E. Levi; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; P. J. Oddone; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; A. Romosan; M. T. Ronan; V. G. Shelkov; A. V. Telnov; W. A. Wenzel; T. J. Harrison; C. M. Hawkes; D. J. Knowles; S. W. O'Neale; R. C. Penny; A. T. Watson; N. K. Watson; T. Deppermann; K. Goetzen; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; K. Peters; H. Schmuecker; M. Steinke; N. R. Barlow; W. Bhimji; J. T. Boyd; N. Chevalier; P. J. Clark; W. N. Cottingham; C. Mackay; F. F. Wilson; K. Abe; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; D. Thiessen; S. Jolly; A. K. McKemey; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. B. Golubev; V. N. Ivanchenko; A. A. Korol; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; A. N. Yushkov; D. Best; M. Chao; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; S. McMahon; D. P. Stoker; C. Buchanan; S. Chun; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; D. B. Macfarlane; H. Paar; S. Prell; Sh. Rahatlou; G. Raven; U. Schwanke; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; B. Dahmes; P. A. Hart; N. Kuznetsova; S. L. Levy; O. Long; A. Lu; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; W. Verkerke; J. Beringer; A. M. Eisner; M. Grothe; C. A. Heusch; W. S. Lockman; T. Pulliam; T. Schalk; R. E. Schmitz; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. Turri; W. Walkowiak; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; E. Chen; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; A. Dvoretskii; D. G. Hitlin; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; S. Yang; S. Jayatilleke; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; T. Barillari; P. Bloom; W. T. Ford; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; P. Rankin; J. Roy; J. G. Smith; W. C. van Hoek; L. Zhang; J. L. Harton; T. Hu; M. Krishnamurthy; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; J. Zhang; D. Altenburg; T. Brandt; J. Brose; T. Colberg; M. Dickopp; R. S. Dubitzky; A. Hauke; E. Maly; R. Müller-Pfefferkorn; S. Otto; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; B. Spaan; L. Wilden; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; F. Brochard; J. Cohen-Tanugi; S. Ferrag; S. T'jampens; Ch. Thiebaux; G. Vasileiadis; M. Verderi; A. Anjomshoaa; R. Bernet; A. Khan; D. Lavin; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; J. E. Swain; J. Tinslay; M. Falbo; C. Borean; C. Bozzi; L. Piemontese; A. Sarti; E. Treadwell; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; D. Falciai; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; A. Zallo; S. Bagnasco; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; G. Crosetti; M. Lo Vetere; M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; F. C. Pastore; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; S. Bailey; M. Morii; R. Bartoldus; G. J. Grenier; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; J. Lamsa; W. T. Meyer; E. I. Rosenberg; J. Yi; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; H. M. Lacker; S. Laplace; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; T. C. Petersen; S. Plaszczynski; M. H. Schune; L. Tantot; S. Trincaz-Duvoid; G. Wormser; R. M. Bionta; V. Brigljevic; D. J. Lange; K. van Bibber; D. M. Wright; A. J. Bevan; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; M. George; M. Kay; D. J. Payne; R. J. Sloane; C. Touramanis; M. L. Aspinwall; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; I. Eschrich; G. W. Morton; J. A. Nash; P. Sanders; D. Smith; G. P. Taylor; J. J. Back; G. Bellodi; P. Dixon; P. F. Harrison; R. J. Potter; H. W. Shorthouse; P. Strother; P. B. Vidal; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; S. George; M. G. Green; A. Kurup; C. E. Marker; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; G. Vaitsas; M. A. Winter; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; R. J. Barlow; A. C. Forti; F. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; A. J. Lyon; N. Savvas; J. H. Weatherall; J. C. Williams; A. Farbin; A. Jawahery; V. Lillard; D. A. Roberts; J. R. Schieck; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; K. T. Flood; S. S. Hertzbach; R. Kofler; V. B. Koptchev; T. B. Moore; H. Staengle; S. Willocq; B. Brau; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Milek; P. M. Patel; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Kroeger; J. Reidy; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; C. Hast; P. Taras; H. Nicholson; C. Cartaro; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; J. M. Losecco; J. R. Alsmiller; T. A. Gabriel; J. Brau; R. Frey; M. Iwasaki; C. T. Potter; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; F. Colecchia; A. Dorigo; F. Galeazzi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; M. Benayoun; H. Briand; J. Chauveau; P. David; Ch. de La Vaissière; L. del Buono; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Ocariz; M. Pivk; L. Roos; J. Stark; P. F. Manfredi; V. Re; V. Speziali; L. Gladney; Q. H. Guo

2002-01-01

145

D0--anti-D0 mixing results from BaBar by analysis of D0 --> K+ pi- pi0 Dalitz-plot regions  

E-print Network

We present a preliminary search for D0--anti-D0 mixing using the decays D0 --> K+ pi- pi0, additionally presenting Dalitz-plot distributions and a measurement of the branching ratio for this mode. A new tagging technique is used to produce the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed Dalitz plot, which in turn is used to motivate the method used for the D-mixing search. We analyze 230.4fb-1 of data collected from the BaBar detector at the PEP-II collider. Assuming CP conservation, we find R_M < 0.054% with 95% confidence, and we estimate that the data are consistent with no mixing at a 4.5% confidence level. We present D-mixing results both with and without the assumption of CP conservation.

M. G. Wilson; for the BaBar Collaboration

2006-05-15

146

Molecular dynamics study of the interactions between dislocation and imperfect stacking fault tetrahedron in Cu  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The microstructure of irradiated face centered cubic alloys with low stacking fault energy is distinguished by the formation of a high number density of nanometer size stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). A recent transmission electron microscopy investigation of high-energy proton irradiated copper [16] has shown that nearly 50% of the visible SFT population are not perfect SFTs, but rather consist of truncated SFT and/or groups of overlapping SFT. This paper presents the results of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the interaction between gliding dislocations, of either edge or screw character, and truncated SFT or overlapping SFT. The most common result of the edge dislocation interaction with a truncated SFT is defect shearing, ultimately leading to complete separation into two smaller defect clusters. Partial absorption of the truncated SFT is the most common result of the interaction with a screw dislocation, resulting in the formation of super-jog (or helical) segments as the defect is absorbed into the dislocation core. The resulting non-planar screw dislocation is self-pinned with reduced mobility and is re-emitted as a similar truncated SFT as the applied shear stress is increased. The re-emitted truncated SFT is often rotated and translated relative to the original position. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that shearing (decreased defect cluster size) and dislocation dragging of the defect clusters by partial absorption into the dislocation core contributes to the formation of defect-free channels.

Saintoyant, Lucie; Lee, Hyon-Jee; Wirth, Brian D.

2007-04-01

147

Extracting Drug-Drug Interaction from the Biomedical Literature Using a Stacked Generalization-Based Approach  

PubMed Central

Drug-drug interaction (DDI) detection is particularly important for patient safety. However, the amount of biomedical literature regarding drug interactions is increasing rapidly. Therefore, there is a need to develop an effective approach for the automatic extraction of DDI information from the biomedical literature. In this paper, we present a Stacked Generalization-based approach for automatic DDI extraction. The approach combines the feature-based, graph and tree kernels and, therefore, reduces the risk of missing important features. In addition, it introduces some domain knowledge based features (the keyword, semantic type, and DrugBank features) into the feature-based kernel, which contribute to the performance improvement. More specifically, the approach applies Stacked generalization to automatically learn the weights from the training data and assign them to three individual kernels to achieve a much better performance than each individual kernel. The experimental results show that our approach can achieve a better performance of 69.24% in F-score compared with other systems in the DDI Extraction 2011 challenge task. PMID:23785452

He, Linna; Yang, Zhihao; Zhao, Zhehuan; Lin, Hongfei; Li, Yanpeng

2013-01-01

148

Dislocation-stacking fault tetrahedron interaction: what can we learn from atomic scale modelling.  

SciTech Connect

The high number density of stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) observed in irradiated fcc metals suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, taken into account when estimating mechanical properties changes of irradiated materials. The central issue is describing the individual interaction between a moving dislocation and an SFT, which is characterized by a very fine size scale, {approx}100 nm. This scale is amenable to both in situ TEM experiments and large-scale atomic modelling. In this paper we present results of an atomistic simulation of dislocation-SFT interactions using molecular dynamics (MD). The results are compared with observations from in situ deformation experiments. It is demonstrated that in some cases the simulations and experimental observations are quite similar, suggesting a reasonable interpretation of experimental observations.

Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Matsukawa, Yoshitaka [ORNL

2004-01-01

149

The relevance of nonlinear stacking interactions in simple models of double-stranded DNA  

PubMed Central

Single molecule DNA experiments provide interesting data that allow a better understanding of the mechanical interactions between the strands and the nucleotides of this molecule. In some sense, these experiments complement the classical ones about DNA thermal denaturation. It is well known that the original Peyrard–Bishop (PB) model by means of a harmonic stacking potential and a nonlinear substrate potential has been able to predict the existence of a critical temperature of full denaturation of the molecule. In the present paper, driven by the findings of single molecule experiments, we substitute the original harmonic intra-strand stacking potential with a Duffing type potential. By elementary and analytical arguments, we show that with this choice it is possible to obtain a sharp transition in the classical domain wall solution of the PB model and the compactification of the classical solitary wave solutions of other models for the dynamics of DNA. We discuss why these solutions may improve our knowledge of the DNA dynamics in several directions. PMID:16971334

Saccomandi, Giuseppe; Sgura, Ivonne

2006-01-01

150

Atomic-Scale Study of Dislocation-Stacking Fault Tetrahedron Interactions. Part I: Mechanisms.  

SciTech Connect

Stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) are formed under irradiation in fcc metals and alloys. The high number density of SFTs observed suggests that they should contribute to radiation-induced hardening and, therefore, be taken into account when estimating mechanical property changes of irradiated materials. The key issue in this is to describe the interaction between a moving dislocation and an individual SFT, which is distinguished by a small physical size of the order of {approx}1-10 nm. We have performed atomistic simulations of edge and screw dislocations interacting with SFTs of different sizes at different temperatures and strain rates. Five possible interaction outcomes have been identified, involving either partial absorption, or shearing or restoration of SFTs. The mechanisms that give rise to these processes are described and their dependence on interaction parameters, such as SFT size, dislocation-SFT geometry, temperature and stress/strain rate are determined. Mechanisms that help to explain the formation of defect-free channels cleared by gliding dislocations, as observed experimentally, are also discussed. Hardening due to the various mechanisms and their dependence on loading conditions will be presented in a following paper (Part II).

Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Rodney, David [Genie Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux; Bacon, David J [University of Liverpool

2006-01-01

151

Pyrene-modified PNAs: Stacking interactions and selective excimer emission in PNA2DNA triplexes.  

PubMed

Pyrene derivatives can be incorporated into nucleic acid analogs in order to obtain switchable probes or supramolecular architectures. In this paper, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) containing 1 to 3 1-pyreneacetic acid units (PNA1-6) with a sequence with prevalence of pyrimidine bases, complementary to cystic fibrosis W1282X point mutation were synthesized. These compounds showed sequence-selective switch-on of pyrene excimer emission in the presence of target DNA, due to PNA2DNA triplex formation, with stability depending on the number and positioning of the pyrene units along the chain. An increase in triplex stability and a very high mismatch-selectivity, derived from combined stacking and base-pairing interactions, were found for PNA2, bearing two distant pyrene units. PMID:25161706

Manicardi, Alex; Guidi, Lucia; Ghidini, Alice; Corradini, Roberto

2014-01-01

152

Pyrene-modified PNAs: Stacking interactions and selective excimer emission in PNA2DNA triplexes  

PubMed Central

Summary Pyrene derivatives can be incorporated into nucleic acid analogs in order to obtain switchable probes or supramolecular architectures. In this paper, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) containing 1 to 3 1-pyreneacetic acid units (PNA1–6) with a sequence with prevalence of pyrimidine bases, complementary to cystic fibrosis W1282X point mutation were synthesized. These compounds showed sequence-selective switch-on of pyrene excimer emission in the presence of target DNA, due to PNA2DNA triplex formation, with stability depending on the number and positioning of the pyrene units along the chain. An increase in triplex stability and a very high mismatch-selectivity, derived from combined stacking and base-pairing interactions, were found for PNA2, bearing two distant pyrene units. PMID:25161706

Guidi, Lucia; Ghidini, Alice

2014-01-01

153

Measurement of ${D^{0}}$-${\\overline{D}{}^{0}}$ Mixing and Search for Indirect $CP$ Violation Using ${D^0\\to K_S^0\\pi^+\\pi^-}$ Decays  

E-print Network

We report a measurement of ${D^{0}}$-${\\overline{D}{}^{0}}$ mixing parameters and a search for indirect $CP$ violation through a time-dependent amplitude analysis of ${D^0\\to K_S^0\\pi^+\\pi^-}$ decays. The results are based on 921~fb$^{-1}$ of data accumulated with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider. Assuming $CP$ conservation, we measure the mixing parameters $x=(0.56\\pm0.19^{+0.03}_{-0.09}{^{+0.06}_{-0.09}})\\%$ and $y=(0.30\\pm0.15^{+0.04}_{-0.05}{^{+0.03}_{-0.06})}\\%$, where the errors are statistical, experimental systematic, and systematic due to the amplitude model, respectively. With $CP$ violation allowed, the parameters $|q/p|=0.90^{+0.16}_{-0.15}{^{+0.05}_{-0.04}}{^{+0.06}_{-0.05}}$ and $\\arg(q/p)=(-6\\pm11{\\pm3}{^{+3}_{-4}})^{\\circ}$ are found to be consistent with conservation of $CP$ symmetry in mixing and in the interference between mixing and decay, respectively.

Abdesselam, A; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Bobrov, A; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; ?ervenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Cho, I -S; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Frost, O; Gaur, V; Ganguly, S; Garmash, A; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W -S; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Iwashita, T; Jaegle, I; Julius, T; Kang, J H; Kato, E; Katrenko, P; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kichimi, H; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, M J; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Klucar, J; Ko, B R; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kronenbitter, B; Kuhr, T; Kumar, R; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Lee, S -H; Li, Y; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Liu, C; Liu, Y; Liu, Z Q; Liventsev, D; Lukin, P; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Mussa, R; Nakao, M; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Nedelkovska, E; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Ogawa, S; Pakhlov, P; Park, H; Park, H K; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petri?, M; Piilonen, L E; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Röhrken, M; Rostomyan, A; Sahoo, H; Saito, T; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santel, D; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Seidl, R; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Stani?, S; Stari?, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Y; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wehle, S; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamashita, Y; Yashchenko, S; Yook, Y; Yuan, C Z; Zhang, C C; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

2014-01-01

154

CDF Grid computing and the decay X(3872) ---> J/psi pi+ pi- with J/psi ---> e+ e-  

SciTech Connect

The main aim of physics research is to obtain a consistent description of nature leading to a detailed understanding of the phenomena observed in experiments. The field of particle physics focuses on the discovery and understanding of the fundamental particles and the forces by which they interact with each other. Using methods from group theory, the present knowledge can be mathematically described by the so-called ''Standard Model'', which interprets the fundamental particles (quarks and leptons) as quantum-mechanical fields interacting via the electromagnetic, weak and strong force. These interactions are mediated via gauge particles such as the photon (for the electromagnetic force), W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} (for the weak force) and gluons (for the strong force). Gravitation is not yet included in this description as it presently cannot be formulated in a way to be incorporated in the Standard Model. However, the gravitational force is negligibly small on microscopic levels. The validity of this mathematical approach is tested experimentally by accelerating particles such as electrons and protons, as well as their antiparticles, to high energies and observing the reactions as these particles collide using sophisticated detectors. Due to the high energy of the particles involved, these detectors need to be as big as a small house to allow for precision measurements. Comparing the predictions from theory with the analyzed reactions observed in these collisions, the Standard Model has been established as a well-founded theory. Precision measurements from the four experiments (Aleph, Delphi, Opal, L3) the Large Electron Positron collider (LEP), operated at CERN during the years 1989-2000, allow the determination of the Standard Model parameters with enormous accuracy.

Kerzel, Ulrich; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

2005-11-01

155

?-Stacking, C-H/?, and halogen bonding interactions in bromobenzene and mixed bromobenzene-benzene clusters.  

PubMed

Noncovalent interactions play an important role in many chemical and biochemical processes. Building upon our recent study of the homoclusters of chlorobenzene, where ?-? stacking and CH/? interactions were identified as the most important binding motifs, in this work we present a study of bromobenzene (PhBr) and mixed bromobenzene-benzene clusters. Electronic spectra in the region of the PhBr monomer S0-S1 (??*) transition were obtained using resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) methods combined with time-of-flight mass analysis. As previously found for related systems, the PhBr cluster spectra show a broad feature whose center is red-shifted from the monomer absorption, and electronic structure calculations indicate the presence of multiple isomers and Franck-Condon activity in low-frequency intermolecular modes. Calculations at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ level find in total eight minimum energy structures for the PhBr dimer: four ?-stacked structures differing in the relative orientation of the Br atoms (denoted D1-D4), one T-shaped structure (D5), and three halogen bonded structures (D6-D8). The calculated binding energies of these complexes, corrected for basis set superposition error (BSSE) and zero-point energy (ZPE), are in the range of -6 to -24 kJ/mol. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations predict that these isomers absorb over a range that is roughly consistent with the breadth of the experimental spectrum. To examine the influence of dipole-dipole interaction, R2PI spectra were also obtained for the mixed PhBr···benzene dimer, where the spectral congestion is reduced and clear vibrational structure is observed. This structure is well-simulated by Franck-Condon calculations that incorporate the lowest frequency intermolecular modes. Calculations find four minimum energy structures for the mixed dimer and predict that the binding energy of the global minimum is reduced by ~30% relative to the global minimum PhBr dimer structure. PMID:23978255

Reid, Scott A; Nyambo, Silver; Muzangwa, Lloyd; Uhler, Brandon

2013-12-19

156

NONWATER QUALITY IMPACTS OF CLOSED-CYCLE COOLING SYSTEMS AND THE INTERACTION OF STACK GAS AND COOLING TOWER PLUMES  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of a literature survey of the nonwater quality impacts of closed-cycle cooling systems. Following discussions of cooling tower and stack gas plumes, interactions of these plumes are considered. For cooling tower plumes, plume types, behavior, salt drift g...

157

Evidence of a Broad Structure at an Invariant Mass of 4.32GeV\\/c2 in the Reaction e+e--->pi+pi-psi(2S) Measured at BABAR  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a measurement of the cross section of the process e+e--->pi+pi-psi(2S) from threshold up to 8 GeV center-of-mass energy using events containing initial-state radiation, produced at the SLAC PEP-II e+e- storage rings. The study is based on 298fb-1 of data recorded with the BABAR detector. A structure is observed in the cross section not far above threshold, near 4.32

B. Aubert; R. Barate; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; F. Couderc; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; E. Grauges; A. Palano; J. C. Chen; N. D. Qi; G. Rong; P. Wang; Y. S. Zhu; G. Eigen; I. Ofte; B. Stugu; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; E. Charles; M. S. Gill; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; M. Pripstein; N. A. Roe; M. T. Ronan; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; M. Barrett; K. E. Ford; T. J. Harrison; A. J. Hart; C. M. Hawkes; S. E. Morgan; A. T. Watson; T. Held; H. Koch; B. Lewandowski; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; T. Schroeder; M. Steinke; J. T. Boyd; J. P. Burke; W. N. Cottingham; D. Walker; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; N. S. Knecht; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; P. Kyberd; M. Saleem; D. J. Sherwood; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu Todyshev; D. S. Best; M. Bondioli; M. Bruinsma; M. Chao; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; R. K. Mommsen; W. Roethel; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; O. Long; B. C. Shen; K. Wang; L. Zhang; H. K. Hadavand; E. J. Hill; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; G. Nesom; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; P. Spradlin; D. C. Williams; M. G. Wilson; J. Albert; E. Chen; A. Dvoretskii; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; A. Ryd; A. Samuel; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; W. O. Ruddick; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. Chen; E. A. Eckhart; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; Q. Zeng; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; T. Brandt; V. Klose; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; P. Grenier; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Capra; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; G. Brandenburg; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; W. Bhimji; D. A. Bowerman; P. D. Dauncey; U. Egede; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; M. B. Nikolich; W. Panduro Vazquez; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; N. T. Meyer; V. Ziegler; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; F. Le Diberder; V. Lepeltier; A. M. Lutz; A. Oyanguren; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; C. H. Cheng; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; I. J. Forster; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; K. A. George; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. di Lodovico; W. Menges; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; P. D. Jackson; T. R. McMahon; S. Ricciardi; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; M. T. Naisbit; J. C. Williams; J. I. Yi; C. Chen; W. D. Hulsbergen; A. Jawahery; C. K. Lae; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; S. Saremi; H. Staengle; R. Cowan; G. Sciolla; S. J. Sekula; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; H. Kim; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; N. Cavallo; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; C. Gatto; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; P. Paolucci; D. Piccolo; C. Sciacca; M. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; J. M. Losecco; T. Allmendinger; G. Benelli; K. K. Gan; K. Honscheid; D. Hufnagel; H. Kagan; R. Kass; A. M. Rahimi; R. Ter-Antonyan; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence

2007-01-01

158

Molecular dynamics study of the interactions between dislocation and imperfect stacking fault tetrahedron in Cu  

Microsoft Academic Search

The microstructure of irradiated face centered cubic alloys with low stacking fault energy is distinguished by the formation of a high number density of nanometer size stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). A recent transmission electron microscopy investigation of high-energy proton irradiated copper [16] has shown that nearly 50% of the visible SFT population are not perfect SFTs, but rather consist of

Lucie Saintoyant; Hyon-Jee Lee; Brian D. Wirth

2007-01-01

159

Dalitz Plot Analysis of Ds+->pi+pi-pi+  

SciTech Connect

A Dalitz plot analysis of {approx} 13, 000 D{sub s}{sup +} decays to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} has been performed. A 384 fb{sup -1} data sample, recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring running at center of mass energies near 10.6 GeV, is used. Amplitudes and phases of the intermediate resonances which contribute to this final state are measured. A high precision measurement of the ratio: {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.199 {+-} 0.004 {+-} 0.006 is performed. Using a model independent partial wave analysis the amplitude and phase of the S-wave have been measured.

Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, R.N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2009-01-26

160

Dalitz Plot Analysis of B+- --> pi+-pi+-pi-+ Decays  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a Dalitz-plot analysis of charmless B{sup {+-}} decays to the final state {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} using a sample of (465 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR experiment at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. They measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}) = (15.2 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(770){pi}{sup {+-}}) = (8.1 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 1.2{sub -1.1}{sup +0.4}) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup {+-}}) = (1.57 {+-} 0.42 {+-} 0.16{sub -0.19}{sup +0.53}) x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} nonresonant) = (5.3 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 0.6{sub -0.5}{sup +1.1}) x 10{sup -6}, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and model-dependent, respectively. Measurements of branching fractions for the modes B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(1450){pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(1370){pi}{sup {+-}} are also presented. They observe no significant direct CP asymmetries for the above modes, and there is no evidence for the decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(980){pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup {+-}} {yields} {chi}{sub c0}{pi}{sup {+-}}, or B{sup {+-}} {yields} {chi}{sub c2}{pi}{sup {+-}}.

Collaboration, The BABAR; Aubert, B.

2009-02-23

161

Structure of Musashi1 in a complex with target RNA: the role of aromatic stacking interactions  

PubMed Central

Mammalian Musashi1 (Msi1) is an RNA-binding protein that regulates the translation of target mRNAs, and participates in the maintenance of cell ‘stemness’ and tumorigenesis. Msi1 reportedly binds to the 3?-untranslated region of mRNA of Numb, which encodes Notch inhibitor, and impedes initiation of its translation by competing with eIF4G for PABP binding, resulting in triggering of Notch signaling. Here, the mechanism by which Msi1 recognizes the target RNA sequence using its Ribonucleoprotein (RNP)-type RNA-binding domains (RBDs), RBD1 and RBD2 has been revealed on identification of the minimal binding RNA for each RBD and determination of the three-dimensional structure of the RBD1:RNA complex. Unique interactions were found for the recognition of the target sequence by Msi1 RBD1: adenine is sandwiched by two phenylalanines and guanine is stacked on the tryptophan in the loop between ?1 and ?1. The minimal recognition sequences that we have defined for Msi1 RBD1 and RBD2 have actually been found in many Msi1 target mRNAs reported to date. The present study provides molecular clues for understanding the biology involving Musashi family proteins. PMID:22140116

Ohyama, Takako; Nagata, Takashi; Tsuda, Kengo; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Imai, Takao; Okano, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Toshio; Katahira, Masato

2012-01-01

162

Stair motifs at protein-DNA interfaces: nonadditivity of H-bond, stacking, and cation-pi interactions.  

PubMed

At the interface between protein and double-stranded DNA, stair motifs simultaneously involve three different types of pairwise interactions: aromatic base stacking, hydrogen bonding, and cation-pi. The relative importance of these interactions is studied in the stair motif occurring in the 1TC3 crystal structure, which involves an arginine and two stacked guanines, by means of Hartree-Fock (HF) and Møller-Plesset energy and free energy calculations, including vibrational, rotational, translational contributions, both in a vacuum and various solvents. The results obtained show an anti-cooperative tendency of the HF energy and vibrational free energy terms, and the cooperativity of the rotational, translational, and solvation free energies. Hence, the cooperativity of the stair motif interactions, in the context of protein-DNA recognition, can be viewed as arising from the environment. PMID:15149205

Biot, Christophe; Wintjens, René; Rooman, Marianne

2004-05-26

163

The collapse of stacking fault tetrahedra by interactions with gliding dislocations.  

SciTech Connect

The collapse of stacking-fault tetrahedra (SFT) by gliding dislocations was observed in in situ straining experiments in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). A stacking-fault tetrahedron was collapsed by intersection with a gliding perfect dislocation: only the base portion divided by the gliding plane of the dislocation annihilated, while the apex portion remained intact. As a result of analysis on evolution of atom configuration induced by intersection with perfect dislocation in SFT, it was found that an unusual atom configuration inevitably appeared in one of the ledges formed on stacking-fault planes, which is traditionally called I-ledge: the atoms on adjacent (111) planes were overlapping each other. The overlapping configuration provides a strong repulsive force, being a conceivable driving force to induce a chain reaction of atom displacements that collapses the SFT base portion.

Matsukawa, Yoshitaka [ORNL; Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL

2005-01-01

164

Improved measurement of the CKM angle gamma in B\\/+-->D(*)K(*)-\\/+ decays with a Dalitz plot analysis of D decays to KS0pi+pi- and KS0K+K-  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on an improved measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violating phase gamma through a Dalitz plot analysis of neutral D meson decays to KS0pi+pi- and KS0K+K- produced in the processes B-\\/+-->DK-\\/+, B-\\/+-->D*K-\\/+ with D*-->Dpi0, Dgamma, and B-\\/+-->DK*-\\/+ with K*-\\/+-->KS0pi-\\/+. Using a sample of 383×106 B Bmacr pairs collected by the BABAR detector, we measure gamma=(76±22±5±5)° (mod 180°), where the first

B. Aubert; M. Bona; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; E. Prencipe; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; G. Lynch; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; C. M. Hawkes; N. Soni; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; M. Barrett; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; Z. Yasin; L. Zhang; V. Sharma; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; M. A. Mazur; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; L. Wang; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; C. H. Cheng; D. A. Doll; B. Echenard; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; M. Karbach; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; S. Playfer; J. E. Watson; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; J. Firmino da Costa; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; K. E. Alwyn; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; V. Lombardo; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; G. Castelli; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; P. Del Amo Sanchez; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; G. Marchiori; M. Morganti; N. Neri; E. Paoloni; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; J. Biesiada; D. Lopes Pegna; C. Lu; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith

2008-01-01

165

Measurement of cosf 2beta in B0-->D(*)h0 Decays with a Time-Dependent Dalitz Plot Analysis of D-->Ks0pi+pi-  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the time-dependent Dalitz plot of D-->KS0pi+pi- in B0-->D(*)h0 decays, where h0 is a pi0, eta, eta', or omega meson and D*-->Dpi0, using a data sample of 383×106 Upsilon(4S)-->BB¯ decays collected with the BABAR detector. We determine cosf 2beta=0.42±0.49±0.09±0.13, sinf 2beta=0.29±0.34±0.03±0.05, and |lambda|=1.01±0.08±0.02, where the first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty, and the third,

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; D. Bailey; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; Y. Zheng; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli; E. Manoni

2007-01-01

166

Tetraquark-based analysis and predictions of the cross sections and distributions for the processes e^+ e^- --> Upsilon(1S) (pi^+ pi^-, K^+ K^-, eta pi^0) near Upsilon(5S)  

E-print Network

We calculate the cross sections and final state distributions for the processes e^+ e^- --> Upsilon(1S) (pi^+ pi^-, K^+ K^-, eta pi^0) near the Upsilon(5S) resonance based on the tetraquark hypothesis. This framework is used to analyse the data on the Upsilon(1S) pi^+ pi^- and Upsilon(1S) K^+ K^- final states [K.F. Chen et al. (Belle Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 112001 (2008); I. Adachi et al. (Belle Collaboration), arXiv:0808.2445], yielding good fits. Dimeson invariant mass spectra in these processes are shown to be dominated by the corresponding light scalar and tensor states. The resulting correlations among the cross sections are worked out. We also predict sigma(e^+ e^- --> Upsilon(1S) K^+ K^-)/sigma(e^+ e^- --> Upsilon(1S) K^0 Kbar^0) = 1/4. These features provide crucial tests of the tetraquark framework and can be searched for in the currently available and forthcoming data from the B factories.

Ahmed Ali; Christian Hambrock; Satoshi Mishima

2010-11-22

167

Stacking interactions of nucleobases: NMR-investigations. II. Self-association of purine-and pyrimidine-derivatives.  

PubMed

The self-association of various purine- and pyrimidine-derivatives in D2O has been studied by means of NMR technique. The thermodynamic quantities have been calculated using an isodesmic NMR model. Among the nucleobases investigated, the adenine-derivatives were found to be most suitable for quantitative determination. A comparison of methylated adenine-derivatives and the pH-dependence of the self-association lead to the conlcusion, that the stacking associates are stabilized by special van der Waals interactions based, essentially, on the polarizability of the pi-electron-system of the assciated molecules. PMID:1234031

Schimmack, W; Sapper, H; Lohmann, W

1975-12-19

168

Dalitz Plot Analyses of B- to D+ Pi- Pi-, B+ to Pi+ Pi- Pi+ and D(S)+ to Pi+ Pi- Pi+ at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

We report on the Dalitz plot analyses of B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{sup +}. The Dalitz plot method and the most recent BABAR results are discussed.

Dong, Liaoyuan; /Iowa State U.

2012-04-10

169

How well can new-generation density functional methods describe stacking interactions in biological systems?w  

E-print Network

, nucleobase stacking hybridization reactions, intercalation of drugs into DNA, catalysis, and biological newly developed DFT methods give reasonable results for the stacking interac- tions in the DNA base for investigating large DNA or protein systems where stacking plays an important role. 1. Introduction Stacking

Truhlar, Donald G

170

Destruction processes of large stacking fault tetrahedra induced by direct interaction with gliding dislocations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The destruction process of large non-truncated stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) induced by gliding dislocations was examined by in situ transmission electron microscope straining experiments. Three different destruction processes were observed: a triangular Frank loop remained after the collapse (Type 1), the whole SFT was incorporated into a gliding dislocation as multiple super jog segments (Type 2), and an apex portion of the original SFT remained as a smaller SFT while the base portion was annihilated (Type 3). The remnants of Type 1 and 2 destruction processes were similar to those of previous models proposed by Kimura, indicating that these processes are based on dislocation reactions as assumed in Kimura models. On contrary, the Type 3 process, which was entirely different from Kimura models, is occasionally accompanied by vacancy migration.

Matsukawa, Y.; Osetsky, Yu. N.; Stoller, R. E.; Zinkle, S. J.

2006-06-01

171

Stacking Interactions between Carbohydrate and Protein Quantified by Combination of Theoretical and Experimental Methods  

PubMed Central

Carbohydrate – receptor interactions are an integral part of biological events. They play an important role in many cellular processes, such as cell-cell adhesion, cell differentiation and in-cell signaling. Carbohydrates can interact with a receptor by using several types of intermolecular interactions. One of the most important is the interaction of a carbohydrate's apolar part with aromatic amino acid residues, known as dispersion interaction or CH/? interaction. In the study presented here, we attempted for the first time to quantify how the CH/? interaction contributes to a more general carbohydrate - protein interaction. We used a combined experimental approach, creating single and double point mutants with high level computational methods, and applied both to Ralstonia solanacearum (RSL) lectin complexes with ?-l-Me-fucoside. Experimentally measured binding affinities were compared with computed carbohydrate-aromatic amino acid residue interaction energies. Experimental binding affinities for the RSL wild type, phenylalanine and alanine mutants were ?8.5, ?7.1 and ?4.1 kcal.mol?1, respectively. These affinities agree with the computed dispersion interaction energy between carbohydrate and aromatic amino acid residues for RSL wild type and phenylalanine, with values ?8.8, ?7.9 kcal.mol?1, excluding the alanine mutant where the interaction energy was ?0.9 kcal.mol?1. Molecular dynamics simulations show that discrepancy can be caused by creation of a new hydrogen bond between the ?-l-Me-fucoside and RSL. Observed results suggest that in this and similar cases the carbohydrate-receptor interaction can be driven mainly by a dispersion interaction. PMID:23056230

Ne?asová, Ivona; Mishra, Sushil Kumar; Komárek, Jan; Ko?a, Jaroslav

2012-01-01

172

Measurements of the branching fractions of B0-->K*0K+K-, B0-->K*0pi+K-, B0-->K*0K+pi-, and B0-->K*0pi+pi-  

Microsoft Academic Search

Branching fraction measurements of charmless B0-->K*0h1+h2- (h1,2=K, pi) decays are presented, using a data sample of 383×106 Upsilon(4S)-->BB¯ decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B-meson factory at SLAC. The results are B(B0-->K*0K+K-)=(27.5±1.3±2.2)×10-6, B(B0-->K*0pi+K-)=(4.6±1.1±0.8)×10-6, and B(B0-->K*0pi+pi-)=(54.5±2.9±4.3)×10-6. The first errors quoted are statistical and the second are systematic. An upper limit is set for B(B0-->K*0K+pi-)<2.2×10-6 at 90% confidence

B. Aubert; M. Bona; D. Boutigny; Y. Karyotakis; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; X. Prudent; V. Tisserand; A. Zghiche; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; L. Lopez; A. Palano; M. Pappagallo; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; L. Sun; G. S. Abrams; M. Battaglia; D. N. Brown; J. Button-Shafer; R. N. Cahn; Y. Groysman; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Kadyk; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Kukartsev; D. Lopes Pegna; G. Lynch; L. M. Mir; T. J. Orimoto; I. L. Osipenkov; M. T. Ronan; K. Tackmann; T. Tanabe; W. A. Wenzel; P. Del Amo Sanchez; C. M. Hawkes; A. T. Watson; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. Walker; D. J. Asgeirsson; T. Cuhadar-Donszelmann; B. G. Fulsom; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; A. Khan; M. Saleem; L. Teodorescu; V. E. Blinov; A. D. Bukin; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; M. Bondioli; S. Curry; I. Eschrich; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; P. Lund; M. Mandelkern; E. C. Martin; D. P. Stoker; S. Abachi; C. Buchanan; S. D. Foulkes; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; B. C. Shen; G. M. Vitug; L. Zhang; H. P. Paar; S. Rahatlou; V. Sharma; J. W. Berryhill; C. Campagnari; A. Cunha; B. Dahmes; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; T. W. Beck; A. M. Eisner; C. J. Flacco; C. A. Heusch; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; T. Schalk; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; M. G. Wilson; L. O. Winstrom; E. Chen; C. H. Cheng; F. Fang; D. G. Hitlin; I. Narsky; T. Piatenko; F. C. Porter; R. Andreassen; G. Mancinelli; B. T. Meadows; K. Mishra; M. D. Sokoloff; F. Blanc; P. C. Bloom; S. Chen; W. T. Ford; J. F. Hirschauer; A. Kreisel; M. Nagel; U. Nauenberg; A. Olivas; J. G. Smith; K. A. Ulmer; S. R. Wagner; J. Zhang; A. M. Gabareen; A. Soffer; W. H. Toki; R. J. Wilson; F. Winklmeier; D. D. Altenburg; E. Feltresi; A. Hauke; H. Jasper; J. Merkel; A. Petzold; B. Spaan; K. Wacker; V. Klose; M. J. Kobel; H. M. Lacker; W. F. Mader; R. Nogowski; J. Schubert; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; J. E. Sundermann; A. Volk; D. Bernard; G. R. Bonneaud; E. Latour; V. Lombardo; Ch. Thiebaux; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; W. Gradl; F. Muheim; S. Playfer; A. I. Robertson; J. E. Watson; Y. Xie; M. Andreotti; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; A. Cecchi; G. Cibinetto; P. Franchini; E. Luppi; M. Negrini; A. Petrella; L. Piemontese; E. Prencipe; V. Santoro; F. Anulli; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; A. Buzzo; R. Contri; M. Lo Vetere; M. M. Macri; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; A. Santroni; S. Tosi; K. S. Chaisanguanthum; M. Morii; J. Wu; R. S. Dubitzky; J. Marks; S. Schenk; U. Uwer; D. J. Bard; P. D. Dauncey; R. L. Flack; J. A. Nash; W. Panduro Vazquez; M. Tibbetts; P. K. Behera; X. Chai; M. J. Charles; U. Mallik; J. Cochran; H. B. Crawley; L. Dong; V. Eyges; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; E. I. Rosenberg; A. E. Rubin; Y. Y. Gao; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; C. K. Lae; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; G. Schott; N. Arnaud; J. Béquilleux; A. D'Orazio; M. Davier; G. Grosdidier; A. Höcker; V. Lepeltier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; S. Pruvot; S. Rodier; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; J. Serrano; V. Sordini; A. Stocchi; W. F. Wang; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; I. Bingham; J. P. Burke; C. A. Chavez; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; R. Gamet; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; K. C. Schofield; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; K. A. George; F. di Lodovico; R. Sacco; G. Cowan; H. U. Flaecher; D. A. Hopkins; S. Paramesvaran; F. Salvatore; A. C. Wren; C. L. Davis; J. Allison; D. Bailey; N. R. Barlow; R. J. Barlow; Y. M. Chia; C. L. Edgar; G. D. Lafferty; T. J. West; J. I. Yi; J. Anderson; C. Chen; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; G. Simi; J. M. Tuggle; G. Blaylock; C. Dallapiccola; S. S. Hertzbach; X. Li; T. B. Moore; E. Salvati; S. Saremi; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; P. H. Fisher; K. Koeneke; G. Sciolla; M. Spitznagel; F. Taylor; R. K. Yamamoto; M. Zhao; Y. Zheng; S. E. McLachlin; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; A. Lazzaro; F. Palombo; J. M. Bauer; L. Cremaldi; V. Eschenburg; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; D. A. Sanders; D. J. Summers; H. W. Zhao; S. Brunet; D. Côté; M. Simard; P. Taras; F. B. Viaud; H. Nicholson; G. de Nardo; F. Fabozzi; L. Lista; D. Monorchio; C. Sciacca; M. A. Baak; G. Raven; H. L. Snoek; C. P. Jessop; K. J. Knoepfel; J. M. Losecco; G. Benelli; L. A. Corwin; K. Honscheid; H. Kagan; R. Kass; J. P. Morris; A. M. Rahimi; J. J. Regensburger; S. J. Sekula; Q. K. Wong; N. L. Blount; J. Brau; R. Frey; O. Igonkina; J. A. Kolb; M. Lu; R. Rahmat; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; J. Strube; E. Torrence; N. Gagliardi; A. Gaz; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; A. Pompili; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; C. Voci; E. Ben-Haim; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; P. David; L. Del Buono; Ch. de La Vaissière; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; J. Malclès; J. Ocariz; A. Perez; J. Prendki; L. Gladney; M. Biasini; R. Covarelli

2007-01-01

173

In-medium modifications of the $??$ interaction in photon-induced reactions  

E-print Network

Differential cross sections of the reactions $(\\gamma,\\pi^\\circ\\pi^\\circ)$ and $(\\gamma,\\pi^\\circ\\pi^++\\pi^\\circ\\pi^-)$ have been measured for several nuclei ($^1$H,$^{12}$C, and $^{\\rm nat}$Pb) at an incident-photon energy of $E_{\\gamma}$=400-460 MeV at the tagged-photon facility at MAMI-B using the TAPS spectrometer. A significant nuclear-mass dependence of the $\\pi\\pi$ invariant-mass distribution is found in the $\\pi^\\circ\\pi^\\circ$ channel. This dependence is not observed in the $\\pi^\\circ\\pi^{+/-}$ channel and is consistent with an in-medium modification of the $\\pi\\pi$ interaction in the $I$=$J$=0 channel. The data are compared to $\\pi$-induced measurements and to calculations within a chiral-unitary approach.

J. G. Messchendorp; S. Janssen; M. Kotulla; J. Ahrens; J. R. H. Annand; R. Beck; F. Bloch; G. Caselotti; L. Fog; D. Hornidge; B. Krusche; W. Langgärtner; J. C. McGeorge; I. J. D. MacGregor; K. Mengel; V. Metag; R. Novotny; R. O. Owens; M. Pfeiffer; S. Sack; R. Sanderson; S. Schadmand

2002-05-15

174

Controlling multivalent interactions in triply-threaded two-component superbundles.  

PubMed

We have investigated the (1)H NMR spectra, the absorption spectra, the fluorescence spectra and decays, and the electrochemical properties of i). a tritopic receptor in which three benzo[24]crown-8 macrorings are fused onto a triphenylene core, ii). a trifurcated trication wherein three dibenzylammonium ions are linked 1,3,5 to a central benzenoid core, and iii). their 1:1 adduct which constitutes a triply-threaded, two-component supramolecular bundle. X-Ray crystallography has established the precise geometry of this paucivalent recognition motif in the solid state. In addition to [N(+)-H...O] hydrogen bonding and [C-H...O] interactions between the NH(2) (+) centers on the three dibenzylammonium ion containing arms of the trication and the three crown ether rings in the tritopic receptor, there is a stabilizing [pi...pi] stacking interaction between the two aromatic cores. Mass spectrometry and (1)H NMR spectroscopy have confirmed the integrity of the 1:1 adduct beyond the solid state, provided the solvents are relatively apolar (e.g., chloroform and acetonitrile). The intense fluorescence emissions of the two recognition components are quenched upon association with the concomitant appearance of a lower energy, broad fluorescence band originating from the pi-pi stacking in the 1:1 adduct of the aromatic cores in the two matching components. Titration experiments, including Job plots, establish the 1:1 stoichiometry of the adduct, an observation which is also confirmed by electrochemical experiments. The electrochemical results show that, both in the tritopic receptor and in the superbundle itself, the first oxidation process is associated with the hexaalkoxytriphenylene core. The successive oxidation processes of the peripheral dioxybenzene units are affected by charge-transfer interactions in the tritopic receptor, whereas, in the superbundle, such units are not interacting. In acetonitrile solution, dethreading/rethreading of the 1:1 adduct can be controlled quantitatively by addition of base and acid. Dethreading and rethreading is also observed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy when dimethylsulfoxide is added to a solution of the 1:1 adduct in equal volumes of acetonitrile and chloroform. A trifurcated trication where methyl groups are located on the para positions of the three dibenzylammonium ions, which are linked 1,3,5 to the neutral benzenoid core, has been employed to demonstrate that dethreading of the 1:1 adduct involves doubly-threaded and singly-threaded species, that is, the paucivalent site is dismembered in a sequence of logical steps involving stable intermediates. This molecular recognition system is a rare example of a supramolecular entity based on a cooperative binding motif that can be switched on and off by chemical means. PMID:14613145

Balzani, Vincenzo; Clemente-León, Miguel; Credi, Alberto; Lowe, James N; Badji?, Jovica D; Stoddart, J Fraser; Williams, David J

2003-11-01

175

Study Stack  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Developed by John Weidner, the Study Stack concept basically assists individuals to memorize information about various subjects, including geography, history, math, languages, and science. Users of the site can select one of the existing stacks, which consists of virtual study cards allowing individuals to learn at their own pace until they are satisfied with their progress. What is also particularly novel about this learning tool is that data entered for customized study stacks can be automatically displayed as a matching game, a word search puzzle, or a hangman game. So far, the site contains dozens of study stacks for each subject, with the areas dedicated to math and science containing quite a number of rather helpful stacks. With its wide range of applications, this site will be very helpful to students at different age levels and teachers who may be seeking to develop a new study tool for any number of topics or themes within a subject area.

Weidner, John

176

Application of diffusion Monte Carlo to materials dominated by van der Waals interactions  

SciTech Connect

Van der Waals forces are notoriously difficult to account for from first principles. We perform extensive calculation to assess the usefulness and validity of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo when applied to van der Waals forces. We present results for noble gas solids and clusters - archetypical van der Waals dominated assemblies, as well as a relevant pi-pi stacking supramolecular complex: DNA + intercalating anti-cancer drug Ellipticine.

Benali, Anouar [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Shulenburger, Luke [Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); Romero, Nichols [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kim, Jeongnim [ORNL; Von Lilienfeld, Anatole [University of Basel

2014-01-01

177

Probing the energetic and structural role of amino acid/nucleobase cation-pi interactions in protein-ligand complexes.  

PubMed

X-ray structures of proteins bound to ligand molecules containing a nucleic acid base were systematically searched for cation-pi interactions between the base and a positively charged or partially charged side chain group located above it, using geometric criteria. Such interactions were found in 38% of the complexes and are thus even more frequent than pi-pi stacking interactions. They are moreover well conserved in families of related proteins. The overwhelming majority of cation-pi contacts involve Ade bases, as these constitute by far the most frequent ligand building block; Arg-Ade is the most frequent cation-pi pair. Ab initio energy calculations at MP2 level were performed on all recorded pairs. Though cation-pi interactions involving the net positive charge carried by Arg or Lys side chains are the most favorable energetically, those involving the partial positive charge of Asn and Gln side chain amino groups (sometimes referred to as amino-pi interactions) are favorable too, owing to the electron correlation energy contribution. Chains of cation-pi interactions with a nucleobase bound simultaneously to two charged groups or a charged group sandwiched between two aromatic moieties are found in several complexes. The systematic association of these motifs with specific ligand molecules in unrelated protein sequences raises the question of their role in protein-ligand structure, stability, and recognition. PMID:12167645

Biot, Christophe; Buisine, Eric; Kwasigroch, Jean-Marc; Wintjens, René; Rooman, Marianne

2002-10-25

178

Branching fractions and CP asymmetries in B0-->pi0pi0, B+-->pi+pi0, and B+-->K+pi0 decays and isospin analysis of the B-->pipi system.  

PubMed

Based on a sample of 227 x 10(6) BB pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, we measure the branching fraction B(B0-->pi(0)pi(0))=(1.17+/-0.32+/-0.10)x10(-6), and the asymmetry Cpi(0)(pi(0))=-0.12+/-0.56+/-0.06. The B0-->pi(0)pi(0) signal has a significance of 5.0 sigma. We also measure B(B+-->pi(+)pi(0))=(5.8+/-0.6+/-0.4)x10(-6), B(B+-->K+pi(0))=(12.0+/-0.7+/-0.6)x10(-6), and the charge asymmetries Api(+)(pi(0))=-0.01+/-0.10+/-0.02 and AK+(pi(0))=0.06+/-0.06+/-0.01. Using isospin relations, we find an upper bound on the angle difference |alpha-alpha(eff)| of 35 degrees at the 90% C.L. PMID:15904359

Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J

2005-05-13

179

A selective recognition mode of a nucleic acid base by an aromatic amino acid: L-phenylalanine-7-methylguanosine 5'-monophosphate stacking interaction.  

PubMed Central

The conformation of 7-methylguanosine 5'-monophosphate (m7GMP) and its interaction with L-phenylalanine (Phe) have been investigated by X-ray crystallographic, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance, and energy calculation methods. The N(7) methylation of the guanine base shifts m7GMP toward an anti--gauche, gauche conformation about the glycosyl and exocyclic C(4')-C(5') bonds, respectively. The prominent stacking observed between the benzene ring of Phe and guanine base of m7GMP is primarily due to the N(7) guarternization of the guanine base. The formation of a hydrogen bonding pair between the anionic carboxyl group and the guanine base further stabilizes this stacking interaction. The present results imply the importance of aromatic amino acids as a hallmark for the selective recognition of a nucleic acid base. PMID:3399389

Ishida, T; Doi, M; Inoue, M

1988-01-01

180

Heteroaromatic ?-stacking energy landscapes.  

PubMed

In this study we investigate ?-stacking interactions of a variety of aromatic heterocycles with benzene using dispersion corrected density functional theory. We calculate extensive potential energy surfaces for parallel-displaced interaction geometries. We find that dispersion contributes significantly to the interaction energy and is complemented by a varying degree of electrostatic interactions. We identify geometric preferences and minimum interaction energies for a set of 13 5- and 6-membered aromatic heterocycles frequently encountered in small drug-like molecules. We demonstrate that the electrostatic properties of these systems are a key determinant for their orientational preferences. The results of this study can be applied in lead optimization for the improvement of stacking interactions, as it provides detailed energy landscapes for a wide range of coplanar heteroaromatic geometries. These energy landscapes can serve as a guide for ring replacement in structure-based drug design. PMID:24773380

Huber, Roland G; Margreiter, Michael A; Fuchs, Julian E; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Tautermann, Christofer S; Liedl, Klaus R; Fox, Thomas

2014-05-27

181

Heteroaromatic ?-Stacking Energy Landscapes  

PubMed Central

In this study we investigate ?-stacking interactions of a variety of aromatic heterocycles with benzene using dispersion corrected density functional theory. We calculate extensive potential energy surfaces for parallel-displaced interaction geometries. We find that dispersion contributes significantly to the interaction energy and is complemented by a varying degree of electrostatic interactions. We identify geometric preferences and minimum interaction energies for a set of 13 5- and 6-membered aromatic heterocycles frequently encountered in small drug-like molecules. We demonstrate that the electrostatic properties of these systems are a key determinant for their orientational preferences. The results of this study can be applied in lead optimization for the improvement of stacking interactions, as it provides detailed energy landscapes for a wide range of coplanar heteroaromatic geometries. These energy landscapes can serve as a guide for ring replacement in structure-based drug design. PMID:24773380

2014-01-01

182

Correlations between high-momentum mesons in p+p. -->. pi. +. pi. +X at s/sup 1/2/=63 GeV  

SciTech Connect

In pp collisions at ..sqrt.. s=62.3 GeV where each proton fragments into at least one low p/sub T/, high-x pion, no significant correlations for ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup +/, ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ and ..pi../sup -/..pi../sup -/ are found, thus excluding quark exchange with Brodsky-Gunion counting rules as the dominant interaction mechanism. This, together with the experimental x dependence of single-particle spectra, suggests the introduction of a new counting rule, which is discussed.

Bobbink, G.J.; van Driel, M.A.; Erne, F.C.; Langeveld, W.G.J.; Kooijman, P.M.; Sens, J.C.; Timmer, J.; Favart, D.; Leleux, P.; Block, M.M.; Campanini, R.; Ludwig, H.W.; Botje, M.A.; van Wezep, D.

1980-01-21

183

Understanding of assembly phenomena by aromatic-aromatic interactions: benzene dimer and the substituted systems.  

PubMed

Interactions involving aromatic rings are important in molecular/biomolecular assembly and engineering. As a consequence, there have been a number of investigations on dimers involving benzene or other substituted pi systems. In this Feature Article, we examine the relevance of the magnitudes of their attractive and repulsive interaction energy components in governing the geometries of several pi-pi systems. The geometries and the associated binding energies were evaluated at the complete basis set (CBS) limit of coupled cluster theory with singles, doubles, and perturbative triples excitations [CCSD(T)] using a least biased scheme for the given data set. The results for the benzene dimer indicate that the floppy T-shaped structure (center-to-center distance: 4.96 A, with an axial benzene off-centered above the facial benzene) is isoenergetic in zero-point-energy (ZPE) corrected binding energy (D0) to the displaced-stacked structure (vertical interplanar distance: 3.54 A). However, the T-shaped structure is likely to be slightly more stable (D0 approximately equal to 2.4-2.5 kcal/mol) if quadruple excitations are included in the coupled cluster calculations. The presence of substituents on the aromatic ring, irrespective of their electron withdrawing or donating nature, leads to an increase in the binding energy, and the displaced-stacked conformations are more stabilized than the T-shaped conformers. This explains the wide prevalence of displaced stacked structures in organic crystals. Despite that the dispersion energy is dominating, the substituent as well as the conformational effects are correlated to the electrostatic interaction. This electrostatic origin implies that the substituent effect would be reduced in polar solution, but important in apolar media, in particular, for assembling processes. PMID:17429954

Lee, Eun Cheol; Kim, Dongwook; Jurecka, Petr; Tarakeshwar, P; Hobza, Pavel; Kim, Kwang S

2007-05-10

184

Engineering the semiconductor/oxide interaction for stacking twin suppression in single crystalline epitaxial silicon(111)/insulator/Si(111) heterostructures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The integration of alternative semiconductor layers on the Si material platform via oxide heterostructures is of interest to increase the performance and/or functionality of future Si-based integrated circuits. The single crystalline quality of epitaxial (epi) semiconductor insulator Si heterostructures is however limited by too high defect densities, mainly due to a lack of knowledge about the fundamental physics of the heteroepitaxy mechanisms at work. To shed light on the physics of stacking twin formation as one of the major defect mechanisms in (111)-oriented fcc-related heterostructures on Si(111), we report a detailed experimental and theoretical study on the structure and defect properties of epi-Si(111)/Y2O3/Pr2O3/Si(111) heterostructures. Synchrotron radiation-grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (SR-GIXRD) proves that the engineered Y2O3/Pr2O3 buffer dielectric heterostructure on Si(111) allows control of the stacking sequence of the overgrowing single crystalline epi-Si(111) layers. The epitaxy relationship of the epi-Si(111)/insulator/Si(111) heterostructure is characterized by a type A/B/A stacking configuration. Theoretical ab initio calculations show that this stacking sequence control of the heterostructure is mainly achieved by electrostatic interaction effects across the ionic oxide/covalent Si interface (IF). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies detect only a small population of misaligned type B epi-Si(111) stacking twins whose location is limited to the oxide/epi-Si IF region. Engineering the oxide/semiconductor IF physics by using tailored oxide systems opens thus a promising approach to grow heterostructures with well-controlled properties.

Schroeder, T.; Zaumseil, P.; Seifarth, O.; Giussani, A.; Müssig, H.-J.; Storck, P.; Geiger, D.; Lichte, H.; Dabrowski, J.

2008-11-01

185

Cross Sections for the Reactions e+e to K+ K- pi+pi-, K+ K- pi0pi0, and K+ K- K+ K- Measured Using Initial-State Radiation  

SciTech Connect

We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}-{gamma}, K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, and K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{gamma}, where the photon is radiated from the initial state. About 84000, 8000, and 4200 fully reconstructed events, respectively, are selected from 454 fb{sup -1} of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy, so that the K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} data can be compared with direct measurements of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} reaction. No direct measurements exist for the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} or e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -} reactions, and we present an update of our previous result with doubled statistics. Studying the structure of these events, we find contributions from a number of intermediate states, and extract their cross sections. In particular, we perform a more detailed study of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{pi}{gamma} reaction, and confirm the presence of the Y (2175) resonance in the {phi}(1020)f{sub 0}(980) and K{sup +}K{sup -} f{sub 0}(980) modes. In the charmonium region, we observe the J/{psi} in all three final states and in several intermediate states, as well as the {phi}(2S) in some modes, and measure the corresponding branching fractions.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Palano, A.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Bari /Bari U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-08-19

186

The Binding Orientation of a Norindenoisoquinoline in the Topoisomerase I-DNA Cleavage Complex Is Primarily Governed by ?-? Stacking Interactions  

PubMed Central

High level ab initio quantum chemical studies have shown that the binding orientations of topoisomerase I (Top1) inhibitors such as camptothecins and indenoisoquinolines are primarily governed by ?-? stacking. However, a recently discovered norindenoisoquinoline antitumor compound was observed by X-ray crystallography to adopt a “flipped” orientation (relative to indenoisoquinolines), which facilitates the formation of a characteristic hydrogen bond with the Arg364 of Top1 in its binding with the Top1-DNA complex. This observation raises the possibility that hydrogen bonding between the norindenoisoquinoline nitrogen and the Arg364 side chain of Top1 might be responsible for the “flip”. It also brings into question whether ?-? stacking, as opposed to hydrogen bonding, is primarily responsible for the binding orientations of indenoisoquinolines and norindenoisoquinolines. In this study, the forces responsible for the binding orientation of a norindenoisoquinoline in the DNA cleavage site were systematically investigated using MP2 methods. The theoretical calculation of the preferred binding orientation based solely on ?-? stacking was completely consistent with the actual orientation observed by X-ray crystallography, indicating that the binding of the norindenoisoquinoline in the Top1-DNA complex is mainly governed by ?-? stacking forces and that the “flip” can occur independently from hydrogen bonding. PMID:18636761

Song, Yunlong; Cushman, Mark

2008-01-01

187

Department of Engineering Design Spring 2012 Good Stack, Bad Stack, Red Stack, Blue Stack-Stack Quality Detection Device  

E-print Network

PENNSTATE Department of Engineering Design Spring 2012 Good Stack, Bad Stack, Red Stack, Blue Stack of the project is to develop an innovative solution for detecting bad paper stacks; the device must be 95

Demirel, Melik C.

188

Cadmium(II) iodide and thiocyanate complexes adopted by polycyclic 1,4-bis(pyridazin-4-yl)benzene: interplay of coordination and ?-? stacking interactions.  

PubMed

New complexes containing the 1,4-bis(pyridazin-4-yl)benzene ligand, namely diaquatetrakis[1,4-bis(pyridazin-4-yl)benzene-?N(2)]cadmium(II) hexaiodidodicadmate(II), [Cd(C14H10N4)4(H2O)2][Cd2I6], (I), and poly[[?-1,4-bis(pyridazin-4-yl)benzene-?(2)N(2):N(2')]bis(?-thiocyanato-?(2)N:S)cadmium(II)], [Cd(NCS)2(C14H10N4)]n, (II), demonstrate the adaptability of the coordination geometries towards the demands of slipped ?-? stacking interactions between the extended organic ligands. In (I), the discrete cationic [Cd-N = 2.408?(3) and 2.413?(3)?Å] and anionic [Cd-I = 2.709?(2)-3.1201?(14)?Å] entities are situated across centres of inversion. The cations associate via complementary O-H...N(2') hydrogen bonding [O...N = 2.748?(4) and 2.765?(4)?Å] and extensive triple ?-? stacking interactions between pairs of pyridazine and phenylene rings [centroid-centroid distances (CCD) = 3.782?(4)-4.286?(3)?Å] to yield two-dimensional square nets. The [Cd2I6](2-) anions reside in channels generated by packing of successive nets. In (II), the Cd(II) cation lies on a centre of inversion and the ligand is situated across a centre of inversion. A two-dimensional coordination array is formed by crosslinking of linear [Cd(?-NCS)2]n chains [Cd-N = 2.3004?(14)?Å and Cd-S = 2.7804?(5)?Å] with N(2):N(2')-bidentate organic bridges [Cd-N = 2.3893?(12)?Å], which generate ?-? stacks by double-slipped interactions between phenylene and pyridazine rings [CCD = 3.721?(2)?Å]. PMID:23459341

Degtyarenko, Anna S; Domasevitch, Konstantin V

2013-03-01

189

Intermolecular interactions between imidazole derivatives intercalated in layered solids. Substituent group effect  

SciTech Connect

This study sheds light on the intermolecular interactions between imidazole derive molecules (2-methyl-imidazole, 2-ethyl-imidazole and benzimidazole) intercalated in T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layers to form a solid of formula unit T(ImD){sub 2}[Ni(CN){sub 4}]. These hybrid inorganic–organic solids were prepared by soft chemical routes and their crystal structures solved and refined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The involved imidazole derivative molecules were found coordinated through the pyridinic N atom to the axial positions for the metal T in the T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layer. In the interlayers region ligand molecules from neighboring layers remain stacked in a face-to-face configuration through dipole–dipole and quadrupole–quadrupole interactions. These intermolecular interactions show a pronounced dependence on the substituent group and are responsible for an ImD-pillaring concatenation of adjacent layers. This is supported by the structural information and the recorded magnetic data in the 2–300 K temperature range. The samples containing Co and Ni are characterized by presence of spin–orbit coupling and pronounced temperature dependence for the effective magnetic moment except for 2-ethyl-imidazole related to the local distortion for the metal coordination environment. For this last one ligand a weak ferromagnetic ordering ascribed to a super-exchange interaction between T metals from neighboring layers through the ligands ?–? interaction was detected. - Graphical abstract: In the interlayers region imidazole derivative molecules are oriented according to their dipolar and quadrupolar interactions and minimizing the steric impediment. Highlights: • Imidazole derivatives intercalation compounds. • Intermolecular interaction between intercalated imidazole derivatives. • Hybrid inorganic–organic solids. • Pi–pi interactions and ferromagnetic coupling. • Dipolar and quadrupolar interactions between intercalated imidazole derivatives.

González, M.; Lemus-Santana, A.A. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico); Rodríguez-Hernández, J. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico); Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales, Universidad de La Habana, Havana (Cuba); Aguirre-Velez, C.I. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico); Knobel, M. [Institute of Physics “Gleb Wataghin”, UNICAMP, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Reguera, E., E-mail: edilso.reguera@gmail.com [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico)

2013-08-15

190

Homochiral, helical supramolecular metal-organic frameworks organized by strong ? · · · ? stacking interactions: single-crystal to single-crystal transformations in closely packed solids.  

PubMed

Enantiopure, trifunctional carboxylate ligands synthesized by linking the strong ? · · · ? stacking 1,8-naphthalimide supramolecular synthon to three naturally occurring amino acids using the azide/alkyne click reaction have been prepared [amino acid = glycine (L(gly)(-)), alanine (L(ala)(-)), and serine (L(ser)(-))]. These ligands have been used to form complexes of the formula [M(L(amino acid))2(4,4'-bipy)(H2O)2] · xH2O (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn; x = 4.25-5.52) when mixed with an appropriate metal salt and 4,4'-bipyridine by layering methods. These complexes are isostructural, with the central metal atom coordinated to two ?(1)-carboxylate ligands, two water molecules, and one end each of two 4,4'-bipyridine ligands in a distorted octahedral environment. Each ligand is oriented in a trans arrangement. These complexes all have homochiral, helical, supramolecular, three-dimensional metal-organic framework structures, with the helical organization of the individual metallic units held together solely by strong, noncovalent ? · · · ? stacking interactions of the naphthalimide; the other two dimensions are organized mainly by the bipyridine ligands. The helices are extremely large; one turn of the helix travels ? 60 Å and has a diameter of ca. 40 Å. For the achiral ligand L(gly)(-), the nickel complex forms two types of homochiral crystals in the same tube, a clear example of spontaneous resolution. Despite the large size of the individual helices, they are tightly interconnected and nestled closely together. Part of the interconnection comes from the interstitial water molecules held inside the framework of the complexes in isolated pockets by hydrogen-bonding interactions. For both [Cu(L(ala))2(4,4'-bipy)(H2O)2] · 4.25H2O and [Co(L(ser))2(4,4'-bipy)(H2O)2] · 4.68H2O, the interstitial water molecules can be removed by placing the crystals under a vacuum for several hours, a process that can be reversed by exposure to atmospheric moisture. This removal/reintroduction of the interstitial water molecules takes place with no loss of crystallinity, representing dramatic examples of single-crystal to single-crystal transformations. The structures undergo little change other than the pockets holding the interstitial water molecules in the hydrated complexes become void spaces in the dehydrated complexes. The removal/reintroduction of the water molecules in these closely packed solids is facilitated by the "soft" ? · · · ? stacking interactions organizing one dimension of the structures. The observed magnetic and Mössbauer spectral properties are typical of isolated, magnetically dilute, paramagnetic pseudooctahedral divalent transition-metal complexes. PMID:21141941

Reger, Daniel L; Horger, Jacob J; Smith, Mark D; Long, Gary J; Grandjean, Fernande

2011-01-17

191

Observation of the CP-conserving K$_{S}$ --> $\\\\pi^{+}\\\\pi^{- }\\\\pi^{0}$ decay amplitude  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interference between CP-conserving $\\\\ks$ and $\\\\kl \\\\rightarrow \\\\threepi$ decay amplitudes was observed by studying the decay rate asymmetries between initial $\\\\ko$ and $\\\\kob$ separately for the phase space regions $E_{\\\\mbox{\\\\rm \\\\scriptsize CM}}(\\\\pi^+)> E_{\\\\mbox{\\\\rm \\\\scriptsize CM}}(\\\\pi^-)$ and $E_{\\\\mbox{\\\\rm \\\\scriptsize CM}}(\\\\pi^+)< E_{\\\\mbox{\\\\rm \\\\scriptsize CM}}(\\\\pi^-)$. For the parameter $\\\\lambda$ we found $\\\\mbox{\\\\rm Re}(\\\\lambda )=0.036\\\\pm0.010(\\\\mbox{\\\\rm stat.}) ^{+0.002}_{-0.003} (\\\\mbox{\\\\rm syst.)}$ and $\\\\mbox{Im}(\\\\lambda)$ consistent with

R Adler; T Alhalel; Angelos Angelopoulos; A Aspostolakis; Elie Aslanides; Gerhard Backenstoss; C P Bee; O Behnke; A Benelli; J Bennet; V Bertin; J K Bienlein; F Blanc; P Bloch; C Bula; P J Carlson; M Carroll; J Carvalho; E Cawley; S Charalambous; G Chardin; M B Chertok; A Cody; M Danielsson; M Dejardin; J Derré; M Dodgson; J Duclos; A Ealet; B Eckart; C Eleftheriadis; I Evangelou; L Faravel; P Fassnacht; J L Faure; C Felder; R Ferreira-Marques; W Fetscher; Maria Fidecaro; A Filipcic; D Francis; J Fry; C Fuglesang; Erwin Gabathuler; R Gamet; D Garreta; T Geralis; H J Gerber; A Go; P Gumplinger; C Guyot; P F Harrison; A Haselden; P J Hayman; F Henry-Coüannier; W G Heyes; R W Hollander; E Hubert; K Jansson; H U Johner; P R Kettle; Claude Kochowski; P Kokkas; R Kreuger; T Lawry; R Le Gac; F Leimgruber; A Liolios; E Machado; P Maley; I Mandic; N Manthos; Gérard Marel; M Mikuz; J Miller; François Montanet; Tatsuya Nakada; A Onofre; B Pagels; I M Papadopoulos; P Pavlopoulos; F Pelucchi; J Pinto da Cunha; Armando Policarpo; G Polivka; H Postma; R Rickenbach; B L Roberts; E Rozaki; T Ruf; L Sacks; L Sakelliou; P Sanders; C Santoni; K Sarigiannis; M Schäfer; L A Schaller; T Schietinger; A Schopper; P Schune; A Soares; Ludwig Tauscher; C Thibault; F Touchard; C Touramanis; F A Triantis; D A Tröster; E Van Beveren; C W E van Eijk; G S Varner; S Vlachos; P Weber; O Wigger; C Witzig; M Wolter; C Yéche; D Zavrtanik; D Zimmerman

1996-01-01

192

B^0 to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0Time Dependent Dalitz Analysis at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

The author presents here results of a time-dependent analysis of the Dalitz structure of neutral B meson decays to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} from a dataset of 346 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) center of mass energy by the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} accelerator. No significant CP violation effects are observed and 68% confidence interval is derived on the weak angle {alpha} to be [75,152].

Cavoto, Gianluca

2007-04-06

193

A new kind of intermolecular stacking interaction between copper (II) mixed chelate complex (Casiopeína III-ia) and adenine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Casiopeínas® are Cu (II) mixed chelate complexes that have shown cytotoxic, genotoxic and antineoplastic activity. In order to understand the interaction of these complexes with biomolecules, we have studied in this work the interaction of Casiopeína III-ia [CAS 223930-33-4] with adenine, cytosine, thymine and guanine. X-ray diffraction analysis shown the molecular structure of an adduct {[Cu(dmbipy)(acac)(H2O)]NO3(adenine)2·2H2O} where dmbipy=4,4?-dimethyl-2,2?-bipyridyne and acac=acetylacetonate,

Juan Carlos García-Ramos; Araceli Tovar-Tovar; Joseelyne Hernández-Lima; Fernando Cortés-Guzmán; Rafael Moreno-Esparza; Lena Ruiz-Azuara

2011-01-01

194

Interaction energy contributions of H-bonded and stacked structures of the AT and GC DNA base pairs from the combined density functional theory and intermolecular perturbation theory approach.  

PubMed

Stacked and Watson-Crick structures of DNA base pairs are investigated with the DFT-SAPT variant of intermolecular perturbation theory, yielding a rigorous decomposition of the interaction energy into electrostatic, induction, dispersion, and exchange contributions. Their interplay in the various structures is analyzed. Total interaction energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit are compared with corresponding second-order Møller-Plesset and estimated coupled-cluster theory results. PMID:16953592

Hesselmann, Andreas; Jansen, Georg; Schütz, Martin

2006-09-13

195

Time-Resolved Fluorescence Imaging Reveals Differential Interactions of N-Glycan Processing Enzymes across the Golgi Stack in Planta1[W][OA  

PubMed Central

N-Glycan processing is one of the most important cellular protein modifications in plants and as such is essential for plant development and defense mechanisms. The accuracy of Golgi-located processing steps is governed by the strict intra-Golgi localization of sequentially acting glycosidases and glycosyltransferases. Their differential distribution goes hand in hand with the compartmentalization of the Golgi stack into cis-, medial-, and trans-cisternae, which separate early from late processing steps. The mechanisms that direct differential enzyme concentration are still unknown, but the formation of multienzyme complexes is considered a feasible Golgi protein localization strategy. In this study, we used two-photon excitation-Förster resonance energy transfer-fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to determine the interaction of N-glycan processing enzymes with differential intra-Golgi locations. Following the coexpression of fluorescent protein-tagged amino-terminal Golgi-targeting sequences (cytoplasmic-transmembrane-stem [CTS] region) of enzyme pairs in leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana spp.), we observed that all tested cis- and medial-Golgi enzymes, namely Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Golgi ?-mannosidase I, Nicotiana tabacum ?1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I, Arabidopsis Golgi ?-mannosidase II (GMII), and Arabidopsis ?1,2-xylosyltransferase, form homodimers and heterodimers, whereas among the late-acting enzymes Arabidopsis ?1,3-galactosyltransferase1 (GALT1), Arabidopsis ?1,4-fucosyltransferase, and Rattus norvegicus ?2,6-sialyltransferase (a nonplant Golgi marker), only GALT1 and medial-Golgi GMII were found to form a heterodimer. Furthermore, the efficiency of energy transfer indicating the formation of interactions decreased considerably in a cis-to-trans fashion. The comparative fluorescence lifetime imaging of several full-length cis- and medial-Golgi enzymes and their respective catalytic domain-deleted CTS clones further suggested that the formation of protein-protein interactions can occur through their amino-terminal CTS region. PMID:23400704

Schoberer, Jennifer; Liebminger, Eva; Botchway, Stanley W.; Strasser, Richard; Hawes, Chris

2013-01-01

196

[Synthesis and characterization of model system in biological related function--model compounds for investigation of metal-metal interaction and nucleobase-aromatics interaction].  

PubMed

Several kinds of compounds available as model systems to investigation on metal-metal interaction in metalloproteins and on interaction of aromatics with nucleobases in arene intercalation to DNA were synthesized and characterized by spectrometry. Double and triple layered porphyrinophanes linked with 1,1'- or 1,3-disubstituted ferrocene moieties and their iron and cobalt complexes were prepared. Stabilities of their oxygenation complexes depended on bridging mode, lengths of alkyl linkers, distance between metals, and feature of hydrophobic cavity. Ferrocenophane derivatives in which nucleobase and aromatic hydrocarbon (naphthalene or anthracene) moieties substituted to their cyclopentadienyl rings in a stacking mode between the two chromophores were synthesized, as a model system of intercalation of aromatic condensed-ring hydrocarbons to DNA. Characterization of the ferrocenophanes by spectrometry and molecular modeling suggested that these chromophores interacted due to NH-pi hydrogen bonding and pi-pi charge transfer. A number of porphyrin derivatives covalently connected with a nucleobase or a nucleobase pair in a face-to-face mode between the porphyrin and nucleobase moiety were synthesized. The spectroscopic behavior of the derivatives indicate a greater affinity of the guanine-cytosine pair for porphyrin in comparison with the adenine-thymine pair. These results are compatible with the already reported spectroscopic and kinetic properties of mixing system of DNA and porphyrin derivatives. Moreover, the fluorescence spectra of the nucleobase-porphyrin derivatives gave a piece of evidence to cause DNA cleavage by photosensitizer via "type I" mechanism, in which direct action of singlet or triplet state of photosensitizer excited by laser irradiation brings about damage of cell or DNA. PMID:11523121

Hisatome, M

2001-08-01

197

Recognition of O6-benzyl-2?-deoxyguanosine by a perimidinone-derived synthetic nucleoside: a DNA interstrand stacking interaction  

PubMed Central

The 2?-deoxynucleoside containing the synthetic base 1-[(2R,4S,5R)-4-hydroxy-5-(hydroxymethyl)-tetrahydrofuran-2-yl)-1H-perimidin-2(3H)-one] (dPer) recognizes in DNA the O6-benzyl-2?-deoxyguanosine nucleoside (O6-Bn-dG), formed by exposure to N-benzylmethylnitrosamine. Herein, we show how dPer distinguishes between O6-Bn-dG and dG in DNA. The structure of the modified Dickerson–Drew dodecamer (DDD) in which guanine at position G4 has been replaced by O6-Bn-dG and cytosine C9 has been replaced with dPer to form the modified O6-Bn-dG:dPer (DDD-XY) duplex [5?-d(C1G2C3X4A5A6T7T8Y9G10C11G12)-3?]2 (X = O6-Bn-dG, Y = dPer) reveals that dPer intercalates into the duplex and adopts the syn conformation about the glycosyl bond. This provides a binding pocket that allows the benzyl group of O6-Bn-dG to intercalate between Per and thymine of the 3?-neighbor A:T base pair. Nuclear magnetic resonance data suggest that a similar intercalative recognition mechanism applies in this sequence in solution. However, in solution, the benzyl ring of O6-Bn-dG undergoes rotation on the nuclear magnetic resonance time scale. In contrast, the structure of the modified DDD in which cytosine at position C9 is replaced with dPer to form the dG:dPer (DDD-GY) [5?-d(C1G2C3G4A5A6T7T8Y9G10C11G12)-3?]2 duplex (Y = dPer) reveals that dPer adopts the anti conformation about the glycosyl bond and forms a less stable wobble pairing interaction with guanine. PMID:23748954

Kowal, Ewa A.; Lad, Rahul R.; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Dhummakupt, Elizabeth; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Egli, Martin; Sturla, Shana J.; Stone, Michael P.

2013-01-01

198

Understanding Java Stack Inspection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current implementations of Java make security decisions by searching the runtime call stack. These systems have attractive security properties, but they have been criticized as being dependent on specific artifacts of the Java imple- mentation. This paper models the stack inspection algorithm in terms of a well-understood logic for access control and demonstrates how stack inspection is a useful tool

Dan S. Wallach; Edward W. Felten

1998-01-01

199

Stacking with stochastic cooling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accumulation of large stacks of antiprotons or ions with the aid of stochastic cooling is more delicate than cooling a constant intensity beam. Basically the difficulty stems from the fact that the optimized gain and the cooling rate are inversely proportional to the number of particles 'seen' by the cooling system. Therefore, to maintain fast stacking, the newly injected batch has to be strongly 'protected' from the Schottky noise of the stack. Vice versa the stack has to be efficiently 'shielded' against the high gain cooling system for the injected beam. In the antiproton accumulators with stacking ratios up to 10 5 the problem is solved by radial separation of the injection and the stack orbits in a region of large dispersion. An array of several tapered cooling systems with a matched gain profile provides a continuous particle flux towards the high-density stack core. Shielding of the different systems from each other is obtained both through the spatial separation and via the revolution frequencies (filters). In the ' old AA', where the antiproton collection and stacking was done in one single ring, the injected beam was further shielded during cooling by means of a movable shutter. The complexity of these systems is very high. For more modest stacking ratios, one might use azimuthal rather than radial separation of stack and injected beam. Schematically half of the circumference would be used to accept and cool new beam and the remainder to house the stack. Fast gating is then required between the high gain cooling of the injected beam and the low gain stack cooling. RF-gymnastics are used to merge the pre-cooled batch with the stack, to re-create free space for the next injection, and to capture the new batch. This scheme is less demanding for the storage ring lattice, but at the expense of some reduction in stacking rate. The talk reviews the 'radial' separation schemes and also gives some considerations to the 'azimuthal' schemes.

Caspers, Fritz; Möhl, Dieter

2004-10-01

200

Interaction of La0.58Sr0.40Co0.20Fe0.80O3-? cathode with volatile Cr in a stack test - Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy investigations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells with special thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes made by sol-gel technology were operated in a short stack sequentially for about 1300 h at temperatures of 700 °C and subsequently for 1200 h at 600 °C, respectively. The stack was operated galvanostatically at a constant current density of 500 mA cm-2. After operation, the stack was dismantled and the cells were analyzed with respect to Cr interaction with the LSCF cathode. Chemical analysis revealed typical overall Cr amounts of several tenths ?g cm-2 cathode area depending on the operation time. SEM cross sections showed less SrCrO4 formation at the typical sites for LSCF (top side of cathode) but there was evidence of chromate formation at the border between the cathode and barrier (electrolyte) layer. This location of foreign phase formation was unexpected. Additional TEM characterizations were therefore conducted. The TEM investigation verified the presence of Cr-containing crystals and revealed pore formation in the barrier layer. The formation of SrCrO4 at this borderline and pore formation were found for the first time after SOFC stack operation.

Menzler, Norbert H.; Sebold, Doris; Wessel, Egbert

2014-05-01

201

Stacks, Queues and Tracks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper studies stack, queue, and track layouts of graph subdivisions. It is known that every graph has a 3-stack subdivision. The best known upper bound on the number of division vertices per edge in a 3-stack subdivision of an n-vertex graph G is improved from O(log n) to O(log minfsn(G);qn(G)g). This result reduces the question of whether queue-number is

David R. Wood

202

Computational Science - Stack Exchange  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a free, community driven Q&A for scientists using computers to solve scientific problems. It is a part of the Stack Exchange network of Q&A websites, and it was created through the open democratic process defined at Stack Exchange Area 51.

203

Observation of pi+pi-pi+pi- photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV at the STAR detector  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} photonuclear production in ultra-peripheral Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final states are observed at low transverse momentum and are accompanied by mutual nuclear excitation of the beam particles. The strong enhancement of the production cross section at low transverse momentum is consistent with coherent photoproduction. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} invariant mass spectrum of the coherent events exhibits a broad peak around 1540 {+-} 40 MeV/c{sup 2} with a width of 570 {+-} 60 MeV/c{sup 2}, in agreement with the photoproduction data for the {rho}{sup 0}(1700). We do not observe a corresponding peak in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final state and measure an upper limit for the ratio of the branching fractions of the {rho}{sup 0}(1700) to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} of 2.5% at 90% confidence level. The ratio of {rho}{sup 0}(1700) and {rho}{sup 0}(770) coherent production cross sections is measured to be 13.4 {+-} 0.8{sub stat.} {+-} 4.4{sub syst.}%.

STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

2010-07-05

204

Stacks of Light  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These two images show 'stacked' Chandra images for two different classes of distant, massive galaxy detected with Spitzer. Image stacking is a procedure used to detect emission from objects that is too faint to be detected in single images. To enhance the signal, images of these faint objects are stacked on top of one another.

In both images, low-energy X-rays are shown in orange and high-energy X-rays in blue, and the stacked object is in the center of the image (the other sources beyond the center of the image are X-ray sources that were directly detected and are not part of the source stacking). On the left is a stacked Chandra image of the 'normal' galaxies seen with Spitzer. The infrared emission for these young, massive galaxies is consistent with expectations for star formation. The Chandra image shows mainly low-energy X-ray emission at the center as expected. On the right, is a stacked Chandra image for galaxies with infrared emission exceeding the levels likely to be caused by star formation. These galaxies contain active galactic nuclei, or quasars, in their centers. These are luminous objects powered by the rapid growth of supermassive black holes. The obscured quasars show much higher levels of high-energy X-ray emission because the less energetic X-rays are mostly absorbed by gas.

2007-01-01

205

High order stacking of a perfluoro ‘Y-enyne’  

Microsoft Academic Search

The X-ray structure of perfluorophenyl substituted Y-enyne 1 reveals a face-to-face stacking interaction between phenyl and perfluorophenyl groups of different molecules resulting in a high order in the solid state. Acetylene–arene and acetylene–fluorine interactions also contribute to the high order stacking. The X-ray structure suggests a distorted conjugation of the chromophore.

Bilal R Kaafarani; A. Alan Pinkerton; Douglas C Neckers

2001-01-01

206

(E)-3-{4-[(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)oxy]-3-methoxyphenyl}-1-(4-methylphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one: a ladder-like structure resulting solely from ?-? stacking interactions.  

PubMed

In the title compound, C26H20ClNO3, the quinoline fragment is nearly orthogonal to the adjacent aryl ring, while the rest of the molecular skeleton is close to being planar. The crystal structure contains no hydrogen bonds of any sort, but there are two ?-? stacking interactions present. One, involving the quinoline ring, links molecules related by inversion, while the other, involving the two nonfused aryl rings, links molecules related by translation, so together forming a ladder-type arrangement. PMID:24992110

Montoya, Alba; Insuasty, Braulio; Cobo, Justo; Glidewell, Christopher

2014-07-15

207

An atomic force microcopy study of the mechanical and electricalproperties of monolayer films of molecules with aromatic end groups  

SciTech Connect

The effect of intermolecular {pi}-{pi} stacking on the electrical and mechanical properties of monolayer films molecules containing aromatic groups was studied using atomic force microscopy. Two types of aromatic molecules, (4-mercaptophenyl) anthrylacetylene (MPAA) and (4-mercaptophenyl)-phenylacetylene (MPPA) were used as model systems with different {pi}-{pi} stacking strength. Monolayer films of these molecules on Au(111) surfaces exhibited conductivities differing by more than one order of magnitude, MPAA being the most conductive and MPPA the least conductive. The response to compressive loads by the AFM tip was also found to be very different for both molecules. In MPAA films distinct molecular conductivity changes are observed upon mechanical perturbation. This effect however was not observed on the MPPA film, where intermolecular {pi}-{pi} interactions are likely weaker.

Fang, Liang; Park, J.Y.; Ma, H.; Jen, A.K.-Y.; Salmeron, M.

2007-09-06

208

Study of the D0 ---> K+ K- pi+ pi-  

SciTech Connect

Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, the authors present a new measurement for the Cabibbo-suppressed decay mode D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. They measure: {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.0295 {+-} 0.0011 {+-} 0.0008. An amplitude analysis has been performed in order to determine the resonant substructure of this decay mode. The dominant components are the decays D{sup 0} {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){sup +} K{sup -}, D{sup 0} {yields} K{sub 1}(1400){sup +}K{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{phi}(1020).

Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; /UC, Davis; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Gobel, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; /CINVESTAV, IPN; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P. /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia

2004-11-01

209

Measurements of the branching fractions for B{sub (s)}{yields}D{sub (s)}{pi}{pi}{pi} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{pi}{pi}  

SciTech Connect

Branching fractions of the decays H{sub b}{yields}H{sub c}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} relative to H{sub b}{yields}H{sub c}{pi}{sup -} are presented, where H{sub b} (H{sub c}) represents B{sup 0} (D{sup +}), B{sup -} (D{sup 0}), B{sub s}{sup 0} (D{sub s}{sup +}), and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} ({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}). The measurements are performed with the LHCb detector using 35 pb{sup -1} of data collected at {radical}(s)=7 TeV. The ratios of branching fractions are measured to be [B(B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=2.38{+-}0.11{+-}0.21, [B(B{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -})]= 1.27{+-}0.06{+-}0.11, [B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=2.01{+-}0.37{+-}0.20, [B({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]/[B({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})]=1.43{+-}0.16{+-}0.13 We also report measurements of partial decay rates of these decays to excited charm hadrons. These results are of comparable or higher precision than existing measurements.

Aaij, R.; Bauer, Th.; Beuzekom, M. van; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Coco, V.; van Eijk, D.; Farinelli, C.; Heijne, V.; Hulsbergen, W.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; van Leerdam, J.; Merk, M.; Mous, I.; Oggero, S.; Pellegrino, A.; du Pree, T.; Storaci, B. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2011-11-01

210

Dalitz Plot Analysis of B- -> D+ pi- pi-  

SciTech Connect

The author reports on a Dalitz plot analysis of B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} decays, based on a sample of about 383 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. They find the total branching fraction of the three-body decay: {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}) = (1.08 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -3}. the masses and widths of D*{sub 2}{sup 0} and D*{sub 0}{sup 0}, the 2{sup +} and 0{sup +} c{bar u} P-wave states decaying to D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, are measured: m{sub D*{sub 2}{sup 0}} = (2460.4 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 1.9) MeV/c{sup 2}, {Lambda}{sub D*{sub 2}{sup 0}} = (41.8 {+-} 2.5 {+-} 2.1 {+-} 2.0) MeV, m{sub D*{sub 0}{sup 0}} = (2297 {+-} 8 {+-} 5 {+-} 19) MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}{sub D*{sub 0}{sup 0}} = (273 {+-} 12 {+-} 17 {+-} 45) MeV. The stated errors reflect the statistical and systematic uncertainties, and the uncertainty related to the assumed composition of signal events and the theoretical model.

Aubert, : B.

2009-01-29

211

Stacking up the Atmosphere  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this hands-on activity, participants learn the characteristics of the five layers of the atmosphere and make illustrations to represent them. They roll the drawings and place them in clear plastic cylinders, and then stack the cylinders to make a model column of the atmosphere.

Youngman, Betsy; Pennycook, Jean; Huffman, Louise; Dahlman, Luann; Nebraska, Andrill- U.

212

STACK GAS REHEAT EVALUATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of technical and economic evaluations of stack gas reheat (SGR) following wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) for coal-fired power plants. The evaluations were based on information from literature and a survey of FGD users, vendors, and architect/engineer ...

213

Inertia Coin Stack Challenge  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners experiment with inertia by performing an easy and hands-on investigation with a playing card and a stack of coins. The activity includes an accompanying Mr. O video which explores Newton's First Law of Motion and inertia in greater detail. Suggestions for extra challenge: add more coins, try different cards.

Houston, Children'S M.

2011-01-01

214

Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Decay Rate Asymmetry of B to D_pi+ pi- pi0 K-  

SciTech Connect

The authors report the observation of the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}}K{sup -}, where D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}} indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, excluding K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. This doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay chain can be used to measure the CKM phase {gamma}. Using about 229 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring, they measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup -}}) = (5.5 {+-} 1.0 (stat.) {+-} 0.7 (syst.)) x 10{sup -6} and the decay rate asymmetry A = -0.02 {+-} 0.16 (stat.) {+-} 0.03 (syst.) for the full decay chain.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

2005-06-10

215

Amplitude Analysis of the Decay $D_s^+ \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+$ in the Experiment E831/FOCUS  

SciTech Connect

We present in this thesis the Dalitz Plot analysis of the D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decay, with the data of the E831/FOCUS, that took data in 1996 and 1997. The masses and widhts of f{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 0}(1370) are free parametres of the fit on Dalitz Plot, objectiving to study in detail these resonances. After this analysis we present the Spectator Model study on the S wave in this decay. For this study we used the formalism developed by M. Svec [2] for scattering. We present the comparison between the Isobar Model, frequently used in Dalitz Plot analysis, and this formalism.

Schilithz, Anderson Correa; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; ,

2005-01-01

216

Search for D0--anti-D0 Mixing in the Decays D0 --> K+ pi- pi+ pi-  

SciTech Connect

We present a search for D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing in the decays D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using 230.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. Assuming CP conservation, we measure the time-integrated mixing rate R{sub M} = (0.019{sub -0.015}{sup +0.016}(stat.) {+-} 0.002(syst.))%, and R{sub M} < 0.048% at the 95% confidence level. Using a frequentist method, we estimate that the data are consistent with no mixing at the 4.3% confidence level. We present results both with and without the assumption of CP conservation. By combining the value of R{sub M} from this analysis with that obtained from an analysis of the decays D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, we find R{sub M} = (0.020{sub -0.010}{sup +0.011})%, where the uncertainty is statistical only. We determine the upper limit R{sub M} < 0.042% at the 95% confidence level, and we find the combined data are consistent with the no-mixing hypothesis at the 2.1% confidence level.

Aubert, B.

2006-09-26

217

In-stack virtual impactor  

SciTech Connect

The MRI in-stack virtual impactor is a unique instrument that can provide real-time continuous measurements of stack aerosol particle-size distributions and can simultaneously provide size-segregated samples for morphological or chemical analysis.

Woffinden, G.J.; Downs, J.L.; Markowski, G.R.; Fegley, M.J.

1982-02-01

218

Energy Expenditure of Sport Stacking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sport stacking is an activity taught in many physical education programs. The activity, although very popular, has been studied minimally, and the energy expenditure for sport stacking is unknown. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to determine the energy expenditure of sport stacking in elementary school children and to compare that value…

Murray, Steven R.; Udermann, Brian E.; Reineke, David M.; Battista, Rebecca A.

2009-01-01

219

Structural Consequences of Anionic Host-Cationic Guest Interactions in a Supramolecular Assembly  

SciTech Connect

The molecular structure of the self-assembled supramolecular assembly [M{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} has been explored with different metals (M = Ga{sup III}, Fe{sup III}, Ti{sup IV}) and different encapsulated guests (NEt{sub 4}{sup +}, BnNMe{sub 3}{sup +}, Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +}, Cp*{sub 2}Co{sup +}) by X-ray crystallography. While the identity of the metal ions at the vertices of the M{sub 4}L{sub 6} structure is found to have little effect on the assembly structure, encapsulated guests significantly distort the size and shape of the interior cavity of the assembly. Cations on the exterior of the assembly are found to interact with the assembly through either {pi}-{pi}, cation-{pi}, or CH-{pi} interactions. In some cases, the exterior guests interact with only one assembly, but cations with the ability to form multiple {pi}-{pi} interactions are able to interact with adjacent assemblies in the crystal lattice. The solvent accessible cavity of the assembly is modeled using the rolling probe method and found to range from 253-434 {angstrom}{sup 3}, depending on the encapsulated guest. Based on the volume of the guest and the volume of the cavity, the packing coefficient for each host-guest complex is found to range from 0.47-0.67.

Pluth, Michael D.; Johnson, Darren W.; Szigethy, Geza; Davis, Anna V.; Teat, Simon J.; Oliver, Allen G.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

2008-07-09

220

Stacking with dual bootstrap resampling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new kind of stacking scheme, based on the hypothesis testing of signal significance and coherence, is proposed. The significance of stacked data is evaluated by running two kinds of bootstrap resampling, one for standard bootstrap and the other for preparing noise stacks by scrambling relative time-shifts between traces. This dual bootstrap procedure allows us to formulate a two-sample problem for signal significance, which is shown to be more reliable than standard bootstrap estimates. The statistics of noise obtained in dual bootstrap resampling is also used when assessing the coherence of data with the empirical distribution function, in which the effect of noise is deconvolved by rescaling. Unlike conventional non-linear stacks such as Nth-root stack and phase-weighted stack, the new stack can recover signals even when the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) is low, and compared to simple linear stack, the number of traces required for unambiguous signal detection is reduced by up to two orders of magnitude. The new scheme, called dual bootstrap stack, could facilitate a range of geophysical data processing when trying to detect subtle signals by stacking low S/N data.

Korenaga, Jun

2013-12-01

221

Asymmetric Flexible Supercapacitor Stack  

PubMed Central

Electrical double layer supercapacitor is very significant in the field of electrical energy storage which can be the solution for the current revolution in the electronic devices like mobile phones, camera flashes which needs flexible and miniaturized energy storage device with all non-aqueous components. The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique over hydrogen decrepitated Mischmetal (Mm) based AB3alloy hydride. The polymer dispersed MWNTs have been obtained by insitu polymerization and the metal oxide/MWNTs were synthesized by sol-gel method. Morphological characterizations of polymer dispersed MWNTs have been carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM and HRTEM). An assymetric double supercapacitor stack has been fabricated using polymer/MWNTs and metal oxide/MWNTs coated over flexible carbon fabric as electrodes and nafion®membrane as a solid electrolyte. Electrochemical performance of the supercapacitor stack has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

2008-01-01

222

Toward the self-assembly of metal-organic nanotubes using metal-metal and ?-stacking interactions: bis(pyridylethynyl) silver(I) metallo-macrocycles and coordination polymers.  

PubMed

Shape-persistent macrocycles and planar organometallic complexes are beginning to show considerable promise as building blocks for the self-assembly of a variety of supramolecular materials including nanofibers, nanowires, and liquid crystals. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of a family of planar di- and tri-silver(I) containing metallo-macrocycles designed to self-assemble into novel metal-organic nanotubes through a combination of ?-stacking and metal-metal interactions. The silver(I) complexes have been fully characterized by elemental analysis, high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS), IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and the solution data are consistent with the formation of the metallo-macrocycles. Four of the complexes have been structurally characterized using X-ray crystallography. However, only the di-silver(I) complex formed with 1,3-bis(pyridin-3-ylethynyl)benzene is found to maintain its macrocyclic structure in the solid state. The di-silver(I) shape-persistent macrocycle assembles into a nanoporous chicken-wire like structure, and ClO(4)(-) anions and disordered H(2)O molecules fill the pores. The silver(I) complexes of 2,6-bis(pyridin-3-ylethynyl)pyridine and 1,4-di(3-pyridyl)buta-1,3-diyne ring-open and crystallize as non-porous coordination polymers. PMID:21207943

Kilpin, Kelly J; Gower, Martin L; Telfer, Shane G; Jameson, Geoffrey B; Crowley, James D

2011-02-01

223

In-stack virtual impactor  

SciTech Connect

In-stack virtual impactor described is a unique instrument that can provide real-time continuous measurements of stack aerosol particle-size distributions and can simultaneously provide size-segregated samples for morphological or chemical analysis. 2 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

Woffinden, G.J.; Downs, J.L.; Markowski, G.R.; Fegley, M.J.

1982-02-01

224

Spherical Torus Center Stack Design  

SciTech Connect

The low aspect ratio spherical torus (ST) configuration requires that the center stack design be optimized within a limited available space, using materials within their established allowables. This paper presents center stack design methods developed by the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Project Team during the initial design of NSTX, and more recently for studies of a possible next-step ST (NSST) device.

C. Neumeyer; P. Heitzenroeder; C. Kessel; M. Ono; M. Peng; J. Schmidt; R. Woolley; I. Zatz

2002-01-18

225

Assessing Elementary Algebra with STACK  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper concerns computer aided assessment (CAA) of mathematics in which a computer algebra system (CAS) is used to help assess students' responses to elementary algebra questions. Using a methodology of documentary analysis, we examine what is taught in elementary algebra. The STACK CAA system, http://www.stack.bham.ac.uk/, which uses the CAS…

Sangwin, Christopher J.

2007-01-01

226

Stacking boundaries and transport in bilayer graphene.  

PubMed

Pristine bilayer graphene behaves in some instances as an insulator with a transport gap of a few millielectronvolts. This behavior has been interpreted as the result of an intrinsic electronic instability induced by many-body correlations. Intriguingly, however, some samples of similar mobility exhibit good metallic properties with a minimal conductivity of the order of 2e(2)/h. Here, we propose an explanation for this dichotomy, which is unrelated to electron interactions and based instead on the reversible formation of boundaries between stacking domains ("solitons"). We argue, using a numerical analysis, that the hallmark features of the previously inferred many-body insulating state can be explained by scattering on boundaries between domains with different stacking order (AB and BA). We furthermore present experimental evidence, reinforcing our interpretation, of reversible switching between a metallic and an insulating regime in suspended bilayers when subjected to thermal cycling or high current annealing. PMID:24605877

San-Jose, P; Gorbachev, R V; Geim, A K; Novoselov, K S; Guinea, F

2014-04-01

227

Flat descent for Artin n-stacks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We prove two flat descent statements for Artin n-stacks. We first show that an n-stack for the etale topology which is an Artin n-stack in the sense of HAGII, is also an n-stack for the fppf topology. Moreover, an n-stack for the fppf topology which possess a fppf n-atlas is an Artin n-stack (i.e. possesses a smooth n-atlas). We deduce

Bertrand Toen; Case Courrier; Eugene Bataillon

2009-01-01

228

Nonreciprocal scattering by stacked nonlinear magneto-active semiconductor layers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The combinatorial frequency generation by the periodic stacks of magnetically biased semiconductor layers has been modelled in a self-consistent problem formulation, taking into account the nonlinear dynamics of carriers. It is shown that magnetic bias not only renders nonreciprocity of the three-wave mixing process but also significantly enhances the nonlinear interactions in the stacks, especially at the frequencies close to the intrinsic magneto-plasma resonances of the constituent layers. The main mechanisms and properties of the combinatorial frequency generation and emission from the stacks are illustrated by the simulation results, and the effects of the individual layer parameters and the structure arrangement on the stack nonlinear and nonreciprocal response are discussed.

Shramkova, O. V.; Schuchinsky, A. G.

2014-08-01

229

Supramolecular Chemistry of 4,4'-Bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide in Transition Metal Complexes: A Rich Diversity of Co-ordinate, Hydrogen-Bond and Aromatic Stacking Interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

4,4'-Bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide (L1) has enormous flexibility as a supramolecular linker since it can be involved not only in co-ordinate and hydrogen bonds via its N,N'-dioxide oxygen centres, but the pyridine-N-oxide rings can also form aromatic ?-? stacking interactions. Thus, L1 can bridge between, or act as a pendant ligand to metal centres and can support hydrogen-bonds within a lattice in a site remote from the metal centre. Of the structurally characterised transition metal complexes abstracted from the literature for this review, 26 form molecular compounds, 14 form 1D chains, 9 form 2D sheets of either 36, 44 or 63 topology, while 5 form 3D networks with either 41263 (?-Po type) or 48668 topology. To target multidimensional architectures it has been found to be necessary to avoid aqueous solutions and strongly co-ordinating anions, and consequently the synthesis of multidimensional L1-bridged transition metal co-ordination polymers has usually involved reaction of L1 with metal salts of weakly co-ordinating anions in low molecular weight alcohols. Of the 98 distinct molecules of L1 reported for complexes in the literature, 42 are bridging, 36 pendant and 20 are non-co-ordinated hydrogen-bonded molecules. Approximately 75% of the bridging L1 molecules adopt an anti-conformation, while the remainder adopt a syn-conformation. This prevalence of the anti-conformation contrasts markedly with the situation observed for lanthanide compounds, for which approximately 75% adopt a syn-conformation. A number of trends in the co-ordination behaviour of L1 with transition metals can be identified. Co-ordination to metal centres is based on sp 2 hybridised oxygen donors, but the ?-interaction between the oxygen p z orbital and the aromatic ring is sufficiently weak that the oxygen lone pairs are normally twisted out of the plane of the pyridine-N-oxide by a steric clash between the metal centre and the ?-hydrogen of the pyridine ring. As a result of this steric hindrance,

Jia, Junhua; Hubberstey, Peter; Champness, Neil R.; Schröder, Martin

230

Full Piezoelectric Multilayer-Stacked Hybrid Actuation/Transduction Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Stacked HYBATS (Hybrid Actuation/Transduction system) demonstrates significantly enhanced electromechanical performance by using the cooperative contributions of the electromechanical responses of multilayer, stacked negative strain components and positive strain components. Both experimental and theoretical studies indicate that, for Stacked HYBATS, the displacement is over three times that of a same-sized conventional flextensional actuator/transducer. The coupled resonance mode between positive strain and negative strain components of Stacked HYBATS is much stronger than the resonance of a single element actuation only when the effective lengths of the two kinds of elements match each other. Compared with the previously invented hybrid actuation system (HYBAS), the multilayer Stacked HYBATS can be designed to provide high mechanical load capability, low voltage driving, and a highly effective piezoelectric constant. The negative strain component will contract, and the positive strain component will expand in the length directions when an electric field is applied on the device. The interaction between the two elements makes an enhanced motion along the Z direction for Stacked-HYBATS. In order to dominate the dynamic length of Stacked-HYBATS by the negative strain component, the area of the cross-section for the negative strain component will be much larger than the total cross-section areas of the two positive strain components. The transverse strain is negative and longitudinal strain positive in inorganic materials, such as ceramics/single crystals. Different piezoelectric multilayer stack configurations can make a piezoelectric ceramic/single-crystal multilayer stack exhibit negative strain or positive strain at a certain direction without increasing the applied voltage. The difference of this innovation from the HYBAS is that all the elements can be made from one-of-a-kind materials. Stacked HYBATS can provide an extremely effective piezoelectric constant at both resonance and off resonance frequencies. The effective piezoelectric constant can be alternated by varying the size of each component, the degree of the pre-curvature of the positive strain components, the thickness of each layer in the multilayer stacks, and the piezoelectric constant of the material used. Because all of the elements are piezoelectric components, Stacked HYBATS can serve as projector and receiver for underwater detection. The performance of this innovation can be enhanced by improving the piezoelectric properties.

Su, Ji; Jiang, Xiaoning; Zu, Tian-Bing

2011-01-01

231

Fuel cell stack compressive loading system  

DOEpatents

A fuel cell module comprising a stack of fuel cells with reactant gas manifolds sealed against the external surfaces of the stack includes a constraint system for providing a compressive load on the stack wherein the constraint system maintains the stack at a constant height (after thermal expansion) and allows the compressive load to decrease with time as a result of the creep characteristics of the stack. Relative motion between the manifold sealing edges and the stack surface is virtually eliminated by this constraint system; however it can only be used with a stack having considerable resiliency and appropriate thermal expansion and creep characteristics.

Fahle, Ronald W. (Manchester, CT); Reiser, Carl A. (Glastonbury, CT)

1982-01-01

232

Anharmonic stacking in supercoiled DNA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multistep denaturation in a short circular DNA molecule is analyzed by a mesoscopic Hamiltonian model which accounts for the helicoidal geometry. Computation of melting profiles by the path integral method suggests that stacking anharmonicity stabilizes the double helix against thermal disruption of the hydrogen bonds. Twisting is essential in the model to capture the importance of nonlinear effects on the thermodynamical properties. In a ladder model with zero twist, anharmonic stacking scarcely affects the thermodynamics. Moderately untwisted helices, with respect to the equilibrium conformation, show an energetic advantage against the overtwisted ones. Accordingly moderately untwisted helices better sustain local fluctuational openings and make more unlikely the thermally driven complete strand separation.

Zoli, Marco

2012-05-01

233

Influences of the size and hydroxyl number of fullerenes/fullerenols on their interactions with proteins.  

PubMed

In this study, we systematically investigated the interaction of fullerenes/fullerenols with model proteins using a widely used computational docking program Autodock 4.0. We found that pi-pi interaction existed in all the proteins-fullerene/fullerenol systems investigated here, and contributed greatly to the overall interaction energy. We also found that with the increase of the carbon cage size, the binding strength between proteins and fullerenes/fullerenols increased constantly. In addition, our results show that functionalization of fullerenes with polar groups, such as hydroxyl groups, decreases the binding between proteins and fullerene derivatives. In other words, the more hydroxyl groups on fullerenols, the weaker binding between proteins and fullerenols. PMID:21137722

Wu, Xian; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Wang, Haifang; Wang, Luyao; Hu, Wenxiang; Cao, Aoneng; Liu, Yuanfang

2010-10-01

234

Progress Update: Stack Project Complete  

ScienceCinema

Progress update from the Savannah River Site. The 75 foot 293 F Stack, built for plutonium production, was cut down to size in order to prevent injury or release of toxic material if the structure were to collapse due to harsh weather.

Cody, Tom

2012-06-14

235

V-stack piezoelectric actuator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aeroelastic control of wings by means of a distributed, trailing-edge control surface is of interest with regards to maneuvers, gust alleviation, and flutter suppression. The use of high energy density, piezoelectric materials as motors provides an appealing solution to this problem. A comparative analysis of the state of the art actuators is currently being conducted. A new piezoelectric actuator design is presented. This actuator meets the requirements for trailing edge flap actuation in both stroke and force. It is compact, simple, sturdy, and leverages stroke geometrically with minimum force penalties while displaying linearity over a wide range of stroke. The V-Stack Piezoelectric Actuator, consists of a base, a lever, two piezoelectric stacks, and a pre-tensioning element. The work is performed alternately by the two stacks, placed on both sides of the lever. Pre-tensioning can be readily applied using a torque wrench, obviating the need for elastic elements and this is for the benefit of the stiffness of the actuator. The characteristics of the actuator are easily modified by changing the base or the stacks. A prototype was constructed and tested experimentally to validate the theoretical model.

Ardelean, Emil V.; Clark, Robert L.

2001-07-01

236

Multilayer Piezoelectric Stack Actuator Characterization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Future NASA missions are increasingly seeking to use actuators for precision positioning to accuracies of the order of fractions of a nanometer. For this purpose, multilayer piezoelectric stacks are being considered as actuators for driving these precision mechanisms. In this study, sets of commercial PZT stacks were tested in various AC and DC conditions at both nominal and extreme temperatures and voltages. AC signal testing included impedance, capacitance and dielectric loss factor of each actuator as a function of the small-signal driving sinusoidal frequency, and the ambient temperature. DC signal testing includes leakage current and displacement as a function of the applied DC voltage. The applied DC voltage was increased to over eight times the manufacturers' specifications to investigate the correlation between leakage current and breakdown voltage. Resonance characterization as a function of temperature was done over a temperature range of -180C to +200C which generally exceeded the manufacturers' specifications. In order to study the lifetime performance of these stacks, five actuators from one manufacturer were driven by a 60volt, 2 kHz sine-wave for ten billion cycles. The tests were performed using a Lab-View controlled automated data acquisition system that monitored the waveform of the stack electrical current and voltage. The measurements included the displacement, impedance, capacitance and leakage current and the analysis of the experimental results will be presented.

Sherrit, Stewart; Jones, Christopher M.; Aldrich, Jack B.; Blodget, Chad; Bao, Xioaqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

2008-01-01

237

Stack Components Nancy L. Garland  

E-print Network

catalysts · Recent SBIR topic (DOE Office of Science): non- precious metal catalysts · Emphasis · New-Pt and non-precious metal catalysts - cost reduction and improved cathode performance · Bipolar plates - cost solicitation: stack durability, cost reduction and high temperature membranes, and non- precious metal

238

Nonlinear wave scattering by stacked layers of semiconductor plasma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The combinatorial frequency generation by periodic and quasiperiodic stacks of nonlinear semiconductor layers has been studied in the self-consistent problem formulation, taking into account mobility of carriers. The three-wave mixing technique is applied to study the nonlinear processes. It is shown that the mixing processes in passive semiconductor structures are driven by the competitive effects of the collision of charges and resonance interactions of carriers with pump waves. The effects of the pump wave dissipation, layer parameters and stack arrangements on the efficiency of the combinatorial frequency generation are discussed.

Shramkova, Oksana V.

2014-03-01

239

Rhythmic ring-ring stacking drives the circadian oscillator clockwise  

PubMed Central

The oscillator of the circadian clock of cyanobacteria is composed of three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, which together generate a self-sustained ?24-h rhythm of phosphorylation of KaiC. The mechanism propelling this oscillator has remained elusive, however. We show that stacking interactions between the CI and CII rings of KaiC drive the transition from the phosphorylation-specific KaiC–KaiA interaction to the dephosphorylation-specific KaiC–KaiB interaction. We have identified the KaiB-binding site, which is on the CI domain. This site is hidden when CI domains are associated as a hexameric ring. However, stacking of the CI and CII rings exposes the KaiB-binding site. Because the clock output protein SasA also binds to CI and competes with KaiB for binding, ring stacking likely regulates clock output. We demonstrate that ADP can expose the KaiB-binding site in the absence of ring stacking, providing an explanation for how it can reset the clock. PMID:22967510

Chang, Yong-Gang; Tseng, Roger; Kuo, Nai-Wei; LiWang, Andy

2012-01-01

240

Stacked Sequential Learning William W. Cohen  

E-print Network

learning". Stacked se- quential learning is a meta-learning algorithm, in which an arbitrary base learner boosting, stacked sequential learning is a meta-learning method, in which an arbitrary base learner

Cohen, William W.

241

Characterization of Piezoelectric Stack Actuators for Vibrothermography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Vibrothermography, also known as Sonic IR and thermosonics, is an NDE technique for finding cracks and flaws based on vibration-induced frictional rubbing of unbonded surfaces. The vibration is usually generated by a piezoelectric stack actuator which transduces electrical energy into large amplitude mechanical vibrations. The amplitude and impedance transfer characteristics of the transducer system control the vibration of the sample. Within a linear contact (no tip chatter) model, the interaction between the transducer system and the specimen can be characterized using the theory of linear time-invariant (LTI) systems and electro-mechanical Norton equivalence. We present quantitative measurements of the performance of piezoelectric stack actuators in a vibrothermography excitation system and investigate the effect of actuator performance and specimen characteristics on the induced vibration in the specimen. We show that the system resonances generated because of metal-metal contact of specimen and actuator are broken by adding a couplant between specimen and actuator. Finally, we give criteria for actuator and couplant selection for vibrothermography.

Vaddi, Jyani; Reusser, Ricky; Holland, Stephen D.

2011-06-01

242

Tunable Geometric Fano Resonances in a Metal/Insulator Stack  

E-print Network

A metal-insulator-metal-insulator stack is shown to have a Fano resonance in the angular domain. The metal/insulator stack consists of two interacting subsystems, a metallic waveguide mode and a surface plasmon mode, coupled by a finite layer metal film. The two modes in close spatial proximity interfere destructively resulting in level repulsion of two metal/insulator stack modes. By adding a coupling prism to momentum match the input EM field, the reflected field exhibits a geometric Fano resonance. Changes to the waveguide insulator permittivity and thickness are shown to tune the geometric Fano resonance. The geometric Fano resonance is also tuned by variations of the exterior insulator permittivity. At a given frequency, the geometric Fano resonance can be tuned to desired lineshape. In addition, this tunability allows for a geometric Fano resonance for any frequency in the visible range.

Grotewohl, Herbert

2014-01-01

243

Calculated state densities of aperiodic nucleotide base stacks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electronic density of states (DOS) histograms and of the nucleotide base stack regions of a segment of human oncogene (both single and double stranded, in B conformation) and of single-stranded random DNA base stack (also in B conformation), were calculated. The computations were performed with the help of the ab initio matrix block negative factor counting (NFC) method for the DOSs. The neglected effects of the sugar-phosphate chain and the water environment (with the counterions) were assessed on the basis of previous ab initio band structure calculations. Further, in the calculation of single nucleotide base stacks also basis set and correlation effects have been investigated. In the case of a single strand the level spacing widths of the allowed regions and the fundamental gap were calculated also with Clementi's double ? basis and corrected for correlation at the MP2 level. The inverse interaction method was applied for the study of Anderson localization.

Ye, Yuan-Jie; Chen, Run-Shen; Martinez, Alberto; Otto, Peter; Ladik, Janos

2000-05-01

244

Artificially stacked atomic layers: toward new van der Waals solids.  

PubMed

Strong in-plane bonding and weak van der Waals interplanar interactions characterize a large number of layered materials, as epitomized by graphite. The advent of graphene (G), individual layers from graphite, and atomic layers isolated from a few other van der Waals bonded layered compounds has enabled the ability to pick, place, and stack atomic layers of arbitrary compositions and build unique layered materials, which would be otherwise impossible to synthesize via other known techniques. Here we demonstrate this concept for solids consisting of randomly stacked layers of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). Dispersions of exfoliated h-BN layers and graphene have been prepared by liquid phase exfoliation methods and mixed, in various concentrations, to create artificially stacked h-BN/G solids. These van der Waals stacked hybrid solid materials show interesting electrical, mechanical, and optical properties distinctly different from their starting parent layers. From extensive first principle calculations we identify (i) a novel approach to control the dipole at the h-BN/G interface by properly sandwiching or sliding layers of h-BN and graphene, and (ii) a way to inject carriers in graphene upon UV excitations of the Frenkell-like excitons of the h-BN layer(s). Our combined approach could be used to create artificial materials, made predominantly from inter planar van der Waals stacking of robust bond saturated atomic layers of different solids with vastly different properties. PMID:22731861

Gao, Guanhui; Gao, Wei; Cannuccia, E; Taha-Tijerina, Jaime; Balicas, Luis; Mathkar, Akshay; Narayanan, T N; Liu, Zhen; Gupta, Bipin K; Peng, Juan; Yin, Yansheng; Rubio, Angel; Ajayan, Pulickel M

2012-07-11

245

3-D Stacked Package Technology and Trends  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need to integrate more device technology in a given board space for handheld applications such as mobile phones has driven the adoption of innovative packages which stack such devices in the vertical or third dimension (3D). Stacking of device chips in small and thin fine-pitch ball grid array packages has evolved into the stacking of packages themselves to achieve

Flynn P. Carson; Young Cheol Kim; In Sang Yoon

2009-01-01

246

Do Stack Traces Help Developers Fix Bugs?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A widely shared belief in the software engineering community is that stack traces are much sought after by developers to support them in debugging. But limited empirical evidence is available to confirm the value of stack traces to developers. In this paper, we seek to provide such evidence by conducting an empirical study on the usage of stack traces by

Rahul Premraj; Adrian Schröter; Nicolas Bettenburg

2010-01-01

247

Stacked triangular lattice: Percolation properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The stacked triangular lattice has the shape of a triangular prism. In spite of being considered frequently in solid-state physics and materials science, its percolation properties have received little attention. We investigate several nonuniversal percolation properties on this lattice using Monte Carlo simulation. We show that the percolation threshold is pcbond=0.18602±0.00002 for bonds and pcsite=0.26240±0.00005 for sites. The number of clusters at the threshold per site is ncbond=0.28458±0.00005 and ncsite=0.03998±0.00005. The stacked triangular lattice is a convenient choice to study the RGB model [Schrenk , Sci. Rep.10.1038/srep00751 2, 751 (2012)]. We present results on this model and its scaling behavior at the percolation threshold.

Schrenk, K. J.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Herrmann, H. J.

2013-03-01

248

Feature-Weighted Linear Stacking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ensemble methods, such as stacking, are designed to boost predictive accuracy\\u000aby blending the predictions of multiple machine learning models. Recent work\\u000ahas shown that the use of meta-features, additional inputs describing each\\u000aexample in a dataset, can boost the performance of ensemble methods, but the\\u000agreatest reported gains have come from nonlinear procedures requiring\\u000asignificant tuning and training time.

Joseph Sill; Gábor Takács; Lester Mackey; David Lin

2009-01-01

249

PRECISION COSMOGRAPHY WITH STACKED VOIDS  

SciTech Connect

We present a purely geometrical method for probing the expansion history of the universe from the observation of the shape of stacked voids in spectroscopic redshift surveys. Our method is an Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test based on the average sphericity of voids posited on the local isotropy of the universe. It works by comparing the temporal extent of cosmic voids along the line of sight with their angular, spatial extent. We describe the algorithm that we use to detect and stack voids in redshift shells on the light cone and test it on mock light cones produced from N-body simulations. We establish a robust statistical model for estimating the average stretching of voids in redshift space and quantify the contamination by peculiar velocities. Finally, assuming that the void statistics that we derive from N-body simulations is preserved when considering galaxy surveys, we assess the capability of this approach to constrain dark energy parameters. We report this assessment in terms of the figure of merit (FoM) of the dark energy task force and in particular of the proposed Euclid mission which is particularly suited for this technique since it is a spectroscopic survey. The FoM due to stacked voids from the Euclid wide survey may double that of all other dark energy probes derived from Euclid data alone (combined with Planck priors). In particular, voids seem to outperform baryon acoustic oscillations by an order of magnitude. This result is consistent with simple estimates based on mode counting. The AP test based on stacked voids may be a significant addition to the portfolio of major dark energy probes and its potentialities must be studied in detail.

Lavaux, Guilhem [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Wandelt, Benjamin D. [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, 98 bis, boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France)

2012-08-01

250

Boston Harbor sewage stack (for microcomputers). Software  

SciTech Connect

The Boston Harbor Sewage Stack is interactive educational computer program about how municipalities deal with sewage, how sewage systems work, non point pollution, and what citizens can do to help - focusing on Boston Harbor and the Boston Harbor Cleanup. The program is written at a level accessible to middle-school students, but with enough depth for adults. Schools and environmental organizations, especially in coastal areas, will find this program a useful addition to their environmental education offerings. The program shows what happens to sewage - from the moment of flush to its passage through the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority's sewage system and into Boston Harbor - now and as the cleanup proceeds. Users encounter topics for exploration, including storm sewers and combined sewer overflows (CSOs); non point pollution from pets, spilled waste oil, lawn and garden chemicals, and other sources; what not to flush and why; how officials can tell if water is polluted; and why it all matters.

Not Available

1992-12-01

251

Stacks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Linton Waters and Jayne Kranat ran a session on the Nuffield "Applying Mathematical Processes" (AMP) activities at BCME7 in Manchester in April this year. These 1-2 hour activities are revamps of some of the Graded Assessment in Mathematics (GAIM) resources, developed in the 1980s, and are freely available via the Nuffield website and the original…

Kimber, Lizzie

2010-01-01

252

Compactified Picard stacks over the moduli stack of stable curves with marked points  

E-print Network

In this paper we give a construction of algebraic (Artin) stacks endowed with a modular map onto the moduli stack of n-pointed stable curves of genus g, for g greater than 2. These stacks are smooth, irreducible and have dimension 4g-3+n, yielding a geometrically meaningful compactification of the degree d universal Picard stack over the moduli stack of smooth curves with marked points.

Melo, Margarida

2008-01-01

253

Study of the tau- ---> pi- pi- pi+ pi0 pi0 nu/tau and tau- --> 3h- 2h+ nu/tau Decays Using the BaBar Detector  

SciTech Connect

The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -} 2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decays have been studied using the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. Preliminary branching fractions are given for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and to the sub-channels {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}(782){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}. A preliminary upper limit is given on the branching fraction for the {phi}(1020){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} mode. In addition a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -}2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay (h = {pi}, K) is presented.

Sobie, R.; /Victoria U.

2005-06-21

254

Measurement of CP Parameters in B- --> D(pi+pi-pi0)K- and Study of the X(3872) in B --> J/psi pi+ pi- K with the BaBar Detector  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation presents two analyses performed on data collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric-energy B Factory. First, a Dalitz analysis is shown that performs the first measurement of CP violation parameters in the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}}K{sup -} using the decay rate asymmetry and D{sup 0} - {bar D}{sup 0} interference. The results can be used to further constrain the value of the CKM angle {gamma}. The second analysis studies the properties of the X(3872) in neutral and charged B {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}K decays. Measurements of the branching ratio and mass are presented as well as the search for additional resonances at higher masses.

Winklmeier, Frank; /SLAC

2006-09-18

255

Calculation of hopping conductivity in aperiodic nucleotide base stacks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The electronic density of states (DOS) of aperiodic nucleotide base and base pair stacks were calculated previously by the negative factor counting (NFC) procedure. Applying the inverse iteration method, the localized electronic wave functions of the first 100 filled levels were determined. As a third step the primary hopping frequencies between the localized electronic wave functions (at different sites) were computed assuming interactions via acoustic phonons. Finally using the hopping frequencies as input of a random walk theory of Lax and coworkers the complex, frequency-dependent hopping conductivities ?( ?) were determined. This procedure was performed for two different 100 base or base pair long sequences in the stack and for a 200 units long segment for a single stack. The influence of the application of a better basis set and that of correlation effects were also investigated. The results show an increase of ?( ?) as compared to the ones of different protein chains and at ?=10 10 s-1 they are close to 1 ? -1 cm -1 in the case of 100 base pairs in the stacks. Further, the application of the better (double ?) basis and of correlation corrections of the level schemes increase ?( ?). One can conclude that in aperiodic DNA there is hopping hole conduction (if its interaction with nucleoproteins generates holes via charge transfer) and its value is about 1 ? -1 cm -1 at high frequencies. This result agrees well with the available experimental data.

Ye, Y.-J.; Chen, R.-S.; Martinez, A.; Otto, P.; Ladik, J.

1999-09-01

256

Analyzing Stack Flows to Compare Java Programs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a method for comparing and detecting clones of Java programs by analyzing program stack flows. A stack flow denotes an operational behavior of a program by describing individual instructions and stack movements for performing specific operations. We analyze stack flows by simulating the operand stack movements during execution of a Java program. Two programs for detection of clones of Java programs are compared by matching similar pairs of stack flows in the programs. Experiments were performed on the proposed method and compared with the earlier approaches of comparing Java programs, the Tamada, k-gram, and stack pattern based methods. Their performance was evaluated with real-world Java programs in several categories collected from the Internet. The experimental results show that the proposed method is more effective than earlier methods of comparing and detecting clones of Java programs.

Lim, Hyun-Il; Han, Taisook

257

Modeling theta-theta Interactions with the Effective Fragment Potential Method: The Benzene Dimer and Substituents  

SciTech Connect

This study compares the results of the general effective fragment potential (EFP2) method to the results of a previous combined coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) study [Sinnokrot and Sherrill, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2004, 126, 7690] on substituent effects in {pi}-{pi} interactions. EFP2 is found to accurately model the binding energies of the benzene-benzene, benzene-phenol, benzene-toluene, benzene-fluorobenzene, and benzene-benzonitrile dimers, as compared with high-level methods [Sinnokrot and Sherrill, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2004, 126, 7690], but at a fraction of the computational cost of CCSD(T). In addition, an EFP-based Monte Carlo/simulated annealing study was undertaken to examine the potential energy surface of the substituted dimers.

Toni Smithl; Lyudmila V. Slipchenko; Mark S. Gordon

2008-02-27

258

Photogrammetric Technique for Timber Stack Volume Contol  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The problem of accurate log volume measurement is a very important, especially in case of seaport volume control where logs are put in a huge stack of hundred meters length and a time for volume control is strongly restricted. Current technology of volume control use manual means such as measuring tape, so the process of measurement is rather inaccurate and time consuming. To estimate the volume of timber stack its frontal area is measured and some control parts of a stack are used for stacking coefficient (wood density in a stack) determination. Non-contact vision based technique is proposed for manual measurements substituting. The developed methods are implemented in portable photogrammetric system for stack parameters measuring and documenting.

Knyaz, V. A.; Maksimov, A. A.

2014-08-01

259

Study of the doubly and singly Cabibbo suppressed decays D+ --> K+ pi- pi+ and D(s)+ --> K+ pi- pi+ in the FOCUS experiment  

SciTech Connect

This thesis illustrates a complete study of the doubly and singly Cabibbo suppressed decays D{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. Data for this analysis have been collected by the fixed-target high-energy photoproduction experiment FOCUS at Fermilab. The authors have selected the D{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} samples with cuts to obtain a sufficiently high statistics, a good signal to noise ratio and, at the same time, eliminate possible contaminations from the more copious and favored decays. The D{sup +} yield consists of 189 {+-} 24 events, with a signal to noise ratio {approx} 1; the D{sub s}{sup +} yield is 567 {+-} 31 and the signal to noise ratio is {approx} 2.5. The authors have measured {Lambda}(D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Lambda}(D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.0065 {+-} 0.0008 {+-} 0.004 and {Lambda}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Lambda}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.127 {+-} 0.007 {+-} 0.014, improving the previous determinations of a factor of 2 and 5, respectively. The author has also performed a Dalitz plot analysis for both decays. The amplitude analysis for D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} represents the first available measurement for this channel.

Edera, Laura; /Milan U.

2005-01-01

260

Branching Ratio Measurements of B ---> J/psi eta K and B+- ---> D0 K+- with D0 ---> pi+ pi- pi0  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented for the decays of B {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K and B{sup {+-}} {yields} DK{sup {+-}}, respectively, with experimental data collected with BABAR detector at PEP-II, located at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). With 90 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, we obtained branching fractions of {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sup {+-}}) = [10.8 {+-} 2.3(stat) {+-} 2.4(syst)] x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sub S}{sup 0}) = [8.4 {+-} 2.6(stat) {+-} 2.7(syst)] x 10{sup -5}; and we set an upper limit of {Beta}[B{sup {+-}} {yields} X(3872)K{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sup {+-}}] < 7.7 x 10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. The branching fraction of decay chain {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} DK{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}) = [5.5 {+-} 1.0(stat) {+-} 0.7(syst)] x 10{sup -6} with 229 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events at {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, here D represents the neutral D meson. The decay rate asymmetry is A = 0.02 {+-} 0.16(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst) for this full decay chain. This decay can be used to extract the unitarity angle {gamma}, a weak CP violation phase, through the interference of decay production of D{sup 0} and {bar D}{sup 0} to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}.

Zeng, Qinglin; /Colorado State U.

2006-03-08

261

First Observation of the Cabibbo-suppressed Decays Xi+(c) ---> Sigma+ pi- pi+ and Xi+(c) ---> Sigma- pi+ pi+ and Measurement of their Branching Ratios  

SciTech Connect

The authors report the first observation of two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. They observe 56 {+-} 13 over a background of 21, and 23 {+-} 7 over a background of 12 events, respectively, for the signals. The data were accumulated using the SELEX spectrometer during the 1996-1997 fixed target run at Fermilab, chiefly from a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratios of the decays relative to the Cabibbo-favored {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} are measured to be B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/B({xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.50 {+-} 0.20, and B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.23 {+-} 0.11, respectively. They also report branching ratios for the same decay modes of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}.

Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Engelfried, J.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Akgun, U.; /Iowa U.; Alkhazov, Georgiy; /St. Petersburg, INP; Amaro-Reyes, J.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Ayan, Ahmet Sedat; /Iowa U.; Balatz, M.Y.; /Moscow, ITEP; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Bondar, N.F.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Cooper, Peter S.; /Fermilab /Michigan U., Flint

2008-04-01

262

First observation and measurement of the resonant structure of the lambda_b->lambda_c pi-pi+pi- decay mode  

SciTech Connect

The authors present the first observation of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay using data from an integrated luminosity of approximately 2.4 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They also present the first observation of the resonant decays {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup 0} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and measure their relative branching ratios.

Azzurri, P.; Barria, P.; Ciocci, M.A.; Donati, S.; Vataga, E.

2009-12-01

263

Study of charmonium resonances in the gg -> K0SK pi- and gg -> K K-pi pi-pi0 processes  

SciTech Connect

This thesis reports the analysis of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} processes using the final dataset of the BABAR experiment located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. From previous measurements, the K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} final state is known to show a clear signal from the {eta}{sub c}(2S) particle. This c{bar c} state escaped detection for almost twenty years and its properties are still not well established on the experimental ground, while accurate predictions exist on the theoretical side. The e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} process is first studied in this thesis. An accurate determination of the {eta}{sub c}(2S) properties is obtained in the K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay mode. We also report the first observation of {eta}{sub c}(2S) and other charmonium states to the K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} final state. The results of this thesis have been published in Physical Review D, and will be useful to test theoretical models describing the charmonium system. The thesis is organized in four chapters. The first one gives a brief introduction of the theoretical models used to describe the charmonium system. The second one discuss the current status of conventional and exotic charmonium spectroscopy, reporting recent experimental results and their interpretation. The third Chapter is devoted to describe the BABAR experiment. The analysis technique and results are described in Chapter 4. Finally, conclusions from this analysis are drawn.

Biassoni, Pietro; /U. Milan, Dept. Phys.

2012-02-22

264

Novel stacked folded cores for blast-resistant sandwich beams  

E-print Network

compression, and the exploitation of fluid-structure interaction effects to reduce the momentum imparted by a blast (Fleck and Deshpande, 2004; McShane et al., 2007; Xue and Hutchinson, 2004). A wide range of metallic cellular cores have been investigated... ., 2012; Radford et al., 2007; Vaughn and Hutchinson, 2006). In this paper we describe the first analysis of a novel sandwich core suitable for blast miti- gation: the Stacked Folded Core. The concept is sketched in Fig. 1: individual folded sheets...

Schenk, M.; Guest, S. D.; McShane, G. J.

2014-08-23

265

Hydrogen Embrittlement And Stacking-Fault Energies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Embrittlement in Ni/Cu alloys appears related to stacking-fault porbabilities. Report describes attempt to show a correlation between stacking-fault energy of different Ni/Cu alloys and susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Correlation could lead to more fundamental understanding and method of predicting susceptibility of given Ni/Cu alloy form stacking-fault energies calculated from X-ray diffraction measurements.

Parr, R. A.; Johnson, M. H.; Davis, J. H.; Oh, T. K.

1988-01-01

266

Manifold seal for fuel cell stack assembly  

DOEpatents

An assembly for sealing a manifold to a stack of fuel cells includes a first resilient member for providing a first sealing barrier between the manifold and the stack. A second resilient member provides a second sealing barrier between the manifold and the stack. The first and second resilient members are retained in such a manner as to define an area therebetween adapted for retaining a sealing composition.

Schmitten, Phillip F. (N. Huntingdon, PA); Wright, Maynard K. (Bethel Park, PA)

1989-01-01

267

catena-Poly[[[4-amino-3,5-bis(pyridin-2-yl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-?(2)N(1),N(5)](dicyanamido-?N)copper(II)]-?2-dicyanamido-?(2)N:N']: coordination polymer chains linked into a bilayer by hydrogen bonds and ?-? stacking interactions.  

PubMed

In the title compound, [Cu(C2N3)2(C12H10N6)]n or [Cu(dca)2(abpt)]n, where abpt is 4-amino-3,5-bis(pyridin-2-yl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole and dca is the dicyanamide anion, the Cu(II) centre is five-coordinate with an approximately square-pyramidal geometry. One of the two dicyanamide ligands is a terminal ligand, but the other one acts as a ?1,5-bridging ligand between pairs of Cu(II) centres, so generating a one-dimensional coordination polymer. A combination of N-H···N and C-H···N hydrogen bonds, augmented by ?-? stacking interactions, links the coordination polymer chains into a bilayer structure. Comparisons are made with some related Cu(II) complexes containing dca ligands and heteroaromatic co-ligands. PMID:24705048

Setifi, Zouaoui; Setifi, Fatima; Saadi, Mohamed; Rouag, Djamil Azzeddine; Glidewell, Christopher

2014-04-01

268

Heat exchange system for recycling stack heat  

Microsoft Academic Search

A heat exchange system is described for recycling waste heat leaving a building stack to supply heat to incoming fresh air or temper stored water of the building water storage system, wherein the building has a source of heat at constant temperature, such as a cooking facility, from which air conveying waste heat is drawn and impelled through a stack

Giuffre

1980-01-01

269

Context adaptation of the communication stack  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a middleware framework to support the development of context-aware adaptive communication protocols stacks. The protocol stacks can be reconfigured according not only to the local context, but also to the context of the remaining remote participants. The context information and the current node configuration feed a Markov decision process that is used to derive the appropriate reconfigurations.

José Mocito; Liliana Rosa; Nuno Almeida; Hugo Miranda; Luís Rodrigues; Antónia Lopes

2006-01-01

270

Sleepy Stack Reduction of Leakage Power  

E-print Network

;Favored input vector Faster recovery than sleep approach An optimal input vector is pre-loaded No recovery Voltage Transistors Stack effect #12;Stack Induce a reverse bias in cutoff Sleep Disconnect Vdd/Gnd when possibility Sleep transistors can be slow Additional routing S and complement "Virtual" Vdd / Gnd State

Mooney, Vincent

271

The Stack of Rational Nodal Curves  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this series of three papers we start to investigate the rational Chow ring of the stack consisting of nodal curves of genus 0, in particular we determine completely the rational Chow ring of the substack consisting of curves with at most 3 nodes. In this first paper we construct the stack of rational nodal curves and its stratification by

Damiano Fulghesu

2009-01-01

272

Project W-420 stack monitoring system upgrades  

SciTech Connect

This project will execute the design, procurement, construction, startup, and turnover activities for upgrades to the stack monitoring system on selected Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) ventilation systems. In this plan, the technical, schedule, and cost baselines are identified, and the roles and responsibilities of project participants are defined for managing the Stack Monitoring System Upgrades, Project W-420.

CARPENTER, K.E.

1999-02-25

273

Effective Stack Design in Air Pollution Control.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Stack design problems fall into two general caterories--(1) those of building re-entry, and (2) those of general area pollution. Extensive research has developed adequate information, available in the literature, to permit effective stack design. A major roadblock to effective design has been the strong belief by architects and engineers that high…

Clarke, John H.

1968-01-01

274

Stack Gas Desulfurization by Seawater in Shanghai  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are a series of advantages in use of seawater as absorbent to remove SO2 in stack gas. Use of seawater for stack gas desulfurization is the first choice method for thermal power plant located on seaside. A study on the possibility of desulfurization by seawater of the East China Sea has be done by our institute. The qualities of

D. N. Zhang; Q. Z. Chen; Y. X. Zhao; Y. Maeda; Y. Tsujino

2001-01-01

275

Modular fuel-cell stack assembly  

DOEpatents

A fuel cell assembly having a plurality of fuel cells arranged in a stack. An end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at an end of said stack. The end plate assembly has an inlet area adapted to receive an exhaust gas from the stack, an outlet area and a passage connecting the inlet area and outlet area and adapted to carry the exhaust gas received at the inlet area from the inlet area to the outlet area. A further end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at a further opposing end of the stack. The further end plate assembly has a further inlet area adapted to receive a further exhaust gas from the stack, a further outlet area and a further passage connecting the further inlet area and further outlet area and adapted to carry the further exhaust gas received at the further inlet area from the further inlet area to the further outlet area.

Patel, Pinakin (Danbury, CT)

2010-07-13

276

Formation of a unique end-to-end stacked pair of G-quadruplexes in the hTERT core promoter with implications for inhibition of telomerase by G-quadruplex-interactive ligands  

PubMed Central

The hTERT core promoter contains a G-rich region of 12 consecutive G-tracts, embracing three Sp1 binding sites, and has the potential to form multiple G-quadruplexes. From the 12 runs of guanine tracts, 9 putative hTERT G-quadruplex-forming sequences were selected to assay for G-quadruplex formation and stability using circular dichroism and a Taq polymerase stop assay. Results from biophysical and chemical assays demonstrate an approximate inverse correlation between total loop size and structure stability. Investigation of the full-length hTERT G-rich sequence using a Taq polymerase arrest assay and dimethyl sulfate footprinting revealed the formation of a unique end-to-end stacked G-quadruplex structure from this sequence. This structure consists of an all parallel G-quadruplex, formed by four consecutive G-tracts, linked to another, atypical G-quadruplex, formed by two pairs of consecutive G-tracts separated by a 26-base loop. This 26-base loop likely forms a stable hairpin structure, which would explain the unexpected stability of this G-quadruplex. Significantly, the formation of this tandem G-quadruplex structure in the full-length sequence masks all three Sp1 binding sites, which is predicted to produce significant inhibition of hTERT promoter activity. Furthermore, our study implies that inhibition of telomerase activity by some G-quadruplex ligands is not only produced by targeting telomeric G-quadruplexes but also by stabilization of the hTERT promoter G-quadruplexes. PMID:19601575

Palumbo, SunMi L.; Ebbinghaus, Scot W.; Hurley, Laurence H.

2009-01-01

277

Effect of various stack parameters on temperature rise in molten carbonate fuel cell stack operation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A mathematical stack model is used to predict the temperature at a constant-load operation of molten-carbonate fuel cell stacks. The validity of the model is proved by a comparison with measured temperature data obtained from the operation of a 5-kW test stack. The model is applied extensively for the simulation of temperature profiles in a larger stack to analyze the effect of various stack parameters on temperature rise and cooling. The results verify that the cathode gas flow has a predominant effect on the maximum temperature inside the stack while the inlet and heating temperatures have limited influence. This explains the need for pressurized operations for control of stack temperature.

Koh, Joon-Ho; Kang, Byoung Sam; Lim, Hee Chun

278

40 CFR 52.345 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.345 Section...PLANS Colorado § 52.345 Stack height regulations. The State of Colorado has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2011-07-01

279

40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2347 Section...CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2010-07-01

280

40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2347 Section...CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2012-07-01

281

40 CFR 52.1388 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.1388 Section...CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1388 Stack height regulations. The State of Montana has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2012-07-01

282

40 CFR 52.345 - Stack height regulations.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.345 Section...PLANS Colorado § 52.345 Stack height regulations. The State of Colorado has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2014-07-01

283

40 CFR 52.345 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.345 Section...PLANS Colorado § 52.345 Stack height regulations. The State of Colorado has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2013-07-01

284

40 CFR 52.1388 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.1388 Section...CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1388 Stack height regulations. The State of Montana has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2010-07-01

285

40 CFR 52.345 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.345 Section...PLANS Colorado § 52.345 Stack height regulations. The State of Colorado has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2012-07-01

286

40 CFR 52.1388 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.1388 Section...CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1388 Stack height regulations. The State of Montana has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2011-07-01

287

40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2347 Section...CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2014-07-01

288

40 CFR 52.345 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.345 Section...PLANS Colorado § 52.345 Stack height regulations. The State of Colorado has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2010-07-01

289

40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2347 Section...CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2013-07-01

290

40 CFR 52.1388 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.1388 Section...CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1388 Stack height regulations. The State of Montana has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2013-07-01

291

40 CFR 52.2347 - Stack height regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stack height regulations. 52.2347 Section...CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2347 Stack height regulations. The State of Utah has committed to revise its stack height regulations should EPA complete...

2011-07-01

292

Dynamical stability of slip-stacking particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

2014-09-01

293

Improvement of phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Phosphoric acid fuel cell components and stack assembly methods were evaluated. Electrodes with Pt loading between 0.3 and 0.9 g/sq. ft were employed. Matrix materials were phenolic (Kynol) fibers and SiC. A new ERC proprietary matrix was used also. Graphite bipolar plates with 33% phenolic resin binder were used. Stacks were tested on hydrogen and simulated reformed methanol for up to 18,000 hours. Two 80 cell (2.1 kW) stacks and a methanol reformer were built and delivered to MERADCOM.

Abens, S. G.; Ascenzo, F. J.; Baker, B. S.; Garretson, G.; Lambrech, M.

1980-07-01

294

Stacked vapor fed amtec modules  

DOEpatents

The present invention pertains to a stacked AMTEC module. The invention includes a tubular member which has an interior. The member is comprised of a ion conductor that substantially conducts ions relative to electrons, preferably a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, positioned about the interior. A porous electrode for conducting electrons and allowing sodium ions to pass therethrough, and wherein electrons and sodium ions recombine to form sodium is positioned about the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte. The electrode is operated at a temperature and a pressure that allows the recombined sodium to vaporize. Additionally, an outer current collector grid for distributing electrons throughout the porous electrode is positioned about and contacts the porous electrode. Also included in the invention is transporting means for transporting liquid sodium to the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte of the tubular member. A transition piece is positioned about the interior of the member and contacts the transporting means. The transition piece divides the member into a first cell and a second cell such that each first and second cell has a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, a first and second porous electrode and a grid. The transition piece conducts electrons from the interior of the tubular member. There is supply means for supplying sodium to the transporting means. Preferably the supply means is a shell which surrounds the tubular member and is operated at a temperature such that the vaporized sodium condenses thereon. Returning means for returning the condensed sodium from the shell to the transporting means provides a continuous supply of liquid sodium to the transporting means. Also, there are first conducting means for conducting electric current from the transition piece which extends through the shell, and second conducting means for conducting electric current to the grid of the first cell which extends through the shell.

Sievers, Robert K. (North Huntingdon, PA)

1989-01-01

295

Near-Earth Asteroid Stack - Mission Animation  

NASA Video Gallery

A possible stack configuration - a deep space habitat, the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle and Space Exploration Vehicle - approaches a near-Earth asteroid. During a mission that could take months...

296

StackOverview 2.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3  

E-print Network

17 Web #12;Web Web 81% Web Web Web Web StackOverview #12;1 1 2 Web 3 2.2.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3 Web 6 3.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3

Tanaka, Jiro

297

Characterization of Piezoelectric Stacks for Space Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Future NASA missions are increasingly seeking to actuate mechanisms to precision levels in the nanometer range and below. Co-fired multilayer piezoelectric stacks offer the required actuation precision that is needed for such mechanisms. To obtain performance statistics and determine reliability for extended use, sets of commercial PZT stacks were tested in various AC and DC conditions at both nominal and high temperatures and voltages. In order to study the lifetime performance of these stacks, five actuators were driven sinusoidally for up to ten billion cycles. An automated data acquisition system was developed and implemented to monitor each stack's electrical current and voltage waveforms over the life of the test. As part of the monitoring tests, the displacement, impedance, capacitance and leakage current were measured to assess the operation degradation. This paper presents some of the results of this effort.

Sherrit, Stewart; Jones, Christopher; Aldrich, Jack; Blodget, Chad; Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

2008-01-01

298

40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless...61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

2012-07-01

299

40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless...61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

2010-07-01

300

40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless...61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

2013-07-01

301

40 CFR 61.53 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.53 Stack sampling. (a) Mercury ore processing facility. (1) Unless...61.13, each owner or operator processing mercury ore shall test emissions from the source...

2011-07-01

302

49 CFR 178.606 - Stacking test.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...F). Alternative test methods which yield equivalent results may be used if...or any distortion likely to reduce its strength, cause instability in stacks of...

2012-10-01

303

49 CFR 178.606 - Stacking test.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...F). Alternative test methods which yield equivalent results may be used if...or any distortion likely to reduce its strength, cause instability in stacks of...

2011-10-01

304

49 CFR 178.606 - Stacking test.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...F). Alternative test methods which yield equivalent results may be used if...or any distortion likely to reduce its strength, cause instability in stacks of...

2013-10-01

305

40 CFR 61.33 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium § 61.33 Stack sampling. (a) Unless a waiver...Administrator. (d) All samples shall be analyzed and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30 days after the...

2012-07-01

306

40 CFR 61.44 - Stack sampling.  

...FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium Rocket Motor Firing § 61.44 Stack sampling. ...61.42(b). (b) All samples shall be analyzed, and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30 days after...

2014-07-01

307

40 CFR 61.33 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium § 61.33 Stack sampling. (a) Unless a waiver...Administrator. (d) All samples shall be analyzed and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30 days after the...

2010-07-01

308

40 CFR 61.33 - Stack sampling.  

...FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium § 61.33 Stack sampling. (a) Unless a waiver...Administrator. (d) All samples shall be analyzed and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30 days after the...

2014-07-01

309

40 CFR 61.33 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium § 61.33 Stack sampling. (a) Unless a waiver...Administrator. (d) All samples shall be analyzed and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30 days after the...

2013-07-01

310

40 CFR 61.33 - Stack sampling.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Beryllium § 61.33 Stack sampling. (a) Unless a waiver...Administrator. (d) All samples shall be analyzed and beryllium emissions shall be determined within 30 days after the...

2011-07-01

311

PBFA-2 vacuum insulator stack failure mechanisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The BPFA-II accelerator includes a large-radius, vertical-axis vacuum insulator stack. The possible failure of the acrylic rings in the stack from electron- or gamma-induced charge buildup is being evaluated. The induced static charges could remain for many hours, and either type of irradiation might cause dendrites to form. Aluminum grading rings sandwiched between the acrylic affect charge accumulation; the acrylic

M. A. Sweeney

1985-01-01

312

Mesoporous bragg stack color tunable sensors.  

PubMed

Herein we report a novel self-assembly synthesis, structural and optical characterization of mesoporous Bragg stacks (MBS) composed of spin-coated multilayer stacks of mesoporous TiO(2) and mesoporous SiO(2). Investigation of the optical response of MBS to the infiltration of alcohols and alkanes into its pores reveals better sensitivity and selectivity than conventional Bragg reflectors. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the chemical sensing ability can be tuned via layer thickness, composition and surface properties. PMID:17090073

Choi, Sung Yeun; Mamak, Marc; von Freymann, Georg; Chopra, Naveen; Ozin, Geoffrey A

2006-11-01

313

A facile method to prepare stable noncovalent functionalized graphene solution by using thionine  

SciTech Connect

Research highlights: {yields} We prepared two kinds of noncovalent functionalized graphene by using the thionine as a stabilizer. {yields} The synthesized functionalized graphenes aqueous solution was very stable because of the presence of {pi}-{pi} interactions, and the resultant products were single- and double-layer graphene. {yields} The modified graphene possesses excellent conductivity property. -- Abstract: A novel noncovalent functionalization approach was presented here to exfoliate and stabilize the chemical converted graphene and the low-temperature exfoliated graphene in aqueous solution by using thionine. It was found that the thionine exhibited the {pi}-{pi} stacking force with the graphene sheets, and the attachment of thionine molecules onto the graphenes' surfaces could obviously improve their solubility in water. The AFM observation further verified that the graphene sheets with single-layer to double-layer were existed in the dispersions. The electronic test indicated that the modified graphene sheets possessed excellent electronic properties.

Chen, Cao; Zhai, Wentao; Lu, Dingding; Zhang, Haobin [Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)] [Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Zheng, Wenge, E-mail: wgzheng@nimte.ac.cn [Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)] [Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

2011-04-15

314

Interaction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Set values for the initial position, velocity, and mass of the two particles, and click on the button "Initialize Animation" to play the animation using your specified values. Note, if m or v are too large, the particles may actually pass through one another which will seem a little strange. Note: the interaction between the particles is a "non-contact" interaction, much like the electrostatic force on two charges. Mathematically, it is actually a Hooke's law interaction.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2008-02-19

315

Precise Measurement of Photons from the Interactions of 300 Gev/c Hadrons on a Lithium Target.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High -p_{T} photons from the reaction (pi-,pi+,p, p)Li togamma + X and photons from (pi-,pi+, p, p)Li tochi + X, chito J/psi + gamma were measured with an electromagnetic calorimeter consisting of a 2 times 4 m ^2 main array of glass blocks and a front active converter/hodoscope. The calorimeter was a part of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Proton High Intensity Lab spectrometer used by the E-705 collaboration: Arizona, Athens, Duke, Fermlab, Florida A&M, McGill, Northwestern, Prairie View A&M, Shandong, and Virginia. The central 92 blocks of the main array were 7.5 x 7.5 x 89.2 cm ^3 SCG1-C scintillating glass. These were surrounded by 74 15 x 15 x 89.2 cm^3 SCG1-C blocks and the outermost blocks were 15 x 15 x 45 cm^3 SF5 Lead glass. The scintillating glass was 20.5 radiation lengths (X_0). The inner converter was a 4.2 X_0 105 x 195 cm^2<=ad gas layered hodoscope for position and energy measurement and each side region had 3.5 X_0 vertical SCG1-C active converter blocks to start showers and measure energy followed by a 156 x 195 cm^2 gas tube hodoscope for position measurement. The experiment ran at interaction rates of 0.5 to 1.0 MHz for seven months during 1987-1988. Electron and positron beams of 2, 6, 10, 30, 60, and 100 GeV/c momenta were used periodically to calibrate the detector, and an LED flashing system provided light through optical fibers to each block for gain tracking. The performance of the detector was studied, including energy resolution and high -rate effects.

Turkington, Timothy Garvey

316

Stacking-dependent band gap and quantum transport in trilayer graphene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Graphene is an extraordinary two-dimensional (2D) system with chiral charge carriers and fascinating electronic, mechanical and thermal properties. In multilayer graphene, stacking order provides an important yet rarely explored degree of freedom for tuning its electronic properties. For instance, Bernal-stacked trilayer graphene (B-TLG) is semi-metallic with a tunable band overlap, and rhombohedral-stacked trilayer graphene (r-TLG) is predicted to be semiconducting with a tunable band gap. These multilayer graphenes are also expected to exhibit rich novel phenomena at low charge densities owing to enhanced electronic interactions and competing symmetries. Here we demonstrate the dramatically different transport properties in TLG with different stacking orders, and the unexpected spontaneous gap opening in charge neutral r-TLG. At the Dirac point, B-TLG remains metallic, whereas r-TLG becomes insulating with an intrinsic interaction-driven gap ~6meV. In magnetic fields, well-developed quantum Hall (QH) plateaux in r-TLG split into three branches at higher fields. Such splitting is a signature of the Lifshitz transition, a topological change in the Fermi surface, that is found only in r-TLG. Our results underscore the rich interaction-induced phenomena in trilayer graphene with different stacking orders, and its potential towards electronic applications.

Bao, W.; Jing, L.; Velasco, J.; Lee, Y.; Liu, G.; Tran, D.; Standley, B.; Aykol, M.; Cronin, S. B.; Smirnov, D.; Koshino, M.; McCann, E.; Bockrath, M.; Lau, C. N.

2011-12-01

317

Observation of exclusively ?-stacked heterodimer of indole and hexafluorobenzene in the gas phase  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, the structure of the indole . . . hexafluorobenzene dimer has been investigated in the gas phase by using resonant two photon ionzation (R2PI) and IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy combined with quantum chemistry calculations. We have confirmed the presence of exclusively ?-stacked structure of the dimer from both experimental and theoretical IR spectra in the N-H stretching region. Observation of a single stable structure of the dimer has also been verified through 3D potential energy surface scan of the ?-stacked dimer by varying the parallel displacement of the hexafluorobenzene unit simultaneously along the major and minor axes of the indole moiety. ?-stacking interaction is present very often between the tryptophan and phenylalanine residues in proteins. But this interaction has not been observed earlier in the gas phase experiment by studying indole . . . benzene dimer because the N-H group of indole predominately directs towards the N-H . . . ? hydrogen bonded T-shaped structure. The chosen molecular systems in this study not only rule out the possibility of the formation of the N-H . . . ? bound T-shaped dimer but also enable the determination of the structure by probing the N-H group. The ?-stacked indole . . . hexafluorobenzene dimer has a unique structure where the center of the hexafluorobenznene ring is aligned with the center of the shared bond of the indole ring. Our work provides useful insight in designing unnatural proteins having strong ?-stacking interaction between the tryptophan and phenylalanine residues.

Kumar, Sumit; Das, Aloke

2013-09-01

318

Measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in X(3872) ---> J/psi pi+ pi- decays  

SciTech Connect

The authors measure the dipion mass spectrum in X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays using 360 pb{sup -1} of {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. The spectrum is fit with predictions for odd C-parity ({sup 3}S{sub 1}, {sup 1}P{sub 1}, and {sup 3}D{sub J}) charmonia decaying to J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, as well as event C-parity states in which the pions are from {rho}{sup 0} decay. The latter case also encompasses exotic interpretations, such as a D{sup 0}{bar D}*{sup 0} molecule. Only the {sup 3}S{sub 1} and J/{psi} {rho} hypotheses are compatible with the data. Since {sup 3}S{sub 1} is untenable on other grounds, decay via J/{psi} {rho} is favored, which implies C = +1 for the X(3872). Models for different J/{psi}-{rho} angular momenta L are considered. Flexibility in the models, especially the introduction of {rho}-{omega} interference, enable good descriptions of the data for both L = 0 and 1.

Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan,

2005-12-01

319

Search for tau- ---> 4pi- 3pi+ (pi0) nu/tau Decays  

SciTech Connect

A search for the decay of the {tau} lepton to seven charged pions and at most one {pi}{sup 0} was performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The analysis uses data recorded on and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance between 1999 and 2003, a total of 124.3 fb{sup -1}. They observe 7 events with an expected background of 11.9 {+-} 2.2 events and calculate a preliminary upper limit of BR({tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -} 3{pi}{sup +}({pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}}) < 2.7 x 10{sup -7} at 90% CL. This is a significant improvement over the previous limit established by the CLEO Collaboration.

Ter-Antonian, R.; Kass, R.; Allmendinger, T.; /Ohio State U.; Hast, C.; /SLAC

2005-06-21

320

Dalitz-plot Analysis of B0 -> anti-D0 pi pi-  

SciTech Connect

The authors report preliminary results from a study of the decay B{sup 0} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using a data sample of 470.9 {+-} 2.8 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Using the Dalitz-plot analysis technique, they find contributions from the intermediate resonances D*{sub 2}(2460){sup -}, D*{sub 0}(2400){sup -}, {rho}(770){sup 0} and f{sub 2}(1270) as well as a {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} S-wave term, a {bar D}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} nonresonant S-wave term and a virtual D*(2010) amplitude. They measure the branching fractions of the contributing decays.

del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U.; /more authors.; ,

2010-08-25

321

Time-dependent amplitude analysis of $B^0 \\to K^0_S\\pi^ pi^-$  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present results from a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{sub s}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay. In Sec. II we describe the time-dependent DP formalism, and introduce the signal parameters that are extracted in the fit to data. In Sec. III we briefly describe the BABAR detector and the data set. In Sec. IV, we explain the selection requirements used to obtain the signal candidates and suppress backgrounds. In Sec. V we describe the fit method and the approach used to control experimental effects such as resolution. In Sec. VI we present the results of the fit, and extract parameters relevant to the contributing intermediate resonant states. In Sec. VII we discuss systematic uncertainties in the results, and finally we summarize the results in Sec. VIII.

Aubert, B.

2009-05-26

322

Measurement of the D+ -> pi+pi0 and D+ -> K+pi0Branching Fractions  

SciTech Connect

We present measurements of the branching fractions for the Cabbibo suppressed decays D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} and D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 124.3 fb{sup -1}. The data were taken with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory operating on and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. We find {Beta}(D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.25 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04) x 10{sup -3} and {Beta}(D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}) = (2.52 {+-} 0.47 {+-} 0.25 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -4}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic and the last error is due to the uncertainties in the absolute branching fraction scale for D{sup +} mesons. This represents the first observation of the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} decay mode and a new measurement of the D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} branching fraction.

Aubert, B.

2006-07-21

323

New results on the pi^+pi^? electroproduction cross sections off protons  

SciTech Connect

In these proceedings we present preliminary {pi}{sup {+-}} electroproduction cross sections off protons in the kinematical area of 1.4 GeV < W < 1.8 GeV{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 1.1 GeV{sup 2}. Our Results extend the kinematical coverage for this exclusive channel with respect to previous measurements. Furthermore, the {pi}{sup {+-}} electroproduction cross sections were obtained for Q{sup 2}-bins of much smaller size. The future analysis of this data within the framework of the JLAB-MSU reaction model (JM) will considerably improve our knowledge on the Q{sup 2} evolution of the transition {gamma}{sub 1}NN* electrocouplings, in particular for the resonances with massive 1.6 GeV.

G. V. Fedotov, R. W. Gothe

2012-04-01

324

Measurement of direct photon emission in the K(L) ---> pi+ pi- gamma decay mode  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the KTeV collaboration reports the analysis of 112.1 x 10{sup 3} candidate K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} decays including a background of 671 {+-} 41 events with the objective of determining the photon production mechanisms intrinsic to the decay process. These decays have been analyzed to extract the relative contributions of the Cp violating bremsstrahlung process and the CP conserving M1 and CP violating E1 direct photon emission processes. The M1 direct photon emission amplitude and its associated vector form factor parameterized as |{bar g}{sub M1}|(1 + a{sub 1}/a{sub 2}/(M{sub {rho}}{sup 2}-M{sub K}{sup 2}) + 2M{sub K}E{sub {gamma}}) have been measured to be |{bar g}{sub M1}| = 1.198 {+-} 0.035(stat) {+-} 0.086(syst) and a{sub 1}/a{sub 2} = =0.738 {+-} 0.007(stat) {+-} 0.018(syst) GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} respectively. An upper limit for the CP violating E1 direct emission amplitude |g{sub E1}| {le} 0.1 (90%CL) has been found. The overall ratio of direct photon emission (DE) to total photon emission including the bremsstrahlung process (IB) has been determined to be DE/(DE + IB) = 0.689 {+-} 0.021 for E{sub {gamma}} {ge} 20 MeV.

Abouzaid, E.; /Chicago U., EFI; Arenton, M.; /Virginia U.; Barker, A.R.; /Colorado U.; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Bellavance, A.; /Rice U.; Blucher, E.; /Chicago U., EFI; Bock,; /Fermilab; Cheu, E.; /Arizona U.; Coleman, R.; /Fermilab; Corcoran, M.D.; /Rice U.; Corti, G.; /Virginia U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2006-04-01

325

Measurement of CP-violation asymmetries in $D^0 \\to K_S \\pi^+ \\pi^-$  

SciTech Connect

We report a measurement of time-integrated CP-violation asymmetries in the resonant substructure of the three-body decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sub s}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using CDF II data corresponding to 6.0 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from Tevatron p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s=1.96 TeV. The charm mesons used in this analysis come from D*{sup +}(2010){yields}D*{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and D*-(2010){yields}{bar D}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}, where the production flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the accompanying pion. We apply a Dalitz-amplitude analysis for the description of the dynamic decay structure and use two complementary approaches, namely a full Dalitz-plot fit employing the isobar model for the contributing resonances and a model-independent bin-by-bin comparison of the D{sup 0} and {bar D}{sup -}{sup 0} Dalitz plots. We find no CP-violation effects and measure an asymmetry of A{sub CP}=(-0.05 {+-}0.57(stat){+-}0.54(syst))% for the overall integrated CP-violation asymmetry, CP-violation asymmetry, consistent with the standard model prediction.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

2012-07-01

326

Observation of new states decaying into Lambda(+)(c)pi(-)pi(+)  

E-print Network

of the known excited charmed baryons led us to place a cut of x p . 0.7 on the com- bination. Figure 1 shows the mass difference spectrum, DM pp H33527 MH20849L 1 c p 1 p 2 H20850 2 MH20849L 1 c H20850, for the region above the well-known L c1 resonances. Also..., if it is fit to the sum of a second order poly- nomial and two Gaussian signals, the resultant x 2 is 59 for 71 degrees of freedom. Of these two signals, the lower one has a yield of 997 1141 2129 , DM pp H33527 480.1 6 2.4 MeV, and a width of s H33527 20.9 6 2...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke

2001-05-01

327

Transition nucleon resonance electrocouplings from CLAS data on pi+pi-p electroproduction off protons.  

SciTech Connect

Electrocouplings of excited proton states with masses less than 1.8 GeV were determined for the first time from the CLAS data on {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}p electroproduction at photon virtualities Q{sup 2} < 1.5 GeV {sup 2}. Electrocouplings were obtained from a combined fit of all available observables within the framework of a phenomenological reaction model. Accurate information on the Q{sup 2}-evolution of {gamma}{sub virt}NN* electrocouplings for many excited proton states with masses less than 1.8 GeV and at photon virtualities up to 1.5 GeV{sup 2} have become available from CLAS data on {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}p electroproduction. These results open up new opportunities for theory to explore confinement mechanisms in the baryon sector through their manifestation in the structure of excited proton states of various quantum numbers, as it was outlined. The analysis reported here covers the range of photon virtualities, where both meson-baryon and quark degrees of freedom can be relevant. Our results on high lying N* electrocouplings for the first time make it possible to explore the transition from meson-baryon to quark degrees of freedom in the structure of excited proton states with masses above 1.6 GeV within the framework of dynamical coupled channel approaches under development in EBAC at Jefferson Lab.

Victor Mokeev

2011-10-01

328

Study of the decay tau(-)->2 pi(-)pi(+)3 pi(0)nu(tau)  

E-print Network

with the isospin expectation but somewhat below the conserved-vector-current prediction. We have searched for resonance substructure in the decay. Within the statistical precision, the decay is saturated by the channels tau(-) --> pi(-)2 pi(0) omega nu(tau), 2 pi...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

1997-11-01

329

Search for b --> u Transitions in B^{+-} --> [K^{-+} pi^{+-} pi0]_D K^{+-} Decays  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a study of the decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} DK{sup {+-}} with D mesons reconstructed in the K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} or K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} final states, where D indicates a D{sup 0} or a {bar D}{sup 0} meson. Using a sample of 474 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC, they measure the ratios R{sup {+-}} {triple_bond} {Lambda}(B{sup {+-}}{yields}[K{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}]{sub D}K{sup {+-}})/{Lambda}(B{sup {+-}}{yields}[K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup 0}]{sub D}K{sup {+-}}). They obtain R{sup +} = (5{sub -10}{sup +12}(stat){sub -4}{sup +2}(syst)) x 10{sup -3} and R{sup -} = (12{sub -10}{sup +12}(stat){sub -5}{sup +3}(syst)) x 10{sup -3}, from which they extract the upper limits at 90% probability: R{sup +} < 23 x 10{sup -3} and R{sup -} < 29 x 10{sup -3}. Using these measurements, they obtain an upper limit for the ratio r{sub B} of the magnitudes of the b {yields} u and b {yields} c amplitudes r{sub B} < 0.13 at 90% probability.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-08-12

330

The K- pi+ S-wave from the D+ --> K- pi+ pi+ Decay  

SciTech Connect

Using data from FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, we present a model independent partial-wave analysis of the K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} S-wave amplitude from the decay D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. The S-wave is a generic complex function to be determined directly from the data fit. The P- and D-waves are parameterized by a sum of Breit-Wigner amplitudes. The measurement of the S-wave amplitude covers the whole elastic range of the K{sup -}{sup +} system.

Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; /UC, Davis; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /CINVESTAV, IPN /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U. /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook National U. /Milan U.

2009-05-01

331

The K- pi+ S-wave from the D+ --> k- pi+ pi+ Decay  

SciTech Connect

Using data from FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, we present a model independent partial-wave analysis of the K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} S-wave amplitude from the decay D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. The S-wave is a generic complex function to be determined directly from the data fit. The P- and D-waves are parameterized by a sum of Breit-Wigner amplitudes. The measurement of the S-wave amplitude covers the whole elastic range of the K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} system.

Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; /UC, Davis; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /CINVESTAV, IPN /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U. /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook National U. /Milan U.

2009-05-01

332

Amplitude Analysis of the Decay B0->K+pi-pi0  

SciTech Connect

We report an updated amplitude analysis of the charmless hadronic decays of neutral B mesons to K{sup +} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}. With a sample of 454 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, we measure the magnitudes and phases of the intermediate resonant and nonresonant amplitudes for B{sup 0} and B{sup 0} decays and determine the corresponding CP-averaged fit fractions and charge asymmetries.

Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2008-09-03

333

Search for b to u transitions in B- to [K+pi-pi0]_D K-  

SciTech Connect

The authors search for decays of a B meson into a neutral D meson and a kaon, with the D meson decaying into K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}. This final state can be reached through the b {yields} c transition B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}K{sup -} followed by the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, or the b {yields} u transition B{sup -} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0}K{sup -} followed by the Cabibbo-favored {bar D}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}. The interference of these two amplitudes is sensitive to the angle {gamma} of the unitarity triangle. They present preliminated results based on 226 x 10{sup 6} e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at SLAC.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano,; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; /LBL,

2006-12-06

334

Inflatable containment diaphragm for sealing and removing stacks  

DOEpatents

A diaphragm with an inflatable torus-shaped perimeter is used to seal at least one end of a stack so that debris that might be hazardous will not be released during removal of the stack. A diaphragm is inserted and inflated in the lower portion of a stack just above where the stack is to be cut such that the perimeter of the diaphragm expands and forms a seal against the interior surface of the stack.

Meskanick, G.R.; Rosso, D.T.

1993-04-13

335

Intelligent Control System of Stack-boiler  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Boiler combustion control system's basic task is to make fuel burn calories adapt to the needs of the water temperature and ensure the economical combustion and the safe operation. In the foundations which have analyzed the stack-boiler's work process and control system structure, the system designed by using the self-learning and self-optimizing fuzzy control system of the PC to make air/coal ratio achieve the best and realize the optimized combustion; through PLC to accelerate the speed of response to the boiler, and speed up the PC to optimize the speed and realize the double loop control system for stack-boiler. The control system in premise of the stack-boiler reaches the goal of the load to achieve the highest efficiency of the boiler combustion.

Jing, Li; Jingxia, Niu; Jianhua, Lang; Shaofeng, Li; Zhi, Li

336

Radiation Tolerant Intelligent Memory Stack (RTIMS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Radiation Tolerant Intelligent Memory Stack (RTIMS), suitable for both geostationary and low earth orbit missions, has been developed. The memory module is fully functional and undergoing environmental and radiation characterization. A self-contained flight-like module is expected to be completed in 2006. RTIMS provides reconfigurable circuitry and 2 gigabits of error corrected or 1 gigabit of triple redundant digital memory in a small package. RTIMS utilizes circuit stacking of heterogeneous components and radiation shielding technologies. A reprogrammable field programmable gate array (FPGA), six synchronous dynamic random access memories, linear regulator, and the radiation mitigation circuitries are stacked into a module of 42.7mm x 42.7mm x 13.00mm. Triple module redundancy, current limiting, configuration scrubbing, and single event function interrupt detection are employed to mitigate radiation effects. The mitigation techniques significantly simplify system design. RTIMS is well suited for deployment in real-time data processing, reconfigurable computing, and memory intensive applications.

Ng, Tak-kwong; Herath, Jeffrey A.

2006-01-01

337

Progress of MCFC stack technology at Toshiba  

SciTech Connect

Toshiba is working on the development of MCFC stack technology; improvement of cell characteristics, and establishment of separator technology. For the cell technology, Toshiba has concentrated on both the restraints of NiO cathode dissolution and electrolyte loss from cells, which are the critical issues to extend cell life in MCFC, and great progress has been made. On the other hand, recognizing that the separator is one of key elements in accomplishing reliable and cost-competitive MCFC stacks, Toshiba has been accelerating the technology establishment and verification of an advanced type separator. A sub-scale stack with such a separator was provided for an electric generating test, and has been operated for more than 10,000 hours. This paper presents several topics obtained through the technical activities in the MCFC field at Toshiba.

Hori, M.; Hayashi, T.; Shimizu, Y. [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

1996-12-31

338

Influence of stack arrangement on performance of multiple-stack solid oxide fuel cells with non-uniform potential operation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The performance of multiple-stack solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with different stack arrangements is compared with respect to the presence of an in-stack pressure drop. It was demonstrated in our previous work that when a multiple-stack SOFC is arranged in series and the operating voltages are allowed to vary among the different stacks, an improved performance over a conventional SOFC

S. Assabumrungrat; N. Ruangrassamee; S. Vivanpatarakij; N. Laosiripojana; A. Arpornwichanop

2009-01-01

339

Longitudinal ultrasonic vibration assisted guillotining of stacked paper.  

PubMed

Ultrasonic vibration assisted cutting is a complex process with high dynamics. The interaction between cutting tool and workpiece is of key interest to understand the entire process. Experimental investigations are limited by the dynamics of the measurement system, and thus appropriately modeling of the ultrasonic vibration assisted cutting process is essential. In this investigation, a dynamic model regarding the ultrasonic vibration assisted guillotining of stacked paper sheets is developed. A Kelvin-Voigt material model, representing the individual sheets, is chosen, with its stiffness and damping parameters being empirically determined. A novel measurement strategy for studying the contact time and interaction between cutting tool and workpiece is introduced. It allows the verification of the highly dynamic behavior of the developed model. With the dynamic model, the experimentally observed cutting forces can be calculated. It is found that the dynamic forces cause a quicker failure of the material, which leads to a lower compression of the stack prior to reaching the critical cutting force. PMID:24746507

Deibel, Karl-Robert; Kaiser, Fabian; Zimmermann, Remo; Meier, Linus; Bolt, Peter; Wegener, Konrad

2014-08-01

340

Study of stacked microstrip phased arrays  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two theoretical methods for studying stacked-patch microstrip phased arrays are compared: (1) the element-by-element approach (finite array approach) of Pozar (1986) and Smolders (1992); and (2) the infinite approach of Pozar and Shaubert (1984) and Liu et al. (1988). Both theories were found to give almost the same results for a 7 x 7 stacked microstrip antenna, except for edge array elements and for large scan angles. Edge array elements could only be analyzed properly by using a finite array approach. Coupling measurements were made on a 7 x 7 array with a single patch layer, and the results agreed well with calculations.

Arts, M. J.; Smolders, A. B.

1993-06-01

341

Color considerations in fluorescent solar concentrator stacks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present modeled results of the luminous and color outputs of a three-layer stack of fluorescent planar concentrators (FPCs). FPCs have the potential to provide sufficient luminous output to illuminate moderate-sized rooms for reasonably-sized collecting areas. It is of course necessary not only that the lumens be sufficient, but also that the light be sufficiently white as to be comfortable. Modeling shows that by use of a stack of three FPCs, one each of violet, green, and red, it is possible to achieve good color rendering and sufficient lighting levels for room illumination.

Swift, Paul D.; Smith, Geoff B.

2003-09-01

342

Three wafer stacking for 3D integration.  

SciTech Connect

Vertical wafer stacking will enable a wide variety of new system architectures by enabling the integration of dissimilar technologies in one small form factor package. With this LDRD, we explored the combination of processes and integration techniques required to achieve stacking of three or more layers. The specific topics that we investigated include design and layout of a reticle set for use as a process development vehicle, through silicon via formation, bonding media, wafer thinning, dielectric deposition for via isolation on the wafer backside, and pad formation.

Greth, K. Douglas; Ford, Christine L.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Timon, Robert P.; Bauer, Todd M.; Hetherington, Dale Laird; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony

2011-11-01

343

DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602099 Competitive Hydrogen Bonding in p-Stacked Oligomers**  

E-print Network

DOI: 10.1002/adma.200602099 Competitive Hydrogen Bonding in p-Stacked Oligomers** By Alain by multiple amide functional groups with the ability to form hydrogen bonds.[5] Thus, one can sig- nificantly of the assembly, by exploiting attractive intermolecular interactions such as hydrogen bonding.[5­7] One clear

Rochefort, Alain

344

Probe for i-motif structure and G-rich strands using end-stacking ability.  

PubMed

We suggest a novel method for probing human i-motif structure based on a pi-stacking interaction between a base pair of two cytosines and a non-polar aromatic fluorophore, PyA, at the end position. PMID:19724792

Lee, Il Joon; Yi, Jeong Wu; Kim, Byeang Hyean

2009-09-28

345

Molecular-level interactions in soils and sediments: the role of aromatic pi- systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This review intends to reduce uncertainties regarding the mechanisms by which molecules with aromatic moieties attach to organic and mineral components of terrestrial environments. We present published evidence for the existence of specific, sorptive interactions of aromatic moieties with environmental sorbents. We find that aromatic pi-systems within organic compounds have the capacity to adsorb to minerals and organic soil and sediment components such as natural organic matter (NOM) and fire-derived black carbon (BC) through strong sorptive forces other than hydrophobic interactions. Specific, polar interactions of aromatic pi-donor and -acceptor compounds show adsorption energies between 4 and 167 kJ mol-1. Bonding strengths of cation-pi interactions and pi-pi electron donor-acceptor (EDA) interactions appear to be larger than H bonding strengths and comparable to inner- and outer-sphere complex formation. We conclude that - in analogy to polar and ionizable functional groups - components with aromatic pi-donor and -acceptor systems equip organic molecules with a substantial sorptive potential. This observation has important implications for the fate and transport of aromatic contaminants. The resulting sorptive interactions might also play a yet- overlooked functional role in the complex chain of processes which preserve NOM against decomposition.

Keiluweit, M.; Kleber, M.

2009-05-01

346

Average Transmission Probability of a Random Stack  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The transmission through a stack of identical slabs that are separated by gaps with random widths is usually treated by calculating the average of the logarithm of the transmission probability. We show how to calculate the average of the transmission probability itself with the aid of a recurrence relation and derive analytical upper and lower…

Lu, Yin; Miniatura, Christian; Englert, Berthold-Georg

2010-01-01

347

Arrays of stacked metal coordination compounds  

DOEpatents

A process is disclosed for preparing novel arrays of metal coordination compounds characterized by arrangement of the metal ions, separated by a linking agent, in stacked order one above the other. The process permits great flexibility in the design of the array. For example, layers of different composition can be added to the array at will.

Bulkowski, John E. (Newark, DE)

1986-01-01

348

Structural Relaxation of Stacked Ultrathin Polystyrene Films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The kinetic behavior of stacked polystyrene ultrathin films is investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and compared to the behavior of bulk polystyrene. The fictive temperature (Tf) was measured as a function of cooling rate and as a function of aging time for aging temperatures below the nominal glass transition temperature (Tg). The stacked thin films show enthalpy overshoots in DSC heating scans which are reduced in height but occur over a broader temperature range relative to the bulk response for a given change in fictive temperature. The cooling rate dependence of the limiting fictive temperature, Tf' is also found to be higher for the stacked thin film samples; the result is that the magnitude of the Tg depression between the thin film sample and the bulk is inversely proportional to the cooling rate consistent with other results in the literature. We also find that the rate of physical aging of the stacked thin films is comparable to the bulk when aging is performed at the same distance from Tg; however, when conducted at the same aging temperature, the thin film samples show accelerated physical aging due to their depressed Tg values. This result is in contrast to recent work in the literature on PMMA ultrathin films and on o-TP confined in nanopores.

Koh, Yung P.; Simon, Sindee L.

2008-03-01

349

49 CFR 178.980 - Stacking test.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the load to be placed on the Large Packaging must be 1.8 times...permissible gross mass of the number of similar Large Packaging that may be stacked...load in pounds. n = maximum number of Large Packagings that may be...

2010-10-01

350

Intercomparison of stack gas mercury measurement methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have carried out joint tests for validation of EPA (Draft) Method 29 (“multi-metals method”) for measurement of mercury (Hg) and other selected metals in the stack gas of a coal-fired electric utility. The tests were performed according to the “analyte spiking” procedure of EPA Method 301

Babu R. Nott

1995-01-01

351

Removing Sulphur Dioxide From Stack Gases  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Process types, process concepts, claims and counterclaims, cost factors, and the level of developed technology for sulfur dioxide control in stack gases are focused upon and evaluated. Wet and dry processes as well as recovery and throwaway processes are compared. (BL)

Slack, A. V.

1973-01-01

352

Somatic Cell Cloning in Polyester Stacks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Single somatic cells, including fibroblasts, myelomas, and hybridomas, proliferate normally when trapped between a plastic dish and a disc of polyester cloth. Contact between the overlay and the plastic for 8-16 days results in identical colony patterns on the cloth and the plate. When several cloth discs are simultaneously stacked over Chinese hamster ovary cells, three or four high-resolution colony

Christian R. H. Raetz; Mary M. Wermuth; Thomas M. McIntyre; Jeffrey D. Esko; Debra C. Wing

1982-01-01

353

Development of mechanically stacked tandem concentrator cells  

SciTech Connect

Mechanically stacked, multijunction (MSMJ) solar cells offer an excellent prospect for significantly increased efficiencies in the near term. In this work, we examine several new concepts for a MSMJ solar cell. These MSMJ cell concepts include the following: A GaAsP cell grown on a GaP substrate for stacking onto a silicon cell; a GaSb cell grown lattice-matched on a GaSb substrate for stacking beneath a GaAs cell; and a Ge cell for stacking beneath a GaAs cell. The growth of GaAsP and of GaSb by vacuum chemical epitaxy and the development of GaSb solar cells are described. The development of a germanium solar cell and of a 26.1% GaAs/Ge MSMJ cell is also described. Finally, this work has identified approaches for achieving efficiencies with a MSMJ cell in excess of 30%. 19 refs., 18 figs., 7 tabs.

Cape, J.A.; Fraas, L.M.; McLeod, P.S.; Partain, L.D.

1987-10-01

354

Pin stack array for thermoacoustic energy conversion  

Microsoft Academic Search

A thermoacoustic stack for connecting two heat exchangers in a thermoacoustic energy converter provides a convex fluid-solid interface in a plane perpendicular to an axis for acoustic oscillation of fluid between the two heat exchangers. The convex surfaces increase the ratio of the fluid volume in the effective thermoacoustic volume that is displaced from the convex surface to the fluid

Robert M. Keolian; Gregory W. Swift

1995-01-01

355

Explosive demolition of K East Reactor Stack  

ScienceCinema

Using $420,000 in Recovery Act funds, the Department of Energy and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company topped off four months of preparations when they safely demolished the exhaust stack at the K East Reactor and equipment inside the reactor building on July 23, 2010.

None

2010-09-02

356

Measurement of heat conduction through stacked screens  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the experimental apparatus for the measurement of heat conduction through stacked screens as well as some experimental results taken with the apparatus. Screens are stacked in a fiberglass-epoxy cylinder, which is 24.4 mm in diameter and 55 mm in length. The cold end of the stacked screens is cooled by a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler at cryogenic temperature, and the hot end is maintained at room temperature. Heat conduction through the screens is determined from the temperature gradient in a calibrated heat flow sensor mounted between the cold end of the stacked screens and the GM cryocooler. The samples used for these experiments consisted of 400-mesh stainless steel screens, 400-mesh phosphor bronze screens, and two different porosities of 325-mesh stainless steel screens. The wire diameter of the 400-mesh stainless steel and phosphor bronze screens was 25.4 micrometers and the 325-mesh stainless steel screen wire diameters were 22.9 micrometers and 27.9 micrometers. Standard porosity values were used for the experimental data with additional porosity values used on selected experiments. The experimental results showed that the helium gas between each screen enhanced the heat conduction through the stacked screens by several orders of magnitude compared to that in vacuum. The conduction degradation factor is the ratio of actual heat conduction to the heat conduction where the regenerator material is assumed to be a solid rod of the same cross sectional area as the metal fraction of the screen. This factor was about 0.1 for the stainless steel and 0.022 for the phosphor bronze, and almost constant for the temperature range of 40 to 80 K at the cold end.

Lewis, M. A.; Kuriyama, T.; Kuriyama, F.; Radebaugh, R.

1998-01-01

357

Stacking Sequence and Layer-Type Changes in Topologically Close-Packed Structures.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Crystal structure changes in several A _3B-type quasi-binary alloy series, involving Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Pd and Pt as the A-component elements and Ti, V, Zr and Nb as the B-component elements, have been explored experimentally using X-ray and electron diffraction. The aim of this work was to discover various stacking sequence and ordered layer-type changes in close-packed structures. Our experimental data further confirm that the hexagonality of the stacking always increases in these alloy series as either the electron concentration (e/a) of a given alloy, or the size ratio (R_{rm B} /R_{rm A}) between two types of atoms is increased. This trend is consistent with the results observed by earlier workers in similar alloy systems. Interestingly, we also note that these observed trends are independent of the component, either the A- or B-, and of the type of stacking layers, either the triangularly-ordered (T-type) or the rectangularly -ordered (R-type), involved in the substitutional change. In addition, two new paths of stacking sequence changes have been established through our experimental work, namely, 3 to 3 to 2 and 1 to 5 to 2. An Ising model has been explored to discover if the observed stacking sequence changes can be interpreted in terms of interactions between a few adjacent layers. Using these interactions as phenomenological parameters, a stacking stability map was constructed showing the arrangement of predicted ground state phases on a two-dimensional parameter -plane. Comparing this map with the known experimental data, it was found that the position and the extent of phase regions in the derived map are rather similar to several real composition phase diagrams. Therefore, such a map can provide useful information about the stacking sequence changes (e.g., allowed or excluded stacking arrangements for the neighboring phases) to be expected in an actual alloy phase diagrams. In a different approach, a total energy calculation utilizing the linearized muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method has been carried out in order to study the relative stabilities between close-packed structures involving differently-ordered stacking layers. Two binary compounds were selected for this investigation. They are Co_3Ti and Ni_3V, and they involve, respectively, the T-type and R-type layers. Correct structures and lattice parameters were obtained for both alloys. The derived structural preferences were further analyzed in terms of the calculation of density of states. This suggests that structures built up from the R-type layers tend to exist in a relatively higher e/a region.

Pei, Shiyou

1988-12-01

358

The Essential Role of stacking adenines in a Two-Base-Pair RNA Kissing Complex  

PubMed Central

In minimal RNA kissing complexes formed between hairpins with cognate GACG tetraloops, the two tertiary GC pairs are likely stabilized by the stacking of 5’-unpaired adenines at each end of the short helix. To test this hypothesis, we mutated the flanking adenines to various nucleosides and examined their effects on the kissing interaction. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was used to detect kissing dimers in a multi-equilibria mixture, whereas optical tweezers were applied to monitor the (un)folding trajectories of single RNA molecules. The experimental findings were rationalized by molecular dynamics simulations. Together, the results showed that the stacked adenines are indispensable for the tertiary interaction. By shielding the tertiary base pairs from solvent and reducing their fraying, the stacked adenines made terminal pairs act more like interior base pairs. The purine double-ring of adenine was essential for effective stacking, whereas additional functional groups modulated the stabilizing effects through varying hydrophobic and electrostatic forces. Furthermore, formation of the kissing complex was dominated by base pairing, whereas its dissociation was significantly influenced by the flanking bases. Together, these findings indicate that unpaired flanking nucleotides play essential roles in the formation of otherwise unstable two-base-pair RNA tertiary interactions. PMID:23517345

Stephenson, William; Asare-Okai, Papa Nii; Chen, Alan A.; Keller, Sean; Santiago, Rachel; Tenenbaum, Scott; Garcia, Angel E.; Fabris, Daniele; Li, Pan T.X.

2013-01-01

359

Solutions to RealWorld Instances of PSPACEComplete Stacking  

E-print Network

planning and sorting with networks of stacks. The Towers of Hanoi puzzle is just a very simple instance sequence. In between, slabs are brought by cranes to a storage area where they are piled up on stacks (for

Nabben, Reinhard

360

VIEW OF STACK WITH AUTOMOBILE AND TRACTOR REPAIR SHOP TO ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF STACK WITH AUTOMOBILE AND TRACTOR REPAIR SHOP TO THE FAR RIGHT. WAREHOUSE WITH ITS RIDGELINE ROTARY VENTS TO RIGHT OF STACK. VIEW FROM THE WEST - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

361

Project W-420 Stack Monitoring system upgrades conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the scope, justification, conceptual design, and performance of Project W-420 stack monitoring system upgrades on six NESHAP-designated, Hanford Tank Farms ventilation exhaust stacks.

TUCK, J.A.

1998-11-06

362

40 CFR 62.14412 - What stack opacity requirements apply?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-07-01 false What stack opacity requirements apply? 62.14412 Section...Emission Limits § 62.14412 What stack opacity requirements apply? Your HMIWI...gases that exhibit greater than 10 percent opacity (6-minute block...

2012-07-01

363

40 CFR 62.14412 - What stack opacity requirements apply?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 false What stack opacity requirements apply? 62.14412 Section...Emission Limits § 62.14412 What stack opacity requirements apply? Your HMIWI...gases that exhibit greater than 10 percent opacity (6-minute block...

2010-07-01

364

40 CFR 62.14412 - What stack opacity requirements apply?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-07-01 false What stack opacity requirements apply? 62.14412 Section...Emission Limits § 62.14412 What stack opacity requirements apply? Your HMIWI...gases that exhibit greater than 10 percent opacity (6-minute block...

2011-07-01

365

Assembly of a ?-? stack of ligands in the binding site of an acetylcholine-binding protein  

PubMed Central

Acetylcholine-binding protein is a water-soluble homologue of the extracellular ligand-binding domain of cys-loop receptors. It is used as a structurally accessible prototype for studying ligand binding to these pharmaceutically important pentameric ion channels, in particular to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, due to conserved binding site residues present at the interface between two subunits. Here we report that an aromatic conjugated small molecule binds acetylcholine-binding protein in an ordered ?–? stack of three identical molecules per binding site, two parallel and one antiparallel. Acetylcholine-binding protein stabilizes the assembly of the stack by aromatic contacts. Thanks to the plasticity of its ligand-binding site, acetylcholine-binding protein can accommodate the formation of aromatic stacks of different size by simple loop repositioning and minimal adjustment of the interactions. This type of supramolecular binding provides a novel paradigm in drug design. PMID:23695669

Stornaiuolo, Mariano; De Kloe, Gerdien E.; Rucktooa, Prakash; Fish, Alexander; van Elk, Rene; Edink, Ewald S.; Bertrand, Daniel; Smit, August B.; de Esch, Iwan J. P.; Sixma, Titia K.

2013-01-01

366

Recent Results of Stack Development at Forschungszentrum Jülich  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the mid-nineties several generations of SOFC stacks have been designed and tested incorporating the anode substrate-type cells developed in Jülich. The 6th generation, the so-called F-design stacks, with metallic interconnect has been the ‘work horse’ used for testing materials, cells and manufacturing processes in cell and stack development since its introduction in the year 2001. Stacks with up to

R. Steinberger-Wilckens; L. G. J. Haart; I. C. Vinke; L. Blum; A. Cramer; J. Remmel; G. Blass; F. Tietz; W. J. Quadakkers

367

Twin-stack decoding of recursive systematic convolutional codes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a method for soft-in\\/soft-out sequential decoding of recursive systematic convolutional codes. The proposed decoder, the twin-stack decoder, is an extension of the well-known ZJ stack decoder, and it uses two stacks. The use of the two stacks lends itself to the generation of soft outputs, and the decoder is easily incorporated into the iterative “turbo” configuration. Under thresholded

Ravi Sivasankaran; Steven W. McLaughlin

2001-01-01

368

Stacking of six-membered aromatic rings in crystals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geometrical preferences of stacking and the possibilities and limitations of using stacking in designing crystal structures have been analyzed, based on the crystal structures of