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Sample records for picosecond infrared studies

  1. Laser-induced reactions in a deep UV resist system: Studied with picosecond infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.; Koskelo, A.; Stoutland, P.O.

    1995-12-31

    One of the most technologically important uses of organic photochemistry is in the imaging industry where radiation-sensitive organic monomers and polymers are used in photoresists. A widely-used class of compounds for imaging applications are diazoketones; these compounds undergo a photoinduced Wolff rearrangement to form a ketene intermediate which subsequently hydrolyses to a base-soluble, carboxylic acid. Another use of organic molecules in polymer matrices is for dopant induced ablation of polymers. As part of a program to develop diagnostics for laser driven reactions in polymer matrices, we have investigated the photoinduced decomposition of 5-diazo-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane-4,6-dione (5-diazo Meldrum`s acid, DM) in a PMMA matrix using picosecond infrared spectroscopy. In particular, irradiation of DM with a 60 ps 266 nm laser pulse results in immediate bleaching of the diazo infrared band ({nu} = 2172 cm{sup -1}). Similarly, a new band appears within our instrument response at 2161 cm{sup -1} (FWHM = 29 cm{sup -1}) and is stable to greater than 6 ns.; we assign this band to the ketene photoproduct of the Wolff rearrangement. Using deconvolution techniques we estimate a limit for its rate of formation of {tau} < 20 ps. The linear dependence of the absorbance change with the pump power (266 nm) even above the threshold of ablation suggest that material ejection take place after 6ns.

  2. Picosecond infrared study of intramolecular energy transfer in [(phen)(CO){sub 3}Re{sup I}(NC)Ru{sup II}(CN)(bpy){sub 2}]{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Peterson, K.A.; Gordon, K.C.; Woodruff, W.H.; Schoonover, J.R.; Meyer, T.J.; Bignozzi, C.A.

    1992-03-01

    The dynamics and mechanism of intramolecular energy transfer in [(phen)(CO){sub 3}Re{sup I}(NC)Ru{sup II}(CN)(bpy){sub 2}]+ following metal-to-ligand charge transfer excitation have been studied using picosecond infrared spectroscopy.

  3. Picosecond infrared study of intramolecular energy transfer in ((phen)(CO) sub 3 Re sup I (NC)Ru sup II (CN)(bpy) sub 2 ) sup +

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Peterson, K.A.; Gordon, K.C.; Woodruff, W.H. ); Schoonover, J.R.; Meyer, T.J. . Dept. of Chemistry); Bignozzi, C.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics and mechanism of intramolecular energy transfer in ((phen)(CO){sub 3}Re{sup I}(NC)Ru{sup II}(CN)(bpy){sub 2})+ following metal-to-ligand charge transfer excitation have been studied using picosecond infrared spectroscopy.

  4. Picosecond melting of peptide nanotubes using an infrared laser: a nonequilibrium simulation study.

    PubMed

    Hoang Viet, Man; Truong, Phan Minh; Derreumaux, Philippe; Li, Mai Suan; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste; Nguyen, Phuong H

    2015-11-01

    Self-assembled functional peptide biomaterials are emerging with a wide range of envisioned applications in the field of nanotechnology. Currently, methods and tools have been developed to control and manipulate as well as to explore new properties of self-assembled structures. However, considerably fewer studies are being devoted to developing efficient methods to degrade or recycle such extremely stable biomaterials. With this in mind, here we suggest a theoretical framework, inspired by the recent developed mid-infrared free-electron laser pulse technology, to dissociate peptide nanotubes. Adopting a diphenylalanine channel as a prototypical example, we find that the primary step in the dissociation process occurs due to the strong resonance between the carboxylate bond vibrations of the diphenylalanine peptides and the tuned laser frequencies. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between tube formation and dissociation. Our work shows a proof of concept and should provide a motivation for future experimental developments with the final aim to open a new and efficient way to cleave or to recycle bio-inspired materials. PMID:26437688

  5. Picosecond dissociation of amyloid fibrils with infrared laser: A nonequilibrium simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang Viet, Man; Derreumaux, Philippe; Li, Mai Suan; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste; Nguyen, Phuong H.

    2015-10-01

    Recently, mid-infrared free-electron laser technology has been developed to dissociate amyloid fibrils. Here, we present a theoretical framework for this type of experiment based on laser-induced nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the fibril is destroyed due to the strong resonance between its amide I vibrational modes and the laser field. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between fibril formation and dissociation. While the overall rearrangements of the fibril finish over short time scales, the interaction between the peptides and the solvent continues over much longer times indicating that the waters play an important role in the dissociation process. Our results thus provide new insights into amyloid fibril dissociation by laser techniques and open up new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  6. Picosecond dissociation of amyloid fibrils with infrared laser: A nonequilibrium simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang Viet, Man; Roland, Christopher Sagui, Celeste; Derreumaux, Philippe; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-10-21

    Recently, mid-infrared free-electron laser technology has been developed to dissociate amyloid fibrils. Here, we present a theoretical framework for this type of experiment based on laser-induced nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the fibril is destroyed due to the strong resonance between its amide I vibrational modes and the laser field. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between fibril formation and dissociation. While the overall rearrangements of the fibril finish over short time scales, the interaction between the peptides and the solvent continues over much longer times indicating that the waters play an important role in the dissociation process. Our results thus provide new insights into amyloid fibril dissociation by laser techniques and open up new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  7. Vibrational Energy Relaxation of Benzene Dimer Studied by Picosecond Time-Resolved Infrared-Ultraviolet Pump-Probe Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaka, R.; Ebata, T.

    2010-06-01

    The benzene dimer is excited to the CH stretching vibrational levels by a picosecond IR pulse, and the time evolution of the population of the pumped and redistributed levels are probed by (1+1)REMPI with a picosecond UV pulse. In order to accomplish IR excitation localized in the site of the T-shaped dimer, two dimer isotopomers [(1) Top=C_6H_6, Stem=C_6D_6, (2) Top=C_6D_6, Stem=C_6H_6] are used. From the time profiles of the pumped and the relaxed levels, the rate constants of intracluster vibrational redistribution (ICVR) at each site and subsequent vibrational predissociation (VP) are discussed.

  8. Applications of infrared free electron lasers in picosecond and nonlinear spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fann, W. S.; Benson, S. V.; Madey, J. M. J.; Etemad, S.; Baker, G. L.; Rothberg, L.; Roberson, M.; Austin, R. H.

    1990-10-01

    In this paper we describe two different types of spectroscopic experiments that exploit the characteristics of the infrared FEL, Mark III, for studies of condensed matter: - the spectrum of χ(3)(-3ω; ω, ω, ω) in polyacetylene: an application of the free electron laser in nonlinear optical spectroscopy, and - a dynamical test of Davydov-like solitons in acetanilide using a picosecond free electron laser. These two studies highlight the unique contributions FELs can make to condensed-matter spectroscopy.

  9. A New Technology for Applanation Free Corneal Trephination: The Picosecond Infrared Laser (PIRL)

    PubMed Central

    Linke, Stephan J.; Frings, Andreas; Ren, Ling; Gomolka, Amadeus; Schumacher, Udo; Reimer, Rudolph; Hansen, Nils-Owe; Jowett, Nathan; Richard, Gisbert; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    The impact of using a Femtosecond laser on final functional results of penetrating keratoplasty is low. The corneal incisions presented here result from laser ablations with ultrafast desorption by impulsive vibrational excitation (DIVE). The results of the current study are based on the first proof-of-principle experiments using a mobile, newly introduced picosecond infrared laser system, and indicate that wavelengths in the mid-infrared range centered at 3 μm are efficient for obtaining applanation-free deep cuts on porcine corneas. PMID:25781907

  10. Picosecond pulsed infrared laser tuned to amide I band dissociates polyglutamine fibrils in cells.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takayasu; Ohori, Gaku; Chiba, Tomoyuki; Tsukiyama, Koichi; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils are causal substances for serious neurodegenerative disorders and amyloidosis. Among them, polyglutamine fibrils seen in multiple polyglutamine diseases are toxic to neurons. Although much efforts have been made to explore the treatments of polyglutamine diseases, there are no effective drugs to block progression of the diseases. We recently found that a free electron laser (FEL), which has an oscillation wavelength at the amide I band (C = O stretch vibration mode) and picosecond pulse width, was effective for conversion of the fibril forms of insulin, lysozyme, and calcitonin peptide into their monomer forms. However, it is not known if that is also the case in polyglutamine fibrils in cells. We found in this study that the fibril-specific β-sheet conformation of polyglutamine peptide was converted into nonfibril form, as evidenced by the infrared microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy after the irradiation tuned to 6.08 μm. Furthermore, irradiation at this wavelength also changed polyglutamine fibrils to their nonfibril state in cultured cells, as shown by infrared mapping image of protein secondary structure. Notably, infrared thermography analysis showed that temperature increase of the cells during the irradiation was within 1 K, excluding thermal damage of cells. These results indicate that the picosecond pulsed infrared laser can safely reduce amyloid fibril structure to the nonfibril form even in cells. PMID:27342599

  11. Picosecond infrared laser (PIRL): an ideal phonomicrosurgical laser?

    PubMed

    Hess, Markus; Hildebrandt, Michael Dominik; Müller, Frank; Kruber, Sebastian; Kroetz, Peter; Schumacher, Udo; Reimer, Rudolph; Kammal, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Wöllmer, Wolfgang; Miller, Dwayne

    2013-11-01

    A comparison of tissue cutting effects in excised cadaver human vocal folds after incisions with three different instruments [scalpel, CO2 laser and the picosecond infrared laser-(PIRL)] was performed. In total, 15 larynges were taken from human cadavers shortly after death. After deep freezing and thawing for the experiment, the vocal folds suspended in the hemilarynx were incised. Histology and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) analyses were performed. Damage zones after cold instrument cuts ranged from 51 to 135 μm, as compared to 9-28 μm after cutting with the PIRL. It was shown that PIRL incision had smaller zones of tissue coagulation and tissue destruction, when compared with scalpel and CO2 laser cuts. The PIRL technology provides an (almost) atraumatic laser, which offers a quantum jump towards realistic 'micro'-phonosurgery on a factual cellular dimension, almost entirely avoiding coagulation, carbonization, or other ways of major tissue destruction in the vicinity of the intervention area. Although not available for clinical use yet, the new technique appears promising for future clinical applications, so that technical and methodological characteristics as well as tissue experiments seem worthwhile to be communicated at this stage of development. PMID:23708442

  12. Picosecond Optical Studies of Solids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broomfield, Seth Emlyn

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Hot carrier relaxation is studied in the alloy semiconductor Ga_{rm 1-x} Al_{rm x}As by analysis of time-resolved luminescence at 4K. Photoexcited carrier densities in the range 10^{16 } to 10^{18}cm ^{-3} were created by 5ps laser pulses in alloys with x values ranging from 0 to 0.36. Carrier temperature cooling curves are discussed in terms of emission and absorption of non-equilibrium phonons by carriers, intervalley scattering of electrons and alloy disorder effects. Energy relaxation within a band of localised exciton states is studied in Ga_{rm 1 -x}Al_{rm x} As by analysis of time-resolved photoluminescence at 4K with a photoexcited carrier density of 10 ^{14}cm^{-3 }. It is found that the width of the band of localised states increases with the degree of alloy disorder as x ranges from 0 to 0.36. A form for the density of localised states is obtained. The intersite exciton overlap is estimated. Photoluminescence of the semiconductor gallium selenide is measured for carrier densities below 3 times 10^{18}cm ^{-3} at 2K. Biexcitons are identified by analysis of the photoluminescence at high densities. This is confirmed by induced optical absorption experiments. It is shown that biexciton dissociation by interaction with low-energy optical phonons occurs as the lattice temperature is increased. The group velocity of excitonic polaritons is obtained from measurements of the time-of-flight of 5ps optical pulses across a 1mum thick layer of gallium arsenide at 4K. The group velocity has a minimum value of 4 times 10 ^5ms^{-1} at the transverse exciton energy, and has a dependence on photon energy which agrees well with a model describing spatial dispersion of polaritons.

  13. Time-resolved fluorescence polarization spectroscopy of visible and near infrared dyes in picosecond dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) dyes absorb and emit light within the range from 700 to 900 nm have several benefits in biological studies for one- and/or two-photon excitation for deeper penetration of tissues. These molecules undergo vibrational and rotational motion in the relaxation of the excited electronic states, Due to the less than ideal anisotropy behavior of NIR dyes stemming from the fluorophores elongated structures and short fluorescence lifetime in picosecond range, no significant efforts have been made to recognize the theory of these dyes in time-resolved polarization dynamics. In this study, the depolarization of the fluorescence due to emission from rotational deactivation in solution will be measured with the excitation of a linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulse and a streak camera. The theory, experiment and application of the ultrafast fluorescence polarization dynamics and anisotropy are illustrated with examples of two of the most important medical based dyes. One is NIR dye, namely Indocyanine Green (ICG) and is compared with Fluorescein which is in visible range with much longer lifetime. A set of first-order linear differential equations was developed to model fluorescence polarization dynamics of NIR dye in picosecond range. Using this model, the important parameters of ultrafast polarization spectroscopy were identified: risetime, initial time, fluorescence lifetime, and rotation times.

  14. Mitotic spindle studied using picosecond laser scissors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, N. M.; Botvinick, E. L.; Shi, Linda; Berns, M. B.; Wu, George

    2006-08-01

    In previous studies we have shown that the second harmonic 532 nm, from a picosecond frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, can cleanly and selectively disrupt spindle fiber microtubules in live cells (Botvinick et al 2004, Biophys. J. 87:4303-4212). In the present study we have ablated different locations and amounts of the metaphase mitotic spindle, and followed the cells in order to observe the fate of the irradiated spindle and the ability of the cell to continue through mitosis. Cells of the rat kangaroo line (PTK2) were stably transfected by ECFP-tubulin and, using fluorescent microscopy and the automated RoboLase microscope, (Botvinick and Berns, 2005, Micros. Res. Tech. 68:65-74) brightly fluorescent individual cells in metaphase were irradiated with 0.2447 nJ/micropulse corresponding to an irradiance of 1.4496*10^7 J/(ps*cm^2) . Upon irradiation the exposed part of the mitotic spindle immediately lost fluorescence and the following events were observed in the cells over time: (1) immediate contraction of the spindle pole towards the cut, (2) recovery of connection between pole and cut microtubule, (3) completion of mitosis. This system should be very useful in studying internal cellular dynamics of the mitotic spindle.

  15. Reduction of thermocoagulative injury via use of a picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) in laryngeal tissues.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Arne; Kucher, Stanislav; Knecht, Rainald; Jowett, Nathan; Krötz, Peter; Reimer, Rudolph; Schumacher, Udo; Anders, Sven; Münscher, Adrian; Dalchow, Carsten V; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2015-04-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is routinely used in glottic microsurgery for the treatment of benign and malignant disease, despite significant collateral thermal damage secondary to photothermal vaporization without thermal confinement. Subsequent tissue response to thermal injury involves excess collagen deposition resulting in scarring and functional impairment. To minimize collateral thermal injury, short-pulse laser systems such as the microsecond pulsed erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) laser and picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) have been developed. This study compares incisions made in ex vivo human laryngeal tissues by CO2 and Er:YAG lasers versus PIRL using light microscopy, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), and infrared thermography (IRT). In comparison to the CO2 and Er:YAG lasers, PIRL incisions showed significantly decreased mean epithelial (59.70 µm) and subepithelial (22.15 µm) damage zones (p < 0.05). Cutting gaps were significantly narrower for PIRL (133.70 µm) compared to Er:YAG and CO2 lasers (p < 0.05), which were more than 5 times larger. ESEM revealed intact collagen fibers along PIRL cutting edges without obvious carbonization, in comparison to diffuse carbonization and tissue melting seen for CO2 and Er:YAG laser incisions. IRT demonstrated median temperature rise of 4.1 K in PIRL vocal fold incisions, significantly less than for Er:YAG laser cuts (171.85 K; p < 0.001). This study has shown increased cutting precision and reduced lateral thermal damage zones for PIRL ablation in comparison to conventional CO2 and Er:YAG lasers in human glottis and supraglottic tissues. PMID:25575843

  16. Size Dependent Ultrafast Cooling of Water Droplets in Microemulsions by Picosecond Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, G.; Patzlaff, T.; Graener, H.

    2002-04-01

    The ultrafast thermal relaxation of reversed micelles in n-octane/AOT/water (where AOT denotes sodium di-2-ethylhexyl sulfosuccinate) microemulsions was investigated by time-resolved infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. This picosecond cooling process can be described in terms of heat diffusion, demonstrating a new method to determine the nanometer radii of the water droplets. The reverse micelles are stable against transient temperatures far above the equilibrium stability range. The amphiphilic interface layer (AOT) seems to provide an efficient heat contact between the water and the nonpolar solvent.

  17. Octave-spanning infrared supercontinuum generation in robust chalcogenide nanotapers using picosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Shabahang, Soroush; Marquez, Michael P; Tao, Guangming; Piracha, Mohammad U; Nguyen, Dat; Delfyett, Peter J; Abouraddy, Ayman F

    2012-11-15

    We report on infrared supercontinuum generation extending over more than one octave of bandwidth, from 850 nm to 2.35 μm, produced in a single spatial mode from a robust, compact, composite chalcogenide glass nanotaper. A picosecond laser at 1.55 μm pumps a high-index-contrast, all-solid nanotaper that strongly confines the field to a 480 nm diameter core, while a thermally compatible built-in polymer jacket lends the nanotaper mechanical stability. PMID:23164864

  18. Ambient Mass Spectrometry Imaging with Picosecond Infrared Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization (PIR-LAESI).

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Talbot, Francis; Tata, Alessandra; Ermini, Leonardo; Franjic, Kresimir; Ventura, Manuela; Zheng, Jinzi; Ginsberg, Howard; Post, Martin; Ifa, Demian R; Jaffray, David; Miller, R J Dwayne; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash

    2015-12-15

    A picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) is capable of cutting through biological tissues in the absence of significant thermal damage. As such, PIRL is a standalone surgical scalpel with the added bonus of minimal postoperative scar tissue formation. In this work, a tandem of PIRL ablation with electrospray ionization (PIR-LAESI) mass spectrometry is demonstrated and characterized for tissue molecular imaging, with a limit of detection in the range of 100 nM for reserpine or better than 5 nM for verapamil in aqueous solution. We characterized PIRL crater size using agar films containing Rhodamine. PIR-LAESI offers a 20-30 μm vertical resolution (∼3 μm removal per pulse) and a lateral resolution of ∼100 μm. We were able to detect 25 fmol of Rhodamine in agar ablation experiments. PIR-LAESI was used to map the distribution of endogenous methoxykaempferol glucoronide in zebra plant (Aphelandra squarrosa) leaves producing a localization map that is corroborated by the literature. PIR-LAESI was further used to image the distribution inside mouse kidneys of gadoteridol, an exogenous magnetic resonance contrast agent intravenously injected. Parallel mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) were performed to corroborate PIR-LAESI images of the exogenous agent. We further show that PIR-LAESI is capable of desorption ionization of proteins as well as phospholipids. This comparative study illustrates that PIR-LAESI is an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry applications. As such, a future PIRL scalpel combined with secondary ionization such as ESI and mass spectrometry has the potential to provide molecular feedback to guide PIRL surgery. PMID:26561279

  19. Fiber laser pumped high power mid-infrared laser with picosecond pulse bunch output.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kaihua; Chen, Tao; Jiang, Peipei; Yang, Dingzhong; Wu, Bo; Shen, Yonghang

    2013-10-21

    We report a novel quasi-synchronously pumped PPMgLN-based high power mid-infrared (MIR) laser with picosecond pulse bunch output. The pump laser is a linearly polarized MOPA structured all fiberized Yb fiber laser with picosecond pulse bunch output. The output from a mode-locked seed fiber laser was directed to pass through a FBG reflector via a circulator to narrow the pulse duration from 800 ps to less than 50 ps and the spectral FWHM from 9 nm to 0.15 nm. The narrowed pulses were further directed to pass through a novel pulse multiplier through which each pulse was made to become a pulse bunch composing of 13 sub-pulses with pulse to pulse time interval of 1.26 ns. The pulses were then amplified via two stage Yb fiber amplifiers to obtain a linearly polarized high average power output up to 85 W, which were then directed to pass through an isolator and to pump a PPMgLN-based optical parametric oscillator via quasi-synchronization pump scheme for ps pulse bunch MIR output. High MIR output with average power up to 4 W was obtained at 3.45 micron showing the feasibility of such pump scheme for ps pulse bunch MIR output. PMID:24150378

  20. Picosecond-time-resolved studies of nonradiative relaxation in ruby and alexandrite

    SciTech Connect

    Gayen, S.K.; Wang, W.B.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamics of the nonradiative transitions between the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ pump band and the /sup 2/E storage level of the Cr/sup 3 +/ ion in ruby and alexandrite crystals is studied using the picosecond excite-and-probe absorption technique. A 527-nm picosecond pulse excites the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ state of the Cr/sup 3 +/ ion, and an infrared picosecond probe pulse monitors the subsequent growth and decay of population in the excited states as a function of pump-probe delay. An upper limit of 7 ps is determined for the nonradiative lifetime of the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ state in ruby. A vibrational relaxation time of 25 ps for the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ band in alexandrite is estimated. The time to attain thermal equilibrium population between the /sup 2/E and /sup 4/T/sub 2/ levels of alexandrite following excitation of /sup 4/T/sub 2/ band is estimated to be approx. 100 ps.

  1. Peak power tunable mid-infrared oscillator pumped by a high power picosecond pulsed fiber amplifier with bunch output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kaihua; Guo, Yan; Lai, Xiaomin; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-07-01

    A high power mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with picosecond pulse bunch output is experimentally demonstrated. The pump source was a high power master oscillation power amplifier (MOPA) picosecond pulsed fiber amplifier. The seed of the MOPA was a gain-switched distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diode (LD) with picosecond pulse operation at a high repetition rate. The seed laser was amplified to 50 W by two-stage pre-amplifiers and a large mode area (LMA) Yb fiber based power-amplifier. A fiber-pigtailed acousto-optic modulator with the first order diffraction transmission was inserted into the second pre-amplifier to form a picosecond pulse bunch train and to change the peak power simultaneously. The power-amplified pulse bunches were focused to pump a wavelength-tunable OPO for emitting high power mid-infrared laser. By adjusting the OPO cavity length, the maximum average idler powers obtained at 3.1, 3.3 and 3.5 μm were 7, 6.6 and 6.4 W respectively.

  2. Picosecond electron-optic diagnostics in laser studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, A. M.

    The papers included in this volume provide an overview of research aimed at the development of methods and instrumentation for ultrahigh-speed electron-optic detection and of their applications in laser physics, laser fusion, fiber-optic communication, picosecond spectroscopy, and photobiology. Topics discussed include the physics of a picosecond electron-optic converter, the aberration theory for cathode lenses, picosecond and subpicosecond laser sources, and a beam deflection system for a subpicosecond electron-optic converter.

  3. Nanosurgery with near-infrared 12-femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Zhang, Huijing; Lemke, Cornelius; König, Karsten

    2011-03-01

    Laser-assisted surgery based on multiphoton absorption of NIR laser light has great potential for high precision surgery at various depths within the cells and tissues. Clinical applications include refractive surgery (fs-LASIK). The non-contact laser method also supports contamination-free cell nanosurgery. Here we apply femtosecond laser scanning microscopes for sub-100 nm surgery of human cells and metaphase chromosomes. A mode-locked 85 MHz Ti:Sapphire laser with an M-shaped ultrabroad band spectrum (maxima: 770 nm/830 nm) with an in situ pulse duration at the target ranging from 12 femtoseconds up to 3 picoseconds was employed. The effects of laser nanoprocessing in cells and chromosomes have been quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy. These studies demonstrate the potential of extreme ultrashort femtosecond laser pulses at low mean milliwatt powers for sub-100 nm surgery.

  4. Retinal threshold studies for nanosecond and picosecond visible laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, William P.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Smith, Audrey B.; Rogers, Mark E.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1995-05-01

    Threshold measurements for Minimum Visible Lesions (MVL) at the retina are reported for 60 picoseconds (ps) and 4 nanoseconds (ns), single laser pulses in rhesus monkey eyes using a visible wavelength of 532 nanometers (nm) from a doubled Nd:YAG laser. The 50% probability for damage (ED50) dosages are calculated for 1 hour and 24 hour post exposures using 95% fiducial limits. For both pulsewidths, the threshold values calculated by probit analysis decrease between the 1 hour and 24 hour ophthalmoscopic evaluations. The ED50 value determined for the 60 ps pulsewidth was less than half the value at 4 ns (0.43 (mu) J/60 ps vs. 0.90 (mu) J/4 ns at 24 hours) for both readings. Of the 136 exposures for pulse energies ranging from 0.03 to 5.0 (mu) J no hemorrhagic lesions were produced for either pulsewidth studied. However, at 6.6 (mu) J one intraretinal hemorrhagic lesion was observed for 60 ps. The slope of the probit curve was higher for 60 ps when compared with the 4 ns value (3.03 at 60 ps vs. 2.68 at 4 ns). MVL threshold doses calculated are comparable with those reported in the literature. However, the 4 ns MVL values is less than one order of magnitude (a factor 4.7) above the Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) level as defined by the 'American National Standard For The Safe Use Of Lasers', ANSI Z136.1-19932. We present the current MVL data as it compares with previous data obtained for picosecond and femtosecond laser pulse thresholds and provide a preliminary assessment of how the ANSI MPE standard might be amended.

  5. Studies on laser material processing with nanosecond and sub-nanosecond and picosecond and sub-picosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Tao, Sha; Wang, Brian; Zhao, Jay

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, laser ablation of widely used metal (Al, Cu. stainless-steel), semiconductor (Si), transparent material (glass, sapphire), ceramic (Al2O3, AlN) and polymer (PI, PMMA) in industry were systematically studied with pulse width from nanosecond (5-100ns), picosecond (6-10ps) to sub-picosecond (0.8-0.95ps). A critical damage zone (CDZ) of up to 100um with ns laser, <=50um with ps laser, and <=20um with sub-ps laser, respectively was observed as a criteria of selecting the laser pulse width. The effects of laser processing parameters on speed and efficiency were also investigated. This is to explore how to provide industry users the best laser solution for device micro-fabrication with best price. Our studies of cutting and drilling with ns, ps, and sub-ps lasers indicate that it is feasible to achieve user accepted quality and speed with cost-effective and reliable laser by optimizing processing conditions.

  6. Low-noise, high-brightness, tunable source of picosecond pulsed light in the near-infrared and visible.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Peter J; Bateman, Samuel A; Lavoute, Laure; Wadsworth, William J

    2011-12-01

    We have built a flexible source of picosecond pulsed light in both the near-infrared and visible spectral regions. A photonic crystal fiber (PCF) was pumped with a pulsed 1064 nm fiber laser to generate four-wave mixing (FWM) sidebands at 947 nm and 1213 nm. This process was seeded at the idler wavelength with a tunable diode laser to limit the spectral width of the sidebands to less than 0.5 nm. Subsequently the idler was mixed efficiently with the residual pump in a nonlinear crystal to yield their sum frequency at 567 nm. All three outputs were tunable by adjusting the seed wavelength and all had very low pulse-to-pulse amplitude noise. This technique could be extended to different wavelength ranges by selecting different seed lasers and PCF. PMID:22273925

  7. Far-field infrared super-resolution microscopy using picosecond time-resolved transient fluorescence detected IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Makoto; Kawashima, Yasutake; Takeda, Akihiro; Ohmori, Tsutomu; Fujii, Masaaki

    2007-05-01

    A new far-field infrared super-resolution microscopy combining laser fluorescence microscope and picosecond time-resolved transient fluorescence detected IR (TFD-IR) spectroscopy is proposed. TFD-IR spectroscopy is a kind of IR-visible/UV double resonance spectroscopy, and detects IR transitions by the transient fluorescence due to electronic transition originating from vibrationally excited level populated by IR light. IR images of rhodamine-6G solution and of fluorescent beads were clearly observed by monitoring the transient fluorescence. Super-resolution twice higher than the diffraction limit for IR light was achieved. The IR spectrum due to the transient fluorescence was also measured from spatial domains smaller than the diffraction limit.

  8. Picosecond flash spectroscopic studies on ultraviolet stabilizers and stabilized polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Spectroscopic and excited state decay kinetics are reported for monomeric and polymeric forms of ultraviolet stabilizers in the 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)-benzotriazole and 2-hydroxybenzophenone classes. For some of these molecules in various solvents at room temperature, (1) ground state absorption spectra, (2) emission spectra, (3) picosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectra, (4) ground state absorption recovery kinetics, (5) emission kinetics, and (6) transient absorption kinetics are reported. In the solid state at low temperatures, emission spectra and their temperature dependent kinetics up to approximately 200K as well as, in one case, the 12K excitation spectra of the observed dual emission are also reported.

  9. Millijoule-level picosecond mid-infrared optical parametric amplifier based on MgO-doped periodically poled lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongyan; Yang, Feng; Chen, Ying; Liu, Ke; Du, Shifeng; Zong, Nan; Yang, Jing; Bo, Yong; Peng, Qinjun; Zhang, Jingyuan; Cui, Dafu; Xu, Zuyan

    2015-03-20

    A millijoule-level high pulse energy picosecond (ps) mid-infrared (MIR) optical parametric amplifier (OPA) at 3.9 μm based on large-aperture MgO-doped periodically poled lithium niobate (MgO:PPLN) crystal was demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The MIR OPA was pumped by a 30 ps 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser at 10 Hz and injected by an energy-adjustable near-infrared seed based on a barium boron oxide (BBO) optical parametric generator/optical parametric amplifier (OPG/OPA) with double-pass geometry. Output energy of 1.14 mJ at 3.9 μm has been obtained at pump energy of 15.2 mJ. Furthermore, the performance of MIR OPG in MgO:PPLN was also investigated for comparing with the seeded OPA. PMID:25968539

  10. High-precision micro-through-hole array in quartz glass machined by infrared picosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Lingfei; Hu, Yan; Li, Jian; Wang, Wenhao; Jiang, Yijian

    2015-11-01

    Circle and triangle micro-through-hole arrays without cracks, chips, and debris were machined in 0.3-mm-thick quartz glass by picosecond laser (wavelength = 1064 nm, pulse width ~12 ps) in air ambient. The diameter of each circle through-hole was 550 μm, and the side length of each triangle hole is 500 μm; 30 μm spacing between the adjacent hole edges and the smooth machined surface with R a = 0.8 μm roughness depicted the high precision of the high-density micro-through-hole arrays. The fundamental properties of the ps laser processing of quartz glass were investigated. The laser ablation threshold fluence of the quartz glass was determined as 3.49 J/cm2. Based on the fundamental investigation, a quantitative design of the cutting path for micro-machining of the through-holes with various geometries in quartz glass was developed. The work presents a more practical ps laser micro-machining technique for micro-through-hole arrays in glass-like materials for industrial application due to the precise quality, flexibility in geometries, ease of manipulation, and large-scale application.

  11. Fiber laser pumped burst-mode operated picosecond mid-infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kai-Hua; Jiang, Pei-Pei; Wu, Bo; Chen, Tao; Shen, Yong-Hang

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate a compact periodically poled MgO-doped lithium niobate (MgO:PPLN)-based optical parametric oscillator (OPO) quasi-synchronously pumped by a fiber laser system with burst-mode operation. The pump source is a peak-power-selectable pulse-multiplied picosecond Yb fiber laser. The chirped pulses from a figure of eight-cavity mode-locked fiber laser seed are narrowed to a duration of less than 50 ps using an FBG reflector and a circulator. The narrowed pulses are directed to pass through a pulse multiplier and to form pulse bunches, each of which is composed of 13 sub-pulses. The obtained pulse bunches are amplified by two-stage fiber pre-amplifiers: one-stage is core-pumped and the other is cladding-pumped. A fiberized acousto-optic modulator is inserted to control the pulse repetition rate (PRR) of the pulse bunches before they are power-amplified in the final amplifier stage with a large mode area (LMA) PM Yb-doped fiber. The maximum average powers from the final amplifier are 85 W, 60 W, and 45 W, respectively, corresponding to the PRR of 2.72 MHz, 1.36 MHz, and 0.68 MHz. The amplified pulses are directed to pump an MgO:PPLN-based optical parametric oscillator (OPO). A maximum peak power at 3.45 μm is obtained approximately to be 8.4 kW. Detailed performance characteristics are presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61078015) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB311803).

  12. Picosecond infrared laser-induced all-atom nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of dissociation of viruses.

    PubMed

    Hoang Man, Viet; Van-Oanh, Nguyen-Thi; Derreumaux, Philippe; Li, Mai Suan; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste; Nguyen, Phuong H

    2016-04-28

    Since the discovery of the plant pathogen tobacco mosaic virus as the first viral entity in the late 1800s, viruses traditionally have been mainly thought of as pathogens for disease-resistances. However, viruses have recently been exploited as nanoplatforms with applications in biomedicine and materials science. To this aim, a large majority of current methods and tools have been developed to improve the physical stability of viral particles, which may be critical to the extreme physical or chemical conditions that viruses may encounter during purification, fabrication processes, storage and use. However, considerably fewer studies are devoted to developing efficient methods to degrade or recycle such enhanced stability biomaterials. With this in mind, we carry out all-atom nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, inspired by the recently developed mid-infrared free-electron laser pulse technology, to dissociate viruses. Adopting the poliovirus as a representative example, we find that the primary step in the dissociation process is due to the strong resonance between the amide I vibrational modes of the virus and the tuned laser frequencies. This process is determined by a balance between the formation and dissociation of the protein shell, reflecting the highly plasticity of the virus. Furthermore, our method should provide a feasible approach to simulate viruses, which is otherwise too expensive for conventional equilibrium all-atom simulations of such very large systems. Our work shows a proof of concept which may open a new, efficient way to cleave or to recycle virus-based materials, provide an extremely valuable tool for elucidating mechanical aspects of viruses, and may well play an important role in future fighting against virus-related diseases. PMID:27071540

  13. Widely tunable parametric generation of picosecond visible and mid-infrared radiation in optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giree, Achut; Jauregui, Cesar; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Parametric generation in an endlessly single-mode photonic crystal fiber can be a simple and efficient way to generate tunable visible and mid-infrared radiation. In this manuscript we report on a visible light source that is tunable from 628nm to 661nm with up to 25% conversion efficiency. This was obtained by tuning the parametric pump from 1030nm to 1055nm in a 1.6m long LMA-10 PM photonic crystal fiber. At the same time, the source generates mid-infrared radiation that can be tuned from ~2.65μm to ~2.9μm. A further increase of the tunable range of both the visible and midinfrared is possible simply by extending the pump tuning range.

  14. Study of solvation dynamics in the interior of staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) using picosecond-resolved emission spectra of tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guangyu; Li, Yu; Wang, Wei; Men, Jing; Zhong, Dongping; Wang, ShuFeng; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-09-01

    We report here our study on ultrafast spectral dynamics in the interior of SNase using picosecond-resolved emission spectra of tryptophan through site-directed mutagenesis. By probing the solvation dynamics in the nucleotide binding pocket and the Ca2+ binding pocket as well as in the interior of hydrophobic core, two robust relaxation time scales on a few picoseconds and on tens of picoseconds have been observed. Both two time scales are strongly correlated with local structural and chemical properties of protein. These distinct differences in solvation dynamics reflect the intimate relationship between the dynamic structures and the functions of enzyme.

  15. Infrared Detection with High Transition Temperature Bolometers and Response of Niobium Tunnel Junctions to Picosecond Voltage Pulses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verghese, Simon

    1993-01-01

    Oxide superconductors with high critical temperature T_{rm c} make sensitive thermometers for several types of infrared bolometers. We built composite bolometers with rm YBa_2Cu _3O_{7-delta} thermometers on sapphire substrates which have higher sensitivity than competing thermal detectors which operate at temperatures above 77 K. A 1 x 1 mm bolometer with gold black serving as the radiation absorber has useful sensitivity for wavelengths 20-100 mum. A 3 x 3 mm bolometer with a bismuth film as the absorber operates from 20-100 mum. High-T_{ rm c} bolometers which are fabricated with micromachining techniques on membranes of Si or Si _3N_4 have potential application to large-format arrays which are used for infrared imaging. Thermal isolation is achieved by suspending the membrane on two thin legs of the membrane material. A nonisothermal high-T_{ rm c} bolometer can be fabricated on a membrane of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) which is in thermal contact with the heat sink along the perimeter of the membrane. A thermal analysis indicates that the YSZ membrane bolometer can have improved sensitivity compared to the sapphire bolometer for spectrometer applications. The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor -insulator-superconductor (SIS) junction is highly nonlinear in the applied voltage. If an SIS junction is excited with photons of energy hbaromega, where hbaromega/e is larger than the width of the nonlinearity in the I-V curve, the response of the quasiparticle current is retarded and depends strongly on omega. We have made the first measurement of the linear response of the quasiparticle current in a Nb/AlO_{rm x} /Nb junction over a broad bandwidth from 75-200 GHz. We used picosecond pulses of millimeter wave radiation which were generated by illuminating a photoconductive switch with a mode-locked laser. The data are in agreement with the theory of linear photon-assisted tunneling. Nonlinear measurements made with these pulses may provide

  16. Toward picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption studies of interfacial photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, Oliver; Mahl, Johannes; Neppl, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    We report on the progress toward developing a novel picosecond time-resolved transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TRXAS) capability for time-domain studies of interfacial photochemistry. The technique is based on the combination of a high repetition rate picosecond laser system with a time-resolved X-ray fluorescent yield setup that may be used for the study of radiation sensitive materials and X-ray spectroscopy compatible photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. The mobile system is currently deployed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and may be used in all operating modes (two-bunch and multi-bunch) of the synchrotron. The use of a time-stamping technique enables the simultaneous recording of TRXAS spectra with delays between the exciting laser pulses and the probing X-ray pulses spanning picosecond to nanosecond temporal scales. First results are discussed that demonstrate the viability of the method to study photoinduced dynamics in transition metal-oxide semiconductor (SC) samples under high vacuum conditions and at SC-liquid electrolyte interfaces during photoelectrochemical water splitting. Opportunities and challenges are outlined to capture crucial short-lived intermediates of photochemical processes with the technique. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Office of Science Early Career Research Program.

  17. Picosecond infrared spectroscopy as probe for photochemical or thermal reactions in solid matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.; Funk, D.J.; Strauss, C.E.M.; Stoutland, P.O.

    1998-08-01

    Spectroscopy in the mid-IR on timescales from pico to milliseconds has been developed for the study of laser-material interactions over broad timescales. To reach these timescales the authors have employed two configurations: (1) for the ps to ns timescale a one and a two stage difference frequency mixing setup is employed, (2) for the longer timescale, CW mid-IR laser diodes have been used. In general, they excite the sample with one pulse at 1064/266/355 nm and probe some time later in the mid IR (2900--800 cm{sup {minus}1}). In the case of photochemical reaction, they excite the sample directly in the UV. Alternatively, they initiate thermal reactions by pumping a heater dye at 1.064 {micro}m, which quickly converts the photon energy into heat. The potential of this technique to study reactions in the solid state was demonstrated for a photochemically induced (266 nm) reaction (Wolff rearrangement of a {alpha}-diazo-ketone to {alpha}-keto-ketene) in a polymer matrix. Thermal initiation resulted in a similar reaction. The position, amplitude and width of the product bands changed, they believe due to additional side reactions and temperature effects.

  18. Picosecond dynamics of reactions in the liquid phase: studies of iodine photodissociation and development of new laser techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, M.A.

    1985-09-01

    Iodine photodissociation and recombination was studied as a model for processes common to chemical reaction in the liquid phase. Picosecond transient absorption measurements from 1000 to 295 nm were used to monitor the dynamics in a variety of solvents. Most of the atoms which undergo geminate recombination were found to do so in less than or equal to 15 ps, in agreement with the results of existing molecular dynamics simulations. Vibrational relaxation times vary from approx.15 ps near the middle of the ground state well to approx.150 ps for complete relaxation to v = 0. The prediction of strong resonant vibrational energy transfer to chlorinated methane solvents was not supported, but some evidence for this mechanism was found for alkane solvents. Current theory is unable to explain the large variation (65 to 2700 ps) of the excited A'-state lifetime in various solvents. The 10-Hz amplified, synchronously-pumped dye laser which was used in these studies is described and characterized. SERS (Stimulated Electronic Raman Scattering) and difference frequency mixing were used in the generation of the infrared and far-infrared, respectively. 54 refs., 38 figs., 3 tabs. (WRF)

  19. Picosecond Laser Studies of Third-Order Nonlinear Optical Properties in Organic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiaofan

    This dissertation makes the following theoretical and experimental contributions to the understanding of organic nonlinear optical materials in general, and of the nonlinear optical properties of polyquinoxaline (PQL) ladder polymers and metal-phthalocyanines doped in polycarbonate thin films in particular. (1) We developed a new model of the third-order nonlinear polarization density which has both "fast" (compared to 10psec, such as from electronic or lattice excitations) nonlinearity and "slow" (acoustic and thermal) components. This model enables a more accurate analysis than was possible previously of the different nonlinear optical processes seen in the picosecond laser studies of nonlinear optical properties of organic materials than was possible previously. (2) We interpreted our own picosecond four wave mixing measurements in ten polymers (in the PQL family) in terms of the new model parameters. (3) We have performed picosecond four-wave mixing measurement at 1064, (580-640), and 532 nm in Cr-phthalocyanine doped polycarbonate thin films. Our study supports the excitonic picture proposed by Ho et al.^{104 } (4) We observed for the first time a two -photon absorption state in Cr-Phthalocyanine near 0.5 eV. The two photon absorption coefficients which we determined by three independent methods agree well. (5) We showed that measuring the decay of ultrasonic waves induced by picosecond pulses is a superior way to measure acoustic velocity, acoustic damping, acousto-optic coupling constants, and thermal conductivity of materials. With this we studied the anomalous frequency dependence of sound damping in glasses and polymers. We propose a model for the diffusion of lattice "voids" in amorphous materials that accounts for some aspects of the anomalous ultrasonic sound damping. (6) We measured third harmonic generation in several PQL polymers and in a Cr-phthalocyanine doped polymer. Differences in four-wave mixing measurement were compared for five metal

  20. Electrolytes Ageing in Lithium-ion Batteries: A Mechanistic Study from Picosecond to Long Timescales.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Daniel; Jiménez Gordon, Isabel; Baltaze, Jean-Pierre; Hernandez-Alba, Oscar; Legand, Solène; Dauvois, Vincent; Si Larbi, Gregory; Schmidhammer, Uli; Marignier, Jean-Louis; Martin, Jean-Frédéric; Belloni, Jacqueline; Mostafavi, Mehran; Le Caër, Sophie

    2015-11-01

    The ageing phenomena occurring in various diethyl carbonate/LiPF6 solutions are studied using gamma and pulse radiolysis as a tool to generate similar species as the ones occurring in electrolysis of Li-ion batteries (LIBs). According to picosecond pulse radiolysis experiments, the reaction of the electron with (Li(+), PF6(-)) is ultrafast, leading to the formation of fluoride anions that can then precipitate into LiF(s). Moreover, direct radiation-matter interaction with the salt produces reactive fluorine atoms forming HF(g) and C2H5F(g). The strong Lewis acid PF5 is also formed. This species then forms various R(1)R(2)R(3) P=O molecules, where R is mainly -F, -OH, and -OC2H5. Substitution reactions take place and oligomers are slowly formed. Similar results were obtained in the ageing of an electrochemical cell filled with the same model solution. This study demonstrates that radiolysis enables a description of the reactivity in LIBs from the picosecond timescale until a few days. PMID:26212854

  1. Picosecond nonlinear optical studies of gold nanoparticles synthesised using coriander leaves (Coriandrum sativum)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal Rao, S.

    2011-07-01

    The results are presented from the experimental picosecond nonlinear optical (NLO) studies of gold nanoparticles synthesised using coriander leaf (Coriandrum sativum) extract. Nanoparticles with an average size of ∼30 nm (distribution of 5-70 nm) were synthesised according to the procedure reported by Narayanan et al. [Mater. Lett. 2008, 62, 4588-4591]. NLO studies were carried out using the Z-scan technique using 2 ps pulses near 800 nm. Open-aperture data suggested saturation absorption as the nonlinear absorption mechanism, whereas closed-aperture data suggested a positive nonlinearity. The magnitude of third-order nonlinearity was estimated to be (3.3 ± 0.6) × 10-13 esu. A solvent contribution to the nonlinearity was also identified and estimated. A comparison is attempted with some recently reported NLO studies of similar gold nanostructures.

  2. Study of self-focusing and self-phase-modulation in the picosecond-time regime.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reintjes, J.; Carman, R. L.; Shimizu, F.

    1973-01-01

    Study of the propagation of a single picosecond pulse of a mode-locked Nd-glass laser in CS2 nitrobenzene and toluene by observations of the birefringence and spectral changes in self-focused laser light. Multiple second-harmonic probing beams are used for birefringence measurements in a single IR pulse in various portions of the active cell. The orientational Kerr effect is found to be the prime factor of induced birefringence in nitrobenzene and toluene. The results for CS2 are also consistent with this mechanism and show that the duration of an IR pulse in the focal volume is less than that of the incident pulse. The properties of beams which are focused within the cell by an external lens are also investigated.

  3. A theoretical study of the stress relaxation in HMX on the picosecond time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The stress relaxation model of β-HMX on the picosecond time scale is studied by a theoretical approach. The relaxation of normal stress is contributed by lattice vibration, and the relaxation of shear stress is contributed by molecular rotation. Based on this model, the energy dissipation rule of the elastic wave and the profile of the shock wave are investigated. We find at low frequency the dissipation rate of the elastic wave is proportional to the power function of frequency, and under high speed shock loading the width of the stress relaxation zone is less than 0.3 μm there is a pressure peak with a height of 14 GPa near the wave front.

  4. Mid-infrared picosecond pump-dump-probe and pump-repump-probe experiments to resolve a ground-state intermediate in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    PubMed

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Clark, Ian P; Towrie, Michael; van Thor, Jasper J

    2009-12-24

    Multipulse picosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy has been used to study photochemical reactions of the cyanobacterial phytochrome photoreceptor Cph1. Different photophysical schemes have been discussed in the literature to describe the pathways after photoexcitation, particularly, to identify reaction phases that are linked to photoisomerisation and electronic decay in the 1566-1772 cm(-1) region that probes C=C and C=O stretching modes of the tetrapyrrole chromophore. Here, multipulse spectroscopy is employed, where, compared to conventional visible pump-mid-infrared probe spectroscopy, an additional visible pulse is incorporated that interacts with populations that are evolving on the excited- and ground-state potential energy surfaces. The time delays between the pump and the dump pulse are chosen such that the dump pulse interacts with different phases in the reaction process. The pump and dump pulses are at the same wavelength, 640 nm, and are resonant with the Pr ground state as well as with the excited state and intermediates. Because the dump pulse additionally pumps the remaining, partially recovered, and partially oriented ground-state population, theory is developed for estimating the fraction of excited-state molecules. The calculations take into account the model-dependent ground-state recovery fraction, the angular dependence of the population transfer resulting from the finite bleach that occurs with linearly polarized intense femtosecond optical excitation, and the partially oriented population for the dump field. Distinct differences between the results from the experiments that use a 1 or a 14 ps dump time favor a branching evolution from S1 to an excited state or reconfigured chromophore and to a newly identified ground-state intermediate (GSI). Optical dumping at 1 ps shows the instantaneous induced absorption of a delocalized C=C stretching mode at 1608 cm(-1), where the increased cross section is associated with the electronic ground

  5. Infrared detection with high-[Tc] bolometers and response of Nb tunnel junctions to picosecond voltage pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Verghese, S.

    1993-05-01

    Oxide superconductors with high critical temperature [Tc] make sensitive thermometers for several types of infrared bolometers. The authors built composite bolometers with YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus][delta

  6. Single water solvation dynamics in the 4-aminobenzonitrile-water cluster cation revealed by picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Nakamura, Takashi; Wohlgemuth, Matthias; Mitrić, Roland; Dopfer, Otto; Fujii, Masaaki

    2015-11-28

    The dynamics of a solvent is important for many chemical and biological processes. Here, the migration dynamics of a single water molecule is triggered by the photoionization of the 4-aminobenzonitrile-water (4ABN-W) cluster and monitored in real time by picosecond time-resolved IR (ps TRIR) spectroscopy. In the neutral cluster, water is hydrogen-bonded to the CN group. When this CN-bound cluster is selectively ionized with an excess energy of 1238 cm(-1), water migrates with a lifetime of τ = 17 ps from the CN to the NH2 group, forming a more stable 4ABN(+)-W(NH) isomer with a yield of unity. By decreasing the ionization excess energy, the yield of the CN → NH2 reaction is reduced. The relatively slow migration in comparison to the ionization-induced solvent dynamics in the related acetanilide-water cluster cation (τ = 5 ps) is discussed in terms of the internal excess energy after photoionization and the shape of the potential energy surface. PMID:26490096

  7. Optical tomography of human skin with subcellular spatial and picosecond time resolution using intense near infrared femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Wollina, Uwe; Riemann, Iris; Peukert, Christiane; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen; Konrad, Helga; Fischer, Peter; Fuenfstueck, Veronika; Fischer, Tobias W.; Elsner, Peter

    2002-06-01

    We describe the novel high resolution imaging tool DermaInspect 100 for non-invasive diagnosis of dermatological disorders based on multiphoton autofluorescence imaging (MAI)and second harmonic generation. Femtosecond laser pulses in the spectral range of 750 nm to 850 nm have been used to image in vitro and in vivo human skin with subcellular spatial and picosecond temporal resolution. The non-linear induced autofluorescence originates mainly from naturally endogenous fluorophores/protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, keratin, collagen, elastin, porphyrins and melanin. Second harmonic generation was observed in the stratum corneum and in the dermis. The system with a wavelength-tunable compact 80 MHz Ti:sapphire laser, a scan module with galvo scan mirrors, piezoelectric objective positioner, fast photon detector and time-resolved single photon counting unit was used to perform optical sectioning and 3D autofluorescence lifetime imaging (t-mapping). In addition, a modified femtosecond laser scanning microscope was involved in autofluorescence measurements. Tissues of patients with psoriasis, nevi, dermatitis, basalioma and melanoma have been investigated. Individual cells and skin structures could be clearly visualized. Intracellular components and connective tissue structures could be further characterized by tuning the excitation wavelength in the range of 750 nm to 850 nm and by calculation of mean fluorescence lifetimes per pixel and of particular regions of interest. The novel non-invasive imaging system provides 4D (x,y,z,t) optical biopsies with subcellular resolution and offers the possibility to introduce a further optical diagnostic method in dermatology.

  8. Photooxidation and photoaquation of iron hexacyanide in aqueous solution: A picosecond X-ray absorption study.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, M; Penfold, T J; Lima, F A; Rittmann, J; Rittmann-Frank, M H; Abela, R; Tavernelli, I; Rothlisberger, U; Milne, C J; Chergui, M

    2014-03-01

    We present a picosecond Fe K-edge absorption study of photoexcited ferrous and ferric hexacyanide in water under 355 and 266 nm excitation. Following 355 nm excitation, the transient spectra for the ferrous and ferric complexes exhibit a red shift of the edge reflecting an increased electron density at the Fe atom. For the former, an enhanced pre-edge transition is also observed. These observations are attributed to the aquated [Fe(CN)5OH2](3-) species, based on quantum chemical calculations which also provide structural parameters. Upon 266 nm excitation of the ferric complex, a transient reminiscent of the aquated species is observed (appearance of a pre-edge feature and red shift of the edge) but it is different from that obtained under 355 nm excitation. This points to a new reaction channel occurring through an intermediate state lying between these two excitation energies. Finally, 266 nm excitation of the ferrous species is dominated by the photooxidation channel with formation of the ferric complex as main photoproduct. However, we observe an additional minor photoproduct, which is identical to the 266 nm generated photoproduct of the ferric species, suggesting that under our experimental conditions, the pump pulse photooxidises the ferrous complex and re-excites the primary ferric photoproduct. PMID:26798775

  9. [Study of cancer cells fluorescence lifetime based on picosecond time resolution].

    PubMed

    Chen, Bi-Fang; Liu, Tian-Fu

    2006-08-01

    The object of the present study was the ultrafast photodynamic processes of hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) for diagnosis and therapy of cancer. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of cancerous and normal cells were measured using an ultrashort pulse laser spectral technique and picosecond time-correlated single-photon counting system. The fast part of cancerous and normal cells fluorescence decay was approximately 150 and 300 ps, the fluorescence peak intensity of cancerous and normal cells decayed about 10% and 55% in 12 hour, the lifetime of cancerous and normal cells was about 824 and 1 798 ps by calculating date of fluorescence decay, and HPD stay time was about 17 and 6 days in the cancerous and normal cells sample respectively. The data show that cancerous cells were greatly intimate with HPD. The results obtained can be used as an important basis for the diagnosis of cancer based on ultrashort pulse laser spectral technique. The results will contribute to feebleness ultrafast fluorescence of biology sample for real time measurement. PMID:17058959

  10. Picosecond kinetic absorption and fluorescence studies of bovine rhodopsin with a fixed 11-ene.

    PubMed Central

    Buchert, J; Stefancic, V; Doukas, A G; Alfano, R R; Callender, R H; Pande, J; Akita, H; Balogh-Nair, V; Nakanishi, K

    1983-01-01

    A synthetic retinal having a fixed 11-cis geometry has been used to prepare a nonbleachable analogue of bovine rhodopsin. Marked differences in the picosecond absorption and fluorescence behavior of this analogue at room temperature, compared with that of natural rhodopsin, were observed. This not only indicates that the 11-cis to trans isomerization of the retinal moiety is the crucial primary event in the photolysis of rhodopsin, but also it establishes that this isomerization must occur on the picosecond time scale or faster. PMID:6626668

  11. Fluorescence and picosecond laser photolysis studies on the deactivation processes of excited hydrogen bonding systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Noriaka; Okada, Tadashi; Mataga, Noboru

    1980-01-01

    The fluorescence quenching reaction of 2-naphthylamine and 1-pyrenol due to hydrogen bonding interaction with pyndine has been investigated Absorption spectra due to the state formed by charge transfer from excited naphthylamine to hydrogen bonded pyridine have been observed by means of picosecond laser photolysis.

  12. Study on third-order nonlinear optical properties of 4-methylsulfanyl chalcone derivatives using picosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    D'silva, E.D.; Podagatlapalli, G. Krishna; Venugopal Rao, S.; Dharmaprakash, S.M.

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Photograph and schematic representation of Z-scan experimental setup used to investigate third order nonlinear properties of the chalcone materials. Highlights: ► Br and NO{sub 2} substituted chalcone derivatives were exposed to picosecond laser pulses. ► Third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties were investigated. ► Compounds show promising third-order and optical limiting properties. ► These materials found suitable for electrical and optical applications. -- Abstract: In this paper we present results from the experimental study of third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of three molecules of Br and NO{sub 2} substituted chalcone derivatives namely (2E)-1-(4-bromophenyl)-3-[4(methylsulfanyl)phenyl]prop-2-en-1-one (4Br4MSP), (2E)-1-(3-bromophenyl)-3-[4-(methylsulfanyl) phenyl]prop-2-en-1-one (3Br4MSP) and (2E)-3[4(methylsulfanyl) phenyl]-1-(4-nitrophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (4N4MSP). The NLO properties have been investigated by Z-scan technique using 2 ps laser pulses at 800 nm. The nonlinear refractive indices, nonlinear absorption coefficient, and the magnitude of third-order susceptibility have been determined. The values obtained are of the order of 10{sup −7} cm{sup 2}/GW, 10{sup −3} cm/GW and 10{sup −14} esu respectively. The molecular second hyperpolarizability for the chalcone derivatives is of the order of 10{sup −32} esu. The coupling factor, excited state cross section, ground state cross section etc. were determined. The optical limiting (OL) property was studied. The results suggest that the nonlinear properties investigated for present chalcones are comparable with some of the reported chalcone derivatives and can be desirable for NLO applications.

  13. Infrared detection with high-{Tc} bolometers and response of Nb tunnel junctions to picosecond voltage pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Verghese, S.

    1993-05-01

    Oxide superconductors with high critical temperature {Tc} make sensitive thermometers for several types of infrared bolometers. The authors built composite bolometers with YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} thermometers on sapphire substrates which have higher sensitivity than competing thermal detectors which operate at temperatures above 77 K. A 1 x 1 mm bolometer with gold black serving as the radiation absorber has useful sensitivity for wavelengths 20--100 {mu}m. A 3 x 3 mm bolometer with a bismuth film as the absorber operates from 20--100 {mu}m. High-{Tc} bolometers which are fabricated with micromachining techniques on membranes of Si or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} have potential application to large-format arrays which are used for infrared imaging. A nonisothermal high-{Tc} bolometer can be fabricated on a membrane of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) which is in thermal contact with the heat sink along the perimeter of the membrane. A thermal analysis indicates that the YSZ membrane bolometer can have improved sensitivity compared to the sapphire bolometer for spectrometer applications. The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) junction is highly nonlinear in the applied voltage. The authors have made the first measurement of the linear response of the quasiparticle current in a Nb/AlO{sub x}/Nb junction over a broad bandwidth from 75--200 GHz. Nonlinear measurements made with these pulses may provide information about the quasiparticle lifetime. Preliminary data from such measurements are presented.

  14. High power mid-infrared supercontinuum generation in a single-mode ZBLAN fiber pumped by amplified picosecond pulses at 2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Liu, Jiang; Shi, Hongxing; Tan, Fangzhou; Jiang, Yijian; Wang, Pu

    2015-03-01

    We report high power all fiber mid-infrared (mid-IR) supercontinuum (SC) generation in a single-mode ZBLAN (ZrF4- BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF) fiber with up to 21.8 W average output power from 1.9 to beyond 3.8 μm pumped by amplified picosecond pulses from a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) based on small-core single-mode thulium-doped fiber (TDF) with injected seed pulse width of 24 ps and repetition of 93.6 MHz at 1963 nm. The optical-optical conversion efficiency from the 793 nm pump laser of the last stage thulium-doped fiber amplifier (TDFA) to mid-IR SC output is 17%. It is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest average power mid-IR SC generation in a ZBLAN fiber to date. In addition, a noise-like fiber oscillator based on a nonlinear loop mirror (NOLM) with wavepacket width of ~1.4 ns and repetition rate of 3.36 MHz at 1966 nm is also used as a seed of the MOPA for mid-IR SC generation in the ZBLAN fiber. At last, a mid-IR SC from 1.9 to beyond 3.6 μm with average output power of 14.3W, which is limited by injected noise-like pulses power, is generated. The optical-optical conversion efficiency from the 793 nm pump laser of the last stage TDFA to mid-IR SC output is 14.9%. This proves the amplified noise-like pulses are also appropriate for high power mid-IR SC generation in the ZBLAN fiber.

  15. Photoionization-induced π↔ H site switching dynamics in phenol(+)-Rg (Rg = Ar, Kr) dimers probed by picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Sakata, Yuri; Schütz, Markus; Dopfer, Otto; Fujii, Masaaki

    2016-09-21

    The ionization-induced π↔ H site switching reaction in phenol(+)-Rg (PhOH(+)-Rg) dimers with Rg = Ar and Kr is traced in real time by picosecond time-resolved infrared (ps-TRIR) spectroscopy. The ps-TRIR spectra show the prompt appearance of the non-vanishing free OH stretching band upon resonant photoionization of the π-bound neutral clusters, and the delayed appearance of the hydrogen-bonded (H-bonded) OH stretching band. This result directly proves that the Rg ligand switches from the π-bound site on the aromatic ring to the H-bonded site at the OH group by ionization. The subsequent H →π back reaction converges the dimer to a π↔ H equilibrium. This result is in sharp contrast to the single-step π→ H forward reaction in the PhOH(+)-Ar2 trimer with 100% yield. The reaction mechanism and yield strongly depend on intracluster vibrational energy redistribution. A classical rate equation analysis for the time evolutions of the band intensities of the two vibrations results in similar estimates for the time constants of the π→ H forward reaction of τ+ = 122 and 73 ps and the H →π back reaction of τ- = 155 and 188 ps for PhOH(+)-Ar and PhOH(+)-Kr, respectively. The one order of magnitude slower time constant in comparison to the PhOH(+)-Ar2 trimer (τ+ = 7 ps) is attributed to the decrease in density of states due to the absence of the second Ar in the dimer. The similar time constants for both PhOH(+)-Rg dimers are well rationalized by a classical interpretation based on the comparable potential energy surfaces, reaction pathways, and density of states arising from their similar intermolecular vibrational frequencies. PMID:27550720

  16. Homogenization of tissues via picosecond-infrared laser (PIRL) ablation: Giving a closer view on the in-vivo composition of protein species as compared to mechanical homogenization

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowski, M.; Wurlitzer, M.; Krutilin, A.; Kiani, P.; Nimer, R.; Omidi, M.; Mannaa, A.; Bussmann, T.; Bartkowiak, K.; Kruber, S.; Uschold, S.; Steffen, P.; Lübberstedt, J.; Küpker, N.; Petersen, H.; Knecht, R.; Hansen, N.O.; Zarrine-Afsar, A.; Robertson, W.D.; Miller, R.J.D.; Schlüter, H.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications and proteolytic processing regulate almost all physiological processes. Dysregulation can potentially result in pathologic protein species causing diseases. Thus, tissue species proteomes of diseased individuals provide diagnostic information. Since the composition of tissue proteomes can rapidly change during tissue homogenization by the action of enzymes released from their compartments, disease specific protein species patterns can vanish. Recently, we described a novel, ultrafast and soft method for cold vaporization of tissue via desorption by impulsive vibrational excitation (DIVE) using a picosecond-infrared-laser (PIRL). Given that DIVE extraction may provide improved access to the original composition of protein species in tissues, we compared the proteome composition of tissue protein homogenates after DIVE homogenization with conventional homogenizations. A higher number of intact protein species was observed in DIVE homogenates. Due to the ultrafast transfer of proteins from tissues via gas phase into frozen condensates of the aerosols, intact protein species were exposed to a lesser extent to enzymatic degradation reactions compared with conventional protein extraction. In addition, total yield of the number of proteins is higher in DIVE homogenates, because they are very homogenous and contain almost no insoluble particles, allowing direct analysis with subsequent analytical methods without the necessity of centrifugation. Biological significance Enzymatic protein modifications during tissue homogenization are responsible for changes of the in-vivo protein species composition. Cold vaporization of tissues by PIRL-DIVE is comparable with taking a snapshot at the time of the laser irradiation of the dynamic changes that occur continuously under in-vivo conditions. At that time point all biomolecules are transferred into an aerosol, which is immediately frozen. PMID:26778141

  17. Infrared sky noise study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The hardware and techniques to measure and compare sky noise at several sites were studied, and a device was developed that would maximize its output and minimize its output for modulation. The instrument and its functions are described. The nature of sky emissions and the fluctuation, gaseous sources of sky noise, and aerosol sources are discussed. It is concluded that sky noise really exists, and the spatial distribution of the sky noise sources are such that observed noise values are linear functions of chopping stroke.

  18. Picosecond lasers: the next generation of short-pulsed lasers.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Joshua R; Kaufman, Joely; Metelitsa, Andrea I; Green, Jeremy B

    2014-12-01

    Selective photothermolysis, first discussed in the context of targeted microsurgery in 1983, proposed that the optimal parameters for specific thermal damage rely critically on the duration over which energy is delivered to the tissue. At that time, nonspecific thermal damage had been an intrinsic limitation of all commercially available lasers, despite efforts to mitigate this by a variety of compensatory cooling mechanisms. Fifteen years later, experimental picosecond lasers were first reported in the dermatological literature to demonstrate greater efficacy over their nanosecond predecessors in the context of targeted destruction of tattoo ink. Within the last 4 years, more than a decade after those experiments, the first commercially available cutaneous picosecond laser unit became available (Cynosure, Westford, Massachusetts), and several pilot studies have demonstrated its utility in tattoo removal. An experimental picosecond infrared laser has also recently demonstrated a nonthermal tissue ablative capability in soft tissue, bone, and dentin. In this article, we review the published data pertaining to dermatology on picosecond lasers from their initial reports to the present as well as discuss forthcoming technology. PMID:25830248

  19. Picosecond and nanosecond studies of the photoreduction of benzophenone by N,N-diethylaniline and triethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Devadoss, C.; Fessenden, R.W. )

    1991-09-19

    The photoreduction of benzophenone by N,N-diethylaniline and triethylamine has been examined in a number of solvents by both nano- and picosecond laser photolysis. With diethylaniline, electron transfer is the primary step and the spectrum of the ion pair has been detected even in nonpolar solvents such as benzene and cyclohexane. Rapid proton transfer then takes place to form a high yield of the ketyl radical. The lifetime of the ion pair in benzene is about 900 ps. In acetonitrile, the ion pair dissociated into individual ions which then decay by back electron transfer and proton transfer. A spectral shift to the red occurs over 100 ps as the contact ion pair dissociated. In acidic alcohols such as methanol and trifluoroethanol, proton transfer from the alcohol occurs to produce the ketyl radical. In the case of triethylamine, no distinct absorption band for benzophenone anion was seen in picosecond experiments but difference spectra, which removed much of the spectrum of benzophenone triplet, clearly showed some contribution from the anion. For this compound, it is likely that electron transfer occurs first followed by very fast proton transfer.

  20. Picosecond vibrational cooling in mixed molecular crystals studied with a new coherent raman scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ta-Chau; Dlott, Dana D.

    1988-05-01

    We demonstrate the pump-induced coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) technique by measuring vibrational cooling in low temperature crystals of pentacene in naphthalene following excitation of a vibration 747 cm -1 above the S 1 origin. Using picosecond photon echoes and a two-color pump-probe technique, we find that the initial state decays in 33 ps, and reappears at the origin 25 ps later. We show that pump-induced CSRS simultaneously measures the decay from the initial state and reappearance at the origin. This technique has many of the advantages of conventional coherent Raman (e.g. intense coherent signals), but is a direct measure of the population dynamics in the initial and final states.

  1. Picosecond ultrasonic study of surface acoustic waves on titanium nitride nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornsson, M. M.; Connolly, A. B.; Mahat, S.; Rachmilowitz, B. E.; Daly, B. C.; Antonelli, G. A.; Myers, A.; Singh, K. J.; Yoo, H. J.; King, S. W.

    2015-03-07

    We have measured surface acoustic waves on nanostructured TiN wires overlaid on multiple thin films on a silicon substrate using the ultrafast pump-probe technique known as picosecond ultrasonics. We find a prominent oscillation in the range of 11–54 GHz for samples with varying pitch ranging from 420 nm down to 168 nm. We find that the observed oscillation increases monotonically in frequency with decrease in pitch, but that the increase is not linear. By comparing our data to two-dimensional mechanical simulations of the nanostructures, we find that the type of surface oscillation to which we are sensitive changes depending on the pitch of the sample. Surface waves on substrates that are loaded by thin films can take multiple forms, including Rayleigh-like waves, Sezawa waves, and radiative (leaky) surface waves. We describe evidence for detection of modes that display characteristics of these three surface wave types.

  2. UV photolysis of nitromethane studied by sub-picosecond time-resolved CARS experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rajchenbach, C.; Jonusauskas, G.; Rulliere, C.

    1996-04-01

    Using sub-picosecond CARS experiment we observed direct photolysis of liquid nitromethane after pulse excitation at 299 nm. We measured the dynamics behavior under excitation of three main ground state Raman lines: the {nu} (CN) mode at 917 cm{sup -1}, the {nu}s(NO2) and {delta}s(CH3) modes near 1400 cm{sup -1} and the {nu}s(CH3) mode at 2968 cm{sup -1}. From the evolution of these modes we deduced that the excited state disappears with a lifetime of 1.1{+-}0.3 ps and we measured a photolysis quantum yield at 299 nm of 24%{+-}5%. Important and fast non-radiative desexcitation channel from excited to ground states has been observed.

  3. Picosecond Chemical and Biological Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rentzepis, P. M.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a currently used picosecond spectroscopy system capable of reliably recording picosecond events. Two areas of picosecond research are discussed: one concerns the interaction of electrons in fluids; the second, the primary events in vision. (Author/HM)

  4. Picosecond study of energy transfer between rhodamine 6G and 3,3'-diethylthiacarbocyanine iodide in the premicellar region: förster mechanism with increased local concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroyasu; Kusumoto, Yoshihumi; Nakashima, Nobuaki; Yoshihara, Keitaro

    1980-04-01

    The mechanism of enhancement in the energy transfer between rhodamine 6G and 3,3'-diethylthiacarbocyanine iodide by sodium lauryl sulfate in the premicellar region was studied by a picosecond laser technique. The Forster mechanism with an increased local concentration suggesting dye-rich induced micelle formation was concluded from the shape of the decay curve.

  5. An investigation into the photochemistry of, and the electrochemically induced CO-loss from, [(CO)5MC(OMe)Me](M = Cr or W) using low-temperature matrix isolation, picosecond infrared spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Suzanne; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Buma, Wybren J; Halpin, Yvonne; Long, Conor; Rooney, A Denise; Woutersen, Sander; Pryce, Mary T

    2015-09-21

    The photophysics and photochemistry of [(CO)5MC(OMe)Me] (M = Cr or W) were investigated using picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy (M = Cr or W), low-temperature matrix isolation techniques (M = Cr), and time-dependent density functional calculations (M = Cr or W). These studies provide unambiguous evidence for the photochemical formation of a long-lived, 18-electron metallaketene species capable of acting as a synthetically useful intermediate. For the Cr complex, an intermediate metallacyclopropanone singlet excited state was detected on the reaction path to the metallaketene species. This metallacyclopropanone excited state species has a lifetime of less than 100 ps and a characteristic bridging carbonyl band at 1770 cm(-1). The tungsten ketene species was also detected but in contrast to the chromium system, this forms directly from a low-lying triplet excited state. The electrochemical release of CO showed a greater efficiency for the chromium complex when compared to the tungsten. PMID:26089130

  6. Transient picosecond studies of singlet fission in PDTP-DFBT low band gap polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Uyen; Vardeny, Valy; Li, Gang; Yang, Yang

    2014-03-01

    We measured picoseconds transient mid-IR photoinduced absorption (PA) spectra in PDTP-DFBT low band-gap polymer. With 800 nm pumping the PA spectrum at t =0 in pristine film and isolated polymer chain in polystyrene shows two prominent PA bands: PA1 at 0.4eV and Pa2 at 0.8eV. PA1 is assigned to absorption from singlet excitons (transition from 1Bu to mAg) , whereas PA2 is due to a state of triplet-pair, which is formed via singlet fission in the sub-ps time domain. We found that PA2 lifetime strongly depends on the excitation intensity, showing non linear recombination process in both pristine film and in polystyrene. We also found that the triplet-pair recombines with no trace of fusion back to the singlet exciton; we thus conclude that singlet fission is an exothermic process in this polymer. We therefore do not find any magnetic field effect on the transient dynamics of the triplet-pair within our experimental sensitivity (0.2%). Supported by DOE and NSF-MRSEC.

  7. Picosecond spectroscopic studies of energy transfer in phycobiliproteins and model dye systems

    SciTech Connect

    Switalski, S.C.

    1987-02-01

    Energy transfer was investigated in the ..cap alpha beta.. monomer and separated ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of C-phycocyanin from Anabaena variabilis and Anacystis nidulans, using steady-state and picosecond spectroscopy. Fluorescence excitation polarization spectra were consistent with a sensitizing (s) - fluorescing (f) model using a Forster energy transfer mechanism. The rise in polarization across the absorption band towards longer wavelength for the ..beta.. subunit and the ..cap alpha beta.. monomer was attributed to energy transfer among the three chromophores in the ..cap alpha beta.. monomer and between the 2 chromophores in the ..beta.. subunit. The constant polarization of the ..cap alpha.. subunit, with one chromophore, is consistent with a lack of any possibility of energy transfer. Fluorescence emission maxima were at 640 nm for the ..cap alpha beta.. monomer and the separated subunits of Anabaena variabilis, and 645 nm for the ..beta.. subunit, 640 nm for the ..cap alpha.. subunit, and 644 nm for ..cap alpha beta.. monomer of Anacystis nidulans. We have shown that the labels s and f are not consistent with all the steady-state spectroscopic results. 171 refs., 32 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. Picosecond optoelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Ever since the invention of picosecond lasers, scientists and electronic engineers have been dreaming of inventing electronic devices that can record in real time the physical and electronic events that take place on picosecond time scales. With the exception of the expensive streak camera, this dream has been largely unfullfilled. Today, a real-time oscilloscope with picosecond time resolution is still not available. To fill the need for even better time resolution, researchers have turned to optical pulses and thus a hybrid technology has emerged-picosecond optoelectronics. This technology, based on bulk photoconductors, has had a slow start. However, because of the simplicity, scaleability, and jitterfree nature of the devices, the technology has recently experienced a rapid growth. This volume reviews the major developments in the field of picosecond optoelectronics over the past decade.

  9. The interplay of protein and solvent picosecond dynamics: Experimental and theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunfen

    Terahertz gap is located between microwaves and infrared. THz-TDS is based on the generation of subpicosecond terahertz pulses using ultrashort laser pulses with pulse durations of a few femtoseconds. From the spectroscopic point of view terahertz radiation excites the low frequency vibrations of molecules. Terahertz spectroscopy provides a new way to study protein dynamics in this critical frequency range. The strong temperature dependence of molecular flexibility near 200 K for proteins and polynucleotides hydrated above 30% by weight, dynamical transition, is one of the most significant phenomena of biomolecular dynamics. Measurements of the dynamical transition were performed for native, fully denatured and unstructured polypeptides using THz-TDS. The results reveal that the dynamical transition is independent of either tertiary or secondary structure. The transition are also found for shorter chain alanine peptides down to penta-alanine, which indicates that a quantitative predictive theory for the temperature dependence lies in the understanding of the interaction of the side chains of the poly peptide or poly nucleotide with the biological water. The far infrared vibrational modes can be calculated using harmonic or anharmonic normal mode analysis, and the resulting Density of States (DOS) strongly resembles the measured absorbance. A large contrast in the terahertz dielectric response between oxidized and reduced cytochrome c has lready been observed experimentally. This large contrast has been associated with a change in the collective structural motions that related to protein flexibility. Molecular simulation results from quasiharmonic analysis and dipole-dipole correlation analysis are compared with the measurements to determine the relative contribution of correlated motions and diffusive motions to the measured dielectric response. The measured hydration dependence is reproduced by hydration dependence of quasiharmonic normal modes, but these modes

  10. Infrared-infrared double resonance study of methyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, R. R. J.; Mukhopadhyay, I.; Lees, R. M.

    1992-09-01

    In this work we carried out an infrared-infrared (IR-IR) double resonance (DR) study of methyl alcohol using a CO 2 laser and a lead salt diode laser, in order to confirm previously proposed far-infrared (FIR) laser assignments for the 9P(34) and 9P(16) CO 2 laser lines. For the 9P(34) CO 2 laser line it is confirmed that the pump radiation excites the torsionally excited Q(125, 9) transition of methyl alcohol in agreement with the assignments proposed earlier. From the study it was noticed that due to the pump radiation, transitions which are not connected by dipole selection rules either to the lower or upper pumped level were also affected. Thus it appears that four-level IR-IR DR experiments are unlikely to provide useful information for transition assignments. The diode laser study was coupled with a recent spectroscopic study using a high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer to detect and identify hot band and perturbation allowed transitions in CH 3OH.

  11. PLEIADES: a picosecond Compton scattering x-ray source for advanced backlighting and time-resolved material studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P; Betts, S M; Booth, R; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Hartemann, F V; Kuba, J; Le Sage, G P; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T; Rosenzweig, J B

    2003-10-20

    The PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser-Electron Inter-Action for the Dynamical Evaluation of Structures) facility has produced first light at 70 keV. This milestone offers a new opportunity to develop laser-driven, compact, tunable x-ray sources for critical applications such as diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility and time-resolved material studies. The electron beam was focused to 50 {micro}m rms, at 57 MeV, with 260 C of charge, a relative energy spread of 0.2%, and a normalized emittance of 5 mm mrad horizontally and 13 mm mrad vertically. The scattered 820-nm laser pulse had an energy of 180 mJ and a duration of 54 fs. Initial x-rays were captured with a cooled charge-coupled device using a Cesium Iodide scintillator; the peak photon energy was approximately 78 keV, with a total x-ray flux of 1.3 x 10{sup 6} photons/shot, and the observed angular distribution found to agree very well with three-dimensional codes. Simple K-edge radiography of a tantalum foil showed good agreement with the theoretical divergence-angle dependence of the x-ray energy. Optimization of the x-ray dose is currently underway, with the goal of reaching 10{sup 8} photons per shot and a peak brightness approaching 10{sup 20} photons/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/s/0.1%bandwidth.

  12. Charge recombination reactions in photoexcited C[sub 60]-amine complexes studied by picosecond pump probe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, H.N.; Pal, H.; Sapre, A.V.; Mittal, J.P. )

    1993-12-15

    Photoexcitation of complexes between fullerence C[sub 60] and organic amines in benzene solutions is known to result in charge separation (CS) and subsequent charge recombination (CR) reactions, which lead to varying yields of fullerence triplet formation. Picosecond flash photolysis studies are carried out on C[sub 60]-diphenylamine (DPA), C[sub 60]-triethylamine (TEA), C[sub 60]-diazabicyclooctane (DABCO), and C[sub 60]-triphenylamine (TPA) systems to find out mechanistic details of the triplet formation on CR by inducing heavy atom and polarity effects by using suitable solvents. It is found that in the case of C[sub 60]-DPA, C[sub 60]-TEA, and C[sub 60]-DABCO systems proton transfer from the amine cation to the C[sub 60] anion in the ion pair state dominates, leading to poor triplet yields, which improve in heavy atom containing solvents. In TPA, proton transfer is not possible and hence fullerene triplet yields are high. Increase of solvent polarity for this system results in decreased C[sub 60] triplet yields with a consequent increase in the ion dissociation yield. A suitable reaction scheme is proposed to explain the results obtained. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Laser-driven phase transitions in aqueous colloidal gold nanoparticles under high pressure: picosecond pump-probe study.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shuichi; Katayama, Tetsuro; Setoura, Kenji; Strasser, Michael; Uwada, Takayuki; Miyasaka, Hiroshi

    2016-02-14

    Pump-probe transient extinction spectroscopy was used to analyze 355 nm picosecond laser heating-induced phenomena in 60 nm-diameter aqueous gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) under a high pressure of 60 MPa. Kinetic spectroscopy revealed that a supercritical layer surrounding the AuNP nucleated with a lifetime of approximately 1 ns during its dynamic expansion and decay for a fluence of 19.6 mJ cm(-2). Moreover, in the post-mortem transmission electron micrographs we observed a number of fragments, a small percentage of size-reduced cores, and erupted particles among the intact particles after 60 shots, suggesting that evaporation occurred under laser illumination. The particle temperature calculation indicated that evaporation begins with a liquid droplet AuNP surrounded by a supercritical layer at temperatures below the boiling point of gold. By applying high pressure, we obtained a clear picture of the evaporation event, which was not possible at ambient pressure because bubble formation caused particle temperatures to rise uncontrollably. In this study, we shed light on the critical role of the supercritical layer formed around the AuNP under high pressure during laser-induced evaporation. PMID:26812175

  14. Broadly tunable picosecond ir source

    DOEpatents

    Campillo, A.J.; Hyer, R.C.; Shapiro, S.L.

    1980-04-23

    A picosecond traveling-wave parametric device capable of controlled spectral bandwidth and wavelength in the infrared is reported. Intense 1.064 ..mu..m picosecond pulses (1) pass through a 4.5 cm long LiNbO/sub 3/ optical parametric oscillator crystal (2) set at its degeneracy angle. A broad band emerges, and a simple grating (3) and mirror (4) arrangement is used to inject a selected narrow-band into a 2 cm long LiNbO/sub 3/ optical parametric amplifier crystal (5) along a second pump line. Typical input energies at 1.064 ..mu..m along both pump lines are 6 to 8 mJ for the oscillator and 10 mJ for the amplifier. This yields 1 mJ of tunable output in the range 1.98 to 2.38 ..mu..m which when down-converted in a 1 cm long CdSe crystal mixer (6) gives 2 ..mu..J of tunable radiation over the 14.8 to 18.5 ..mu..m region. The bandwidth and wavelength of both the 2 and 16 ..mu..m radiation output are controlled solely by the diffraction grating.

  15. Broadly tunable picosecond IR source

    DOEpatents

    Campillo, Anthony J.; Hyer, Ronald C.; Shapiro, Stanley J.

    1982-01-01

    A picosecond traveling-wave parametric device capable of controlled spectral bandwidth and wavelength in the infrared is reported. Intense 1.064 .mu.m picosecond pulses (1) pass through a 4.5 cm long LiNbO.sub.3 optical parametric oscillator crystal (2) set at its degeneracy angle. A broad band emerges, and a simple grating (3) and mirror (4) arrangement is used to inject a selected narrow-band into a 2 cm long LiNbO.sub.3 optical parametric amplifier crystal (5) along a second pump line. Typical input energies at 1.064 .mu.m along both pump lines are 6-8 mJ for the oscillator and 10 mJ for the amplifier. This yields 1 mJ of tunable output in the range 1.98 to 2.38 .mu.m which when down-converted in a 1 cm long CdSe crystal mixer (6) gives 2 .mu.J of tunable radiation over the 14.8 to 18.5 .mu.m region. The bandwidth and wavelength of both the 2 and 16 .mu.m radiation output are controlled solely by the diffraction grating.

  16. Electron thermalization and trapping rates in pure and doped alkali and alkaline-earth iodide crystals studied by picosecond optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucer, K. B.; Bizarri, G.; Burger, A.; Gektin, A.; Trefilova, L.; Williams, R. T.

    2014-04-01

    Although light continues to be emitted from insulating crystals used as scintillators over a period of nanoseconds to microseconds after stopping of an energetic particle, much of what determines the nonlinearity of response goes on in the first picoseconds. On this time scale, free carriers and excitons are at high density near the track core and thus are subject to nonlinear quenching. The hot (free) electrons eventually cool to low enough energy that trapping on holes, dopants, or defects can commence. In the track environment, spatial distributions of trapped carriers determined on the picosecond time scale can influence the proportionality between light yield and the initial particle energy throughout the whole light pulse. Picosecond spectroscopy of optical absorption induced by a short pulse of above-gap excitation provides a useful window on what occurs during the crucial early evolution of excited populations. The laser excitation can be tuned to excite carriers that are initially very hot (˜3 eV) relative to the band edges, or that are almost thermalized (˜0.1 eV excess energy) at the outset. Undoped and doped samples of NaI:Tl(0%, 0.1%), CsI:Tl(0%, 0.01%, 0.04%, 0.3%), and SrI2:Eu(0%, 0.2%, 0.5%, 3%) are studied in this work.

  17. Picosecond Imaging Circuit Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kash, Jeffrey A.

    1998-03-01

    With ever-increasing complexity, probing the internal operation of a silicon IC becomes more challenging. Present methods of internal probing are becoming obsolete. We have discovered that a very weak picosecond pulse of light is emitted by each FET in a CMOS circuit whenever the circuit changes logic state. This pulsed emission can be simultaneously imaged and time resolved, using a technique we have named Picosecond Imaging Circuit Analysis (PICA). With a suitable imaging detector, PICA allows time resolved measurement on thousands of devices simultaneously. Computer videos made from measurements on real IC's will be shown. These videos, along with a more quantitative evaluation of the light emission, permit the complete operation of an IC to be measured in a non-invasive way with picosecond time resolution.

  18. A high accuracy femto-/picosecond laser damage test facility dedicated to the study of optical thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mangote, B.; Gallais, L.; Zerrad, M.; Lemarchand, F.; Gao, L. H.; Commandre, M.; Lequime, M.

    2012-01-15

    A laser damage test facility delivering pulses from 100 fs to 3 ps and designed to operate at 1030 nm is presented. The different details of its implementation and performances are given. The originality of this system relies the online damage detection system based on Nomarski microscopy and the use of a non-conventional energy detection method based on the utilization of a cooled CCD that offers the possibility to obtain the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) with high accuracy. Applications of this instrument to study thin films under laser irradiation are presented. Particularly the deterministic behavior of the sub-picosecond damage is investigated in the case of fused silica and oxide films. It is demonstrated that the transition of 0-1 damage probability is very sharp and the LIDT is perfectly deterministic at few hundreds of femtoseconds. The damage process in dielectric materials being the results of electronic processes, specific information such as the material bandgap is needed for the interpretation of results and applications of scaling laws. A review of the different approaches for the estimation of the absorption gap of optical dielectric coatings is conducted and the results given by the different methods are compared and discussed. The LIDT and gap of several oxide materials are then measured with the presented instrument: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, HfO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and ZrO{sub 2}. The obtained relation between the LIDT and gap at 1030 nm confirms the linear evolution of the threshold with the bandgap that exists at 800 nm, and our work expands the number of tested materials.

  19. CO photodissociation dynamics in cytochrome P450BM3 studied by subpicosecond visible and mid-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rupenyan, Alisa; Commandeur, Jan; Groot, Marie Louise

    2009-07-01

    Cytochrome P450BM3 is a bacterial enzyme with a heme cofactor that binds small diatomic ligands. Here we report the first study of carbon monoxide (CO) photodissociation and rebinding in ferrous P450BM3 on an ultrafast time scale. We monitored dissociation of carbon monoxide upon Soret band excitation using visible and infrared femtosecond spectroscopy between 100 fs and 4 ns. The dynamics of the ferric P450 was probed for reference in the visible spectral region. In the photodissociated ferrous P450-CO complex, the vibrational hot deligated ground state is populated in 0.2 ps and relaxes on a picosecond time scale. The onset of geminate recombination of CO with the heme is observed on a nanosecond time scale. In the mid-infrared spectral region, the bleached absorption due to the bound C=O stretch vibration is constant on the picosecond to 1 ns time scale, indicating that the photodissociation yield is 100% and that rebinding occurs after 1 ns. In the infrared absorption difference spectra, we additionally resolve two small bands of dissociated CO molecules at 2092 and 2114 cm(-1). This indicates that the escape of photolyzed CO to solvent and the geminate recombination are preceded by transient docking within the protein in a manner similar to that of globins. The bands partially decay with a time constant of 1 ps, possibly due to a relaxation of the protein around the CO docking site, allowing for greater orientational freedom of the CO molecules. PMID:19492790

  20. Experimental study of the excitation of rhodium isomer in a plasma produced by a picosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Afonin, V. I.; Kakshin, A. G.; Mazunin, A. V.

    2010-03-15

    Estimates and first experimental results on the excitation of a long-lived isomer state (E{sub m} = 39.756 keV, J{sup p} = 9/2{sup -}, and T{sub 1/2} = 56.114 min) of Rh{sup 103} nuclei under the action of X radiation in a hot solid-state-density rhodium plasma produced by a picosecond laser pulse in the SOKOL-P laser facility are presented.

  1. Picosecond beam monitor

    DOEpatents

    Schutt, D.W.; Beck, G.O.

    1974-01-01

    The current in the beam of a particle accelerator is monitored with picosecond resolution by causing the beam to impinge upon the center conductor of a coaxial line, generating a pulse of electromagnetic energy in response thereto. This pulse is detected by means such as a sampling oscilloscope. (Official Gazette)

  2. Studies on linear, nonlinear optical and excited state dynamics of silicon nanoparticles prepared by picosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Syed; Krishna Podagatlapalli, G.; Mounika, R.; Nageswara Rao, S. V. S.; Pathak, A. P.; Venugopal Rao, S.

    2015-12-01

    We report results from our studies on the fabrication and characterization of silicon (Si) nanoparticles (NPs) and nanostructures (NSs) achieved through the ablation of Si target in four different liquids using ˜2 picosecond (ps) pulses. The consequence of using different liquid media on the ablation of Si target was investigated by studying the surface morphology along with material composition of Si based NPs. The recorded mean sizes of these NPs were ˜9.5 nm, ˜37 nm, ˜45 nm and ˜42 nm obtained in acetone, water, dichloromethane (DCM) and chloroform, respectively. The generated NPs were characterized by selected area electron diffraction (SAED), high resolution transmission microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopic techniques and Photoluminescence (PL) studies. SAED, HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy data confirmed that the material composition was Si NPs in acetone, Si/SiO2 NPs in water, Si-C NPs in DCM and Si-C NPs in chloroform and all of them were confirmed to be polycrystalline in nature. Surface morphological information of the fabricated Si substrates was obtained using the field emission scanning electron microscopic (FESEM) technique. FESEM data revealed the formation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) for the case of ablation in acetone and water while random NSs were observed for the case of ablation in DCM and chloroform. Femtosecond (fs) nonlinear optical properties and excited state dynamics of these colloidal Si NPs were investigated using the Z-scan and pump-probe techniques with ˜150 fs (100 MHz) and ˜70 fs (1 kHz) laser pulses, respectively. The fs pump-probe data obtained at 600 nm consisted of single and double exponential decays which were tentatively assigned to electron-electron collisional relaxation (<1 ps) and non-radiative transitions (>1 ps). Large third order optical nonlinearities (˜10-14 e.s.u.) for these colloids have been estimated from Z-scan data at an excitation wavelength of 680 nm suggesting that the

  3. Studies on linear, nonlinear optical and excited state dynamics of silicon nanoparticles prepared by picosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamad, Syed; Nageswara Rao, S. V. S.; Pathak, A. P.; Krishna Podagatlapalli, G.; Mounika, R.; Venugopal Rao, S. E-mail: soma-venu@uohyd.ac.in

    2015-12-15

    We report results from our studies on the fabrication and characterization of silicon (Si) nanoparticles (NPs) and nanostructures (NSs) achieved through the ablation of Si target in four different liquids using ∼2 picosecond (ps) pulses. The consequence of using different liquid media on the ablation of Si target was investigated by studying the surface morphology along with material composition of Si based NPs. The recorded mean sizes of these NPs were ∼9.5 nm, ∼37 nm, ∼45 nm and ∼42 nm obtained in acetone, water, dichloromethane (DCM) and chloroform, respectively. The generated NPs were characterized by selected area electron diffraction (SAED), high resolution transmission microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopic techniques and Photoluminescence (PL) studies. SAED, HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy data confirmed that the material composition was Si NPs in acetone, Si/SiO{sub 2} NPs in water, Si-C NPs in DCM and Si-C NPs in chloroform and all of them were confirmed to be polycrystalline in nature. Surface morphological information of the fabricated Si substrates was obtained using the field emission scanning electron microscopic (FESEM) technique. FESEM data revealed the formation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) for the case of ablation in acetone and water while random NSs were observed for the case of ablation in DCM and chloroform. Femtosecond (fs) nonlinear optical properties and excited state dynamics of these colloidal Si NPs were investigated using the Z-scan and pump-probe techniques with ∼150 fs (100 MHz) and ∼70 fs (1 kHz) laser pulses, respectively. The fs pump-probe data obtained at 600 nm consisted of single and double exponential decays which were tentatively assigned to electron-electron collisional relaxation (<1 ps) and non-radiative transitions (>1 ps). Large third order optical nonlinearities (∼10{sup −14} e.s.u.) for these colloids have been estimated from Z-scan data at an excitation wavelength of 680 nm

  4. Picosecond diffuse reflectance and transmission laser flash photolysis study of various triaryl-2-pyrazolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, G. P.; Leicester, P. A.; Wilkinson, F.; Worrall, D. R.; Ferreira, L. F. Vieira; Chittock, R.; Toner, W.

    In this study the first ever reported application of diffuse reflectance laser flash photolysis for the observation of sub-nanosecond transient absorption decays is presented. The compounds studied are various triaryl-2-pyrazolines, both as microcrytals and contained within polycarbonate films. The microcrystalline samples were studied using pump—probe laser flash photolysis in diffuse reflectance mode and the observed transient absorption decay could be fitted using a biexponential model with, in the case of 1, 5-diphenyl-3-styryl-2-pyrazoline, lifetimes of 1.6 × 10 -10 and 1.3 × 10 -9s for the first and second decay components, respectively. This model could also be used to fit the decay kinetics obtained from transmission pump—probe laser flash photolysis experiments conducted upon polycarbonate films containing this same compound, the lifetimes in this instance being 5.5 × 10 -12 and 1.7 × 10 -10s for the first and second decay components, respectively. In addition, a study of the quenching of the pyrazoline excited states in a polycarbonate matrix by disulphone magenta was undertaken. In this case it was necessary to modify the second term of the biexponential model with a term to allow for Förster type long range energy transfer, the Förster critical transfer distance being determined as 25 Å. This biexponential model is rationalized as initial excitation being to the S2 state, the first decay component being relaxation to the S1 state and the second component decay of the S1 state to the ground state, by radiative and non-radiative relaxation and, when DSM is present, long range energy transfer to this energy acceptor.

  5. Development and study of picosecond start and trigger detector for high-energy heavy ion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurevich, V. I.

    2015-07-01

    Two modular Cherenkov detectors based on MCP-PMTs XP85012 are developed for study Au+Au collisions in future experiments with beams of Nuclotron and collider NICA at JINR, Dubna. The detector arrays register high-energy photons and relativistic charged particles with aim of fast triggering the collisions and generation of start signal with time resolution better then 50 ps for TOF detector. The MC simulation showed the trigger efficiency of 100% for impact parameter range b<10 fm. The best time resolution for single detector channel σt≈21 ps was obtained with DRS4 digitizer in TOF measurements with a deuteron beam.

  6. INFRARED STUDIES OF EPSILON AURIGAE IN ECLIPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Stencel, Robert E.; Kloppenborg, Brian K.; Wall, Randall E.; Hopkins, Jeffrey L.; Howell, Steve B.; Hoard, D. W.; Rayner, John; Bus, Schelte; Tokunaga, Alan; Sitko, Michael L.; Bradford, Suellen; Russell, Ray W.; Lynch, David K.; Hammel, Heidi; Whitney, Barbara; Orton, Glenn; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma; Hora, Joseph L.; Hinz, Philip; Hoffmann, William; and others

    2011-11-15

    We report here on a series of medium resolution spectro-photometric observations of the enigmatic long period eclipsing binary epsilon Aurigae, during its eclipse interval of 2009-2011, using near-infrared spectra obtained with SpeX on the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), mid-infrared spectra obtained with BASS on AOES and IRTF, MIRSI on IRTF, and MIRAC4 on the MMT, along with mid-infrared photometry using MIRSI on IRTF and MIRAC4 on the MMT, plus 1995-2000 timeframe published photometry and data obtained with Denver's TNTCAM2 at WIRO. The goals of these observations included: (1) comparing eclipse depths with prior eclipse data, (2) confirming the re-appearance of CO absorption bands at and after mid-eclipse, associated with sublimation in the disk, (3) seeking evidence for any mid-infrared solid state spectral features from particles in the disk, and (4) providing evidence that the externally irradiated disk has azimuthal temperature differences. IR eclipse depths appear similar to those observed during the most recent (1983) eclipse, although evidence for post-mid-eclipse disk temperature increase is present, due to F star heated portions of the disk coming into view. Molecular CO absorption returned 57 days after nominal mid-eclipse, but was not detected at mid-eclipse plus 34 days, narrowing the association with differentially heated sub-regions in the disk. Transient He I 10830A absorption was detected at mid-eclipse, persisting for at least 90 days thereafter, providing a diagnostic for the hot central region. The lack of solid-state features in Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph, BASS, and MIRAC spectra to date suggests the dominance of large particles (micron-sized) in the disk. Based on these observations, mid-infrared studies out of eclipse can directly monitor and map the disk thermal changes, and better constrain disk opacity and thermal conductivity.

  7. Ab Initio Study of Hot Carriers in the First Picosecond after Sunlight Absorption in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, Marco; Vigil-Fowler, Derek; Lischner, Johannes; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Louie, Steven G.

    2014-06-01

    Hot carrier thermalization is a major source of efficiency loss in solar cells. Because of the subpicosecond time scale and complex physics involved, a microscopic characterization of hot carriers is challenging even for the simplest materials. We develop and apply an ab initio approach based on density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory to investigate hot carriers in semiconductors. Our calculations include electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions, and require no experimental input other than the structure of the material. We apply our approach to study the relaxation time and mean free path of hot carriers in Si, and map the band and k dependence of these quantities. We demonstrate that a hot carrier distribution characteristic of Si under solar illumination thermalizes within 350 fs, in excellent agreement with pump-probe experiments. Our work sheds light on the subpicosecond time scale after sunlight absorption in Si, and constitutes a first step towards ab initio quantification of hot carrier dynamics in materials.

  8. Study of surface relief gratings on azo organometallic films in picosecond regime.

    PubMed

    Luc, J; Bouchouit, K; Czaplicki, R; Fillaut, J-L; Sahraoui, B

    2008-09-29

    Materials for optical data storage and optical information processing must exhibit good holographic properties. Many materials for these applications have been already proposed. Here we describe a grating inscription process characterized by short inscription time and long-time stability. A series of ruthenium-acetylide organometallic complexes containing an azobenzene fragment were synthesized. Photo-induced gratings were produced by short pulse (16 ps, 532 nm) laser irradiation. The surface relief gratings formed at the same time were observed by atomic force microscope. In this work, we highlight the short inscription times brought into play as well as the good temporal stability of these gratings stored at room temperature. We study the influence of the polarization states and the light intensity of writing beams on the dynamics of the surface relief gratings formation and we compare these results with those of a known representative of azobenzene derivative (Disperse Red 1). Lastly, we show that it is possible to write two-dimensional surface relief gratings. PMID:18825202

  9. Ultrafast protein dynamics of hemoglobin as studied by picosecond time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Yasuhisa; Nagai, Masako

    2012-03-01

    Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy on human adult hemoglobin (HbA) following ligand photolysis revealed that the frequency of the iron-histidine stretching [ν(Fe-His)] mode exhibited a 2-cm-1 downshift with a time constant of about 300 ps, suggesting a structural change in the heme pocket following the ligand photolysis. Low-frequency heme modes suggested that the primary metastable form of HbA has a more disordered orientation of propionates and a less strained environment than the deoxy form. The latter fact is consistent with the experimental observation that the ν(Fe-His) frequency of the metastable form is higher than the deoxy form. The present study shows that HbA adopts a metastable structure within the instrument response time and remains little changed in the subnanosecond to nanosecond time regime. Characteristics of the primary protein response of HbA based on the comparison of the results of HbA with those of the isolated chains and myoglobin are discussed.

  10. Mariner Jupiter/Saturn infrared instrument study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Mariner Jupiter/Saturn infrared instrumentation conceptual design study was conducted to determine the physical and operational characteristics of the instruments needed to satisfy the experiment science requirements. The design of the instruments is based on using as many proven concepts as possible. Many design features are taken from current developments such as the Mariner, Pioneer 10, Viking Orbiter radiometers, and Nimbus D spectrometer. Calibration techniques and error analysis for the instrument system are discussed.

  11. Picosecond Spin Caloritronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, David G.

    The coupling of spin and heat, i.e., spin caloritronics, gives rise to new physical phenomena in nanoscale spin devices and new ways to manipulate local magnetization. Our work in this field takes advantage of recent advances in the measurement and understanding of heat transport at the nanoscale using ultrafast lasers. We use a picosecond duration pump laser pulses as a source of heat and picosecond duration probe laser pulses to detect changes in temperature, spin accumulation, and spin transfer torque using a combination of time-domain thermoreflectance and time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect Our pump-probe optical methods enable us to change the temperature of ferromagnetic layers on a picosecond time-scale and generate enormous heat fluxes on the order of 100 GW m-2 that persist for ~ 30 ps. Thermally-driven ultrafast demagnetization of a perpendicular ferromagnet leads to spin accumulation in a normal metal and spin transfer torque in an in-plane ferromagnet. The data are well described by models of spin generation and transport based on differences and gradients of thermodynamic parameters. The spin-dependent Seebeck effect of a perpendicular ferromagnetic layer converts a heat current into spin current, which in turn can be used to exert a spin transfer torque (STT) on a second ferromagnetic layer with in-plane magnetization. Using a [Co,Ni] multilayer as the source of spin, an energy fluence of ~ 4 J m-2 creates thermal STT sufficient to induce ~ 1 % tilting of the magnetization of a 2 nm-thick CoFeB layer.

  12. The first terawatt picosecond CO{sub 2} laser for advanced accelerator studies at the Brookhaven ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Skaritka, J.

    1996-10-01

    The first terawatt picosecond C0{sub 2} laser system is under development at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility. Presently operational 1 Joule 100-ps ATF laser will be upgraded with a 10 atm amplifier capable of delivery {approximately} 15 Joules of laser energy in a 3 ps pulse. We describe the design of the x-ray preionized 10 atm amplifier of a 10 liter active volume energized by a 1 MV, 200 kA transverse electric discharge. The amplifier, equipped with internal optics, permits the accommodation of a regenerative stage and a multi-pass booster in a relatively compact single discharge volume. The ATF terawatt C0{sub 2} laser shall become operational in 1997 to serve for laser acceleration, x-ray generation and other strong-field physics experiments.

  13. [Study on photographing experiment of infrared detector].

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Jiang; Zhang, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Infrared detectors are widely used in multi spectral remote sensing systems, and in order to verify photographing principles of infrared time delay integration (TDI) detector, and make preparations for future research, a verification system for infrared TDI camera is proposed in the present paper. Experimental methods are explained thoroughly and two major factors which affect image quality are analyzed. First, the causes of image motion and their effects on the quality of image are studied, and a novel architecture using high precision DC-speed machine is presented, then the relationship between velocity of precision turntable and detectors line transfer frequency is determined by Kalman algorithm. Second, four focusing means are analyzed and compared, and video signal amplitude method is selected according to practical application. Finally, a genuine demo system is established in national supervision and test center for optics mechanics quality. 5.3, 6.4 and 9.2 mm drones are chosen for testing. Experimental results indicate that the obtained drone is vivid, and camera's resolution achieves 11.3 lines per mm, which satisfies preliminary aims. PMID:21428103

  14. Functionalization of manganite nanoparticles and their interaction with biologically relevant small ligands: Picosecond time-resolved FRET studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Anupam; Makhal, Abhinandan; Ghosh, Barnali; Raychaudhuri, A. K.; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2010-12-01

    We report molecular functionalization of the promising manganite nanoparticles La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) for their solubilization in aqueous environments. The functionalization of individual NPs with the biocompatible citrate ligand, as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, reveals that citrates are covalently attached to the surface of the NPs. UV-VIS spectroscopic studies on the citrate functionalized NPs reveals an optical band in the visible region. Uniform size selectivity (2.6 nm) of the functionalization process is confirmed from high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). In the present study we have used the optical band of the functionalized NPs to monitor their interaction with other biologically important ligands. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) of a covalently attached probe4-nitrophenylanthranilate (NPA) with the capped NPs confirm the attachment of the NPA ligands to the surface functional group (-OH) of the citrate ligand. The FRET of a DNA base mimic, 2-aminopurine (2AP), with the NPs confirms the surface adsorption of 2AP. Our study may find relevance in the study of the interaction of individual manganite NPs with drug/ligand molecules.We report molecular functionalization of the promising manganite nanoparticles La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) for their solubilization in aqueous environments. The functionalization of individual NPs with the biocompatible citrate ligand, as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, reveals that citrates are covalently attached to the surface of the NPs. UV-VIS spectroscopic studies on the citrate functionalized NPs reveals an optical band in the visible region. Uniform size selectivity (2.6 nm) of the functionalization process is confirmed from high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). In the present study we have used the optical band of the functionalized NPs to monitor their interaction with other biologically important ligands. F

  15. Picosecond x-ray science.

    SciTech Connect

    Landahl, E.; Reis, D.; Wang, J.; Young, L.

    2006-01-01

    The report discusses the exciting times for short pulse X-rays and the current users of the technology in the United States. Tracking nuclear motions with X-rays transcends scientific disciplines and includes Biology, Materials Science, Condensed Matter and Chemistry. 1 picosecond accesses many phenomena previously hidden at 100ps. Synchrotron advantage over laser plasma and LCLS is that it's easily tunable. There is a large and diverse user community of this technology that is growing rapidly. A working group is being formed to implement 'fast track' Phases 1 and 2 which includes tunable, polarized, monochromatic, focused X-rays; variable pulse length (1 to 100ps) and 1 kHz, 10{sup 9} X-rays/s with 1% bandwidth. ERL would be a major advance for ultrafast time-resolved studies.

  16. Infrared signature studies of aerospace vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahulikar, Shripad P.; Sonawane, Hemant R.; Arvind Rao, G.

    2007-10-01

    Infrared (IR) emissions from aircraft are used to detect, track, and lock-on to the target. MAN Portable Air Defence Systems (MANPADS) have emerged as a major cause of aircraft and helicopter loss. Therefore, IR signature studies are important to counter this threat for survivability enhancement, and are an important aspect of stealth technology. This paper reviews contemporary developments in this discipline, with particular emphasis on IR signature prediction from aerospace vehicles. The role of atmosphere in IR signature analysis, and relation between IR signature level and target susceptibility are illustrated. Also, IR signature suppression systems and countermeasure techniques are discussed, to highlight their effectiveness and implications in terms of penalties.

  17. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    underlying physics. There are now at least six different disciplines that deal with infrared radiation in one form or another, and in one or several different spectral portions of the whole IR range. These are spectroscopy, astronomy, thermal imaging, detector and source development and metrology, as well the field of optical data transmission. Scientists working in these fields range from chemists and astronomers through to physicists and even photographers. This issue presents examples from some of these fields. All the papers—though some of them deal with fundamental or applied research—include interesting elements that make them directly applicable to university-level teaching at the graduate or postgraduate level. Source (e.g. quantum cascade lasers) and detector development (e.g. multispectral sensors), as well as metrology issues and optical data transmission, are omitted since they belong to fundamental research journals. Using a more-or-less arbitrary order according to wavelength range, the issue starts with a paper on the physics of near-infrared photography using consumer product cameras in the spectral range from 800 nm to 1.1 µm [1]. It is followed by a series of three papers dealing with IR imaging in spectral ranges from 3 to 14 µm [2-4]. One of them deals with laboratory courses that may help to characterize the IR camera response [2], the second discusses potential applications for nondestructive testing techniques [3] and the third gives an example of how IR thermal imaging may be used to understand cloud cover of the Earth [4], which is the prerequisite for successful climate modelling. The next two papers cover the vast field of IR spectroscopy [5, 6]. The first of these deals with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the spectral range from 2.5 to 25 µm, studying e.g. ro-vibrational excitations in gases or optical phonon interactions within solids [5]. The second deals mostly with the spectroscopy of liquids such as biofuels and special

  18. Numerical study of the influence of picosecond laser spot size on ablated depth and threshold fluence of metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiming; Lauer, Benjamin; Neuenschwander, Beat; Romano, Valerio

    2016-03-01

    Picosecond laser systems have been widely used in industrial microprocessing applications since they are a cost-effective tool to achieve high throughput. To better understand the ablation process, firstly the dependence of the ablation depth and the threshold fluence on the laser spot size were determined experimentally by performing ablation with a 10ps pulsed laser system. Further, a 2D axisymmetric model was established to demonstrate the possible mechanism of the phenomena. Three sets of spot radii, namely 15.5μm, 31.5μm and 49.6μm, respectively with equal laser peak fluences ranging from 0.6J/cm2 to 4.5J/cm2 were applied on copper. It was found that the laser ablation depth increases while the threshold fluence decreases with decreasing spot size at identical peak fluence. A 2D axisymmetric thermomechanical model was developed to qualitatively illustrate the mechanism behind these phenomena. The numerical results of the position where the tensile stress exceed to ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of copper show the same trend as the experimental ones. The longitudinal tensile stress was seen to play a more crucial role than the radial tensile/compressive stress on laser ablation process. The impact of the thermal stress on the ablation depth and threshold fluence is derived from the lattice temperature gradient along the surface of the material, leading to spallation and possible modifications of the mechanical properties already at lower laser peak fluences. This is elucidated numerically and analytically. The deviation of the experimental results from the simulation might be attributed to the fact that this simulation model is static. Nevertheless, at low laser fluences, this static approach can provide good explanations of the cold ablation with ultrashort pulsed laser. The limitation of this model is also illustrated.

  19. New format presentation for infrared spectral emittance data. Infrared spectrometry studies, phase 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, R. J. P.; Green, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    Methods for infrared radiance measurements from geological materials were studied for airborne use over terrains with minimal vegetation. The tasks of the investigation were: (1) calculation of emittance ratios, (2) comparison of IR spectral emittance data with K-band scatterometer data over Pisgah Crater, and (3) standard infrared spectral file. Published papers reporting the research are included.

  20. Vibrational frequency fluctuation of ions in aqueous solutions studied by three-pulse infrared photon echo method.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kaoru; Tayama, Jumpei; Saito, Shinji; Tominaga, Keisuke

    2012-11-20

    In liquid water, hydrogen bonds form three-dimensional network structures, which have been modeled in various molecular dynamics simulations. Locally, the hydrogen bonds continuously form and break, and the network structure continuously fluctuates. In aqueous solutions, the water molecules perturb the solute molecules, resulting in fluctuations of the electronic and vibrational states. These thermal fluctuations are fundamental to understanding the activation processes in chemical reactions and the function of biopolymers. In this Account, we review studies of the vibrational frequency fluctuations of solute molecules in aqueous solutions using three-pulse infrared photon echo experiments. For comparison, we also briefly describe dynamic fluorescence Stokes shift experiments for investigating solvation dynamics in water. The Stokes shift technique gives a response function, which describes the energy relaxation in the nonequilibrium state and corresponds to the transition energy fluctuation of the electronic state at thermal equilibrium in linear response theorem. The dielectric response of water in the megahertz to terahertz frequency region is a key physical quantity for understanding both of these frequency fluctuations because of the influence of electrostatic interactions between the solute and solvent. We focus on the temperature dependence of the three experiments to discuss the molecular mechanisms of both the frequency fluctuations in aqueous solutions. We used a biexponential function with sub-picosecond and picosecond time constants to characterize the time-correlation functions of both the vibrational and electronic frequency fluctuations. We focus on the slower component, with time constants of 1-2 ps for both the frequency fluctuations at room temperature. However, the temperature dependence and isotope effect for the time constants differ for these two types of fluctuations. The dielectric interactions generally describe the solvation dynamics of

  1. Picosecond x-ray measurements from 100 eV to 30 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Attwood, D.T.; Kauffman, R.L.; Stradling, G.L.

    1980-10-15

    Picosecond x-ray measurements relevant to the Livermore Laser Fusion Program are reviewed. Resolved to 15 picoseconds, streak camera detection capabilities extend from 100 eV to higher than 30 keV, with synchronous capabilities in the visible, near infrared, and ultraviolet. Capabilities include automated data retrieval using charge coupled devices (CCD's), absolute x-ray intensity levels, novel cathodes, x-ray mirror/reflector combinations, and a variety of x-ray imaging devices.

  2. Infrared and Submilllimeter Studies of Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Tyler L.

    2014-07-01

    Dense Cores are the birthplace of stars, and so understanding their structure and evolution is key to understanding star formation. Information on the density, temperature, and motions within cores are needed to describe these properties, and are obtained through continuum and line observations at far infrared and submm/mm wavelengths. Recent observations of dust emission with Herschel and molecular line observations with single-dish telescopes and interferometers provide the wavelength coverage and resolution to finally map core properties without appealing to spherical simplifications. Although large scale Herschel observations reveal numerous filaments in molecular clouds which are well described by cylindrical geometries, cores are still modeled as spherical entities. A few examples of other core geometries exist in the literature, and the wealth of new data on cloud filaments demand that non-spherical models receive more attention in future studies. This talk will examine the evidence for non-spherical cores and their connection to the filaments from which they form.

  3. Picosecond photoconductivity of natural and CVD diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnov, Serge V.; Pimenov, Sergej M.; Ralchenko, Victor G.; Klimentov, Sergei M.; Konov, Vitali I.; Korotoushenko, K. G.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Plotnikova, S. P.; Sagatelyan, D. M.; Holly, Sandor

    1995-07-01

    Photoexcitation and recombination of nonequilibrium charge carriers in both natural gemstone diamonds and CVD (chemical vapor deposition) polycrystalline diamond films in UV spectrum regions have been investigated. Transient picosecond photoconductivity technique applied permitted to conduct measurements with the time resolution better than 200 picoseconds and to register a charge carrier concentration value as low as 1020 - 1013 cm-3. The dependencies of photocurrent amplitude as a function of incident laser radiation intensity in the range from 103 to 1010 W/cm2 have been obtained. Charge carrier lifetimes had been measured and charge carrier drift mobility were estimated. It is shown that the electronic properties of high quality thick CVD diamond films are comparable to those of the most perfect natural type IIa crystals. Investigation of Raman and luminescence spectra of diamonds have been performed along with scanning electron microscopy studies to characterize bulk and surface structure of tested specimens.

  4. Infrared Imaging System for Studying Brain Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Frederick; Mintz, Frederick; Gunapala, Sarath

    2007-01-01

    A proposed special-purpose infrared imaging system would be a compact, portable, less-expensive alternative to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) systems heretofore used to study brain function. Whereas a typical fMRI system fills a large room, and must be magnetically isolated, this system would fit into a bicycle helmet. The system would include an assembly that would be mounted inside the padding in a modified bicycle helmet or other suitable headgear. The assembly would include newly designed infrared photodetectors and data-acquisition circuits on integrated-circuit chips on low-thermal-conductivity supports in evacuated housings (see figure) arranged in multiple rows and columns that would define image coordinates. Each housing would be spring-loaded against the wearer s head. The chips would be cooled by a small Stirling Engine mounted contiguous to, but thermally isolated from, the portions of the assembly in thermal contact with the wearer s head. Flexible wires or cables for transmitting data from the aforementioned chips would be routed to an integrated, multichannel transmitter and thence through the top of the assembly to a patch antenna on the outside of the helmet. The multiple streams of data from the infrared-detector chips would be sent to a remote site, where they would be processed, by software, into a three-dimensional display of evoked potentials that would represent firing neuronal bundles and thereby indicate locations of neuronal activity associated with mental or physical activity. The 3D images will be analogous to current fMRI images. The data would also be made available, in real-time, for comparison with data in local or internationally accessible relational databases that already exist in universities and research centers. Hence, this system could be used in research on, and for the diagnosis of response from the wearer s brain to physiological, psychological, and environmental changes in real time. The images would also be

  5. Infrared laboratory studies of synthetic planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D.

    1973-01-01

    Previous research dealing with telluric gases is briefly reviewed. Current research concerning absorption-line broadening, and particulate constituents of planetary atmospheres are discussed. Two articles are included: optical constants of liquid ammonia in the infrared, and broadening of infrared absorption lines at reduced temperatures for nitrous oxide.

  6. Parametric instabilities in picosecond time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Baldis, H.A.; Rozmus, W.; Labaune, C.; Mounaix, Ph.; Pesme, D.; Baton, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    1993-03-01

    The coupling of intense laser light with plasmas is a rich field of plasma physics, with many applications. Among these are inertial confinement fusion (ICF), x-ray lasers, particle acceleration, and x-ray sources. Parametric instabilities have been studied for many years because of their importance to ICF; with laser pulses with duration of approximately a nanosecond, and laser intensities in the range 10{sup 14}--10{sup 15}W/cm{sup 2} these instabilities are of crucial concern because of a number of detrimental effects. Although the laser pulse duration of interest for these studies are relatively long, it has been evident in the past years that to reach an understanding of these instabilities requires their characterization and analysis in picosecond time scales. At the laser intensities of interest, the growth rate for stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is of the order of picoseconds, and of an order of magnitude shorter for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). In this paper the authors discuss SBS and SRS in the context of their evolution in picosecond time scales. They describe the fundamental concepts associated with their growth and saturation, and recent work on the nonlinear treatment required for the modeling of these instabilities at high laser intensities.

  7. Picosecond time-resolved emission studies. I. Real-time measurements of solvent-solute interactions. II. Kinetics of energy flow in a photosynthetic antenna system. [4-aminophthalimide

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.W.

    1985-11-01

    Using a picosecond fluorimeter, the dynamics of solvation of electronically excited 4-aminophthalimide in a variety of solvents is measured. The solvation process is manifested by a time-dependent red shift in the emission spectrum in certain solvents. This red shift is time-resolved using a streak camera system. The time constant of the relaxation is found to correlate strongly with the longitudinal dielectric relaxation rate of the solvent. The correlation holds for changes in solvent, for isotopic substitution of a solvent, and for changes in temperature. Never before have direct measurements of excited-state solvation dynamics been shown to correlate with dielectric relaxation over such a wide range of experimental conditions. Emission from certain photosynthetic antenna complexes, phycobilisomes, and from the building blocks of phycobilisomes, phycobiliproteins, has also been studied using the streak camera system. Both the rising and filling portions of the time-resolved emission profiles of the fluorescing chromophores in these structures are studied. The rates of energy transfer between structural domains of the antenna complex and within the isolated biliprotein complexes are deduced from these studies. Comparison of emission profiles from a series of structurally distinct phycobilisomes isolated from three related strains of cyanobacteria have provided new insights into the correlation of the energy transfer function and macromolecular structure in these light-harvesting antenna systems. 133 refs., 58 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. Ultraviolet and infrared correlation studies in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Lakshmi S.; Sujatha, N. V.; Narayanankutty, K.

    We have studied the variation of diffuse ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the northern part of the Orion constellation using a set of eight areas of the GALEX All-Sky Imaging Survey in the far and near UV. Different components of diffuse UV radiation, like dust scattered emission and H2 fluorescence, were quantified and separated after removing the point sources and the foreground emission in each of the fields. Then the dependence of the individual UV components on the infrared 100 μ m dust emission was studied. We did not find any positive correlation between the diffuse-UV and IR-100 micron intensities, probably due to the high optical depth of the region or the entire dust column not contributing to the diffuse UV radiation. However, in the far UV we noticed the presence of an excess emission in addition to the dust scattered radiation, which is clearly absent in the near UV. This excess emission, identified as the H2 fluorescence, is produced by the Trapezium stars in the surrounding molecular clouds. We also compare our results with those of previous studies in the region, based on Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations.

  9. Infrared Thermographic Study of Laser Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Mohler, Jonathan H.; Chow, Charles T. S.

    1986-07-01

    Pyrotechnic ignition has been studied in the past by making a limited number of discrete temperature-time observations during ignition. Present-day infrared scanning techniques make it possible to record thermal profiles, during ignition, with high spacial and temporal resolution. Data thus obtained can be used with existing theory to characterize pyrotechnic materials and to develop more precise kinetic models of the ignition process. Ignition has been studied theoretically and experimentally using various thermal methods. It has been shown that the whole process can, ideally, be divided into two stages. In the first stage, the sample pellet behaves like an inert body heated by an external heat source. The second stage is governed by the chemical reaction in the heated volume produced during the first stage. High speed thermographic recording of the temperature distribution in the test sample during laser ignition makes it possible to calculate the heat content at any instant. Thus, one can actually observe laser heating and the onset of self-sustained combustion in the pellet. The experimental apparatus used to make these observations is described. The temperature distributions recorded are shown to be in good agreement with those predicted by heat transfer theory. Heat content values calculated from the observed temperature distributions are used to calculate thermal and kinetic parameters for several samples. These values are found to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  10. [Infrared and Raman spectra study on Tianhuang].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun-gui; Chen, Tao

    2012-08-01

    The Tianhuang stones, from Shoushan in China, were studied by using X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy to obtain the spectra characterization. Wave numbers 3621, 3629 and 3631 cm(-1) in the IR spectra and 3626, 3627 and 3632 cm(-1) in the Raman spectra are the characteristic peaks of dickitic Tianhuang, nacritic Tianhuang and illitic Tianhuang, respectively. Raman spectra assigned to OH are in good agreement with the IR results at 3550 -3750 cm(-1). Dickitic Tianhuang includes ordered dickite and disordered dickite. Compared with ordered dickite, the band assigned to OH3 of disordered dickite shifts to low-frequency by 8 cm(-1) and the relative intensity becomes stronger. The disorder structure may relate to the high level of Fe. The IR absorption spectra of nacritic Tianhuang superimposes strong peaks of dickite, indicating that IR absorption bands of dickite are stronger than that of nacrite at 3550-3750 cm(-1). The main mineral composition of illitic Tianhuang is 2M(1), while illite Tianhuang contains a small amount of 1M. All these characters provide a theoretical basis for the scientific identification of Tianhuang. PMID:23156769

  11. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of turquoise minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čejka, Jiří; Sejkora, Jiří; Macek, Ivo; Malíková, Radana; Wang, Lina; Scholz, Ricardo; Xi, Yunfei; Frost, Ray L.

    2015-10-01

    Raman and infrared spectra of three well-defined turquoise samples, CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O, from Lavender Pit, Bisbee, Cochise county, Arizona; Kouroudaiko mine, Faleme river, Senegal and Lynch Station, Virginia were studied, interpreted and compared. Observed Raman and infrared bands were assigned to the stretching and bending vibrations of phosphate tetrahedra, water molecules and hydroxyl ions. Approximate O-H⋯O hydrogen bond lengths were inferred from the Raman and infrared spectra. No Raman and infrared bands attributable to the stretching and bending vibrations of (PO3OH)2- units were observed.

  12. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of turquoise minerals.

    PubMed

    Čejka, Jiří; Sejkora, Jiří; Macek, Ivo; Malíková, Radana; Wang, Lina; Scholz, Ricardo; Xi, Yunfei; Frost, Ray L

    2015-10-01

    Raman and infrared spectra of three well-defined turquoise samples, CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O, from Lavender Pit, Bisbee, Cochise county, Arizona; Kouroudaiko mine, Faleme river, Senegal and Lynch Station, Virginia were studied, interpreted and compared. Observed Raman and infrared bands were assigned to the stretching and bending vibrations of phosphate tetrahedra, water molecules and hydroxyl ions. Approximate O-H⋯O hydrogen bond lengths were inferred from the Raman and infrared spectra. No Raman and infrared bands attributable to the stretching and bending vibrations of (PO3OH)(2-) units were observed. PMID:25956330

  13. Optothermal response of plasmonic nanofocusing lens under picosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Z.; Chen, C.; Traverso, L.; Xu, X.; Pan, L.; Chao, I.-H.; Lavine, A. S.

    2014-03-01

    This work studied the optothermal response of plasmonic nanofocusing structures under picosecond pulsed laser irradiation. The surface plasmon polariton is simulated to calculate the optical energy dissipation as the Joule heating source and the thermal transport process is studied using a two temperature model (TTM). At the picosecond time scale that we are interested in, the Fourier heat equation is used to study the electron thermal transport and the hyperbolic heat equation is used to study the lattice thermal transport. For comparison, the single temperature model (STM) is also studied. The difference between TTM and STM indicates that TTM provides more accurate estimates in the picosecond time scale and the STM results are only reliable when the local electron and lattice temperature difference is negligible.

  14. Preparation of water soluble L-arginine capped CdSe/ZnS QDs and their interaction with synthetic DNA: Picosecond-resolved FRET study

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, Anupam; Goswami, Nirmal; Lemmens, Peter; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2012-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies on the interaction of water soluble arginine-capped CdSe/ZnS QDs with ethidium bromide (EB) labeled synthetic dodecamer DNA. Highlights: ► We have solubilized CdSe/ZnS QD in water replacing their TOPO ligand by L-arginine. ► We have studied arginine@QD–DNA interaction using FRET technique. ► Arginine@QDs act as energy donor and ethidium bromide-DNA acts as energy acceptor. ► We have applied a kinetic model to understand the kinetics of energy transfer. ► Circular dichroism studies revealed negligible perturbation in the DNA B-form in the arg@QD-DNA complex. -- Abstract: We have exchanged TOPO (trioctylphosphine oxide) ligand of CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) with an amino acid L-arginine (Arg) at the toluene/water interface and eventually rendered the QDs from toluene to aqueous phase. We have studied the interaction of the water soluble Arg-capped QDs (energy donor) with ethidium (EB) labeled synthetic dodecamer DNA (energy acceptor) using picoseconds resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. Furthermore, we have applied a model developed by M. Tachiya to understand the kinetics of energy transfer and the distribution of acceptor (EB-DNA) molecules around the donor QDs. Circular dichroism (CD) studies revealed a negligible perturbation in the native B-form structure of the DNA upon interaction with Arg-capped QDs. The melting and the rehybridization pathways of the DNA attached to the QDs have been monitored by the CD which reveals hydrogen bonding is the associative mechanism for interaction between Arg-capped QDs and DNA.

  15. REMOTE FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED AIR POLLUTION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A commercial Fourier transform infrared interferometer system has been installed in a van and used to make longpath absorption and single-ended emission measurements of gaseous pollutant concentrations at a variety of pollutant sources. The interferometer system is described and ...

  16. Ultrasensitive coherent Raman technique with picosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, M.W.; Pellin, M.J.; Biwer, B.M.; Gruen, D.M.

    1987-02-16

    The use of picosecond, Q-switched lasers and advanced polarization schemes has led to the development of a coherent Raman technique with the sensitivity of coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy experiments but without the troublesome phase-matching requirements. Experiments in dilute solutions of benzene indicate a limit of sensitivity for the current apparatus of 2.5 x 10/sup -4/ M in two minutes of signal averaging over 150 cm/sup -1/. Possible applications to the in situ study of passive films and thin films on transparent media are discussed.

  17. Infrared spectroscopy study of irradiated PVDF

    SciTech Connect

    Chappa, Veronica; Grosso, Mariela del; Garcia Bermudez, Gerardo; Behar, Moni

    2007-10-26

    The effects induced by 1 MeV/amu ion irradiations were compared to those induced by 4-12 MeV/amu irradiations. Structural analysis with infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was carried out on PVDF irradiated using C and He beams with different fluences. From these spectra it was observed, as a function of fluence, an overall destruction of the polymer, amorphization of the crystalline regions and the creation of in-chain unsaturations. The track dimensions were determined using a previously developed Monte Carlo simulation code and these results were compared to a semiempirical model.

  18. Molecular collision processes in the presence of picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. W.; George, T. F.

    1979-01-01

    Radiative transitions in molecular collision processes taking place in the presence of picosecond pulses are studied within a semiclassical formalism. An expression for adiabatic potential surfaces in the electronic-field representation is obtained, which directly leads to the evaluation of transition probabilities. Calculations with a Landau-Zener-type model indicate that picosecond pulses can be much more effective in inducing transitions than a single long pulse of the same intensity and the same total energy, if the intensity is sufficiently high that the perturbation treatment is not valid.

  19. Spectral coherence in all-normal dispersion supercontinuum in presence of Raman scattering and direct seeding from sub-picosecond pump.

    PubMed

    Klimczak, Mariusz; Soboń, Grzegorz; Abramski, Krzysztof; Buczyński, Ryszard

    2014-12-29

    Intensity stability and wavelength correlations of near-infrared supercontinuum generation are studied in all-normal flattened dispersion, all-solid soft glass photonic crystal fiber. We use dispersive Fourier transformation method to measure shot-to-shot resolved spectra under pumping from a sub-picosecond, fiber-based chirped pulse amplification (CPA) system. For the first time to our knowledge, we demonstrate how unconverted radiation from pump, propagating in the photonic cladding of the fiber, improves the measured degree of coherence in the spectrum and influences its wavelength correlation by seeding of multiple four-wave-mixing / Raman scattering components. The presented results suggest a convenient and simple way of stabilizing of shot-to-shot coherence in sub-picosecond fiber laser pumped, normal-dispersion supercontinuum sources by direct, pump-related seeding. PMID:25607134

  20. Ultrafast energy transfer to liquid water by sub-picosecond high-intensity terahertz pulses: an ab initio molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pankaj Kr; Vendrell, Oriol; Santra, Robin

    2013-12-16

    Sub-picosecond heating of bulk water is accomplished by ultrashort and intense THz pulses which are able to transfer a large amount of energy to the liquid. The energy transferred corresponds to a temperature jump of about 600 K. Liquid water becomes a structureless and hot gas-like system still at the density of the liquid, in which the hydrogen-bonding structure has been washed out. PMID:24155137

  1. Infrared micro-spectroscopic studies of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Melissa; Mohlenhoff, Brian; Jennings, Michael; Diem, Max

    2009-01-01

    We report results from a study of human and canine mucosal cells, investigated by infrared micro-spectroscopy, and analyzed by methods of multivariate statistics. We demonstrate that the infrared spectra of individual cells are sensitive to the stage of maturation, and that a distinction between healthy and diseased cells will be possible. Since this report is written for an audience not familiar with infrared micro-spectroscopy, a short introduction into this field is presented along with a summary of principal component analysis. PMID:16797481

  2. Case study: using infrared technology for evidentiary purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Noel D.; Hansen, Joel; Miller, John Lester; Beniga, Rico; Austria, Rich

    2014-06-01

    Infrared technology and imaging systems are already used extensively by the law enforcement (LE) community, typically to gain a tactical advantage or obtain immediate situational awareness. As the use of infrared technology becomes more affordable and widespread, LE is finding new ways to use it and leverage the results in the courtroom as evidence. A case study will be presented where infrared imagery was used to support the Portland Police Bureau (PPB) in prosecuting an individual for a crime where a conviction might not have been assured without said imagery. Tests conducted at FLIR Systems, combined with expert witness testimony by a FLIR employee, helped a jury understand the significance of a key piece of infrared evidence, resulting in a conviction of the criminal. This case was the first Federal case of its kind where infrared imagery was used forensically as evidence and, as such, established precedence. Prior to this, infrared imagery has been offered and debated in court only as to whether it constitutes a legal search. Courtroom observations and lessons learned from this trial have shown that both industry and LE can do a better job of making the prosecution's cases stronger utilizing infrared technology and thus taking criminals off the street.

  3. An Infrared Study of the Juggler Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holbrook, J. C.; Temi, P.; Rank, D.; Bregman, J.

    1996-01-01

    This work is an examination of the infrared reflection nebula surrounding a protostellar source, IRS 1, in the CRL 2136 region at 2.2, 3.08, and 3.45 micron. The greatest absorption due to water ice occurs within 5 arcsec (10,000 AU, D = 2000 pc) of IRS 1. The water ice absorption decreases with increasing radius from IRS 1. This Tau(sub ice) structure suggests that the water ice is primarily associated with IRS 1. The flux from IRS 1 has a (2.2) - (3.45) color of 5, much redder than the nebula. The color structure combined with the Tau(sub ice) structure suggests the presence of an icy-dusty disk around IRS 1 orientated NE to SW. Radio CO maps presented by Kastner et al. reveal a molecular outflow orientated perpendicular to the disk. The south and east reflection lobes line the conical cavity created by the blueshifted molecular outflow.

  4. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of truffles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dezhang; Liu, Gang; Song, Dingshan; Liu, Jian-hong; Zhou, Yilan; Ou, Jiaming; Sun, Shizhong

    2006-01-01

    Truffles are rare wild growing edible mushrooms belonging to Ascomycetes. In this paper, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to obtain vibrational spectra of truffles. The results show that the mushrooms exhibit characteristic spectra. The two strongest absorption bands appear at about 1077cm -1 and 1040 cm -1, which were described as C-O stretching in carbohydrate. The vibrational spectra indicate that the main compositions of the truffles are polysaccharide and protein. According to the characteristics bands and absorption ratios of spectra, different species of truffles can be discriminated. It is also found the great changes between moldy and healthy truffles, which the major differences are observed in the bands of protein. In addition, FTIR spectral differences are observed between the same species of truffles from different producing areas. It is showed that the FTIR spectroscopic method is valuable tool for rapid and nondestructive analysis of truffles prior to any extraction method used.

  5. Wavelength conversion through soliton self-frequency shift in tellurite microstructured fiber with picosecond pump pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Wanjun; Li, Xia; Xing, Zhaojun; Zhou, Qinling; Fang, Yongzheng; Gao, Weiqing; Xiong, Liangming; Hu, Lili; Liao, Meisong

    2016-01-01

    Wavelength conversion to the wavelength range that is not covered by commercially available lasers could be accomplished through the soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) effect. In this study, the phenomenon of SSFS pumped by a picosecond-order pulse in a tellurite microstructured fiber is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The balance between the dispersion and the nonlinearity achieved by a 1958 nm pump laser induces a distinct SSFS effect. Attributed to the large spectral distance between the pump pulse and the fiber zero-dispersion wavelength, the SSFS is not cancelled due to energy shedding from the soliton to the dispersive wave. Details about the physical mechanisms behind this phenomenon and the variations of the wavelength shift, the conversion efficiency are revealed based on numerical simulations. Owing to the large soliton number N, the pulse width of the first split fundamental soliton is approximately 40 fs, producing a pulse compression factor of ˜38, much higher than that pumped by a femtosecond pulse. Experiments were also conducted to confirm the validity of the simulation results. By varying the pump power, a continuous soliton shift from 1990 nm to 2264 nm was generated. The generation of SSFS in tellurite microstructured fibers with picosecond pump pulse can provide a new approach for wavelength conversion in the mid-infrared range and could be useful in medical and some other areas.

  6. 3-Picolyl Azide Adenine Dinucleotide as a Probe of Femtosecond to Picosecond Enzyme Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Samrat; Li, Yun-Liang; Rock, William; Houtman, Jon C. D.; Kohen, Amnon; Cheatum, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Functionally relevant femtosecond to picosecond dynamics in enzyme active sites can be difficult to measure because of a lack of spectroscopic probes that can be located in the active site without altering the behavior of the enzyme. We have developed a new NAD+ analog 3-Picolyl Azide Adenine Dinucleotide (PAAD+), which has the potential to be a general spectroscopic probe for NAD-dependent enzymes. This analog is stable and binds in the active site of a typical NAD-dependent enzyme formate dehydrogenase (FDH) with similar characteristics to natural NAD+. It has an isolated infrared transition with high molar absorptivity that makes it suitable for observing enzyme dynamics using 2D IR spectroscopy. 2D IR experiments show that in aqueous solution, the analog undergoes complete spectral diffusion within hundreds of femtoseconds consistent with the water hydrogen bonding dynamics that would be expected. When bound to FDH in a binary complex, it shows picosecond fluctuations and a large static offset, consistent with previous studies of the binary complexes of this enzyme. These results show that PAAD+ is an excellent probe of local dynamics and that it should be a general tool for probing the dynamics of a wide range of NAD-dependent enzymes. PMID:22126535

  7. Vibrational dephasing in molecular mixed crystals: A picosecond time domain CARS study of pentacene in naphthalene and benzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duppen, Koos; Weitekamp, D. P.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1983-12-01

    Multiresonant time-domain coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) experiments have been employed in a study of the decay of vibrational coherences of pentacene doped into naphthalene and benzoic acid. In all cases, the CARS decay is found to be exponential, which indicates that the electronic and vibronic inhomogeneities in this system are strongly correlated. The temperature dependence of vibrational dephasing shows no effect of coupling to the lowest-frequency librational mode of pentacene that is known to dominate electronic dephasing. This surprising result can be understood on basis of a dephasing model where rapid coherence exchange exists between a cold vibrational transition and a corresponding near-resonant librationally hot one. For the 767 cm-1 vibrational transition, oscillations of the CARS signal as a function of delay are shown to arise from interference at the detector with a nearby naphthalene host signal. An inconsistency with a previously reported spontaneous Raman study is resolved by showing that the signal observed there is actually site-selected fluorescence.

  8. The effect of picosecond laser pulses on redox-dependent processes in mice red blood cells studied in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronova, Olga; Gening, Tatyana; Abakumova, Tatyana; Sysolyatin, Aleksey; Zolotovskiy, Igor; Antoneeva, Inna; Ostatochnikov, Vladimir; Gening, Snezhanna

    2014-02-01

    The study highlights the effect of different modes of in vivo laser irradiation of mice using a PFL8LA laser with λ = 1560 nm, pulse duration of 1,4•10-12 s, peak power of 3,72•103 W and average output power of 20•10-3 W on the lipid peroxidation parameters: conjugated dienes, ketodienes and conjugated trienes, malondialdehyde, Schiff bases and the activity of antioxidant enzymes - catalase, glutathione -S-transferase and superoxide dismutase in erythrocytes and plasma of mice. Two groups of mice received a total dose of 3.8 J/cm2 per group, but the 1st group was irradiated only once, while the 2nd - four times. Significant differences in the parameters of the 1st and 2nd groups indicate different effects of the irradiation modes on redox-dependent processes in red blood cells of mice.

  9. Picosecond laser studies of V-T processes in gases and electronic excitation transport in disordered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, J.F.

    1987-06-01

    SVL fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study intramolecular energy transfer from the 0/sup 0/ level of aniline induced by collisions with CO/sub 2/. Time-correlated photon counting was used to measure concentration dependent fluorescence depolarization for rhodamine 6G in glycerol. Fluorescence decays from these viscous solutions provide data for analyzing the three-dimensional, three-body excitation transport theory developed by Gochanour, Andersen and Fayer for disordered systems. The two-dimensional, two-body excitation theory developed by Loring and Fayer was also examined using time-resolved fluorescence depolarization techniques. The samples, made up of submonolayers of rhodamine 3B adsorbed onto optically flat fused silica yield fluorescence profiles which agree well with profiles developed from the theory for reduced surface coverages up to approx.0.4. At higher coverages, excitation trapping by rhodamine 3B aggregates truncates the depolarization process, yielding apparent reduced coverages which are appreciably lower than the true coverages.

  10. Picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) study of vibrational dephasing of carbon disulfide and benzene in solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Joseph W.; Woodward, Anne M.; Stephenson, John C.

    1986-01-01

    The vibrational dephasing of the 656/cm mode (nu1, a1g) of CS2 and the 991/cm mode (nu2, a1g) of benzene have been studied as a function of concentration in mixtures with a number of solvents using a ps time-resolved CARS technique. This technique employs two tunable synchronously-pumped mode-locked dye lasers in a stimulated Raman pump, coherent anti-Stokes Raman probe time-resolved experiment. Results are obtained for CS2 in carbon tetrachloride, benzene, nitrobenzene, and ethanol and for benzene nu2 in CS2. The dephasing rates of CS2 nu1 increase on dilution with the polar solvents and decrease or remain constant on dilution with the nonpolar solvents. The CS2/benzene solutions show a contrasting behavior, with the CS2 nu1 dephasing rate being nearly independent of concentration whereas the benzene nu2 dephasing rate decreases on dilution. These results are compared to theoretical models for vibrational dephasing of polyatomic molecules in solution.

  11. Picosecond surface restricted transient grating studies of carrier reaction dynamics at n -GaAs(100) interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Jahn, L.A.; Miller, R.J.D. )

    1992-03-01

    The surface restricted transient grating technique has been found to be sensitive to the Fermi level pinning surface states at the atomic interface of the native oxide layer of (100) GaAs. The sensitivity to these states is better than 10{sup {minus}4} of a monolayer. The grating signal associated with the surface states is eliminated by photoinduced removal of the oxide layer and hole transfer to Se{sup {minus}2} ions adsorbed to the surface. These results support the assignment of the signal to electronic factors associated with surface state species. The use of space charge field focusing of hole carriers to the surface has enabled a discrimination of the hole carrier reaction dynamics from those of the electron at the surface. {ital In} {ital situ} studies of interfacial hole transfer to Se{sup {minus}2} ions present at liquid junctions found the hole transfer time to be less than 30 ps. The selective quenching of the hole carrier through interfacial charge transfer has found that the hole carrier contributes to the optical dispersion in the 1 {mu} region to approximately the same extent as the electron.

  12. Incubation and nanostructure formation on n- and p-type Si(1 0 0) and Si(1 1 1) at various doping levels induced by sub-nanojoule femto- and picosecond near-infrared laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüle, M.; Afshar, M.; Feili, D.; Seidel, H.; König, K.; Straub, M.

    2014-09-01

    N- and p-doped Si(1 0 0) and Si(1 1 1) surfaces with dopant concentrations of 2 × 1014-1 × 1019 cm-3 were irradiated by tightly focused 85-MHz repetition rate Ti:sapphire laser light (central wavelength 800 nm, bandwidth 120 nm) at pulse durations of 12 fs to 1.6 ps. Dependent on pulse peak intensity and exposure time nanorifts, ripples of period 130 nm as well as sponge-like randomly nanoporous surface structures were generated with water immersion and, thereafter, laid bare by etching off aggregated oxide nanoparticles. The same structure types emerged in air or water with transform-limited 100-fs pulses. At a pulse length of 12 fs pronounced incubation occurred with incubation coefficients S = 0.66-0.85, whereas incubation was diminished for picosecond pulses (S > 0.95). The ablation threshold strongly rose with dopant concentration. At similar doping level it was higher for n-type than for p-type samples and for Si(1 0 0) compared to Si(1 1 1) surfaces. These observations are attributed to laser-induced defect states in the bandgap which participate in photoexcitation, deactivation of dopants by complex formation, and different densities of interface states at the boundary with the ultrathin native silicon dioxide surface layer. The threshold increase with pulse length revealed predominant single-photon excitation as well as multiphoton absorption.

  13. The Jefferson Lab Sub-picosecond X-ray Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, J. R.; Benson, S. V.; Bohn, C. L.; Douglas, D. R.; Dylla, H. F.; Gubeli, J. F.; Happek, U.; Jordan, K.; Krafft, G. A.; Neil, G. R.; Piot, P.; Shinn, M. D.; Williams, G. P.

    2003-08-01

    The kW-class infrared (IR) Free Electron Laser (FEL) at Jefferson Lab had the capability of producing intracavity Thomson scattering of the IR off the electron beam thus producing high average flux, sub-picosecond x-rays. We have measured these x-rays and demonstrated the energy tuneability range from 3.5 keV to 18 keV. The corresponding flux and brightness has been estimated and will be discussed. This year, 2002, the FEL was disassembled and has been reconfigured to produce 10 kW average power IR. We present the estimated x-ray capabilities for the new FEL and discuss potential applications.

  14. Infrared Spectroscopic Studies with the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (sofia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Becklin, E. E.

    2011-06-01

    The joint U.S. and German Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) will be a premier facility for studying the physics and chemistry of the interstellar medium and the stellar evolution process for many decades. SOFIA's first-generation instrument complement includes broadband imagers, moderate resolution spectrographs capable of resolving broad features due to dust and large molecules, and high resolution spectrometers suitable for kinematic studies of molecular and atomic gas lines at km/s resolution. SOFIA spectroscopic science applications will be discussed, with special emphasis on investigations related to infrared spectroscopy of astrophysical gas, grains, and ices. First light images and early science results related to these topics will be presented.

  15. An infrared study of dust in Type IIn supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Ori Dosovitz

    2010-11-01

    Given their high sensitivity to warm dust, infrared observations serve as important probes of supernovae and the surrounding supernova environment. Warm dust can trace progenitor mass loss rates, circumstellar interaction, and dust formation in the supernova environment, ultimately contributing to a broader understanding of stellar evolution, supernova explosion mechanics, and the origin of dust in the universe. The Type IIn supernova subclass, named for the "narrow" emission lines, tends to exhibit late-time infrared emission from warm dust more often than other subclasses. These supernovae, however, are particularly rare, consisting of only ˜2--3% of all core-collapse events. With only a handful of Type IIn observations at infrared wavelengths, the nature of the Type IIn environments and progenitors remain relatively unknown. This thesis presents an infrared study of Type IIn supernovae, beginning with a case study of SN 2005ip. A combination of Spitzer/IRS and IRAC, APO/TripleSpec, and FanCam data constrain the dust mass, temperature, and luminosity, identify the origin and heating mechanism of the warm dust, and characterize the progenitor system. Expanding on this work, a warm Spitzer/IRAC mission surveys the coordinates of 68 Type IIn supernovae within 250 Mpc from the past ten years. The detection of late-time emission from nine targets (>10%) nearly doubles the database of existing mid-infrared observations of Type IIn events. Pre-exisiting dust produced by massive progenitor eruptions (i.e., luminous blue variables) and heated by an infrared echo likely dominates the observed mid-infraraed flux. Finally, a characterization of the next generation of near-infrared detectors identifies several non-ideal noise sources and calibrations procedures. The resulting improvement in detector sensitivity paves the way for the next generation of transient observations as they trend towards cooler objects and higher redshifts.

  16. Picosecond lasers for tattoo removal: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Ofer; Atzmony, Lihi; Akerman, Lehavit; Levi, Assi; Kershenovich, Ruben; Lapidoth, Moshe; Mimouni, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Given that the pigment particles in tattoos have a relaxation time of <10 ns, picosecond lasers would be expected to be more effective than nanosecond lasers in tattoo removal. To systematically review the evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety of picosecond lasers for tattoo removal, Pubmed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), ClinicalTrials.gov, and reference lists were searched for relevant trials. The primary outcome was >70 % clearance of tattoo pigment. Secondary outcomes were 90-100 % clearance of tattoo pigment, number of laser sessions required, and adverse effects. Eight trials were included, six with human participants (160 participants) and 2 with animal models. Seven of the eight trials explored the usage of either 755, 758, 795, 1064, or 1064/532-nm picosecond lasers for black and blue ink tattoos. In the human trials, 69-100 % of tattoos showed over 70 % clearance of pigment after 1-10 laser treatments. Reported side effects included pain, hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation, blister formation and transient erythema, edema, and pinpoint bleeding. Included articles varied in type of laser investigated, mostly non-comparative studies and with a medium to high risk of bias. There is sparse evidence that picosecond lasers are more effective than their nanosecond counterparts for mainly black and blue ink tattoo removal, with minor side effects. PMID:27311768

  17. Astronomical polarization studies at radio and infrared wavelengths. Part 2: Far infrared polarization of dust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, B. K.

    1976-01-01

    Far infrared polarization of dust clouds is examined. The recently observed 10 micron polarization of the Orion Nebula and the Galactic Center suggests that far infrared polarization may be found in these objects. Estimates are made of the degree of far infrared polarization that may exist in the Orion Nebula. An attempt to observe far infrared polarization from the Orion Nebula was carried out.

  18. Picosecond dynamics of free carrier populations, space- charge fields, and photorefractive nonlinearities in zincblende semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Thomas Spencer

    Generally, nonlinear optics studies investigate optically-induced changes in refraction or absorption, and their application to spectroscopy or device fabrication. The photorefractive effect is a nonlinear optical effect that occurs in solids, where transport of an optically-induced free-carrier population results in an internal space-charge field, which produces an index change via the linear electrooptic effect. The photorefractive effect has been widely studied for a variety of materials and device applications, mainly because it allows large index changes to be generated with laser beams having only a few milliwatts of average power. Compound semiconductors are important photorefractive materials because they offer a near-infrared optical response, and because their carrier transport properties allow the index change to be generated quickly and efficiently. While many researchers have attempted to measure the fundamental temporal dynamics of the photorefractive effect in semiconductors using continuous-wave, nanosecond- and picosecond-pulsed laser beams, these investigations have been unsuccessful. However, studies with this goal are of clear relevance because they provide information about the fundamental physical processes that produce this effect, as well as the material's speed and efficiency limitations for device applications. In this dissertation, for the first time, we time-resolve the temporal dynamics of the photorefractive nonlinearities in two zincblende semiconductors, semi- insulating GaAs and undoped CdTe. While CdTe offers a lattice-match to the infrared material HgxCd1-xTe, semi-insulating GaAs has been widely used in optoelectronic and high- speed electronic applications. We use a novel transient- grating experimental method that allows picosecond temporal resolution and high sensitivity. Our results provide a clear and detailed picture of the picosecond photorefractive response of both materials, showing nonlinearities due to hot

  19. Studying infrared light therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiyan; Zeng, Yuhui; Meng, Qingqiang; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an extensive neurodegenerative disease. It is generally believed that there are some connections between AD and amyloid protein plaques in the brain. AD is a chronic disease that usually starts slowly and gets worse over time. The typical symptoms are memory loss, language disorders, mood swings and behavioral issues. Gradual losses of somatic functions eventually lead patients to death. Currently, the main therapeutic method is pharmacotherapy, which may temporarily reduce symptoms, but has many side effects. No current treatment can reverse AD's deterioration. Infrared (IR) light therapy has been studied in a range of single and multiple irradiation protocols in previous studies and was found beneficial for neuropathology. In our research, we have verified the effect of infrared light on AD through Alzheimer's disease mouse model. This transgenic mouse model is made by co-injecting two vectors encoding mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and mutant presenilin-1 (PSEN1). We designed an experimental apparatus for treating mice, which primarily includes a therapeutic box and a LED array, which emits infrared light. After the treatment, we assessed the effects of infrared light by testing cognitive performance of the mice in Morris water maze. Our results show that infra-red therapy is able to improve cognitive performance in the mouse model. It might provide a novel and safe way to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Laboratory infrared studies of molecules of atmospheric and astrophysical interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, N. N.

    1982-01-01

    Nineteen reprints on the molecular species are compiled. Much of the work was done by using the Doppler-limited resolution provided by diode lasers. The diode laser was used as a source to a grating spectrometer which has been used earlier for high resolution studies. This technique provided many advantages. Wherever possible, the studies have been directed to intensity determinations of infrared bands.

  1. Picosecond spectroscopic studies of equilibrium structural fluctuations of native and partially unfolded states of Zinc II-substituted and metal-free cytochromes C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Jagnyaseni

    Picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was employed to characterize the equilibrium and non-equilibrium protein structural fluctuations in Zn II-substituted (ZnCytc) and metal-free (fbCytc) cytochromes c using dynamic fluorescence Stokes shift (FSS) and fluorescence anisotropy (FA) measurements. The intrinsic porphyrin chromophore is used as the probe for the structural fluctuations of the surrounding protein and solvent. The FSS experiments examine how the time scales detected from the dynamic solvation of a chromoprotein report changes in the character of motion. ZnCytc and fbCytc serve as limited, single-chromophore models for photosynthetic reaction center and light-harvesting proteins. The dynamic solvation of redox and light-harvesting chromophores in photosynthesis plays an important role in the quantum efficiency of electron transfer and energy transfer performed by these systems, respectively. The FSS response function of fbCytc in water is biexponential over the 100-ps--50-ns regime and the two time constants are 1.4 ns and 9.1 ns. ZnCytc under similar solution conditions shows a biexponential FSS response but with time constants of 0.2 ns and 1.5 ns. The two correlation times from the FSS response function correspond to motions of the hydrophobic core and the solvent-contact layer, respectively. Both FSS correlation times were lengthened and the solvation reorganization energy was reduced from 43 cm-1 to 33 cm-1 in the presence of 50% (v/v) glycerol. A Brownian diffusion model with thermally activated barrier crossings on the protein-folding energy landscape is used to interpret these results. The conclusion is that the mean-squared deviations of the fluctuations exhibited by fbCytc are perhaps a factor of ten larger than those in ZnCytc, which is consistent with the suggestion that fbCytc assumes a dynamic, partially unfolded structure with some of the characteristics of a molten globule. The nature of the motion associated with the

  2. Tunable Far Infrared Studies in Support of Stratospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance Kelly; Park, K.; Nolt, I. G.; Evenson, K. M.

    1998-01-01

    The research performed during this reporting period has been a collaboration between institutions including the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the University of Oregon, and the NASA Langley Research Center. The program has included fully line-resolved measurements of submillimeter and far infrared spectroscopic line parameters (pressure broadening coefficients and their temperature dependences, and fine positions) for the analysis of field measurements of stratospheric constituents, far infrared database improvements, and studies for improved satellite measurements of the Earth's atmosphere. This research program is designed to enable the full utilization of spectra obtained in far infrared/submillimeter field measurements, such as FIRS-2, FILOS, IBEX, SLS, EosMLS, and proposed NASA and European Space Agency measurements of ClO and OH (e.g., PIRAMHYD) for the retrieval of accurate stratospheric altitude profiles of key trace gases involved in ozone layer photochemistry.

  3. Homogeneity study of ointment dosage forms by infrared imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Renato Lajarim; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2012-01-25

    Ointment dosage forms are semi-solid preparations intended for local or transdermal delivery of active substances usually for application to the skin and it is important that they present a homogeneous appearance. In this work, a study of the homogeneity of a tacrolimus ointment dosage form was performed using infrared imaging spectroscopy coupled with principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to interpret the imaging data. Optical visible microscopy images indicated possible phase separation in the ointment and, based on the results presented by distribution concentration maps from infrared imaging, it was possible to conclude that, in fact, there was phase separation incorporated in the ointment. Thus, infrared imaging spectroscopy associated to PCA and MCR-ALS is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for the development process of ointment dosage forms. PMID:22018891

  4. Social Perception in Infancy: A Near Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd-Fox, Sarah; Blasi, Anna; Volein, Agnes; Everdell, Nick; Elwell, Claire E.; Johnson, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    The capacity to engage and communicate in a social world is one of the defining characteristics of the human species. While the network of regions that compose the social brain have been the subject of extensive research in adults, there are limited techniques available for monitoring young infants. This study used near infrared spectroscopy to…

  5. Infrared Heterodyne Spectroscopy and its Unique Application to Planetary Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Since the early 1970's the infrared heterodyne technique has evolved into a powerful tool for the study of molecular constituents, temperatures, and dynamics in planetary atmospheres. Its extremely high spectral resolution (Lambda/(Delta)Lambda/>10(exp 6)) and highly accurate frequency measurement (to 1 part in 10(exp 8)) enabled the detection of nonthermal/natural lasing phenomena on Mars and Venus; direct measurements of winds on Venus, Mars, and Titan; study of mid-infrared aurorae on Jupiter; direct measurement of species abundances on Mars (ozone, isotopic CO2), hydrocarbons on Jupiter, Saturn., Neptune, and Titan, and stratospheric composition in the Earth's stratosphere (O3, CIO, N2O, CO2 ....). Fully resolved emission and absorption line shapes measured by this method enabled the unambiguous retrieval of molecular abundances and local temperatures and thermal structure in regions not probed by other techniques. The mesosphere of Mars and thermosphere of Venus are uniquely probed by infrared heterodyne spectroscopy. Results of these studies tested and constrained photochemical and dynamical theoretical models describing the phenomena measured. The infrared heterodyne technique will be described. Highlights in its evolution to today's instrumentation and resultant discoveries will be presented, including work at Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Koln. Resultant work will include studies supporting NASA and ESA space missions and collaborations between instrumental and theoretical groups.

  6. Infrared Study of Fullerene Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; Villaver, E.; García-Lario, P.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Manchado, A.; Stanghellini, L.; Shaw, R. A.; Cataldo, F.

    2012-12-01

    We present a study of 16 planetary nebulae (PNe) where fullerenes have been detected in their Spitzer Space Telescope spectra. This large sample of objects offers a unique opportunity to test conditions of fullerene formation and survival under different metallicity environments because we are analyzing five sources in our own Galaxy, four in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and seven in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Among the 16 PNe studied, we present the first detection of C60 (and possibly also C70) fullerenes in the PN M 1-60 as well as of the unusual ~6.6, 9.8, and 20 μm features (attributed to possible planar C24) in the PN K 3-54. Although selection effects in the original samples of PNe observed with Spitzer may play a potentially significant role in the statistics, we find that the detection rate of fullerenes in C-rich PNe increases with decreasing metallicity (~5% in the Galaxy, ~20% in the LMC, and ~44% in the SMC) and we interpret this as a possible consequence of the limited dust processing occurring in Magellanic Cloud (MC) PNe. CLOUDY photoionization modeling matches the observed IR fluxes with central stars that display a rather narrow range in effective temperature (~30,000-45,000 K), suggesting a common evolutionary status of the objects and similar fullerene formation conditions. Furthermore, the data suggest that fullerene PNe likely evolve from low-mass progenitors and are usually of low excitation. We do not find a metallicity dependence on the estimated fullerene abundances. The observed C60 intensity ratios in the Galactic sources confirm our previous finding in the MCs that the fullerene emission is not excited by the UV radiation from the central star. CLOUDY models also show that line- and wind-blanketed model atmospheres can explain many of the observed [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios using photoionization, suggesting that possibly the UV radiation from the central star, and not shocks, is triggering the decomposition of the

  7. INFRARED STUDY OF FULLERENE PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Manchado, A.; Garcia-Lario, P.; Stanghellini, L.; Shaw, R. A.; Cataldo, F. E-mail: amt@iac.es E-mail: Pedro.Garcia-Lario@sciops.esa.int E-mail: letizia@noao.edu

    2012-12-01

    We present a study of 16 planetary nebulae (PNe) where fullerenes have been detected in their Spitzer Space Telescope spectra. This large sample of objects offers a unique opportunity to test conditions of fullerene formation and survival under different metallicity environments because we are analyzing five sources in our own Galaxy, four in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and seven in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Among the 16 PNe studied, we present the first detection of C{sub 60} (and possibly also C{sub 70}) fullerenes in the PN M 1-60 as well as of the unusual {approx}6.6, 9.8, and 20 {mu}m features (attributed to possible planar C{sub 24}) in the PN K 3-54. Although selection effects in the original samples of PNe observed with Spitzer may play a potentially significant role in the statistics, we find that the detection rate of fullerenes in C-rich PNe increases with decreasing metallicity ({approx}5% in the Galaxy, {approx}20% in the LMC, and {approx}44% in the SMC) and we interpret this as a possible consequence of the limited dust processing occurring in Magellanic Cloud (MC) PNe. CLOUDY photoionization modeling matches the observed IR fluxes with central stars that display a rather narrow range in effective temperature ({approx}30,000-45,000 K), suggesting a common evolutionary status of the objects and similar fullerene formation conditions. Furthermore, the data suggest that fullerene PNe likely evolve from low-mass progenitors and are usually of low excitation. We do not find a metallicity dependence on the estimated fullerene abundances. The observed C{sub 60} intensity ratios in the Galactic sources confirm our previous finding in the MCs that the fullerene emission is not excited by the UV radiation from the central star. CLOUDY models also show that line- and wind-blanketed model atmospheres can explain many of the observed [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios using photoionization, suggesting that possibly the UV radiation from the central star, and

  8. Metal nanofilms studied with infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahsold, Gerhard; Priebe, Andreas; Pucci, Annemarie; Otto, Andreas

    2006-03-01

    Metal films with thickness in the nanometer range are optically transparent. In the IR range their transmittance may show both the Drude-type behaviour of coalesced islands and the tail of the plasmon absorption of single islands. Therefore, IR transmittance spectroscopy is a sensitive tool for in-situ studies of metal-film growth on insulating substrates and of the film conductivity. With IR transmittance spectroscopy the in-plane film conductivity and its correlation to the film-growth process can be determined without electrical contacts. Adsorbate induced changes can be observed well. Their analysis may give insight into the adsorbate-metal bonding. Depending on the film's roughness the IR lines of adsorbate-vibration modes may be strongly modified because of their interaction with electronic excitations of the film. The atomic roughness of cold-condensed metal films produces additional IR activity: strong IR activity of Raman lines of centrosymmetric adsorbate molecules is observed in those cases where the adsorbate has states close to the Fermi level.

  9. Infrared laboratory studies of synthetic planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D.

    1972-01-01

    The initial stages of the research were involved with a test of Burch's law of multiplicative transmittance for mixed absorbing gases when their lines are broadened by H2 and He, which are constituents of the atmospheres of the major planets. The broadening of individual lines in the CO fundamental by various gases was investigated. Line strength and half-width for individual CO lines were studied as a function of temperature. Measurements of total band absorptance as a function of absorber thickness and total effective pressure were made at various temperatures for bands of CO and N2O. Attempts were made to develop a phenomenological theory of line broadening that would account for the phenomena observed for the CO fundamental and those reported for more highly polar gases. Laboratory measurements of nitric acid vapor absorptance were compared with balloon measurements in arriving at an estimate of the quantity of nitric acid vapor present in the earth's atmosphere in the region of the ozone layer.

  10. Picosecond DPSS laser technology for OPCPA pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupel, Andreas; Bodnar, Nathan; Webb, Benjamin; Shah, Lawrence; Richardson, Martin

    2014-02-01

    We present the design and challenges of a diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) system to amplify picosecond pulses to high pulse energies and high average powers. We discuss our implemented solutions to mitigate thermal effects and present the obtained performance of the picosecond pulse amplification at the multi-10-MW level. Our here presented picosecond DPSS laser is well suited for pumping an optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) system. Several laser technologies have been employed to pump OPCPA systems and we show how our DPSS system compares in performance to the other approaches.

  11. Study of Heat Transfer Dynamics from Gold Nanorods to the Environment via Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Son C; Zhang, Qiao; Manthiram, Karthish; Ye, Xingchen; Lomont, Justin P; Harris, Charles B; Weller, Horst; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2016-02-23

    Studying the local solvent surrounding nanoparticles is important to understanding the energy exchange dynamics between the particles and their environment, and there is a need for spectroscopic methods that can dynamically probe the solvent region that is in nearby contact with the nanoparticles. In this work, we demonstrate the use of time-resolved infrared spectroscopy to track changes in a vibrational mode of local water on the time scale of hundreds of picoseconds, revealing the dynamics of heat transfer from gold nanorods to the local water environment. We applied this probe to a prototypical plasmonic photothermal system consisting of organic CTAB bilayer capped gold nanorods, as well as gold nanorods coated with varying thicknesses of inorganic mesoporous-silica. The heat transfer time constant of CTAB capped gold nanorods is about 350 ps and becomes faster with higher laser excitation power, eventually generating bubbles due to superheating in the local solvent. Silica coating of the nanorods slows down the heat transfer and suppresses the formation of superheated bubbles. PMID:26840805

  12. Fundamentals of picosecond laser ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Osamu; Larciprete, Maria Cristina; Li Voti, Roberto; Wright, Oliver B

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an introduction to picosecond laser ultrasonics, a means by which gigahertz-terahertz ultrasonic waves can be generated and detected by ultrashort light pulses. This method can be used to characterize materials with nanometer spatial resolution. With reference to key experiments, we first review the theoretical background for normal-incidence optical detection of longitudinal acoustic waves in opaque single-layer isotropic thin films. The theory is extended to handle isotropic multilayer samples, and is again compared to experiment. We then review applications to anisotropic samples, including oblique-incidence optical probing, and treat the generation and detection of shear waves. Solids including metals and semiconductors are mainly discussed, although liquids are briefly mentioned. PMID:24998119

  13. Conceptual design study for Infrared Limb Experiment (IRLE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Doran J.; Ulwick, Jim; Esplin, Roy; Batty, J. C.; Ware, Gene; Tew, Craig

    1989-01-01

    The phase A engineering design study for the Infrared Limb Experiment (IRLE) instrument, the infrared portion of the Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere Explorer (MELTER) satellite payload is given. The IRLE instrument is a satellite instrument, based on the heritage of the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) program, that will make global measurements of O3, CO2, NO, NO2, H2O, and OH from earth limb emissions. These measurements will be used to provide improved understanding of the photochemistry, radiation, dynamics, energetics, and transport phenomena in the lower thermosphere, mesosphere, and stratosphere. The IRLE instrument is the infrared portion of the MELTER satellite payload. MELTER is being proposed to NASA Goddard by a consortium consisting of the University of Michigan, University of Colorado and NASA Langley. It is proposed that the Space Dynamics Laboratory at Utah State University (SDL/USU) build the IRLE instrument for NASA Langley. MELTER is scheduled for launch in November 1994 into a sun-synchronous, 650-km circular orbit with an inclination angle of 97.8 deg and an ascending node at 3:00 p.m. local time.

  14. Comprehensive Infrared Study of Tetryl, Dinitrotoluene, and Trinitrotoluene Compounds.

    PubMed

    Puiu, Adriana; Giubileo, Gianfranco; Cesaro, Stella Nunziante; Bencivenni, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    The present work describes an experimental and theoretical study of energetic materials used for detecting explosives in order to prevent terrorist actions, as well as for de-mining projects. Particular attention was devoted to examining the infrared absorption spectroscopy of classic explosives in order to create a useful mobile apparatus for on-field detection of explosives. This paper reports the vibrational absorption spectra of tetryl, dinitrotoluene, and trinitrotoluene molecules approached using two different spectroscopic techniques, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS). Diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra of all samples were analyzed in a very wide spectral range (400-7500 cm(-1)) showing for the first time the existence of weak absorption bands attributable to overtones or combination bands, while laser photoacoustic spectroscopy spectra have been investigated in the fingerprint region of organic compounds that share the CO2 laser emission range (~920-1100 cm(-1)). The Fourier transform infrared spectra of both matrix isolated dinitrotoluenes have been also investigated. The theoretical treatment of tetryl is reported for the first time. PMID:26555761

  15. Snow studies using thermal infrared observations from earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    The application of satellite high resolution infrared data was studied for mapping snow cover. The study has two objectives: (1) to determine whether existing radiometers onboard the Nimbus and ITOS satellites can provide hydrologically useful snow information, and (2) to develop analysis techniques applicable to future IR sensor systems on earth satellites. The IR measurements are being analyzed in conjunction with concurrent satellite photographs and conventional snow cover data.

  16. Timing high-speed microprocessor circuits using picosecond imaging circuit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, Steven E.; McManus, Moyra K.; Manzer, Dennis G.

    2001-04-01

    IBM Research has developed a time resolved imaging technique, Picosecond Imaging Circuit Analysis (PICA), which uses single photon events to analyze signals in modern microprocessors on a picosecond time scale. This paper will describe the experimental setup as well as the data management software. A case study of a particularly hard debug problem on a state of the art microprocessor will demonstrate the application of the PICA method.

  17. Environmental Affects on Surfactin Studied Using Multidimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nite, Jacob; Krummel, Amber

    2014-03-01

    Surfactin, a cyclic lipopeptide produced by Bacillus subtilis, is a pore forming toxin that has been studied in the literature extensively. It is known to exist in two different conformations, S1 and S2, which are thought to relate to surfactin's pore forming ability. The vibrational characteristics of surfactin have been studied using linear infrared spectroscopy as well as two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy in different environments. The environments probed were specifically chosen to mimic surfactin in an aqueous environment as well as a lipid membrane environment. The vibrational spectra were interpreted using transitional dipole coupling to relate the coupling evident in the data to the structural conformers obtained from NMR data. These measurements have been used to link the structural characteristics of surfactin to different solvent environments to gain insight into surfactin's pore forming ability mechanisms. Colorado State University. Maciel Fellowship.

  18. [Study on spectral emission characteristics of infrared lamps].

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Chen, Z; Gu, B; Luo, Y; Wang, T

    1999-04-01

    The spectral characteristics at wavelength ranges of 0.35-0.85 microm and 1.72-16.7 microm (5800-600 cm(-1)) for both domestic and imported infrared lamps used in scientific research, industry, medical service, home electrical appliance etc. have heen studied and compared. This paper has provided the theoreical and experimental bases for their applications and improvement in designs, technology of manufacture, quality and performance. PMID:15819000

  19. Infrared Structural Biology: Detect Functionally Important Structural Motions of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Aihua

    Proteins are dynamic. Lack of dynamic structures of proteins hampers our understanding of protein functions. Infrared structural biology (IRSB) is an emerging technology. There are several advantages of IRSB for mechanistic studies of proteins: (1) its excellent dynamic range (detecting structural motions from picoseconds to >= seconds); (2) its high structural sensitivity (detect tiny but functionally important structural motions such as proton transfer and changes in hydrogen bonding interaction); (3) its ability to detect different structural motions simultaneously. Successful development of infrared structural biology demands not only new experimental techniques (from infrared technologies to chemical synthesis and cell biology), but also new data processing (how to translate infrared signals into quantitative structural information of proteins). These topics will be discussed as well as examples of how to use IRSB to study structure-function relationship of proteins. This work was supported by NSF DBI1338097 and OCAST HR10-078.

  20. Infrared spectroscopic study of sputtered tungsten oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.L.; Lassegues, J.C. )

    1993-10-01

    Recent infrared and Raman spectroscopic studies of various tungsten oxide films concluded either the formation of W=O terminal bonds or the transformation of such bonds into W-OH groups upon proton insertion. The infrared transmission and reflection spectra of bleached and colored sputtered films were reinvestigated in order to resolve the previous contradictory interpretations and for better insight into the mechanism of electrochromism at the molecular level. The new results confirm the first interpretation and allow us to show that H[sup +] or Li[sup +] insertion creates shorter ([approximately]1.7[angstrom]) and longer ([approximately]2 [angstrom]) W-O bonds around the W[sup 5+] centers. These results are in agreement with the concepts of small polaron and of intervalence charge transfer mechanism. They illustrate the local lattice distortion around a W[sup 5+] site. Aging of the initial films has also been followed and characterized by H/D in situ isotopic exchange.

  1. Study of oral cavity lesions by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Giorgini, E; Conti, C; Rocchetti, R; Rubini, C; Sabbatini, S; Librando, V; Tosi, G

    2016-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy is considered a useful tool in the biomedical field, for analysing in situ and at cellular level, very small areas of tissues and cells, with minimal sample preparation and without the use of stains or probes. This spectroscopic technique has been successfully applied to analyse biological samples from patients affected by tumoral pathologies, with particular attention to oral cavity lesions. In this study, we describe the application of FTIR microspectroscopy to characterize and discriminate the most recurrent benign and malignant diseases of oral cavity compartment. Infrared maps were acquired on tissues affected by the following pathologies: squamous cell carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma, squamous dysplasia, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, radicular cyst, residual cyst, unicystic ameloblastoma, and ameloblastic fibroma, together with healthy tissue samples (used as control group). The epithelial and connective components of all samples were distinguished and submitted to multivariate analysis. The results were in agreement with histological suggestions. PMID:27049108

  2. One- and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic studies of solution-phase homogeneous catalysis and spin-forbidden reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Karma Rae

    2008-12-01

    Understanding chemical reactions requires the knowledge of the elementary steps of breaking and making bonds, and often a variety of experimental techniques are needed to achieve this goal. The initial steps occur on the femto- through picosecond time-scales, requiring the use of ultrafast spectroscopic methods, while the rate-limiting steps often occur more slowly, requiring alternative techniques. Ultrafast one and two-dimensional infrared and step-scan FTIR spectroscopies are used to investigate the photochemical reactions of four organometallic complexes. The analysis leads to a detailed understanding of mechanisms that are general in nature and may be applicable to a variety of reactions.

  3. Thermal Infrared Studies of Chloride Salts; Implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldridge, A. M.; Osterloo, M. M.; Christensen, P. R.

    2007-12-01

    Morphological and spectral evidence supporting the past occurrence of widespread water on the surface of Mars continues to build. Furthermore, geochemical footprints of water are especially compelling. As a past reservoir of water receded, it would have left behind evaporitic chemistries specific to Martian water-rock interactions (e.g. chlorides, sulfates and phyllosilicates). To understand the extent and abundance of past water, the detection of such minerals is key. In support of both orbital and in situ thermal infrared (TIR) observations, we have examined the TIR behavior of chloride minerals. In the thermal infrared, most minerals are identified based on characteristic absorption features. However, chloride detection is particularly challenging because these minerals are transparent over much of the infrared and therefore their identification must be based on the effect that they have on the spectra of coexisting materials. Additionally, the transparent nature of chlorides results in greybody (non-unit emissivity) behavior and consequently the standard calibration techniques to convert from radiance to emissivity produces a slope in the spectra. Here we discuss laboratory spectral studies including emission, reflectance, and transmission spectra of a suite of chloride minerals and mixtures. These studies are then used to interpret a spectrally distinct deposit identified with 2001 Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) data in the low albedo, mid-to-low latitude, southern highlands of Mars which correspond to mid- late Noachian aged terrains and early Hesperian aged ridged plains units.

  4. Picosecond optical vortex pulse illumination forms a monocrystalline silicon needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Fuyuto; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Hidai, Hirofumi; Yamane, Keisaku; Morita, Ryuji; Omatsu, Takashige

    2016-02-01

    The formation of a monocrystalline silicon needle by picosecond optical vortex pulse illumination was demonstrated for the first time in this study. The dynamics of this silicon needle formation was further revealed by employing an ultrahigh-speed camera. The melted silicon was collected through picosecond pulse deposition to the dark core of the optical vortex, forming the silicon needle on a submicrosecond time scale. The needle was composed of monocrystalline silicon with the same lattice index (100) as that of the silicon substrate, and had a height of approximately 14 μm and a thickness of approximately 3 μm. Overlaid vortex pulses allowed the needle to be shaped with a height of approximately 40 μm without any changes to the crystalline properties. Such a monocrystalline silicon needle can be applied to devices in many fields, such as core-shell structures for silicon photonics and photovoltaic devices as well as nano- or microelectromechanical systems.

  5. Femtosecond-picosecond laser photolysis studies on the dynamics of excited charge-transfer complexes: Aromatic hydrocarbon-acid anhydride, -tetracyanoethylene, and -tetracyanoquinodimethane systems in acetonitrile solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Asahi, Tsuyoshi; Mataga, Noboru )

    1991-03-07

    Formation processes of contact ion pairs (CIP) from the excited Franck-Condon (FC) state of charge-transfer (CT) complexes of aromatic hydrocarbons with acid anhydride as well as cyano compound acceptors in acetonitrile solution and charge recombination (CR) rates (k{sub CR}{sup CIP}) of produced CIP states have been investigated by femtosecond and picosecond laser phototlysis and time-resolved absorption spectral measurements covering a wide range of free energy gap-{Delta}G{degree}{sub ip} between the ion pair and the ground state. It has been confirmed that the CIP formation becomes faster and k{sub CR}{sup CIP} of the produced CIP increases with increase of the strengths of the electron donor (D) and acceptor (A) in the complex, i.e., with decrease of the {minus}{Delta}G{degree}{sub ip} value. This peculiar energy gap dependence of k{sub CR}{sup CIP}, quite different from the bell-shaped one observed in the case of the solvent-separated ion pairs (SSIP) or loose ion pairs (LIP) formed by encounter between fluorescer and quencher in the fluoresence quenching reaction, has been interpreted by assuming the change of electronic and geometrical structures of CIP depending on the strengths of D and A.

  6. Picosecond and nanosecond studies of the photoreduction of benzophenone by 1,4-diazabicyclo(2. 2. 2)octane: Characterization of the transient

    SciTech Connect

    Devadoss, C.; Fessenden, R.W. )

    1990-05-31

    The transient that is produced in the quenching of triplet benzophenone by 1,4-diazabicyclo(2.2.2)octane (DABCO) has been examined by use of nano- and picosecond laser photolysis. The initial step in all solvents, both polar and nonpolar, is electron transfer to form a triplet contact ion pair. In nonpolar solvents, the ion pair remains in this form until it decays. For polar solvents, the spectra change somewhat over the first 100 ps showing that the solvation changes and the ion pair becomes solvent separated. The lifetime of the ion pair varies greatly with the solvent. In saturated hydrocarbons it is about 80 ps. Nonpolar solvents with either {pi} electrons or a lone pair of electrons stabilize the ion pair on the nanosecond to microsecond time scale. A small amount of alcohol in benzene also stabilizes the ion pair by hydrogen bonding. A shift in the peak position with time toward the blue accompanies the formation of hydrogen bonds in this case.

  7. Studies of planetary boundary layer by infrared thermal imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Albina, Bogdan; Dimitriu, Dan Gheorghe Gurlui, Silviu Octavian; Cazacu, Marius Mihai; Timofte, Adrian

    2014-11-24

    The IR camera is a relatively novel device for remote sensing of atmospheric thermal processes from the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) based on measurements of the infrared radiation. Infrared radiation is energy radiated by the motion of atoms and molecules on the surface of aerosols, when their temperature is more than absolute zero. The IR camera measures directly the intensity of radiation emitted by aerosols which is converted by an imaging sensor into an electric signal, resulting a thermal image. Every image pixel that corresponds to a specific radiance is pre-processed to identify the brightness temperature. The thermal infrared imaging radiometer used in this study, NicAir, is a precision radiometer developed by Prata et al. The device was calibrated for the temperature range of 270–320 K and using a calibration table along with image processing software, important information about variations in temperature can be extracted from acquired IR images. The PBL is the lowest layer of the troposphere where the atmosphere interacts with the ground surfaces. The importance of PBL lies in the fact that it provides a finite but varying volume in which pollutants can disperse. The aim of this paper is to analyze the PBL altitude and thickness variations over Iasi region using the IR imaging camera as well as its behavior from day to night and thermal processes occurring in PBL.

  8. Studies of dust grain properties in infrared reflection nebulae.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Y J; Tielens, A G; Werner, M W

    1990-01-20

    We have developed a model for reflection nebulae around luminous infrared sources embedded in dense dust clouds. The aim of this study is to determine the sizes of the scattering grains. In our analysis, we have adopted an MRN-like power-law size distribution (Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck) of graphite and silicate grains, but other current dust models would give results which were substantially the same. In the optically thin limit, the intensity of the scattered light is proportional to the dust column density, while in the optically thick limit, it reflects the grain albedo. The results show that the shape of the infrared spectrum is the result of a combination of the scattering properties of the dust, the spectrum of the illuminating source, and foreground extinction, while geometry plays a minor role. Comparison of our model results with infrared observations of the reflection nebula surrounding OMC-2/IRS 1 shows that either a grain size distribution like that found in the diffuse interstellar medium, or one consisting of larger grains, can explain the observed shape of the spectrum. However, the absolute intensity level of the scattered light, as well as the observed polarization, requires large grains (approximately 5000 angstroms). By adding water ice mantles to the silicate and graphite cores, we have modeled the 3.08 micrometers ice band feature, which has been observed in the spectra of several infrared reflection nebulae. We show that this ice band arises naturally in optically thick reflection nebulae containing ice-coated grains. We show that the shape of the ice band is diagnostic of the presence of large grains, as previously suggested by Knacke and McCorkle. Comparison with observations of the BN/KL reflection nebula in the OMC-1 cloud shows that large ice grains (approximately 5000 angstroms) contribute substantially to the scattered light. PMID:11538693

  9. Sub-Picosecond Injection of Electrons from Excited [Ru (2,2'-bipy-4,4'-dicarboxy)2(SCN)2] into TiO2 Using Transient Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, R. J.; Asbury, J. B.; Ferrere, S.; Ghosh, H. N.; Sprague, J. R.; Lian, T.; Nozik, A. J.

    1999-05-04

    We have used femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to time resolve the injection of electrons into nanocrystalline TiO2 film electrodes under ambient conditions following photoexcitation of the adsorbed dye, [Ru(4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridine)2(NCS)2] (N3). Pumping at one of the metal-to-ligand charge transfer adsorption peaks and probing the absorption of electrons injected into the TiO2 conduction band at 1.52 {micro}m and in the range of 4.1 to 7.0 {micro}m, we have directly observed the arrival of the injected electrons. Our measurements indicate an instrument-limited {approx}50-fs upper limit on the electron injection time under ambient conditions in air. We have compared the infrared transient absorption for noninjecting (blank) systems consisting of N3 in ethanol and N3 adsorbed to films of nanocrystalline Al2O3 and ZrO2, and found no indication of electron injection at probe wavelengths in the mid-IR (4.1 to 7.0 {micro}m). At 1.52 {micro}m interferences exist in the observed transient adsorption signal for the blanks.

  10. Photoluminescence Study of Long Wavelength Superlattice Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoglund, Linda; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Soibel, Alexander; Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Keo, Sam; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the relation between the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and the PL peak wavelength was studied. A linear decrease of the PL intensity with increasing cut-off wavelength of long wavelength infrared CBIRDs was observed at 77 K and the trend remained unchanged in the temperature range 10 - 77 K. This relation between the PL intensity and the peak wavelength can be favorably used for comparison of the optical quality of samples with different PL peak wavelengths. A strong increase of the width of the PL spectrum in the studied temperature interval was observed, which was attributed to thermal broadening.

  11. Shaping pulses using frequency conversion with a modulated picosecond free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, B.A.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Computer simulations and experiments indicate that we can shape the infrared picosecond pulses of the Mark III FEL in amplitude, frequency, and phase. Strongly modulated fundamental and second harmonic pulses have been generated by operating the Mark III FEL in the regime of strong sideband growth. In this paper, we present the results of simulations and experiments for second harmonic generation with fundamental inputs from 2 to 3 {mu}m.

  12. Observation of coherent undulator radiation from sub-picosecond electron pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bocek, D.; Hernandez, M.; Kung, P.; Lihn, Hung-chi; Settakorn, C.; Wiedemann, H.

    1995-09-01

    The generation and observation of high power, coherent, far-infrared undulator radiation from sub-picosecond electron bunches at the SUNSHINE facility is reported. Coherent undulator radiation tunable from 50 to 200 microns wavelength is demonstrated. Measurements of the energy (up to 1.7 mJ per 1 microsecs macropulse), frequency spectrum, and spatial distribution of the radiation are reported. Apparent exponential growth of the radiated energy as a function of undulator length is observed.

  13. Infrared Imaging, Spectroscopic, and Photometric Studies of Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrz, Robert D.

    1997-01-01

    We have continued our program of infrared (IR) photometric, imaging, spectroscopic, and polarimetric temporal observations of comets to study the properties of comet dust and comet nuclei. During the first two years we digitized our IR data base on P/Halley and other recent comets to facilitate further analysis and comparison with other data bases, and found compelling evidence for the emission of a burst of small grains from P/Halley's nucleus at perihelion. We reported imaging and photometric observations of Comets Austin 1990 V and Swift-Tuttle 1992. The Swift-Tuttle 1992t observations included IR photometry, several 7-14 micron long-slit spectra of the coma and a time-sequence of more than 150 10 micron broadband images of the coma. An analysis of near-IR images of the inner coma of P/Halley obtained on three consecutive nights in 1986 March showed sunwardjets. We completed our analysis of IR imaging spectrosco-photometric data on comets. We also obtained observations of Comets Hyakutake 1996 B2 and Hale/Bopp 1995 01. We obtained infrared imaging, photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric temporal observations of bright comets using a network of five telescopes, with emphasis on simultaneous observations of comets at many wavelengths with different instruments. Our program offers several unique advantages: 1) rapid observational response to new comets with dedicated infrared telescopes; 2) observations within a few degrees of the sun when comets are near perihelion and 3) access to advanced infrared array imagers and spectrometers. In particular, reduction, analysis, publication and archiving of our Jupiter/sl-9 and Comet Hyakutake infrared data received special emphasis. Instrumentation development included installation of the latest version of the innovative FORTH telescope control and a data acquisition system that enables us to control three telescopes remotely by telephone from anywhere in the world for comet observations in broad daylight. We have

  14. Lidar receivers for picosecond remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoyanov, D. V.; Dreischuh, T. N.

    1992-01-01

    The lidars of picosecond resolution are an attractive tool for remote probing of some highly dynamic objects like sea subsurface waters, small-scale turbulences in the atmosphere, etc. The picosecond lasers are suitable illuminating sources, but the main restrictions are due to the lack of proper receiving methods, combining the both high temporal and amplitude resolution, good sensitivity, short integration time, and wide dynamic range. The methods for short pulse measurements are not suitable for picosecond lidars, operating at low level, with highly dynamic signals. The streak-cameras are of high cost, lower sensitivity, and lower dynamic range (approximately 10(exp 3)). Because of the background, the single quantum regime in photomultipliers (PMT) is ineffective. The sampling of highly dynamic optical signals with resolution less than or equal to 1ns is a serious problem, limiting the application of the high speed PMT-MCP (microchannel plate) in the picosecond lidar systems. The goal of this work is to describe the use of a new photodetection technique which combines the picosecond resolution with the high amplitude resolution, dynamic range, and sensitivity.

  15. Picosecond time-resolved fluorescence studies on excitation energy transfer in a histidine 117 mutant of the D2 protein of photosystem II in Synechocystis 6803.

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, S; Bruce, D

    2000-11-21

    The role of the peripheral reaction center chlorophyll a molecule associated with His117 of the D2 polypeptide in photosystem II was investigated in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 using a combination of steady state, pump-probe, and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Data were obtained from intact cells and isolated thylakoid membranes of a control mutant and a D2-H117T mutant, both of which lacked photosystem I. Excitation energy transfer and trapping were investigated by analyzing the data with a kinetic model that used an exact numerical solution of the Pauli master equation, taking into account available photosystem II spectral and structural information. The results of our kinetic analysis revealed the observed difference in excited-state dynamics between the H117T mutant and the control to be consistent with a retardation of the rate of excitation energy transfer from the peripheral chlorophyll of D2 (Chl at His117) to the electron-transfer pigments and an increase of the rate constant for charge recombination in the H117T mutant. The kinetic model was able to account for the experimentally observed changes in absorption cross section and fluorescence decay kinetics between the control and mutant by invoking changes in only these two rate constants. The results rule out quenching of excitation by a chlorophyll cation radical as a mechanism responsible for the lower efficiency of excitation energy utilization in the H117T mutant. Our work also demonstrates the importance of the chlorophyll associated with His117 of the D2 protein for excitation energy transfer to the PSII electron-transfer pigments and for the effective stabilization of the primary radical pair. PMID:11087370

  16. Experimental study of infrared filaments under different initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirell, Daniel Joseph

    In 1964, four years after the first working laser was constructed, long skinny damage tracks and fluorescence trails were seen inside of certain transparent media that were excited by intense light pulses [1]. What was so remarkable about these features was the narrowness of the spatial profile and their long propagation length in the beam in concert with the very high intensity of the light that would be necessary to produce them. A purely linear model of light propagation through such media was insufficient to explain the results of these experiments and hence a new area of nonlinear optics, latex coined filamentation (to describe the length, slimness, and intensity of the light field), was born. Filament studies begin with a medium that has a nonlinear index of refraction, n¯2, that interacts with an intense beam of light so as to cause it to self-focus. The n¯2 of liquid and solid transparent media is much higher than the n¯ 2 of gases and therefore a much higher intensity of laser source would need to be invented to begin the study of filaments in air. With the advent of the Ti-Sapphire Kerr-lens modelocked laser [2], working in combination with the development of the chirped pulse amplifier system in the mid-1990's, light intensities sufficient to produce filaments in air was realized. Since that time much experimental and theoretical work has been done to better understand some of the additional complexities that arise specifically in the filamentation of light in air using several different wavelengths (UV to IR) and pulsewidths (femto- to pico-seconds). Many theoretical models exist each with a different emphasis on the various physical mechanisms that may produce the features experimentally observed in filaments. The experimental work has sought to give the theoretician better data on some of the properties of filaments such as the: (a) spatial and temporal structure of the beam and of the produced plasma (that arises due to the high intensity light

  17. Infrared study of γ irradiated fluoride optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, A.; Poulain, M.; Boisde, G.; Cardin, V.; Maze, G.

    1986-05-01

    In order to develop infrared optical fiber systems in nuclear media, studies are made to know the behavior on line of fluoride glass optical fibers under irradiation. the increase of induced loss and the influence of the dose rate are given at 2.4 microns. Cycles of rela-xation at room temperature and y ray exposure allows an important bleaching and an unaffected kinetic of losses. Characterization of defects created by y radiation on bulk of ZBLA glass is carried out by means of electron spin resonance (ESR). A linear kinetic of ESR signal with dose is observed and possible models for defects are discussed.

  18. Infrared absorption study of neutron-transmutation-doped germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, I. S.; Haller, E. E.

    1988-01-01

    Using high-resolution far-infrared Fourier transform absorption spectroscopy and Hall effect measurements, the evolution of the shallow acceptor and donor impurity levels in germanium during and after the neutron transmutation doping process was studied. The results show unambiguously that the gallium acceptor level concentration equals the concentration of transmutated Ge-70 atoms during the whole process indicating that neither recoil during transmutation nor gallium-defect complex formation play significant roles. The arsenic donor levels appear at full concentration only after annealing for 1 h at 450 C. It is shown that this is due to donor-radiation-defect complex formation. Again, recoil does not play a significant role.

  19. Study on detecting CFRP composites using pulsed infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Yan; Li, Hui-Juan; Zhao, Yue-Jin; Zhang, Cun-Lin

    2011-08-01

    Composite sandwich structure has been widely used in aerospace due to its lightweight, high stiffness and strength. The quality of the structure is crucial to durability and structural integrity of the rehabilitated the structure, Delaminations, debonding and water ingressing to honeycomb are typical defects in the structure. Defects in the structure will influence the quality of product. Pulse thermography has been an effective NDE method in recent ten years. The technique uses pulse to excite the specimen, because the presence of subsurface defects reduce the diffusion rate, then temperature difference between defect area and sound area will be measured by an infrared camera. Subsurface defects become visible with time delays, it is a non-contact, quickly inspection method. Pulsed infrared thermography has been widely used in aerospace and mechanical manufacture industry because it can offer non-contact, quickly and visual examinations of defects. It is a meaningful research topic to study on quantitative testing with the structure rapidly and non-destructively. Sandwich composites with aluminum facesheet and aluminum honeycomb cores are chosen as study objectives. Some back-drilled holes with different sizes and depths in the specimen are used to simulate delaminations between plies in the strcuture .The paper presents a method for defining the boundaries, quantitatively estimating the sizes of the flaws in the CFRP using pulsed infrared thermography. Processing captured data using splinefitting, measuring the size of the defects by calculating the pixels numbers that exceed the detection threshold and computing areas of defects by binary image. Compared with the designed sizes and areas having defects, the results show that the method offers more than 90% accuracies with reference to the sizes of artificial flaws embedded in the CFRP sheet. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of using detection threshold to inspect the CFRP sheet. The curve of

  20. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  1. Diode-pumped solid state laser sources of picosecond UV pulses for photobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roisse, Eric; Louradour, Frederic; Couderc, Vincent; Barthelemy, Alain; Gaignet, M.; Balembois, Francois; Georges, Patrick M.; Brun, Alain

    1998-05-01

    We realized three different configurations for the production of picoseconds pulses in the UV by a diode-pumped solid-state laser. The first one is based on a diode-pumped Cr:LiSAF oscillator delivering tunable picosecond pulses in the near infrared. A Ti:Sapphire regenerative amplifier increased IR pulses energy up to 4.5 (mu) J. After doubling and tripling in two LBO crystals, we obtained pulses with an energy up to 0.14 (mu) J tunable between 273 and 286 nm. In the second scheme, based on a modelocked Nd:YAG laser, the SHG (KTP) and SFG (LBO) crystals are both inserted inside the cavity. The laser operated in a Q-switched mode-locked regime and produced 1.2 mW of UV average power in pulse of 60 picoseconds duration and 4 W peak power. In the last architecture, we used a resonant enhancement with a ring- cavity. We obtained 54% conversion efficiency in the green for picoseconds pulses at 1064 nm at 100 MHz rep. rate. A special arrangement was implemented for compensation of the birefringence and walk-off of the KTP crystal in the resonant cavity. Conversion to UV in the same cavity is in progress.

  2. The Stanford Picosecond FEL Center

    SciTech Connect

    Schwettman, H.A.; Smith, T.I.; Swent, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    In the past two years, FELs have decisively passed the threshold of scientific productivity. There are now six FEL facilities in the United States and Europe, each delivering more than 2000 hours of FEL beam time per year. at the present time approximately 100 papers are published each in referred journals describing optics experiments performed with FELs. Despite the recent success there are important challenges the FEL facilities must address. At Stanford these challenges include: (1) Providing sufficient experimental time at reasonable cost: At Stanford we provide 2000 hours of experimental time per year at a cost of approximately $500 per hour: We are now studying options for markedly increasing experimental time and decreasing cost per hour. (2) Competing effectively with conventional lasers in the mid-IR: Despite the NRC report we do not intend to concede the mid-IR to conventional lasers. FELs are capable of providing optical beams of exceptional quality and stability, and they can also be remarkable flexible devices. Improvements in our superconducting linac driver and our optical beam conditioning systems will dramatically enhance our FEL experimental capabilities. (3) making the transition from first generation to second generation experiments: Important pump-probe and photon echo experiments have been performed at Stanford and others are feasible using present capabilities. None-the-less we are now investing substantial experimental time to improving signal-to-noise and developing other optical cababilities. (4) Extending operation to the far-infrared where the FEL is unique inits capabilities: {open_quotes}FIREFLY{close_quotes} will extend our FEL capabilities to 100 microns. We are now seeking funds for optical instrumentation. (5) Creating and maintaining a good environment for graduate students.

  3. Infrared Study of Galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrieta, Andres; Lebron, M. E.; Pantoja, C.

    2014-01-01

    The Zone of Avoidance (ZoA) is a region of the sky in which extinction at optical wavelengths is very high due to the gas and dust of the Milky Way (e.g. Kraan-Korteweg et al. 2000, A&ARv, 10, 211). This region is bounded by low latitudes in the galactic coordinate system. A visual inspection of optical or infrared images and HI surveys are still the best ways to identify new galaxy candidates in the ZoA. Many all sky surveys at long wavelengths have been completed and are available through public databases (e.g. WISE, SDSS) allowing their use in other research projects. In this poster we present the results of an infrared study of a small region in the anti-center ZoA taking advantage of IRSA/IPAC archive data. We searched for infrared emission for a sample of 86 galaxies studied in HI by Pantoja et al. (1994, AJ, 108, 92). The WISE space telescope archived data at 3.4, 4.6, 12μm and 22μm was used. Composed images using the 3.4, 4.6 and 12μm bands are presented together with single images of the 22 μm band. Most of the galaxies detected in HI by Pantoja et al. (1994) are bright at 12 and 22μm, indicating the presence of hot dust. This is expected from galaxies with a lot of gas, dust and star formation. On the other hand, most of the 56 galaxies without HI emission are brighter at 3.4 and 4.6μm and had no emission in the 22μm band. These characteristics may be linked to small amount of gas and dust. This research has made use of the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. We gratefully acknowledge the support from the Fundación Comunitaria de Puerto Rico for this project.

  4. Optical Studies on Antimonide Superlattice Infrared Detector Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoglund, Linda; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Ting, David Z.; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Liao, Anna; Keo, Sam; Lee, Michael C.; Nguyen, Jean; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2010-01-01

    In this study the material quality and optical properties of type II InAs/GaSb superlattices are investigated using transmission and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The influence of the material quality on the intensity of the luminescence and on the electrical properties of the detectors is studied and a good correlation between the photodetector current-voltage (IV) characteristics and the PL intensity is observed. Studies of the temperature dependence of the PL reveal that Shockley-Read-Hall processes are limiting the minority carrier lifetime in both the mid-IR wavelength and the long-IR wavelength detector material studied. These results demonstrate that PL spectroscopy is a valuable tool for optimization of infrared detectors.

  5. Picosecond photoresponse in van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Massicotte, M; Schmidt, P; Vialla, F; Schädler, K G; Reserbat-Plantey, A; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Tielrooij, K J; Koppens, F H L

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional crystals such as graphene and transition-metal dichalcogenides demonstrate a range of unique and complementary optoelectronic properties. Assembling different two-dimensional materials in vertical heterostructures enables the combination of these properties in one device, thus creating multifunctional optoelectronic systems with superior performance. Here, we demonstrate that graphene/WSe2/graphene heterostructures ally the high photodetection efficiency of transition-metal dichalcogenides with a picosecond photoresponse comparable to that of graphene, thereby optimizing both speed and efficiency in a single photodetector. We follow the extraction of photoexcited carriers in these devices using time-resolved photocurrent measurements and demonstrate a photoresponse time as short as 5.5 ps, which we tune by applying a bias and by varying the transition-metal dichalcogenide layer thickness. Our study provides direct insight into the physical processes governing the detection speed and quantum efficiency of these van der Waals heterostuctures, such as out-of-plane carrier drift and recombination. The observation and understanding of ultrafast and efficient photodetection demonstrate the potential of hybrid transition-metal dichalcogenide-based heterostructures as a platform for future optoelectronic devices. PMID:26436565

  6. Dielectric breakdown induced by picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1976-01-01

    The damage thresholds of transparent optical materials were investigated. Single picosecond pulses at 1.06 microns, 0.53 microns and 0.35 microns were obtained from a mode locked Nd-YAG oscillator-amplifier-frequency multiplier system. The pulses were Gaussian in space and time and permitted the determination of breakdown thresholds with a reproducibility of 15%. It was shown that the breakdown thresholds are characteristic of the bulk material, which included nine alkali halides, five different laser host materials, KDP, quartz, sapphire and calcium fluoride. The extension of the damage data to the ultraviolet is significant, because some indication was obtained that two- and three-photon absorption processes begin to play a role in determining the threshold. Throughout the visible region of the spectrum the threshold is still an increasing function of frequency, indicating that avalanche ionization is the dominant factor in determining the breakdown threshold. This was confirmed by a detailed study of the damage morphology with a high resolution microscope just above the threshold. The influence of self focusing is discussed, and evidence for beam distortion below the power threshold for complete self focusing is presented, confirming the theory of Marburger.

  7. Picosecond photoresponse in van der Waals heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massicotte, M.; Schmidt, P.; Vialla, F.; Schädler, K. G.; Reserbat-Plantey, A.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Tielrooij, K. J.; Koppens, F. H. L.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional crystals such as graphene and transition-metal dichalcogenides demonstrate a range of unique and complementary optoelectronic properties. Assembling different two-dimensional materials in vertical heterostructures enables the combination of these properties in one device, thus creating multifunctional optoelectronic systems with superior performance. Here, we demonstrate that graphene/WSe2/graphene heterostructures ally the high photodetection efficiency of transition-metal dichalcogenides with a picosecond photoresponse comparable to that of graphene, thereby optimizing both speed and efficiency in a single photodetector. We follow the extraction of photoexcited carriers in these devices using time-resolved photocurrent measurements and demonstrate a photoresponse time as short as 5.5 ps, which we tune by applying a bias and by varying the transition-metal dichalcogenide layer thickness. Our study provides direct insight into the physical processes governing the detection speed and quantum efficiency of these van der Waals heterostuctures, such as out-of-plane carrier drift and recombination. The observation and understanding of ultrafast and efficient photodetection demonstrate the potential of hybrid transition-metal dichalcogenide-based heterostructures as a platform for future optoelectronic devices.

  8. Picosecond lasers with the dynamical operation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheev, N. G.; Morozov, V. B.; Olenin, A. N.; Yakovlev, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    Numerical model for simulation of generation process in advanced pulse-periodic high-peak-power picosecond diode-pumped Nd:YAG and Nd:YLF lasers has been developed. The model adequately describes picosecond pulse formation governed by active and passive mode-locking, negative feedback and adjustable loss level in the oscillator cavity. Optical jitter of output pulses attributed to laser generation development from spontaneous noise level was evaluated using statistical analysis of calculation results. In the presented laser scheme, minimal jitter value on the level ~40 ps was estimated.

  9. Study on laser and infrared attenuation performance of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang-cui; Liu, Qing-hai; Dai, Meng-yan; Cheng, Xiang; Fang, Guo-feng; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Haifeng

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, the weapon systems of laser and infrared (IR) imaging guidance have been widely used in modern warfare because of their high precision and strong anti-interference. However, military smoke, a rapid and effective passive jamming method, can effectively counteract the attack of precision-guided weapons by their scattering and absorbing effects. The traditional smoke has good visible light (0.4-0.76μm) obscurant performance, but hardly any effects to other electromagnetic wave bands while the weapon systems of laser and IR imaging guidance usually work in broad band, including the near-infrared (1-3μm), middle-infrared (3-5μm), far-infrared (8-14μm), and so on. Accordingly, exploiting new effective obscurant materials has attracted tremendous interest worldwide nowadays. As is known, the nano-structured materials have lots of unique properties comparing with the traditional materials suggesting that they might be the perfect alternatives to solve the problems above. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are well-ordered, all-carbon hollow graphitic nano-structured materials with a high aspect ratio, lengths from several hundred nanometers to several millimeters. CNTs possess many unique intrinsic physical-chemical properties and are investigated in many areas reported by the previous studies. However, no application research about CNTs in smoke technology field is reported yet. In this paper, the attenuation performances of CNTs smoke to laser and IR were assessed in 20m3 smoke chamber. The testing wavebands employed in experiments are 1.06μm and 10.6μm laser, 3-5μm and 8-14μm IR radiation. The main parameters were obtained included the attenuation rate, transmission rate, mass extinction coefficient, etc. The experimental results suggest that CNTs smoke exhibits excellent attenuation ability to the broadband IR radiation. Their mass extinction coefficients are all above 1m2·g-1. Nevertheless, the mass extinction coefficients vary with the sampling time

  10. Long life feasibility study for the shuttle infrared telescope facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the feasibility of designing an Infrared Telescope of the 1 meter class which would operate effectively as a Shuttleborne, 14-day Spacelab payload and then be adapted with little modification to work as a 6 month Space station or free flyer payload. The optics configuration and requirements from a previous study were used without modification. In addition, an enhancement to 2 year mission lengths was studied. The cryogenic system selected was a hybrid design with an internal solid Hydrogen tank at 8 Kelvin and an internal superfluid tank at 2K. In addition to the cryogenic design, a detailed look at secondary mirror actuators for chopping, focus and decenter was conducted and analysis and cryo test reported.

  11. Tunable Infrared Laser Instruments for Airborne Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, A.; Diskin, G.; Weibring, P.; Richter, D.; Walega, J. G.; Sachse, G.; Slate, T.; Rana, M.; Podolske, J.

    2008-01-01

    Tunable infrared laser-based instruments on airborne platforms have provided invaluable contributions to atmospheric studies over the past several decades. This paper presents an overview of some recent studies and developments using this approach that were presented at the 2007 Field Laser Applications in Industry and Research (FLAIR, http://www.inoa.it/flair/) conference in Florence, Italy. The present overview only covers select in situ absorption-based instruments that were presented in the airborne session at this conference. In no case are comprehensive details presented. These details can be found in the numerous references given. Additional approaches based upon cavity-enhanced and photoacoustic measurements, which are also making invaluable contributions in airborne atmospheric studies, are not discussed in this brief overview.

  12. The molecular structure of chloritoid: a mid-infrared and near-infrared spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuo; Liu, Qinfu; Cheng, Hongfei; Deng, Yutao; Frost, Ray L

    2015-06-15

    The mineral chloritoid collected from the argillite in the bottom of Yaopo Formation of Western Beijing was characterized by mid-infrared (MIR) and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. The MIR spectra showed all fundamental vibrations including the hydroxyl units, basic aluminosilicate framework and the influence of iron on the chloritoid structure. The NIR spectrum of the chloritoid showed combination (ν+δ)OH bands with the fundamental stretching (ν) and bending (δ) vibrations. Based on the chemical component data and the analysis result from the MIR and NIR spectra, the crystal structure of chloritoid from western hills of Beijing, China, can be illustrated. Therefore, the application of the technique across the entire infrared region is expected to become more routine and extend its usefulness, and the reproducibility of measurement and richness of qualitative information should be simultaneously considered for proper selection of a spectroscopic method for the unit cell structural analysis. PMID:25828887

  13. The molecular structure of chloritoid: A mid-infrared and near-infrared spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kuo; Liu, Qinfu; Cheng, Hongfei; Deng, Yutao; Frost, Ray L.

    2015-06-01

    The mineral chloritoid collected from the argillite in the bottom of Yaopo Formation of Western Beijing was characterized by mid-infrared (MIR) and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. The MIR spectra showed all fundamental vibrations including the hydroxyl units, basic aluminosilicate framework and the influence of iron on the chloritoid structure. The NIR spectrum of the chloritoid showed combination (ν + δ)OH bands with the fundamental stretching (ν) and bending (δ) vibrations. Based on the chemical component data and the analysis result from the MIR and NIR spectra, the crystal structure of chloritoid from western hills of Beijing, China, can be illustrated. Therefore, the application of the technique across the entire infrared region is expected to become more routine and extend its usefulness, and the reproducibility of measurement and richness of qualitative information should be simultaneously considered for proper selection of a spectroscopic method for the unit cell structural analysis.

  14. Tunable Far Infrared Studies in Support of Stratospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, Kelly V.; Park, K.; Nolt, I. G.; Evenson, K. M.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes research done under NASA Grant NAG5-4653. The research performed under this grant has been a collaboration between institutions including the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the University of Oregon, and the NASA Langley Research Center. The program has included fully line-resolved measurements of submillimeter and far infrared spectroscopic line parameters (pressure broadening coefficients and their temperature dependences, and line positions) for the analysis of field measurements of stratospheric constituents, far infrared database improvements, and studies for improved satellite measurements of the Earth's atmosphere. This research program is designed to enable the full utilization of spectra obtained in far infrared/submillimeter field measurements, such as FIRS-2, FILOS, IBEX, SLS, EosMLS, and proposed European Space Agency measurements of OH (e.g., PIRAMHYD and SFINX) for the retrieval of accurate stratospheric altitude profiles of key trace gases involved in ozone layer photochemistry. For the analysis of the spectra obtained in the stratosphere from far infrared measurements it is necessary to have accurate values of the molecular parameters (line positions, strengths, and pressure broadening coefficients) for the measured molecules and for possible interfering species. Knowledge of line positions is in increasingly good shape, with some notable exceptions. The increase in position information includes research that has been performed in the present program of research on HO2, H2O, H2O2, O3, HCl, HF, HBr, HI, CO, OH, and ClO. Examples where further line position studies are necessary include hot band and minor isotopomer lines of some of the major trace species (H2O, O3) and normal lines of some triatomic and larger molecules (NO2). Knowledge of strengths is in generally good shape, since most of the lines are from electric dipole transitions whose intensities are well

  15. Infrared Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lascours, Jean; Albe, Virginie

    2001-01-01

    Describes a series of simple and nontraditional experiments that enable students to discover the properties of infrared radiation by studying the propagation, reflection, diffusion, and refraction of infrared. The experiments rely on two modules, an infrared transmitter and an infrared receiver. (SAH)

  16. Infrared Studies of Optically Pumped Simple Conjugated Polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, Howard E.

    This dissertation presents the results of a series of infrared spectroscopic studies of optically pumped simple conjugated polymers. It had previously been shown that photoexcitation of the simplest of these polymers, trans -polyacetylene, produced infrared absorptions characteristic of solitons, which are self-localized defects that arise as solutions to the model Hamiltonian proposed by Su, Schrieffer and Heeger (SSH). Upon this foundation, four lines of research to study conjugated polymers were pursued. One, a highly sensitive repetition of the previous measurements for carefully isomerized samples of both (CH) _{x} and its deuterated analogue, (CD)_{x}, have allowed the observation of very weak absorptions, previously unobserved. The frequencies and intensities of these absorptions agree with those predicted by recent calculations, based on the SSH model, to be due to a third bound mode of the soliton defect. Two, comparison of the photoinduced absorption spectra of a series of samples of Shirakawa, Durham, and Naarman type polyacetylene samples has demonstrated the dependence of both frequencies and relative oscillator strengths of the infrared peaks upon sample preparation. The amplitude mode formalism, combined with the results of other experiments, allows these data to provide a connection between spectroscopy of excited states and sample morphology. Three, more complicated polymers have been studied. The four largest peaks characteristic of photogenerated bipolarons in polythiophene have similar interpretation to the stronger peaks in polyacetylene; smaller features have been interpreted similarly to the weak absorptions described in the previous paragraph. Absorptions at lower energy have been assigned as due to vibrations of the rings of polythiophene which are not related to the Peierls-type electron-phonon coupling described by SSH. Preliminary data on the newer polymer polyisothianaphthene is also presented. And, four, the inconclusive results of a

  17. Study of near infrared technology for intracranial hematoma detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quan; Ma, Hong Y.; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton

    2000-04-01

    Although intracranial hematoma detection only requires the continuous wave technique of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), previous studies have shown that there are still some problems in obtaining very accurate, reliable hematoma detection. Several of the most important limitations of NIR technology for hematoma detection such as the dynamic range of detection, hair absorption, optical contact, layered structure of the head, and depth of detection are reported in this article. A pulsed light source of variable intensity was designed and studied in order to overcome hair absorption and to increase the dynamic range and depth of detection. An adaptive elastic optical probe was made to improve the optical contact and decrease contact noise. A new microcontroller operated portable hematoma detector was developed. Due to the layered structure of the human head, simulation on a layered medium was analyzed experimentally. Model inhomogeneity tests and animal hematoma tests showed the effectiveness of the improved hematoma detector for intracranial hematoma detection.

  18. Complexation dynamics of CH3SCN and Li(+) in acetonitrile studied by two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, YoungAh; Park, Sungnam

    2015-10-01

    Ion-molecule complexation dynamics were studied with CH3SCN and Li(+) in acetonitrile by vibrationally probing the nitrile stretching vibration of CH3SCN. The nitrile stretching vibration of CH3SCN has a long lifetime (T1 = ∼90 ps) and its frequency is significantly blue-shifted when CH3SCN is bound with Li(+) ions to form a CH3SCNLi(+) complex in acetonitrile. Such spectral properties enable us to distinguish free CH3SCN and the CH3SCNLi(+) complex in solutions and measure their dynamics occurring on hundred picosecond timescales. For the complexation between CH3SCN and Li(+) in acetonitrile, the change in enthalpy (ΔH = -7.17 kJ mol(-1)) and the change in entropy (ΔS = -34.4 J K(-1) mol(-1)) were determined by temperature-dependent FTIR experiments. Polarization-controlled infrared pump-probe (IR PP) spectroscopy was used to measure the population decay and orientational dynamics of free CH3SCN and the CH3SCNLi(+) complex. Especially, the orientational relaxation of the CH3SCNLi(+) complex was found to be almost 3 times slower than those of free CH3SCN because Li(+) ions strongly interact with the neighboring solvents. Most importantly, the complexation dynamics of CH3SCN and Li(+) in acetonitrile were successfully measured in real time by 2DIR spectroscopy for the first time and the dissociation and association time constants were directly determined by using the two-species exchange kinetic model. Our experimental results provide a comprehensive overview of the ion-molecule complexation dynamics in solutions occurring under thermal equilibrium conditions. PMID:26323322

  19. Picosecond Spectroscopy of Reactive Intermediates: Generation and Dynamics of Arylmethyl Ions and Radicals in Solution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jeffrey Allan

    A detailed experimental description is presented of a practical and relatively inexpensive approach for two simultaneous and independent types of picosecond spectroscopic measurements. Two data collection subsystems, (1) a picosecond pump-probe transient absorption/emission spectrometer and (2) a streak camera system for time-dependent measurements of absorption and emission, were developed as independent subsystems within an integrated system based on a single mode-locked Nd:YAG laser which concurrently supplies each subsystem with picosecond pulses. Considerations concerning electrical and optical interfacing between the two subsystems are discussed. With these two subsystems, picosecond-pulsed photolyses of diphenylmethyl chloride, diphenylmethyl bromide, triphenylmethyl chloride, triphenylmethyl bromide, and triphenylacetyl chloride in acetonitrile, methylene chloride, and cyclohexane were studied. The dependence of the yields of radicals and ions are discussed with respect to the nature of the starting compound and the solvent. Ion-pair dynamics were monitored with subsystems 1 and 2. Microscopic rate constants for the collapse of the contact ion pair (CIP), separation of the CIP, and reformation of the CIP from the separated ions were calculated. The photophysics and photochemistry of the triphenylmethyl radical generated from triphenylmethyl chloride, and triphenylacetyl chloride, and tert-butyl triphenylperacetate in solution were studied by means of a unique three-pulse picosecond transient absorption technique. The emission lifetime of the excited triphenylmethyl radical was measured as a function of solvent polarity with subsystem 2. These data were collectively used to gain an understanding of the electronically excited triphenylmethyl radical.

  20. Development of rike techniques using picosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, M.W.; Pellin, M.J.; Biwer, B.M.; Gruen, D.M.

    1987-09-25

    The sensitivity of the Raman-induced Kerr effect is greatly enhanced through the use of picosecond lasers. Experiments in dilute solutions of benzene indicate that sensitivity at the monolayer level is achievable. Applications to transparent media, to fluorescing samples, and to in situ measurements of electrode surfaces are discussed.

  1. Ultrasensitive coherent Raman technique with picosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, M.W.; Pellin, M.J.; Biwer, B.M.; Gruen, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Raman-induced Kerr effect is greatly enhanced through the use of picosecond lasers. Experiments in dilute solutions of benzene indicate that sensitivity at the monolayer level is achievable. Applications to transparent media, to fluorescing samples, and to in situ measurements of electrode surfaces are discussed.

  2. [Study on the inclusion compound of avermectin by infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Shen, Wen; Zhang, Guang-Hua; Guo, Ning; Li, Yun-Tao

    2014-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the formation and effect of inclusion complex of Avermectin-beta-cyclodextrin based on the accommodation property of beta-cyclodextrin's molecular cavity. The inclusion complex of Averrnectin-beta-cyclodextrin was prepared using saturated solution method and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was employed to determine its entraping efficiency. The formation of Avermectin-beta-cyclodextrin inclusion complex was also demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy(IR). The change of chemical structure produced by photocatalysis of Abamectin was analyzed and the effect of inclusion complex to strengthen the photolysis stability of Abamectin's chemical structure was studied. The results show that the entraping efficiency of the inclusion complex was 40. 5%. The IR analysis presents that the intermolecular hydrogen bond was formed in the Avermectin-beta-cyclodextrin inclusion complex, indicating the composition effect was different from physical mixture. The lactones structure of Avermectin Bla can be photodecomposed and disrupted. After decomposition, the infrared stretching vibration peak of C-O-C structure disappeared and the lactone bond was significantly broken. The lactones structure of avermectin Bla was covered by the inclusion molecular loci in beta-cyclodextrin after the formation of avermectin-beta-cyclodextrin inclusion complex, providing a good photophobic protection for C-O-C structure in the macrocyclic lactone structure of avermectin Bla and improving the photostability of avermectin Bla molecule. The innovation of this study is that the structure and the characters of the prepared avermectin-beta-cyclodextrin inclusion complex were analyzed using spectrum methods. This inclusion complex is expected to be the ideal intermediate in the construction of protective controlled release formulation of avermectin. PMID:25095407

  3. Infrared spectrometric study of acid-degradable glasses.

    PubMed

    De Maeyer, E A P; Verbeeck, R M H; Vercruysse, C W J

    2002-08-01

    The composition of glasses used in glass-ionomer cements affects their leaching behavior and hence the properties of the cement. The aim of this study was to correlate the composition and leaching behavior of these glasses with their infrared absorption characteristics. The wavenumber of the absorption band of the Si-O asymmetric stretching vibration shifts to a higher value with decreasing content of mono- and bivalent cations in the glass. This effect can be ascribed to the influence of these extraneous ions on the glass network order and connectivity. Preferential leaching of these ions induces an increase of asymmetric stretching vibration and a general modification of the band profile. The results can be correlated with the x-ray diffraction characteristics of the glass. PMID:12147746

  4. Infrared spectroscopy of molecules with nanorod arrays: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Tardieu, Clément; Vincent, Grégory; Haïdar, Riad; Collin, Stéphane

    2016-04-15

    Nanorod arrays with diameters much smaller than the wavelength exhibit sharp resonances with strong electric-field enhancement and angular dependence. They are investigated for enhanced infrared spectroscopy of molecular bonds. The molecule 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane (CS) is taken as a reference, and its complex permittivity is determined experimentally in the 3-5 μm wavelength range. When grafted on silicon nitride nanorods, we show numerically that its weak absorption bands due to chemical bond vibrations can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude compared with unstructured thin film. We propose a figure of merit (FoM) to assess the performance of this spectroscopic scheme, and we study the impact of the nanorod cross section on the FoM. PMID:27082334

  5. Raman and infrared spectroscopic study of kamphaugite-(Y)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    We have studied the carbonate mineral kamphaugite-(Y)(CaY(CO3)2(OH)·H2O), a mineral which contains yttrium and specific rare earth elements. Chemical analysis shows the presence of Ca, Y and C. Back scattering SEM appears to indicate a single pure phase. The vibrational spectroscopy of kamphaugite-(Y) was obtained using a combination of Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Two distinct Raman bands observed at 1078 and 1088 cm-1 provide evidence for the non-equivalence of the carbonate anion in the kamphaugite-(Y) structure. Such a concept is supported by the number of bands assigned to the carbonate antisymmetric stretching mode. Multiple bands in the ν4 region offers further support for the non-equivalence of carbonate anions in the structure. Vibrational spectroscopy enables aspects of the structure of the mineral kamphaugite-(Y) to be assessed.

  6. Study of surfaces using near infrared optical fiber spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.; Arendale, W. A.; Hughes, C.

    1995-01-01

    The measurement and control of cleanliness for critical surfaces during manufacturing and in service provides a unique challenge for fulfillment of environmentally benign operations. Of particular interest has been work performed in maintaining quality in the production of bondline surfaces in propulsion systems and the identification of possible contaminants. This work requires an in-depth study of the possible sources of contamination, methodologies to identify contaminants, discrimination between contaminants and chemical species caused by environment, and the effect of particular contaminants on the bondline integrity of the critical surfaces. This presentation will provide an introduction to the use of optical fiber spectrometry in a nondestructive measurement system for process monitoring and how it can be used to help clarify issues concerning surface chemistry. Correlation of the Near Infrared (NIR) spectroscopic results with Optical Stimulated Electron Emission (OSEE) and ellipsometry will also be presented.

  7. Ultrafast infrared studies of complex ligand rearrangements in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Christine K.

    2003-05-31

    The complete description of a chemical reaction in solution depends upon an understanding of the reactive molecule as well as its interactions with the surrounding solvent molecules. Using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy it is possible to observe both the solute-solvent interactions and the rearrangement steps which determine the overall course of a chemical reaction. The topics addressed in these studies focus on reaction mechanisms which require the rearrangement of complex ligands and the spectroscopic techniques necessary for the determination of these mechanisms. Ligand rearrangement is studied by considering two different reaction mechanisms for which the rearrangement of a complex ligand constitutes the most important step of the reaction. The first system concerns the rearrangement of a cyclopentadienyl ring as the response of an organometallic complex to a loss of electron density. This mechanism, commonly referred to as ''ring slip'', is frequently cited to explain reaction mechanisms. However, the ring slipped intermediate is too short-lived to be observed using conventional methods. Using a combination of ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations it has been shown that the intermediate exists, but does not form an eighteen-electron intermediate as suggested by traditional molecular orbital models. The second example examines the initial steps of alkyne polymerization. Group 6 (Cr, Mo, W) pentacarbonyl species are generated photolytically and used to catalyze the polymerization of unsaturated hydrocarbons through a series of coordination and rearrangement steps. Observing this reaction on the femto- to millisecond timescale indicates that the initial coordination of an alkyne solvent molecule to the metal center results in a stable intermediate that does not rearrange to form the polymer precursor. This suggests that polymerization requires the dissociation of additional carbonyl ligands before rearrangement can occur. Overall

  8. Space-Based Thermal Infrared Studies of Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainzer, A.; Usui, F.; Trilling, D. E.

    Large-area surveys operating at mid-infrared wavelengths have proven to be a valuable means of discovering and characterizing minor planets. Through the use of radiometric models, it is possible to derive physical properties such as diameters, albedos, and thermal inertia for large numbers of objects. Modern detector array technology has resulted in a significant improvement in spatial resolution and sensitivity compared with previous generations of spacebased infrared telescopes, giving rise to a commensurate increase in the number of objects that have been observed at these wavelengths. Spacebased infrared surveys of asteroids therefore offer an effective method of rapidly gathering information about the orbital and physical properties of small-body populations. The AKARI, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)/ Near- Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE), Spitzer Space Telescope, and Herschel Space Observatory missions have significantly increased the number of minor planets with well-determined diameters and albedos.

  9. Crosstalk study of near infrared InGaAs detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue; Tang, Hengjing; Li, Tao; Fan, Cui; Shao, Xiumei; Li, Jianwei; Wei, Jun; Gong, Haimei

    2016-05-01

    Crosstalk characteristics of high density FPA detectors attract widespread attention in the application of electro-optical systems. Crosstalk characteristics of near-infrared (NIR) InGaAs photodiodes and focal plane arrays (FPAs) were studied in this paper. The mesa type detector was investigated by using laser beam induced current technique (LBIC) to measure the absorption outside the designed photosensitive area, and the results show that the excess absorption enlarges the crosstalk of the adjacent pixels. The structure optimization using the effective absorption layer between the pixels can effectively reduce the crosstalk to 2.5%. The major crosstalk components of the optimization photodiode come from the electronic signal caused by carrier lateral diffusion. For the planar type detectors, test structures were used to compare the crosstalk of different structures, and the guard ring structure shows good suppression of the crosstalk. Then the back-illuminated 32x32 InGaAs photodiodes with 30μm pitch were designed, and LBIC was used to measure its lateral diffusion of the effective carriers and fill factor of photosensitive area. The results indicate that the fill factor of detectors can reach up to 98% when the diffusion region is optimized, and the minimum response exists between two neighborhood pixels. Based on these crosstalk measurement results and optimizing structure designs, the linear InGaAs photodiodes were designed and thus the InGaAs FPA assembly was fabricated. The assembly shows higher electro-optical performance and good improvement on crosstalk. The assembly was applied in infrared imaging system and modulation transfer function (MTF) of FPA assembly was calculated to be above 0.50. The clear image based on FPA assembly was obtained.

  10. Humidity-dependent dynamic infrared linear dichroism study of a poly(ester urethane).

    PubMed

    Schoonover, Jon R; Steckle, Warren P; Cox, Jonathan D; Johnston, Cliff T; Wang, Yanqia; Gillikin, Angela M; Palmer, Richard A

    2007-05-01

    Fourier transform infrared techniques, infrared difference spectroscopy and dynamic infrared linear dichroism (DIRLD), have been utilized to explore the effects of humidity and water absorption on a poly(ester urethane). An environmental infrared microbalance cell was used to measure the infrared spectra as a function of humidity and accompanying weight change for the absorption-desorption processes. The infrared difference data indicate that exposure to humidity affects the hydrogen-bonding interactions in the polymer. Dynamic infrared linear dichroism studies in tensile deformation mode as a function of humidity demonstrate how changes in water content affect the orientational response of functional groups. Complex behavior as a function of humidity for functional groups involved in hydrogen bonding indicates that water absorbed by the polymer affects the micro-environments near these functional groups. PMID:16950649

  11. Humidity-dependent dynamic infrared linear dichroism study of a poly(ester urethane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonover, Jon R.; Steckle, Warren P., Jr.; Cox, Jonathan D.; Johnston, Cliff T.; Wang, Yanqia; Gillikin, Angela M.; Palmer, Richard A.

    2007-05-01

    Fourier transform infrared techniques, infrared difference spectroscopy and dynamic infrared linear dichroism (DIRLD), have been utilized to explore the effects of humidity and water absorption on a poly(ester urethane). An environmental infrared microbalance cell was used to measure the infrared spectra as a function of humidity and accompanying weight change for the absorption-desorption processes. The infrared difference data indicate that exposure to humidity affects the hydrogen-bonding interactions in the polymer. Dynamic infrared linear dichroism studies in tensile deformation mode as a function of humidity demonstrate how changes in water content affect the orientational response of functional groups. Complex behavior as a function of humidity for functional groups involved in hydrogen bonding indicates that water absorbed by the polymer affects the micro-environments near these functional groups.

  12. An investigation on the hole quality during picosecond laser helical drilling of stainless steel 304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongyu; Di, Jianke; Zhou, Ming; Yan, Yu; Wang, Rong

    2015-05-01

    Precision drilling with ultra-short pulse lasers (e.g., picosecond and femtosecond) has been advocated to significantly improve the quality of the micro-holes with reduced recast layer thickness and no heat-affected zone. However, a combination of high-power picosecond laser with helical drilling strategy in laser drilling has rarely been reported in previous studies. In the present study, a series of micro-holes with circular, triangular, rectangular, and rhombic shapes (diameter 0.6 mm) were manufactured on stainless steel 304 using a newly developed laser drilling system which incorporated a picosecond laser and a high-speed laser beam rotation apparatus into a five-axis positioning platform. The quality of the helical drilled holes, e.g., recast layer, micro-crack, circularity, and conicity, were evaluated using an optical microscope, an optical interferometer, and a scanning electron microscope. In addition, the microstructure of the samples was investigated following etching treatment. It was demonstrated that the entrance ends, the exit ends, and the side walls of the micro-holes were quite smooth without accumulation of spattering material and formation of recast layer and micro-crack. No tapering phenomenon was observed, and the circularity of the holes was fairly good. There was no distinctive difference with regard to the microstructure between the edges of the holes and the bulk material. Picosecond laser helical drilling can be an effective technique for manufacturing of micro-holes with very high quality. The development of high-power picosecond laser would promote picosecond laser drilling to be more industrial relevance in the future.

  13. GIRL: German Infrared Laboratory. Telescope study, phase B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegelmilch, R.; Zeiss, C.

    1981-01-01

    The construction and mounting of mirrors for an infrared telescope are described. Tests conducted to determine the thermal and stress characteristics of various types of mounting for main and collection mirrors are also discussed.

  14. Laser ablation of CFRP using picosecond laser pulses at different wavelengths from UV to IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolynski, Alexander; Herrmann, Thomas; Mucha, Patrick; Haloui, Hatim; L'huillier, Johannes

    Laser processing of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) has a great industrial relevance for high performance structural parts in airplanes, machine tools and cars. Through-holes drilled by nanosecond laser pulses show thermal induced molten layers and voids. Recently, picosecond lasers have demonstrated the ability to drill high-efficient and high-quality rivet through-holes. In this paper a high-power picosecond laser system operating at different wavelengths (355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm) has been used for CFRP ablation experiments to study the influence of different laser parameters in terms of machining quality and processing time.

  15. Towards microfluidic reactors for in situ synchrotron infrared studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverwood, I. P.; Al-Rifai, N.; Cao, E.; Nelson, D. J.; Chutia, A.; Wells, P. P.; Nolan, S. P.; Frogley, M. D.; Cinque, G.; Gavriilidis, A.; Catlow, C. R. A.

    2016-02-01

    Anodically bonded etched silicon microfluidic devices that allow infrared spectroscopic measurement of solutions are reported. These extend spatially well-resolved in situ infrared measurement to higher temperatures and pressures than previously reported, making them useful for effectively time-resolved measurement of realistic catalytic processes. A data processing technique necessary for the mitigation of interference fringes caused by multiple reflections of the probe beam is also described.

  16. Radiometric Study of Soil Profiles in the Infrared Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomareva, T. V.; Ponomarev, E. I.

    2016-02-01

    The applicability of radiometric survey of soil profiles in the infrared range for the analysis of soil physical properties was studied. Radiometric data were obtained for different dates of the growing season for a number of soil profiles. The specificity of temperature profiles of texture-differentiated soils (Luvisols and Retisols) as related to weather conditions of the growing season was examined. The correlation analysis showed a close relationship between the air and surface soil temperatures and between the radiometric and thermodynamic soil temperatures in the upper 10 cm. In the studied profiles, the gradient of radiometric temperatures reached 0.5-0.8°C/cm in the humus horizons and sharply decreased at the depth of more than 15-20 cm. The gradient analysis of radiometric images made it possible to outline the boundaries of soil horizons. For the texture-differentiated soils, the most distinct boundaries were established between the gray-humus AY horizon and the underlying eluvial EL horizon in podzolic soils and between the AY horizon and the underlying humus-eluvial AEL horizon in gray soils.

  17. High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  18. Double regenerative amplification of picosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhen-ao; Chen, Li-yuan; Bai, Zhen-xu; Chen, Meng; Li, Gang

    2012-04-01

    An double Nd:YAG regenerative amplification picosecond pulse laser is demonstrated under the semiconductor saturable absorption mirror(SESAM) mode-locking technology and regenerative amplification technology, using BBO crystal as PC electro-optic crystal. The laser obtained is 20.71ps pulse width at 10 KHz repetition rate, and the energy power is up to 4W which is much larger than the system without pre-amplification. This result will lay a foundation for the following amplification.

  19. Design study of a laser-cooled infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehlen, Markus P.; Boncher, William L.; Love, Steven P.

    2015-03-01

    The performance of a solid-state optical refrigerator is the result of a complex interplay of numerous optical and thermal parameters. We present a first preliminary study of an optical cryocooler using ray-tracing techniques. A numerical optimization identified a non-resonant cavity with astigmatism. This geometry offered more efficient pump absorption by the YLF:10%Yb laser-cooling crystal compared to non-resonant cavities without astigmatism that have been pursued experimentally so far. Ray tracing simulations indicate that ~80% of the incident pump light can absorbed for temperatures down to ~100 K. Calculations of heat loads, cooling power, and net payload heat lift are presented. They show that it is possible to cool a payload to a range of 90-100 K while producing a net payload heat lift of 80 mW and 300 mW when pumping a YLF:10%Yb crystal with 20 W and 50 W at 1020 nm, respectively. This performance is suited to cool HgCdTe infrared detectors that are used for sensing in the 8-12 μm atmospheric window. While the detector noise would be ~6× greater at 100 K than at 77 K, the laser refrigerator would introduce no vibrations and thus eliminate sources of microphonic noise that are limiting the performance of current systems.

  20. Infrared thermography based studies on mobile phone induced heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Soumya, C.; Jayakumar, T.; Philip, John

    2015-07-01

    Here, we report the skin temperature rise due to the absorption of radio frequency (RF) energy from three handheld mobile phones using infrared thermography technique. Experiments are performed under two different conditions, viz. when the mobile phones are placed in soft touch with the skin surface and away from the skin surface. Additionally, the temperature rise of mobile phones during charging, operation and simultaneous charging and talking are monitored under different exposure conditions. It is observed that the temperature of the cheek and ear regions monotonically increased with time during the usage of mobile phones and the magnitude of the temperature rise is higher for the mobile phone with higher specific absorption rate. The increase in skin temperature is higher when the mobile phones are in contact with the skin surface due to the combined effect of absorption of RF electromagnetic power and conductive heat transfer. The increase in the skin temperature in non-contact mode is found to be within the safety limit of 1 °C. The measured temperature rise is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The empirical equation obtained from the temperature rise on the cheek region of the subjects correlates well with the specific absorption rate of the mobile phones. Our study suggests that the use of mobile phones in non-contact mode can significantly lower the skin temperature rise during its use and hence, is safer compared to the contact mode.

  1. Infrared thermometry study of nanofluid pool boiling phenomena

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Infrared thermometry was used to obtain first-of-a-kind, time- and space-resolved data for pool boiling phenomena in water-based nanofluids with diamond and silica nanoparticles at low concentration (<0.1 vol.%). In addition to macroscopic parameters like the average heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux [CHF] value, more fundamental parameters such as the bubble departure diameter and frequency, growth and wait times, and nucleation site density [NSD] were directly measured for a thin, resistively heated, indium-tin-oxide surface deposited onto a sapphire substrate. Consistent with other nanofluid studies, the nanoparticles caused deterioration in the nucleate boiling heat transfer (by as much as 50%) and an increase in the CHF (by as much as 100%). The bubble departure frequency and NSD were found to be lower in nanofluids compared with water for the same wall superheat. Furthermore, it was found that a porous layer of nanoparticles built up on the heater surface during nucleate boiling, which improved surface wettability compared with the water-boiled surfaces. Using the prevalent nucleate boiling models, it was possible to correlate this improved surface wettability to the experimentally observed reductions in the bubble departure frequency, NSD, and ultimately to the deterioration in the nucleate boiling heat transfer and the CHF enhancement. PMID:21711754

  2. Infrared thermometry study of nanofluid pool boiling phenomena.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Craig; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hu, Lin-Wen; McKrell, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Infrared thermometry was used to obtain first-of-a-kind, time- and space-resolved data for pool boiling phenomena in water-based nanofluids with diamond and silica nanoparticles at low concentration (<0.1 vol.%). In addition to macroscopic parameters like the average heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux [CHF] value, more fundamental parameters such as the bubble departure diameter and frequency, growth and wait times, and nucleation site density [NSD] were directly measured for a thin, resistively heated, indium-tin-oxide surface deposited onto a sapphire substrate. Consistent with other nanofluid studies, the nanoparticles caused deterioration in the nucleate boiling heat transfer (by as much as 50%) and an increase in the CHF (by as much as 100%). The bubble departure frequency and NSD were found to be lower in nanofluids compared with water for the same wall superheat. Furthermore, it was found that a porous layer of nanoparticles built up on the heater surface during nucleate boiling, which improved surface wettability compared with the water-boiled surfaces. Using the prevalent nucleate boiling models, it was possible to correlate this improved surface wettability to the experimentally observed reductions in the bubble departure frequency, NSD, and ultimately to the deterioration in the nucleate boiling heat transfer and the CHF enhancement. PMID:21711754

  3. A picosecond high pressure gas switch

    SciTech Connect

    Cravey, W.R.; Poulsen, P.P.; Pincosy, P.A.

    1992-06-01

    Work is being done to develop a high pressure gas switch (HPGS) with picosecond risetimes for UWB applications. Pulse risetimes on the order of 200 picoseconds have been observed at 1 kHz prf and 1 atmosphere. Calculations show that switching closure times on the order of tens of picoseconds can be achieved at high pressures and higher electric fields. A voltage hold-off of 1 MV/cm has been measured at 10 atmospheres and several MV/cm appears possible with the HPGS. With these high electric field levels, energy storage of tens of Joules in a reasonably sized package is achievable. Initial HPGS performance has been characterized on the WASP pulse generator at LLNL. A detailed description of the switch used for initial testing is given. Switch recovery times of 1-ms have been measured at 1 atmosphere. Data on the switching uniformity, voltage hold-off recovery, and pulse repeatability, is presented. In addition, a physics switch model is described and results are compared with lab data.

  4. Population Studies of Quasars in Infrared and X-Ray Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Joseph; Singal, Jack

    2016-01-01

    We present newly assembled multiwavelength datasets for studying the luminosity evolution, density evolution, and luminosity functions of quasars in infrared and X-ray light, as well as preliminary results for these parameters in infrared. We use infrared and X-ray data from NASA's Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Chandra X-ray satellites respectively, in combination with optically identified quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We present results for the infrared population parameters, including luminosity evolution which suggests that quasars have evolved more slowly in infrared than in other bands. We also demonstrate new techniques for recovering the intrinsic luminosity-luminosity correlations in datasets with different wavebands in the presence of artificial correlations introduced by survey limits and similar redshift evolutions.

  5. An Infrared Laboratory for the Study of Planetary Materials (IRIS): First Results of Impact Rock Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlok, A.; Ahmedi, M.; Hiesinger, H.

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of a study about the mid-infrared reflect ance properties of impact rocks from the zördlinger Ries impact crater. Spectra from separated components of suevite, melt glass, devitrified glass and matrix show a high degree of similarity, reflecting the high abundance of amorphous materials.

  6. Prospects for Chemical Evolution Studies in the Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatte, Niranjan; Genzel, Reinhard

    Near infrared instrumentation at 4 and 8 meter class telescopes has grown rapidly in the past few years with the advent of 10242 and 20482 detector arrays. We present a brief review of high resolution spectroscopic capabilities available world-wide, with an eye on new developments, e.g. spatially resolved spectroscopy offered by integral field instruments. Observing at near-infrared wavelengths has its own quirks. We discuss observing strategies to get past the limits of high background (including both thermal background and background due to OH sky emission lines), variations in atmospheric transmission, and detector constraints. Special attention is given to the subject of OH suppression/avoidance, which can significantly increase the sensitivity in the J, H and short K windows. This is especially important for (fainter) high redshift targets, where the rest frame visible diagnostic lines are shifted into the near infrared.

  7. Airfoil transition and separation studies using an infrared imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartenberg, Ehud; Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An infrared imaging system was used to detect the thermal signature of boundary-layer flow regimes on a NACA 0012 airfoil from zero angle of attack up to separation. The boundary-layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow and the onset of separation could be seen on the airfoil thermograms. The findings were compared against the behavior of aluminum foil tufts observable both visually and with the infrared imaging system. This arrangement offers the option of using the infrared imaging system both for flow regime detection through surface thermography and flow visualization by the aluminum foil tufts. Ultimately the surface temperature changes due to variation in the angle of attack of a lifting surface provide a means for interpretation of the boundary-layer flow regimes.

  8. IN SITU INFRARED STUDY OF CATALYTIC DECOMPOSITION OF NO

    SciTech Connect

    KHALID ALMUSAITEER; RAM KRISHNAMURTHY; STEVEN S.C. CHUANG

    1998-08-18

    The growing concerns for the environment and increasingly stringent standards for NO emission have presented a major challenge to control NO emissions from electric utility plants and automobiles. Catalytic decomposition of NO is the most attractive approach for the control of NO emission for its simplicity. Successful development of an effective catalyst for NO decomposition will greatly decrease the equipment and operation cost of NO control. Due to lack of understanding of the mechanism of NO decomposition, efforts on the search of an effective catalyst have been unsuccessful. Scientific development of an effective catalyst requires fundamental understanding of the nature of active site, the rate-limiting step, and an approach to prolong the life of the catalyst. Research is proposed to study the reactivity of adsorbates for the direct NO decomposition and to investigate the feasibility of two novel approaches for improving catalyst activity and resistance to sintering. The first approach is the use of silanation to stabilize metal crystallites and supports for Cu-ZSM-5 and promoted Pt catalysts; the second is utilization of oxygen spillover and desorption to enhance NO decomposition activity. An innovative infrared reactor system will be used to observe and determine the dynamic behavior and the reactivity of adsorbates during NO decomposition, oxygen spillover, and silanation. A series of experiments including X-ray diffraction, temperature programmed desorption, temperature programmed reaction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy will be used to characterized the catalysts. The information obtained from this study will provide a scientific basis for developing an effective catalyst for the NO decomposition under practical flue gas conditions.

  9. In Situ Infrared Study of Catalytic Decomposition of NO

    SciTech Connect

    Cher-Dip Tan; Steven S.C. Chuang

    1997-07-17

    The growing concerns for the environment and increasingly stringent standards for NO emission have presented a major challenge to control NO emmissions from electric utility plants and automobiles. Catalytic decomposition of NO is the most attractive approach for the control of NO emission for its simplicity. Successful development of an effective catalyst for NO decomposition will greatly decrease the equipment and operation cost of NO control. Due to lack of understanding of the mechanism of NO decomposition, efforts on the search of an effective catalyst have been unsuccesful. Scientific development of an effective catalyst requires fundamental understanding of the nature of active site, the rate-limiting step, and an approach to prolong the life of the catalyst. Research is proposed to study the reactivity of adsorbates for the direct NO decomposition and to investigate the feasibility of two novel approaches for improving catalyst activity and resistance to sintering. The first approach is the use of silanation to stabilize metal crystallites and supports for Cu-ZSM-5 and promoted Pt catalysts; the second is utilization of oxygen spillover and desorption to enhance NO decomposition activity. An innovative infrared reactor system will be used to observe and determine the dynamic behavior and the reactivity of adsorbates during NO decomposition, oxygen spillover, and silanation. A series of experiments including X-ray diffraction, temperature programmed desorption, temperature programmed reaction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy will be used to characterized the catalysts. The information obtained from this study will provide a scientific basis for developing an effective catalyst for the NO decomposition under practical flue gas conditions.

  10. Acidic properties of sulfated zirconia: An infrared spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Babou, F.; Coudurier, G.; Vedrine, J.C.

    1995-04-01

    Sulfated zirconia with S content of 2 wt.% equivalent to complete coverage of its surface was studied by infrared spectroscopy. At least four sulfated species were identified and exhibited an important and reversible sensitivity to water. These equilibria were demonstrated to exist by the study of adsorption of incremental amounts of water. D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O isotopically enriched water molecules were used to assist interpretation of IR spectra. To characterize acidity features, the probe molecules butane, CO, and H{sub 2}O (as weak bases) or pyridine (as a strong base) were adsorbed. Two Lewis acid sites (L{sub 1} and L{sub 2}) were observed and one Bronsted site (B) related to the zirconia support (L{sub 1}) and the sulfated species (L{sub 2}, B). They were evidenced by pyridine adsorption which was shown to partly displace adsorbed sulfate species. With the help of previous theoretical calculations using an ab initio method and representing the zirconia surface by a mononuclear zirconium complex, it is emphasized that the sulfated zirconia can be visualized as a H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} compound grafted onto the surface of zirconia in a way which makes it very sensitive to water but in a reversible way. Its acidity is similar to that of sulfuric acid but it is not really superacidic. Comparison with other oxides leads us to suggest that the cationic charge borne by the metallic cation is of prime importance for the acidity strength. The role of water on the acidic and catalytic properties for n-butane isomerization reaction is emphasized. 33 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Cirrus microphysics and infrared radiative transfer: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Thomas P.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Valero, Francisco P. J.; Kinne, Stefan

    1988-01-01

    Coincident measurements of cirrus cloud microphysical properties such as particle size distribution and particle shape and morphology, and measurements of infrared intensity and flux were made. Data was acquired nearly simultaneously in space and time by a KingAir in cloud and by an ER-2 at an altitude of 19 km. Upwelling infrared intensities and fluxes measured from the ER-2 and observations of cloud particle size distributions and particle phase and morphology made from the KingAir are discussed. Broad-band flux measurements were available both in and below the cirrus layer from the KingAir.

  12. An infrared and luminescence study of tritiated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Kosteski, T.; Kherani, N.P.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.; Shmayda, W.

    1997-07-01

    Tritium has been incorporated into amorphous silicon. Infrared spectroscopy shows new infrared vibration modes due to silicon-tritium (Si-T) bonds in the amorphous silicon network. Si-T vibration frequencies are related to Si-H vibration frequencies by simple mass relationships. Inelastic collisions of {beta} particles, produced as a result of tritium decay, with the amorphous silicon network results in the generation of electron-hole pairs. Radiative recombination of these carriers is observed. Dangling bonds associated with the tritium decay reduce luminescence efficiency.

  13. Study on Senna alata and its different extracts by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adiana, M. A.; Mazura, M. P.

    2011-04-01

    Senna alata L. commonly known as candle bush belongs to the family of Fabaceae and the plant has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory, analgesic, laxative and antiplatelet-aggregating activity. In order to develop a rapid and effective analysis method for studying integrally the main constituents in the medicinal materials and their extracts, discriminating the extracts from different extraction process, comparing the categories of chemical constituents in the different extracts and monitoring the qualities of medicinal materials, we applied Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) associated with second derivative infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy (2D-IR) to study the main constituents of S. alata and its different extracts (extracted by hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and methanol in turn). The findings indicated that FT-IR and 2D-IR can provide many holistic variation rules of chemical constituents. Use of the macroscopical fingerprint characters of FT-IR and 2D-IR spectrum can identify the main chemical constituents in medicinal materials and their extracts, but also compare the components differences among similar samples. In a conclusion, FT-IR spectroscopy combined with 2D correlation analysis provides a powerful method for the quality control of traditional medicines.

  14. Picosecond optical vortex pulse illumination forms a monocrystalline silicon needle.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fuyuto; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Hidai, Hirofumi; Yamane, Keisaku; Morita, Ryuji; Omatsu, Takashige

    2016-01-01

    The formation of a monocrystalline silicon needle by picosecond optical vortex pulse illumination was demonstrated for the first time in this study. The dynamics of this silicon needle formation was further revealed by employing an ultrahigh-speed camera. The melted silicon was collected through picosecond pulse deposition to the dark core of the optical vortex, forming the silicon needle on a submicrosecond time scale. The needle was composed of monocrystalline silicon with the same lattice index (100) as that of the silicon substrate, and had a height of approximately 14 μm and a thickness of approximately 3 μm. Overlaid vortex pulses allowed the needle to be shaped with a height of approximately 40 μm without any changes to the crystalline properties. Such a monocrystalline silicon needle can be applied to devices in many fields, such as core-shell structures for silicon photonics and photovoltaic devices as well as nano- or microelectromechanical systems. PMID:26907639

  15. Probing carrier dynamics in nanostructures by picosecond cathodoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Merano, M; Sonderegger, S; Crottini, A; Collin, S; Renucci, P; Pelucchi, E; Malko, A; Baier, M H; Kapon, E; Deveaud, B; Ganière, J-D

    2005-11-24

    Picosecond and femtosecond spectroscopy allow the detailed study of carrier dynamics in nanostructured materials. In such experiments, a laser pulse normally excites several nanostructures at once. However, spectroscopic information may also be acquired using pulses from an electron beam in a modern electron microscope, exploiting a phenomenon called cathodoluminescence. This approach offers several advantages. The multimode imaging capabilities of the electron microscope enable the correlation of optical properties (via cathodoluminescence) with surface morphology (secondary electron mode) at the nanometre scale. The broad energy range of the electrons can excite wide-bandgap materials, such as diamond- or gallium-nitride-based structures that are not easily excited by conventional optical means. But perhaps most intriguingly, the small beam can probe a single selected nanostructure. Here we apply an original time-resolved cathodoluminescence set-up to describe carrier dynamics within single gallium-arsenide-based pyramidal nanostructures with a time resolution of 10 picoseconds and a spatial resolution of 50 nanometres. The behaviour of such charge carriers could be useful for evaluating elementary components in quantum computers, optical quantum gates or single photon sources for quantum cryptography. PMID:16306988

  16. Picosecond and femtosecond laser ablation of hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexander A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Kar, Ajoy K.; Khabbaz, Marouan

    1996-12-01

    In this study, the interaction of picosecond and femtosecond pulsed laser radiation with human dental tissue was investigated experimentally, as this unexplored field is expected to be a potential alternative in powerful laser processing of biomedical structures. Dentin ablation rate experiments were performed by using teeth sections of different thickness. Dental tissue samples were irradiated in air with i) a regenerative amplifier laser at 1064 nm, pulse duration 110 ps, ii) the second harmonic laser at 532 nm, pulse duration 100 ps, and iii) a picosecond tunable dye amplifier at 595 nm, pulse width 800 fs. In all the experiments the pulse repetition rate was 10 Hz. The ablation rate per pulse at different energy fluence settings was calculated by measuring the time needed for the perforation of the whole dental sample thickness. Short laser pulses can confine thermal energy within the optical zone, which maximizes photothermal and photomechanical mechanisms of interaction. Tissue ablation rates were found to be comparable to or better than other nanosecond lasers, and left smooth surfaces, free of thermal damage.

  17. Picosecond optical vortex pulse illumination forms a monocrystalline silicon needle

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Fuyuto; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Hidai, Hirofumi; Yamane, Keisaku; Morita, Ryuji; Omatsu, Takashige

    2016-01-01

    The formation of a monocrystalline silicon needle by picosecond optical vortex pulse illumination was demonstrated for the first time in this study. The dynamics of this silicon needle formation was further revealed by employing an ultrahigh-speed camera. The melted silicon was collected through picosecond pulse deposition to the dark core of the optical vortex, forming the silicon needle on a submicrosecond time scale. The needle was composed of monocrystalline silicon with the same lattice index (100) as that of the silicon substrate, and had a height of approximately 14 μm and a thickness of approximately 3 μm. Overlaid vortex pulses allowed the needle to be shaped with a height of approximately 40 μm without any changes to the crystalline properties. Such a monocrystalline silicon needle can be applied to devices in many fields, such as core–shell structures for silicon photonics and photovoltaic devices as well as nano- or microelectromechanical systems. PMID:26907639

  18. Amplitude and polarization instability of picosecond light pulses exciting a semiconductor optical resonator.

    PubMed

    Markarov, V A; Pershin, S M; Podshivalov, A A; Zadoian, R S; Zheludev, N I

    1983-11-01

    The first results of our study of nonlinear shift, distortion of form, and destruction of picosecond light pulses interacting with a nonlinear Fabry-Perot resonator in a strongly nonstationary regime are reported. Polarization instability of the light pulse transmitted through a nonlinear resonator has been observed. PMID:19718182

  19. Infrared laser sealing of porcine tissues: preliminary in vivo studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Kerr, Duane; Latimer, Cassandra; Rosenbury, Sarah B.; Giglio, Nicholas C.; Schweinsberger, Gino R.; Perkins, William C.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Ward, Arlen; Nau, William H.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-02-01

    We are exploring infrared (IR) lasers as an alternative energy modality to radiofrequency (RF) and ultrasonic (US) devices intended to provide rapid surgical hemostasis with minimal collateral zones of thermal damage and tissue necrosis. Previously, a 1470-nm IR laser sealed and cut ex vivo porcine renal arteries of 1-8 mm in 2 s, yielding burst pressures < 1200 mmHg (compared to normal systolic blood pressure of 120 mmHg) and thermal coagulation zones < 3 mm (including the seal). This preliminary study describes in vivo testing of a laser probe in a porcine model. A prototype, fiber optic based handheld probe with vessel/tissue clasping mechanism was tested on blood vessels < 6 mm diameter using incident 1470-nm laser power of 35 W for 1-5 s. The probe was evaluated for hemostasis after sealing isolated and bundled vasculature of abdomen and hind leg, as well as liver and lung parenchyma. Sealed vessel samples were collected for histological analysis of lateral thermal damage. Hemostasis was achieved in 57 of 73 seals (78%). The probe consistently sealed vasculature in small bowel mesentery, mesometrium, and gastro splenic and epiploic regions. Seal performance was less consistent on hind leg vasculature including saphenous arteries and bundles and femoral and iliac arteries. Collagen denaturation averaged 1.6 mm in 8 samples excised for histologic examination. A handheld laser probe sealed porcine vessels in vivo. With further improvements in probe design and laser parameter optimization, IR lasers may provide an alternative to RF and US vessel sealing devices.

  20. A Satellite Infrared Technique for Diurnal Rainfall Variability Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anagnostou, Emmanouil

    1998-01-01

    Reliable information on the distribution of precipitation at high temporal resolution (infrared (IR) brightness temperatures from geostationary platforms have a weak physical connection to precipitation, however, their high sampling frequency makes them attractive in studying the temporal evolution of cloudiness and convection. On the other hand, microwave-based (MW) observations from lower sampling-frequency polar-orbiting platforms can provide a better physical connection to precipitating hydrometeors. A recent invention in rainfall estimation from a combination of these two sensors involves adjustment of IR estimates using co-existing MW-based precipitation data on a monthly basis. These techniques use the MW data to remove systematic errors in IR rain estimates, while retaining the high sampling frequency of IR observations (approximately every 15-30 minutes). Perhaps of even greater importance to climate and hydrometeorological applications is the separation of mesoscale convective systems into a portion of rain associated with deep convection (hereafter called convective precipitation), and to precipitation falling from more widespread anvil clouds. This current work focuses on estimation of tropical convective and stratiform rainfall. We attempt to answer fundamental questions, such as : is estimation of convective and stratiform precipitation from IR feasible? If so, how accurate can this be? What is the scale dependence of the IR algorithm's performance? To address these questions, quantitative comparisons are performed between coincident IR- and MW-based instantaneous rainfall estimates at the MW 85 Ghz resolution (-12.5 km). Our data set spans a three-month period (January to March, 1996) of MW and IR observations over northern South America (15N-15S and 35W-80W), which includes the Amazon river basin.

  1. Studies of Arctic Middle Atmosphere Chemistry using Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenmaier, Rodica

    The objective of this Ph.D. project is to investigate Arctic middle atmosphere chemistry using solar infrared absorption spectroscopy. These measurements were made at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka, Nunavut, which is operated by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC). This research is part of the CANDAC/PEARL Arctic Middle Atmosphere Chemistry theme and aims to improve our understanding of the processes controlling the stratospheric ozone budget using measurements of the concentrations of stratospheric constituents. The instrument, a Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, has been specifically designed for high-resolution measurements over a broad spectral range and has been used to measure reactive species, source gases, reservoirs, and dynamical tracers at PEARL since August 2006. The first part of this research focuses on the optimization of ozone retrievals, for which 22 microwindows were studied and compared. The spectral region from 1000 to 1005 cm-1 was found to be the most sensitive in both the stratosphere and troposphere, giving the highest number of independent pieces of information and the smallest total error for retrievals at Eureka. Similar studies were performed in coordination with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change for nine other species, with the goal of improving and harmonizing the retrieval parameters among all Infrared Working Group sites. Previous satellite validation exercises have identified the highly variable polar conditions of the spring period to be a challenge. In this work, comparisons between the 125HR and ACE-FTS (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier transform spectrometer) from 2007 to 2010 have been used to develop strict criteria that allow the ground and satellite-based instruments to be confidently compared. After applying these criteria, the differences between the two instruments were generally

  2. Study of Banana Dehydration Using Sequential Infrared Radiation and Freeze-Drying

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The drying and quality characteristics of banana slices processed with a sequential infrared radiation and freeze-drying (SIRFD) method were investigated. To study the drying characteristics of bananas during the infrared (IR) and hot air predehydration, Cavendish bananas slices with 5 mm thickness...

  3. Infrared Studies of Epsilon Aurigae in Eclipse 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Kloppenborg, B.; Wall, R.; Howell, S.; Hoard, D.; Rayner, J.; Bus, S.; Tokunaga, A.; Sitko, M.; Russell, R.; Lynch, D.; Brafford, S.; Hammel, H.; Whitney, B.; Orton, G.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Hora, J.; Hoffman, W.; Skemer, A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a series of observations of the enigmatic long period eclipsing binary epsilon Aurigae during its eclipse interval 2009-2011, using near-infrared spectra & photometry obtained with SpeX/IRTF, Spitzer/IRAC, mid-infrared data with BASS on IRTF & AEOS, MIRSI on IRTF and MIRAC4 on MMT, along with MIRSI on IRTF and MIRAC4 on MMT & Denver's TNTCAM2 at WIRO, and an Optec SSP-4 J&H photometer at Mt.Evans Observatory. The objective of these observations include: (1) confirm the appearance of CO absorption bands at and after mid-eclipse, due to the dark disk, and (2) seek evidence for any mid-infrared solid state spectral features from particles in the disk, seen during different portions of total eclipse. The results to date show that the infrared eclipse is less deep than the optical one, and the implied disk temperature has begun to increase from 550K toward 1100K as eclipse progresses past midpoint and heated portions of the disk come into view. Material properties of the disk are consistent with large particles. This work was supported in part by the bequest of William Herschel Womble in support of astronomy at the University of Denver, by NSF grant 1016678 and JPL RSA 1414715 to the University of Denver, by NASA ADP grant NNX09AC73G to the University of Cincinnati, by The Aerospace Corporation's Independent Research and Development Program.

  4. Structural and bonding environments derived from infrared spectroscopic studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrared spectroscopy, generally in the form of FTIR, has been used to characterize the organic matter in animal manure and relevant materials or fractions. The FT-IR spectra of most manure samples resemble the Type III spectra of humic substances with strong aliphatic characters. However, the absor...

  5. Using infrared thermography to study freezing in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that determine when and to what extent a plant will freeze are complex. While thermocouples have served as the main method of monitoring the freezing process in plants, infrared thermography offers distinct advantages, and the use of this latter technology has provided new insights on the p...

  6. Infrared generation and wave-mixing studies in cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, W.; Stockdale, J.A.D.; Dodhy, A.; Compton, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    A Nd-YAG pumped dye laser and heat pipe has been used to investigate stimulated infrared production, wave mixing, and ionization in cesium vapor near the one-photon resonant 7P/sub 1/2,3/2/ fine structure states.

  7. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic Studies Of Wheat In The Mid Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinger, Jill M.; Griffiths, Peter R.

    1989-12-01

    Official grain standards of the United States state that wheat may be divided into seven classes which are: Durum, Red Durum, Hard Red Spring, Hard Red Winter, Soft Red Winter, White, and Mixed.1 Most end uses of wheat involve converting the grain into flour through one of a variety of grinding methods. The quality of wheat-based products is often very dependent upon the type or class of wheat which was used to make the flour. Pasta products, for example, are made almost exclusively from the flour of durum wheats, which are the hardest of the wheats listed above. The highest quality breads are produced using flour from wheats classed as hard, whereas cakes, cookies and pastries are considered best when flour from wheats classed as soft are used. It is obvious then that the capability of determining the class of a particular wheat, especially with respect to hardness, is of economic importance to growers, processors, and merchants of wheat and wheat products. Hardness has been measured in many different ways 2-5 but, as of yet, no one method has become the method of choice. This paper reports on the use of principal components analysis (PCA) of mid infrared diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra of diluted ground wheats to aid in the classification of those wheats with respect to their hardness. The theory and mathematics involved in a principal component analysis have been described elsewhere.9

  8. Observational Studies of Protoplanetary Disks at Mid-Infrared Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Telesco, Charles; Wright, Christopher; Packham, Christopher; Marinas, Naibi

    2013-07-01

    We have used mid-infrared cameras on 8-to-10 m class telescopes to study the properties of young circumstellar disks. During the initial phases of this program we examined a large sample of mid-IR images of standard stars delivered by T-ReCS at Gemini South to evaluate its on-sky performance as characterized by, for example the angular resolution, the PSF shape, and the PSF temporal stability, properties that are most relevant to our high-angular resolution study of disks. With this information we developed an Interactive Data Language (IDL) package of routines optimized for reducing the data and correcting for image defects commonly seen in ground-based mid-IR data. We obtained, reduced, and analyzed mid-IR images and spectra of several Herbig Ae/Be disks (including HD 259431, MWC 1080, VV Ser) and the debris disk (β Pic), and derived their physical properties by means of radiative transfer modeling or spectroscopic decomposition and analyses. These results are highlighted here. During this study, we also helped commission CanariCam, a new mid-IR facility instrument built by the University of Florida for the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) on La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. CanariCam is an imager with spectroscopic, polarimetric, and coronagraphic capabilities, with the dual-beam polarimetry being a unique mode introduced with CanariCam for the first time to a 10 m telescope at mid-IR wavelengths. It is well known that measurements of polarization, originating from aligned dust grains in the disks and their environments, have the potential to shed light on the morphologies of the magnetic fields in these regions, information that is critical to understanding how stars and planets form. We have obtained polarimetric data of several Herbig Ae/Be disks and YSOs, and the data reduction and analyses are in process. We present preliminary results here. This poster is based upon work supported by the NSF under grant AST-0903672 and AST-0908624 awarded to C.M.T.

  9. Dynamical test of Davydov-type solitons in acetanilide using a picosecond free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fann, Wunshain; Rothberg, Lewis; Roberson, Mark; Benson, Steve; Madey, John; Etemad, Shahab; Austin, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Picosecond infrared excitation experiments on acetanilide, an α-helix protein analog, indicate that the anomalous 1650-cm-1 band which appears on cooling of acetanilide crystals persists for at least several microseconds following rapid pulsed heating. The ground-state recovery time is 15+/-5 psec, consistent with a conventional mode strongly coupled to the phonon bath. We therefore suggest that the unusual temperature-dependent spectroscopy of acetanilide can be accounted for by slightly nondegenerate hydrogen atom configurations in the crystal.

  10. Raman and infrared studies of synthetic Maya Blue pigment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza, Layra; Manciu, Felicia; Ramirez, Alejandra; Chianelli, Russell

    2008-10-01

    A fascinating aspect of Maya pigments is that despite the environmentally harsh humidity and high temperatures they resist fading and they have unprecedented stability. In this investigation, we address the question of how organic dye binds to inorganic palygorskite to form a pigment similar to Maya Blue. We also address how such binding might be affected by varying the proportion of dye relative to that of the mineral, and by varying the length of heating time used in preparation of the pigment. Our analysis by Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopies proves the partial elimination of the selection rules for the centrosymmetric indigo, and shows the disappearance of the indigo N-H bonding, as the organic molecules incorporate into palygorskite material. Infrared data confirm the loss of zeolitic water and a partial removal of structural water after the heating process. Evidence of bonding between palygorskite and indigo through oxygen is revealed by both spectroscopic measurements.