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Sample records for pig gastric glands

  1. Lineage and clonal development of gastric glands.

    PubMed

    Nomura, S; Esumi, H; Job, C; Tan, S S

    1998-12-01

    Individual gastric glands of the stomach are composed of cells of different phenotypes. These are derived from multipotent progenitor stem cells located at the isthmus region of the gland. Previous cell lineage analyses suggest that gastric glands, as in the colon and small intestine, are invariably monoclonal by adult stages. However, little is known about the ontogenetic progression of glandular clonality in the stomach. To examine this issue, we employed an in situ cell lineage marker in female mice heterozygous for an X-linked transgene. We found that stomach glands commence development as polyclonal units, but by adulthood (6 weeks), the majority progressed to monoclonal units. Our analysis suggests that at least three progenitor cells are required to initiate the development of individual gastric glands if they are analyzed just after birth. Hence, unlike the colon and small intestine, stomachs showed a significant fraction (10-25%) of polyclonal glands at adult stages. We suggest that these glands persist from polyclonal glands present in the embryonic stomach and hypothesize that they represent a subpopulation of glands with larger numbers of self-renewing stem cells. PMID:9851847

  2. Luminal perfusion of isolated gastric glands.

    PubMed

    Waisbren, S J; Geibel, J; Boron, W F; Modlin, I M

    1994-04-01

    We have extended to rabbit gastric glands the technique for perfusing single isolated renal tubules. We isolated glands by hand dissection and used concentric glass pipettes to hold them and perfuse their lumina. Parietal cells (PCs), which tended to be located toward the gland opening, were identified by their pyramidal shape, large size, and autofluorescence. Chief cells (CCs) were identified by their round shape and smaller size. In some experiments, we perfused the lumen with hydroxypyrenetrisulfonate, a pH-sensitive fluorophore, at pH 7.4 and used digital image processing to monitor luminal pH (pH1). Solutions were buffered with N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid to pH 7.4 at 37 degrees C. With fast perfusion, we found no evidence of decreased pH1, even with stimulation by 10 microM carbachol. With slow perfusion, pH1 often fell below the dye's sensitive range (pH < 5), especially at low perfusate buffering power. In other experiments, we loaded cells with the pH-sensitive dye 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein and monitored intracellular pH (pHi) in multiple individual PCs and CCs in a single gland. Mean pHi was 7.21 +/- 0.02 (n = 136 cells) for PCs and 7.27 +/- 0.03 (n = 103) for CCs. To examine the response to decreased pH1 and basolateral pH (pHb), we lowered pHb to 6.4 or lowered pH1 to 3.4 or 1.4. Lowering pHb to 6.4 for approximately 1 min caused pHi to fall reversibly by 0.39 +/- 0.05 (n = 53) in PCs and 0.58 +/- 0.03 (n = 50) in CCs. Lowering pH1 to 3.4 or 1.4 caused no significant pHi changes in PCs (n = 38 and 82) or in CCs (n = 44 and 77). Carbachol did not affect the response to changes in pH1 or pHb. We conclude that the apical surfaces of PCs and CCs are unusually resistant to extreme pH gradients. PMID:8178950

  3. Mammary gland tumors in irradiated and untreated guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Hoch-Ligeti, C.; Liebelt, A.G.; Congdon, C.C.; Stewart, H.L.

    1986-01-01

    This is a report of mammary gland tumors from 62 guinea pigs. The tumors arose in the terminal ductal-lobular units as either lobular acinar carcinoma or cystadenocarcinoma or as papillary carcinomas within large ducts near the mammilla. About half the number of the males had terminal ductal-lobular carcinomas and all but 2 of the papillary duct carcinomas also arose in males. Large tumors frequently exhibited squamous, chondromatous, osseous, fatty and myoepitheliomatous types of tissues. In 2 irradiated males and 1 female the tumors metastasized. Whole-body irradiation did not produce significant changes in the number or sex distribution or in the morphology of mammary gland tumors in inbred or outbred guinea pigs. All females had cystic ovaries without increase in granulosa cells, 24 (66.6%) had uterine tumors and 13 (34.2%) had adrenal gland tumors; all males had atrophic testes, 5 (16.5%) had testicular and 6 (22.2%) had adrenal gland tumors.

  4. [STUDYING OF MORPHOLOGICAL PECULIARITIES OF SUBMANDIBULAR SALIVARY GLANDS AFTER GASTRIC RESECTION IN EXPERIMENT].

    PubMed

    Usenko, A Yu; Kosenko, K; Savitskaya, I M

    2016-03-01

    The impact of gastric resection on the submandibular salivary gland (SSG) state, using histological and histochemical methods of investigation in experiment, was studied up. A relative mass of a SSG after gastric resection conduction have had reduced, and the accompanying changes in stroma were revealed with the gland's secretion enhancement. Essential dystrophic changes in the SSG parenchyma and stroma after gastric resection conduction may cause a pronounced disorders of their function. PMID:27514096

  5. Gastric adenocarcinoma of fundic gland type: Endoscopic and clinicopathological features.

    PubMed

    Tohda, Gen; Osawa, Takeshi; Asada, Yasuyuki; Dochin, Masaki; Terahata, Shintarou

    2016-02-25

    Gastric adenocarcinoma of fundic gland type (GA-FG) with chief cell differentiation was recently proposed as an extremely rare type of gastric adenocarcinoma. Here, we report 4 cases of GA-FG with chief cell differentiation. Endoscopic features included a submucosal tumor shape or a flat shape, whitish discoloration and dilated vessels on the surface. The tumors were located in the upper or middle third of the stomach. All cases were preoperatively diagnosed as GA-FG by biopsy, and endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed. Resected specimens revealed well-differentiated adenocarcinomas resembling chief cells. Tumor cells were diffusely positive for pepsinogen-I, but partially positive for H(+)/K(+)-ATPase in scattered locations around the tumor margin. Despite the presence of minimal invasion of the carcinoma into the submucosal layer, which was observed in two cases, neither lymphatic nor venous invasion was detected in any of the cases. Finally, all cases showed less aggressive clinical behavior with low grade malignancy. PMID:26962407

  6. Study on the role of gastric Helicobacter infection in gross pathological and histological lesions of the stomach in finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Szeredi, L; Palkovics, G; Solymosi, N; Tekes, L; Méhesfalvi, J

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of gastric Helicobacter infection in finishing pigs and the influence of this infection on gastric lesions was studied. Stomachs of 89 finishing pigs from 27 randomly selected herds were sampled at the slaughterhouse. Forty cases (Group A) were selected based upon the presence of gross pathological lesions in the pars oesophagea, and further 49 cases were obtained at random (Group B). Three samples of gastric tissue (junction of pars oesophagea and pars cardiaca, fundic area, and pyloric area) were collected from each stomach for histological and immunohistochemical examination. Helicobacter antigen was detected in 76 cases (85.4%). No association was found between the presence of Helicobacter in the stomach and the occurrence of gross pathological lesions in the pars oesophagea or gastritis detected on histological examination. However, a significant association was found between the occurrence of Helicobacter in the pyloric area and the presence of erosions/ulcers in the pars oesophagea (OR: 7.01, p = 0.022) in Group B. A significant association was also evident between the presence of Helicobacter and glandular lesions (dilatation of the glands + glandular abscess + degeneration of glandular epithelial cells). In conclusion, Helicobacter infection seems to be a contributing factor to pathological changes in the stomach of finishing pigs. PMID:16156132

  7. Binding and internalization of /sup 125/I-CCK8 in fundic gastric glands

    SciTech Connect

    Praissman, M.; Walden, M.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have characterized the binding and internalization of cholecystokinin (CCK8), a peptide hormone involved in the regulation of gastric secretory processes, in isolated fundic gastric glands (GG) from guinea pig. Surface bound and internalized /sup 125/I-CCK8 radioligand (RL) were differentiated by glycine-HCl treatment. At 24/sup 0/C, steady state binding (2.9%) of RL to surface sites was found at 5 min and remained constant for 2 h; internalized /sup 125/I-CCK8 increased steadily and was 4- and 6-fold greater at 30 and 120 min, respectively, than surface bound RL. At 4/sup 0/C, surface binding reached 2.7% at 30 min and continued to increase to 4.5% at 180 min; internalized RL levels reached only 1.4% at 180 min. The metabolic inhibitor, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl-hydrazone, reduced the amount of RL internalized by 80% in 30 min at 24/sup 0/C while reducing surface binding by only 20%. The lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine reduced the amounts of /sup 125/I-CCK8 internalized by 21 and 34% at 100 and 500 uM, respectively, without affecting surface binding. Dansylcadaverine at 250uM had no effect on the binding or internalization of RL. At 24/sup 0/C, approx. 55% of surface bound /sup 125/I-CCK8 dissociated in 1 h and 67% in 2 h; less than 15% of internalized RL dissociated in the same time period. These data indicate that the internalization of /sup 125/I-CCK-8 is a rapid and energy dependent process, and that internalized RL may undergo lysosomal action.

  8. Novel insights of the gastric gland organization revealed by chief cell specific expression of moesin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lixin; Hatakeyama, Jason; Zhang, Bing; Makdisi, Joy; Ender, Cody; Forte, John G

    2009-02-01

    ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) proteins play critical roles in epithelial and endothelial cell polarity, among other functions. In gastric glands, ezrin is mainly expressed in acid-secreting parietal cells, but not in mucous neck cells or zymogenic chief cells. In looking for other ERM proteins, moesin was found lining the lumen of much of the gastric gland, but it was not expressed in parietal cells. No significant radixin expression was detected in the gastric glands. Moesin showed an increased gradient of expression from the neck to the base of the glands. In addition, the staining pattern of moesin revealed a branched morphology for the gastric lumen. This pattern of short branches extending from the glandular lumen was confirmed by using antibody against zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) to stain tight junctions. With a mucous neck cell probe (lectin GSII, from Griffonia simplicifolia) and a chief cell marker (pepsinogen C), immunohistochemistry revealed that the mucous neck cells at the top of the glands do not express moesin, but, progressing toward the base, mucous cells showing decreased GSII staining had low or moderate level of moesin expression. The level of moesin expression continued to increase toward the base of the glands and reached a plateau in the base where chief cells and parietal cells abound. The level of pepsinogen expression also increased toward the base. Pepsinogen C was located on cytoplasmic granules and/or more generally distributed in chief cells, whereas moesin was exclusively expressed on the apical membrane. This is a clear demonstration of distinctive cellular expression of two ERM family members in the same tissue. The results provide the first evidence that moesin is involved in the cell biology of chief cells. Novel insights on gastric gland morphology revealed by the moesin and ZO-1 staining provide the basis for a model of cell maturation and migration within the gland. PMID:19074636

  9. Novel insights of the gastric gland organization revealed by chief cell specific expression of moesin

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lixin; Hatakeyama, Jason; Zhang, Bing; Makdisi, Joy; Ender, Cody; Forte, John G.

    2009-01-01

    ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) proteins play critical roles in epithelial and endothelial cell polarity, among other functions. In gastric glands, ezrin is mainly expressed in acid-secreting parietal cells, but not in mucous neck cells or zymogenic chief cells. In looking for other ERM proteins, moesin was found lining the lumen of much of the gastric gland, but it was not expressed in parietal cells. No significant radixin expression was detected in the gastric glands. Moesin showed an increased gradient of expression from the neck to the base of the glands. In addition, the staining pattern of moesin revealed a branched morphology for the gastric lumen. This pattern of short branches extending from the glandular lumen was confirmed by using antibody against zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) to stain tight junctions. With a mucous neck cell probe (lectin GSII, from Griffonia simplicifolia) and a chief cell marker (pepsinogen C), immunohistochemistry revealed that the mucous neck cells at the top of the glands do not express moesin, but, progressing toward the base, mucous cells showing decreased GSII staining had low or moderate level of moesin expression. The level of moesin expression continued to increase toward the base of the glands and reached a plateau in the base where chief cells and parietal cells abound. The level of pepsinogen expression also increased toward the base. Pepsinogen C was located on cytoplasmic granules and/or more generally distributed in chief cells, whereas moesin was exclusively expressed on the apical membrane. This is a clear demonstration of distinctive cellular expression of two ERM family members in the same tissue. The results provide the first evidence that moesin is involved in the cell biology of chief cells. Novel insights on gastric gland morphology revealed by the moesin and ZO-1 staining provide the basis for a model of cell maturation and migration within the gland. PMID:19074636

  10. Gastric protein hydrolysis of raw and roasted almonds in the growing pig.

    PubMed

    Bornhorst, Gail M; Drechsler, Krista C; Montoya, Carlos A; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J; Singh, R Paul

    2016-11-15

    Gastric protein hydrolysis may influence gastric emptying rate and subsequent protein digestibility in the small intestine. This study examined the gastric hydrolysis of dietary protein from raw and roasted almonds in the growing pig as a model for the adult human. The gastric hydrolysis of almond proteins was quantified by performing tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequent image analysis. There was an interaction between digestion time, stomach region, and almond type for gastric protein hydrolysis (p<0.05). Gastric emptying rate of protein was a significant (p<0.05) covariate in the gastric protein hydrolysis. In general, greater gastric protein hydrolysis was observed in raw almonds (compared to roasted almonds), hypothesized to be related to structural changes in almond proteins during roasting. Greater gastric protein hydrolysis was observed in the distal stomach (compared to the proximal stomach), likely related to the lower pH in the distal stomach. PMID:27283660

  11. Inhibition of gastric secretion in guinea pig by relatively low dose ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Batzri, S.; Catravas, G.

    1988-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of a single dose of ionizing radiation on gastric secretion in awake guinea pigs equipped with a permanent gastric cannula. Changes in gastric secretion were measured using a dye dilution technique. Infusion of histamine increased acid and fluid output and there was a positive correlation (r = 0.93) between the two. Total body irradiation with 400 cGy, like cimetidine, suppressed acid and fluid secretion under basal conditions and during histamine stimulation by 50-90%. Recovery from the radiation damage was only partial after one week. Irradiation inhibited the rise in gastric juice volume during histamine stimulation and also reduced the normal gain in body weight of the guinea pig. These results demonstrate that ionizing radiations have an immediate and long lasting effects on the gastric mucosal function of the guinea pig.

  12. Distribution of calcified concretions and calcium ions in the pig pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Lewczuk, B; Przybylska, B; Wyrzykowski, Z

    1994-01-01

    Serial sections of pig pineal glands were stained with von Kossa's and Alizarin red S methods to determine the occurrence and localization of calcified concretions. In the pineal glands of pigs aged eight months, concretions were not found. A small number of concretions was observed in all investigated pineal glands of three years old pigs. The concretions were distributed in the connective tissue of the pineal capsule and septa. The potassium pyroantimonate method was used for ultracytochemical localization of calcium ions. In pinealocytes, precipitates were observed in nuclei, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasmic matrix. Single precipitates were found on the outer membranes of dense bodies, multivesicular bodies and lysosomes. There were no differences in the amount or the localization of precipitates between dark and light pinealocytes and between pinealocytes of animals aged both eight months and three years. The results suggest that: (1) the calcified concretions in the pig pineal gland are formed by the leptomeningeal tissue without participation of the pinealocytes, (2) cytoplasmic dense bodies, specific components of the pig pineal gland, are only slightly involved in calcium turnover in the pinealocytes. PMID:7758619

  13. Supplementing monosodium glutamate to partial enteral nutrition slows gastric emptying in preterm pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging evidence suggests that free glutamate may play a functional role in modulating gastroduodenal motor function. We hypothesized that supplementing monosodium glutamate (MSG) to partial enteral nutrition stimulates gastric emptying in preterm pigs. Ten-day-old preterm, parenterally fed pigs re...

  14. [Prevalence of gastric lesions in the pars proventricularis in finishing pigs at slaughter in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    van den Berg, A; Brülisauer, F; Regula, G

    2005-07-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted at two large abattoirs in the winter 2003/04 to determine the prevalence of gastric lesions in Swiss finishing pigs. The stomachs of 1897 pigs from 107 slaughter groups were examined for macroscopic epithelial lesion of the pars proventricularis. Severe hyperceratosis, erosion, ulceration and constriction at the transition between oesophagus and stomach were described as gastric lesions. Lesions were observed in 36% of all animals, with slaughter group prevalence ranging from 0% to 94%. Ulceration or constriction was present in four percent of the examined pigs. Associations between gastric lesions, farm management data, and data obtained at ante and post mortem examinations conducted at the slaughterhouse were analysed. A significantly higher prevalence of gastric lesions was found in pigs originating from conventional housing systems compared to pigs raised on farms with 'animal-friendly' housing systems providing straw bedding and outdoor exercise to pigs. In addition, significantly higher prevalence was observed in pigs originating from herds with clinical signs of tail biting and peritarsitis. PMID:16041976

  15. Role of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 in gastric accommodation in conscious guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Junichi; Oshima, Tadayuki; Kondo, Takashi; Tomita, Toshihiko; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Hattori, Tomohisa; Kase, Yoshio; Miwa, Hiroto

    2012-04-01

    We report the establishment of a new model for measuring gastric tone and liquid meal-induced accommodation in conscious guinea pigs and the role played by transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1). An indwelling polyethylene bag was placed in proximal stomachs of 5-week-old male Hartley guinea pigs. Gastric tone was measured by distending the bag and recording changes in intrabag pressure at various volumes. Gastric accommodation was measured by administering liquid meals and recording intrabag pressure over time. N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) (a nitric-oxide synthase inhibitor), atropine sulfate (atropine) (a muscarinic receptor antagonist), allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) (a TRPA1 agonist), or theophylline-7-(N-4-isopropylphenyl) acetamide (HC-030031) (a selective TRPA1 antagonist) was administered 15 to 60 min before measurement. Gastric tone was increased by stepwise distension of the bag and was further significantly increased by L-NAME and significantly decreased by atropine. A liquid meal (15% w/v; 1.7 kcal) significantly decreased intrabag pressure 5 to 20 min after administration, indicating gastric accommodation; this was completely suppressed by L-NAME and further enhanced by atropine. AITC significantly increased gastric tone; this increase was decreased by HC-030031 and atropine. A combination of AITC and L-NAME significantly increased gastric tone compared with L-NAME alone. HC-030031 alone significantly decreased gastric tone. Liquid meal-induced gastric accommodation was significantly suppressed by pretreatment with AITC. We established a new model for measuring gastric tone and accommodation in conscious guinea pigs. TRPA1 activation suppresses gastric accommodation by increasing gastric tone through cholinergic neuronal pathways. PMID:22262922

  16. Effect of Irradiation on Microvascular Endothelial Cells of Parotid Glands in the Miniature Pig

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Junji; Yan Xing; Gao Runtao; Mao Lisha; Cotrim, Ana P.; Zheng Changyu; Zhang Chunmei; Baum, Bruce J.; Wang Songlin

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of irradiation on microvascular endothelial cells in miniature pig parotid glands. Methods and Materials: A single 25-Gy dose of irradiation (IR) was delivered to parotid glands of 6 miniature pigs. Three other animals served as non-IR controls. Local blood flow rate in glands was measured pre- and post-IR with an ultrasonic Doppler analyzer. Samples of parotid gland tissue were taken at 4 h, 24 h, 1 week, and 2 weeks after IR for microvascular density (MVD) analysis and sphingomyelinase (SMase) assay. Histopathology and immunohistochemical staining (anti-CD31 and anti-AQP1) were used to assess morphological changes. MVD was determined by calculating the number of CD31- or AQP1-stained cells per field. A terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) apoptosis assay was used to detect apoptotic cells. The activity of acid and neutral Mg{sup 2+}-dependent SMase (ASMase and NSMase, respectively) was also assayed. Results: Local parotid gland blood flow rate decreased rapidly at 4 h post-IR and remained below control levels throughout the 14-day observation period. Parotid MVD also declined from 4 to 24 hours and remained below control levels thereafter. The activity levels of ASMase and NSMase in parotid glands increased rapidly from 4 to 24 h post-IR and then declined gradually. The frequency of detecting apoptotic nuclei in the glands followed similar kinetics. Conclusions: Single-dose IR led to a significant reduction of MVD and local blood flow rate, indicating marked damage to microvascular endothelial cells in miniature pig parotid glands. The significant and rapid increases of ASMase and NSMase activity levels may be important in this IR-induced damage.

  17. The physicochemical characterisation of pepsin degraded pig gastric mucin.

    PubMed

    Abodinar, Atiga; Tømmeraas, Kristoffer; Ronander, Elena; Smith, Alan M; Morris, Gordon A

    2016-06-01

    Mucins are the main macromolecular components of the mucus secretions that cover the oral cavity, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts of animals. The properties of the mucus secretions are therefore directly correlated with the physicochemical properties of mucin glycoproteins. In this study, mucins were obtained from pig gastric mucous after digestion with pepsin at 37°C for 4h, these mucins were characterised in terms of compositional and hydrodynamic properties. Compositional analysis showed that this mucin contains protein (15%), carbohydrates (55%) of which the constituents are: fucose (4%), galactose (9%), glucosamine (55%), glucosamine (33%) and sialic acid (2%). The latter component gives the mucin polymer a pH-dependant negative charge, with a ζ-potential of -3mV at pH 1.2 up to -11mV at pH 7.4. The weight average molar mass was ∼1×10(6)g/mol and intrinsic viscosity was ∼0.42dL/g although there was a small pH dependency due to the polyelectrolyte behavior of the polymer. The measurements of viscosity versus shear rate showed shear thinning behavior and the critical overlap concentration was determined to be 10-11% w/v indicating a compact structure. Knowledge of these properties is fundamental to the understanding interactions of mucins, with for example, novel drug delivery systems. PMID:26944659

  18. Peroral endoscopic pyloromyotomy accelerates gastric emptying in healthy pigs: proof of concept

    PubMed Central

    Geyl, Sophie; Legros, Romain; Charissou, Aurélie; Mesturoux, Laura; Couquet, Claude-Yves; Carrier, Paul; Brayette, Anaïs; El-Ouafi, Zora; Loustaud-Ratti, Veronique; Sautereau, Denis; Monteil, Jacques; Jacques, Jérémie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Gastroparesis, or delayed gastric emptying, can be diagnosed with gastric emptying scintigraphy. Manometric studies of patients with gastroparesis show increased pyloric tone (pylorospasm). Among the recent endoscopic therapies for pylorospasm is peroral endoscopic pylorotomy (POP). In this study, we explored the effect of POP on gastric emptying in healthy pigs. Material and methods: Four mini-pigs underwent POP following general anaesthesia. The mucosal entrance was situated 5 cm above the pylorus. POP was performed through a submucosal tunnel dissection. The duration of gastric emptying was assessed by scintigraphy before and after the procedure. The pigs were then euthanised for necropsy and pathologic assessment of the pylorus. Results: The mean duration of the procedure was 55 (± 4 SD) min. All surgeries were performed in their entirety with 100 % feasibility. There were no cases of bleeding. The one case of perforation had no clinical significance. The duration of gastric emptying was 2.22-fold shorter after POP compared with before POP (T½ post-POP = 84.5 [± 35.7 SD] min vs. T½ pre-POP = 188.4 [± 87.3 SD] min; P = 0.029). In agreement with the endoscopic observations, sectioning of the pyloric muscle in each pig was histologically complete. Conclusion: The efficacy of the procedure provides indirect proof of the involvement of the pyloric ring in delayed gastric emptying and suggests new therapies for patients with gastroparesis. Our protocol combining gastric emptying scintigraphy and POP validated the use of anaesthetised mini-pigs as a learning and training model for POP or other endoscopic/surgical procedures related to gastric emptying. PMID:27556100

  19. GLP-1 receptor is expressed in human stomach mucosa: analysis of its cellular association and distribution within gastric glands.

    PubMed

    Broide, Efrat; Bloch, Olga; Ben-Yehudah, Gilad; Cantrell, Dror; Shirin, Haim; Rapoport, Micha J

    2013-09-01

    The stomach is a target organ of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). However, the cellular expression and glandular distribution of its receptor (GLP-1R) in human gastric mucosa are not known. We determined the expression of GLP-1R in different regions of human stomach mucosa and its specific cellular association and distribution within gastric glands. Tissue samples from stomach body and antrum were obtained from 20 patients during routine esophagogastroduodenoscopy. mRNA encoding GLP-1R protein expression was evaluated by RT-PCR. Determination of cell types bearing GLP-1R, their localization, and their frequency in gastric glands in different gastric regions were estimated by immunohistochemical morphological analysis. Levels of GLP-1R mRNA were similar in body and antrum. GLP-1R immunoreactivity was found throughout the gastric mucosa in various types of glandular cells. The highest frequency of GLP-1R immunoreactive cells was found in the neck area of the principal glands in cells morphologically identified as parietal cells. GLP-1R immunostaining was also found on enteroendocrine-like cells in the pyloric glands. This study provides the first description of GLP-1R expression in human gastric glands and its specific cellular association. Our data suggest that GLP-1 may act directly on the gastric mucosa to modulate its complex functions. PMID:23803499

  20. Classification of Gastric Tumors using Shape Features of Gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Uchino, Yoshitaka; Oka, Teruaki

    Recently in Japan, pathologists have been in short supply, while each pathological diagnosis requires a substantial amount of time because each analyte must be inspected by multiple pathologists for adequate diagnosis. This paper deals with the classification method of gastric cancer and gastric adenoma, using image processing and pattern analysis. We first select the R component and G component from the RGB basis of the digital image, and the Y component from the YIQ basis for our system. After pre-processing, we automatically extracted the shape of the nucleus and cytoplasm. After many inspections, we selected 40 features for shape of the nucleus and cytoplasm and 14 features for texture within the cytoplasm for assessment of tumors. Principal component analysis, F test of homoscedasticity, t test of difference of average, stepwise method for selecting the smaller number of features, and discriminant method using Mahalanobis distance were all performed. Total ratio of diagnosis reached 96.9%, showing the validity of our proposed method.

  1. Phorbol ester stimulates secretory activity while inhibiting receptor-activated aminopyrine uptake by gastric glands

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.R.; Chew, C.S.

    1986-03-05

    Both cyclic AMP-dependent and -independent secretagogues stimulate pepsinogen release, respiration and H/sup +/ secretory activity (AP uptake) in rabbit gastric glands. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (T), a diacyglycerol analog, activates protein kinase C (PKC) and stimulates secretion in many systems. T stimulated respiration and pepsinogen release by glands and increased AP uptake by both glands and purified parietal cells. However, T reduced AP uptake by glands stimulated with carbachol (C) or histamine (H) with an apparent IC/sub 50/ of 1 nM. Preincubation with T for 30 min produced maximum inhibition which was not reversed by removal of T. T accelerated the decline of the transient C peak while the late steady state response to H was most inhibited. H-stimulated AP uptake was also inhibited by 50 ..mu..g/ml 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol, a reported PKC activator, but not by the inactive phorbol, 4..cap alpha..-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate. In contrast, T potentiated AP uptake by glands stimulated with submaximal doses of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. These results suggest inhibition by T is a specific effect of PKC activators. The differing effects of T on secretion indicators may result from a dual action of T on receptor and post-receptor intracellular events.

  2. Endogenous histamine and promethazine-induced gastric ulcers in the guinea pig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djahanguiri, B.; Hemmati, M.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments performed with an inhibitor of diaminoxydase, aminoguanidine and an inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, NSD 1055, showed that the frequency of gastric ulcers induced by promethazine was increased with the first inhibitor and decreased with the second. It is suggested that ulcers induced by promethazine in guinea pigs might be due to histamino-liberator effect of the antihistaminio compound.

  3. Gastric ulceration and suspected vitamin A toxicosis in grower pigs fed fish silage.

    PubMed Central

    Coates, J W; Holbek, N E; Beames, R M; Puls, R; O'Brien, W P

    1998-01-01

    In 3 feeding trials, gastric ulceration was diagnosed in 2 of 12 lame and recumbent grower pigs fed a diet of 50% fish silage produced from the offal of farmed Atlantic salmon. Premature femoral physeal closure and elevated serum retinyl palmitate levels, features of vitamin A toxicosis, were also observed. Images Figure 1. PMID:9524722

  4. Phenotypic identity of gastric mucous neck cells and mucous cells of cardiac, pyloric, and Brunner's glands.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, N R; Bhathal, P S; Francis, D M

    1994-01-01

    AIM--To investigate the tissue specificity of a novel monoclonal antibody raised to a tissue fraction of normal human liver and which identified certain cells of gastric and duodenal mucosa. METHODS--A total of 155 samples of various tissues obtained from 100 surgical specimens were fixed in cold ethanol-paraformaldehyde, embedded in paraffin wax, and 3 microns sections were studied by immunohistochemical and lectin staining procedures. RESULTS--Immunohistochemical staining showed a major tissue specific component which was strongly expressed by mucous neck cells of the body of the stomach, glands of the cardia and pyloric antrum, and by Brunner's glands. Staining for antigen in the periductal glands of normal major biliary and pancreatic ducts was variable and relatively weaker. It was not detected elsewhere in normal intestine or in the other normal tissues tested. Barrett's mucosa of gastric cardia type, and pyloric gland metaplasia in the gall bladder and small bowel affected with Crohn's disease stained for the antigen. The tissue distribution of the antigen was identical with that of a glycoprotein, demonstrated by an induced affinity for concanavalin A following treatment of tissue sections with periodic acid. The antigen was not sensitive to sialidase. CONCLUSIONS--The tissue component identified (designated here as antigen D10) seems to be characteristic of certain differentiated epithelial cells derived from that part of foregut giving rise to stomach, duodenum, and biliary and pancreatic ducts. The antibody will be of use in investigating pathological processes involving tissue differentiation at these sites, and in the oesophagus and intestines. Images PMID:8132810

  5. Simultaneous measurement and imaging of intracellular Ca(2+) and H(+) transport in isolated rabbit gastric glands.

    PubMed

    Pérez, J F; Ruiz, M C; Michelangeli, F

    2001-12-15

    1. Activation of H(+) secretion in the intracellular canaliculi of parietal cells occurs on an unknown time scale with ill-defined kinetics for the coupling of H(+) secretion and the elevation of intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) stimulated by secretagogues. 2. We developed a method to determine H(+) secretion in isolated rabbit gastric glands with spatio-temporal resolution, using the fluorescent indicator Lysosensor Yellow-Blue (LYB). Glands accumulated the dye exclusively in the intracellular canaliculi of parietal cells and the gland lumen. Dye fluorescence in the acid spaces of the glands increased upon stimulation of acid secretion by carbachol, histamine and forskolin. Simultaneous fluorescence measurements of acid secretion and [Ca(2+)](i) at 1 s resolution were made by joint loading of LYB and Fluo-3. 3. Carbachol-stimulated H(+) secretion was detected in the gland lumen as early as 3 s after the onset of the [Ca(2+)](i) spike. H(+) accumulation appeared to be transient and paralleled the release component of the [Ca(2+)](i) spike. Short and repetitive stimulations with carbachol elicited repetitive responses in [Ca(2+)](i) and H(+) secretion. 4. Histamine or forskolin stimulated H(+) secretion with a delayed onset (around 2 min) and a sustained response. Acid secretion was temporally unrelated to the oscillatory Ca(2+) responses. 5. The striking difference in the kinetics of activation of H(+) secretion by cholinergic and cAMP-dependent secretagogues indicates that two distinct mechanisms are operating in the final stimulation of the pump, in spite of both eliciting a [Ca(2+)](i) response. PMID:11744751

  6. Impact of the amount of straw provided to pigs kept in intensive production conditions on the occurrence and severity of gastric ulceration at slaughter.

    PubMed

    Herskin, Mette S; Jensen, Henrik E; Jespersen, Anna; Forkman, Björn; Jensen, Margit B; Canibe, Nuria; Pedersen, Lene J

    2016-02-01

    This study examined effects of the amount of straw offered on occurrence and severity of gastric lesions in pigs kept in pens (18 pigs, 0.7 m(2)/pig) with partly slatted flooring and 10, 500 or 1000 g straw/pig/day from 30 kg live weight. The pigs had ad libitum access to dry feed. Forty-five pigs were used, three from each of 15 pens. After euthanization, the dimension of the non-glandular region of the stomach was measured. Lesions were characterized and scored. Irrespective of straw provided, 67% of the pigs showed signs of gastric pathology. Pigs provided with 500 or 1000 g straw were pooled as 'permanent access'. The proportion of pigs with ulcerations was reduced by permanent access to straw (7 vs. 33%; P<0.05), suggesting that permanent access to straw may improve animal health, and be considered as one possible strategy to limit gastric ulceration in pigs. PMID:26850561

  7. Mechanosensitive enteric neurons in the guinea pig gastric corpus

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuoli-Weber, Gemma; Schemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    For long it was believed that a particular population of enteric neurons, referred to as intrinsic primary afferent neuron (IPAN)s, encodes mechanical stimulation. We recently proposed a new concept suggesting that there are in addition mechanosensitive enteric neurons (MEN) that are multifunctional. Based on firing pattern MEN behaved as rapidly, slowly, or ultra-slowly adapting RAMEN, SAMEN, or USAMEN, respectively. We aimed to validate this concept in the myenteric plexus of the gastric corpus, a region where IPANs were not identified and existence of enteric sensory neurons was even questioned. The gastric corpus is characterized by a particularly dense extrinsic sensory innervation. Neuronal activity was recorded with voltage sensitive dye imaging after deformation of ganglia by compression (intraganglionic volume injection or von Fry hair) or tension (ganglionic stretch). We demonstrated that 27% of the gastric neurons were MEN and responded to intraganglionic volume injection. Of these 73% were RAMEN, 25% SAMEN, and 2% USAMEN with a firing frequency of 1.7 (1.1/2.2), 5.1 (2.2/7.7), and of 5.4 (5.0/15.5) Hz, respectively. The responses were reproducible and stronger with increased stimulus strength. Even after adaptation another deformation evoked spike discharge again suggesting a resetting mode of the mechanoreceptors. All MEN received fast synaptic input. Fifty five percent of all MEN were cholinergic and 45% nitrergic. Responses in some MEN significantly decreased after perfusion of TTX, low Ca++/high Mg++ Krebs solution, capsaicin induced nerve defunctionalization and capsazepine indicating the involvement of TRPV1 expressing extrinsic mechanosensitive nerves. Half of gastric MEN responded to intraganglionic volume injection as well as to ganglionic stretch and 23% responded to stretch only. Tension-sensitive MEN were to a large proportion USAMEN (44%). In summary, we demonstrated for the first time compression and tension-sensitive MEN in the stomach

  8. Concurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma of Fundic Gland Type and Carcinoma with Lymphoid Stroma: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hee Jeong; Kim, Kyungbin; Kim, Misung; Choi, Hyejeong; Kim, Young Min; Suh, Jae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Both gastric adenocarcinoma of fundic gland type (ADC-FG) and carcinoma with lymphoid stroma (lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma, LELC) are relatively rare. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of LELC. However, the pathogenesis of ADC-FG, as well as the role of EBV in the carcinogenesis of LELC, remain unclear and under debate. The current study presents a case of concurrent ADC-FG and LELC in the stomach in a 69-year-old man. Total gastrectomy was performed, and two separate masses were identified. Upon histological and immunohistochemical examination, the mass located in the lower body was determined to be LELC and the mass in the upper body was diagnosed as ADC-FG. The lesions were characterized by different mucin phenotypes and EBV in situ results. In the lower-body mass, EBV in situ hybridization expression was diffusely strongly positive, but MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC6, and CD10 were all negative. On the other hand, in the upper-body mass, the results were positive for MUC6 but negative for MUC2, MUC5AC, CD10, and EBV by in situ hybridization. The remaining gastric tissue was unremarkable, and perigastric lymph node metastases were absent. Seven months after the gastrectomy, a postoperative computed tomography scan revealed no recurrence or metastasis. PMID:27462199

  9. Effects of Erythropoietin Administration on Adrenal Glands of Landrace/Large White Pigs after Ventricular Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Faa, Armando; Faa, Gavino; Papalois, Apostolos; Obinu, Eleonora; Locci, Giorgia; Pais, Maria Elena; Lelovas, Pavlos; Barouxis, Dimitrios; Pantazopoulos, Charalampos; Vasileiou, Panagiotis V; Iacovidou, Nicoletta; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the effects of erythropoietin administration on the adrenal glands in a swine model of ventricular fibrillation and resuscitation. Methods. Ventricular fibrillation was induced via pacing wire forwarded into the right ventricle in 20 female Landrace/Large White pigs, allocated into 2 groups: experimental group treated with bolus dose of erythropoietin (EPO) and control group which received normal saline. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was performed immediately after drug administration as per the 2010 European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines for Advanced Life Support (ALS) until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or death. Animals who achieved ROSC were monitored, mechanically ventilated, extubated, observed, and euthanized. At necroscopy, adrenal glands samples were formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, and routinely processed. Sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Results. Oedema and apoptosis were the most frequent histological changes and were detected in all animals in the adrenal cortex and in the medulla. Mild and focal endothelial lesions were also detected. A marked interindividual variability in the degree of the intensity of apoptosis and oedema at cortical and medullary level was observed within groups. Comparing the two groups, higher levels of pathological changes were detected in the control group. No significant difference between the two groups was observed regarding the endothelial changes. Conclusions. In animals exposed to ventricular fibrillation, EPO treatment has protective effects on the adrenal gland. PMID:27504455

  10. Effects of Erythropoietin Administration on Adrenal Glands of Landrace/Large White Pigs after Ventricular Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Faa, Gavino; Papalois, Apostolos; Obinu, Eleonora; Locci, Giorgia; Pais, Maria Elena; Lelovas, Pavlos; Barouxis, Dimitrios; Pantazopoulos, Charalampos; Vasileiou, Panagiotis V.; Iacovidou, Nicoletta; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the effects of erythropoietin administration on the adrenal glands in a swine model of ventricular fibrillation and resuscitation. Methods. Ventricular fibrillation was induced via pacing wire forwarded into the right ventricle in 20 female Landrace/Large White pigs, allocated into 2 groups: experimental group treated with bolus dose of erythropoietin (EPO) and control group which received normal saline. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was performed immediately after drug administration as per the 2010 European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines for Advanced Life Support (ALS) until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or death. Animals who achieved ROSC were monitored, mechanically ventilated, extubated, observed, and euthanized. At necroscopy, adrenal glands samples were formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, and routinely processed. Sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Results. Oedema and apoptosis were the most frequent histological changes and were detected in all animals in the adrenal cortex and in the medulla. Mild and focal endothelial lesions were also detected. A marked interindividual variability in the degree of the intensity of apoptosis and oedema at cortical and medullary level was observed within groups. Comparing the two groups, higher levels of pathological changes were detected in the control group. No significant difference between the two groups was observed regarding the endothelial changes. Conclusions. In animals exposed to ventricular fibrillation, EPO treatment has protective effects on the adrenal gland. PMID:27504455

  11. Prevalence, distribution and pattern of gastric lesions in slaughtered pigs in south-western Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Omotosho, Oladipo O; Emikpe, Benjamin O; Lasisi, Olalekan T; Jarikre, Theophilus A

    2016-01-01

    Gastric lesions, especially ulceration, cause significant economic losses in the swine industry worldwide. The study was designed to assess its prevalence, distribution and pattern in pigs in south-western Nigeria. Slaughter house surveys were conducted on three government-established abattoirs in Lagos, Ogun and Oyo states. Stomachs from 480 pigs were assessed for gross lesions, which were graded using a modification of a standard technique. Tissues from different regions of the stomach were routinely stained to assess histopathologic changes. Data were presented as frequency counts and analysed using analysis of variance and chi-square technique. Significance was determined at p ≤ 0.05. Gastric lesions were encountered across the four regions of the stomach with a point prevalence of 57.29%. The prevalence of lesions in the non-glandular region was 32.9%, with severe hyperkeratosis (13.13%) being most frequently observed (p < 0.05). Erosions were significantly higher in the cardia (8.54%) (p < 0.05), followed by fundus (8.33%). Gastric ulcers were significantly higher in the fundus (19.58%) (p < 0.05). Scars of healed ulcers and lacerations were also observed in the fundus (5.42%) (p < 0.05). The gastric lesion distribution across the four regions of the stomach and the occurrence of ulceration in the fundus showed an unusual pattern, which is rarely reported in other parts of the world. The reason for these findings in pigs in Nigeria is not fully understood; therefore, further studies are required to identify and manage these factors for increased productivity, improved animal welfare and enhanced food security. PMID:27247073

  12. Milk ceruloplasmin and its expression by mammary gland and liver in pigs.

    PubMed

    Cerveza, P J; Mehrbod, F; Cotton, S J; Lomeli, N; Linder, M C; Fonda, E G; Wickler, S J

    2000-01-15

    Concentrations of ceruloplasmin and copper in milk and blood plasma, the nature of milk ceruloplasmin, and the effects of lactation and gestation on these parameters, as well as the expression of ceruloplasmin mRNA by the mammary gland, were examined in pigs. As seen previously in humans, ceruloplasmin and copper concentrations in sow milk were much higher a few days after birth than 1 month later, averaging 26.5 and 6.6 mg ceruloplasmin/L (by immunoassay) and 1.67 and 0.34 mg total Cu/L, on days 3 and 33 postpartum, respectively. Values for ceruloplasmin oxidase activity (measured with p-phenylene diamine) were 7.8 and 1.3 nmol/min/L, respectively. Daily milk ceruloplasmin production went from 61 to 22 mg/day and daily copper output from 38 to 12 mg/day. In contrast, there was little or no variation in serum ceruloplasmin concentration during lactation or gestation, although total plasma copper was high at the end of gestation. Milk ceruloplasmin was of the same apparent size as serum ceruloplasmin, as determined by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting, and ceruloplasmin mRNAs of liver and mammary gland were indistinguishable by Northern analysis and RT-PCR of the various exons. Expression of total RNA and ceruloplasmin mRNA, as detected in biopsies of mammary gland, increased markedly upon onset of lactation and then declined during the next month in conjunction with a drop in milk ceruloplasmin production. The results indicate that milk ceruloplasmin, while being the same protein as in plasma, is not derived from the plasma but is produced by the mammary gland. PMID:10620372

  13. Computer modeling of gastric parietal cell: significance of canalicular space, gland lumen, and variable canalicular [K+].

    PubMed

    Crothers, James M; Forte, John G; Machen, Terry E

    2016-05-01

    A computer model, constructed for evaluation of integrated functioning of cellular components involved in acid secretion by the gastric parietal cell, has provided new interpretations of older experimental evidence, showing the functional significance of a canalicular space separated from a mucosal bath by a gland lumen and also shedding light on basolateral Cl(-) transport. The model shows 1) changes in levels of parietal cell secretion (with stimulation or H-K-ATPase inhibitors) result mainly from changes in electrochemical driving forces for apical K(+) and Cl(-) efflux, as canalicular [K(+)] ([K(+)]can) increases or decreases with changes in apical H(+)/K(+) exchange rate; 2) H-K-ATPase inhibition in frog gastric mucosa would increase [K(+)]can similarly with low or high mucosal [K(+)], depolarizing apical membrane voltage similarly, so electrogenic H(+) pumping is not indicated by inhibition causing similar increase in transepithelial potential difference (Vt) with 4 and 80 mM mucosal K(+); 3) decreased H(+) secretion during strongly mucosal-positive voltage clamping is consistent with an electroneutral H-K-ATPase being inhibited by greatly decreased [K(+)]can (Michaelis-Menten mechanism); 4) slow initial change ("long time-constant transient") in current or Vt with clamping of Vt or current involves slow change in [K(+)]can; 5) the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) symporter (NKCC) is likely to have a significant role in Cl(-) influx, despite evidence that it is not necessary for acid secretion; and 6) relative contributions of Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger (AE2) and NKCC to Cl(-) influx would differ greatly between resting and stimulated states, possibly explaining reported differences in physiological characteristics of stimulated open-circuit Cl(-) secretion (≈H(+)) and resting short-circuit Cl(-) secretion (>H(+)). PMID:26847387

  14. Upper GI tract lesions in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP): enrichment of pyloric gland adenomas and other gastric and duodenal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Wood, Laura D; Salaria, Safia N; Cruise, Michael W; Giardiello, Francis M; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2014-03-01

    Patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in the APC gene, develop neoplasms in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract. To clarify the upper GI tract lesions in FAP patients in a tertiary care setting, we reviewed specimens from 321 endoscopies in 66 patients with FAP. Tubular adenomas in the small bowel were the most common neoplasms (present in 89% of patients), although only 1 patient developed invasive carcinoma of the small bowel. Several types of gastric neoplasms were identified--65% of patients had at least 1 fundic gland polyp, and 23% of patients had at least 1 gastric foveolar-type gastric adenoma. Pyloric gland adenomas were also enriched, occurring in 6% of patients--this is a novel finding in FAP patients. Despite the high frequency of gastric neoplasms, only 1 patient developed carcinoma in the stomach. The very low frequency of carcinoma in these patients suggests that current screening procedures prevent the vast majority of upper GI tract carcinomas in patients with FAP, at least in the tertiary care setting. PMID:24525509

  15. Analysis of the variation in the action of L-365,260 at CCKB/gastrin receptors in rat, guinea-pig and mouse isolated gastric tissue assays.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, S. P.; Harper, E. A.; Watt, G. F.; Gerskowitch, V. P.; Hull, R. A.; Shankley, N. P.; Black, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    affinity constant for L-365,260 (pKB approximately 7.5). The guinea-pig gastric muscle and mouse stomach data could be explained by the presence of this receptor and a second one characterized by a high affinity constant for L-365,260 (pKB approximately 8.6). The activity of the two proposed receptor subtypes was consistent between experiments in the guinea-pig and the high affinity receptor appeared to be predominant. In contrast, the mouse stomach data could only be simulated by assuming that the proportion and absolute number of each subtype varied significantly between the replicate experiments. 4. The L-365,260 affinity estimates at the inferred receptor subtypes were indistinguishable from those obtained in a corresponding analysis of the behaviour of L-365,260 in CCKB/gastrin receptor radioligand binding experiments in guinea-pig gastric gland and mouse and rat cerebral cortex preparations. PMID:8842444

  16. Gastric inhibitory peptide, serotonin, and glucagon are unexpected chloride secretagogues in the rectal gland of the skate (Leucoraja erinacea).

    PubMed

    Kelley, Catherine A; Decker, Sarah E; Silva, Patricio; Forrest, John N

    2014-05-01

    Since the discovery of the rectal gland of the dogfish shark 50 years ago, experiments with this tissue have greatly aided our understanding of secondary active chloride secretion and the secretagogues responsible for this function. In contrast, very little is known about the rectal gland of skates. In the present experiments, we performed the first studies in the perfused rectal gland of the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea), an organ weighing less than one-tenth of the shark rectal gland. Our results indicate that the skate gland can be studied by modified perfusion techniques and in primary culture monolayers, and that secretion is blocked by the inhibitors of membrane proteins required for secondary active chloride secretion. Our major finding is that three G protein-coupled receptor agonists, the incretin gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), also known as glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, as well as glucagon and serotonin, are unexpected potent chloride secretagogues in the skate but not the shark. Glucagon stimulated chloride secretion to a mean value of 1,661 ± 587 μeq·h(-1)·g(-1) and serotonin stimulated to 2,893 ± 699 μeq·h(-1)·g(-1). GIP stimulated chloride secretion to 3,733 ± 679 μeq·h(-1)·g(-1) and significantly increased tissue cAMP content compared with basal conditions. This is the first report of GIP functioning as a chloride secretagogue in any species or tissue. PMID:24553297

  17. Effect of O. porcinus Tick Salivary Gland Extract on the African Swine Fever Virus Infection in Domestic Pig

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jennifer; Hutet, Evelyne; Paboeuf, Frédéric; Randriamparany, Tantely; Holzmuller, Philippe; Lancelot, Renaud; Rodrigues, Valérie; Vial, Laurence; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever is a haemorrhagic disease in pig production that can have disastrous financial consequences for farming. No vaccines are currently available and animal slaughtering or area zoning to restrict risk-related movements are the only effective measures to prevent the spread of the disease. Ornithodoros soft ticks are known to transmit the African swine fever virus (ASFV) to pigs in farms, following the natural epidemiologic cycle of the virus. Tick saliva has been shown to modulate the host physiological and immunological responses during feeding on skin, thus affecting viral infection. To better understand the interaction between soft tick, ASFV and pig at the bite location and the possible influence of tick saliva on pig infection by ASFV, salivary gland extract (SGE) of Ornithodoros porcinus, co-inoculated or not with ASFV, was used for intradermal auricular inoculation. Our results showed that, after the virus triggered the disease, pigs inoculated with virus and SGE presented greater hyperthermia than pigs inoculated with virus alone. The density of Langerhans cells was modulated at the tick bite or inoculation site, either through recruitment by ASFV or inhibition by SGE. Additionally, SGE and virus induced macrophage recruitment each. This effect was enhanced when they were co-inoculated. Finally, the co-inoculation of SGE and virus delayed the early local spread of virus to the first lymph node on the inoculation side. This study has shown that the effect of SGE was powerful enough to be quantified in pig both on the systemic and local immune response. We believe this model should be developed with infected tick and could improve knowledge of both tick vector competence and tick saliva immunomodulation. PMID:26828597

  18. Effect of O. porcinus Tick Salivary Gland Extract on the African Swine Fever Virus Infection in Domestic Pig.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Jennifer; Hutet, Evelyne; Paboeuf, Frédéric; Randriamparany, Tantely; Holzmuller, Philippe; Lancelot, Renaud; Rodrigues, Valérie; Vial, Laurence; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever is a haemorrhagic disease in pig production that can have disastrous financial consequences for farming. No vaccines are currently available and animal slaughtering or area zoning to restrict risk-related movements are the only effective measures to prevent the spread of the disease. Ornithodoros soft ticks are known to transmit the African swine fever virus (ASFV) to pigs in farms, following the natural epidemiologic cycle of the virus. Tick saliva has been shown to modulate the host physiological and immunological responses during feeding on skin, thus affecting viral infection. To better understand the interaction between soft tick, ASFV and pig at the bite location and the possible influence of tick saliva on pig infection by ASFV, salivary gland extract (SGE) of Ornithodoros porcinus, co-inoculated or not with ASFV, was used for intradermal auricular inoculation. Our results showed that, after the virus triggered the disease, pigs inoculated with virus and SGE presented greater hyperthermia than pigs inoculated with virus alone. The density of Langerhans cells was modulated at the tick bite or inoculation site, either through recruitment by ASFV or inhibition by SGE. Additionally, SGE and virus induced macrophage recruitment each. This effect was enhanced when they were co-inoculated. Finally, the co-inoculation of SGE and virus delayed the early local spread of virus to the first lymph node on the inoculation side. This study has shown that the effect of SGE was powerful enough to be quantified in pig both on the systemic and local immune response. We believe this model should be developed with infected tick and could improve knowledge of both tick vector competence and tick saliva immunomodulation. PMID:26828597

  19. Alteration in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in gastric neoplasias of fundic gland (chief cell predominant) type.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Yasuhiro; Mitomi, Hiroyuki; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Michiko; Lee, Se-Yong; Matsumoto, Kenshi; Yao, Takashi; Watanabe, Sumio

    2013-11-01

    Gastric neoplasia of chief cell-predominant type (GN-CCP) has been reported as a new, rare variant of gastric tumor. GN-CCPs were defined as tumors consisting of irregular anastomosing glands of columnar cells mimicking chief cells of fundic gland with nuclear atypia and prolapse-type submucosal involvement. We comparatively evaluated clinicopathologic features between 31 GN-CCPs and 130 cases of conventional gastric adenocarcinoma invading into submucosa (CGA-SM) in addition to nuclear β-catenin immunolabeling and direct sequencing of members of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, CTNNB1, APC, and AXIN, in a subset of these tumors. GN-CCP presented as small protruded lesions located in the upper third of the stomach, with minimal involvement into the submucosa and rare lymphovascular invasion. None of the lesions have demonstrated a recurrence of disease or metastasis on follow-up. Nuclear β-catenin immunolabeling was higher in GN-CCP (labeling index [LI]: median, 19.3%; high expresser [LI >30%], 7/27 cases [26%]) than CGA-SM (median LI, 14.7%; high expresser, 1/19 cases [6%]). Missense mutation of APC was observed in 1 GN-CCP but not CGA-SM. Missense or nonsense mutations of CTNNB1 and AXIN1 were higher in GN-CCPs (14.8%, both) than CGA-SMs (5.3%, both). Missense mutations of AXIN2 were higher in GN-CCPs (25.9%) than in CGA-SMs (10.5%). Overall, 14 (51.9%) of 27 GN-CCPs and 5 (26.3%) of 19 CGA-SM cases harbored at least 1 of these gene mutations. In conclusion, GN-CCPs as a unique variant of nonaggressive tumor are characterized by nuclear β-catenin accumulation and mutation of CTNNB1 or AXIN gene, suggesting activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:24011952

  20. Endoscopic evaluation and biopsy collection of the gastrointestinal tract in the green moray eel (Gymnothorax funebris): application in a case of chronic regurgitation with gastric mucus gland hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Meegan, Jenny; Sidor, Inga F; Field, Cara; Roddy, Nicole; Sirpenski, Gayle; Dunn, J Lawrence

    2012-09-01

    A green moray eel (Gymnothorax funebris) was evaluated for chronic regurgitation. By using flexible endoscopy, the gastrointestinal tract was evaluated and revealed multifocal proliferative gastric masses and an intestinal ulcer. Biopsy specimens revealed gastric mucus gland hyperplasia, intestinal nematodiasis, and mild enteritis. Esophagoscopy and gastroscopy were performed by using a larger endoscope (length, 200 cm). A smaller endoscope (length, 100 cm) facilitated entering the intestinal tract in normograde or retrograde directions. A control eel was also evaluated, and no gross or histologic abnormalities were detected. The case eel was treated with metoclopramide and fenbendazole, responded well to therapy, and regurgitation decreased. A year later, the animal died of unrelated causes. Necropsy revealed coelomic gastric adhesions. The gastric proliferative lesions were associated with degeneration and necrosis of gastric pit mucosa without significant inflammation; etiology was unknown. Gastrointestinal endoscopy proved a useful diagnostic tool for evaluation and biopsy collection in this eel species. PMID:23082527

  1. Localised calcium release events in cells from the muscle of guinea-pig gastric fundus

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, S P; Bolton, T B

    2004-01-01

    After enzymatic dispersion of the muscle of the guinea-pig gastric fundus, single elongated cells were observed which differed from archetypal smooth muscle cells due to their knurled, tuberose or otherwise irregular surface morphology. These, but not archetypal smooth muscle cells, consistently displayed spontaneous localized (i.e. non-propagating) intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) release events. Such calcium events were novel in their magnitude and kinetic profiles. They included short transient events, plateau events and events which coalesced spatially or temporally (compound events). Quantitative analysis of the events with an automatic detection programme showed that their spatio-temporal characteristics (full width and full duration at half-maximum amplitude) were approximately exponentially distributed. Their amplitude distribution suggested the presence of two release modes. Carbachol application caused an initial cell-wide calcium transient followed by an increase in localized calcium release events. Pharmacological analysis suggested that localized calcium release was largely dependent on external calcium entry acting on both inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) to release stored calcium. Nominally calcium-free external solution immediately and reversibly abolished all localized calcium release without blocking the initial transient calcium release response to carbachol. This was inhibited by 2-APB (100 μm), ryanodine (10 or 50 μm) or U-73122 (1 μm). 2-APB (100 μm), xestospongin C (XeC, 10 μm) or U-73122 (1 μm) blocked both spontaneous localized calcium release and localized release stimulated by 10 μm carbachol. Ryanodine (50 μm) also inhibited spontaneous release, but enhanced localized release in response to carbachol. This study represents the first characterization of localized calcium release events in cells from the gastric fundus. PMID:14608011

  2. Ghrelin immunohistochemistry of gastric adenocarcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma of salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Aydin, S; Ozercan, I H; Dagli, F; Aydin, S; Dogru, O; Celebi, S; Akin, O; Guzel, S P

    2005-01-01

    Ghrelin (G-HH) synthesized in several tissues including salivary and stomach glands stimulates appetite in humans by modulating neuropeptide Y neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. Loss of appetite is one of the most important symptoms of stomach cancer. We conducted a study using immunohistochemistry to determine whether salivary glands and stomach cancer tissues produce ghrelin. We determined that negative ghrelin immunohistochemistry discriminates tumors from normal tissues and may therefore further our understanding of the clinically important problem of reduced food intake and anorexia in cancer patients. Radioimmunoassay analyses confirmed that cancer cells do not produce a G-HH peptide, whereas normal cells yield this peptide. PMID:16298902

  3. Myorelaxant activity of 2-t-butyl-4-methoxyphenol (BHA) in guinea pig gastric fundus.

    PubMed

    Fusi, F; Valoti, M; Petkov, G V; Boev, K K; Sgaragli, G P

    1998-10-30

    This study investigates the mechanism whereby the antioxidant 2-t-butyl-4-methoxyphenol (BHA) relaxes guinea pig gastric fundus smooth muscle. In circular smooth muscle strips, 10 microM cyclopiazonic acid, a specific inhibitor of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase, induced a prolonged rise in tension which depended on the presence of extracellular Ca2+. BHA (pIC50 = 5.83), sodium nitroprusside (6.85), isoproterenol (7.69) and nifedipine (8.02), but not 2,6-di-t-butyl-4-methoxyphenol (DTBHA) (up to 30 microM), relaxed muscle strips contracted with cyclopiazonic acid. Methyl-1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-3-nitro-4-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-pyri dine-5-carboxylate (Bay K 8644) (1 microM) antagonised the nifedipine- but not the BHA-induced relaxation. Nifedipine and isoproterenol (10 microM) caused a decrease in spontaneous tone, but did not counteract the subsequent rise in tension elicited by 10 microM cyclopiazonic acid. Conversely, 100 microM BHA and 100 microM sodium nitroprusside not only significantly reduced spontaneous tone but also markedly impaired the response of the muscles to cyclopiazonic acid. DTBHA failed to show either effect. When added to preparations completely relaxed by 100 microM BHA, 10 mM tetraethylammonium still elicited nifedipine-sensitive tonic and phasic contractions in the presence or absence of 10 microM cyclopiazonic acid. BHA and DTBHA inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, the Ca2+-promoted contraction of strips depolarised by 10 mM tetraethylammonium. The BHA antagonism showed a non-competitive profile while that of DTBHA was competitive. In muscle strips at rest, 10 microM BHA caused a significant increase in tissue cAMP concentration, leaving cGMP unmodified. To conclude, the myorelaxant action of BHA on gastric fundus smooth muscle appears to be mediated partly by an increase in cAMP levels and partly by inhibition of Ca2+ influx from the extracellular space. PMID:9845271

  4. PET/CT findings in a case with FDG-avid disseminated lacrimal gland MALToma with sequential development of large B-cell lymphoma and gastric MALToma.

    PubMed

    Yildirim-Poyraz, Nilufer; Ozdemir, Elif; Basturk, Abdulkadir; Kilicarslan, Aydan; Turkolmez, Seyda

    2015-02-01

    Primary orbital lymphomas are rare; the major histopathologic type is extranodal marginal-zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) or MALToma. We present a case of a 79-year-old female patient with FDG-avid lacrimal gland MALToma with nodal and pulmonary involvement (stage IVE). Nasopharynx and gastric involvement were detected on restaging F-FDG PET/CT after rituximab therapy, and it was found to have a site of transformation to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in the nasopharynx. Gastric MALT lymphoma was also confirmed histopathologically, and she then underwent combination chemotherapy regimen, resulting in regression after 3 courses. PMID:24873799

  5. Detection of novel CYP11A1-derived secosteroids in the human epidermis and serum and pig adrenal gland

    PubMed Central

    Slominski, Andrzej T.; Kim, Tae-Kang; Li, Wei; Postlethwaite, Arnold; Tieu, Elaine W.; Tang, Edith K. Y.; Tuckey, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether novel pathways of vitamin D3 (D3) and 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) metabolism initiated by CYP11A1 and previously characterized in vitro, occur in vivo, we analyzed samples of human serum and epidermis, and pig adrenals for the presence of intermediates and products of these pathways. We extracted human epidermis from 13 individuals and sera from 13 individuals and analyzed them by LC/qTOF-MS alongside the corresponding standards. Pig adrenal glands were also analyzed for these steroids and secosteroids. Epidermal, serum and adrenal samples showed the presence of D3 hydroxy-derivatives corresponding to 20(OH)D3, 22(OH)D3, 25(OH)D3, 1,25(OH)2D3, 20,22(OH)2D3, 20,23(OH)2D3, 20,24(OH)2D3, 20,25(OH)2D3, 20,26(OH)2D3, 1,20,23(OH)3D3 and 17,20,23(OH)3D3, plus 1,20(OH)2D3 which was detectable only in the epidermis. Serum concentrations of 20(OH)D3 and 22(OH)D3 were only 30- and 15-fold lower than 25(OH)D3, respectively, and at levels above those required for biological activity as measured in vitro. We also detected 1,20,24(OH)3D3, 1,20,25(OH)3D3 and 1,20,26(OH)3D3 in the adrenals. Products of CYP11A1 action on 7DHC, namely 22(OH)7DHC, 20,22(OH)27DHC and 7-dehydropregnenolone were also detected in serum, epidermis and the adrenal. Thus, we have detected novel CYP11A1-derived secosteroids in the skin, serum and adrenal gland and based on their concentrations and biological activity suggest that they act as hormones in vivo. PMID:26445902

  6. Interaction of tobacco smoke exposure and ovalbumin-sensitization promotes goblet cell and submucosal gland metaplasia in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Pavuluri, Suresh; Hanus, Veronica; Bergren, Dale R

    2013-12-01

    Exposure to irritants such as tobacco smoke (TS) causes acute airway inflammation. Chronic exposure may cause airway remodeling contributing to enhanced airway resistance. We hypothesize that combining airway sensitization and inhalation of irritants enhances the number of mucous producing cells beyond either agent alone. Guinea pigs were antigen sensitized or treated with its vehicle. These two groups were further divided into daily exposure to TS or air. After 3 months airway reactivity to ovalbumin (OA) was determined, airway and blood samples were examined and lung substance P quantified. Combining sensitization and TS exposure increased airway reactivity to OA, goblet cell and submucosal gland populations. Airway eosinophilia was greatest in the OA-sensitized group exposed to air rather than with its combination with TS exposure. Lung substance P levels were similarly elevated in both OA-sensitized groups. Airway irritant exposure in which airway sensitization exists enhances the potential of mucus production, airway resistance and mucus plugging of the airways through increasing the number of goblet cells and submucosal glands. PMID:23933030

  7. Esterification of glycerol 3-phosphate in lactating guinea-pig mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, N. J.

    1967-01-01

    1. The presence of palmitoyl-CoA–l-glycerol 3-phosphate palmitoyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.15) has been demonstrated in a particulate fraction of mammary tissue from lactating guinea pigs. 2. Cell-free preparations also catalysed the activation of palmitate and oleate, and the conversion of enzymically formed phosphatidic acid into glycerides, in accord with the Kennedy pathway of glyceride formation. 3. The properties of the system that esterifies l-glycerol 3-phosphate were studied with respect to substrates and cofactors, and the reaction product was shown to be phosphatidic acid (1,2-diacyl glycerol 3-phosphate). 4. The extent to which newly formed phosphatidic acid was converted into glyceride in a cell-free system was dependent on the nature of the acyl donor, the concentration of subcellular particles, the time of incubation and the concentration of Mg2+. PMID:6070127

  8. Glutathione depletion impairs transcriptional activation of heat shock genes in primary cultures of guinea pig gastric mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Rokutan, K; Hirakawa, T; Teshima, S; Honda, S; Kishi, K

    1996-05-15

    When primary cultures of guinea pig gastric mucosal cells were exposed to heat (43 degree C), ethanol, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), or diamide, heat shock proteins (HSP90, HSP70, HSP60, and HSC73) were rapidly synthesized. The extent of each HSP induction varied with the type of stress. Ethanol, H2O2, and diamide increased the syntheses of several other undefined proteins besides the HSPs. However, none of these proteins were induced by exposure to heat or the reagents, when intracellular glutathione was depleted to <10% of the control level by pretreatment with DL-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine. Gel mobility shift assay using a synthetic oligonucleotide coding HSP70 heat shock element showed that glutathione depletion inhibited the heat- and the reagent-initiated activation of the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and did not promote the expression of HSP70 mRNA. Immunoblot analysis with antiserum against HSF1 demonstrated that the steady-state level of HSF1 was not changed in glutathione-depleted cells, but glutathione depletion inhibited the nuclear translocation of HSF1 after exposure to heat stress. These results suggest that intracellular glutathione may support early and important biochemical events in the acquisition by gastric mucosal cells of an adaptive response to irritants. PMID:8636403

  9. Gastric bolus feeding rapidly stimulates hepatic protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth and protein deposition rates are more rapid during the neonatal period than at any other stage of postnatal life. Feeding stimulates protein synthesis in the liver, as it does in other tissues of the neonatal pig. The purpose of this study was to examine the feeding-induced time course of the...

  10. Gastric lipase: localization of the enzyme in the stomach

    SciTech Connect

    DeNigris, S.J.; Hamosh, M.; Hamosh, P.; Kasbekar, D.K.

    1986-03-05

    Isolated gastric glands prepared from human and rabbit stomach secrete lipase in response to secretagogues. They have investigated the localization of this enzyme in three species (rabbit, baboon, guinea pig). Gastric mucosa was sampled from the cardia (C), fundus-smooth (FS), fundus-ruggae (FR) and the antral area (A). Lipase activity was measured in mucosal homogenates using /sup 3/H-triolein as substrate and is expressed in units (U) = nmols free fatty acid released/min/mg wet weight. The localization of lipase is compared with that of pepsin (measured by hydrolysis of 2% hemoglobin at pH 1.8 and expressed in I.U.). Lipase is localized in a well defined area in the rabbit and is diffusely distributed in both guinea pig and baboon. The distribution of lipase and pepsin containing cells differs in all three species. The cellular origin of gastric lipase remains to be determined.

  11. Long Noncoding RNA and mRNA Expression Profiles in the Thyroid Gland of Two Phenotypically Extreme Pig Breeds Using Ribo-Zero RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yifei; Mao, Haiguang; Huang, Minjie; Chen, Lixing; Chen, Jiucheng; Cai, Zhaowei; Wang, Ying; Xu, Ningying

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid gland is an important endocrine organ modulating development, growth, and metabolism, mainly by controlling the synthesis and secretion of thyroid hormones (THs). However, little is known about the pig thyroid transcriptome. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) regulate gene expression and play critical roles in many cellular processes. Yorkshire pigs have a higher growth rate but lower fat deposition than that of Jinhua pigs, and thus, these species are ideal models for studying growth and lipid metabolism. This study revealed higher levels of THs in the serum of Yorkshire pigs than in the serum of Jinhua pigs. By using Ribo-zero RNA sequencing-which can capture both polyA and non-polyA transcripts-the thyroid transcriptome of both breeds were analyzed and 22,435 known mRNAs were found to be expressed in the pig thyroid. In addition, 1189 novel mRNAs and 1018 candidate lncRNA transcripts were detected. Multiple TH-synthesis-related genes were identified among the 455 differentially-expressed known mRNAs, 37 novel mRNAs, and 52 lncRNA transcripts. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that differentially-expressed genes were enriched in the microtubule-based process, which contributes to THs secretion. Moreover, integrating analysis predicted 13 potential lncRNA-mRNA gene pairs. These data expanded the repertoire of porcine lncRNAs and mRNAs and contribute to understanding the possible molecular mechanisms involved in animal growth and lipid metabolism. PMID:27409639

  12. Long Noncoding RNA and mRNA Expression Profiles in the Thyroid Gland of Two Phenotypically Extreme Pig Breeds Using Ribo-Zero RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yifei; Mao, Haiguang; Huang, Minjie; Chen, Lixing; Chen, Jiucheng; Cai, Zhaowei; Wang, Ying; Xu, Ningying

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid gland is an important endocrine organ modulating development, growth, and metabolism, mainly by controlling the synthesis and secretion of thyroid hormones (THs). However, little is known about the pig thyroid transcriptome. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) regulate gene expression and play critical roles in many cellular processes. Yorkshire pigs have a higher growth rate but lower fat deposition than that of Jinhua pigs, and thus, these species are ideal models for studying growth and lipid metabolism. This study revealed higher levels of THs in the serum of Yorkshire pigs than in the serum of Jinhua pigs. By using Ribo-zero RNA sequencing—which can capture both polyA and non-polyA transcripts—the thyroid transcriptome of both breeds were analyzed and 22,435 known mRNAs were found to be expressed in the pig thyroid. In addition, 1189 novel mRNAs and 1018 candidate lncRNA transcripts were detected. Multiple TH-synthesis-related genes were identified among the 455 differentially-expressed known mRNAs, 37 novel mRNAs, and 52 lncRNA transcripts. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that differentially-expressed genes were enriched in the microtubule-based process, which contributes to THs secretion. Moreover, integrating analysis predicted 13 potential lncRNA-mRNA gene pairs. These data expanded the repertoire of porcine lncRNAs and mRNAs and contribute to understanding the possible molecular mechanisms involved in animal growth and lipid metabolism. PMID:27409639

  13. The Influence of Antral Ulcers on Intramural Gastric Nerve Projections Supplying the Pyloric Sphincter in the Pig (Sus scrofa domestica)—Neuronal Tracing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zalecki, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Background Gastric ulcerations in the region of antrum pylori represent a serious medical problem in humans and animals. Such localization of ulcers can influence the intrinsic descending nerve supply to the pyloric sphincter. The pyloric function is precisely regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic nerves. Impaired neural regulation could result in pyloric sphincter dysfunction and gastric emptying malfunction. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of gastric antral ulcerations on the density and distribution of intramural gastric descending neurons supplying the pyloric sphincter in pigs. Methodology/Principal Findings The experiment was performed on 2 groups of pigs: healthy gilts (n=6) and gilts with experimentally induced peptic ulcers in the region of antrum pylori (n=6). Gastric neurons supplying pyloric sphincter were labeled using the retrograde neuronal tracing technique (20μl of Fast Blue tracer injected into the pyloric sphincter muscle). After a week survival period the animals were sacrificed and the stomachs were collected. Then, the stomach wall was cross-cut into 0.5cm thick sections taken in specified intervals (section I - 1.5cm; section II - 3.5cm; section III - 5.5cm; section IV – 7.5cm) starting from the sphincter. Consecutive microscopic slices prepared from each section were analyzed under fluorescent microscope to count traced neurons. Obtained data were statistically analyzed. The total number of FB-positive perikarya observed within all studied sections significantly decreased from 903.3 ± 130.7 in control to 243.8 ± 67.3 in experimental animals. In healthy pigs 76.1 ± 6.7% of labeled neurons were observed within the section I, 23.53 ± 6.5% in section II and only occasional cells in section III. In experimental animals, as many as 93.8 ± 2.1% of labeled cells were observed within the section I and only 6.2 ± 2.2% in section II, while section III was devoid of such neurons. There were no traced perikarya in section IV

  14. Endoscopic biopsy of islet transplants in the gastric submucosal space provides evidence of islet graft rejection in diabetic pigs.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Fujita, Minoru; Bottino, Rita; Piganelli, Jon D; McGrath, Kevin; Li, Jiang; Lee, Whayoung; Iwase, Hayato; Wijkstrom, Martin; Bertera, Suzanne; Long, Cassandra; Landsittel, Douglas; Haruma, Ken; Cooper, David K C; Hara, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of islets into the gastric submucosal space (GSMS) has several advantages (e.g., avoidance of the instant blood-mediated inflammatory response [IBMIR], ability to biopsy). The aim of this study was to determine whether endoscopic biopsy of islet allografts transplanted into the GSMS in diabetic pigs can provide histopathological and immunohistochemical information that correlates with the clinical course (e.g.,, blood glucose level, insulin requirement). Islet allografts (Group1: 10,000 kIEq /kg [n = 4]; Group2: 15,000 kIEq /kg [n = 2]) were transplanted into the GSMS of diabetic pigs under immunosuppression. In Group2, the anti-oxidant, BMX-001 was applied during preservation, isolation, and culture of the islets, and at the time of transplantation. Endoscopic biopsies of the islet grafts were obtained one or 2 weeks after transplantation, and histopathological features were compared with the clinical course (e.g., blood glucose, insulin requirement). In Group1, in the absence of anti-oxidant therapy, most of the islets became fragmented, and there was no reduction in exogenous insulin requirement. In Group2, with an increased number of transplanted islets in the presence of BMX-001, more healthy insulin-positive islet masses were obtained at biopsy and necropsy (4 weeks), and these correlated with reductions in both blood glucose level and insulin requirement. In all cases, inflammatory cell infiltrates were present. After islet transplantation into the GSMS, endoscopic biopsy can provide information on graft rejection, which would be an immense advantage in clinical islet transplantation. PMID:26857703

  15. Isolation of parietal cells from guinea-pig gastric mucosa and the immunological characterization of their antigenic structure.

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, D P; Katiyar, V N; Rees, C; Taylor, K B; Wright, J P

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for the isolation of parietal cells from the gastric mucosa of the guinea pig by enzymatic digestion with collagenase. A suspension was obtained that contained 70-80% parietal cells. About 80% of the cells were viable immediately after incubation, but viability dropped sharply after one hour. Parietal cells were identified by their morphology on light and electron microscopy, by their uptake of neutral red, by immunofluorescent staining and by carbonic anhydrase activity. Antibodies to four distinct parietal-cell antigens were obtained from rabbits immunized with the isolated parietal cells or fractions thereof. These antibodies were directed against the microsomal fraction of the parietal-cell cytoplasm, the plasma and nuclear membranes, the soluble proteins, and Castle's intrinsic factor. The antibody against the microsomal fraction, though reacting in the same way as the antibody to parietal cell canaliculi found in the serum of patients with pernicious anaemia, showed greater species specificity. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 5 Fig 6 PMID:52572

  16. Increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes in adrenal glands contributes to high circulating catecholamines in pigs with tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tomaszek, A; Kiczak, L; Bania, J; Paslawska, U; Zacharski, M; Janiszewski, A; Noszczyk-Nowak, A; Dziegiel, P; Kuropka, P; Ponikowski, P; Jankowska, E A

    2015-04-01

    High levels of circulating catecholamines have been established as fundamental pathophysiological elements of heart failure (HF). However, it is unclear whether the increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesis enzymes in the adrenal glands contributes to these hormone abnormalities in large animal HF models. We analyzed the mRNA levels of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes: tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in adrenal glands of 18 pigs with chronic systolic non-ischaemic HF (tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy due to right ventricle pacing) and 6 sham-operated controls. Pigs with severe HF demonstrated an increased expression of TH and DBH (but neither AAAD nor PNMT) as compared to animals with milder HF and controls (P<0.05 in all cases). The increased adrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH was accompanied by a reduced left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) (P<0.001) and an elevated plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) (P<0.01), the other indices reflecting HF severity. There was a positive relationship between the increased adrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH, and the high levels of circulating adrenaline and noradrenaline (all P<0.05). The association with noradrenaline remained significant also when adjusted for LVEF and plasma BNP, suggesting a significant contribution of adrenals to the circulating pool of catecholamines in subjects with systolic HF. PMID:25903953

  17. Isolated guinea pig gastric chief cells express tumour necrosis factor receptors coupled with the sphingomyelin pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Fiorucci, S; Santucci, L; Migliorati, G; Riccardi, C; Amorosi, A; Mancini, A; Roberti, R; Morelli, A

    1996-01-01

    The tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced gastropathy and Helicobacter pylori induced gastritis. Both conditions are characterised by high plasma pepsinogen concentrations, which are thought to reflect an increased rate of enzyme release by the pepsinogen secreting (chief) cells. The mechanisms responsible for this cell dysfunction are unknown. This study investigates whether chief cells express TNF receptors and, if so, whether their activation results in cell death. Immunohistochemical studies conducted with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against two TNF receptor associated proteins of 55 kDa (TNF-R1) and 75 kDa (TNF-R2) showed that TNF binding sites were expressed in approximately 100% gastric chief cells. Western blot analysis of whole chief cell lysates probed with the TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 mAbs gave two distinct bands of 55 and 75 kDa in the immunoprecipitate. Incubating chief cells with TNF caused concentration and time dependent cell death, which was prevented by pretreating the cells with anti-TNF receptor mAbs. Exposing the cells to TNF reduced sphingomyelin content by 25%. Sphingomyelinase (10(-6) to 10(-2) IU/ml) mimicked the effect of TNF in that it provoked a concentration and time dependent reduction in chief cell viability and increased pepsinogen release. In conclusion, gastric chief cells express two TNF receptors partially linked to the sphingomyelin pathway. TNF induced chief cell dysfunction might be responsible for the high plasma pepsinogen concentrations seen in patients with NSAID gastropathy or H pylori induced gastritis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8801194

  18. Effects of PGE2 and of different synthetic PGE derivatives on the glycosylation of pig gastric mucins.

    PubMed

    Enss, M L; Heim, H K; Wagner, S; Beil, W; Eisenblätter, R; Sewing, K F; Hedrich, H J

    1998-07-01

    The glycosylation of pig gastric mucins, discharged in response to prostaglandin (PG) E2 and to three synthetic PGE-derivatives (misoprostol, nocloprost, rioprostil) was compared. After a 20 h culture period in the absence or presence of 1 micromol/l of one of the PGs, mucins were isolated by gel chromatography and their glycosylation characterized by their linkage to a panel of lectins. For all tested PGs, a significantly increased lectin linkage to mucin glycoproteins of high molecular weight was detected; no significant effects were observed for low molecular weight glycoproteins. Within the stimulatory pattern, major effects were found for the linkage of peanut agglutinin and soybean agglutinin, suggesting predominant effects on the expression of galactose and N-acetyl-galactosamine. Only minor effects were found for sialic acid, mannose, N-acetyl-glucosamine and fucose expression, as evidenced by the linkage of Sambucus nigra agglutinin, Concanavalin A, Datura stramonium agglutinin and Ulex europaeus I agglutinin. All PGs exerted a similar stimulatory pattern. However, at the indicated concentration, misoprostol (281 +/- 36% of control) rendered a significantly higher overall effect than PGE2 (208 +/- 31%), whereas the increases induced by nocloprost (237 +/- 35%) and rioprostil (202 +/- 35%) were not significantly different from the PGE2 effects. These results, suggesting similar stimulatory effects of PGE2 and of the tested synthetic PGs on glycosylation of mucin oligosaccharides, discharged from mucous cells during an in vitro culture, may, at least in part, explain clinical findings that during an impairment of the endogenous PG synthesis, the tested synthetic PGs are effective exogenous substitutes for endogenous E-type prostaglandins and act as anti-ulcer drugs. PMID:9758207

  19. GNAS mutation as an alternative mechanism of activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in gastric adenocarcinoma of the fundic gland type.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Ryosuke; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Mitomi, Hiroyuki; Hidaka, Yasuhiro; Lee, Se-yong; Watanabe, Sumio; Yao, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma of the fundic gland type (GAFG) is a rare variant of gastric tumor. We have recently reported the frequent accumulation of β-catenin in GAFGs and showed that approximately half of the cases studied harbored at least 1 mutation in CTNNB1/AXINs/APC, leading to the constitutive activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. However, the mechanisms of Wnt signaling activation in the remaining cases are unknown. Accumulating evidence showed that the activating mutation in GNAS promotes tumorigenesis via the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway or the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway. Therefore, we analyzed the mutations in GNAS (exons 8 and 9) and in KRAS (exon 2) in 26 GAFGs. Immunohistochemistry revealed nuclear β-catenin expression in 22 of 26 GAFGs, and 10 (38.5%) of 26 cases harbored at least 1 mutation in CTNNB1/AXINs/APC. Activating mutations in GNAS were found in 5 (19.2%) of 26 GAFGs, all of which harbored R201C mutations. Activating mutations in KRAS were found in 2 (7.7%) of 26 GAFGs, and both of these also contained GNAS activating mutations. Four of 5 cases with GNAS mutation showed nuclear β-catenin expression, and presence of GNAS mutation was associated with β-catenin nuclear expression (P = .01). Furthermore, 3 of these 4 cases did not harbor mutations in CTNNB1, APC, or AXINs, suggesting that mutations in the Wnt component genes and those in GNAS occur almost exclusively. These results suggest that GNAS mutation might occur in a small subset of GAFG as an alternative mechanism of activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:25288233

  20. Disparate effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on apoptosis in guinea-pig gastric mucous cells: inhibition of basal apoptosis by diclofenac

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Miranda; Hanson, Peter J

    2002-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) induce apoptosis in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines. Similar actions on normal gastric epithelial cells could contribute to NSAID gastropathy. The present work therefore compared the actions of diclofenac, ibuprofen, indomethacin, and the cyclo-oxygenase-2 selective inhibitor, NS-398, on a primary culture of guinea-pig gastric mucous epithelial cells. Cell number was assessed by staining with crystal violet. Apoptotic activity was determined by condensation and fragmentation of nuclei and by assay of caspase-3-like activity. Necrosis was evaluated from release of cellular enzymes. Ibuprofen (250 μM for 24 h) promoted cell loss, and apoptosis, under both basal conditions and when apoptosis was increased by 25 μM N-Hexanoyl-D-sphingosine (C6-ceramide). Diclofenac (250 μM for 24 h) reduced the proportion of apoptotic nuclei from 5.2 to 2.1%, and caused inhibition of caspase-3-like activity, without causing necrosis under basal conditions. No such reduction in apoptotic activity was evident in the presence of 25 μM C6-ceramide. The inhibitory effect of diclofenac on basal caspase-3-like activity was also exhibited by the structurally similar mefenamic and flufenamic acids (1–250 μM), but not by niflumic acid. Inhibition of superoxide production by the cells increased caspase-3-like activity, but the inhibitory action of diclofenac on caspase activity remained. Diclofenac did not affect superoxide production. Diclofenac inhibited caspase-3-like activity in cell homogenates and also inhibited human recombinant caspase-3. In conclusion, NSAIDs vary in their effect on apoptotic activity in a primary culture of guinea-pig gastric mucous epithelial cells, and the inhibitory effect of diclofenac on basal apoptosis could involve an action on caspase activity. PMID:11815376

  1. Tissue integration of polyacrylamide hydrogel: an experimental study of periurethral, perivesical, and mammary gland tissue in the pig.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Lise H; Nielsen, John B; Mouritsen, Lone; Sørensen, Michael; Lose, Gunnar

    2008-06-01

    BACKGROUND Polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAAG) is a nondegradable water-based polymer with high viscoelasticity. The gel is used as a tissue filler, the only risk being prolonged infection with anaerobic, contaminating microorganisms if not treated early with broad-spectrum antibiotics. OBJECTIVE With silicone gel as reference, PAAG tissue integration and migration was studied in a longitudinal study of the pig. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty-one pigs were used. PAAG and silicone gel were injected into mammary tissue, and PAAG was injected into urethral or bladder wall or the anal canal. Tissues and regional lymph nodes were examined at 1, 1(1/2), 3, 3(1/2), 6, 12, and 14 months, and other lymph nodes and organs were examined at 1, 6, 12, and 14 months. RESULTS PAAG was invaded by macrophages and giant cells that were gradually replaced by a network of fibrous tissue. Silicone gel was seen inside these cells or as large vacuoles, surrounded by a fibrous capsule. Regional lymph nodes contained PAAG only at 1 1/2 months and silicone gel at 12 months. CONCLUSION PAAG is a stable, viscoelastic bulking agent, which unlike silicone gel is slowly integrated within its host tissue via a thin fibrous network. Long-term risk of fibrosis and migration is minimal. PMID:18547185

  2. Effect of diet grinding and pelleting fed either dry or liquid feed on dry matter and pH in the stomach of pigs and the development of gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mösseler, A; Wintermann, M; Sander, S J; Kamphues, J

    2012-12-01

    The physical form of diets has a marked impact on the development of gastric ulcers in pigs. Earlier studies showed effects of fine grinding and pelleting on the integrity of gastric mucosa as well as on local intragastric milieu. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dry or liquid feeding on intragastric milieu (DM and pH) in pigs. The 23 piglets were housed individually and fed with test diets and water ad lib for 6 wk. Both experimental diets [coarsely ground diet fed as mash (CM) vs. finely ground pelleted diet (FP)] were identical in ingredients (39.5% wheat, 34% barley, 20% soybean meal) and chemical composition and were either offered dry or in liquid (25% DM) form. At the end of the trial the animals were slaughtered; the stomach was removed and samples were taken from different localizations. Feeding diets dry or liquid had no effect on the pH (P > 0.05). The diet noticeably affected the gastric content. The FP diets resulted in a more liquid chyme (P < 0.05), and the intragastric pH did not differ between regions. Feeding CM caused marked effects of localization regarding pH (highest values: pars nonglandularis; lowest values: fundus). None of the pigs fed CM showed signs of gastric ulcers, but the score was markedly higher (P < 0.05) when pigs were fed FP. Therefore the predominant factor for development of gastric ulcers seems to be the structure (particle size) of the diet. PMID:23365374

  3. Synergistic effect between 5-HT4 receptor agonist and phosphodiesterase 4-inhibitor in releasing acetylcholine in pig gastric circular muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Romain A; Van Colen, Inge; Pauwelyn, Vicky; De Maeyer, Joris H

    2016-06-15

    5-HT4 receptor agonists have a gastroprokinetic effect by facilitating acetylcholine release from cholinergic nerves innervating gastrointestinal smooth muscle. The role of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 in the signal transduction pathway of the 5-HT4 receptors located on the cholinergic neurons towards the circular muscle layer in pig stomach was investigated by analysis of acetylcholine release. Circular muscle strips were prepared from pig proximal stomach and tritium outflow, induced by electrical field stimulation, was studied as a marker for acetylcholine release after incubation with [(3)H]-choline. The PDE4-inhibitor roflumilast concentration-dependently (0.1-1µM) enhanced the facilitating effect of a submaximally effective concentration of the 5-HT4 receptor agonist prucalopride (0.01µM) on electrically induced acetylcholine release. Roflumilast (0.3µM) enhanced acetylcholine release per se but in the combined presence of roflumilast and prucalopride, acetylcholine release was enhanced more than the sum of the effect of the 2 compounds alone. The 5-HT4 receptor agonist velusetrag concentration-dependently (0.01-0.1µM) enhanced acetylcholine release; the effect of the minimally effective concentration (0.01µM) was significantly enhanced by 1µM of the PDE4-inhibitor rolipram, again to a level higher than the sum of the effect of the 2 compounds alone. The synergistic effect between 5-HT4 receptor agonists and PDE4-inhibitors demonstrates that the intracellular pathway of the 5-HT4 receptors located on cholinergic neurons towards pig gastric circular muscle is controlled by PDE4. Combining a 5-HT4 receptor agonist with a PDE4-inhibitor might thus enhance its gastroprokinetic effect. PMID:27060014

  4. Adrenal glands

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002219.htm Adrenal glands To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The adrenal glands are two triangle-shaped glands. One gland is ...

  5. Studies on the intracellular segregation of polyribosome-associated messenger ribonucleic acid species in the lactating guinea-pig mammary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, R K; Boulton, A P; Harrison, O S; Parker, D; Campbell, P N

    1979-01-01

    (pre-alpha-lactalbumin) is removed. 8. The results are discussed in terms of the mechanisms involved in the intracellular segregation of mRNA species in the lactating guinea-pig mammary gland. Images PLATE 1 Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. PMID:518553

  6. Salivary Glands

    MedlinePlus

    ... salivary gland tumors usually show up as painless enlargements of these glands. Tumors rarely involve more than ... otolaryngologist-head and neck surgeon should check these enlargements. Malignant tumors of the major salivary glands can ...

  7. Quantification of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-protein adducts in the in vivo gastric digesta of mini-pigs using a GC-MS/MS method with accuracy profile validation.

    PubMed

    Delosière, Mylène; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique; Chantelauze, Céline; Durand, Denys; Thomas, Agnès; Joly, Charlotte; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; Rémond, Didier; Comte, Blandine; Gladine, Cécile; Guy, Alexandre; Durand, Thierry; Laurentie, Michel; Dufour, Claire

    2016-08-10

    Hydroxyalkenals are lipid oxidation end-products resulting from the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). This study aimed at quantifying the production of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-protein adducts (HNE-P) via Michael addition from n-6 PUFA oxidation in the gastric digesta of mini-pigs after the consumption of meat-based meals with different plant antioxidant contents. Using the accuracy profile procedure, we validated an extraction protocol for the quantification of HNE-P by GC-MS/MS in gastric contents. The formation of HNE-P in the gastric compartment was observed for the first time, with concentrations ranging from less than 0.52 to 1.33 nmol HNE-P per 500 mg digesta. Nevertheless, most gastric HNE-P levels were below the limit of quantification of 0.52 nmol HNE-P per 500 mg digesta. In this animal study, the protective effect of plant antioxidant sources on HNE-P formation was not evidenced contrasting with the results using TBARS as markers. PMID:27418316

  8. Effect of Soyabean Isoflavones Exposure on Onset of Puberty, Serum Hormone Concentration and Gene Expression in Hypothalamus, Pituitary Gland and Ovary of Female Bama Miniature Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Juexin; Zhang, Bin; Li, Lili; Xiao, Chaowu; Oladele, Oso Abimbola; Jiang, Guoli; Ding, Hao; Wang, Shengping; Xing, Yueteng; Xiao, Dingfu; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    This study was to investigate the effect of soyabean isoflavones (SIF) on onset of puberty, serum hormone concentration, and gene expression in hypothalamus, pituitary and ovary of female Bama miniature pigs. Fifty five, 35-days old pigs were randomly assigned into 5 treatment groups consisting of 11 pigs per treatment. Results showed that dietary supplementation of varying dosage (0, 250, 500, and 1,250 mg/kg) of SIF induced puberty delay of the pigs with the age of puberty of pigs fed basal diet supplemented with 1,250 mg/kg SIF was significantly higher (p<0.05) compared to control. Supplementation of SIF or estradiol valerate (EV) reduced (p<0.05) serum gonadotrophin releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone concentration, but increased follicle-stimulating hormone concentration in pigs at 4 months of age. The expression of KiSS-1 metastasis-suppressor (KISS1), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta-5-delta-4 isomerase (3β-HSD) was reduced (p<0.01) in SIF-supplemented groups. Expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor in the pituitary of miniature pigs was reduced (p<0.05) compared to the control when exposed to 250, 1,250 mg/kg SIF and EV. Pigs on 250 mg/kg SIF and EV also showed reduced (p<0.05) expression of cytochrome P450 19A1 compared to the control. Our results indicated that dietary supplementation of SIF induced puberty delay, which may be due to down-regulation of key genes that play vital roles in the synthesis of steroid hormones. PMID:26580281

  9. Pituitary gland

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... gland is the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus decides which hormones the pituitary should release by sending it either ... the hypothalamus, the pituitary gland releases the following hormones: GH (growth hormone) – increases size of muscle and ...

  10. Endocrine glands

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... composed of glands that produce chemical messengers called hormones. Glands of the endocrine system include the pituitary ... system since they contain endocrine tissue that secretes hormones. These include the pancreas, ovaries and testes. The ...

  11. Endocrine glands

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002351.htm Endocrine glands To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Endocrine glands release (secrete) hormones into the bloodstream. The ...

  12. Split gland

    DOEpatents

    Petranto, J.J.

    1989-09-05

    A split gland having only three parts is described. The gland has substantially the same stability to the relative motion of the constituent half-gland members during the attachment process to a female fitting as have more complicated designs. Ease of manufacture and use result from the reduction in complexity of the present invention. 15 figs.

  13. Split gland

    DOEpatents

    Petranto, Joseph J.

    1989-01-01

    A split gland having only three parts is described. The gland has substantially the same stability to the relative motion of the constituent half-gland members during the attachment process to a female fitting as have more complicated designs. Ease of manufacture and use result from the reduction in complexity of the present invention.

  14. A gastric acid secretion model.

    PubMed Central

    de Beus, A M; Fabry, T L; Lacker, H M

    1993-01-01

    A theory of gastric acid production and self-protection is formulated mathematically and examined for clinical and experimental correlations, implications, and predictions using analytic and numerical techniques. In our model, gastric acid secretion in the stomach, as represented by an archetypal gastron, consists of two chambers, circulatory and luminal, connected by two different regions of ion exchange. The capillary circulation of the gastric mucosa is arranged in arterial-venous arcades which pass from the gastric glands up to the surface epithelial lining of the lumen; therefore the upstream region of the capillary chamber communicates with oxyntic cells, while the downstream region communicates with epithelial cells. Both cell types abut the gastric lumen. Ion currents across the upstream region are calculated from a steady-state oxyntic cell model with active ion transport, while the downstream ion fluxes are (facilitated) diffusion driven or secondarily active. Water transport is considered iso-osmotic. The steady-state model is solved in closed form for low gastric lumen pH. A wide variety of previously performed static and dynamic experiments on ion and CO2 transport in the gastric lumen and gastric blood supply are for the first time correlated with each other for an (at least) semiquantitative test of current concepts of gastric acid secretion and for the purpose of model verification. Agreement with the data is reported with a few outstanding and instructive exceptions. Model predictions and implications are also discussed. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8396457

  15. Morphological Features of the Porcine Lacrimal Gland and Its Compatibility for Human Lacrimal Gland Xenografting

    PubMed Central

    Gaffling, Simone; Asano, Nagayoshi; Hampel, Ulrike; Garreis, Fabian; Hornegger, Joachim; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present first data concerning the anatomical structure, blood supply and location of the lacrimal gland of the pig. Our data indicate that the porcine lacrimal gland may serve as a potential xenograft candidate in humans or as an animal model for engineering of a bioartificial lacrimal gland tissue construct for clinical application. For this purpose, we used different macroscopic preparation techniques and digital reconstruction of the histological gland morphology to gain new insights and important information concerning the feasibility of a lacrimal gland transplantation from pig to humans in general. Our results show that the lacrimal gland of the pig reveals a lot of morphological similarities to the analogous human lacrimal gland and thus might be regarded as a xenograft in the future. This is true for a similar anatomical location within the orbit as well as for the feeding artery supply to the organ. Functional differences concerning the composition of the tear fluid, due to a different secretory unit distribution within the gland tissue will, however, be a challenge in future investigations. PMID:24069265

  16. Endocrine glands

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... and nervous systems work very closely together. The brain continuously sends instructions to the endocrine system, and ... master switchboard because it’s the part of the brain that controls the endocrine system. The pituitary gland, ...

  17. Pituitary gland

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... stimulates breast tissue in nursing mothers to produce milk ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) - causes the adrenal glands to ... less urine Oxytocin – initiates labor, uterine contractions and milk ejection in mothers

  18. [Effect of prednisolone on the basal gastric secretion in laboratory rats depending on functional state of the stomach adrenoreceptors].

    PubMed

    Trefilov, A B

    2002-04-01

    Activation of the stomach adrenoreceptors with adrenaline resulting in inhibition of fundal glands promotes stimulating effect of prednisolone glucocorticosteroid action on basal gastric secretion. PMID:12058541

  19. Adrenal Gland Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    The adrenal glands are small glands located on top of each kidney. They produce hormones that you can't live ... stress and has many other important functions. With adrenal gland disorders, your glands make too much or not ...

  20. Pacemaker role of pericytes in generating synchronized spontaneous Ca2+ transients in the myenteric microvasculature of the guinea-pig gastric antrum.

    PubMed

    Hashitani, Hikaru; Mitsui, Retsu; Masaki, Shota; Van Helden, Dirk F

    2015-11-01

    Properties of spontaneous Ca(2+) transients in the myenteric microvasculature of the guinea-pig stomach were investigated. Specifically, we explored the spatio-temporal origin of Ca(2+) transients and the role of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) in their intercellular synchrony using fluorescence Ca(2+) imaging and immunohistochemistry. The microvasculature generated spontaneous Ca(2+) transients that were independent of both Ca(2+) transients in interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and neural activity. Spontaneous Ca(2+) transients were highly synchronous along the length of microvasculature, and appeared to be initiated in pericytes and spread to arteriolar smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In most cases, the generation or synchrony of Ca(2+) transients was not affected by blockers of L-type VDCCs. In nifedipine-treated preparations, synchronous spontaneous Ca(2+) transients were readily blocked by Ni(2+), mibefradil or ML216, blockers for T-type VDCCs. These blockers also suppressed the known T-type VDCC dependent component of ICC Ca(2+) transients or slow waves. Spontaneous Ca(2+) transients were also suppressed by caffeine, tetracaine or cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). After the blockade of both L- and T-type VDCCs, asynchronous Ca(2+) transients were generated in pericytes on precapillary arterioles and/or capillaries but not in arteriolar SMCs, and were abolished by CPA or nominally Ca(2+) free solution. Together these data indicate that pericytes in the myenteric microvasculature may act as the origin of synchronous spontaneous Ca(2+) transients. Pericyte Ca(2+) transients arise from Ca(2+) release from the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum and the opening of T-type Ca(2+) VDCCs is required for their synchrony and propagation to arteriolar SMCs. PMID:26153078

  1. Salivary gland biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - salivary gland ... You have several pairs of salivary glands that drain into your mouth: A major pair in front of the ears (parotid glands) Another major pair beneath your jaw (submandibular ...

  2. Salivary Gland Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your salivary glands make saliva - sometimes called spit - and empty it into your mouth through openings called ducts. Saliva makes your ... antibodies that can kill germs. Problems with salivary glands can cause the glands to become irritated and ...

  3. Thymus Gland Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Thymus Gland, Adult, Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Thymus Gland, Adult, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the thymus gland; drawing shows ...

  4. Adrenal Gland Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... here Home > Types of Cancer > Adrenal Gland Tumor Adrenal Gland Tumor This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Adrenal Gland Tumor. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Adrenal Gland Tumor Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and ...

  5. Gastric suction

    MedlinePlus

    ... al. Position paper update: gastric lavage for gastrointestinal decontamination. Clin Toxicol (Phila) . 2013;51(3); 140-146. ... 2012:chap 49. Zeringe M, Fowler GC. Gastrointesinal decontamination. In: Pfenninger JL, Fowler GC, eds. Pfenninger & Fowler's ...

  6. Gastric Banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastric banding before deciding to have the procedure. Advertisements for a device or procedure may not include ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  7. Gastric culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... test or procedure preparation (3 to 6 years) School age test or procedure preparation (6 to 12 ... immune system. The final results of the gastric culture test may take several weeks. Your provider will ...

  8. Gastric foregut cystic developmental malformation: Case series and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yan-Hua; Wang, Chang-Xing; Li, Jiang-Tao; Chen, Qing-Yu; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Pan, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Foregut cystic developmental malformation (FCDM) is a very rare lesion of the alimentary tract, especially in the stomach. We discuss the concepts of gastric duplication cyst, bronchogenic cysts, and FCDM. Nomenclature has been inconsistent and confusing, but, by some definitions, gastric duplication cysts involve gastric mucosa and submucosal glands, bronchogenic cysts involve respiratory mucosa with underlying cartilage and glands, and FCDM lacks gastric mucosa or underlying glands or cartilage but has pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium (PCCE). We searched our departmental case files from the past 15 years and identified 12 cases of FCDM in the alimentary tract. We summarize the features of these 12 cases including a report in detail on a 52-year-old man with a submucosal cyst lined with simple PCCE and irregular and stratified circular muscle layers that merged with gastric smooth muscle bundles near the lesser curvature of the gastric cardia. A literature review of cases with this histology yielded 25 cases. We propose the term gastric-FCDM for such cases. Our own series of 12 cases confirms that preoperative recognition of the entity is infrequent and problematic. The rarity of this developmental disorder, as well as a lack of understanding of its embryologic origins, may contribute to missing the diagnosis. Not appreciating the diagnosis preoperatively can lead to an inappropriate surgical approach. In contrast, presurgical recognition of the entity will contribute to a good outcome and reduced risk of complications. PMID:25593458

  9. Insulin receptors in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Insulin binding studies were conducted using mammary membrane preparations to further the authors understanding of insulin's role in regulating mammary metabolism, particularly ruminant mammary metabolism. Specific objectives were to: (1) characterize insulin binding to bovine mammary microsomes and determine if the specificity and kinetics of binding indicate the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland; (2) examine and compare insulin binding by liver and mammary microsomes of the pig and dairy cow; (3) examine insulin binding to bovine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) and evaluate this model's usefulness in assessing insulin receptor regulation in the mammary gland of the cow; (4) examine the effect of dietary fat in insulin binding by rat mammary and liver microsomes. The specificity and kinetics of /sup 125/I-insulin binding of bovine mammary microsomes indicated the presence of insulin receptors in bovine mammary gland. Bovine liver and mammary microsomes specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did the corresponding porcine microsomes, and mammary microsomes, regardless of species, specifically bound less /sup 125/I-insulin than did liver microsomes. These differences in binding suggest differences in insulin responsiveness between pigs and cattle, as well as between the liver and mammary glands.

  10. Mast cell expression of the serotonin1A receptor in guinea pig and human intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Liu, Sumei; Fei, Guijun; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2013-05-15

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is released from enterochromaffin cells in the mucosa of the small intestine. We tested a hypothesis that elevation of 5-HT in the environment of enteric mast cells might degranulate the mast cells and release mediators that become paracrine signals to the enteric nervous system, spinal afferents, and secretory glands. Western blotting, immunofluorescence, ELISA, and pharmacological analysis were used to study expression of 5-HT receptors by mast cells in the small intestine and action of 5-HT to degranulate the mast cells and release histamine in guinea pig small intestine and segments of human jejunum discarded during Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgeries. Mast cells in human and guinea pig preparations expressed the 5-HT1A receptor. ELISA detected spontaneous release of histamine in guinea pig and human preparations. The selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-PIPAT evoked release of histamine. A selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100135, suppressed stimulation of histamine release by 5-HT or 8-hydroxy-PIPAT. Mast cell-stabilizing drugs, doxantrazole and cromolyn sodium, suppressed the release of histamine evoked by 5-HT or 8-hydroxy-PIPAT in guinea pig and human preparations. Our results support the hypothesis that serotonergic degranulation of enteric mast cells and release of preformed mediators, including histamine, are mediated by the 5-HT1A serotonergic receptor. Association of 5-HT with the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders (e.g., irritable bowel syndrome) underlies a question of whether selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonists might have therapeutic application in disorders of this nature. PMID:23518679

  11. Mast cell expression of the serotonin1A receptor in guinea pig and human intestine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Liu, Sumei; Fei, Guijun; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J.; Mikami, Dean J.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is released from enterochromaffin cells in the mucosa of the small intestine. We tested a hypothesis that elevation of 5-HT in the environment of enteric mast cells might degranulate the mast cells and release mediators that become paracrine signals to the enteric nervous system, spinal afferents, and secretory glands. Western blotting, immunofluorescence, ELISA, and pharmacological analysis were used to study expression of 5-HT receptors by mast cells in the small intestine and action of 5-HT to degranulate the mast cells and release histamine in guinea pig small intestine and segments of human jejunum discarded during Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgeries. Mast cells in human and guinea pig preparations expressed the 5-HT1A receptor. ELISA detected spontaneous release of histamine in guinea pig and human preparations. The selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-PIPAT evoked release of histamine. A selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100135, suppressed stimulation of histamine release by 5-HT or 8-hydroxy-PIPAT. Mast cell-stabilizing drugs, doxantrazole and cromolyn sodium, suppressed the release of histamine evoked by 5-HT or 8-hydroxy-PIPAT in guinea pig and human preparations. Our results support the hypothesis that serotonergic degranulation of enteric mast cells and release of preformed mediators, including histamine, are mediated by the 5-HT1A serotonergic receptor. Association of 5-HT with the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders (e.g., irritable bowel syndrome) underlies a question of whether selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonists might have therapeutic application in disorders of this nature. PMID:23518679

  12. bak deletion stimulates gastric epithelial proliferation and enhances Helicobacter felis-induced gastric atrophy and dysplasia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, C. A.; Abuderman, A. A.; Burkitt, M. D.; Williams, J. M.; O'Reilly, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter infection causes a chronic superficial gastritis that in some cases progresses via atrophic gastritis to adenocarcinoma. Proapoptotic bak has been shown to regulate radiation-induced apoptosis in the stomach and colon and also susceptibility to colorectal carcinogenesis in vivo. Therefore we investigated the gastric mucosal pathology following H. felis infection in bak-null mice at 6 or 48 wk postinfection. Primary gastric gland culture from bak-null mice was also used to assess the effects of bak deletion on IFN-γ-, TNF-α-, or IL-1β-induced apoptosis. bak-null gastric corpus glands were longer, had increased epithelial Ki-67 expression, and contained fewer parietal and enteroendocrine cells compared with the wild type (wt). In wt mice, bak was expressed at the luminal surface of gastric corpus glands, and this increased 2 wk post-H. felis infection. Apoptotic cell numbers were decreased in bak-null corpus 6 and 48 wk following infection and in primary gland cultures following cytokine administration. Increased gastric epithelial Ki-67 labeling index was observed in C57BL/6 mice after H. felis infection, whereas no such increase was detected in bak-null mice. More severe gastric atrophy was observed in bak-null compared with C57BL/6 mice 6 and 48 wk postinfection, and 76% of bak-null compared with 25% of C57BL/6 mice showed evidence of gastric dysplasia following long-term infection. Collectively, bak therefore regulates gastric epithelial cell apoptosis, proliferation, differentiation, mucosal thickness, and susceptibility to gastric atrophy and dysplasia following H. felis infection. PMID:26159699

  13. Syndromic Gastric Polyps: At the Crossroads of Genetic and Environmental Cancer Predisposition.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Giardiello, Francis M; Offerhaus, G Johan; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Gastric polyps occur in 1-4 % of patients undergoing gastroscopy. Although most are sporadic, some gastric polyps are part of an underlying hereditary syndrome. Gastric polyps can be seen in each of the well-known gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes, but also in Lynch syndrome and in several rare not primarily gastrointestinal syndromes. In addition, Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach (GAPPS) is a recently described heritable syndrome characterized by isolated gastric polyposis and risk of gastric cancer.Some of these syndromes are associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer, whereas others are not. However, the neoplastic potential and the precursor status of these gastric polyps are not always clear, even in syndromes with a well-established risk of gastric cancer. For instance, the neoplastic potential of Peutz-Jeghers polyps is debatable, despite the well-established risk of gastric cancer in this syndrome. Also fundic gland polyps and gastric foveolar-type adenomas in FAP carry a low risk of malignant transformation. In contrast, gastric juvenile polyps are precursor lesions of gastric cancer in juvenile polyposis syndrome through neoplastic progression of juvenile polyps in these patients.Although these hereditary syndromes with gastric polyps are rare, recognition is important for individual patient management. Furthermore, the initiation and progression of these lesions can be influenced by environmental factors such as Helicobacter Pylori infection. This makes these rare lesions an appropriate model for understanding the clonal evolution of early gastric cancer in the wider population. PMID:27573780

  14. Gastric mucous neck cell and intestinal goblet cell phenotypes in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, N R; Bhathal, P S

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the phenotype of cells comprising diffuse and intestinal-type gastric cancers using monoclonal antibodies to two antigens. One antigen (designated D10) is characteristic of gastric mucous neck cells, cardiac glands, pyloric glands, and Brunner's glands. The second antigen (designated 17NM) is specific to the mucous vacuole of intestinal goblet cells. METHODS: Thirty two gastrectomy specimens with adenocarcinoma were studied. Serial paraffin sections were stained immunohistochemically for D10 and 17NM and histochemically for acid and neutral mucins. The cancers were classified histologically as of either diffuse or intestinal type according to Lauren. RESULTS: Of 15 diffuse-type gastric carcinomas, 11 showed the majority of cancer cells staining for D10 while four were typical signet ring cell cancers staining predominantly for 17NM; five tumours displayed both phenotypes with the two phenotypes segregated in different areas of the tumours. In contrast, of 16 intestinal-type cancers, six expressed 17NM, three D10, five neither antigen, and two expressed both antigens. One indeterminate-type cancer expressed both antigens. The staining of individual cells for D10 and 17NM was mutually exclusive in both diffuse and intestinal types. In contrast to the diffuse cancers, intestinal-type cancers typically expressed either antigen only in occasional small groups of cells and individual cells. CONCLUSIONS: In disease, the gastric stem cell can assume the capacity of the duodenal stem cell for divergent differentiation into either intestinal goblet cells (for example, as in intestinal metaplasia) or Brunner's gland cells (for example, as in pyloric gland/Brunner's gland metaplasia). With neoplastic transformation, this potential for divergent differentiation is maintained and gives rise to diffuse-type cancers that display either the D10 phenotype, the 17NM phenotype, or the clonal expression of both phenotypes. In the more cell cohesive (intestinal

  15. The effect of immobilization and 3 (beta-aminoethyl)-1, 2, 4 triazol on the calcium content in gastric tissues of guinea pigs during the formation of experimental ulcers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grechishkin, L. L.; Ritling, K.

    1980-01-01

    A sharp fall in the concentration of calcium in gastric tissues upon immobilization and after administration of the histamine analog was recorded. Similar shifts were seen to occur in the blood plasma as well. This implies that under the effect of different action, tissue dystrophy develops by following a common mechanism involving not only the adenyl cyclase system, but that of calcium ion metabolism as well. The calcium ion content in the blood plasma and gastric tissues were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  16. Thyroid gland removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002933.htm Thyroid gland removal To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Thyroid gland removal is surgery to remove all or ...

  17. Salivary gland tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers Salivary duct stones Salivary gland infections Dehydration Sarcoidosis Sjögren syndrome The most common type of salivary ... Cancer Cirrhosis Salivary duct stones Salivary gland infections Sarcoidosis Tumor Update Date 10/30/2015 Updated by: ...

  18. Adrenal Gland Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Most adrenal gland tumors are ... and may not require treatment. Malignant adrenal gland cancers are uncommon. Types of tumors include Adrenocortical carcinoma - ...

  19. Pituitary Gland Disorders Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ... Women's Health Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ...

  20. Thyroid gland biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a sample of cells is needed from the thyroid gland a fine needle biopsy can be performed. During ... procedure, a skinny needle is inserted into the thyroid gland, and a sample of thyroid cells and fluid ...

  1. [Gastric Acid].

    PubMed

    Ruíz Chávez, R

    1996-01-01

    Gastric acid, a product of parietal cells secretion, full fills multiple biological roles which are absolutely necessary to keep corporal homeostasis. The production of the acid depends upon an effector cellular process represented in the first step by histamine, acetilcholine and gastrin, first messengers of the process. These interact with specific receptors than in sequence activate second messengers -cAMP and the calcium-calmodulin system- which afterwards activate a kinase. An specific protein is then phosphorilated by this enzyme, being the crucial factor that starts the production of acid. Finally, a proton bomb, extrudes the acid towards the gastric lumen. The secretion process mentioned above, is progressive lyactivated in three steps, two of which are stimulators -cephalic and gastric phases- and the other one inhibitor or intestinal phase. These stages are started by mental and neurological phenomena -thought, sight, smell or memory-; by food, drugs or other ingested substances; and by products of digestion. Changes in regulation of acid secretion, in the structure of gastro-duodenal mucosal barrier by a wide spectrum of factors and agents including food, drugs and H. pylori, are the basis of acid-peptic disease, entity in which gastric acid plays a fundamental role. From the therapeutic point of view, so at the theoretical as at the practical levels, t is possible to interfere with the secretion of acid by neutralization of some of the steps of the effector cellular process. An adequate knowledge of the basics related to gastric acid, allows to create strategies for the clinical handling of associated pathology, specifically in relation to peptic acid disease in all of the known clinical forms. PMID:12165790

  2. Prevalence of gastro-oesophageal ulcers in grower-finisher pigs in the northern province of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Makinde, M O; Gous, T A

    1998-06-01

    Ulceration of the gastric pars oesophagea is a common problem in intensive pig production that is often detected at slaughter. A survey was carried out at the Pietersburg abattoir in the Northern Province during a 6-month period. In total, 4320 pig stomachs were examined. Gastro-oesophageal ulcers were observed in 5.1% of the stomachs, gastric erosion in 15.2%, and hyperkeratosis in 18.9%. Time of slaughter was found to affect the prevalence of gastric lesions in the pig. PMID:9760399

  3. Gastric Carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Borch, Kurt; Ahrén, Bo; Ahlman, Håkan; Falkmer, Sture; Granérus, Göran; Grimelius, Lars

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze tumor biology and the outcome of differentiated treatment in relation to tumor subtype in patients with gastric carcinoid. Background: Gastric carcinoids may be subdivided into ECL cell carcinoids (type 1 associated with atrophic gastritis, type 2 associated with gastrinoma, type 3 without predisposing conditions) and miscellaneous types (type 4). The biologic behavior and prognosis vary considerably in relation to type. Methods: A total of 65 patients from 24 hospitals (51 type 1, 1 type 2, 4 type 3, and 9 type 4) were included. Management recommendations were issued for newly diagnosed cases, that is, endoscopic or surgical treatment of type 1 and 2 carcinoids (including antrectomy to abolish hypergastrinemia) and radical resection for type 3 and 4 carcinoids. Results: Infiltration beyond the submucosa occurred in 9 of 51 type 1, 4 of 4 type 3, and 7 of 9 type 4 carcinoids. Metastases occurred in 4 of 51 type 1 (3 regional lymph nodes, 1 liver), the single type 2 (regional lymph nodes), 3 of 4 type 3 (all liver), and 7 of 9 type 4 carcinoids (all liver). Of the patients with type 1 carcinoid, 3 had no specific treatment, 40 were treated with endoscopic or surgical excision (in 10 cases combined with antrectomy), 7 underwent total gastrectomy, and 1 underwent proximal gastric resection. Radical tumor removal was not possible in 2 of 4 patients with type 3 and 7 of 9 patients with type 4 carcinoid. Five- and 10-year crude survival rates were 96.1% and 73.9% for type 1 (not different from the general population), but only 33.3% and 22.2% for type 4 carcinoids. Conclusion: Subtyping of gastric carcinoids is helpful in the prediction of malignant potential and long-term survival and is a guide to management. Long-term survival did not differ from that of the general population regarding type 1 carcinoids but was poor regarding type 4 carcinoids. PMID:15973103

  4. Gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Do, Patrick H; Kang, Young S; Cahill, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Gastric infarction is an extremely rare occurrence owing to the stomach’s extensive vascular supply. We report an unusual case of gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery. We describe the imaging findings and discuss possible causes of this condition. PMID:27200168

  5. Decreased gastric secretory functions in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Takebe, K; Imamura, K; Miyazawa, T; Ishii, M; Kudoh, K; Terada, A; Machida, K; Kikuchi, H; Kasai, F

    1994-06-01

    A total of 37 subjects consisted of 10 healthy subjects (Group III), 15 diabetic patients without autonomic neuropathy (Group II), and 12 diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy including gastroparesis in 6 cases (Group I). All three groups were comparable in age. In order to clarify the gastric function in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy, secretion of serum gastrin, gastric secretory function, endoscopic Congo red test of fundic glands, and coefficiency of variance of electrocardiographic beat-to-beat intervals (C.V. R-R) were examined. In Group I, 5 patients had hypergastrinemia, but its elevation was inhibited when an acid solution was injected into the stomach. Gastric secretion and C.V. R-R were markedly lower in Group I, compared with Groups II and III. In Group I, the area of fundic glands (parietal cells) was reduced considerably. The C.V. R-R was significantly correlated with fasting serum gastrin concentration and with maximal acid output. From these results, in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy (vagal neuropathy), gastric acid secretion in response to tetragastrin stimulation was lowered with a reduction in area of fundic gland distribution. Hypergastrinemia may reflect a negative feedback mechanism responding to decreased acidity of gastric content in the antrum. PMID:7817384

  6. A mini Cl- channel sensitive to external pH in the basolateral membrane of guinea-pig parietal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kajita, H; Morishima, S; Shirakata, Y; Kotera, T; Ueda, S; Okuma, M; Okada, Y

    1995-01-01

    1. Voltage-independent whole-cell Cl- currents were recorded from both single, isolated parietal cells and parietal cells within gastric glands obtained from the fundus of guinea-pig stomach. 2. The Cl- currents were rapidly suppressed by a Cl- channel blocker, NPPB (5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate), added to the (basolateral) bathing solution in a concentration-dependent manner with a half-maximal inhibition concentration of 12 microM. 3. The selectivity sequence among anions was I- > Br- > Cl- > F-, corresponding to Eisenman's sequence I. 4. The Cl- currents were independent of cytosolic Ca2+, cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, GTP-gamma-S and cell volume, and were not affected by application of acid secretagogues, omeprazol, arachidonic acid or prostaglandin E2. 5. Reduction of pH in the (basolateral) bathing solution immediately inhibited the Cl- current with a pK (-log of KD) of 6.3, whereas changes in intracellular pH had no effect. 6. The single-channel conductance was estimated to be 0.46-0.6 pS by variance noise analysis during inhibition of whole-cell Cl- currents by NPPB or acidic pH. 7. It is concluded that pH-sensitive 'mini' Cl- channels, with a sub-picosiemens unitary conductance, exist in the basolateral membrane of guinea-pig parietal cells. PMID:8568665

  7. Salivary Gland Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... contains antibodies that can kill germs. Salivary gland cancer is a type of head and neck cancer. It is rare. It may not cause any ... pain in your face Doctors diagnose salivary gland cancer using a physical exam, imaging tests, and a ...

  8. Mammary Glands: Developmental Changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mammary gland progresses from the accumulation of a few cells in the embryonic ectoderm to a highly arborescent tubulo-alveolar gland capable of secreting a highly nutritious product for consumption. Throughout this progression, various changes occur during each developmental stage: prenatal, pr...

  9. Salivary Gland Secretion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, H. L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes materials and procedures for an experiment utilizing a live dog to demonstrate: (1) physiology of the salivary gland; (2) parasympathetic control of the salivary gland; (3) influence of varying salivary flow rates on sodium and potassium ions, osmolarity and pH; and (4) salivary secretion as an active process. (DS)

  10. Rare Parotid Gland Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sanan, Akshay; Cognetti, David M

    2016-04-01

    The differential diagnosis for "rare" parotid gland diseases is broad and encompasses infectious, neoplastic, autoimmune, metabolic, and iatrogenic etiologies. The body of knowledge of parotid gland diseases has grown owing to advances in imaging and pathologic analysis and molecular technology. This article reviews rare parotid diseases, discussing the respective disease's clinical presentation, diagnosis, imaging, pathogenesis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:26902981

  11. Borrmann Type 4 Advanced Gastric Cancer: Focus on the Development of Scirrhous Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyoungwon; Park, Moo In; Kim, Sung Eun; Park, Seun Ja

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Borrmann type 4 advanced gastric cancer (AGC) is very important for improving the prognosis of AGC patients. Because there is no definite mass in most cases of Borrmann type 4 AGC, its accurate diagnosis via endoscopy requires an understanding of its pathogenesis and developmental process. Moreover, many people confuse linitis plastica (LP) type gastric cancer (GC), scirrhous GC, and Borrmann type 4 AGC. To distinguish each of these cancers, knowledge of their endoscopic and pathological differences is necessary, especially for LP type GCs in the developmental stage. In conclusion, diagnosis of pre-stage or latent LP type GC before progression to typical LP type GC requires the detection of IIc-like lesions in the fundic gland area. It is also crucial to identify any abnormalities such as sclerosis of the gastric wall and hypertrophy of the mucosal folds during endoscopy. PMID:27456608

  12. Identification of non-neoplastic and neoplastic gastric polyps using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shanghai; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Gastric polyps can be broadly defined as luminal lesions projecting above the plane of the mucosal surface. They are generally divided into non-neoplastic and neoplastic polyps. Accurate diagnosis of neoplastic polyps is important because of their well-known relationship with gastric cancer. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) is one of the most important recent inventions in biological imaging. In this study, we used MPM to image the microstructure of gastric polyps, including fundic gland polyps, hyperplastic polyps, inflammatory fibroid polyps and adenomas, then compared with gold-standard hematoxylin- eosin(H-E)-stained histopathology. MPM images showed that different gastric polyps have different gland architecture and cell morphology. Dilated, elongated or branch-like hyperplastic polyps are arranged by columnar epithelial cells. Inflammatory fibroid polyps are composed of small, thin-walled blood vessels surrounded by short spindle cells. Fundic glands polyps are lined by parietal cells and chief cells, admixed with normal glands. Gastric adenomas are generally composed of tubules or villi of dysplastic epithelium, which usually show some degree of intestinal-type differentiation toward absorptive cells, goblet cells, endocrine cells. Our results demonstrated that MPM can be used to identify non- neoplastic and neoplastic gastric polyps without the need of any staining procedure.

  13. Apoptotic and proliferative activity of mouse gastric mucosa following oral administration of fumonisin B1

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Mohammadghasemi, Fahimeh; Zendehdel, Kazem; Kamyabi-moghaddam, Zahra; Tavassoli, Abbas; Amini-najafi, Fatemeh; Khosravi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Fumonisins are a group of toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxins, which contaminate the grains and their products. The aim of this study was to examine the apoptotic and proliferative activity of mouse gastric mucosa following administration of fumonisin B1 (FB1). Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine female mice divided into treatment (n=15) and control (n=14) groups. The treatment group received FB1 (150 mg/kg diet) for 16 weeks. The gastric atrophy was allocated using grading criteria modeled on the updated Sydney System. Immunohistochemistry studies were performed for evaluation of apoptosis and proliferative activity in gastric mucosa. Results: Mild to moderate gastric atrophy were observed in microscopic findings of the gastric mucosa in treated animals (P<0.05). Number of parietal cells significantly decreased in the treatment group in comparison with the control (P<0.05). Treatment with FB1 for 16 weeks significantly reduced both gastric mucosa height and mitotic index in the gastric glands (P<0.05). TUNEL- and Bax-labeled positive cell numbers significantly increased in the FB1-treated group compared to the control (P<0.05). In addition, proliferative activity of gastric glands in the treated group was significantly lower than the control (P<0.05). Conclusion: Oral administration of FB1 caused atrophy in gastric mucosa both via increasing of apoptosis and suppressing the mitotic activity of these cells. PMID:25810870

  14. Gland With Cantilever Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Patrick B.

    1989-01-01

    Single-piece gland forms tight seal on probe or tube containing liquid or gas at high pressure. Gland and probe align as assembled by simple torquing procedure. Disconnected easily and reused at same site. Made from any of wide variety of materials so compatible with application. Cantilever ring at top of gland bites into wall of tube or probe, sealing it. Wall of tube or probe must be thick enough to accommodate deformation without rupturing. Maximum deformation designed in coordination with seating and deformation of boss or conical seal.

  15. Sweating Like a Pig: Physics or Irony?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2016-03-01

    In his interesting and informative book Is That a Fact?, Joe Schwarcz avers that pigs do not sweat and the saying "sweating like a pig" originates in iron smelting. Oblong pieces of hot iron, with a fancied resemblance to a sow with piglets, cool in sand to the dew point of the surrounding air, and hence water condenses on the "pig." But this explanation, which I have seen on the Internet, lacks a few caveats. It implies that molten iron, solidifying and cooling, anywhere, anytime, accretes liquid water, as if this were a special property of cooling iron. Set aside that real pigs sweat perceptibly from their snouts; kiss a pig and verify for yourself. Pigs also sweat imperceptibly. Imperceptible (insensible) perspiration is water vapor from the skin and lungs exuded without sensible condensation. That from humans is about 1 liter/day. Sweat is 99% liquid water, NaCl the dominant solute, secreted quickly, sometimes profusely, by subcutaneous sweat glands in response to thermal stress, in contrast to the slow, continuous diffusion of water vapor through skin.

  16. [Meibomian gland morphology study progression].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuqian; Dong, Nuo; Wu, Huping

    2014-04-01

    The meibomian gland (MG) in the eyelids, which is the largest sebaceous gland throughout the body, synthesize and secrete lipids to form the superficial tear film layer. It plays a key role in maintaining the ocular surface health. Abnormalities in meibomian gland morphology lead to meibomian gland dysfunction, which is the main cause of evaporative dry eye. Study on meibomian gland morphology will contribute significantly to the diagnosis and treatment of meibomian gland dysfunction. This review is just focusing on the current studies about techniques to visualize the morphology of the MG and changes of meibomian gland morphology related to diseases. PMID:24931156

  17. Thyroid gland removal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery to remove part or all of your thyroid gland. This operation is called thyroidectomy . You probably ... in just a few weeks. If you had thyroid cancer, you may need to have radioactive iodine ...

  18. Adrenal glands (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Triangular-shaped glands located on top of the kidneys. They produce hormones such as estrogen, progesterone, steroids, cortisol, and cortisone, and chemicals such as adrenalin (epinephrine), norepinephrine, and dopamine.

  19. Enlarged prostate gland

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is encased within the prostate gland. As a man ages, the prostate typically enlarges in size in ... urinate, and incontinence. Less than half of all men with BPH have symptoms of the disease, or ...

  20. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... adrenal tumors that appear malignant. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal? In the past, ... of procedure and the patients overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain Shorter hospital stay Quicker ...

  1. Enlarged prostate gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... enlarges in size in a process called benign hypertrophy, which means that the gland got larger without ... in several of the symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy, or BPH. Symptoms may include a slowed or ...

  2. Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology » Endocrine System » Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  3. Experimental transfer of adult Oesophagostomum dentatum from donor to helminth naive recipient pigs: a methodological study.

    PubMed

    Bjørn, H; Roepstorff, A; Grøndahl, C; Eriksen, L; Bjerregaard, J; Nansen, P

    1995-12-01

    This study was carried out to compare potential methods of transplanting adult Oesophagostomum dentatum from experimentally infected donor pigs to helminth naive recipient pigs. The following methods were each tested in five pigs: A. Transfer of worms by stomach tube to the gastric ventricle of pigs per os pretreated with 0.5 mg/kg cisapride to increase gastrointestinal peristalsis; B. Transfer by stomach tube to the gastric ventricle of pigs per os pre-treated with cisapride (0.5 mg/kg) and omeprazol 20 mg which blocks hydrochloric acid secretion; C. Surgical transfer of worms to caecum of pigs. Worms for transplantation to pigs were obtained after slaughter of experimentally infected donor pigs and following isolation from the contents of the large intestine, using an agar gel migration technique. A mean of 1054 nematodes were transferred into each recipient pig within 2 hours. Procedures A and B resulted in establishment rates corresponding to only 0.5% and 7.6% of the transferred worms. In contrast, surgical transfer allowed 74.2% of the transplanted worms to be established. In all groups the transplanted worms migrated to the normal predilection site, i.e. the middle part of the large intestine. More female than male worms established in all groups. It was concluded from this study that surgical transfer was the most reliable of the methods tested for experimental establishment of adult O. dentatum in helminth naive pigs. PMID:8583123

  4. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  5. Benign Pediatric Salivary Gland Lesions.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Eric R; Ord, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Salivary gland lesions are rare in pediatric patients. In addition, the types of salivary gland tumors are different in their distribution in specific sites in the major and minor salivary glands in children compared with adults. This article reviews benign neoplastic and nonneoplastic salivary gland disorders in pediatric patients to help clinicians to develop an orderly differential diagnosis that will lead to expedient treatment of pediatric patients with salivary gland lesions. PMID:26614702

  6. Radionuclide salivary gland imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1981-10-01

    Salivary gland imaging with 99mTc as pertechnetate provides functional information concerning trapping and excretion of the parotid and submandibular glands. Anatomic information gained often adds little to clinical evaluation. On the other hand, functional information may detect subclinical involvement, which correlates well with biopsy of the minor labial salivary glands. Salivary gland abnormalities in systemic disease such as sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and other collagenvascular disorders may be detected before they result in the clinical manifestaions of Sjoegren's syndrome. Such glands, after initially demonstrating increased trapping in the acute phase, tend to have decreased trapping and failure to discharge pertechnetate in response to an appropriate physiologic stimulus. Increased uptake of gallium-67 citrate often accompanies these findings. Inflammatory parotitis can be suspected when increased perfusion is evident on radionuclide angiography with any agent. The ability of the salivary gland image to detect and categorize mass lesions, which result in focal areas of diminished activity such as tumors, cysts, and most other masses, is disappointing, while its ability to detect and categorize Warthin's tumor, which concentrates pertechnetate, is much more valuable, although not specific.

  7. Comparison of guinea pig cytomegalovirus and guinea pig herpes-like virus: pathogenesis and persistence in experimentally infected animals.

    PubMed Central

    Tenser, R B; Hsiung, G D

    1976-01-01

    The pathogenesis of guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) and guinea pig herpes-like virus (GPHLV) in guinea pigs was compared. Animals were inoculated with the two viruses by different routes and sacrificed after varying periods of time. GPCMV was consistently isolated from salivary gland 2 weeks postinoculation and thereafter following intraperitoneal or subcutaneous incoulaton. Virus was less frequently found in other tissues including blood, spleen, and kidney. Intranuclear inclusions were seen in tissue sections of salivary gland after inoculation with GPCMV- infected tissue suspension, but were only rarely found after inoculation with tissue culture virus. In GPHLV-infected guinea pigs, consistent latent infection of leukocytes and other tissues was detected by cocultivation techniques. Intranuclear inclusions were not found in the spleen, salivary gland, or other infected tissues after GPHLV infection with either tissue culture virus or infected tissue suspension. Guinea pigs inoculated with GPCMV produced high titers of specific neutralizing antibody to the homologous virus; those inoculated with GPHLV developed long-term viremia accompanied by minimal neutralizing antibody levels to the virus. Images PMID:178599

  8. Mouse gastric mucin: cloning and chromosomal localization.

    PubMed Central

    Shekels, L L; Lyftogt, C; Kieliszewski, M; Filie, J D; Kozak, C A; Ho, S B

    1995-01-01

    Mucins protect gastric epithelium by maintaining a favourable pH gradient and preventing autodigestion. The purpose of this study was to clone a mouse gastric mucin which would provide a foundation for analysis of mucin gene regulation. Mucin was purified from the glandular portion of gastric specimens and deglycosylated by HF solvolysis. Antibodies against native and deglycosylated mouse gastric mucin (MGM) were raised in chickens. Screening of a mouse stomach cDNA library with the anti-(deglycosylated MGM) antibody yielded partial clones containing a 48 bp tandem repeat and 768 bp of non-repetitive sequence. The 16-amino-acid tandem repeat has a consensus sequence of QTSSPNTGKTSTISTT with 25% serine and 38% threonine. The MGM tandem repeat sequence bears no similarity to previously identified mucins. The MGM non-repetitive region shares sequence similarity with human MUC5AC and, to a lesser extent, human MUC2 and rat intestinal mucin. Northern blot analysis reveals a polydisperse message beginning at 13.5 kb in mouse stomach with no expression in oesophagus, trachea, small intestine, large intestine, caecum, lung or kidney. Immunoreactivity of antibodies against deglycosylated MGM and against a synthetic MGM tandem repeat peptide was restricted to superficial mucous cells, antral glands and Brunner's glands in the pyloric-duodenal region. DNA analysis shows that MGM recognizes mouse and rat DNA but not hamster, rabbit or human DNA. The MGM gene maps to a site on mouse chromosome 7 homologous to the location of a human secretory mucin gene cluster on human chromosome 11p15. Due to sequence similarity and predominant expression in the stomach, the MGM gene may be considered a MUC5AC homologue and named Muc5ac. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:7487932

  9. Benign epithelial gastric polyps--frequency, location, and age and sex distribution.

    PubMed

    Ljubicić, N; Kujundzić, M; Roić, G; Banić, M; Cupić, H; Doko, M; Zovak, M

    2002-06-01

    Prospective investigation has been undertaken with the aim to study the frequency, location and age and sex distribution of various histological types of benign gastric epithelial polyps. Histological type--adenomatous, hyperplastic and fundic gland polyps--was diagnosed on the basis of at least three histological samples taken from the polyp. Biopsy samples were also taken from the antrum and the body of the stomach so that gastritis could be graded and classified, and the presence of H. pylori could be determined by histology. All 6,700 patients, who had undergone upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in a one-year period, participated in this study. Among them 42 benign gastric epithelial polyp were found in 31 patients: adenomatous gastric polyps in 7 patients, hyperplastic gastric polyp in 21 and fundic gland polyp in 3 patients. All patients with hyperplastic polyps had chronic active superficial gastritis, whereas most of the patients with adenomatous polyps had a chronic atrophic gastritis with high prevalence of intestinal metaplasia. Among 21 patients with hyperplastic gastric polyps, 16 (76%) patients were positive for H. pylori infection in contrast to only 2 patients (29%) with adenomatous gastric polyps and 1 patient (33%) with fundic gland polyp. Presented data indicates that hyperplastic gastric polyps are the most common and they are associated with the presence of chronic active superficial gastritis and concomitant H. pylori infection. Adenomatous polyps are rarer and they tend to be associated with chronic atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Fundic gland polyp is the rarest type of gastric polyps. PMID:12137323

  10. The evolution of sweat glands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folk, G. Edgar; Semken, A.

    1991-09-01

    Mammals have two kinds of sweat glands, apocrine and eccrine, which provide for thermal cooling. In this paper we describe the distribution and characteristics of these glands in selected mammals, especially primates, and reject the suggested development of the eccrine gland from the apocrine gland during the Tertiary geological period. The evidence strongly suggests that the two glands, depending on the presence or absence of fur, have equal and similar functions among mammals; apocrine glands are not primitive. However, there is a unique and remarkable thermal eccrine system in humans; we suggest that this system evolved in concert with bipedalism and a smooth hairless skin.

  11. Effect of lapachol, a naphthaquinone isolated from Tectona grandis, on experimental peptic ulcer and gastric secretion.

    PubMed

    Goel, R K; Pathak, N K; Biswas, M; Pandey, V B; Sanyal, A K

    1987-02-01

    Lapachol, a naphthaquinone isolated from the roots of Tectona grandis given at a dose of 5 mg kg-1 p.o. twice daily for 3 days was found to have an anti-ulcerogenic effect on subsequently induced experimental gastric and duodenal ulcers in rats and guinea-pigs. Its action appears to be associated with an effect on the protein content of gastric juice, and it reversed aspirin-induced changes in peptic activity, protein and sialic acid. PMID:2882001

  12. Resolution of Fundic Gland Polyposis following Laparoscopic Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation and Subsequent Cessation of Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Brockmeyer, Joel R.; Connolly, Erin E.; Wittchow, Richard J.; Kothari, Shanu N.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric polyps occur from a variety of sources and are found commonly on upper endoscopy. We present the case of a 49-year-old female who presented for evaluation for antireflux surgery with a history of fundic gland polyposis who required twice-daily proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for control of her gastric reflux. After verifying that she met criteria for surgery, she underwent an uncomplicated laparoscopic magnetic sphincter augmentation placement. With the cessation of PPIs following surgery, the fundic gland polyposis resolved. Fundic gland polyps may occur sporadically or within certain syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis. Multiple possible inciting factors exist, including the use of PPIs. This is the first reported case of the resolution of numerous fundic gland polyps following the completion of laparoscopic magnetic sphincter augmentation. PMID:26600954

  13. Eccrine Sweat Glands are Major Contributors to Reepithelialization of Human Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Rittié, Laure; Sachs, Dana L.; Orringer, Jeffrey S.; Voorhees, John J.; Fisher, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Eccrine sweat glands are skin-associated epithelial structures (appendages) that are unique to some primates including humans and are absent in the skin of most laboratory animals including rodents, rabbits, and pigs. On the basis of the known importance of other skin appendages (hair follicles, apocrine glands, and sebaceous glands) for wound repair in model animals, the present study was designed to assess the role of eccrine glands in the repair of wounded human skin. Partial-thickness wounds were generated on healthy human forearms, and epidermal repair was studied in skin biopsy samples obtained at precise times during the first week after wounding. Wound reepithelialization was assessed using immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted 3-dimensional reconstruction of in vivo wounded skin samples. Our data demonstrate a key role for eccrine sweat glands in reconstituting the epidermis after wounding in humans. More specifically, i) eccrine sweat glands generate keratinocyte outgrowths that ultimately form new epidermis; ii) eccrine sweat glands are the most abundant appendages in human skin, outnumbering hair follicles by a factor close to 3; and iii) the rate of expansion of keratinocyte outgrowths from eccrine sweat glands parallels the rate of reepithelialization. This novel appreciation of the unique importance of eccrine sweat glands for epidermal repair may be exploited to improve our approaches to understanding and treating human wounds. PMID:23159944

  14. Salivary gland emergencies.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Matthew A; Turturro, Michael A

    2013-05-01

    Salivary gland disorders are uncommon in the emergency department setting. Given the vast differential that spans infectious, autoimmune, neoplastic, and metabolic processes, they can pose a diagnostic challenge even to skilled clinicians. There is a paucity of evidence-based data regarding the management of these disorders with frequent incongruence between specific sources. Although by no means exhaustive or absolute, this article reconciles existing literature and serves as a concise and informative guide to salivary gland disorders encountered by the emergency care practitioner. PMID:23601484

  15. What Is Salivary Gland Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... are many types of salivary gland adenocarcinomas. Acinic cell carcinoma: Most acinic cell carcinomas start in the ... cancer can develop in the salivary glands. Squamous cell carcinoma: This cancer occurs mainly in older men. ...

  16. Rheological and microstructural properties of porcine gastric digesta and diets containing pectin or mango powder.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Dhital, Sushil; Williams, Barbara A; Chen, Xiao Dong; Gidley, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Hydrated polysaccharides and their assemblies are known to modulate gastric emptying rate due to their capacity to change the structural and rheological properties of gastric contents (digesta). In the present study, we investigated the rheological and microstructural properties of gastric digesta from pigs fed with diets incorporating mango powder or pectin, and compared results with those from hydrated diets of the same water content, in order to investigate the origins for rheological changes in the pig stomach. All of the hydrated diets and gastric digesta were particle-dominated suspensions, generally showing weak gel or more solid-like behavior with the storage modulus (G') always greater than loss modulus (G") under small deformation oscillatory measurements, and with small deformation viscosity greater than steady shear viscosity (i.e. non-Cox-Merz superposition). Although significant rheological differences were observed between the hydrated diets, rheological parameters for gastric digesta were similar for all diets, indicative of a rheological homeostasis in the pig stomach. Whilst the addition of gastric mucin (20mg/mL) to control and mango diets altered the rheology to match the gastric digesta rheology, the effect of mucin on the pectin-containing diet was negligible. The viscous effect of pectin also hindered the action of alpha amylase as observed from relatively less damaged starch granules in pectin digesta compared to mango and control digesta. Based on the experimental findings that the rheology of gastric digesta differs from hydrated diets of the same water content, the current study revealed composition-dependent complex behavior of gastric digesta in vivo, suggesting that the rheology of food products or ingredients may not necessarily reflect the rheological effect when ingested. PMID:27185134

  17. Gastric tissue biopsy and culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - gastric tissue; Biopsy - gastric tissue ... of organisms that cause infection. A gastric tissue culture may be considered normal if it does not show certain bacteria. Stomach acids normally prevent too much bacteria from growing.

  18. Unusually large submandibular gland stone.

    PubMed

    Al-Hussona, Aws Adel

    2015-01-01

    Submandibular gland calculi is the most common disease of the gland. In this article, we report a case with unusually large stone located at the hilum of the gland causing necrosis of the overlying duct and the oral mucosa (floor of mouth). PMID:25934409

  19. The Human Submandibular Gland

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Elias Q.; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Loeffelbein, Denys J.; Rohleder, Nils H.; Nieberler, Markus; Hasler, Rafael; Kesting, Marco R.

    2012-01-01

    Submandibular acinar glands secrete numerous proteins such as digestive enzymes and defense proteins on the basis of the exocrine secretion mode. Exocytosis is a complex process, including a soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE)–mediated membrane fusion of vesicles and target membrane and the additional activation of cytoskeletal proteins. Relevant data are available predominantly for animal salivary glands, especially of the rat parotid acinar cells. The authors investigated the secretory molecular machinery of acinar (serous) cells in the human submandibular gland by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence and found diverse proteins associated with exocytosis for the first time. SNAP-23, syntaxin-2, syntaxin-4, and VAMP-2 were localized at the luminal plasma membrane; syntaxin-2 and septin-2 were expressed in vesicles in the cytoplasm. Double staining of syntaxin-2 and septin-2 revealed a colocalization on the same vesicles. Lactoferrin and α-amylase served as a marker for secretory vesicles and were labeled positively together with syntaxin-2 and septin-2 in double-staining procedures. Cytoskeletal components such as actin, myosin II, cofilin, and profilin are concentrated at the apical plasma membrane of acinar submandibular glands. These observations complement the understanding of the complex exocytosis mechanisms. PMID:22131313

  20. Pediatric Salivary Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ord, Robert A; Carlson, Eric R

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric malignant salivary gland tumors are extremely rare. The percentage of malignant tumors is higher than that seen in adults, although the outcomes in terms of survival are better in pediatric patients. The mainstay of treatment is surgical excision with negative margins. This article reviews current concepts in demographics, etiology, management, and outcomes of malignant salivary tumors in children. PMID:26614703

  1. Effects of Aloe vera and sucralfate on gastric microcirculatory changes, cytokine levels and gastric ulcer healing in rats

    PubMed Central

    Eamlamnam, Kallaya; Patumraj, Suthiluk; Visedopas, Naruemon; Thong-Ngam, Duangporn

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effects of Aloe vera and sucralfate on gastric microcirculatory changes, cytokine levels and gastric ulcer healing. METHODS: Male Spraque-Dawley rats (n= 48) were divided into four groups. Group1 served as control group, group 2 as gastric ulcer group without treatment, groups 3 and 4 as gastric ulcer treatment groups with sucralfate and Aloe vera. The rats from each group were divided into 2 subgroups for study of leukocyte adherence, TNF-α and IL-10 levels and gastric ulcer healing on days 1 and 8 after induction of gastric ulcer by 20 % acetic acid. RESULTS: On day 1 after induction of gastric ulcer, the leukocyte adherence in postcapillary venule was significantly (P< 0.05) increased in the ulcer groups when compared to the control group. The level of TNF-α was elevated and the level of IL-10 was reduced. In the ulcer groups treated with sucralfate and Aloe vera, leukocyte adherence was reduced in postcapillary venule. The level of IL-10 was elevated, but the level of TNF-α had no significant difference. On day 8, the leukocyte adherence in postcapillary venule and the level of TNF-α were still increased and the level of IL-10 was reduced in the ulcer group without treatment. The ulcer treated with sucralfate and Aloe vera had lower leukocyte adherence in postcapillary venule and TNF-α level. The level of IL-10 was still elevated compared to the ulcer group without treatment. Furthermore, histopathological examination of stomach on days 1 and 8 after induction of gastric ulcer showed that gastric tissue was damaged with inflammation. In the ulcer groups treated with sucralfate and Aloe vera on days 1 and 8, gastric inflammation was reduced, epithelial cell proliferation was enhanced and gastric glands became elongated. The ulcer sizes were also reduced compared to the ulcer group without treatment. CONCLUSION: Administration of 20 % acetic acid can induce gastric inflammation, increase leukocyte adherence in postcapillary venule

  2. Update on gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllou, Maria; Stanley, Adrian J

    2014-01-01

    Although less common than oesophageal variceal haemorrhage, gastric variceal bleeding remains a serious complication of portal hypertension, with a high associated mortality. In this review we provide an update on the aetiology, classification and management of gastric varices, including acute bleeding, prevention of rebleeding and primary prophylaxis. We describe the optimum management strategies for gastric varices including drug, endoscopic and radiological therapies, focusing on recent published evidence. PMID:24891929

  3. A comparison between the gastric and salivary concentration of iodide, pertechnetate, and bromide in man

    PubMed Central

    Harden, R. McG.; Alexander, W. D.; Shimmins, J.; Chisholm, D.

    1969-01-01

    The concentration of iodide (I−) and pertechnetate (TcO4−) and bromide (Br−) has been measured simultaneously in gastric juice and parotid saliva. The combined gastric and salivary clearance for iodide and pertechnetate is more than twice the clearance of these ions by the thyroid gland. The concentration of the ions was in the order I−>TcO4−>Br− in both gastric juice and saliva. Differences exist between the secretion of iodide, pertechnetate, and bromide. Bromide, in contrast to iodide and pertechnetate, was found to be more concentrated in gastric juice than in saliva. The ratio of the iodide to pertechnetate clearance was greater in gastric juice than in saliva. PMID:5358585

  4. The role of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Alén, Begoña O.; Leal-López, Saúl; Alén, María Otero; Viaño, Patricia; García-Castro, Victoria; Mosteiro, Carlos S.; Beiras, Andrés; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Gallego, Rosalía; García-Caballero, Tomás; Camiña, Jesús P.; Pazos, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide encoded by the ghrelin gene, and the GPR39 receptor were reported to be involved in the control of mitogenesis of gastric cancer cell lines; however, the relationship between the obestatin/GPR39 system and gastric cancer progression remains unknown. In the present study, we determined the expression levels of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas and explored their potential functional roles. Twenty-eight patients with gastric adenocarcinomas were retrospectively studied, and clinical data were obtained. The role of obestatin/GPR39 in gastric cancer progression was studied in vitro using the human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cell line. Obestatin exogenous administration in these GPR39-bearing cells deregulated the expression of several hallmarks of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis. Moreover, obestatin signaling promoted phenotypic changes via GPR39, increasingly impacting on the cell morphology, proliferation, migration and invasion of these cells. In healthy human stomachs, obestatin expression was observed in the neuroendocrine cells and GPR39 expression was localized mainly in the chief cells of the oxyntic glands. In human gastric adenocarcinomas, no obestatin expression was found; however, an aberrant pattern of GPR39 expression was discovered, correlating to the dedifferentiation of the tumor. Altogether, our data strongly suggest the involvement of the obestatin/GPR39 system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of human gastric adenocarcinomas and highlight the potential usefulness of GPR39 as a prognostic marker in gastric cancer. PMID:26716511

  5. Heterotopic Intestinal Cyst of the Submandibular Gland: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Mi Jung; Park, Hye-Rim; Min, Soo Kee; Seo, Jinwon; Kim, Eun Soo; Kim, Si Whan; Park, Bumjung

    2013-01-01

    Heterotopic gastrointestinal cysts are rarely found in the oral cavity. Most of these cysts are lined with gastric mucosa and involve the tongue. There have been no reported heterotopic intestinal cysts of the submandibular gland that are completely lined with colonic mucosa. An 8-year-old girl presented with an enlarging swelling in the left submandibular area, and a 4-cm unilocular cyst was fully excised. The cyst was completely lined with colonic mucosa that was surrounded by smooth muscle layer, and the lining cells were positive for CDX-2, an intestinal marker, indicating a high degree of differentiation. The pathogenesis remains unclear, but it may be related to the misplacement of embryonic rests within the oral cavity during early fetal development. Although heterotopic intestinal cysts rarely occur in the submandibular gland, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of facial swellings in the pediatric population. PMID:23837022

  6. Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma of the Lacrimal Gland: Sustained Remission after Eradication of Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hasosah, Mohammed; Baothman, Abdullah; Satti, Mohamed; Kutbi, Suzanne; Alghamdi, Khaled; Jacobson, Kevan

    2011-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is the third most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and it is strongly associated with helicobacter pylori infection of the stomach. MALT lymphoma of the lacrimal gland usually presents as a localized disease process in extranodal tissues. The treatment options of MALT lymphoma of the lacrimal gland chiefly include radiation of the tumor, chemotherapy, surgical removal, or a combination of these strategies. We report a case of localized MALT lymphoma of the lacrimal gland, with prolonged sustained remission after eradication of gastric Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) infection. He sustains in remission of lacrimal MALT lymphoma for four years without chemotherapy or radiotherapy. PMID:22606434

  7. Gastric Adenocarcinomas Express the Glycosphingolipid Gb3/CD77: Targeting of Gastric Cancer Cells with Shiga Toxin B-Subunit.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Philipp Emanuel; Maak, Matthias; Nitsche, Ulrich; Perl, Markus; Novotny, Alexander; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Dransart, Estelle; Holtorf, Anne; Johannes, Ludger; Janssen, Klaus-Peter

    2016-05-01

    The B-subunit of the bacterial Shiga toxin (STxB), which is nontoxic and has low immunogenicity, can be used for tumor targeting of breast, colon, and pancreatic cancer. Here, we tested whether human gastric cancers, which are among the most aggressive tumor entities, express the cellular receptor of Shiga toxin, the glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide (Gb3/CD77). The majority of cases showed an extensive staining for Gb3 (36/50 cases, 72%), as evidenced on tissue sections of surgically resected specimen. Gb3 expression was detected independent of type (diffuse/intestinal), and was negatively correlated to increasing tumor-node-metastasis stages (P = 0.0385), as well as with markers for senescence. Gb3 expression in nondiseased gastric mucosa was restricted to chief and parietal cells at the bottom of the gastric glands, and was not elevated in endoscopic samples of gastritis (n = 10). Gb3 expression in established cell lines of gastric carcinoma was heterogeneous, with 6 of 10 lines being positive, evidenced by flow cytometry. STxB was taken up rapidly by live Gb3-positive gastric cancer cells, following the intracellular retrograde transport route, avoiding lysosomes and rapidly reaching the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum. Treatment of the Gb3-expressing gastric carcinoma cell line St3051 with STxB coupled to SN38, the active metabolite of the topoisomerase type I inhibitor irinotecan, resulted in >100-fold increased cytotoxicity, as compared with irinotecan alone. No cytotoxicity was observed on gastric cancer cell lines lacking Gb3 expression, demonstrating receptor specificity of the STxB-SN38 compound. Thus, STxB is a highly specific transport vehicle for cytotoxic agents in gastric carcinoma. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 1008-17. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26826119

  8. Trop2 marks transient gastric fetal epithelium and adult regenerating cells after epithelial damage

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez Vallone, Valeria; Leprovots, Morgane; Strollo, Sandra; Vasile, Gabriela; Lefort, Anne; Libert, Frederick; Vassart, Gilbert; Garcia, Marie-Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mouse fetal intestinal progenitors lining the epithelium prior to villogenesis grow as spheroids when cultured ex vivo and express the transmembrane glycoprotein Trop2 as a marker. Here, we report the characterization of Trop2-expressing cells from fetal pre-glandular stomach, growing as immortal undifferentiated spheroids, and their relationship with gastric development and regeneration. Trop2+ cells generating gastric spheroids differed from adult glandular Lgr5+ stem cells, but appeared highly related to fetal intestinal spheroids. Although they shared a common spheroid signature, intestinal and gastric fetal spheroid-generating cells expressed organ-specific transcription factors and were committed to intestinal and glandular gastric differentiation, respectively. Trop2 expression was transient during glandular stomach development, being lost at the onset of gland formation, whereas it persisted in the squamous forestomach. Undetectable under homeostasis, Trop2 was strongly re-expressed in glands after acute Lgr5+ stem cell ablation or following indomethacin-induced injury. These highly proliferative reactive adult Trop2+ cells exhibited a transcriptome displaying similarity with that of gastric embryonic Trop2+ cells, suggesting that epithelium regeneration in adult stomach glands involves the partial re-expression of a fetal genetic program. PMID:26989172

  9. Lateral hypothalamic lesions cause gastric injury by stimulating gastric contractility.

    PubMed

    Garrick, T; Grijalva, C V; Trauner, M

    1993-07-01

    Changes in gastric contractility following lateral hypothalamic (LH) lesions with and without bilateral cervical vagotomy were measured in urethan-anesthetized rats. LH lesions were induced with direct current passed through stereotaxically placed electrodes. Gastric contractility was recorded continuously for 4 h with acutely implanted strain gauge force transducers and analyzed by computer. LH lesions consistently stimulated gastric contractility and caused more gastric mucosal injury than control conditions. Vagotomy blocked both gastric mucosal injury and high-amplitude gastric contractions. In rats with LH lesions and exogenously infused intragastric hydrochloric acid, atropine methyl nitrate inhibited high-amplitude gastric contractions and gastric erosions. These findings indicate that LH lesions stimulate vagally mediated high-amplitude gastric contractions, which, in the presence of hydrochloric acid, cause gastric mucosal erosions. PMID:8338162

  10. Treatment of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orditura, Michele; Galizia, Gennaro; Sforza, Vincenzo; Gambardella, Valentina; Fabozzi, Alessio; Laterza, Maria Maddalena; Andreozzi, Francesca; Ventriglia, Jole; Savastano, Beatrice; Mabilia, Andrea; Lieto, Eva; Ciardiello, Fortunato; De Vita, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The authors focused on the current surgical treatment of resectable gastric cancer, and significance of peri- and post-operative chemo or chemoradiation. Gastric cancer is the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Surgery remains the only curative therapy, while perioperative and adjuvant chemotherapy, as well as chemoradiation, can improve outcome of resectable gastric cancer with extended lymph node dissection. More than half of radically resected gastric cancer patients relapse locally or with distant metastases, or receive the diagnosis of gastric cancer when tumor is disseminated; therefore, median survival rarely exceeds 12 mo, and 5-years survival is less than 10%. Cisplatin and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy, with addition of trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients, is the widely used treatment in stage IV patients fit for chemotherapy. Recent evidence supports the use of second-line chemotherapy after progression in patients with good performance status PMID:24587643

  11. Not all gastric masses are gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Del Rosario, Michael; Tsai, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer metastasising to the gastrointestinal tract normally does not occur. However, as clinicians, we must be aware that lung adenocarcinoma, as in all cancers, can and will metastasise to any part of the body. We describe a case of a patient with a presumed primary gastric adenocarcinoma who presented with shortness of breath due to pleural effusion. Pathology from the pleural effusion was positive for primary lung adenocarcinoma. Further investigation revealed that the patient's gastric mass was misdiagnosed as gastric adenocarcinoma. We correctly diagnosed the mass as metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. This was very significant because the patient was transitioning to palliative care with possible tube feeding. After the correct diagnosis, her management drastically changed and her health improved. Clinical, pathological and medical management of lung cancer metastasis to the stomach are discussed. PMID:26976833

  12. Tests of gastric neuromuscular function.

    PubMed

    Parkman, Henry P; Jones, Michael P

    2009-05-01

    Tests of gastric neuromuscular function are used to evaluate patients with symptoms referable to the upper digestive tract. These symptoms can be associated with alterations in the rates of gastric emptying, impaired accommodation, heightened gastric sensation, or alterations in gastric myoelectrical function and contractility. Management of gastric neuromuscular disorders requires an understanding of pathophysiology and treatment options as well as the appropriate use and interpretation of diagnostic tests. These tests include measures of gastric emptying; contractility; electrical activity; regional gastric motility of the fundus, antrum, and pylorus; and tests of sensation and compliance. Tests are also being developed to improve our understanding of the afferent sensory pathways from the stomach to the central nervous system that mediate gastric sensation in health and gastric disorders. This article reviews tests of gastric function and provides a basic description of the tests, the methodologies behind them, descriptions of the physiology that they assess, and their clinical utility. PMID:19293005

  13. Multiple bilateral submandibular gland sialolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Sunder, V S; Chakravarthy, C; Mikkilinine, R; Mahoorkar, S

    2014-01-01

    Sialolithiasis accounts for the most common etiology of salivary gland obstruction which leads to recurrent painful swelling of the involved gland which often exacerbates while eating. Stones may be encountered in any of the salivary glands but most frequently in the submandibular gland and its duct. Simultaneous sialolithiasis in more than one salivary gland is rare, occurring in fewer than 3% of cases. Seventy to 80% of cases feature solitary stones; only about 5% of patients have three or more stones, the case report which we are presenting here had three submandibular sialoliths involving both the submandibular glands which were removed by intraoral approach and no post-operative complications were noted. PMID:24326820

  14. Pathogenesis of Lassa virus infection in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Jahrling, P B; Smith, S; Hesse, R A; Rhoderick, J B

    1982-01-01

    A rodent model for human Lassa fever was developed which uses inbred (strain 13) and outbred (Hartley) guinea pigs. Strain 13 guinea pigs were uniformly susceptible to lethal infection by 2 or more PFU of Lassa virus strain Josiah. In contrast, no more than 30% of the Hartley guinea pigs died regardless of the virus dose. In lethally infected strain 13 guinea pigs, peak titers of virus (10(7) to 10(8) PFU) occurred in the spleen and lymph nodes at 8 to 9 days, in the salivary glands at 11 days, and in the lung at 14 to 16 days. Virus reached low titers (10(4) PFU) in the plasma and brain and intermediate titers in the liver, adrenal glands, kidney, pancreas, and heart. In moribund animals, the most consistent and severe histological lesion as an interstitial pneumonia. In contrast, the brain was only minimally involved. The immune response of lethally infected strain 13 guinea pigs, as measured by the indirect fluorescent antibody test, was detectable within 10 days of infection and was similar in timing and intensity to the fluorescent antibody test response of both lethally infected and surviving outbred animals. In contrast to the fluorescent antibody response, neutralizing antibody developed late in convalescence and was thus detected only in surviving outbred guinea pigs. The availability of a rodent model for human Lassa fever in uniformly susceptible strain 13 guinea pigs should facilitate detailed pathophysiological studies and efficacy testing of antiviral drugs, candidate vaccines, and immunotherapy regimens to develop control methods for this life-threatening disease in humans. Images PMID:6749685

  15. Airway Gland Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, Jonathan H; Wine, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    Submucosal glands contribute to airway surface liquid (ASL), a film that protects all airway surfaces. Glandular mucus comprises electrolytes, water, the gel-forming mucin MUC5B, and hundreds of different proteins with diverse protective functions. Gland volume per unit area of mucosal surface correlates positively with impaction rate of inhaled particles. In human main bronchi, the volume of the glands is ∼ 50 times that of surface goblet cells, but the glands diminish in size and frequency distally. ASL and its trapped particles are removed from the airways by mucociliary transport. Airway glands have a tubuloacinar structure, with a single terminal duct, a nonciliated collecting duct, then branching secretory tubules lined with mucous cells and ending in serous acini. They allow for a massive increase in numbers of mucus-producing cells without replacing surface ciliated cells. Active secretion of Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) by serous cells produces most of the fluid of gland secretions. Glands are densely innervated by tonically active, mutually excitatory airway intrinsic neurons. Most gland mucus is secreted constitutively in vivo, with large, transient increases produced by emergency reflex drive from the vagus. Elevations of [cAMP]i and [Ca(2+)]i coordinate electrolyte and macromolecular secretion and probably occur together for baseline activity in vivo, with cholinergic elevation of [Ca(2+)]i being mainly responsive for transient increases in secretion. Altered submucosal gland function contributes to the pathology of all obstructive diseases, but is an early stage of pathogenesis only in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26336032

  16. Laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for pyloric stenosis caused by heterotopic glands in a young female: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Tanioka, Toshiro; Matsumoto, Satoru; Takahashi, Shusaku; Ueki, Shinya; Takahashi, Masahiro; Ichihara, Shin

    2015-06-01

    A 17-year-old female was referred to our hospital with worsening dietary intake and abdominal bloating. She had epigastric fullness, but no abdominal pain. Gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed food residue and pyloric stenosis. A contrast-enhanced radiograph also showed pyloric stenosis, and gastrografin was not passed well through her pylorus. Computed tomography revealed similar findings. The biopsy results indicated hyperplasia of the gastric glands. The patient was diagnosed with a benign lesion, and underwent endoscopic balloon dilation several times. However, her stenosis worsened and we decided to perform surgery. In consideration of the cosmetic outcome, we performed laparoscopic distal gastrectomy. The postoperative course was good, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 10. The final diagnosis was pyloric stenosis caused by heterotopic glands. No malignant lesions were found. Since gastric stenosis caused by heterotopic glands has not been reported previously, we consider this to be a very rare case. PMID:24986451

  17. JB-9322, a new selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist with potent gastric mucosal protective properties.

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, B.; Montero, M. J.; Sevilla, M. A.; Román, L. S.

    1995-01-01

    1. JB-9322 is a selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist with gastric antisecretory activity and mucosal protective properties. 2. The affinity of JB-9322 for the guinea-pig atria histamine H2-receptor was approximately 2 times greater than that of ranitidine. 3. In vivo, the ID50 value for the inhibition of gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated rats was 5.28 mg kg-1 intraperitoneally. JB-9322 also dose-dependently inhibited gastric juice volume and pepsin secretion. In gastric lumen-perfused rats, intravenous injection of JB-9322 dose-dependently reduced histamine-, pentagastrin- and carbachol-stimulated gastric acid secretion. 4. JB-9322 showed antiulcer activity against aspirin and indomethacin-induced gastric lesions and was more potent than ranitidine. 5. JB-9322 effectively inhibited macroscopic gastric haemorrhagic lesions induced by ethanol. Intraperitoneal injection was effective in preventing the lesions as well as oral treatment. The oral ID50 value for these lesions was 1.33 mg kg-1. By contrast, ranitidine (50 mg kg-1) failed to reduce these lesions. In addition, the protective effect of JB-9322 was independent of prostaglandin synthesis. 6. These results indicate that JB-9322 is a new antiulcer drug that exerts a potent cytoprotective effect in addition to its gastric antisecretory activity. PMID:7647984

  18. Risk factors for sebaceous gland diseases and their relationship to gastrointestinal dysfunction in Han adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Liao, Wanqing; Chao, Woon; Chen, Qiaoling; Zeng, Hanxiang; Wu, Chipeng; Wu, Shaoxi; Ho, Hon In

    2008-09-01

    Sebaceous gland diseases are a group of common dermatological diseases with multiple causes. To date, a systematic report of the risk factors for sebaceous gland diseases in adolescents has not been published. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and risk factors for certain sebaceous gland diseases (seborrhea, seborrheic dermatitis, acne, androgenetic alopecia and rosacea) and their relationship to gastrointestinal dysfunction in adolescents. From August-October, 2002-2005, a questionnaire survey was carried out to obtain epidemiological data about sebaceous gland diseases. Using random cluster sampling, 13 215 Han adolescents aged 12-20 years were recruited from four countries or districts (Macau; Guangzhou, China; Malaysia; and Indonesia). The statistical software SPSS ver. 13.0 was used to analyze the data. The prevalence of seborrhea, seborrheic dermatitis, acne, androgenetic alopecia and rosacea was 28.27%, 10.17%, 51.03%, 1.65% and 0.97%, respectively. Based on multivariate logistic regression analysis, the risk factors for sebaceous gland diseases included: age; duration of local residency; halitosis; gastric reflux; abdominal bloating; constipation; sweet food; spicy food; family history of acne; late night sleeping on a daily basis; excessive axillary, body and facial hair; excessive periareolar hair; and anxiety. There was a statistically significant difference in the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms (halitosis; gastric reflux; abdominal bloating; constipation) between patients with and without sebaceous gland diseases (chi(2) = 150.743; P = 0.000). Gastrointestinal dysfunction is an important risk factor for diseases of the sebaceous glands and is correlated with their occurrence and development. PMID:18837699

  19. Occupation and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J F; Podas, T

    2003-05-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations-for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  20. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastric banding is not a "quick fix" for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. You must ... panel on weight loss surgery: executive report update. Obesity . 2009;17:842-62. PMID: 19396063 www.ncbi. ...

  1. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... or "sleeve" out of the rest. The new, banana-shaped stomach is much smaller than the original ... of your stomach, leaving you with a smaller banana-shaped stomach called the gastric sleeve. Because it's ...

  2. Occupation and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J; Podas, T

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations—for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  3. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the syndrome is recommended. What are the estimated cancer risks associated with HDGC? Not everyone who ... the lifetime risk for diffuse gastric cancer is estimated to be 70% to 80% for men and ...

  4. Gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... your legs to help prevent blood clots from forming. You will receive shots of medicine to prevent ... diversion with duodenal switch Dumping syndrome References Buchwald H. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. In: Buchwald ...

  5. Tuberculosis of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Iserì, Mete; Aydìner, Omer; Celìk, Levent; Peker, Onder

    2005-04-01

    Tuberculosis of the parotid gland is very rare and clinically indistinguishable from a neoplasm. Thus the diagnosis of parotid gland involvement with tuberculosis has traditionally been made after surgical resection. We present a case which was diagnosed on fine needle aspiration cytology and managed medically. PMID:15949089

  6. Salivary gland diseases in children

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Zenk, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland diseases in children are rare, apart from viral-induced diseases. Nevertheless, it is essential for the otolaryngologist to recognize these uncommon findings in children and adolescents and to diagnose and initiate the proper treatment. The present work provides an overview of the entire spectrum of congenital and acquired diseases of the salivary glands in childhood and adolescence. The current literature was reviewed and the results discussed and summarized. Besides congenital diseases of the salivary glands in children, the main etiologies of viral and bacterial infections, autoimmune diseases and tumors of the salivary glands were considered. In addition to the known facts, new developments in diagnostics, imaging and therapy, including sialendoscopy in obstructive diseases and chronic recurrent juvenile sialadenitis were taken into account. In addition, systemic causes of salivary gland swelling and the treatment of sialorrhoea were discussed. Although salivary gland diseases in children are usually included in the pathology of the adult, they differ in their incidence and some­times in their symptoms. Clinical diagnostics and especially the surgical treatment are influenced by a stringent indications and a less invasive strategy. Due to the rarity of tumors of the salivary glands in children, it is recommended to treat them in a specialized center with greater surgical experience. Altogether the knowledge of the differential diagnoses in salivary gland diseases in children is important for otolaryngologists, to indicate the proper therapeutic approach. PMID:25587366

  7. Transmission of sheep-bovine spongiform encephalopathy to pigs.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Carlos; Bolea, Rosa; Marín, Belén; Cobrière, Fabien; Filali, Hicham; Vazquez, Francisco; Pitarch, José Luis; Vargas, Antonia; Acín, Cristina; Moreno, Bernardino; Pumarola, Martí; Andreoletti, Olivier; Badiola, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    Experimental transmission of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent has been successfully reported in pigs inoculated via three simultaneous distinct routes (intracerebral, intraperitoneal and intravenous). Sheep derived BSE (Sh-BSE) is transmitted more efficiently than the original cattle-BSE isolate in a transgenic mouse model expressing porcine prion protein. However, the neuropathology and distribution of Sh-BSE in pigs as natural hosts, and susceptibility to this agent, is unknown. In the present study, seven pigs were intracerebrally inoculated with Sh-BSE prions. One pig was euthanized for analysis in the preclinical disease stage. The remaining six pigs developed neurological signs and histopathology revealed severe spongiform changes accompanied by astrogliosis and microgliosis throughout the central nervous system. Intracellular and neuropil-associated pathological prion protein (PrP(Sc)) deposition was consistently observed in different brain sections and corroborated by Western blot. PrP(Sc) was detected by immunohistochemistry and enzyme immunoassay in the following tissues in at least one animal: lymphoid tissues, peripheral nerves, gastrointestinal tract, skeletal muscle, adrenal gland and pancreas. PrP(Sc) deposition was revealed by immunohistochemistry alone in the retina, optic nerve and kidney. These results demonstrate the efficient transmission of Sh-BSE in pigs and show for the first time that in this species propagation of bovine PrP(Sc) in a wide range of peripheral tissues is possible. These results provide important insight into the distribution and detection of prions in non-ruminant animals. PMID:26742788

  8. CT of Gastric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guniganti, Preethi; Bradenham, Courtney H; Raptis, Constantine; Menias, Christine O; Mellnick, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms among adult patients seeking care in the emergency department, and, with the increased use of computed tomography (CT) to image patients with these complaints, radiologists will more frequently encounter a variety of emergent gastric pathologic conditions on CT studies. Familiarity with the CT appearance of emergent gastric conditions is important, as the clinical presentation is often nonspecific and the radiologist may be the first to recognize gastric disease as the cause of a patient's symptoms. Although endoscopy and barium fluoroscopy remain important tools for evaluating patients with suspected gastric disease in the outpatient setting, compared with CT these modalities enable less comprehensive evaluation of patients with nonspecific complaints and are less readily available in the acute setting. Endoscopy is also more invasive than CT and has greater potential risks. Although the mucosal detail of CT is relatively poor compared with barium fluoroscopy or endoscopy, CT can be used with the appropriate imaging protocols to identify inflammatory conditions of the stomach ranging from gastritis to peptic ulcer disease. In addition, CT can readily demonstrate the various complications of gastric disease, including perforation, obstruction, and hemorrhage, which may direct further clinical, endoscopic, or surgical management. We will review the normal anatomy of the stomach and discuss emergent gastric disease with a focus on the usual clinical presentation, typical imaging appearance, and differentiating features, as well as potential imaging pitfalls. PMID:26562229

  9. [HISTOLOGYCAL AND HISTOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF AREOLAE IN THE PIG PLACENTA].

    PubMed

    Siraziev, R Z

    2015-01-01

    Rounded white lustreless dome-shaped wheels are detected by visually from allantochorion side in the in fetal areas epiteliochorial pig's placenta on day 30 of pregnancy. These structures are located over the opening of the uterine glands. Areolaes consist from maternal and foetal parts. Areola include glandular epithelium, chorial and endometrial stroma at the mouth of the uterine glands, areolar cavity-enhanced formed by endometrial and chorial invaginations. Chorion gives in cavity radial folds lining differences high epithelium. Glycogen, neutral and acid sulfated glycoproteins, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronates, total and cationic protein, RNA, arginine, gistidine, lysin were founded in structural components of areoles during gestation period. Numerous areolas serve as specialized sites for absorption the secrets of uterine glands; they are form a powerful functional system of histotrophic nutrition. PMID:26281215

  10. Gastric Adenocarcinoma Presenting with Gastric Outlet Obstruction in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman; AlGhamdi, Salem; Al-Kasim, Fawaz; Habib, Zakaria; Ourfali, Nouri

    2014-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma is extremely rare in children representing only 0.05% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Here, we report the first pediatric case of gastric cancer presenting with gastric outlet obstruction. Upper endoscopy revealed a markedly thickened antral mucosa occluding the pylorus and a clean base ulcer 1.5 cm × 2 cm at the lesser curvature of the stomach. The narrowed antrum and pylorus underwent balloon dilation, and biopsy from the antrum showed evidence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis. The biopsy taken from the edge of the gastric ulcer demonstrated signet-ring-cell type infiltrate consistent with gastric adenocarcinoma. At laparotomy, there were metastases to the liver, head of pancreas, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Therefore, the gastric carcinoma was deemed unresectable. The patient died few months after initiation of chemotherapy due to advanced malignancy. In conclusion, this case report underscores the possibility of gastric adenocarcinoma occurring in children and presenting with gastric outlet obstruction. PMID:24707411

  11. [Revisiting meibomian gland dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Baudouin, C

    2014-12-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunctions (MGD) are frequent affections, sometimes asymptomatic, more often responsible for disabling, potentially severe, manifestations. MGD is indeed the most frequent cause of dry eye, through the induction of tear film instability. However, eyelid inflammation, microbial proliferation that modifies melting temperature of meibum, frequent association with skin diseases, as well as potentially severe corneal complications make them complex multifactorial disorders. Complementary mechanisms combine to actually result in a vicious circle, or more accurately a double vicious cycle. The first one is self-stimulated by the microbiological changes, which create their own conditions for MGD development. The second one is related to tear film instability that results from MGD and is also self-stimulated through hyperosmolarity and inflammatory phenomena, which are both consequence and cause of dry eye. We herein propose a new pathophysiological schema on MGD, in order to better identify mechanisms and more efficiently target therapeutics. PMID:25455142

  12. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Poorly Differentiated Carcinoma; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer

  13. Cleaning pipelines: a pigging primer

    SciTech Connect

    Kipin, P.

    1985-02-04

    The ''pig'', a cleaning device currently used to clear out pipes, is discussed here. Types of pigs are described and include styrofoam, rubber, and soft foam. The limitations to the use of pigs are discussed. Unless all valves are fully open, a pig can get stuck. Ball-type tees may cause a short pig to drop and bypass. Generally, no pig is able to traverse a one-cut miter.

  14. General Information about Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Gastric Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  15. Histopathological study using computer database of 10 000 consecutive gastric specimens: (1) benign conditions.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2015-08-01

    Using a computer database, the author investigated the histopathology of 10 000 consecutive gastric specimens, taken in the last 12 years (2002-2013) at the pathology laboratory of a Japanese hospital. Re-observation of the already examined histological sections was done when the histological diagnosis and findings on the computer data base were not very obvious. The gastric specimens were identified as 8579 benign conditions and 1421 malignant lesions. The 8579 benign conditions were comprised almost normal stomach in 74 cases (0.9%), chronic gastritis in 4374 (51.0%), benign gastric peptic ulcer in 2195 (25.6%), foveolar hyperplastic polyp in 1004 (11.7%), fundic gland polyp in 421 (4.9%), adenoma in 487 (5.6%), heterotopic pancreas in 9 (0.1%), pancreatic acinar metaplasia (PAM) in 8 (0.1%), and amyloidosis in 7 (0.1%). Chronic gastritis showed lymphocytic infiltration and frequently showed erosions and intestinal metaplasia. Gastric peptic ulcer showed exudate, necrosis, active inflammation, and regenerative atypia of the epithelium. Foveolar hyperplastic polyp revealed 23 malignant changes and frequently showed dysplastic glands and intestinal metaplasia. Fundic gland polyp demonstrated cystic dilations of fundic gland ducts. Gastric adenoma showed adenomatous proliferation in the superficial mucosa and cystic dilation of the epithelium under the adenoma. Heterotopic pancreas was located in the submucosa and consisted of acinar cells, ducts, and occasionally islets. PAM was a tiny lesion in the mucosa and consisted of only pancreatic acinar cells. Amyloidosis was primary amyloidosis with positive reaction with Congo-red stain. PMID:25688102

  16. [Tumor of the Parotid Gland].

    PubMed

    Pötzl, Teresa; Iselin, Sabine; Husner, Alexander

    2016-05-11

    Salivary gland tumors are a rare, histologically heterogeneous group of tumors which constitute approximately 4–6 % of all head and neck neoplasms. In 2/3 of cases they are benign, especially in the parotid gland. We report about a rare tumor of the parotid gland presenting as an extraskeletal chondroma. Histologically there were multiple S 100 protein-positive nests of chondrocytes. The externally completed cytology suspected a pleomorphic adenoma, nevertheless, the final histopathological findings showed another tumor entity. PMID:27167480

  17. GASTRIC MOTOR DISTURBANCES IN PATIENTS WITH IDIOPATHIC RAPID GASTRIC EMPTYING

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Manduca, Armando; Lake, David S.; Fidler, Jeff; Edwards, Phillip; Grimm, Roger C.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Riederer, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The mechanisms of “idiopathic” rapid gastric emptying, which is associated with functional dyspepsia and functional diarrhea, are not understood. Our hypotheses were that increased gastric motility and reduced postprandial gastric accommodation contribute to rapid gastric emptying. Methods Fasting and postprandial (300kCal nutrient meal) gastric volumes were measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 20 healthy people and 17 with functional dyspepsia; 7 had normal and 10 had rapid gastric emptying. In 17 healthy people and patients, contractility was analyzed by spectral analysis of a time-series of gastric cross-sectional areas. Logistic regression models analyzed whether contractile parameters, fasting volume, and postprandial volume change could discriminate between health and patients with normal or rapid gastric emptying. Results While upper gastrointestinal symptoms were comparable, patients with rapid emptying had a higher (p = 0.002) body mass index (BMI) than normal gastric emptying. MRI visualized propagating contractions at ~ 3 cpm in healthy people and patients. Compared to controls (0.16 ± 0.02, Mean ± SEM), the amplitude of gastric contractions in the entire stomach was higher (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.2–14.0) in patients with rapid (0.24 ± 0.03) but not normal gastric emptying (0.10 ± 0.03). Similar differences were observed in the distal stomach. However, the propagation velocity, fasting gastric volume, and the postprandial volume change were not significantly different between patients and controls. Conclusions MRI provides a noninvasive and refined assessment of gastric volumes and contractility in humans. Increased gastric contractility may contribute to rapid gastric emptying in functional dyspepsia. PMID:21470342

  18. KLF4 deletion alters gastric cell lineage and induces MUC2 expression.

    PubMed

    Yu, T; Chen, X; Lin, T; Liu, J; Li, M; Zhang, W; Xu, X; Zhao, W; Liu, M; Napier, D L; Wang, C; Evers, B M; Liu, C

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the world, particularly in underdeveloped countries. The mechanism of gastric cancer is less understood compared with other types of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a zinc-finger transcription factor and is a potential tumor suppressor in GI cancers. In this study, we have generated two mouse models, Rosa-Cre;Klf4(fl/fl) and Lgr5-Cre;Klf4(fl/fl). KLF4 was deleted by Rosa-Cre in the gastric epithelia cells or by Lgr5-Cre in the antral stem cells in the adult mice. KLF4 deletion resulted in increased proliferating cells and decreased pit mucous cells. Surprisingly, the intestinal goblet cell marker, MUC2, which is not expressed in normal gastric tissues, was strongly induced at the base of the KLF4-deleted antral glands. To understand the clinical relevance of these findings, we analyzed the expression of KLF4 and MUC2 in human gastric cancer. In a subset of human gastric cancer, the expression of KLF4 is negatively associated with MUC2 expression. In conclusion, KLF4 is essential for normal homeostasis of antral stem cells; loss of KLF4 and expression of MUC2 could be important markers for gastric cancer diagnosis. PMID:27277677

  19. Effect of misoprostol and cimetidine on gastric cell labeling index

    SciTech Connect

    Fich, A.; Arber, N.; Sestieri, M.; Zajicek, G.; Rachmilewitz, D.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of misoprostol and cimetidine on gastric cell turnover was studied. Endoscopic biopsy specimens of fundic and antral mucosa were obtained from duodenal ulcer patients before and after 4 wk of therapy with cimetidine 1.2 g/day or misoprostol 800 micrograms/day. Biopsy specimens were incubated with (/sup 3/H)thymidine. Glandular column length and number of labeled cells were determined after autoradiography. There was no significant difference in column length of antral or fundic glands before or after therapy with cimetidine and misoprostol. The number of antral and fundic labeled cells was significantly decreased after misoprostol treatment (3.6 +/- 0.3 and 4.6 +/- 0.4, mean +/- SE), as opposed to their respective number before therapy (6.9 +/- 0.5 and 8.3 +/- 0.8) (p less than 0.01). On the other hand, after treatment with cimetidine, the number of antral and fundic labeled cells was significantly higher (11.8 +/- 0.9 and 7.5 +/- 1.0, respectively) as compared with their number before therapy (5.7 +/- 0.5 and 5.6 +/- 0.6, respectively). The decreased gastric cell turnover induced by misoprostol indicates that the trophic effect of prostanoids on gastric mucosa is not due to an increase in cellular kinetics. The increased gastric cell turnover induced by cimetidine may contribute to its therapeutic effect in peptic ulcer disease.

  20. Traffic Noise Exposure Increases Gastric Pepsin Secretion in Rat.

    PubMed

    Moslehi, Azam; Nabavizadeh, Fatemeh; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Rouhbakhsh, Nematollah; Sotudeh, Masoud; Salimi, Ehsan; Barzegar Behrooz, Amir

    2016-03-01

    Noise is considered as one of the most severe sources of environmental and workplace constraints. Many noise effects are well known on immune function, hormonal levels, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. In this study, our aim is to evaluate the effects of traffic noise exposure on basal and stimulated gastric pepsin secretion. 48 male rats were exposed to traffic noise (86 dB) for a short term of (8h/day for 1 day) and a long term of (8h/day for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days) as well as a control group. The gastric contents were collected by the wash-out technique. Pepsin secretion was measured by employing the Anson method. Histological studies were carried out on the epithelial layer. The corticosteroid hormone was measured in the serum for the stress augmentation. The present finding indicated no changes in pepsin secretion content in the short term, but in the 14 and 21 days traffic noise exposure, basal gastric pepsin secretion increased markedly compared to the control group. Histological results showed that the number of oxyntic glands and cell nuclei decreased in comparison with the control group while the thickness of the epithelial layer increases. In addition, the corticosterone levels increase in all groups in comparison with the control. It seems that the increase of gastric pepsin secretion is due to the description and translation processes in the peptic cells and needs enough time for completion. PMID:27107524

  1. Characteristics and EGFP expression of porcine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; He, Xiao-Ying

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish a porcine mammary gland epithelial (PMGE) cell line, and to determine if these PMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of PMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating pig. The passage sixteen PMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in PMGE cells was tested by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was tested for PMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that PMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the cells contained different cell types. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells, and the PMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the PMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected porcine mammary gland epithelial (ET-PMGE) cell line. PMID:20400167

  2. Diffusion through Pig Gastric Mucin: Effect of Relative Humidity

    PubMed Central

    Runnsjö, Anna; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Sparr, Emma; Kocherbitov, Vitaly; Arnebrant, Thomas; Engblom, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Mucus covers the epithelium found in all intestinal tracts, where it serves as an important protecting barrier, and pharmaceutical drugs administrated by the oral, rectal, vaginal, ocular, or nasal route need to penetrate the mucus in order to reach their targets. Furthermore, the diffusion in mucus as well as the viscosity of mucus in the eyes, nose and throat can change depending on the relative humidity of the surrounding air. In this study we have investigated how diffusion through gels of mucin, the main protein in mucus, is affected by changes in ambient relative humidity (i.e. water activity). Already a small decrease in water activity was found to give rise to a significant decrease in penetration rate through the mucin gel of the antibacterial drug metronidazole. We also show that a decrease in water activity leads to decreased diffusion rate in the mucin gel for the fluorophore fluorescein. This study shows that it is possible to alter transport rates of molecules through mucus by changing the water activity in the gel. It furthermore illustrates the importance of considering effects of the water activity in the mucosa during development of potential pharmaceuticals. PMID:27336158

  3. Calcium Signaling in Lacrimal Glands

    PubMed Central

    Putney, James W.; Bird, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Lacrimal glands provide the important function of lubricating and protecting the ocular surface. Failure of proper lacrimal gland function results in a number of debilitating dry eye diseases. Lacrimal glands secrete lipids, mucins, proteins, salts and water and these secretions are at least partially regulated by neurotransmitter-mediated cell signaling. The predominant signaling mechanism for lacrimal secretion involves activation of phospholipase C, generation of the Ca2+-mobilizing messenger, IP3, and release of Ca2+ stored in the endoplasmic reticulum. The loss of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum then triggers a process known as store-operated Ca2+ entry, involving a Ca2+ sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum, STIM1, which activates plasma membrane store-operated channels comprised of Orai subunits. Recent studies with deletions of the channel subunit, Orai1, confirm the important role of SOCE in both fluid and protein secretion in lacrimal glands, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24507443

  4. Adrenal Gland Disorders: Condition Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... of salt and water Controlling the "fight or flight" response to stress Maintaining pregnancy Initiating and controlling ... overview of the adrenal glands: Beyond fight or flight . Retrieved June 29, 2012 from http://www.endocrineweb. ...

  5. Effect of gastric acid suppressants on human gastric motility

    PubMed Central

    Parkman, H; Urbain, J; Knight, L; Brown, K; Trate, D; Miller, M; Maurer, A; Fisher, R

    1998-01-01

    Background—The effect of histamine H2 receptor antagonists on gastric emptying is controversial. 
Aims—To determine the effects of ranitidine, famotidine, and omeprazole on gastric motility and emptying. 
Patients and methods—Fifteen normal subjects underwent simultaneous antroduodenal manometry, electrogastrography (EGG), and gastric emptying with dynamic antral scintigraphy (DAS). After 30 minutes of fasting manometry and EGG recording, subjects received either intravenous saline, ranitidine, or famotidine, followed by another 30 minutes recording and then three hours of postprandial recording after ingestion of a radiolabelled meal. Images were obtained every 10-15 minutes for three hours to measure gastric emptying and assess antral contractility. Similar testing was performed after omeprazole 20 mg daily for one week. 
Results—Fasting antral phase III migrating motor complexes (MMCs) were more common after ranitidine (9/15 subjects, 60%), famotidine (12/15, 80%), and omeprazole (8/12, 67%) compared with placebo (4/14, 29%; p<0.05). Postprandially, ranitidine, famotidine, and omeprazole slowed gastric emptying, increased the amplitude of DAS contractions, increased the EGG power, and increased the antral manometric motility index. 
Conclusions—Suppression of gastric acid secretion with therapeutic doses of gastric acid suppressants is associated with delayed gastric emptying but increased antral motility. 

 Keywords: gastric motility; gastric emptying; histamine H2 receptor antagonists; proton pump inhibitors; gastric acid secretion; scintigraphy PMID:9536950

  6. Percutaneous implantation of gastric electrodes - a novel technique applied in animals and in patients.

    PubMed

    Elfvin, A; Andersson, S; Abrahamsson, H; Edebo, A; Simrén, M; Lönroth, H

    2007-02-01

    Temporary electrodes implanted under general anaesthesia, or via an oral or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy route have been used for testing of gastric electrical stimulation (GES). We have developed a principle for percutaneous electrode implantation. Leads were constructed so that the tip could be anchored to the gastric submucosa under gastroscopic control. Acute experiments were performed in anaesthetized pigs. Three patients referred for nausea and/or vomiting and non-established indications for GES (chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, functional dyspepsia without gastroparesis) were evaluated. Electrode function was tested by recording and stimulation techniques. In the pigs, a slow-wave (SW) rhythm (3 min(-1)) was recorded with decrease in frequency at the end of the experiments. In the patients, implantation time from start of gastroscopy to end of electrode placement was 12-20 min. Electrode distance varied from 12 to 45 mm. Gastric electromyography showed a regular SW rhythm of about 3 min(-1). Antral pressure waves had intervals being multiples of the SW-to-SW time. With temporary GES for 7-9 days, weekly frequency of the referral symptoms decreased >80% in two patients and 33% in one patient. Temporary percutaneous gastric leads can easily be implanted and may be used for testing of GES and study of gastric electrophysiology. PMID:17244164

  7. Pig in the Middle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Sophie

    2000-01-01

    Explores themes relating to human transition as they appear in "Charlotte's Web" and four other stories using pigs as a subject. Discusses the motifs common to all these texts that recur in the film "Babe." Considers how the cycle of life and death is ceaseless, and pigs symbolize the necessary transitions that people must all make. (NH)

  8. Isolated Bilateral Lacrimal Gland Agenesis.

    PubMed

    Al-Ryalat, Nosaiba T; Ezzat, Jumana W; Ababneh, Osama H; AlRyalat, Saif Aldeen S; Al-Hadidy, Azmy M

    2016-01-01

    A 5-year-old boy presented to the ophthalmology department complaining of absent tearing while crying. Slit-lamp examination showed decreased tear margin film with normal punctae. Orbit magnetic resonance imaging was done and showed bilateral absent lacrimal glands. This is the third case of isolated bilateral lacrimal gland agenesis in the literature. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53:e35-e38.]. PMID:27486892

  9. Immunotherapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matsueda, Satoko; Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the majority of cases gastric cancer is advanced at diagnosis and although medical and surgical treatments have improved, survival rates remain poor. Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a powerful and promising clinical approach for treatment of cancer and has shown major success in breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Here, we provide an overview of concepts of modern cancer immunotherapy including the theory, current approaches, remaining hurdles to be overcome, and the future prospect of cancer immunotherapy in the treatment of gastric cancer. Adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, gene therapies, monoclonal antibody therapies have all been used with some initial successes in gastric cancer. However, to date the results in gastric cancer have been disappointing as current approaches often do not stimulate immunity efficiently allowing tumors continue to grow despite the presence of a measurable immune response. Here, we discuss the identification of targets for immunotherapy and the role of biomarkers in prospectively identifying appropriate subjects or immunotherapy. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms by which tumor cells escape host immunosurveillance and produce an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We show how advances have provided tools for overcoming the mechanisms of immunosuppression including the use of monoclonal antibodies to block negative regulators normally expressed on the surface of T cells which limit activation and proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. Immunotherapy has greatly improved and is becoming an important factor in such fields as medical care and welfare for human being. Progress has been rapid ensuring that the future of immunotherapy for gastric cancer is bright. PMID:24587645

  10. Cysticercosis in the pig.

    PubMed

    de Aluja, A S

    2008-01-01

    Taenia solium cysticercosis is still an important parasitosis in rural pigs in many developing countries, México among them. The main causes for the persistence of this condition are lack of hygiene in the rural communities, lack of education of the animal owners, lack of control in the trade of pigs and their meat and lack of conscientious meat inspection. The pig production systems in the marginated areas of Mexico are briefly mentioned and it is stressed that among the important reasons for the persistence of the reproductive cycle of Taenia solium is the fact that appropriate toilet facilities in village dwellings are not mandatory. The diagnostic methods of cysticercosis in the living pigs and in their meat are discussed and the degenerative stages of the larvae as well as methods to test their viability are explained. The treatment of infected pigs and their meat is discussed. Recommendations for control programmes are given. PMID:18393899

  11. Tail biting in pigs.

    PubMed

    Schrøder-Petersen, D L; Simonsen, H B

    2001-11-01

    One of the costly and welfare-reducing problems in modern pig production is tail biting. Tail biting is an abnormal behaviour, characterized by one pig's dental manipulation of another pig's tail. Tail biting can be classified into two groups: the pre-injury stage, before any wound on the tail is present, and the injury stage, where the tail is wounded and bleeding. Tail biting in the injury stage will reduce welfare of the bitten pig and the possible spread of infection is a health as well as welfare problem. The pigs that become tail biters may also suffer, because they are frustrated due to living in a stressful environment. This frustration may result in an excessive motivation for biting the tails of pen mates. This review aims to summarize recent research and theories in relation to tail biting. PMID:11681870

  12. Scent glands in legume flowers.

    PubMed

    Marinho, C R; Souza, C D; Barros, T C; Teixeira, S P

    2014-01-01

    Scent glands, or osmophores, are predominantly floral secretory structures that secrete volatile substances during anthesis, and therefore act in interactions with pollinators. The Leguminosae family, despite being the third largest angiosperm family, with a wide geographical distribution and diversity of habits, morphology and pollinators, has been ignored with respect to these glands. Thus, we localised and characterised the sites of fragrance production and release in flowers of legumes, in which scent plays an important role in pollination, and also tested whether there are relationships between the structure of the scent gland and the pollinator habit: diurnal or nocturnal. Flowers in pre-anthesis and anthesis of 12 legume species were collected and analysed using immersion in neutral red, olfactory tests and anatomical studies (light and scanning electron microscopy). The main production site of floral scent is the perianth, especially the petals. The scent glands are distributed in a restricted way in Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Anadenanthera peregrina, Inga edulis and Parkia pendula, constituting mesophilic osmophores, and in a diffuse way in Bauhinia rufa, Hymenaea courbaril, Erythrostemon gilliesii, Poincianella pluviosa, Pterodon pubescens, Platycyamus regnellii, Mucuna urens and Tipuana tipu. The glands are comprised of cells of the epidermis and mesophyll that secrete mainly terpenes, nitrogen compounds and phenols. Relationships between the presence of osmophores and type of anthesis (diurnal and nocturnal) and the pollinator were not found. Our data on scent glands in Leguminosae are original and detail the type of diffuse release, which has been very poorly studied. PMID:23574349

  13. Paradoxical role of Helicobacter pylori infection: protective effect against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, A; Ikeno, T; Ishida, K; Maruta, F; Murakami, M; Sato, T; Saito, H; Ishizone, S; Kawasaki, S; Ota, H; Katsuyama, T

    2001-11-01

    We investigated the effect of ethanol (a representative necrotizing agent) on gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in Mongolian gerbils. Seventy-eight gerbils were used. Four and 12 weeks after H. pylori inoculation, 30% ethanol was administered into the stomach. The stomachs were removed after 30 min, the intramucosal prostaglandin (PG) E2 concentration was measured, and histopathology was recorded. H. pylori infection caused chronic active gastritis, gastric erosion, hypersecretion of mucin from gland mucus cells, and a rise in the activity of intramucosal PGE2. After ethanol administration, gastric erosion was significantly less in animals infected with H. pylori than in uninfected animals. In conclusion, in the early stage of H. pylori infection, accentuation of intramucosal PGE2 and hypersecretion of mucin from gland mucus cells have a protective effect against gastric mucosal injury induced by necrotizing agents. PMID:11713948

  14. Melanoma with gastric metastases.

    PubMed

    Wong, Katherine; Serafi, Sam W; Bhatia, Abhijit S; Ibarra, Irene; Allen, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman with a history of malignant melanoma who presented with dyspnea and fatigue was found to have metastases to the stomach detected on endoscopy. Primary cutaneous malignant melanoma with gastric metastases is a rare occurrence, and it is often not detected until autopsy because of its non-specific manifestations. PMID:27609722

  15. Models of gastric emptying.

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, D F

    1977-01-01

    Some empirical and theoretical models of the emptying behaviour of the stomach are presented. The laws of Laplace, Hooke, and Poisseuille are used to derive a new model of gastric emptying. Published data on humans are used to test the model and evaluate empirical constants. It is shown that for meals with an initial volume of larger than or equal to 300 ml, the reciprocal of the cube root of the volume of meal remaining is proportional to the time the meal is in the stomach.For meals of initial volume of less than 300 ml the equation has to be corrected for the fact that the 'resting volume' of gastric contents is about 28 ml. The more exact formula is given in the text. As this model invokes no neural or hormonal factors, it is suggested that the gastric emptying response to the volume of a meal does not depend on these factors. The gastric emptying response to the composition of the meal does depend on such factors and a recent model of this process is used to evaluate an empirical constant. PMID:856678

  16. Liu-Jun-Zi-Tang, a kampo medicine, promotes adaptive relaxation in isolated guinea pig stomachs.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, T; Arakawa, T; Kase, Y; Akiyama, S; Ishige, A; Takeda, S; Sasaki, H; Uno, H; Fukuda, T; Higuchi, K; Kobayashi, K

    1999-01-01

    Some patients with dysmotility-like functional dyspepsia present impaired reservoir functions such as gastric adaptive relaxation. A traditional Chinese herbal medicine, Liu-Jun-Zi-Tang, has been identified as an effective drug against dyspeptic symptoms and is widely used for therapy in such patients. In this study, we examined the effects of this drug on the gastric adaptive relaxation in isolated guinea pig stomachs. The changes in intragastric volume and pressure were recorded in the presence of atropine and guanethidine. Gastric adaptive relaxation was induced by luminal distention. Liu-Jun-Zi-Tang (100 mg/ml) induced gastric adaptive relaxation at a lower intragastric pressure and increased the % volume of the gastric adaptive relaxation and the absolute intragastric volume. Metoclopramide (2 mg/ml), trimebutine (6 mg/ml) and cisapride (2 mg/ml) did not affect gastric adaptive relaxation. It was inhibited by means of the incubation of the stomach with NG-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM). Liu-Jun-Zi-Tang (100 mg/ml), but not gastroprokinetics overcame the effect of NG-nitro-L-arginine. These results suggested that Liu-Jun-Zi-Tang promoted gastric adaptive relaxation. This effect might, at least in part, contribute to the symptom relief in patients with functional dyspepsia. PMID:10568209

  17. Effects of MCI-727, a new antiulcer agent, on various gastric and duodenal lesions in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, S; Kawamura, M; Kitsukawa, M; Ando, K; Nitta, I; Tobe, A; Okabe, S

    1991-04-01

    Effects of a new antiulcer drug, MCI-727, on gastric and duodenal lesions, gastric secretion and gastric motility were studied in comparison with cimetidine and teprenone. MCI-727 dose-dependently (3-100 mg/kg, p.o. or i.d.) inhibited the development of acute gastric or duodenal lesions such as pyrolus ligation-, water-immersion stress-, indomethacin-, HCl-, HCl-ethanol-induced gastric lesions and cysteamine-induced duodenal lesions in rats and histamine-induced duodenal lesions in guinea pigs. These antiulcer effects exceeded those of cimetidine or teprenone. Repeated administration of MCI-727 (0.3-3 mg/kg/day, p.o., for 10 days) significantly promoted the spontaneous healing of acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcers. Concerning gastric acid secretion, MCI-727 selectively inhibited tetragastrin-stimulated acid secretion without effecting basal acid secretion and acid secretion by other stimuli. Cimetidine and teprenone inhibited acid secretion in several cases. MCI-727 and teprenone had inhibitory effects on gastric motility, although cimetidine had no effect. These results suggest that MCI-727 has a wide spectrum of antiulcer activity, and its mode of antiulcer action is different from that of cimetidine or teprenone. PMID:1886287

  18. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-26

    High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Anaplastic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Malignant Mixed Cell Type Tumor; Salivary Gland Poorly Differentiated Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer

  19. Genetic Ablation of the ClC-2 Cl- Channel Disrupts Mouse Gastric Parietal Cell Acid Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Nighot, Meghali P.; Nighot, Prashant K.; Ma, Thomas Y.; Malinowska, Danuta H.; Shull, Gary E.; Cuppoletti, John; Blikslager, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    The present studies were designed to examine the effects of ClC-2 ablation on cellular morphology, parietal cell abundance, H/K ATPase expression, parietal cell ultrastructure and acid secretion using WT and ClC-2-/- mouse stomachs. Cellular histology, morphology and proteins were examined using imaging techniques, electron microscopy and western blot. The effect of histamine on the pH of gastric contents was measured. Acid secretion was also measured using methods and secretagogues previously established to give maximal acid secretion and morphological change. Compared to WT, ClC-2-/- gastric mucosal histological organization appeared disrupted, including dilation of gastric glands, shortening of the gastric gland region and disorganization of all cell layers. Parietal cell numbers and H/K ATPase expression were significantly reduced by 34% (P<0.05) and 53% (P<0.001) respectively and cytoplasmic tubulovesicles appeared markedly reduced on electron microscopic evaluation without evidence of canalicular expansion. In WT parietal cells, ClC-2 was apparent in a similar cellular location as the H/K ATPase by immunofluorescence and appeared associated with tubulovesicles by immunogold electron microscopy. Histamine-stimulated [H+] of the gastric contents was significantly (P<0.025) lower by 9.4 fold (89%) in the ClC-2-/- mouse compared to WT. Histamine/carbachol stimulated gastric acid secretion was significantly reduced (range 84–95%, P<0.005) in ClC-2-/- compared to WT, while pepsinogen secretion was unaffected. Genetic ablation of ClC-2 resulted in reduced gastric gland region, reduced parietal cell number, reduced H/K ATPase, reduced tubulovesicles and reduced stimulated acid secretion. PMID:26378782

  20. Salivary Gland Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adams, April; Warner, Kristy; Nör, Jacques E.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests the existence of a tumorigenic population of cancer cells that demonstrate stem cell-like properties such as self-renewal and multipotency. These cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSC), are able to both initiate and maintain tumor formation and progression. Studies have shown that CSC are resistant to traditional chemotherapy treatments preventing complete eradication of the tumor cell population. Following treatment, CSC are able to re-initiate tumor growth leading to patient relapse. Salivary gland cancers are relatively rare but constitute a highly significant public health issue due to the lack of effective treatments. In particular, patients with mucoepidermoid carcinoma or adenoid cystic carcinoma, the two most common salivary malignancies, have low long-term survival rates due to the lack of response to current therapies. Considering the role of CSC in resistance to therapy in other tumor types, it is possible that this unique sub-population of cells is involved in resistance of salivary gland tumors to treatment. Characterization of CSC can lead to better understanding of the pathobiology of salivary gland malignancies as well as to the development of more effective therapies. Here, we make a brief overview of the state-of-the-science in salivary gland cancer, and discuss possible implications of the cancer stem cell hypothesis to the treatment of salivary gland malignancies. PMID:23810400

  1. Selective Cryolysis of Sebaceous Glands.

    PubMed

    Jalian, H Ray; Tam, Joshua; Vuong, Linh N; Fisher, Jeremy; Garibyan, Lilit; Mihm, Martin C; Zurakowski, David; Evans, Conor L; Anderson, R Rox

    2015-09-01

    Acne vulgaris is a nearly universal cutaneous inflammatory disease. Excess sebum production is an integral part of disease pathogenesis. Medical therapies that reduce sebum excretion result in clinical improvement of acne. Given the preferential susceptibility of lipid-containing cells to cold, we investigated the hypothesis that controlled local skin cooling causes preferential injury to sebaceous glands, in murine and swine models using a range of temperatures as low as -10 °C, and then on the backs of human subjects. In mouse ears, peak histologic damage occurred 72 hours after treatment; eosinophilic necrotic plugs formed within sebaceous glands, and the number of glands was significantly reduced up to 1 week post treatment. Cooling disrupted sebocyte cell membranes, alkaline phosphatase activity, and significantly reduced sebocyte lipid content. In human volunteers, cooling damaged sebaceous glands and reduced sebum output for 2 weeks, with minimal injury to surrounding tissues. Selective cryolysis of sebaceous glands is achievable through brief, non-invasive skin cooling, suggesting that controlled cooling could be developed as an effective treatment for acne vulgaris. PMID:25860384

  2. The Mammary Glands of Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Cline, J. Mark; Wood, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    This review describes the normal biology and physiology of the mammary gland in macaques, including the typical histologic appearance across the life span (development, reproductive maturity, lactation, and senescence). The molecular events regulating breast morphogenesis are described, as well as systemic and local hormonal regulators of mammary gland proliferation, differentiation, and function. Similarities and differences to the human breast are described. Regulatory events are illuminated by discussion of genetically modified mouse models. Tissue response markers, including immunohistochemical markers of proliferation and other hormonally induced changes and studies to date, regarding the effects of exogenous hormones, are briefly summarized. In general, estrogens stimulate progesterone receptor expression and proliferation in the mammary gland, and combinations of estrogens and progestogens cause greater proliferation than estrogens alone. Evaluation of novel chemical agents in macaques requires careful evaluation of age and hormonal context to avoid the confounding effects of mammary gland development, past reproductive history, and other influences on mammary gland morphology. The expression of proliferation markers and progesterone receptors may be used as biomarkers to measure chemically induced hormonal effects. PMID:21475638

  3. Salivary glands - "an unisex organ'?

    PubMed

    Konttinen, Y T; Stegaev, V; Mackiewicz, Z; Porola, P; Hänninen, A; Szodoray, P

    2010-10-01

    Usually no distinction is made between female and male salivary glands although cyclic changes of and ⁄ or differences in serum and salivary sex steroid concentrations characterize women and men. Moreover, sexual dimorphism is well recognized in salivary glands of rodents.Salivary glands contain estrogen and androgen receptors and are, according to modern high throughput technologies,subjected to gender differences not explainable by gene dose effects by the X chromosome alone. Because sex steroids are lipophilic, it is often thought that approximately 10% of them passively diffuse from plasma to saliva. Indeed, saliva can find use as sample material in sports medicine, pediatrics, veterinary medicine and behavioral sciences. Last but not least, humans and other primates are unique in that they have a reticular zone in their adrenal cortex, which produces dehydroepiandrosterone and androstendione pro-hormones. These are processed in peripheral tissues, not only in female breast and uterus and male prostate, but also in salivary glands by an intracrine enzymatic machinery to active 17b-estradiol,dihydrotestosterone and others, to satisfy and buffer against a constantly changing needs caused by circadian,menstrual, pregnancy and chronobiological hormonal changes in the systemic circulation. Female dominance of Sjögren's syndrome and certain forms of salivary gland cancer probably reflect these gender-based differences. PMID:20412448

  4. Pathogenesis of Bolivian Hemorrhagic Fever in Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Bell, T M; Bunton, T E; Shaia, C I; Raymond, J W; Honnold, S P; Donnelly, G C; Shamblin, J D; Wilkinson, E R; Cashman, K A

    2016-01-01

    Machupo virus, the cause of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, is a highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever with no Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines or therapeutics. This study evaluated the guinea pig as a model using the Machupo virus-Chicava strain administered via aerosol challenge. Guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) were serially sampled to evaluate the temporal progression of infection, gross and histologic lesions, and sequential changes in serum chemistry and hematology. The incubation period was 5 to 12 days, and complete blood counts revealed leukopenia with lymphopenia and thrombocytopenia. Gross pathologic findings included congestion and hemorrhage of the gastrointestinal mucosa and serosa, noncollapsing lungs with fluid exudation, enlarged lymph nodes, and progressive pallor and friability of the liver. Histologic lesions consisted of foci of degeneration and cell death in the haired skin, liver, pancreas, adrenal glands, lymph nodes, tongue, esophagus, salivary glands, renal pelvis, small intestine, and large intestine. Lymphohistiocytic interstitial pneumonia was also present. Inflammation within the central nervous system, interpreted as nonsuppurative encephalitis, was histologically apparent approximately 16 days postexposure and was generally progressive. Macrophages in the tracheobronchial lymph node, on day 5 postexposure, were the first cells to demonstrate visible viral antigen. Viral antigen was detected throughout the lymphoid system by day 9 postexposure, followed by prominent spread within epithelial tissues and then brain. This study provides insight into the course of Machupo virus infection and supports the utility of guinea pigs as an additional animal model for vaccine and therapeutic development. PMID:26139838

  5. Pseudoendogenous origin of prednisolone in pigs from the food chain.

    PubMed

    Arioli, F; Pasquale, E; Panseri, S; Bonizzi, L; Labella, G F; Casati, A; Foschini, S; Chiesa, L

    2015-01-01

    The debate about the origin of prednisolone in animal organisms has lasted for 5 years. Bovine species have been the most studied, but studies on humans and horses are also present in the literature. Even if prednisolone in pigs does not yet represent a problem for control agencies, interest has recently increased with regard to this species. To date, there has been just a single study in the literature about this topic, performed on 10 sows treated with prednisolone or a synthetic analogue of adrenocorticotropic hormone. We therefore initiated a study on 80 pigs, a number considered representative in relation to the expected frequency (prevalence) of prednisolone detection in urine collected at slaughter. Prednisolone was detected in urine both at the farm and at the slaughterhouse, with a concentration and frequency higher at slaughter. The presence of prednisolone was also studied in the adrenal glands, where the corticosteroids are produced in response to stress, and it was detected in 89% of the samples. These results, together with the similar behaviours of prednisolone and cortisol, i.e. a mutual rise in the two corticosteroids in urine collected at the slaughterhouse and the correlation between the concentrations of the two corticosteroids in the adrenal glands, seem to indicate an endogenous origin of prednisolone in pigs. PMID:25768050

  6. Follicular lymphoma of the submandibular salivary gland

    PubMed Central

    Shashidara, R.; Prasad, Priyanka R.; Jaishankar; Joseph, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Lymphomas are neoplastic diseases of lymph nodes. Lymphoma of the salivary gland is rare accounting for less than 5% of lymphomas overall. Furthermore, lymphomas arising in the submandibular gland are reported to comprise 916% of all salivary gland lymphomas. Among lymphomas originating from salivary glands, the ratio of follicular lymphoma is very low. They can also be seen in the lymph nodes of the salivary glands which is an uncommon presentation. Here, we present a case follicular lymphoma which presented as a salivary gland tumour. PMID:25364171

  7. Increased apoptosis in gastric mucosa adjacent to intestinal metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    van Grieken, N C T; Meijer, G A; zur Hausen, A; Meuwissen, S G M; Baak, J P A; Kuipers, E J

    2003-01-01

    Background: The biological processes involved in the development of gastric mucosal atrophy and intestinal metaplasia are still incompletely understood. Reports testing the hypothesis that apoptosis leads to atrophy have yielded conflicting results. The availability of new antibodies for the detection of apoptotic cells in tissue sections has facilitated the analysis of the role of apoptosis in the gastritis–atrophy–intestinal metaplasia sequence. Methods: Archival material from 40 gastric resection specimens with normal mucosa (n = 5), chronic active gastritis (n = 17), or intestinal metaplasia (n = 18) was studied. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies directed against cleaved cytokeratin 18 and active caspase 3. Slides were scored on a 0–3 scale for the presence of apoptotic cells. Results: Normal gastric mucosa contained low numbers of apoptotic cells at the surface epithelium (mean score, 0.20). This number was significantly increased in cases with chronic gastritis (mean score, 1.06) and in those with intestinal metaplasia (mean score, 2.56). Within the intestinal metaplasia cases, 44 different foci of intestinal metaplasia were identified. In 39 of these 44 areas, concentrations of apoptotic cells were seen immediately adjacent to the foci of intestinal metaplasia, but not in the metaplastic epithelium itself. Conclusions: Apoptosis is uncommon in normal gastric mucosa. Chronic inflammation and intestinal metaplasia are associated with increased apoptosis, but occur mainly at the mucosal surface and not in the deeper layers. These findings do not support the concept that apoptosis underlies the loss of gastric glands and leads to atrophy, but the observed concentration of apoptotic epithelial cells adjacent to foci of intestinal metaplasia could be related to heterogeneity of epithelial damage, causing apoptosis, to which intestinal metaplasia is a response. PMID:12719456

  8. Pig production in the Solomon Islands. I. Village pig production.

    PubMed

    de Fredrick, D F

    1977-05-01

    In 181 villages in the Solomon Islands the pig: human ratio was 1:5-8 and the annual per capita pork consumption was 4-2 kg. Some communities did not keep pigs or eat pig meat. Sows weaned an average of 5-5 piglets per year and mean liveweight at 12 months of age was 28-4 kg. Most pigs were kept on the ground but some were housed in pens over the sea and very few lived in their owner's houses. Pigs were important in the social life of the people but proportionally fewer pigs were raised than in neighbouring Pacific countries. PMID:906090

  9. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer This page lists ... stomach (gastric) cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Cyramza (Ramucirumab) Docetaxel ...

  10. [Salivary gland tumors in children].

    PubMed

    Thariat, Juliette; Vedrine, Pierre-Olivier; Orbach, Daniel; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Badoual, Cécile; Butori, Catherine; Teissier, Natacha; Toussaint, Bruno; Castillo, Laurent

    2011-07-01

    Salivary gland tumors in children are rare: they correspond to 8-10% of head and neck pediatric tumors. Clinicians of all disciplines should be aware of this diagnosis in front of non-inflammatory mass of the parotid or in the territory of other salivary glands. In children, 50% of salivary gland tumors are malignant which contrasts with a 10-25% risk in adults. Epithelial tumors are the most common, mucoepidermoïd carcinomas of the parotid in particular. Surgery is the treatment of choice in epithelial tumors. Adjuvant radiotherapy may be indicated in case of unfavorable prognostic factors but must be balanced with the risk of radiation-induced growth defects and secondary cancer. The role of chemotherapy is limited in these tumors, but should be discussed in case of an inoperable or metastatic lesion. PMID:21690035

  11. Gastric metastasis from salivary duct carcinoma mimicking primary gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Kanefumi; Takeno, Shinsuke; Nimura, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Yoshikazu; Sueta, Takayuki; Maki, Kenji; Kayashima, Yoshiyuki; Shiwaku, Hironari; Kato, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We present a very rare case of gastric metastasis mimicking primary gastric cancer in a patient who had undergone surgery for salivary duct carcinoma. Presentation of case A 67-year-old man had been diagnosed as having right parotid cancer and had undergone a right parotidectomy and lymph node dissection. The histological diagnosis was salivary duct carcinoma. One year after the surgery, a positron emission tomography–computed tomography scan using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) revealed an abnormal uptake of FDG in the left cervical, mediastinal, paraaortic, and cardiac lymph nodes; stomach; and pancreas. On gastroduodenoscopy, there was a huge, easily bleeding ulcer mimicking primary gastric cancer at the upper body of the stomach. Biopsy revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Therefore, we were unable to differentiate between the primary gastric cancer and the metastatic tumor using gastroduodenoscopy and biopsy. Because of the uncontrollable bleeding from the gastric cancer, we performed an emergency palliative total gastrectomy. On histological examination, the gastric lesion was found to be metastatic carcinoma originating from the salivary duct carcinoma. Discussion In the presented case, we could not diagnose the gastric metastasis originating from the salivary duct carcinoma even by endoscopic biopsy. This is because the histological appearance of salivary duct carcinoma is similar to that of high-grade adenocarcinoma, thus, resembling primary gastric cancer. Conclusion When we perform endoscopic examination of patients with malignant neoplasias, a possibility of metastatic gastric cancer should be taken into consideration. PMID:27085106

  12. The use of murine-derived fundic organoids in studies of gastric physiology

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Michael A; Aihara, Eitaro; Feng, Rui; Engevik, Amy; Shroyer, Noah F; Ottemann, Karen M; Worrell, Roger T; Montrose, Marshall H; Shivdasani, Ramesh A; Zavros, Yana

    2015-01-01

    Studies of gastric function and disease have been limited by the lack of extended primary cultures of the epithelium. An in vitro approach to study gastric development is primary mouse-derived antral epithelium cultured as three-dimensional spheroids known as organoids. There have been no reports on the use of organoids for gastric function. We have devised two unique gastric fundic-derived organoid cultures: model 1 for the expansion of gastric fundic stem cells, and model 2 for the maintenance of mature cell lineages. Both models were generated from single glands dissociated from whole fundic tissue and grown in basement membrane matrix (Matrigel) and organoid growth medium. Model 1 enriches for a stem cell-like niche via simple passage of the organoids. Maintained in Matrigel and growth medium, proliferating organoids expressed high levels of stem cell markers CD44 and Lgr5. Model 2 is a system of gastric organoids co-cultured with immortalized stomach mesenchymal cells (ISMCs). Organoids maintained in co-culture with ISMCs express robust numbers of surface pit, mucous neck, chief, endocrine and parietal cells. Histamine induced a significant decrease in intraluminal pH that was reversed by omeprazole in fundic organoids and indicated functional activity and regulation of parietal cells. Localized photodamage resulted in rapid cell exfoliation coincident with migration of neighbouring cells to the damaged area, sustaining epithelial continuity. Thus, we report the use of these models for studies of epithelial cell biology and cell damage and repair. PMID:25605613

  13. Schlafen 4-expressing myeloid-derived suppressor cells are induced during murine gastric metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; Hayes, Michael M; Photenhauer, Amanda; Eaton, Kathryn A; Li, Qian; Ocadiz-Ruiz, Ramon; Merchant, Juanita L

    2016-08-01

    Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection triggers neoplastic transformation of the gastric mucosa in a small subset of patients, but the risk factors that induce progression to gastric metaplasia have not been identified. Prior to cancer development, the oxyntic gastric glands atrophy and are replaced by metaplastic cells in response to chronic gastritis. Previously, we identified schlafen 4 (Slfn4) as a GLI1 target gene and myeloid differentiation factor that correlates with spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) in mice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that migration of SLFN4-expressing cells from the bone marrow to peripheral organs predicts preneoplastic changes in the gastric microenvironment. Lineage tracing in Helicobacter-infected Slfn4 reporter mice revealed that SLFN4+ cells migrated to the stomach, where they exhibited myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) markers and acquired the ability to inhibit T cell proliferation. SLFN4+ MDSCs were not observed in infected GLI1-deficient mice. Overexpression of sonic hedgehog ligand (SHH) in infected WT mice accelerated the appearance of SLFN4+ MDSCs in the gastric corpus. Similarly, in the stomachs of H. pylori-infected patients, the human SLFN4 ortholog SLFN12L colocalized to cells that expressed MDSC surface markers CD15+CD33+HLA-DRlo. Together, these results indicate that SLFN4 marks a GLI1-dependent population of MDSCs that predict a shift in the gastric mucosa to a metaplastic phenotype. PMID:27427984

  14. Gastric Aspiration Models

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Bruce A.; Alluri, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    The procedures described below are for producing gastric aspiration pneumonitis in mice with alterations for rats and rabbits described parenthetically. We use 4 different injury vehicles delivered intratracheally to investigate the inflammatory responses to gastric aspiration: Normal saline (NS) as the injury vehicle controlNS + HCl, pH = 1.25 (acid)NS + gastric particles, pH ≈ 5.3 (part.)NS + gastric particles + HCl, pH = 1.25 (acid + part.) The volume, pH, and gastric particle concentration all affect the resulting lung injury. In mice, we generally use an injury volume of 3.6 ml/kg (rat: 1.2 ml/kg, rabbit: 2.4 ml/kg), an injury pH (for the acid-containing vehicles) of 1.25, and a gastric particulate concentration (in the particulate-containing vehicles) of 10 mg/ml (rat: 40 mg/ml). In our hands this results in a maximal, non-lethal lung injury with ≤ 10% mortality for the most injurious vehicle (i.e., acid + part.) The maximum tolerable particulate concentration needs to be determined empirically for any new strains to be used, especially in genetically-altered mice, because an altered inflammatory response may have detrimental affects on mortality. We have extensive experience utilizing these procedures in the outbred strain, CD-1, as well as many genetically-altered inbred stains on the C57BL/6 background. Choice of strain should be carefully considered, especially in terms of strain-specific immune bias, to assure proper data interpretation. The size of the mouse should be ≥ 20 g at the time of injury. Smaller mice can be attempted, if necessary, but the surgical manipulation becomes increasingly more difficult and the surgery survival rate decreases substantially. There are no size or strain constraints for rat and rabbit models, but we generally use Long-Evans rats at 250–300 g and New Zealand White rats at ≈ 2 kg at the time of initial injury.

  15. Clinical epidemiology of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Tiing Leong; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and the fourth most common cancer globally. There are, however, distinct differences in incidence rates in different geographic regions. While the incidence rate of gastric cancer has been falling, that of gastric cardia cancers is reportedly on the rise in some regions. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor of non-cardia gastric cancer, and data has emerged concerning the role of H. pylori eradication for primary prevention of gastric cancer. Dietary, lifestyle and metabolic factors have also been implicated. Although addressing these other factors may contribute to health, the actual impact in terms of cancer prevention is unclear. Once irreversible histological changes have occurred, endoscopic surveillance would be necessary. A molecular classification system offers hope for molecularly tailored, personalised therapies for gastric cancer, which may improve the prognosis for patients. PMID:25630323

  16. Observation of Helicobacter-like organisms in gastric mucosa of grey foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and bobcats (Lynx rufus).

    PubMed

    Hamir, Amir N; Stasko, Judi; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2004-04-01

    Archival specimens of gastric mucosa of 10 raccoons (Procyon lotor), 9 porcupines (Erethizon dorsatum), 6 grey foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), 6 bobcats (Lynx rufus), 4 skunks (Mephitis mephitis), and 3 black bears (Ursus americanus) were microscopically examined for evidence of Helicobacter-like organisms. Such organisms were seen in the specimens from the grey foxes and bobcats only. Histochemical stains (modified Steiner and carbol fuchsin methods) revealed long spiral organisms within lumina of gastric glands; however, neither gross nor microscopic lesions were observed. By electron microscopy (EM), the organisms were found to be free in the glandular lumina and were seen occasionally in the cytoplasm of gastric epithelial cells. Morphologically, 2 different phenotypes of spiral organisms were identified by EM. The organisms associated with bobcats appeared to be more tightly coiled than those seen in grey foxes. The presence of Helicobacter-like organisms in the gastric mucosa of grey foxes has not previously been described. PMID:15188962

  17. Altered gastric chief cell lineage differentiation in histamine-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Koji; Weis, Victoria; Wang, Timothy C; Falus, András; Goldenring, James R

    2009-06-01

    The orderly differentiation of cell lineages within gastric glands is regulated by a complicated interplay of local mucosal growth factors and hormones. Histamine secreted from enterochromaffin-like cells plays an important role in not only stimulated gastric acid secretion but also coordination of intramucosal growth and lineage differentiation. We have examined histidine-decarboxylase (HDC)-deficient mice, which lack endogenous histamine synthesis, to evaluate the influence of histamine on differentiation of fundic mucosal lineages and the development of metaplasia following induction of acute oxyntic atrophy. Stomachs from HDC-deficient mice and wild-type mice were evaluated at 8 wk and 12 mo of age. DMP-777 was administrated orally to 6-wk-old mice for 1 to 14 days. Sections of gastric mucosa were stained with antibodies against Mist1, intrinsic factor, H/K-ATPase, trefoil factor 2 (TFF2), chromogranin A, and Ext1 and for the cell cycle marker phospho-histone H3. HDC-deficient mice at 8 wk of age demonstrated a prominent increase in chief cells expressing Mist1 and intrinsic factor. Importantly Mist1-positive mature chief cells were present in the midgland region as well as at the bases of fundic glands, indicating a premature differentiation of chief cells. Mice dually deficient for both HDC and gastrin showed a normal distribution of chief cells in fundic glands. Treatment of HDC-deficient mice with DMP-777 led to loss of parietal cells and an accelerated and exaggerated emergence of mucous cell metaplasia with the presence of dual intrinsic factor and TFF2-expressing cells throughout the gland length, indicative of the emergence of spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) from chief cells. These findings indicate that histamine, in concert with gastrin, regulates the appropriate differentiation of chief cells from mucous neck cells as they migrate toward the bases of fundic glands. Nevertheless, histamine is not required for emergence of SPEM

  18. Diffuse Infiltrative Gastrointestinal Lipomatosis in a Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus)

    PubMed Central

    Beninson, Jennifer A; Keller, Jill M; Hoenerhoff, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    An intact adult male guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) went into cardiopulmonary arrest during a surgical procedure, and efforts at resuscitation were unsuccessful. Gross examination revealed a gastric rupture along the greater curvature of the stomach, which was associated with free blood and ingesta in the abdominal cavity, and a 2-cm nodular, partially circumferential, soft-to-firm mass within the pyloric region. Histologically, the pyloric mass was composed of sheets of infiltrative adipocytes expanding the muscular wall. Similar infiltrative sheets of adipocytes were present adjacent to the rupture site and within the small intestine, cecum, and colon. These findings are consistent with diffuse infiltrative lipomatosis, an exceedingly rare condition in human and veterinary species. This report is the first description of this rare disease in guinea pigs, and the concurrent involvement of both the stomach and intestines has not been reported in any veterinary species. PMID:26473346

  19. Gastric cancer review

    PubMed Central

    Carcas, Lauren Peirce

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is an aggressive disease that continues to have a daunting impact on global health. Despite an overall decline in incidence over the last several decades, gastric cancer remains the fourth most common type of cancer and is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. This review aims to discuss the global distribution of the disease and the trend of decreasing incidence of disease, delineate the different pathologic subtypes and their immunohistochemical (IHC) staining patterns and molecular signatures and mutations, explore the role of the pathogen H. pylori in tumorgenesis, discuss the increasing incidence of the disease in the young, western populations and define the role of biologic agents in the treatment of the disease. PMID:25589897

  20. General Information about Salivary Gland Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Salivary Gland Cancer Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  1. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-12-15

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to the occurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cagA and vacA are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26690981

  2. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to the occurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cagA and vacA are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26690981

  3. The protease-activated receptor-2 agonist induces gastric mucus secretion and mucosal cytoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Kawabata, Atsufumi; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Ryotaro; Nishida, Minoru; Araki, Hiromasa; Arizono, Naoki; Oda, Yasuo; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2001-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), a receptor activated by trypsin/tryptase, modulates smooth muscle tone and exocrine secretion in the salivary glands and pancreas. Given that PAR-2 is expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract, we investigated effects of PAR-2 agonists on mucus secretion and gastric mucosal injury in the rat. PAR-2–activating peptides triggered secretion of mucus in the stomach, but not in the duodenum. This mucus secretion was abolished by pretreatment with capsaicin, which stimulates and ablates specific sensory neurons, but it was resistant to cyclo-oxygenase inhibition. In contrast, capsaicin treatment failed to block PAR-2–mediated secretion from the salivary glands. Intravenous calcitonin gene–related peptide (CGRP) and neurokinin A markedly elicited gastric mucus secretion, as did substance P to a lesser extent. Specific antagonists of the CGRP1 and NK2, but not the NK1, receptors inhibited PAR-2–mediated mucus secretion. Pretreatment with the PAR-2 agonist strongly prevented gastric injury caused by HCl-ethanol or indomethacin. Thus, PAR-2 activation triggers the cytoprotective secretion of gastric mucus by stimulating the release of CGRP and tachykinins from sensory neurons. In contrast, the PAR-2–mediated salivary exocrine secretion appears to be independent of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons. PMID:11390426

  4. Submandibular gland mucocele: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Kayhan; Yaman, Huseyin; Arbag, Hamdi; Koroglu, Duygu; Toy, Hatice

    2005-12-01

    Submandibular gland mucocele should be remembered in the differential diagnosis of swelling at the submandibular triangle. In the cystic lesion of the submandibular area, the biochemical analysis of aspirated material for amylase should be performed. The cases with submandibular gland mucocele should be treated by removing the lesion with both the submandibular and the sublingual glands. PMID:16301155

  5. Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Factors Request Permissions Print to PDF Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 08/ ... anything that increases a person’s chance of developing cancer. Although risk factors often influence the development of cancer, most do ...

  6. Galectin-3 Plays an Important Role in Innate Immunity to Gastric Infection by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Park, Ah-Mee; Hagiwara, Satoru; Hsu, Daniel K; Liu, Fu-Tong; Yoshie, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    We studied the role of galectin-3 (Gal3) in gastric infection by Helicobacter pylori We first demonstrated that Gal3 was selectively expressed by gastric surface epithelial cells and abundantly secreted into the surface mucus layer. We next inoculated H. pylori Sydney strain 1 into wild-type (WT) and Gal3-deficient mice using a stomach tube. At 2 weeks postinoculation, the bacterial cells were mostly trapped within the surface mucus layer in WT mice. In sharp contrast, they infiltrated deep into the gastric glands in Gal3-deficient mice. Bacterial loads in the gastric tissues were also much higher in Gal3-deficient mice than in WT mice. At 6 months postinoculation,H. pylori had successfully colonized within the gastric glands of both WT and Gal3-deficient mice, although the bacterial loads were still higher in the latter. Furthermore, large lymphoid clusters mostly consisting of B cells were frequently observed in the gastric submucosa of Gal3-deficient mice.In vitro, peritoneal macrophages from Gal3-deficient mice were inefficient in killing engulfed H. pylori Furthermore, recombinant Gal3 not only induced rapid aggregation of H. pylori but also exerted a potent bactericidal effect on H. pylori as revealed by propidium iodide uptake and a morphological shift from spiral to coccoid form. However, a minor fraction of bacterial cells, probably transient phase variants of Gal3-binding sugar moieties, escaped killing by Gal3. Collectively, our data demonstrate that Gal3 plays an important role in innate immunity to infection and colonization of H. pylori. PMID:26857579

  7. Molecular mechanisms of epithelial regeneration and neovascularization during healing of gastric and esophageal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, A S; Ahluwalia, A

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we reviewed and updated current views on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of gastric and esophageal ulcer healing. Gastric ulcer healing encompasses inflammation, cell proliferation, epithelial regeneration, gland reconstruction, formation of granulation tissue, neovascularization (new blood vessel formation), interactions between various cells and the matrix and tissue remodeling, resulting in scar formation. All these events are controlled by the cytokines and growth factors, GI hormones including gastrin, CCK, and orexigenic peptides such as ghrelin, orexin-A and obestatin as well as Cox2 generated prostaglandins. These growth factors and hormones trigger cell proliferation, migration, and survival utilizing Ras, MAPK, PI-3K/AKT, PLC-γ and Rho/Rac/actin signaling pathways. Hypoxia triggers activation of some of these genes (e.g., VEGF) via hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). Growth factors: EGF, HGF, IGF-1, their receptors and Cox2 are important for epithelial cell proliferation, migration, re-epithelialization and regeneration of gastric glands during gastric ulcer healing. Serum response factor (SRF) is also essential for re-epithelialization and muscle restoration. VEGF, bFGF, angiopoietins, nitric oxide, endothelin, prostaglandins and metalloproteinases are important for angiogenesis, vascular remodeling and mucosal regeneration within gastric ulcer scar. SRF is critical limiting factor for VEGF-induced angiogenesis. Esophageal ulcer healing follows similar pattern to gastric ulcer, but KGF and its receptor are the key players in regeneration of the epithelium. In addition to local mucosal cells from viable mucosa bordering necrosis, circulating bone marrow derived stem and progenitor cells are potentially important for ulcer healing, contributing to the regeneration of epithelial and connective tissue components and neovascularization. PMID:22300072

  8. Pathology and Genetics of Syndromic Gastric Polyps.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Wood, Laura D; Offerhaus, G Johan; Arnold, Christina A; Lam-Himlin, Dora; Giardiello, Francis M; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Gastric polyps are found in 1% to 4% of patients undergoing gastroscopy. The vast majority are sporadic, but some gastric polyps indicate an underlying syndrome. Gastric polyps can manifest in each of the gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes, including the recently described gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach syndrome. In addition, gastric polyps occur in Lynch syndrome and in a few rare conditions that are not primarily gastrointestinal. While some of these syndromes are clearly associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer, others are not. Interestingly, even in disorders with a well-established risk of gastric cancer, the neoplastic potential and the precursor status of these gastric polyps are not always clear. Although rare, recognition of syndromic gastric polyps is important for individual patient management. These conditions also serve as important models to study gastric homeostasis and gastric tumorigenesis. PMID:26721304

  9. Modeling human development and disease in pluripotent stem cell-derived gastric organoids

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Kyle W.; Catá, Emily M.; Crawford, Calyn M.; Sinagoga, Katie L.; Schumacher, Michael; Rockich, Briana E.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Mayhew, Christopher N.; Spence, Jason R.; Zavros, Yana; Wells, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Gastric diseases, including peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, affect 10% of the world’s population and are largely due to chronic H. pylori infection1–3. Species differences in embryonic development and architecture of the adult stomach make animal models suboptimal for studying human stomach organogenesis and pathogenesis4, and there is no experimental model of normal human gastric mucosa. Here we report the de novo generation of three-dimensional human gastric tissue in vitro through the directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). We identified that temporal manipulation of the FGF, WNT, BMP, retinoic acid and EGF signaling pathways and three-dimensional growth are sufficient to generate human gastric organoids (hGOs). Developing hGOs progressed through molecular and morphogenetic stages that were nearly identical to the developing antrum of the mouse stomach. Organoids formed primitive gastric gland- and pit-like domains, proliferative zones containing LGR5-expressing cells, surface and antral mucous cells, and a diversity of gastric endocrine cells. We used hGO cultures to identify novel signaling mechanisms that regulate early endoderm patterning and gastric endocrine cell differentiation upstream of the transcription factor NEUROG3. Using hGOs to model pathogenesis of human disease, we found that H. pylori infection resulted in rapid association of the virulence factor CagA with the c-Met receptor, activation of signaling and induction of epithelial proliferation. Together, these studies describe a novel and robust in vitro system for elucidating the mechanisms underlying human stomach development and disease. PMID:25363776

  10. Generation of bi-transgenic pigs overexpressing human lactoferrin and lysozyme in milk.

    PubMed

    Cui, Dan; Li, Jia; Zhang, Linlin; Liu, Shen; Wen, Xiao; Li, Qiuyan; Zhao, Yaofeng; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Ran; Li, Ning

    2015-04-01

    Intensive swine production industry uses antibiotics to treat diseases and improve pig growth. This can not only cause antibiotic resistance, but can also pollute the environment or eventually affect human public health. To date, human lactoferrin (hLF) and human lysozyme (hLZ) have been known as non-adaptive but interactive antimicrobial members and could act in concert against bacteria, which contribute to host defense. Therefore, their expression in pigs might be an alternative strategy for replacing antibiotics in the pig production industry. In our study, we produced hLF and hLZ bi-transgenic pigs and assessed the milk's antibacterial ability. Integration of both transgenes was confirmed by PCR and southern blot. Both the hLF and hLZ were expressed in the mammary gland of bi-transgenic pigs, as detected by western blotting. The expression amounts were 6.5 g/L for hLF and 1.1 mg/L for hLZ using ELISA. Interestingly, pig milk containing hLF and hLZ had synergistic antimicrobial activity. Our results suggest an alternative approach for avoiding the use of antibiotics in the pig industry, which would be of great benefit to the commercial swine production. PMID:25236863

  11. Visualization of sphingolipids and phospholipids in the fundic gland mucosa of human stomach using imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kurabe, Nobuya; Igarashi, Hisaki; Ohnishi, Ippei; Tajima, Shogo; Inoue, Yusuke; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the lipid distribution in gastric mucosae. METHODS: Imaging mass spectrometry (MS) is a useful tool to survey the distribution of biomolecules in surgical specimens. Here we used the imaging MS apparatus named iMScope to identify the dominant molecules present in the human gastric mucosa near the fundic glands. Five gastric specimens were subjected to iMScope analysis. These specimens were also analyzed by immunohistochemistry using MUC5AC, H(+)-K(+)-ATPaseβ Claudin18 antibodies. RESULTS: Three major molecules with m/z 725.5, 780.5, and 782.5 detected in the gastric mucosa were identified as sphingomyelin (SM) (d18:1/16:0), phosphatidylcholine (PC) (16:0/18:2), and PC (16:0/18:1), respectively, through MS/MS analyses. Using immunohistological staining, SM (d18:1/16:0) signals were mainly co-localized with the foveolar epithelium marker MUC5AC. In contrast, PC (16:0/18:2) signals were observed in the region testing positive for the fundic gland marker H(+)-K(+)-ATPaseβ. PC (16:0/18:1) signals were uniformly distributed throughout the mucosa. CONCLUSION: Our basic data will contribute to the studies of lipid species in physical and pathological conditions of the human stomach. PMID:27190696

  12. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in pigs infected experimentally with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Andrada, M; Quesada-Canales, O; Suárez-Bonnet, A; Paz-Sánchez, Y; Espinosa de Los Monteros, A; Rodríguez, F

    2014-01-01

    Porcine enzootic pneumonia, primarily caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mh), is a contagious disease characterized by catarrhal bronchointerstitial pneumonia. Previous studies have evaluated immunohistochemically the distribution of Mh, different cellular populations and cytokines during Mh-induced pneumonia. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 is overexpressed during inflammatory responses by different cell types in the lung. The aim of this study was to elucidate the possible role of COX-2 in the pathogenesis of porcine enzootic pneumonia. COX-2 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded lung tissues from 10 pigs infected experimentally with Mh. Ten pigs were inoculated intranasally with Mh and killed in pairs weekly from 1 to 5 weeks post inoculation. Three Mh-free pigs were taken as controls. Bronchial and bronchiolar epithelial cells, bronchial submucosal glands and a small number of macrophages in the bronchoalveolar exudate expressed COX-2. COX-2 protein was always associated with areas of pneumonia and expression was minimal in lungs from control pigs. These results suggest that COX-2 plays a role in the pathogenesis of Mh-infection. PMID:24925603

  13. The reptilian thyroid and parathyroid glands.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Sam; Lock, Brad

    2008-01-01

    The field of reptilian clinical endocrinology is still in its infancy. The thyroid and parathyroid glands are intimately involved with many basic metabolic functions. These glands have been the subject of extensive research studies in reptilian species; however, the effects of abnormal gland function have been poorly documented in clinical cases. These glands play a major role in maintaining physiologic homeostasis in all vertebrates. With the advent of more sensitive assays, it should be possible to measure the small amounts of hormones found in reptilian species. The purpose of this article is to review the literature regarding clinical endocrinology of the thyroid and parathyroid glands in reptiles. PMID:18165144

  14. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric ulcer].

    PubMed

    Maaroos, H I

    1994-01-01

    In connection with longitudinal ulcer studies and the demonstration of Helicobacter pylori as the main cause of chronic gastritis, new aspects of gastric ulcer recurrences and healing become evident. This extends the possibilities to prognosticate the course of gastric ulcer and to use more effective treatment. PMID:7937016

  15. Regional differences in neostigmine-induced contraction and relaxation of stomach from diabetic guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Cellini, Joseph; DiNovo, Karyn; Harlow, Jessica; LePard, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Delayed gastric emptying and autonomic neuropathy have been documented in patients with diabetes mellitus. Some medications used to treat delayed gastric emptying enhance release of acetylcholine from autonomic neurons to strengthen gastric contractions. Autonomic coordination among gastric regions may be altered in diabetes resulting in poor outcomes in response to prokinetic drugs. Fundus, antrum, and pylorus from STZ or control guinea pigs were treated with neostigmine to mimic release of acetylcholine from autonomic neurons by prokinetic agents. In diabetic animals, neostigmine-induced contractions were weaker in fundus and pylorus but similar in antrum. The muscarinic receptor antagonist 4-DAMP or the nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamethonium reduced neostigmine-induced contractions. Activation of presynaptic muscarinic receptors on nitrergic neurons was impaired in fundus and antrum from diabetic animals. Nerve-stimulated contractions and relaxations, number of nNOS myenteric neurons, and tissue choline content were reduced in fundus from diabetic animals. Despite reduced number of myenteric neurons, tissue choline content was increased in antrum from diabetic animals. Since cholinergic motility of each gastric region was affected differently by diabetes, prokinetic drugs that nondiscriminately enhance acetylcholine release from autonomic neurons may not effectively normalize delayed gastric emptying in patients with diabetes and more selective medications may be warranted. PMID:21075692

  16. Variations of Weight Loss Following Gastric Bypass and Gastric Band

    PubMed Central

    Puzziferri, Nancy; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Livingston, Edward H.; Carmody, Thomas J.; Provost, David A.; Rush, A. John

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare and describe the weight loss outcomes from gastric bypass and gastric band so as to define the variation of excess weight loss (EWL) among individual patients, the time to onset of effect, and the durability of weight loss in severely obese adults. Summary Background Data Gastric bypass and gastric band are the most common operations for obesity performed in the United States, but few reports have compared these 2 procedures. Methods Patients (N = 1733, aged 18–65 years) met National Institutes of Health criteria for obesity surgery and underwent either gastric bypass or gastric band between March 1997 and November 2006. The selection of bypass versus band was based on patient/surgeon discussion. The evaluable sample consisted of 1518 patients. The percentage of EWL was assessed over 2 years. Successful weight loss was defined a priori as ≥40% EWL in each of four 6-month postoperative measurement periods. The analyses included a mixed model and generalized estimating equation (GEE) model with repeated measures. Odds ratios and descriptive analyses were also provided. Results Gastric bypass was associated with less individual variation in weight loss than gastric band. Both procedures were associated with a significant EWL benefit (Treatment Group effect P < 0.0001), but they differed in terms of time to effect (Treatment Group × Period interaction effect P < 0.0001). The mean EWL for gastric bypass was greater at each measurement period (6, 12, 18, 24 months) compared with gastric band (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, at each of the postoperative measurement periods within each treatment group (bypass and band), the mean EWL was greater for those who had preoperative body mass index (BMI) ≤50 kg/m2 than for those who had preoperative BMI >50 kg/m2 (P < 0.0001). Gastric bypass was consistently associated with a greater likelihood of at least a 40% EWL in each of the 6-month postoperative measurement periods (GEE, P < 0.0001). The odds ratio

  17. Quantification of sweat gland innervation

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher H.; Illigens, Ben M. W.; Wang, Ningshan; Freeman, Roy

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a novel method to quantify the density of nerve fibers innervating sweat glands in healthy control and diabetic subjects, to compare the results to an unbiased stereologic technique, and to identify the relationship to standardized physical examination and patient-reported symptom scores. Methods: Thirty diabetic and 64 healthy subjects had skin biopsies performed at the distal leg and distal and proximal thigh. Nerve fibers innervating sweat glands, stained with PGP 9.5, were imaged by light microscopy. Sweat gland nerve fiber density (SGNFD) was quantified by manual morphometry. As a gold standard, three additional subjects had biopsies analyzed by confocal microscopy using unbiased stereologic quantification. Severity of neuropathy was measured by standardized instruments including the Neuropathy Impairment Score in the Lower Limb (NIS-LL) while symptoms were measured by the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument. Results: Manual morphometry increased with unbiased stereology (r = 0.93, p < 0.01). Diabetic subjects had reduced SGNFD compared to controls at the distal leg (p < 0.001), distal thigh (p < 0.01), and proximal thigh (p < 0.05). The SGNFD at the distal leg of diabetic subjects decreased as the NIS-LL worsened (r = −0.89, p < 0.001) and was concordant with symptoms of reduced sweat production (p < 0.01). Conclusions: We describe a novel method to quantify the density of nerve fibers innervating sweat glands. The technique differentiates groups of patients with mild diabetic neuropathy from healthy control subjects and correlates with both physical examination scores and symptoms relevant to sudomotor dysfunction. This method provides a reliable structural measure of sweat gland innervation that complements the investigation of small fiber neuropathies. GLOSSARY AOI = area of interest; CI = confidence interval; ICC = intraclass correlation coefficient; IENFD = intraepidermal nerve fiber density; IgG = immunoglobulin G; NIS

  18. Neuronal release of endogenous dopamine from corpus of guinea pig stomach.

    PubMed

    Shichijo, K; Sakurai-Yamashita, Y; Sekine, I; Taniyama, K

    1997-11-01

    Neuronal release of endogenous dopamine was identified in mucosa-free preparations (muscle layer including intramural plexus) from guinea pig stomach corpus by measuring tissue dopamine content and dopamine release and by immunohistochemical methods using a dopamine antiserum. Dopamine content in mucosa-free preparations of guinea pig gastric corpus was one-tenth of norepinephrine content. Electrical transmural stimulation of mucosa-free preparations of gastric corpus increased the release of endogenous dopamine in a frequency-dependent (3-20 Hz) manner. The stimulated release of dopamine was prevented by either removal of external Ca2+ or treatment with tetrodotoxin. Dopamine-immunopositive nerve fibers surrounding choline acetyltransferase-immunopositive ganglion cells were seen in the myenteric plexus of whole mount preparations of gastric corpus even after bilateral transection of the splanchnic nerve proximal to the junction with the vagal nerve (section of nerves between the celiac ganglion and stomach). Domperidone and sulpiride potentiated the stimulated release of acetylcholine and reversed the dopamine-induced inhibition of acetylcholine release from mucosa-free preparations. These results indicate that dopamine is physiologically released from neurons and from possible dopaminergic nerve terminals and regulates cholinergic neuronal activity in the corpus of guinea pig stomach. PMID:9374701

  19. Primary Gastric Chorioadenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baraka, Bahaaeldin A; Al Kharusi, Suad S; Al Bahrani, Bassim J; Bhathagar, Gunmala

    2016-09-01

    Primary gastric chorioadenocarcinoma (PGC) is a rare and rapidly invasive tumor. Choriocarcinoma is usually known to be of endometrial origin and gestational; however, it has been reported in other extragenital organs, such as the gall bladder, prostate, lung, liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Human chorionic gonadotropin related neoplasms of the stomach are seldom discussed in the literature. We report a case of PGC in a 56-year-old man treated with a standard non-gestational choriocarcinoma chemotherapy regimen, EMA/CO (etoposide, methotrexate, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, vincristine), with a complete response and good tolerability. PMID:27602194

  20. Primary Gastric Chorioadenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baraka, Bahaaeldin A.; Al Kharusi, Suad S.; Al Bahrani, Bassim J.; Bhathagar, Gunmala

    2016-01-01

    Primary gastric chorioadenocarcinoma (PGC) is a rare and rapidly invasive tumor. Choriocarcinoma is usually known to be of endometrial origin and gestational; however, it has been reported in other extragenital organs, such as the gall bladder, prostate, lung, liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Human chorionic gonadotropin related neoplasms of the stomach are seldom discussed in the literature. We report a case of PGC in a 56-year-old man treated with a standard non-gestational choriocarcinoma chemotherapy regimen, EMA/CO (etoposide, methotrexate, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, vincristine), with a complete response and good tolerability. PMID:27602194

  1. Iodine deficiency induces a VEGF-dependent microvascular response in salivary glands and in the stomach.

    PubMed

    Vanderstraeten, Jessica; Derradji, Hanane; Craps, Julie; Sonveaux, Pierre; Colin, Ides M; Many, Marie-Christine; Gérard, Anne-Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Despite efforts to optimize iodine supply in iodine deficient countries, iodine deficiency (ID) remains a global problem worldwide. Activation of the local microvasculature by ID in the thyroid gland aims at improving the local supply of iodide. For this purpose, the thyrocytes secrete vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that acts on adjacent capillaries, via a reactive oxygen species (ROS)/Hypoxia Inducible factor (HIF)-dependent pathway. Beside the thyroid, other organs including salivary glands and the stomach do express the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and are able to take iodide up, potentially rendering them sensitive to ID. To verify this hypothesis, ID-induced effects on the local microvasculature were studied in salivary glands and in the stomach. ID was induced by feeding young mice with an iodide-deficient diet and NIS inhibitor perchlorate in the drinking water. In salivary glands, ID induced a transient increase in HIF-1α protein expression accompanied by a transient, VEGF-dependent increase in blood flow. In the gastric mucosa, ID transiently increased VEGF expression in the mucin-secreting epithelium and in ghrelin-secreting endocrine cells. These observations suggest that microvascular changes in response to ID occur in NIS-expressing tissues other than the thyroid. NIS expressing cells could be viewed as iodide sensors that respond to ID by inducing vascular changes, probably to optimize iodide bioavailability at regional or systemic levels. PMID:26838679

  2. Purification and crystallization of yeast glycosylphosphatidylinositol transamidase subunit PIG-S (PIG-S71–467)

    PubMed Central

    Kamariah, Neelagandan; Eisenhaber, Frank; Adhikari, Sharmila; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Grüber, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    The transfer of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors onto eukaryotic proteins is catalyzed by the transamidase complex, which is composed of at least five subunits (PIG-K, PIG-S, PIG-T, PIG-U and GPAA1). Here, the recombinant protein PIG-S71–467 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including residues 71–467 of the entire 534-residue protein, was cloned, expressed and purified to homogeneity. The monodisperse protein was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method. A diffraction data set was collected to 3.2 Å resolution with 91.6% completeness. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 106.72, b = 59.33, c = 124.3 Å, β = 114.19°, and contained two molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:21821889

  3. Goiter Frequency Is More Strongly Associated with Gastric Adenocarcinoma than Urine Iodine Level

    PubMed Central

    Tabaeizadeh, Mohammad; Haghpanah, Vahid; Keshtkar, Abbasali; Semnani, Shahryar; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Adabi, Khadijeh; Heshmat, Ramin; Rohani, Davood; Kia, Alireza; Hatami, Ehsan; Jahangirrad, Ataollah; Nabizadeh, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We designed our study to evaluate the hypothesis that gastric cancer is correlated with iodine deficiency or thyroid dysfunction. Materials and Methods We investigated the total body iodine reserve, thyroid function status and autoimmune disorder in 40 recently diagnosed gastric adenocarcinoma cases versus 80 healthy controls. The participants came from a region with high gastric cancer rate but sufficient iodine supply due to salt iodination. The investigation included urine iodine level, thyroid gland clinical and ultrasonographic examination, and thyroid function tests. Results Goiter was detected more frequently in the case group (P=0.001); such a finding, however, was not true for lower than normal urine iodine levels. The free T3 mean level was significantly lower in the case group compared to the control group (P=0.005). Conclusions The higher prevalence of goiter rather than low levels of urinary iodine in gastric adenocarcinoma cases suggests that goiter, perhaps due to protracted but currently adjusted iodine deficiency, is more likely to be associated with gastric adenocarcinoma compared to the existing iodine deficiency itself. PMID:23844325

  4. Linked color imaging technology facilitates early detection of flat gastric cancers.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Hisashi; Miura, Yoshimasa; Hayashi, Yoshikazu; Takezawa, Takahito; Ino, Yuji; Okada, Masahiro; Osawa, Hiroyuki; Lefor, Alan K; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2015-12-01

    Conventional endoscopy can miss flat early gastric cancers (0-IIb) because they may not be visible. We treated a patient with synchronous flat early gastric cancers missed by conventional white-light endoscopy (WLE). A 74-year-old Japanese male was referred for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of a depressed-type early gastric cancer (0-IIc) on the posterior wall of the antrum. Linked color imaging (LCI) detected two flat reddish lesions (0-IIb) measuring 30 mm and 10 mm in diameter in the distal body and prepyloric area, respectively, which had not been detected by conventional WLE. LCI clearly demonstrated the line of demarcation between the malignant lesion and the surrounding mucosa without magnification. Flat early gastric cancers were suspected because both lesions had irregular surface patterns using magnifying blue laser imaging (BLI). An additional depressed lesion (0-IIc) was detected by laser WLE along the greater curvature in the antrum. Magnifying BLI suggested a malignant lesion. Histological examination of biopsy specimens revealed atypical glands in all four lesions. ESD of these lesions was performed. Pathological examination of the resected specimens confirmed well-differentiated adenocarcinoma localized to the mucosa in all four lesions. Flat early gastric cancers became clearly visible using new endoscopic technology. PMID:26560036

  5. Meibomian gland dysfunction: hyperkeratinization or atrophy?

    PubMed

    Jester, James V; Parfitt, Geraint J; Brown, Donald J

    2015-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is the major cause of evaporative dry eye disease (EDED) and dysfunction is widely thought to mechanistically involve ductal hyperkeratinization, plugging and obstruction. This review re-evaluates the role of hyperkeratinization in MGD based on more recent findings from mouse models. In these studies, eyelids from normal young and old mice or mice exposed to desiccating stress were evaluated by immunofluorescent tomography and 3-dimensional reconstruction to evaluate gland volume, expression of hyperkeratinization markers and cell proliferation or stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy to assess lipid quality. Results indicate that aging mice show dropout of meibomian glands with loss of gland volume and a forward migration of the mucocutaneous junction anterior to the gland orifice; similar age-related changes that are detected in human subjects. Atrophic glands also showed evidence of epithelial plugging of the orifice without the presence of hyperkeratinization. Mice exposed to desiccating stress showed hyperproliferation of the meibomian gland and ductal dilation suggesting a marked increase in lipid synthesis. Lipid quality was also affected in EDED mice with an increase in the protein content of lipid within the duct of the gland. Overall, age-related changes in the mouse show similar structural and functional correlates with that observed in clinical MGD without evidence of hyperkeratinization suggesting that gland atrophy may be a major cause of EDED. The response of the meibomian gland to desiccating stress also suggest that environmental conditions may accelerate or potentiate age-related changes. PMID:26817690

  6. EFFECT OF INFLAMMATION ON LACRIMAL GLAND FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Zoukhri, Driss

    2005-01-01

    The lacrimal gland is the main contributor to the aqueous layer of the tear film. It secretes proteins, electrolytes and water, which helps to nourish and protect the ocular surface. Lacrimal gland secretion is primarily under neural control, which is achieved through a neural reflex arc. Stimuli to the ocular surface activate afferent sensory nerves in the cornea and conjunctiva. This in turn activates efferent parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves in the lacrimal gland to stimulate secretion. Sex steroid hormones are also important regulators of lacrimal gland functions. A decrease or lack of lacrimal gland secretion is the leading cause of aqueous tear deficient dry eye syndrome (DES). It has been suggested that DES is an inflammatory disorder that affects the ocular surface and the lacrimal gland. In several pathological instances, the lacrimal gland can become a target of the immune system and show signs of inflammation. This can result from autoimmune diseases (Sjögren's syndrome), organ transplantation (graft versus host disease), or simply as a result of aging. The hallmarks of lacrimal gland inflammation are the presence of focal lymphocytic infiltrates and increased production of proinflammatory cytokines. The mechanisms leading to lacrimal gland dysfunction are still poorly understood. Apoptosis, production of autoantibodies, hormonal imbalance, alterations in signaling molecules, neural dysfunction, and increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines have been proposed as possible mediators of lacrimal gland insufficiency in disease states. PMID:16309672

  7. [Molecular Subtypes of Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Hatogai, Ken; Doi, Toshihiko

    2016-03-01

    Gastric cancer has been classified based on the pathological characteristics including microscopic configuration and growth pattern. Although these classifications have been used in studies investigating prognosis and recurrence pattern, they are not considered for decisions regarding the therapeutic strategy. In the ToGA study, trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, demonstrated clinical efficacy for gastric cancer with HER2 overexpression or HER2 gene amplification. Based on these findings of the ToGA study, the definition of HER2-positive gastric cancer was established. Thereafter, several molecular targeted agents, including agents targeting other receptor tyrosine kinases, have been investigated in gastric cancer. However, to date no biomarker, except HER2, has been established. Based on the recent technological development in the field of gene analysis, a comprehensive molecular evaluation of gastric cancer was performed as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, and a new molecular classification was proposed that divided gastric cancer into the following 4 subtypes: tumors positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite instability tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Each subtype has specific molecular alterations including gene mutation and amplification, DNA methylation, and protein overexpression. Additionally, some subtypes were suggested to be correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics or as targets of some molecular targeted agents that are currently under development. The new molecular classification is expected to be a roadmap for patient stratification and clinical trials on molecular targeted therapies in gastric cancer. PMID:27067842

  8. Other Helicobacters and gastric microbiota.

    PubMed

    De Witte, Chloë; Schulz, Christian; Smet, Annemieke; Malfertheiner, Peter; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2016-09-01

    This article aimed to review the literature from 2015 dealing with gastric and enterohepatic non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter species (NHPH). A summary of the gastric microbiota interactions with H. pylori is also presented. An extensive number of studies were published during the last year and have led to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of infections with NHPH. These infections are increasingly reported in human patients, including infections with H. cinaedi, mainly characterized by severe bacteremia. Whole-genome sequencing appears to be the most reliable technique for identification of NHPH at species level. Presence of NHPH in laboratory animals may influence the outcome of experiments, making screening and eradication desirable. Vaccination based on UreB proteins or bacterial lysate with CCR4 antagonists as well as oral glutathione supplementation may be promising strategies to dampen the pathogenic effects associated with gastric NHPH infections. Several virulent factors such as outer membrane proteins, phospholipase C-gamma 2, Bak protein, and nickel-binding proteins are associated with colonization of the gastric mucosae and development of gastritis. The development of high-throughput sequencing has led to new insights in the gastric microbiota composition and its interaction with H. pylori. Alterations in the gastric microbiota caused by the pH-increasing effect of a H. pylori infection may increase the risk for gastric cancer. PMID:27531542

  9. Inhibition of the gastric H+,K+ -ATPase by plectrinone A, a diterpenoid isolated from Plectranthus barbatus Andrews.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Carla; Bossolani, Myllene P; Torres, Luce M B; Lima-Landman, Maria Teresa R; Lapa, Antonio J; Souccar, Caden

    2007-04-20

    This work assessed the mechanism underlying the antisecretory gastric acid effect of Plectranthus barbatus Andrews (Lamiaceae) and active constituents. Popularly known as "false-boldo", this plant is used in Brazilian folk medicine to treat gastrointestinal and hepatic ailments. The plant aqueous extract (AE) and isolated compounds were assayed in vivo in pylorus-ligated mice, and in vitro on acid secretion measured as [(14)C]-aminopyrine ([(14)C]-AP) accumulation in rabbit gastric glands and gastric H(+),K(+)-ATPase preparations. Injected into the duodenal lumen, the AE of the plant leaves (0.5 and 1.0 g/kg) decreased the volume (62 and 76%) and total acidity (23 and 50%) of gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated mice. Bioguided purification of the AE yielded an active fraction (IC(50)=24 microg/ml) that inhibited acid secretion in rabbit gastric glands with a potency 10 to 18 times greater than that of the originating extract, on both the basal and stimulated acid secretion by histamine (His) (1 microM) or bethanechol (100 microM). At the same concentrations the gastric H(+),K(+)-ATPase activity was also inhibited. The active constituent was chemically identified as the abietanoid dienedione plectrinone A which reduced the H(+),K(+)-ATPase activity with IC(50)=171 microM. The results indicate that inhibition of the gastric proton pump by this diterpenoid may account for the antisecretory acid effect and reputed anti ulcer activity of Plectranthus barbatus. PMID:17166678

  10. Characterization of progressive metaplasia in the gastric corpus mucosa of Mongolian gerbils infected with Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Choi, Eunyoung; Petersen, Christine P; Noto, Jennifer M; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Piazuelo, Maria B; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Goldenring, James R

    2016-08-01

    Spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) and intestinal metaplasia are considered neoplastic precursors of gastric adenocarcinoma in humans. Loss of parietal cells causes the development of SPEM in the gastric corpus and then chronic inflammation drives SPEM toward a more proliferative lineage. Mongolian gerbils infected with Helicobacter pylori develop chronic gastritis and metaplasia, mimicking aspects of human gastritis with H. pylori infection. We therefore examined metaplastic lineages in the gastric corpus mucosa of gerbils infected by H. pylori strain 7.13, which produces rapid onset of severe inflammation. Six weeks following H. pylori infection, Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II (GSII)-positive SPEM developed in the base of oxyntic glands in association with parietal cell loss and inflammation. In association with severe inflammation, SPEM glands evolved into aberrant phenotypes, including branched lesions, dilated lesions, and penetrating invasive glands. Mucin 4 (MUC4) was up-regulated in SPEM and progressive SPEM. Clusterin was expressed in the tips of branched and dilated lesions and throughout regions of invasive glands. Intriguingly, clusterin-positive regions in these lesions expressed Ki67 and matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7). These same regions were also positive for expression of phospho-IkBα, suggestive of activated NFkB signalling. These findings suggest that clusterin-positive regions in progressive phenotypes of SPEM have invasive characteristics. Thus, H. pylori infection in gerbils induces SPEM, which then can progress to further aberrant and invasive metaplastic phenotypes. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27125972

  11. Isolation and characterization of novel tachykinins from the posterior salivary gland of the common octopus Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsuhiro; Iwakoshi-Ukena, Eiko; Takuwa-Kuroda, Kyoko; Minakata, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    Two novel tachykinins (OctTK-I: Lys-Pro-Pro-Ser-Ser-Ser-Glu-Phe-Ile-Gly-Leu-Met-NH(2) and OctTK-II: Lys-Pro-Pro-Ser-Ser-Ser-Glu-Phe-Val-Gly-Leu-Met-NH(2)) were isolated from the posterior salivary gland of the octopus (Octopus vulgaris) using a contraction assay of the carp rectum. These peptides had in common the pentapeptide sequence -Phe-X-Gly-Leu-Met-NH(2) at the C-terminal and induced immediate contractions on the carp rectum and the guinea-pig ileum. cDNAs encoding their precursor proteins were cloned. The OctTK gene was expressed in the posterior salivary gland and the expression was localized in mucus-secreting cells of the gland. The results suggested that OctTKs might be secreted as a venomous substance acting on vertebrates such as fishes, which are the prey or natural enemies of the octopus. PMID:12576083

  12. A Simple "Pig" Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    Our pig game involves a series of tosses of a die with the possibility of a player's score improving with each additional toss. With each additional toss, however, there is also the chance of losing the entire score accumulated so far. Two different strategies for deciding how many tosses a player should attempt are developed and then compared in…

  13. St. Paul's Pig Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Penny Folley

    1982-01-01

    Describes a guinea pig (cavy) breeding and management program developed as part of an elementary school science curriculum. Includes comments on show competitions (sponsored by the American Rabbit Breeders Association) to measure the success of the breeding program and to enable children to experience the business world. (Author/JN)

  14. Pipeline design essential in making pigging plans

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, H.

    1998-08-01

    Pigs have gotten an unfortunate reputation for getting stuck in pipelines. As a result, for many years few pigged their pipelines and consequently, many companies are paying the price to repair or replace their corroded pipelines. It is currently considered a necessary evil to run pigs to improve pipeline efficiency and prevent corrosion. Some pipelines were not designed to run pigs and occasionally the wrong type of pig is selected to run in a particular pipeline, increasing the chances of sticking a pig. A pipeline properly designed for pigging along with proper pig selection greatly reduces chances of sticking a pig.

  15. Gastric Emptying in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Soenen, Stijn; Rayner, Chris K; Horowitz, Michael; Jones, Karen L

    2015-08-01

    Aging is characterized by a diminished homeostatic regulation of physiologic functions, including slowing of gastric emptying. Gastric and small intestinal motor and humoral mechanisms in humans are complex and highly variable: ingested food is stored, mixed with digestive enzymes, ground into small particles, and delivered as a liquefied form into the duodenum at a rate allowing efficient digestion and absorption. In healthy aging, motor function is well preserved whereas deficits in sensory function are more apparent. The effects of aging on gastric emptying are relevant to the absorption of oral medications and the regulation of appetite, postprandial glycemia, and blood pressure. PMID:26195094

  16. Salivary gland diseases: infections, sialolithiasis and mucoceles.

    PubMed

    Delli, Konstantina; Spijkervet, Fred K L; Vissink, Arjan

    2014-01-01

    The three most frequently diagnosed salivary gland diseases are salivary gland infections, sialolithiasis and mucoceles. Salivary gland infections are usually of bacterial or viral etiology and can be divided into acute and chronic types. Occasionally they can result from obstruction of the salivary duct, an autoimmmune disease or cancer therapy. Infections can occur in all types of salivary glands and are observed at all ages. Sialolithiasis is characterized by the development of calcified structures in the salivary glands, especially in the submandibular gland. Sialoliths are generally attributed to retention of saliva and are usually accompanied by swelling and pain when a salivary stimulus is applied. Mucoceles can be differentiated into mucus extravasation phenomenon or mucus escape reaction, mucus retention cysts and ranulas. They result from extravasation of saliva into the surrounding soft tissues or from retention of saliva within the duct. PMID:24862601

  17. What gastric cancer proteomic studies show about gastric carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; de Oliveira Gigek, Carolina; do Santos, Leonardo Caires; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Cardoso

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex, heterogeneous, and multistep disease. Over the past decades, several studies have aimed to determine the molecular factors that lead to gastric cancer development and progression. After completing the human genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have presented rapid progress. Differently from the relative static state of genome, the cell proteome is dynamic and changes in pathologic conditions. Proteomic approaches have been used to determine proteome profiles and identify differentially expressed proteins between groups of samples, such as neoplastic and nonneoplastic samples or between samples of different cancer subtypes or stages. Therefore, proteomic technologies are a useful tool toward improving the knowledge of gastric cancer molecular pathogenesis and the understanding of tumor heterogeneity. This review aimed to summarize the proteins or protein families that are frequently identified by using high-throughput screening methods and which thus may have a key role in gastric carcinogenesis. The increased knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis will clearly help in the development of new anticancer treatments. Although the studies are still in their infancy, the reviewed proteins may be useful for gastric cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and patient management. PMID:27126070

  18. Exocrine Glands of Schwarziana quadripunctata (Hymenoptera, Apinae, Meliponini).

    PubMed

    Cruz-Landim, C; Reginato, R D

    2001-08-01

    This article 'describes the location, anatomy, histology and ontogeny of adult Schwarziana quadripunctata exocrine glands. These glands appear either as individualized organs (salivary gland system and Dufour gland) or as epidermis differentiation (tegumentary glands). Variations in the occurrence and degree of development among colony components with regard to their degree of maturity are also described. PMID:11706578

  19. Gastric tissue biopsy and culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... laboratory test that examines the tissue sample for bacteria and other organisms that can cause disease. ... of organisms that cause infection. A gastric tissue culture may be ... Stomach acids normally prevent too much bacteria from growing.

  20. Parotitis and Sialendoscopy of the Parotid Gland.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Stephen; Busso, Carlos; Walvekar, Rohan R

    2016-04-01

    Nonneoplastic disorders of the salivary glands involve inflammatory processes. These disorders have been managed conservatively with antibiotics, warm compresses, massage, sialogogues, and adequate hydration. Up to 40% of patients may have an inadequate response or persistent symptoms. When conservative techniques fail, the next step is operative intervention. Sialendoscopy offers a minimally invasive option for the diagnosis and management of chronic inflammatory disorders of the salivary glands and offers the option of gland and function preservation. In this article, we review some of the more common nonneoplastic disorders of the parotid gland, indications for diagnostic and interventional sialendoscopy, and operative techniques. PMID:26912292

  1. Glucose transporter expression in rat mammary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Burnol, A F; Leturque, A; Loizeau, M; Postic, C; Girard, J

    1990-01-01

    The expression of different glucose transporter isoforms was measured during the development and differentiation of the rat mammary gland. Before conception, when the mammary gland is mainly composed of adipocytes, Glut 4 and Glut 1 mRNAs and proteins were present. During pregnancy, the expression of Glut 4 decreased progressively, whereas that of Glut 1 increased. In the lactating mammary gland only Glut 1 was present, and was expressed at a high level. The absence of Glut 4 suggests that glucose transport is not regulated by insulin in the lactating rat mammary gland. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2396989

  2. Parotid gland metastasis of a breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Perez-Fidalgo, J A; Chirivella, I; Laforga, J; Colio, J M; Blanes, M D; Baydal, R; Roselló, S; De-la-Morena, E; Lluch, A

    2007-04-01

    Parotid gland metastases from malignant tumors are extremely rare. A 61-year-old woman was diagnosed with an early breast cancer with no expression of oestrogen and progesterone receptors. Five years later the patient presented a tumour in parotid gland. After total parotidectomy, microscopic analysis of the gland demonstrated an invasive duct carcinoma (IDC) with positive expression of oestrogen receptor. The patient was treated with chemotherapy followed by complementary local radiotherapy. Diagnosis of a metastasic tumour in parotid gland poses a challenge. In our case an immunohistochemical study of oestrogen receptor was fundamental to establish a diagnosis. PMID:17462982

  3. Gastric cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Berger, Hilmar; Marques, Miguel S; Zietlow, Rike; Meyer, Thomas F; Machado, Jose C; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) results from a multistep process that is influenced by Helicobacter pylori infection, genetic susceptibility of the host, as well as of other environmental factors. GC results from the accumulation of numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, leading to dysregulation of multiple signaling pathways, which disrupt the cell cycle and the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. For this special issue, we have selected to review last year's advances related to three main topics: the cell of origin that initiates malignant growth in GC, the mechanisms of direct genotoxicity induced by H. pylori infection, and the role of aberrantly expressed long noncoding RNAs in GC transformation. The understanding of the molecular basis of GC development is of utmost importance for the identification of novel targets for GC prevention and treatment. PMID:27531537

  4. [Gastric duplication of 3 observations].

    PubMed

    Bugallo, M; Carauni, D; Serra, E; De los Reyes, C; Briend, S; Valdovinos, B; Lanari, A

    2000-01-01

    Gástric duplicación si an infrequent congenital malformation present in both, neonatal period and childhood, and exceptionally during adulthood. We present here there cases of gastric duplication from patients of different ages, in which it was not possible to make diagnosis before surgery. In all of them cystic form was the predominating one, without communication with gastric lumen (cavity). Diagnosis was performed after laparotomy and histopathological examination. PMID:11086515

  5. Genetic Ablation of Parietal Cells in Transgenic Mice: A New Model for Analyzing Cell Lineage Relationships in the Gastric Mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Victor; West, A. Brian; Goldenring, James R.; Levenson, Robert

    1996-03-01

    The gastric mucosa of mammalian stomach contains several differentiated cell types specialized for the secretion of acid, digestive enzymes, mucus, and hormones. Understanding whether each of these cell lineages is derived from a common stem cell has been a challenging problem. We have used a genetic approach to analyze the ontogeny of progenitor cells within mouse stomach. Herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase was targeted to parietal cells within the gastric mucosa of transgenic mice, and parietal cells were ablated by treatment of animals with the antiherpetic drug ganciclovir. Ganciclovir treatment produced complete ablation of parietal cells, dissolution of gastric glands, and loss of chief and mucus-producing cells. Termination of drug treatment led to the reemergence of all major gastric epithelial cell types and restoration of glandular architecture. Our results imply the existence of a pluripotent stem cell for the gastric mucosa. Parietal cell ablation should provide a model for analyzing cell lineage relationships within the stomach as well as mechanisms underlying gastric injury and repair.

  6. [MRI of the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Langevad, Line; Madsen, Camilla Gøbel; Siebner, Hartwig; Garde, Ellen

    2014-11-10

    The pineal gland (CP) is located centrally in the brain and produces melatonin. Cysts and concrements are frequent findings on MRI but their significance is still unclear. The visualization of CP is difficult due to its location and surrounding structures and so far, no standardized method exists. New studies suggest a correlation between CP-morphology and melatonin secretion as well as a connection between melatonin, disturbed circadian rhythm, and the development of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, underlining the need for a standardized approach to CP on MRI. PMID:25394927

  7. Gene methylation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yiping; Dang, Siwen; Hou, Peng

    2013-09-23

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Over 70% of new cases and deaths occur in developing countries. In the early years of the molecular biology revolution, cancer research mainly focuses on genetic alterations, including gastric cancer. Epigenetic mechanisms are essential for normal development and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression patterns in mammals. Disruption of epigenetic processes can lead to altered gene function and malignant cellular transformation. Recent advancements in the rapidly evolving field of cancer epigenetics have shown extensive reprogramming of every component of the epigenetic machinery in cancer, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning, noncoding RNAs, and microRNAs. Aberrant DNA methylation in the promoter regions of gene, which leads to inactivation of tumor suppressor and other cancer-related genes in cancer cells, is the most well-defined epigenetic hallmark in gastric cancer. The advantages of gene methylation as a target for detection and diagnosis of cancer in biopsy specimens and non-invasive body fluids such as serum and gastric washes have led to many studies of application in gastric cancer. This review focuses on the most common and important phenomenon of epigenetics, DNA methylation, in gastric cancer and illustrates the impact epigenetics has had on this field. PMID:23669186

  8. Targeted therapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Alexandra; Ristimäki, Ari

    2015-05-01

    Gastric cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage. Although chemotherapy prolongs survival and improves quality of life, the survival of gastric cancer patients with advanced disease is short. Thanks to recent insights into the molecular pathways involved in gastric carcinogenesis, new targeted treatment options have become available for gastric cancer patients. Trastuzumab, an antibody targeted to HER-2, was shown to improve survival of advanced gastric cancer patients harboring HER-2 overexpression due to gene amplification in their tumor cells, and is currently also explored in adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings. Another agent with promising results in clinical trials is ramucirumab, an antibody targeting VEGFR-2. No clear survival benefit, however, were experienced with agents targeting EGFR (cetuximab, panitumumab), VEGF-A (bevacizumab), or mTOR (everolimus). Drugs targeting c-MET/HGF are currently under investigation in biomarker-selected cohorts, with promising results in early clinical trials. This review will summarize the current status of targeted treatment options in gastric cancer. PMID:25706252

  9. Gastric control of food intake.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P H; McHugh, P R; Moran, T H; Stephenson, J D

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of gastric emptying leads to enhanced satiety and this mechanism may contribute to the undereating observed after administration of cholecystokinin (CCK) and fenfluramine, and in patients with anorexia nervosa. Pyloric smooth muscle bears specific CCK receptors and the evidence suggests that a major site of action for CCK satiety is in the periphery. CCK receptors are widespread in the neonatal rat stomach but not in the brain and over the first two weeks of life binding in the stomach decreases and that in the brain increases. This and the finding that independent ingestion as well as gastric emptying are inhibited by CCK at birth suggest the stomach as its likely site of action in the neonatal rat. Fenfluramine inhibits feeding in animals and in patients with bulimia nervosa. In monkeys, fenfluramine inhibits gastric emptying and this action correlates with its feeding inhibition. Patients with anorexia nervosa who are acutely starving and rats maintained on a restricted diet have delayed gastric emptying. Anorexic patients showed abnormal reporting of both hunger and satiety, and, together with those with bulimia nervosa, often associated gastric contents with symptoms of eating disorder, indicating disturbed interpretation of gastric signals. PMID:3065484

  10. Genetics and gastric cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Lu, Fang; Zeng, Sha; Sun, Suqing; Lu, Li; Liu, Lifeng

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer has high morbidity and mortality in China. It is ranked first in malignant tumors of the digestive system. Its etiology and pathogenesis are still unclear, but they may be associated with a variety of factors. Genetic susceptibility genes have become a research hotspot in China. Elucidating the genetic mechanisms of gastric cancer can facilitate achieving individualized prevention and developing more effective methods to reduce clinical adverse consequences, which has important clinical significance. Genetic susceptibility results from the influence of genetic factors or specific genetic defects that endow an individual’s offspring with certain physiological and metabolic features that are prone to certain diseases. Currently, studies on the genetic susceptibility genes of gastric cancer have become a hotspot. The purpose is to screen for the etiology of gastric cancer, search for gene therapy methods, and ultimately provide a scientific basis for the prevention and control of gastric cancer. This article reviews the current progress of studies on genetic susceptibility genes for gastric cancer. PMID:26309491

  11. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do. PMID:26566288

  12. Salivary gland MALT lymphoma associated with Helicobacter pylori infection in a patient with Sjögren's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, M; Miyajima, S; Okada, N

    2000-07-01

    We report a case of salivary gland MALT lymphoma in Sjögren's syndrome associated with localized H. pylori infection. A 76-year-old woman had a history of bilateral cheek masses for two years. Histologically, the parotid glands were invaded by numerous centrocyte-like cells to form lymphoepithelial lesions. The tumor cells showed immunohistological differentiation into B cells. Southern blotting demonstrated immunoglobulin gene rearrangement. These results indicated that the tumors were MALT lymphoma. H. pylori, as assessed by the urease test (CLO test; BML Ltd., Tokyo, Japan), was positive in the tumor specimen. After wide local excision of the tumors followed by radio therapy and oral administration of antibiotics and proton pump inhibitor, no evidence of recurrence was found during the 24-months of follow up. H. pylori infection in the salivary gland is rare, although the source of infection and transmission of H. pylori organisms has been thought to be the oral cavity. We discussed the association between H. pylori infection and salivary gland MALT lymphoma. The microorganism may play a role as an additional antigenic stimulus for the development of salivary gland MALT lymphoma as well as for the development of gastric MALT lymphoma. This means that H. pylori can play a role in lymphoma progression as booster of B cell lymphoproliferation. PMID:10935342

  13. Impact of prolonged leucine supplementation on protein synthesis and lean growth in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Daniel A; Steinhoff-Wagner, Julia; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V; Hernandez-Garcia, Adriana; Fiorotto, Marta L; Davis, Teresa A

    2015-09-15

    Most low-birth weight infants experience extrauterine growth failure due to reduced nutrient intake as a result of feeding intolerance. The objective of this study was to determine whether prolonged enteral leucine supplementation improves lean growth in neonatal pigs fed a restricted protein diet. Neonatal pigs (n = 14-16/diet, 5 days old, 1.8 ± 0.3 kg) were fed by gastric catheter a whey-based milk replacement diet with either a high protein (HP) or restricted protein (RP) content or RP supplemented with leucine to the same level as in the HP diet (RPL). Pigs were fed 40 ml·kg body wt(-1)·meal(-1) every 4 h for 21 days. Feeding the HP diet resulted in greater total body weight and lean body mass compared with RP-fed pigs (P < 0.05). Masses of the longissimus dorsi muscle, heart, and kidneys were greater in the HP- than RP-fed pigs (P < 0.05). Body weight, lean body mass, and masses of the longissimus dorsi, heart, and kidneys in pigs fed the RPL diet were intermediate to RP- and HP-fed pigs. Protein synthesis and mTOR signaling were increased in all muscles with feeding (P < 0.05); leucine supplementation increased mTOR signaling and protein synthesis rate in the longissimus dorsi (P < 0.05). There was no effect of diet on indices of protein degradation signaling in any tissue (P > 0.05). Thus, when protein intake is chronically restricted, the capacity for leucine supplementation to enhance muscle protein accretion in neonatal pigs that are meal-fed milk protein-based diets is limited. PMID:26374843

  14. Pembrolizumab, Combination Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy Before Surgery in Treating Adult Patients With Locally Advanced Gastroesophageal Junction or Gastric Cardia Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Gastric Cardia Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer

  15. Nonobvious obstructive meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Blackie, Caroline A; Korb, Donald R; Knop, Eric; Bedi, Raman; Knop, Nadja; Holland, Edward J

    2010-12-01

    This review presents the rationale and supporting data for a recent paradigm shift in our understanding of meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). The historical understanding of MGD has been that of an infectious hypersecretory disorder with obvious signs of inflammation, hypersecretion, and purulent excreta. The current understanding of MGD now includes the polar concept of a less obvious or nonobvious type of hyposecretory obstructive MGD, where inflammation and other signs of pathology may be absent unless special examination techniques are employed. A new term, nonobvious obstructive MGD (NOMGD), is used to describe what may be the most common form of obstructive MGD. Obstructive MGD is an area of growing importance because obstructive MGD is now recognized to be the most common cause of evaporative dry eye, and because NOMGD seems to be the precursor to obvious obstructive MGD, it is also an important area to understand. The prevalence of NOMGD seems to be very high but currently significantly underdiagnosed. This review presents the relevant anatomy and physiology, concepts of obstructive MGD, the usual absence of inflammation in obstructive MGD, nomenclature and classification of obstructive and NOMGD, clinical diagnosis of NOMGD emphasizing the necessity for diagnostic expression, the use of a new instrument for diagnostic expression providing a standardized method of assessing meibomian gland functionality, the complementary roles of the aqueous and lipid layers, and the specific treatment of NOMGD, emphasizing that the success of treatment of all forms of obstructive MGD is dependent on the relief of the obstruction. PMID:20847669

  16. Meibomian Gland Dysfunction: Endocrine Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ozlem G.; Kartal, Elçin; Taheri, Nusret

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the hormone levels of patients with seborrheic meibomian gland dysfunction with controls. Procedures. This is a retrospective case-control study involving 50 patients and 50 controls. Blood workup for hormones was studied in both groups by using macroELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Statistical evaluation was done by using SPSS 15.0 independent samples t-test. Results. There were statistically significant differences of serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels between patients and controls (P = 0.000). Female gender showed statistically significant differences of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and prolactin levels between patients and controls (P = 0.014 and P = 0.043), in addition to serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels (P = 0.000 and P = 0.001). However, male gender showed statistically significant differences of only serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels between patients and controls. (P = 0.003 and P = 0.003 resp.). Conclusions. Increased serum levels of testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate in both genders should be considered as diagnostic markers for seborrheic meibomian gland dysfunction. PMID:24533183

  17. Gastric lactobezoar - a rare disorder?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Gastric lactobezoar, a pathological conglomeration of milk and mucus in the stomach of milk-fed infants often causing gastric outlet obstruction, is a rarely reported disorder (96 cases since its first description in 1959). While most patients were described 1975-1985 only 26 children have been published since 1986. Clinically, gastric lactobezoars frequently manifest as acute abdomen with abdominal distension (61.0% of 96 patients), vomiting (54.2%), diarrhea (21.9%), and/or a palpable abdominal mass (19.8%). Respiratory (23.0%) and cardiocirculatory (16.7%) symptoms are not uncommon. The pathogenesis of lactobezoar formation is multifactorial: exogenous influences such as high casein content (54.2%), medium chain triglycerides (54.2%) or enhanced caloric density (65.6%) of infant milk as well as endogenous factors including immature gastrointestinal functions (66.0%), dehydration (27.5%) and many other mechanisms have been suggested. Diagnosis is easy if the potential presence of a gastric lactobezoar is thought of, and is based on a history of inappropriate milk feeding, signs of acute abdomen and characteristic features of diagnostic imaging. Previously, plain and/or air-, clear fluid- or opaque contrast medium radiography techniques were used to demonstrate a mass free-floating in the lumen of the stomach. This feature differentiates a gastric lactobezoar from intussusception or an abdominal neoplasm. Currently, abdominal ultrasound, showing highly echogenic intrabezoaric air trapping, is the diagnostic method of choice. However, identifying a gastric lactobezoar requires an investigator experienced in gastrointestinal problems of infancy as can be appreciated from the results of our review which show that in not even a single patient gastric lactobezoar was initially considered as a possible differential diagnosis. Furthermore, in over 30% of plain radiographs reported, diagnosis was initially missed although a lactobezoar was clearly demonstrable on repeat

  18. Natural trematode infestation in feral Nebrodi Black pigs: pathological investigations.

    PubMed

    Capucchio, Maria Teresa; Catalano, Deborah; Di Marco, Vincenzo; Russo, Miriam; Aronica, Vincenzo; Tomaselli, Amedeo; Lazzara, Alessandro; Amedeo, Stefano; Scaglione, Frine Eleonora; Dore, Bruno; Guarda, Franco

    2009-01-22

    Few studies describe the parasites of pigs bred in the wild state, although pigs are a known reservoir of trematode infestation. This article reports the results of a retrospective study carried out from January 2003 to June 2007 on 3021 Nebrodi Black male and female pigs, regularly slaughtered, aged between 8 months and 4 years. Fasciola hepatica and Dicrocoelium dendriticum flukes were detected in 143 (4.37%) of 3021 livers. The predominant histological features were multifocal to diffuse chronic hepatitis, with fibrosis and severely thickened walls of the bile ducts and chronic parietal, sometimes nodular inflammation. F. hepatica infestation was frequently associated with marked hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the submucosal glands. The study results confirm the important role swine play in the transmission of trematode infestations, indicate the prevalence of these parasites in the Nebrodi Park area, and draw attention to the need for a prophylaxis plan to prevent the spread of infestation to ruminants and humans living in the area. PMID:19038498

  19. Two forensic autopsy cases of death from unexpected lesions of the pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hideto; Hayashi, Kino; Fukunaga, Tatsushige

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we report the findings of 2 forensic autopsy cases, in which unexpected pituitary lesions were the underlying cause of death. Case 1: A 56-year-old woman was found dead at her home during a cold winter spell. Macroscopic autopsy findings included a difference in the color of blood that filled her left and right cardiac chambers (deep red and dark red, respectively), collapse of both lungs, atrophy of the thyroid gland, and a large tumor arising from the sella turcica. Microscopic examination revealed a pituitary adenoma along with extensive bleeding. The cause of death was considered to be hypothermia, resulting from dysregulation of thermogenesis due to the pituitary adenoma. Case 2: An 86-year-old man with a history of pollakiuria was found dead in a bathtub, with his face and chest submerged in bathwater and his legs positioned outside the bathtub. The macroscopic findings of the autopsy included hyper-inflated lungs, fluid collection in the thoracic cavity, and aspiration of gastric contents in the bronchi. The atherosclerotic changes of the man's coronary and cerebral arteries were considered mild for his age. Microscopic examination showed a marked infiltration of lymphocytes and plasma cells in the posterior pituitary gland, as well as in the liver, pancreas, and submandibular gland. Considering the results of the autopsy and the findings from the investigation conducted at the death scene, we concluded that the man probably lost consciousness following a neurally mediated syncope, which was induced by diabetes insipidus (lymphocytic hypophysitis). After losing consciousness, the man likely fell in the filled bathtub and then drowned. These 2 cases highlight the need for a thorough post-mortem investigation, including a microscopic examination of the pituitary gland. In addition, forensic pathologists should carefully study the pituitary gland in cases where the cause of death is thought to be related to dysfunction of thermoregulation or

  20. What Does the Thyroid Gland Do?

    MedlinePlus

    ... it helps other cells do their job. hypothyroidism (hi-poh-THY-royd-izm): when your thyroid gland ... thyroid hormone (“hypo” means ‘under’ or ‘below’). hyperthyroidism (hi-purr-THY-royd-izm): when your thyroid gland ...

  1. Effects of Isotretinoin on Meibomian Glands.

    PubMed

    Moy, Allison; McNamara, Nancy A; Lin, Meng C

    2015-09-01

    The authors have reviewed the potential etiology and long-standing consequences of isotretinoin use in the development of dry eye symptoms in the absence of significant clinical findings. Despite the normal appearance of meibomian gland structure on meibography and minimal signs of eyelid margin inflammation, the secretory function of these glands is reduced and symptoms of dryness can greatly impact a patient's quality of life. The available literature indicates that isotretinoin's effect on the meibomian glands likely mimics its effects on the sebaceous glands of the skin in the treatment of acne. Several representative cases seen at the University of California Berkeley School of Optometry Dry Eye Clinic provide a clinical paradigm with the goal of raising awareness of the potential prevalence of this disease in patients who experience symptoms of dry eye. These cases highlight the importance of meibomian gland expression in determining whether there is poor quality and/or quantity of meibum secondary to reduced gland function. Currently, there is no definitive method to restore the structure and function of damaged meibomian glands; thus, treatment options for isotretinoin-associated meibomian gland dysfunction are primarily palliative to manage patient symptoms. PMID:26154692

  2. [Meibomian gland disfunction in computer vision syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pimenidi, M K; Polunin, G S; Safonova, T N

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews ethiology and pathogenesis of dry eye syndrome due to meibomian gland disfunction (MDG). It is showed that blink rate influences meibomian gland functioning and computer vision syndrome development. Current diagnosis and treatment options of MDG are presented. PMID:21395003

  3. Microscopy of the echidna sublingual glands.

    PubMed

    Krause, William J

    2011-10-01

    The secretory units and duct system of the echidna sublingual glands exhibit subtle architectural modifications to accommodate the viscous secretion produced by these glands. The glands are compound tubular glands, the secretory units of which are elongate with open lumina and consist only of mucous cells. Closely packed spindle-shaped myoepithelial cells invest the secretory units, but are absent around the ducts. The branched secretory tubules open into an abbreviated duct system characterized by wide lumina. Striated ducts normally associated with the second portion of the intralobular duct system are absent. The duct system shows the most obvious modification of general salivary gland architecture presumably to accommodate the viscous secretion propelled from the secretory units by surrounding myoepithelial cells. PMID:21671992

  4. Gordon Research Conference on Mammary Gland Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 conference was the tenth in the series of biennial Gordon Research Conferences on Mammary Gland Biology. Traditionally this conference brings together scientists from diverse backgrounds and experience but with a common interest in the biology of the mammary gland. Investigators from agricultural and medical schools, biochemists, cell and molecular biologists, endocrinologists, immunologists, and representatives from the emerging biotechnology industries met to discuss current concepts and results on the function and regulation of the normal and neoplastic mammary gland in a variety of species. Of the participants, approximately three-fourths were engaged in studying the normal mammary gland function, whereas the other quarter were engaged in studying the neoplastic gland. The interactions between scientists, clinicians, veterinarians examining both normal and neoplastic cell function serves to foster the multi-disciplinary goals of the conference and has stimulated many cooperative projects among participants in previous years.

  5. Risks of Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  6. Aldioxa improves delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric compliance, pathophysiologic mechanisms of functional dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Teita; Aida, Shuji; Suemasu, Shintaro; Tahara, Kayoko; Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Mizushima, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric accommodation (decreased gastric compliance) play important roles in functional dyspepsia (FD). Here we screen for a clinically used drug with an ability to improve delayed gastric emptying in rats. Oral administration of aldioxa (dihydroxyaluminum allantoinate) partially improved clonidine- or restraint stress-induced delayed gastric emptying. Administration of allantoin, but not aluminium hydroxide, restored the gastric emptying. Both aldioxa and allantoin inhibited clonidine binding to the α-2 adrenergic receptor, suggesting that antagonistic activity of the allantoin moiety of aldioxa on this receptor is involved in the restoration of gastric emptying activity. Aldioxa or aluminium hydroxide but not allantoin restored gastric compliance with restraint stress, suggesting that aluminium hydroxide moiety is involved in this restoration. We propose that aldioxa is a candidate drug for FD, because its safety in humans has already been confirmed and its ameliorating effect on both of delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric compliance are confirmed here. PMID:26620883

  7. Subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Roberto; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Santoro, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Although a steady decline in the incidence and mortality rates of gastric carcinoma has been observed in the last century worldwide, the absolute number of new cases/year is increasing because of the aging of the population. So far, surgical resection with curative intent has been the only treatment providing hope for cure; therefore, gastric cancer surgery has become a specialized field in digestive surgery. Gastrectomy with lymph node (LN) dissection for cancer patients remains a challenging procedure which requires skilled, well-trained surgeons who are very familiar with the fast-evolving oncological principles of gastric cancer surgery. As a matter of fact, the extent of gastric resection and LN dissection depends on the size of the disease and gastric cancer surgery has become a patient and “disease-tailored” surgery, ranging from endoscopic resection to laparoscopic assisted gastrectomy and conventional extended multivisceral resections. LN metastases are the most important prognostic factor in patients that undergo curative resection. LN dissection remains the most challenging part of the operation due to the location of LN stations around major retroperitoneal vessels and adjacent organs, which are not routinely included in the resected specimen and need to be preserved in order to avoid dangerous intra- and postoperative complications. Hence, the surgeon is the most important non-TMN prognostic factor in gastric cancer. Subtotal gastrectomy is the treatment of choice for middle and distal-third gastric cancer as it provides similar survival rates and better functional outcome compared to total gastrectomy, especially in early-stage disease with favorable prognosis. Nonetheless, the resection range for middle-third gastric cancer cases and the extent of LN dissection at early stages remains controversial. Due to the necessity of a more extended procedure at advanced stages and the trend for more conservative treatments in early gastric cancer, the

  8. Acetaldehyde and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Salaspuro, Mikko

    2011-04-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene polymorphisms associating with enhanced acetaldehyde exposure and markedly increased cancer risk in alcohol drinkers provide undisputable evidence for acetaldehyde being a local carcinogen not only in esophageal but also in gastric cancer. Accordingly, acetaldehyde associated with alcoholic beverages has recently been classified as a Group 1 carcinogen to humans. Microbes are responsible for the bulk of acetaldehyde production from ethanol both in saliva and Helicobacter pylori-infected and achlorhydric stomach. Acetaldehyde is the most abundant carcinogen in tobacco smoke and it readily dissolves into saliva during smoking. Many foodstuffs and 'non-alcoholic' beverages are important but unrecognized sources of local acetaldehyde exposure. The cumulative cancer risk associated with increasing acetaldehyde exposure suggests the need for worldwide screening of the acetaldehyde levels of alcoholic beverages and as well of the ethanol and acetaldehyde of food produced by fermentation. The generally regarded as safe status of acetaldehyde should be re-evaluated. The as low as reasonably achievable principle should be applied to the acetaldehyde of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and food. Risk groups with ADH-and ALDH2 gene polymorphisms, H. pylori infection or achlorhydric atrophic gastritis, or both, should be screened and educated in this health issue. L-cysteine formulations binding carcinogenic acetaldehyde locally in the stomach provide new means for intervention studies. PMID:21401890

  9. [Gastric cancer in Lima].

    PubMed

    Pilco, Paul; Payet, Eduardo; Cáceres, Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer continues to be one of the most common malignant neoplasias in the world. Despite the decreasing incidence of this disease in developed countries, Eastern Europe and Latin America show the highest incidences. It accounted for 8.6% of all new cases of cancer in 2002. In Peru it has increased between 1990 and 1997 amounting to 24.3/100000 in men and 17.6/100000 in women, during the last period studied, thus it is considered a high risk area. Mortality: it is still the leading cause of death for both sexes, in men it is 19.3/100000 and in women 14.2/100000. Incidence is directly proportional to the place of origin in Metropolitan Lima, a city of almost 8 million inhabitants, and the districts with the highest incidences are Puente Piedra and Lince followed by Villa El Salvador, El Augustino, Breña and Rimac among others. These are districts with medium-low socioeconomic levels, whereas the lowest incidences are found in districts with high socioeconomic levels, such as San Isidro and Miraflores, among others. PMID:17211488

  10. Discrimination of rat Brunner's gland carbohydrate antigens by site-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chimuro, Tomoyuki; Kuroyama, Hiroyuki; Goso, Yukinobu; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Kurihara, Makoto

    2016-09-01

    Mucus produced and secreted by gastrointestinal mucosa contains various types of mucins equipped with unique sugar chains considered to play critical roles in protecting mucous membranes; therefore, the identification and verification of mucin sugar chains is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms. In our previous work, we generated three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), RGM22, RGM26, and RGM42, which recognize sugar chains in rat gastric mucin. Here, we immunohistochemically analyzed the rat gastrointestinal mucosa and found that the antigens recognized by RGM22 and RGM42 were expressed in the rat antrum and Brunner's glands, whereas that recognized by RGM26 was detected in the antrum, but rarely in Brunner's glands. We found that these antibodies reacted with porcine gastric mucin-derived oligosaccharides bearing a common structure: GalNAcα1-3(Fucα1-2)Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-6GalNAc-ol. Moreover, epitope analysis revealed that RGM42 and RGM22 recognized α-linked GalNAc and GalNAcα1-3Gal, respectively, on the GalNAcα1-3(Fucα1-2)Gal structure, whereas RGM26 was specific for GalNAcα1-3(Fucα1-2)Gal. These results indicate that rat Brunner's glands express specific antigens bearing GalNAcα1-3Gal that are recognized by RGM22 and RGM42. Thus, RGM22, RGM26, and RGM42 with their unique antigen specificities could be useful tools for investigation of oligosaccharide diversity among mucins. PMID:27454489

  11. Ingestion, gastric fill, and gastric emptying before and after withdrawal of gastric contents.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, J M; Siemers, W; Grill, H J

    1994-11-01

    The notion that satiation signals are derived from the stomach with no additional contribution of postgastric sources (J. A. Deutsch. In: Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience, Food and Water Intake. 1990, vol. 10, p. 151-182) was evaluated in two experiments. In experiment 1, the gastric contents were withdrawn after the rat met the satiety criterion for an initial intraoral intake test (12.5% glucose delivered at 1.0 ml/min). Ten minutes later, the intraoral infusion was continued until the rat again met the satiety criterion. We found that rats reingested an amount closely corresponding to the amount withdrawn, in agreement with previous studies using spout-licking tests. Despite a lower gastric emptying rate during reingestion than during the initial test, the amount recovered from the stomach (both volume and solute content) after reingestion was significantly less (gastric volume 16% less; gastric glucose 18% less) than that withdrawn initially. In experiment 2, a portion (8 ml) of the gastric contents was removed after the end of an initial intraoral intake test and, after 10 min, rats were again given an opportunity to ingest to satiety. The procedure was repeated for a total of three withdrawals (24 ml) and three reingestion opportunities. Rats accurately replaced the amounts withdrawn such that net intake at the end of the experiment did not differ from that ingested during the initial test. In addition, the amount recovered from the stomach after the terminal test was considerably less (gastric volume 25% less; gastric glucose 29% less) than that recovered at the end of single-test control sessions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7977874

  12. Exercise enclosures for guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cyndi

    2009-11-01

    Exercise and exploration are important to the health and happiness of guinea pigs. Laboratory housing does not always provide the space necessary for such opportunities. This article presents an inexpensive, versatile option for an enclosed exercise area for the laboratory guinea pig. PMID:19847177

  13. Pepsinogens I and II: purification from gastric mucosa and radioimmunoassay in serum

    SciTech Connect

    Samloff, I.M.

    1982-01-01

    Pepsinogen I and pepsinogen II were purified from gastric mucosa and used to develop a radioimmunoassay for pepsinogen II and an improved radioimmunoassay for pepsinogen I. Each immunochemically homogeneous preparation contained only its characteristic components by radioelectophoretic analysis, and migrated as a singly band in polyacrylamide gel. The mean (+/- SD) level of serum pepsinogen II in 42 healthy control subjects was 10,8 +/- 3.8 ng/ml, significantly less (p less than 0.001) than the level of pepsinogen I, which was 62.9 +/- 22.2 ng/ml. The correlation between serum pepsinogen I and pepsinogen II was highly significant (r . 0.700, p less than 0.001) in these subjects. In 20 patients with pernicious anemia the mean serum pepsinogen II level was 10.6 +/- 2.5 ng/ml, not different from normal, but significantly higher (p less than 0.001) than the level of pepsinogen I which was 5.9 +/- 4.7 ng/ml. IN 10 patients with total gastrectomy, serum pepsinogen I was 3.9 +/- 3.1 ng/ml and serum pepsinogen II was 3.2 +/- 3.1 ng/ml; both values were significantly lower (p less than 0.001) than the corresponding levels in pernicious anemia. The predominance of pepsinogen I in the serum of healthy control subjects suggests that either the gastric chief cell normally releases more pepsinogen I than pepsinogen II into the circulation or that pepsinogen I has longer metabolic clearance rate than pepsinogen II. The marked decrease in serum pepsinogen I in patients with pernicious anemia is best explained by a loss of gastric chief cells due to severe atropic gastritis of the fundic glands. The normal distribution of serum pepsinogen II levels in these patients may reflect an increased number of pyloric glands due to pyloric gland metaplasia of the proximal stomach.

  14. Simultaneous quadruple modal nonlinear optical imaging for gastric diseases diagnosis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Jian; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-03-01

    We report the development of a unique simultaneous quadruple-modal nonlinear optical microscopy (i.e., stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), second-harmonic generation (SHG), two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), and third-harmonic generation (THG)) platform for characterization of the gastric diseases (i.e., gastritis, intestinal metaplasia (IM), intestinal type adenocarcinoma). SRS highlights the goblet cells found in IM. SHG images the distribution of collagen in lamina propria. Collagen is found to aggregate for intestinal type adenocarcinoma. TPEF reveals the cell morphology and can reflect the damage inside glands caused by the diseases. THG visualizes the nuclei with high spatial resolution, which facilitates the identification of neutrophils that are usually used as a feature of inflammation. This work shows that the co-registration of quadruple-modal images can be an effective means for diagnosis and characterization of gastric diseases at the cellular and molecular levels.

  15. In vivo formation of nitrosocarbamates in the stomach of rats and guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Rickard, R.W.; Dorough, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    The N-nitrosocarbamates are potent mutagens and carcinogens and have been synthesized under acid conditions that prevail in the human stomach. However, it has never been documented that nitrosocarbamates are actually formed in vivo in the stomach of any mammalian species. Using /sup 14/C-labeled carbaryl and carbofuran, attempts were made to isolate the nitroso derivatives from the stomach contents of rats and guinea pigs treated orally with the carbamate and sodium nitrite. Only trace quantities of nitrocarbamate were recovered from the rat stomach, whereas 0.5 to 2.0% of the carbamate doses were isolated as the nitroso derivative from the contents of the guinea pig stomach. The rather low apparent yields resulted in part from the instability of the nitrosocarbamates and from absorption of the carbamate and/or nitrosocarbamate from the stomach. Higher rates of synthesis were indicated by incubating the carbamates with sodium nitrite in the presence of the stomach contents at 37/sup 0/C for 15 min. About 30% nitrosation occurred with the guinea pig and about 0.5% with the rat. The difference was attributed to the pH of the gastric contents. For the rat, the pH ranged from 3 to 5; gastric contents of the guinea pig had a pH between 1 and 2. Since the pH of the human stomach is also in the pH 1-2 range, it is likely that nitrosation of carbamates in humans would be very similar to that in the guinea pig. 21 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Technology And Pregnant Pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    One of the interesting things about aerospace spinoff is the way it keeps cropping up in uncommon applications unimaginably remote from the original technology. For example, the pig pregnancy detector. The pig pregnancy detector? City folk may be surprised to learn that there is such a thing-and wonder why. The why is because it is a sow's job to produce piglets and farmers can't afford to keep those who don't; it costs about a half-dollar a day in feed, labor and facilities, and even in small herds that's intolerable. So the barren sow must go. Until recently, the best method of determining pig pregnancy was "eyeballing," daily visual examination over a period of time. The problem with eyeballing is that pregnancy is not evident until well advanced; when there is no pregnancy, the farmer learns too late that he has been feeding a sow that won't give him a litter. Advancing technology provided an answer: the quick, easy-to-use, accurate automatic detector for early evaluation of pregnancy status. Among the most popular of these devices are Scanopreg and Scanoprobe, to whose development NASA technology contributed. Scanopreg is an ultrasonic system which detects pregnancy about 30 days after breeding, long before eyeballing can provide an answer. The companion Scanoprobe is a dual-function unit which not only determines pregnancy but also gives farmers an analysis of a hog's meat-fat ratio, an important factor in breeding. Only a short time on the market, Scanopreg and Scanoprobe have already found wide acceptance among meat producers because they rapidly repay their cost.

  17. Oral glutathione supplementation drastically reduces Helicobacter-induced gastric pathologies

    PubMed Central

    De Bruyne, Ellen; Ducatelle, Richard; Foss, Dennis; Sanchez, Margaret; Joosten, Myrthe; Zhang, Guangzhi; Smet, Annemieke; Pasmans, Frank; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter (H.) suis causes gastric pathologies in both pigs and humans. Very little is known on the metabolism of this bacterium and its impact on the host. In this study, we have revealed the importance of the glutamate-generating metabolism, as shown by a complete depletion of glutamine (Gln) in the medium during H. suis culture. Besides Gln, H. suis can also convert glutathione (GSH) to glutamate, and both reactions are catalyzed by the H. suis γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT). Both for H. pylori and H. suis, it has been hypothesized that the degradation of Gln and GSH may lead to a deficiency for the host, possibly initiating or promoting several pathologies. Therefore the in vivo effect of oral supplementation with Gln and GSH was assessed. Oral supplementation with Gln was shown to temper H. suis induced gastritis and epithelial (hyper)proliferation in Mongolian gerbils. Astonishingly, supplementation of the feed with GSH, another GGT substrate, resulted in inflammation and epithelial proliferation levels returning to baseline levels of uninfected controls. This indicates that Gln and GSH supplementation may help reducing tissue damage caused by Helicobacter infection in both humans and pigs, highlighting their potential as a supportive therapy during and after Helicobacter eradication therapy. PMID:26833404

  18. Interactions between developing nerves and salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, João N; Hoffman, Matthew P

    2013-01-01

    Our aim is to provide a summary of the field of salivary gland development and regeneration from the perspective of what is known about the function of nerves during these processes. The primary function of adult salivary glands is to produce and secrete saliva. Neuronal control of adult salivary gland function has been a focus of research ever since Pavlov's seminal experiments on salivation in dogs. Less is known about salivary gland innervation during development and how the developing nerves influence gland organogenesis and regeneration. Here, we will review what is known about the communication between the autonomic nervous system and the epithelium of the salivary glands during organogenesis. An important emerging theme is the instructive role of the nervous system on the epithelial stem/progenitor cells during development as well as regeneration after damage. We will provide a brief overview of the neuroanatomy of the salivary glands and discuss recent literature that begins to integrate neurobiology with epithelial organogenesis, which may provide paradigms for exploring these interactions in other organ systems. PMID:23974175

  19. Historical vignettes of the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Lydiatt, Daniel D; Bucher, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    Although "glands" in the neck corresponding to the thyroid were known for thousands of years, they were mainly considered pathological when encountered. Recognition of the thyroid gland as an anatomical and physiological entity required human dissection, which began in earnest in the 16th century. Leonardo Da Vinci is generally credited as the first to draw the thyroid gland as an anatomical organ. The drawings were subsequently "lost" to medicine for nearly 260 years. The drawings were probably of a nonhuman specimen. Da Vinci vowed to produce an anatomical atlas, but it was never completed. Michelangelo Buonarroti promised to complete drawings for the anatomical work of Realdus Columbus, De Re Anatomica, but these were also never completed. Andreas Vesalius established the thyroid gland as an anatomical organ with his description and drawings in the Fabrica. The thyroid was still depicted in a nonhuman form during this time. The copper etchings of Bartholomew Eustachius made in the 1560s were obviously of humans, but were not actually published until 1714 with a description by Johannes Maria Lancisius. These etchings also depicted some interesting anatomy, which we describe. The Adenographia by Thomas Wharton in 1656 named the thyroid gland for the first time and more fully described it. The book also attempted to assign a function to the gland. The thyroid gland's interesting history thus touches a number of famous men from diverse backgrounds. PMID:21120907

  20. Bioengineered Lacrimal Gland Organ Regeneration in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Masatoshi; Tsubota, Kazuo; Tsuji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The lacrimal gland plays an important role in maintaining a homeostatic environment for healthy ocular surfaces via tear secretion. Dry eye disease, which is caused by lacrimal gland dysfunction, is one of the most prevalent eye disorders and causes ocular discomfort, significant visual disturbances, and a reduced quality of life. Current therapies for dry eye disease, including artificial tear eye drops, are transient and palliative. The lacrimal gland, which consists of acini, ducts, and myoepithelial cells, develops from its organ germ via reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during embryogenesis. Lacrimal tissue stem cells have been identified for use in regenerative therapeutic approaches aimed at restoring lacrimal gland functions. Fully functional organ replacement, such as for tooth and hair follicles, has also been developed via a novel three-dimensional stem cell manipulation, designated the Organ Germ Method, as a next-generation regenerative medicine. Recently, we successfully developed fully functional bioengineered lacrimal gland replacements after transplanting a bioengineered organ germ using this method. This study represented a significant advance in potential lacrimal gland organ replacement as a novel regenerative therapy for dry eye disease. In this review, we will summarize recent progress in lacrimal regeneration research and the development of bioengineered lacrimal gland organ replacement therapy. PMID:26264034

  1. Biological Roles of Uterine Glands in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    All mammalian uteri contain glands in the endometrium that synthesize or transport and secrete substances essential for survival and development of the conceptus (embryo/fetus and associated extraembryonic membranes). This review summarizes information related to the biological roles of uterine glands and their secretions in blastocyst/conceptus survival and implantation, uterine receptivity, and stromal cell decidualization in humans and animal models. The infertility and recurrent pregnancy loss observed in the ovine uterine gland knockout (UGKO) model unequivocally supports a primary role for uterine glands and, by inference, their secretions present in uterine luminal fluid in survival and development of the conceptus. Further, studies with mutant and progesterone-induced UGKO mice found that uterine glands and their secretions are required for establishment of uterine receptivity and blastocyst implantation as well as stromal cell decidualization. Similarly in humans, uterine glands and their secretory products are likely critical regulators of blastocyst implantation, uterine receptivity, and conceptus growth and development during the first trimester. Circumstantial evidence suggests that deficient glandular activity may be a causative factor in pregnancy failure and complications in humans. Thus, an increased understanding of uterine gland biology is important for diagnosis, prevention and treatment of fertility and pregnancy problems in mammals. PMID:24959816

  2. Circadian clock system in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Yoshitaka; Okano, Toshiyuki

    2002-02-01

    The pineal gland is a neuroendocrine organ that functions as a central circadian oscillator in a variety of nonmammalian vertebrates. In many cases, the pineal gland retains photic input and endocrinal-output pathways both linked tightly to the oscillator. This contrasts well with the mammalian pineal gland equipped only with the output of melatonin production that is subject to neuronal regulation by central circadian oscillator located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Molecular studies on animal clock genes were performed first in Drosophila and later developed in rodents. More recently, clock genes such as Per, Cry, Clock, and Bmal have been found in a variety of vertebrate clock structures including the avian pineal gland. The profiles of the temporal change of the clock gene expression in the avian pineal gland are more similar to those in the mammalian SCN rather than to those in the mammalian pineal gland. Avian pineal gland and mammalian SCN seem to share a fundamental molecular framework of the clock oscillator composed of a transcription/translation-based autoregulatory feedback loop. The circadian time-keeping mechanism also requires several post-translational events, such as protein translocation and degradation processes, in which protein phosphorylation plays a very important role for the stable 24-h cycling of the oscillator and/or the photic-input pathway for entrainment of the clock. PMID:11890455

  3. Epstein-Barr virus in gastric carcinomas and gastric stump carcinomas: a late event in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    zur Hausen, A; van Rees, B P; van Beek, J; Craanen, M E; Bloemena, E; Offerhaus, G J A; Meijer, C J L M; van den Brule, A J C

    2004-01-01

    Background: To determine at what stage during gastric carcinogenesis Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) enters the gastric epithelial cells, the presence of EBV was investigated in two pathogenetically related but distinct forms of adenocarcinoma of the stomach—gastric carcinoma of the intact stomach (GCIS) and gastric stump carcinoma (GSC)—and their presumed precursor lesions. Patients and methods: Eleven patients with EBV positive GCIS and eight patients with EBV positive GSC, demonstrated by the highly sensitive EBV encoded RNA 1/2 (EBER1/2) RNA in situ hybridisation (RISH) technique, were studied. Paraffin wax embedded tissue available from preoperative gastric biopsies and tumour adjacent tissue from the resection specimens containing normal gastric mucosa, inflamed gastric mucosa, and preneoplastic lesions (intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia) was investigated by EBER1/2 RISH, in addition to EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) and latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results: In both GCIS and GSC and their precursor lesions EBER1/2 transcripts were restricted to the carcinoma cells. In addition, positivity of EBNA-1 IHC was also restricted to the tumour cells. IHC for LMP-1 was negative in all cases tested. Conclusions: The absence of EBER1/2 transcripts in preneoplastic gastric lesions (intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia) and their presence in two distinct types of gastric carcinoma strongly suggest that EBV can only infect neoplastic gastric cells and thus is a late event in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:15113855

  4. Concomitant Intake of Quercetin with a Grain-Based Diet Acutely Lowers Postprandial Plasma Glucose and Lipid Concentrations in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wein, Silvia; Wolffram, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    Treatment goals of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMT2) include glycemic control and reduction of nonglycemic risk factors, for example, dyslipidemia. Quercetin, a plant-derived polyphenol, often discussed for possible antidiabetic effects, was investigated for acute postprandial glucose- and lipid-lowering effects in healthy growing pigs. Male pigs (n = 16, body weight = BW 25–30 kg) were fed flavonoid-poor grain-based meals without (GBM) or with quercetin (GBMQ). In a first experiment, postprandial plasma concentrations of glucose, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and triacylglycerols were analyzed in 8 pigs receiving 500 g of either GBM or GBMQ (10 mg/kg BW) in a cross-over design. Blood samples were collected before, and up to 5 h every 30 min, as well as 6 and 8 h after the feeding. In the second experiment, 2 h after ingestions of 1000 g of either GBM or GBMQ (50 mg/kg BW) animals were sacrificed; gastric content was collected and analyzed for dry matter content. Quercetin ingestion reduced postprandial glucose, NEFA, and TG concentration, but two hours after ingestion of the meal no effect on gastric emptying was observed. Our results point to inhibitory effects of quercetin on nutrient absorption, which appear not to be attributable to delayed gastric emptying. PMID:24847478

  5. Ghrelin and gastric acid secretion

    PubMed Central

    Yakabi, Koji; Kawashima, Junichi; Kato, Shingo

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin, a novel growth hormone-releasing peptide, was originally isolated from rat and human stomach. Ghrelin has been known to increase the secretion of growth hormone (GH), food intake, and body weight gain when administered peripherally or centrally. Ghrelin is also known to stimulate the gastric motility and the secretion of gastric acid. In the previous studies, the action of ghrelin on acid secretion was shown to be as strong as that of histamine and gastrin in in-vivo experiment. In the studies, the mechanism for the action of ghrelin was also investigated. It was shown that vagotomy completely inhibited the action of ghrelin on the secretion of gastric acid suggesting that vagal nerve is involved in the mechanism for the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. As famotidine did not inhibit ghrelin-induced acid secretion in the study by Masuda et al, they concluded that histamine was not involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. However, we have shown that famotidine completely inhibited ghrelin-induced acid secretion and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) mRNA was increased in gastric mucosa by ghrelin injection which is inhibited by vagotomy Our results indicate that histamine is involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. Furthermore synergistic action of gastrin and ghrelin on gastric acid secretion was shown. Although gastrin has important roles in postprandial secretion of gastric acid, ghrelin may be related to acid secretion during fasting period or at night. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the physiological role of ghrelin in acid secretion. PMID:19009648

  6. Salivary glands and human selection: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Shields, E D; Mann, R W

    1996-01-01

    Stafne static bone defect (SSBD) of the mandible is the only described destructive bone lesion that is highly localized, nonprogressive, but nonhealing. This common defect in male is found in the region of the major salivary glands that produce a cornucopia of biologically active factors. We describe rare phenocopies caused by mandibular immobility that hold the gland in a constant position thus implicating a localized chronic "leak" of an osteoclast induction factor from the major salivary glands as the pathologic agent. This finding suggests that increased salivary gland size could simulate immobility by apposing the gland to bone, thus allowing the "leaked" factor's gradient to have an effect. In one step, the putative genetic enlargement of a critical gland that produces many factors important for survival, a broad biological vista would be available to the massive potential for both positive and negative selection. Positive selection was identified by observing a correlation between the prevalence of enhanced androgen-induced enlarge salivary glands (SSBD) as a marker, with a great preponderance of males) and the conjectured resulting increased production of immunoreactive factors, with pole-to-equator isotherm and broad ranged infection clines. Negative selection was observed among the slave ancestors of African Americans for a potential embryonic homeotic mutation causing larger salivary glands in both sexes (decreased prevalence of SSBD, with an equal sex ratio). The decreased production of saliva and electrolytes diminished the salt and water depletive effects of severe diarrhea and vomiting induced by enteric diseases, which killed many slaves. Data presented suggests that SSBD is a polymorphism and a marker of selection processes that cause variation in size, or structure, of the major salivary glands. PMID:8773904

  7. On the mechanism of salivary gland radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Konings, Antonius W.T. . E-mail: a.w.t.konings@med.rug.nl; Coppes, Rob P.; Vissink, Arjan

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To contribute to the understanding of the enigmatic radiosensitivity of the salivary glands by analysis of appropriate literature, especially with respect to mechanisms of action of early radiation damage, and to supply information on the possibilities of amelioration of radiation damage to the salivary glands after radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Selected published data on the mechanism of salivary gland radiosensitivity and radioprotection were studied and analyzed. Results: From a classical point of view, the salivary glands should not respond as rapidly to radiation as they appear to do. Next to the suggestion of massive apoptosis, the leakage of granules and subsequent lysis of acinar cells was suggested to be responsible for the acute radiation-induced function loss of the salivary glands. The main problem with these hypotheses is that recently performed assays show no cell loss during the first days after irradiation, while saliva flow is dramatically diminished. The water secretion is selectively hampered during the first days after single-dose irradiation. Literature is discussed that shows that the compromised cells suffer selective radiation damage to the plasma membrane, disturbing signal transduction primarily affecting watery secretion. Although the cellular composition of the submandibular gland and the parotid gland are different, the damage response is very alike. The acute radiation-induced function loss in both salivary glands can be ameliorated by prophylactic treatment with specific receptor agonists. Conclusions: The most probable mechanism of action, explaining the enigmatic high radiosensitivity for early effects, is selective radiation damage to the plasma membrane of the secretory cells, disturbing muscarinic receptor stimulated watery secretion. Later damage is mainly due to classical mitotic cell death of progenitor cells, leading to a hampered replacement capacity of the gland for secretory cells

  8. Microvascular transplantation of the rat submandibular gland.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, J H; Zhang, F; Levin, D E; Singer, M I; Buncke, H J

    2000-11-01

    Xerostomia results from salivary gland irradiation during treatment of head and neck malignancies. In addition to having difficulty with speech and swallowing, these patients experience loss of taste, dental caries, and chronic fungal infections. The paired submandibular glands provide 70 percent of the normal salivary flow and are difficult to shield during radiation therapy. Another sicca condition, xerophthalmia, may result from facial nerve injury or other medical disorders and results in pain, corneal ulceration, and possible vision loss. Treatment options for xerostomia are limited, and management of xerophthalmia usually focuses on the eyelids, rather than the fundamental problem of inadequate secretory protection. In this study, a rat model for submandibular gland microvascular transplantation was developed to assess the feasibility of salivary tissue transfer. Sixteen rats underwent submandibular gland transplantation from the neck to the groin. Fourteen of these rats underwent microvascular anastomosis of the vascular pedicle. Ten glands were assessed for viability at 4 days after transplantation, and four glands were examined after 7, 10, 14, or 21 days. By gross and histologic examination, 93 percent of transplanted glands showed expected long-term viability after at least 4 postoperative days. Microvascular techniques were shown to be applicable to the transplantation of submandibular gland salivary tissue. This has not previously been shown in a rat model. It is possible that submandibular glands could be transplanted to the eye for treatment of xerophthalmia and out of the neck during irradiation of the head and neck, with subsequent replantation after treatment as a means of preventing permanent xerostomia. PMID:11083564

  9. The Pig--Pet, Pork or Sacrifice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Arthur

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the various roles of the pig in children's books, including E. B. White's CHARLOTTE'S WEB and Nina Bawden's PEPPERMINT PIG. Notes that, although pigs are often used as metaphors for greed, gluttony, and squalor, the portrayal of pigs in children's literature is typically positive. (MM)

  10. Immunohistochemical study of DNA topoisomerase II in human gastric disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Yabuki, N.; Sasano, H.; Kato, K.; Ohara, S.; Toyota, T.; Nagura, H.; Miyaike, M.; Nozaki, N.; Kikuchi, A.

    1996-01-01

    Topoisomerase II (topo II) separates chromosomes at the end of mitosis and is also the target for various chemotherapeutic agents. Expression of this enzyme has been demonstrated to increase rapidly at the end of the S to G2/M phase and decrease after the completion of mitosis. We immunolocalized topo II in specimens of both normal and neoplastic human gastric mucosas to evaluate expression of this enzyme. Three different antibodies were used for the immunostaining of topo II (anti-topo II alpha isoform, anti-topo II beta isoform and anti-topo II alpha and -beta isoforms). There were no significant differences in topo II labeling index (LI) between frozen and paraffin-embedded tissue sections obtained from the same cases. Topo II LI was significantly correlated with Ki67 LI in all of the specimens examined. The area of cells positive for Topo II was much narrower than that of Ki67 in the normal gastric glands, and the pattern of Topo II immunolocalization in both adenomas and adenocarcinomas was also essentially the same as that of Ki67. The topo II LI values (positive cells/1000 cells) for normal gastric gland, adenoma, intestinal-type adenocarcinoma, and diffuse-type adenocarcinoma were 114.7 +/- 2.2, 266.7 +/- 18.8, 277.6 +/- 19.2, and 324.5 +/- 5.3, respectively. Significant differences in topo II LI and topo II/Ki67 index were observed between normal and neoplastic mucosas (P < 0.0001) and between adenomas or intestinal-type adenocarcinoma and diffuse-type adenocarcinoma (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively). Simultaneous measurement of topo II alpha and nuclear DNA content by two-parameter flow cytometry revealed that the Jurkat cell line established from acute lymphocytic leukemia cells expressed the enzyme in cells at other than S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle whereas topo-II alpha-positive cells were predominantly observed in S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle in the cells from normal lymph nodes. These findings suggest that dys-regulation or

  11. Mammary gland tumors in captive African hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Gerner, M

    2000-04-01

    From December 1995 to July 1999, eight mammary gland tumors were diagnosed in eight adult captive female African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris). The tumors presented as single or multiple subcutaneous masses along the cranial or caudal abdomen that varied in size for each hedgehog. Histologically, seven of eight (88%) mammary gland tumors were malignant. Tumors were classified as solid (4 cases), tubular (2 cases), and papillary (2 cases). Seven tumors had infiltrated into the surrounding stroma and three tumors had histologic evidence of neoplastic vascular invasion. Three hedgehogs had concurrent neoplasms. These are believed to be the first reported cases of mammary gland tumors in African hedgehogs. PMID:10813628

  12. Anesthetic Considerations on Adrenal Gland Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Domi, Rudin; Sula, Hektor; Kaci, Myzafer; Paparisto, Sokol; Bodeci, Artan; Xhemali, Astrit

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal gland surgery needs a multidisciplinary team including endocrinologist, radiologist, anesthesiologist, and surgeon. The indications for adrenal gland surgery include hormonal secreting and non-hormonal secreting tumors. Adrenal hormonal secreting tumors present to the anesthesiologist unique challenges requiring good preoperative evaluation, perioperative hemodynamic control, corrections of all electrolytes and metabolic abnormalities, a detailed and careful anesthetic strategy, overall knowledge about the specific diseases, control and maintaining of postoperative adrenal function, and finally a good collaboration with other involved colleagues. This review will focus on the endocrine issues, as well as on the above-mentioned aspects of anesthetic management during hormone secreting adrenal gland tumor resection. PMID:25368694

  13. Malignant lymphomas involving the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Colby, T V; Dorfman, R F

    1979-01-01

    Malignant lymphomas involving the salivary glands are probably more common than has been previously recognized. They must be differentiated from the benign lymphoepithelial lesion, although there may be an association between the two. The entire histologic spectrum of malignant lymphomas found at other sites can be seen in the salivary gland. In this study of 59 patients with lymphoma affecting the salivary gland, a large percentage were found to have disseminated disease. We recommend the same rigorous clinical evaluation and staging procedures as used in patients who present with primary lymph node involvement. PMID:583554

  14. Elective cesarean delivery affects gut maturation and delays microbial colonization but does not increase necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs.

    PubMed

    Siggers, R H; Thymann, T; Jensen, B B; Mølbak, L; Heegaard, P M H; Schmidt, M; Buddington, R K; Sangild, P T

    2008-03-01

    Although preterm birth and formula feeding increase the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), the influences of cesarean section (CS) and vaginal delivery (VD) are unknown. Therefore, gut characteristics and NEC incidence and severity were evaluated in preterm pigs (92% gestation) delivered by CS or VD. An initial study showed that newborn CS pigs (n = 6) had decreased gastric acid secretion, absorption of intact proteins, activity of brush-border enzymes and pancreatic hydrolases, plasma cortisol, rectal temperature, and changes in blood chemistry, indicating impaired respiratory function, compared with VD littermates (n = 6). In a second experiment, preterm CS (n = 16) and VD (n = 16) pigs were given total parenteral nutrition (36 h) then fed porcine colostrum (VD-COL, n = 6; CS-COL, n = 6) or infant milk formula (VD-FORM, n = 10; CS-FORM, n = 10) for 2 days. Across delivery, FORM pigs showed significantly higher NEC incidence, tissue proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-gamma and IL-6), Clostridium colonization, and impaired intestinal function, compared with COL pigs. NEC incidence was equal for CS (6/16) and VD (6/16) pigs, CS pigs had decreased bacterial diversity and density, higher villus heights, and increased brush-border enzyme activities (lactase, aminopeptidases) compared with VD pigs. In particular, VD-FORM pigs showed reduced mucosal proportions, reduced lactase and aminopeptidases, and increased proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 compared with CS-FORM (P < 0.06). Despite the initial improvement of intestinal and metabolic functions following VD, gut function, and inflammation were similar, or more negatively affected in VD neonates than CS neonates. Both delivery modes exhibited positive and negative influences on the preterm gut, which may explain the similar NEC incidence. PMID:18160527

  15. Pathogenicity of three strains of Serpulina pilosicoli in pigs with a naturally acquired intestinal flora.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, J R; Smith, W J; Murray, B P; McOrist, S

    1997-01-01

    hyperplasia in colonic glands were evident in 15 of the 18 challenged pigs. S. pilosicoli was recovered on bacterial culture of the colon from all except one of the pigs with these histologic lesions. Serpulina sp. was clearly visible within the colonic glands of these affected pigs in silver-stained sections of the gut. Clinical and pathologic findings in control pigs were unremarkable, with no diarrhea or colonic lesions evident. The results provide further evidence that S. pilosicoli is a specific enteric pathogen for conventional pigs. It is capable of colonizing the large intestine and causing mucosal damage, which although mild is sufficient to result in significant adverse effects on growth. PMID:9284139

  16. Recapitulating Human Gastric Cancer Pathogenesis: Experimental Models of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; El Zaatari, Mohamad; Merchant, Juanita L

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the various experimental models to study gastric cancer pathogenesis, with the role of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) used as the major examples. We review differences in human stomach anatomy compared to the stomachs of the experimental models, including the mouse and invertebrate models such as Drosophila and C. elegans. The contribution of major signaling pathways, e.g., Notch, Hedgehog, AKT/PI3K is discussed in the context of their potential contribution to foregut tumorigenesis. We critically examine the rationale behind specific GEMMs, chemical carcinogens, dietary promoters, Helicobacter infection, and direct mutagenesis of relevant oncogenes and tumor suppressor that have been developed to study gastric cancer pathogenesis. Despite species differences, more efficient and effective models to test specific genes and pathways disrupted in human gastric carcinogenesis have yet to emerge. As we better understand these species differences, "humanized" versions of mouse models will more closely approximate human gastric cancer pathogenesis. Towards that end, epigenetic marks on chromatin, the gut microbiota, and ways of manipulating the immune system will likely move center stage, permitting greater overlap between rodent and human cancer phenotypes thus providing a unified progression model. PMID:27573785

  17. New exocrine glands in ants: the hypostomal gland and basitarsal gland in the genus Melissotarsus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölldobler, Bert; Obermayer, Malu; Plowes, Nicola J. R.; Fisher, Brian L.

    2014-07-01

    Fisher and Robertson (Insect Soc 46: 78-83, 1999) discovered the production of silk-like secretions emerging from slit-shaped openings along the anterior margin of the ventral hypostoma of Melissotarsus ant workers. The current histological study describes a hitherto unknown hypostomal gland from which this silk-like substance originates. In addition, this study describes a new basitarsal gland in the three pairs of legs of Melissotarsus workers.

  18. Delayed gastric emptying in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Marrinan, Sarah; Emmanuel, Anton V; Burn, David J

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms are evident in all stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). Most of the gastrointestinal abnormalities associated with PD are attributable to impaired motility. At the level of the stomach, this results in delayed gastric emptying. The etiology of delayed gastric emptying in PD is probably multifactorial but is at least partly related to Lewy pathology in the enteric nervous system and discrete brainstem nuclei. Delayed gastric emptying occurs in both early and advanced PD but is underdetected in routine clinical practice. Recognition of delayed gastric emptying is important because it can cause an array of upper gastrointestinal symptoms, but additionally it has important implications for the absorption and action of levodopa. Delayed gastric emptying contributes significantly to response fluctuations seen in people on long-term l-dopa therapy. Neurohormonal aspects of the brain-gut axis are pertinent to discussions regarding the pathophysiology of delayed gastric emptying in PD and are also hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of PD itself. Ghrelin is a gastric-derived hormone with potential as a therapeutic agent for delayed gastric emptying and also as a novel neuroprotective agent in PD. Recent findings relating to ghrelin in the context of PD and gastric emptying are considered. This article highlights the pathological abnormalities that may account for delayed gastric emptying in PD. It also considers the wider relevance of abnormal gastric pathology to our current understanding of the etiology of PD. PMID:24151126

  19. [The pig sty].

    PubMed

    Pires, J C

    1993-11-01

    A first-page picture of the journal O Estado de S. Paulo on October, 1993, depicts 3 children playing in the ruins of a school building in Bahia. They are dressed in rags, just like the immense majority of children begotten in recent years. They are disgracefully filthy, with dishevelled hair, in the company of a pig content to share its habitat with such animalistic beings. In the inside pages of the same edition are profuse photos of other pigs dressed in suits and ties. This ostentation mocks the people and mainly the 3 children who do not attend school because the money for it has been embezzled from their pockets. Decent journalists, conscious of these piggish humans, endeavor every day to make this country a decent place to live. In the fight for a dignified and decent country, the journal Planejamento Agora, edited by ABEPF, makes an important statement with its slogan that the fight is true when the spirit is unabated. Planejamento Agora stoically battles to make every animal child alive today a human child who is wanted. The work and team of Planejamento Agora are saluted, and they are urged to continue the struggle on behalf of such children. PMID:12346085

  20. Functional role of autophagy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic pathway responsible for the degradation of long-lived proteins and damaged intracellular organelles. Perturbations in autophagy are found in gastric cancer. In host gastric cells, autophagy can be induced by Helicobacter pylori (or H. pylori) infection, which is associated with the oncogenesis of gastric cancer. In gastric cancer cells, autophagy has both pro-survival and pro-death functions in determining cell fate. Besides, autophagy modulates gastric cancer metastasis by affecting a wide range of pathological events, including extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tumor angiogenesis, and tumor microenvironment. In addition, some of the autophagy-related proteins, such as Beclin 1, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3), and p62/sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1) have certain prognostic values for gastric cancer. In this article, we review the recent studies regarding the functional role of autophagy in gastric cancer. PMID:26910278

  1. Choroidal and cutaneous metastasis from gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shoichiro; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Yoshito; Ezaki, Hisao; Yamada, Takuya; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Miyazaki, Masanori; Nakai, Kei; Yakushijin, Takayuki; Watabe, Kenji; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Nishida, Kohji; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2013-03-01

    Choroidal or cutaneous metastasis of gastric cancer is rare. Gastrointestinal cancer was found in only 4% in patients with uveal metastasis. Choroidal metastasis from gastric cancer was reported in two cases in earlier literature. The frequency of gastric cancer as a primary lesion was 6% in cutaneous metastasis of men, and cutaneous metastasis occurs in 0.8% of all gastric cancers. We report a patient with gastric adenocarcinoma who presented with visual disorder in his left eye and skin pain on his head as his initial symptoms. These symptoms were diagnosed to be caused by choroidal and cutaneous metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma. Two cycles of chemotherapy consisted of oral S-1 and intravenous cisplatin (SPIRITS regimen); this was markedly effective to reduce the primary gastric lesion and almost all the metastatic lesions. PMID:23538460

  2. Magnetic system tracts steel bodied pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Kershaw, C.F.

    1982-06-01

    A new magnetic detection method can track and locate all types of pipeline-pigging devices - the standard swabbing, batching, and cleaning pig; online corrosion survey pigs; both dummy and live tools; and internal geometry pigs. The battery-operated detection instrument has six levels of sensitivity for varying pipeline depths, diameters, and wall thicknesses. Its operating principle involves sensing and recording the pig's characteristic magnetic signature.

  3. Comparison of Gastric Microbiota Between Gastric Juice and Mucosa by Next Generation Sequencing Method

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jihee; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Jaeyeon; Jo, Hyun Jin; Park, Ji Hyun; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Kim, Yeon-Ran; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-01-01

    Background: Not much is known about the role of gastric microbiota except for Helicobacter pylori in human health and disease. In this study, we aimed to detect human gastric microbiota in both gastric mucosa and gastric juice by barcoded 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and to compare the results from mucosa and juice. Methods: Gastric biopsies and stomach juices were collected from 4 subjects who underwent standard endoscopy at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. Gastric microbiota of antral mucosa, corpus mucosa samples, and gastric fluids were analyzed by barcoded 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The analysis focused on bacteria, such as H. pylori and nitrosating or nitrate-reducing bacteria. Results: Gastric fluid samples showed higher diversity compared to that of gastric mucosa samples. The mean of operational taxonomic units was higher in gastric fluid than in gastric mucosa. The samples of gastric fluid and gastric mucosa showed different composition of phyla. The composition of H. pylori and Proteobacteria was higher in mucosa samples compared to gastric fluid samples (H. pylori, 66.5% vs. 3.3%, P = 0.033; Proteobacteria, 75.4% vs. 26.3%, P = 0.041), while Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes were proportioned relatively less in mucosa samples than gastric fluid. However there was no significant difference. (Actinobacteria, 3.5% vs. 20.2%, P = 0.312; Bacteroidetes, 6.0% vs. 14.8%, P = 0.329; Firmicutes, 12.8% vs. 33.4%, P = 0.246). Conclusions: Even though these samples were small, gastric mucosa could be more effective than gastric fluid in the detection of meaningful gastric microbiota by pyrosequencing. PMID:27051651

  4. De Novo Gastric Cancer After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chung-Sik; Yoo, Moon-Won; Kim, Beom-Su; Hwang, Shin; Kim, Ki-Hun; Yook, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Byung-Sik; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In South Korea, which has a high incidence of gastric cancer, the most common de novo malignancy associated with liver transplantation is gastric cancer. This study sought to identify clinicopathologic characteristics in gastric cancer patients after liver transplantation, and to help manage these cases. MATERIAL AND METHODS We investigated gastric cancer patients after liver transplantation at Asan Medical Center. We analyzed sex, age, cause of liver transplantation, initiating immunosuppressant, pre-transplantation gastric fibroscopy findings, time interval between transplantation and gastric cancer occurrence, follow-up period, existence of gastric cancer screening, Helicobacter pylori infection, family cancer history, gastric cancer treatment, cancer location, size of tumor, macroscopic gross type, WHO histologic type, Lauren's classification, TNM stage, and survival. RESULTS Of 2968 adult liver transplantation patients at our hospital, 19 were diagnosed with gastric cancer. The mean age at the time of gastric cancer diagnosis was 60.2±6.8 (46-71) years and mean time interval between liver transplantation and diagnosis of gastric cancer was 56.0±30.7 (3.20-113) months. Endoscopic submucosal dissection was done for 10 patients, 4 of whom underwent surgical resection. Surgical resection as an initial treatment was done in 8 patients. One patient received chemotherapy first. The standard incidence ratio of gastric cancer in these patients was 1036 per 100 000 persons (95% CI, 623.7-1,619) in men and 318.9 per 100 000 (95% CI, 4.170-1,774) in women. CONCLUSIONS For long-term survival of liver transplant patients, early detection of de novo cancer is necessary. Therefore, annual screening for gastric cancer after liver transplantation is needed, especially in areas where the incidence of gastric cancer is high, such as South Korea. PMID:27334929

  5. Structure-Inherent Targeting of NIR Fluorophores for Parathyroid and Thyroid Gland Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Hoon; Park, Min Ho; Owens, Eric A.; Wada, Hideyuki; Henary, Maged; Handgraaf, Hein J.M.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Frangioni, John V.; Choi, Hak Soo

    2014-01-01

    The typical method for creating targeted contrast agents requires covalent conjugation of separate targeting and fluorophore domains. In this study, we demonstrate that it is possible create tissue-specific near-infrared fluorophores using the inherent chemical structure. Thus, a single compact molecule performs both targeting and imaging. We use this strategy to solve a major problem in head/neck surgery, the identification and preservation of parathyroid and thyroid glands. We synthesized 700-nm and 800-nm halogenated fluorophores that show high uptake in the specific glands after a single intravenous injection of only 0.06 mg kg−1 in a pig. Using a dual-channel near-infrared imaging system, we demonstrate the real-time, high-sensitivity, unambiguous identification of parathyroid and thyroid glands simultaneously in the context of blood and surrounding soft tissue. This novel technology lays the foundation for head/neck surgery performed with increased precision and efficiency, and potentially lowers morbidity, and a general strategy for targeted near-infrared fluorophore development. PMID:25559343

  6. Kir1.1 (ROMK) and Kv7.1 (KCNQ1/KvLQT1) are essential for normal gastric acid secretion: importance of functional Kir1.1.

    PubMed

    Vucic, Esad; Alfadda, Tariq; MacGregor, Gordon G; Dong, Ke; Wang, Tong; Geibel, John P

    2015-07-01

    Potassium channels comprise the apical leak pathway supplying extracellular K(+) for exchange with protons by the gastric H(+), K(+)-ATPase and provide potential therapeutic targets for inhibiting gastric acid secretion. The Kir1.1 (ROMK) potassium channel mediates the high capacity K(+) recycling necessary for NaCl reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of the kidney, and this channel exhibits functional and regulatory characteristic well suited for K(+) recycling by gastric parietal cells. We report here that Kir1.1 channels are required for gastric acid secretion and that this channel participates with Kv7.1 (KCNQ1/KvLQT1) in the potassium recycling process. We show that Kir1.1 colocalizes with the β-subunit of H(+), K(+)-ATPase in gastric parietal cells of Kir1.1 wild-type mice. In Kir1.1-deficient mice, gastric mucosal morphology, as well as parietal cell number, proliferation index, and ultrastructure were normal but secretagogue-stimulated gastric acid secretion in whole stomach and perfused gastric glands was absent. Luminal application of potassium-restored acid secretion in perfused gastric glands from Kir1.1-deficient as well as barium-blocked wild-type mice. In wild-type mice, both luminal Tertiapin-Q, an inhibitor of Kir1.1, as well as XE991, an inhibitor of Kv7.1, reduced proton secretion. We propose that Kir1.1 and Kv7.1 channels collaborate in potassium and current recycling across the apical pole of parietal cells. PMID:25127675

  7. Role of sebaceous glands in inflammatory dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Shi, Vivian Y; Leo, Michael; Hassoun, Lauren; Chahal, Dev S; Maibach, Howard I; Sivamani, Raja K

    2015-11-01

    Skin is an important interface between the host and its environment. Inflammatory dermatoses often have disrupted skin barrier function, rendering patients more susceptible to allergenic triggers leading to an exaggerated immune response. The skin surface lipid film, an important component of the skin barrier, comprises a mixture of keratinocyte and sebaceous gland-derived lipids. Recent evidence demonstrated that defective keratinocyte lipid synthesis predisposes for the development of atopic dermatitis. However, the important role of sebaceous gland-derived lipids in skin inflammatory diseases may be underrecognized. This overview focuses on the importance of the contribution of sebaceous glands to barrier function. Sebaceous gland alteration may play a role in the pathogenesis of common skin diseases including acne vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, rosacea, and seborrheic dermatitis. PMID:26386632

  8. [Radiotherapy of carcinoma of the salivary glands].

    PubMed

    Servagi-Vernat, S; Tochet, F

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, and technique of radiotherapy for salivary glands carcinoma are presented, and the contribution of neutrons and carbon ions. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed. PMID:27521038

  9. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the submandibular gland

    PubMed Central

    Ahamed, A. Saneem; Kannan, V. Sadesh; Velaven, K.; Sathyanarayanan, G. R.; Roshni, J.; Elavarasi, E.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cysts are benign, slowly growing unilocular or multilocular lesions that appear in the head and neck. They are also called Branchial cyst. The head and neck sites are the salivary glands(more commonly parotid and rarely submandibular gland) and the oral cavity (usually the floor of the mouth). there are various methods of investigation available today, of which Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) can be used to provide an immediate diagnosis of a lymphoepithelial cyst. The other investigations include, Ultrasonogram,and Computed tomography. It usually occurs due to the process of lymphocyte-induced cystic ductular dilatation and the confirmatory diagnosis is always made postoperatively by histopathological examination. The mainstay in the treatment of a lymphoepithelial cyst remains the surgical approach, which includes complete enucleation of the cyst along with total excision of the involved salivary gland. This is a report of a lymphoepithelial cyst involving the submandibular salivary gland and its management. PMID:25210369

  10. Lipid Transport in the Lactating Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    McManaman, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells depend on phospholipid (PL) and fatty acid (FA) transport to maintain membrane structure and organization, and to fuel and regulate cellular functions. In mammary glands of lactating animals, copious milk secretion, including large quantities of lipid in some species, requires adaptation and integration of PL and FA synthesis and transport processes to meet secretion demands. At present few details exist about how these processes are regulated within the mammary gland. However, recent advances in our understanding of the structural and molecular biology of membrane systems and cellular lipid trafficking provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the regulation and integration of PL and FA transport processes the lactating mammary gland. This review discusses the PL and FA transport processes required to maintain the structural integrity and organization of the mammary gland and support its secretory functions within the context of current molecular and cellular models of their regulation. PMID:24567110

  11. Construction and analysis of an hn-cDNA library derived from the p-arm of pig chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Anderson Dear, D V; Miller, J R

    1996-09-01

    Our aim is to find unidentified genes on specific pig chromosomes or chromosome fragments. Our approach has involved the construction of a heterogeneous nuclear complementary (hn-c) DNA library of the p-arm of pig Chromosome (Chr) 12, the only pig chromosome present in the pig x hamster hybrid cell line 8990. Total RNA was extracted from the cells and first-strand synthesis of hn-cDNA carried out with random and oligo dT primers. Pig hn-cDNA was isolated by amplification of first-strand synthesized hn-cDNA with primers specific for Short Interspersed Repeat Elements (SINEs) via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Hn-cDNAs were size selected and cloned in E. coli XL-1 blue cells with PCR-Script as the vector. The library consisted of 6000 clones. Clone inserts were amplified by PCR with vector-specific primers, and randomly picked inserts greater than 600 bp were sequenced. Homology searches were carried out with the FASTA search program on the GenEmbl database. Thirty clones were sequenced, and of these three showed strong homologies to GenEmbl sequences: (1) to sheep, mouse, human, and rat mammary gland factor (MGF); (2) to MLN-50, a gene that is amplified in human familial breast cancer and is present on human Chr 17; the latter is homologous to pig chromosome 12; (3) to a family of unassigned overlapping human ESTs. Of the other sequenced clones, seven were over 80% homologous with pig SINE sequences; three were over 75% homologous to human LINE sequences; six displayed open reading frames over a mean distance equivalent to 50 amino acids, although these showed no significant similarities with sequences in the databases. Using this approach, we have been able to identify several new genes on the p-arm of pig Chr 12. This is the first report of gene isolation from a library derived from a pig chromosome fragment. PMID:8703117

  12. The harderian gland: a tercentennial review.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, A P

    1994-01-01

    The harderian gland was first described in 1694 by Johann Jacob Harder (1656-1711). It occurs in most terrestrial vertebrates and is located within the orbit where, in some species, it is the largest structure. It may be compound tubular or compound tubuloalveolar, and its secretory duct is usually morphologically distinct only after leaving the substance of the gland to open on the surface of the nictitating membrane. The tubules of the gland are formed of a single layer of columnar epithelial cells surrounded by myoepithelial cells. The chief product(s) of the gland varies between different groups of vertebrates, and epithelial cells possess granules or vacuoles whose contents may be mucous, serous or lipid. In rodents, the gland synthesises lipids, porphyrins and indoles. In the case of lipid vacuoles, the gland is unusual in releasing these by an exocytotic mechanism. It is unclear whether the gland can act both as an exocrine and endocrine organ. There is control of gland structure and synthesis through a variety of humoral agents, including gonadal, thyroid and pituitary hormones; in addition there is a rich autonomic innervation and many neuropeptides have been identified. The proposed functions of the gland are remarkably diverse and include the gland being (1) a source of 'saliva', (2) a site of immune response, (3) a photoprotective organ, (4) part of a retinal-pineal axis, (5) a source of pheromones, (6) a source of thermoregulatory lipids, (7) a site of osmoregulation, and (8) a source of growth factors. The gland is discussed in terms of its embryology and phylogeny, and in relation to ecological variables. Several goals of future research are identified. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 Fig. 21 Fig. 22 Fig. 23 Fig. 24 Fig. 25 Fig. 26 Fig. 27 Fig. 28 Fig. 29 Fig. 30 Fig. 31 Fig. 32 Fig. 36 Fig. 37 Fig. 38 Fig. 40 PMID:7559104

  13. Field experiences with intelligent pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.N.; Duvivier, J.P.; Lefevre, D.E.; Robb, G.A.

    1996-08-01

    Oil and gas production operations use intelligent pigs for corrosion inspection of gathering systems and pipelines worldwide. The authors have been involved with intelligent pig inspections which have been conducted on over 155 different pipelines owned by one international corporation. A variety of intelligent pig vendors have been used with tools ranging from standard first generation magnetic flux leakage (MFL) to high-resolution MFL to standard and custom made ultrasonic (UT) tools. Experiences encountered during these inspections are discussed and resolutions to many of the problems are described.

  14. Facial Nerve and Parotid Gland Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kochhar, Amit; Larian, Babak; Azizzadeh, Babak

    2016-04-01

    This article provides an overview of important anatomic and functional anatomy associated with the parotid gland and facial nerve for the practicing otolaryngologist, head and neck surgeon, facial plastic surgeon, and plastic surgeon. The discussion includes the important anatomic relationships and physiology related to the parotid gland and salivary production. A comprehensive description of the path of facial nerve, its branches, and important anatomic landmarks also are provided. PMID:27040583

  15. Pheromones and exocrine glands in Isoptera.

    PubMed

    Costa-Leonardo, Ana Maria; Haifig, Ives

    2010-01-01

    Termites are eusocial insects that have a peculiar and intriguing system of communication using pheromones. The termite pheromones are composed of a blend of chemical substances and they coordinate different social interactions or activities, including foraging, building, mating, defense, and nestmate recognition. Some of these sociochemicals are volatile, spreading in the air, and others are contact pheromones, which are transmitted by trophallaxis and grooming. Among the termite semiochemicals, the most known are alarm, trail, sex pheromones, and hydrocarbons responsible for the recognition of nestmates. The sources of the pheromones are exocrine glands located all over the termite body. The principal exocrine structures considered pheromone-producing glands in Isoptera are the frontal, mandibular, salivary or labial, sternal, and tergal glands. The frontal gland is the source of alarm pheromone and defensive chemicals, but the mandibular secretions have been little studied and their function is not well established in Isoptera. The secretion of salivary glands involves numerous chemical compounds, some of them without pheromonal function. The worker saliva contains a phagostimulating pheromone and probably a building pheromone, while the salivary reservoir of some soldiers contains defensive chemicals. The sternal gland is the only source of trail-following pheromone, whereas sex pheromones are secreted by two glandular sources, the sternal and tergal glands. To date, the termite semiochemicals have indicated that few molecules are involved in their chemical communication, that is, the same compound may be secreted by different glands, different castes and species, and for different functions, depending on the concentration. In addition to the pheromonal parsimony, recent studies also indicate the occurrence of a synergic effect among the compounds involved in the chemical communication of Isoptera. PMID:20831960

  16. [Clinical features of accessory parotid gland tumors].

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Hiroyoshi; Wada, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Hidefumi; Yamada, Kei; Matsushita, Naoki; Okamoto, Sachimi; Teranishi, Yuichi; Koda, Yuki; Kosugi, Yuki; Yamane, Hideo

    2013-12-01

    Accessory parotid gland tumors are relatively rare; hence, adequately detailed clinical analyses of these tumors are difficult to perform at a single institution. In this report, we describe the findings for 65 patients [29 men, 36 women; median age, 51 (9-81) years] with accessory parotid gland tumors, consisting of 4 cases documented by us and 61 cases previously reported by other Japanese authors. Approximately 50% of the patients were treated in an otolaryngology department, while the remaining patients were treated in plastic surgery, oral surgery, or dermatology departments. In 4 patients, the results of preoperative fine-needle aspiration cytology indicated that the tumor was benign; however, the postoperative histopathology results revealed malignant tumors. The frequencies of malignant and benign tumors were 44.6% (n = 29) and 55.4% (n = 36), respectively. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma and pleomorphic adenoma were the most frequent types of malignant and benign accessory parotid gland tumors, respectively. Among the various surgical methods that were used, such as direct cheek and intraoral incisions, a standard parotidectomy incision was the most preferred treatment approach for these tumors. Recently, an endoscopic approach has also been found to yield satisfactory results. An optimal approach should be selected after evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of these methods. No definite guidelines are available regarding the choice of elective neck dissection and postoperative radiation therapy for malignant accessory parotid gland tumors. Although tumor resection (plus elective neck dissection) and postoperative radiation therapy have been frequently performed for various kinds of malignant accessory parotid gland tumors to date, additional studies are needed regarding the criteria for selecting elective neck dissection and postoperative radiation therapy. Since the malignancy rate for accessory parotid gland tumors is higher than that for parotid gland

  17. Reversibility of gastric mucosal lesions induced by sodium phosphate tablets and characterized by probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Coron, Emmanuel; Dewitte, Marie; Aubert, Philippe; Musquer, Nicolas; Neunlist, Michel; Bruley des Varannes, Stanislas

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Adequate bowel preparation is key for the optimal quality of colonoscopy. The sodium phosphate laxatives used for preparation may induce gastric injuries. However, in vivo studies monitoring the effects of sodium phosphate on the gastric mucosa are currently lacking. We aimed to characterize the effects of sodium phosphate tablets (Colokit®; Mayoly Spindler, Chatou, France) on the gastric mucosa in a large-animal model. Methods: Fourteen anesthetized pigs were used for this study. Fundic mucosal sites were analyzed at 1.5, 24, and 72 hours after the endoscopically guided application of sodium phosphate tablets (NaPT) and placebo tablets (PlaT) and were compared with unexposed sites. Different mucosal parameters were assessed with white light endoscopy, probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE), histology, and ex vivo permeability measurements. Results: At 90 minutes after the application of NaPT, significant increases in epithelial irregularity and crypt pit intensity were observed with pCLE. These microscopic lesions persisted at 24 hours but were resolved at 72 hours. In addition, white light endoscopy revealed local exanthema in 57 % of the animals at 1.5 hours after NaPT application. Such lesions were observed in 22 % of the pigs at 24 hours and disappeared at 72 hours after application. After 1.5 hours, PlaT induced a slight but significant increase in epithelial irregularity, as well as architectural scores that were significantly lower than the ones induced by NaPT and that disappeared after 72 hours. Conclusions: The direct and prolonged gastric application of NaPT in pigs can induce acute superficial macroscopic and microscopic injuries that are reversible within 72 hours. PMID:26134776

  18. Indications for Salivary Gland Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thomson, David J; Slevin, Nick J; Mendenhall, William M

    2016-01-01

    There is an established role for post-operative radiotherapy in the treatment of benign and malignant salivary gland tumours. For benign disease, the addition of radiotherapy improves local tumour control in cases with incomplete excision, involved surgical margins or multi-focal disease recurrence. After capsule rupture or spillage alone, surveillance should usually be advised. For malignant disease, post-operative radiotherapy is recommended for an advanced tumour stage, high-grade tumour, perineural or lympho-vascular invasion, close or positive resection margins, extra-parotid extension or lymph node involvement. The main benefit is increased loco-regional tumour control, although this may translate into a modest improvement in survival. The possible late side effects of parotid bed irradiation include skin changes, chronic otitis externa, sensorineural hearing loss, osteoradionecrosis and secondary malignancy. Severe complications are rare, but patients should be counselled carefully about the risks. Primary radiotherapy is unlikely to be curative and is reserved to cases in which resection would cause unacceptable functional or cosmetic morbidity or would likely result in subtotal resection (R2) or to patients with distant metastases to gain local tumour control. There are provisional data on the use of charged particle radiotherapy in this setting. Some patients may benefit from synchronous chemotherapy with radiotherapy, but this group is not defined, and data from comparative prospective studies are required before routine clinical use of this treatment. PMID:27093301

  19. Acotiamide Hydrochloride, a Therapeutic Agent for Functional Dyspepsia, Enhances Acetylcholine-induced Contraction via Inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Circular Muscle Strips of Guinea Pig Stomach.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Kawachi, M; Matsunaga, Y; Hori, Y; Ozaki, T; Nagahama, K; Hirayama, M; Kawabata, Y; Shiraishi, Y; Takei, M; Tanaka, T

    2016-04-01

    Acotiamide is a first-in-class prokinetic drug approved in Japan for the treatment of functional dyspepsia. Given that acotiamide enhances gastric motility in conscious dogs and rats, we assessed the in vitro effects of this drug on the contraction of guinea pig stomach strips and on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in stomach homogenate following fundus removal. We also investigated the serotonin 5-HT4 receptor agonist mosapride, dopamine D2 receptor and AChE inhibitor itopride, and representative AChE inhibitor neostigmine. Acotiamide (0.3 and 1 μM) and itopride (1 and 3 μM) significantly enhanced the contraction of gastric body strips induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS), but mosapride (1 and 10 μM) did not. Acotiamide and itopride significantly enhanced the contraction of gastric body and antrum strips induced by acetylcholine (ACh), but not that induced by carbachol (CCh). Neostigmine also significantly enhanced the contraction of gastric body strips induced by ACh, but not that by CCh. In contrast, mosapride failed to enhance contractions induced by either ACh or CCh in gastric antrum strips. Acotiamide exerted mixed inhibition of AChE, and the percentage inhibition of acotiamide (100 μM) against AChE activity was markedly reduced after the reaction mixture was dialyzed. In contrast, itopride exerted noncompetitive inhibition on AChE activity. These results indicate that acotiamide enhances ACh-dependent contraction in gastric strips of guinea pigs via the inhibition of AChE activity, and that it exerts mixed and reversible inhibition of AChE derived from guinea pig stomach. PMID:26418413

  20. Sialolithiasis of an accessory parotid gland: an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Debnath, S C; Adhyapok, A K

    2015-09-01

    We report a rare case of sialolithiasis of an accessory parotid gland, which was located anteromedial to the masseter muscle and isolated from the main parotid gland. The calculus developed from this accessory gland, and the main gland was free of lithiasis and inflammation. To our knowledge, there is no reported case of 14 stones in an accessory parotid salivary gland. The calculus was removed through a standard incision without injury to the facial nerve or a salivary fistula. PMID:26048098

  1. Lacrimal Gland Radiosensitivity in Uveal Melanoma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Karin Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Naus, Nicole; Pan, Connie de; Santen, Cornelis A. van; Levendag, Peter; Luyten, Gre P.M.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To find a dose-volume effect for inhomogeneous irradiated lacrimal glands. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2006, 72 patients (42 men and 30 women) were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in a prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial (median follow-up, 32 months). A total dose of 50 Gy was given on 5 consecutive days. The mean of all Schirmer test results obtained {>=}6 months after treatment was correlated with the radiation dose delivered to the lacrimal gland. Also, the appearance of dry eye syndrome (DES) was related to the lacrimal gland dose distribution. Results: Of the 72 patients, 17 developed a late Schirmer value <10 mm; 9 patients developed DES. A statistically significant relationship was found between the received median dose in the lacrimal gland vs. reduced tear production (p = 0.000) and vs. the appearance of DES (p = 0.003), respectively. A median dose of 7 Gy/fraction to the lacrimal gland caused a 50% risk of low Schirmer results. A median dose of 10 Gy resulted in a 50% probability of DES. Conclusion: We found a clear dose-volume relationship for irradiated lacrimal glands with regard to reduced tear production and the appearance of DES.

  2. Malignant sweat gland tumours: an update.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, José C; Calonje, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous adnexal tumours can be a diagnostic challenge for the pathologist. This is particularly true in the case of tumours with sweat gland differentiation, due to a large number of rare entities, a multiplicity of names to designate the same neoplasms and consequent lack of consensus regarding their classification and nomenclature. In the traditional view, sweat gland tumours were divided into eccrine and apocrine. However, this has been challenged in recent years, and in fact many of these tumours may have both eccrine and apocrine variants. Some display more complex features and defy classification, due to the presence of other lines of differentiation, namely follicular and/or sebaceous (in the case of apocrine tumours, due to the close embryological relationship between apocrine glands, hair follicles and sebaceous glands). The present paper reviews and updates the basic concepts regarding the following malignant sweat gland tumours: apocrine carcinoma, porocarcinoma, hidradenocarcinoma, spiradenocarcinoma, cylindrocarcinoma, microcystic adnexal carcinoma and related entities, squamoid eccrine ductal carcinoma, digital papillary adenocarcinoma, primary cutaneous mucinous carcinoma, endocrine mucin-producing sweat gland carcinoma and primary cutaneous signet ring cell carcinoma. Particular emphasis is put in recent findings that may have implications in the diagnosis and management of these tumours. PMID:26114606

  3. Partial irradiation of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, A; Ship, J A; Kim, H M; Ten Haken, R K

    2001-07-01

    Recent efforts to reduce xerostomia associated with irradiation (RT) of head and neck cancer include the use of conformal and intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) to partly spare the major salivary glands, notably the parotid glands, from a high radiation dose while treating adequately all the targets at risk of disease. Knowledge of the dose-volume-response relationships in the salivary glands would determine treatment planning goals and facilitate optimization of the RT plans. Recent prospective studies of salivary flows following inhomogeneous irradiation of the parotid glands have utilized dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and various models to assess these relationships. These studies found that the mean dose to the gland is correlated with the reduction of the salivary output. This is consistent with a pure parallel architecture of the functional subunits (FSUs) of the salivary glands. The range of the mean doses, which have been found in these studies to cause significant salivary flow reduction is 26 to 39 Gy. PMID:11447580

  4. Advances in gastric cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Antonio; Cito, Letizia

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a multifactorial neoplastic pathology numbering among its causes both environmental and genetic predisposing factors. It is mainly diffused in South America and South-East Asia, where it shows the highest morbility percentages and it is relatively scarcely diffused in Western countries and North America. Although molecular mechanisms leading to gastric cancer development are only partially known, three main causes are well characterized: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, diet rich in salted and/or smoked food and red meat, and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) mutations. Unhealthy diet and H. pylori infection are able to induce in stomach cancer cells genotypic and phenotypic transformation, but their effects may be crossed by a diet rich in vegetables and fresh fruits. Various authors have recently focused their attention on the importance of a well balanced diet, suggesting a necessary dietary education starting from childhood. A constant surveillance will be necessary in people carrying E-cadherin mutations, since they are highly prone in developing gastric cancer, also within the inner stomach layers. Above all in the United States, several carriers decided to undergo a gastrectomy, preferring changing their lifestyle than living with the awareness of the development of a possible gastric cancer. This kind of choice is strictly personal, hence a decision cannot be suggested within the clinical management. Here we summarize the key points of gastric cancer prevention analyzing possible strategies referred to the different predisposing factors. We will discuss about the effects of diet, H. pylori infection and E-cadherin mutations and how each of them can be handled. PMID:23061031

  5. The Postpharyngeal Gland: Specialized Organ for Lipid Nutrition in Leaf-Cutting Ants

    PubMed Central

    Decio, Pâmela; Vieira, Alexsandro Santana; Dias, Nathalia Baptista; Palma, Mario Sergio; Bueno, Odair Correa

    2016-01-01

    There are several hypotheses about the possible functions of the postpharyngeal gland (PPG) in ants. The proposed functions include roles as cephalic or gastric caeca and diverticulum of the digestive tract, mixing of hydrocarbons, nestmate recognition, feeding larvae, and the accumulation of lipids inside this gland, whose origin is contradictory. The current study aimed to investigate the functions of these glands by examining the protein expression profile of the PPGs of Atta sexdens rubropilosa (Hymenoptera, Formicidae). Mated females received lipid supplementation and their glands were extracted and analyzed using a proteomic approach. The protocol used combined two-dimensional electrophoresis and shotgun strategies, followed by mass spectrometry. We also detected lipid β-oxidation by immunofluorescent marking of acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Supplying ants with lipids elicited responses in the glandular cells of the PPG; these included increased expression of proteins related to defense mechanisms and signal transduction and reorganization of the cytoskeleton due to cell expansion. In addition, some proteins in PPG were overexpressed, especially those involved in lipid and energy metabolism. Part of the lipids may be reduced, used for the synthesis of fatty alcohol, transported to the hemolymph, or may be used as substrate for the synthesis of acetyl-CoA, which is oxidized to form molecules that drive oxidative phosphorylation and produce energy for cellular metabolic processes. These findings suggest that this organ is specialized for lipid nutrition of adult leaf-cutting ants and characterized like a of diverticulum foregut, with the ability to absorb, store, metabolize, and mobilize lipids to the hemolymph. However, we do not rule out that the PPG may have other functions in other species of ants. PMID:27149618

  6. The Postpharyngeal Gland: Specialized Organ for Lipid Nutrition in Leaf-Cutting Ants.

    PubMed

    Decio, Pâmela; Vieira, Alexsandro Santana; Dias, Nathalia Baptista; Palma, Mario Sergio; Bueno, Odair Correa

    2016-01-01

    There are several hypotheses about the possible functions of the postpharyngeal gland (PPG) in ants. The proposed functions include roles as cephalic or gastric caeca and diverticulum of the digestive tract, mixing of hydrocarbons, nestmate recognition, feeding larvae, and the accumulation of lipids inside this gland, whose origin is contradictory. The current study aimed to investigate the functions of these glands by examining the protein expression profile of the PPGs of Atta sexdens rubropilosa (Hymenoptera, Formicidae). Mated females received lipid supplementation and their glands were extracted and analyzed using a proteomic approach. The protocol used combined two-dimensional electrophoresis and shotgun strategies, followed by mass spectrometry. We also detected lipid β-oxidation by immunofluorescent marking of acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Supplying ants with lipids elicited responses in the glandular cells of the PPG; these included increased expression of proteins related to defense mechanisms and signal transduction and reorganization of the cytoskeleton due to cell expansion. In addition, some proteins in PPG were overexpressed, especially those involved in lipid and energy metabolism. Part of the lipids may be reduced, used for the synthesis of fatty alcohol, transported to the hemolymph, or may be used as substrate for the synthesis of acetyl-CoA, which is oxidized to form molecules that drive oxidative phosphorylation and produce energy for cellular metabolic processes. These findings suggest that this organ is specialized for lipid nutrition of adult leaf-cutting ants and characterized like a of diverticulum foregut, with the ability to absorb, store, metabolize, and mobilize lipids to the hemolymph. However, we do not rule out that the PPG may have other functions in other species of ants. PMID:27149618

  7. 64Cu DOTA-Trastuzumab PET/CT in Studying Patients With Gastric Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer

  8. The regulation of lipogenesis in vivo in the lactating mammary gland of the rat during the starved-refed transition. Studies wtih acarbose, a glucosidase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, S W; Williamson, D H

    1987-01-01

    Depression of carbohydrate digestion by oral administration of acarbose, a glucosidase inhibitor, led to a 75% inhibition of the re-activation of lipogenesis in vivo in the mammary gland of 18 h-starved lactating rats refed with 5 g of chow diet. Rates of [1-14C]glucose incorporation in vitro into lipid and CO2 in mammary-gland acini isolated from refed animals were elevated compared with acini from starved rats, but acarbose treatment completely prevented this stimulation. Gastric intubation of glucose led to a large stimulation of lipogenesis in the mammary gland of starved lactating rats, similar to that induced by refeeding with chow diet; this was dependent on the amount of glucose given and the time elapsed between glucose administration and injection of 3H2O for the measurement of lipogenesis. The switch-on of lipogenesis in the mammary gland of starved lactating rats, by refeeding or by intubation of glucose, was associated with a decrease in the ratio of [glucose 6-phosphate]/[fructose 1,6-bisphosphate] in the gland, indicative of an increase in phosphofructokinase activity. A time-course study revealed that the ratio decreased rapidly over the first 30 min of chow refeeding, after which a large surge in lipogenesis was seen. Acarbose, given 25 min after the onset of refeeding, led to a stepwise increase in the ratio, in parallel with the observed decrease in lipogenic activity. It is concluded that the control of lipogenesis in the mammary gland is closely linked to the availability of dietary carbohydrate. An important site of regulation of lipogenesis in the gland appears to be at the level of phosphofructokinase. A possible role of insulin in the regulation of phosphofructokinase activity, and the acute modulation of insulin-sensitivity in the gland during the starved-refed transition, are discussed. PMID:2954538

  9. Early gradual feeding with bovine colostrum improves gut function and NEC resistance relative to infant formula in preterm pigs.

    PubMed

    Shen, René L; Thymann, Thomas; Østergaard, Mette V; Støy, Ann Cathrine F; Krych, Łukasz; Nielsen, Dennis S; Lauridsen, Charlotte; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens J; Burrin, Douglas G; Sangild, Per T

    2015-09-01

    It is unclear when and how to start enteral feeding for preterm infants when mother's milk is not available. We hypothesized that early and slow advancement with either formula or bovine colostrum stimulates gut maturation and prevents necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm pigs, used as models for preterm infants. Pigs were given either total parenteral nutrition (TPN, n = 14) or slowly advancing volumes (16-64 ml·kg(-1)·day(-1)) of preterm infant formula (IF, n = 15) or bovine colostrum (BC, n = 13), both given as adjunct to parenteral nutrition. On day 5, both enteral diets increased intestinal mass (27 ± 1 vs. 22 ± 1 g/kg) and glucagon-like peptide 2 release, relative to TPN (P < 0.05). The incidence of mild NEC lesions was higher in IF than BC and TPN pigs (60 vs. 0 and 15%, respectively, P < 0.05). Only the IF pigs showed reduced gastric emptying and gastric inhibitory polypeptide release, and increased tissue proinflammatory cytokine levels (IL-1β and IL-8, P < 0.05) and expression of immune-related genes (AOAH, LBP, CXCL10, TLR2), relative to TPN. The IF pigs also showed reduced intestinal villus-to-crypt ratio, lactose digestion, and some plasma amino acids (Arg, Cit, Gln, Tyr, Val), and higher intestinal permeability, compared with BC pigs (all P < 0.05). Colonic microbiota analyses showed limited differences among groups. Early feeding with formula induces intestinal dysfunction whereas bovine colostrum supports gut maturation when mother's milk is absent during the first week after preterm birth. A diet-dependent feeding guideline may be required for newborn preterm infants. PMID:26138468

  10. The Accuracy of Gastric Insufflation in Testing for Gastroesophageal Perforations during Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is an effective technique for the symptomatic relief of the manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disorder but is associated with a 0.8-1% rate of gastroesophageal perforation. Early detection and repair of these injuries is critical to patient outcome, but occult injuries occur and may be missed. Gastric insufflation technique evaluates the integrity of the gastroesophageal wall after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. Gastric insufflation technique involves occlusion of the proximal stomach with a non-crushing bowel clamp while insufflating the submerged gastroesophageal junction. We conducted an animal study to assess the utility of gastric insufflation technique. Methods: Five pigs (mean weight, 40.4 kg) underwent testing of laparoscopic gastric insufflation technique. In four animals, laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication was performed and then gastroesophageal junction injuries were created (3-5 mm distraction-type wall injuries). Non-crushing bowel clamps provided occlusion of the pylorus and then the proximal stomach during gastroesophageal insufflation. The gastroesophageal junction was then submerged. In the fifth animal, gastric insufflation technique was repeated while calibrated injuries were created to determine the smallest detectable injury. An injury was considered detectable if rising air bubbles were noted from the submerged gastroesophageal structures. Maximal luminal pressures needed to detect injuries were recorded with an in-line manometer. Results: In all animals, 5-7 mm injuries of the gastroesophageal junction were easily detected using gastric insufflation technique when the proximal stomach was occluded. When the pylorus alone was occluded, detection of gastroesophageal injuries was inconsistent. Small injuries (lt;3 mm) of the esophagus were difficult to visualize with pyloric occlusion alone but were consistently detectable with proximal stomach occlusion at pressures less than 20 mm Hg

  11. Molecular classification and prediction in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongzhong; Song, Won-min; Zhang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer, a highly heterogeneous disease, is the second leading cause of cancer death and the fourth most common cancer globally, with East Asia accounting for more than half of cases annually. Alongside TNM staging, gastric cancer clinic has two well-recognized classification systems, the Lauren classification that subdivides gastric adenocarcinoma into intestinal and diffuse types and the alternative World Health Organization system that divides gastric cancer into papillary, tubular, mucinous (colloid), and poorly cohesive carcinomas. Both classification systems enable a better understanding of the histogenesis and the biology of gastric cancer yet have a limited clinical utility in guiding patient therapy due to the molecular heterogeneity of gastric cancer. Unprecedented whole-genome-scale data have been catalyzing and advancing the molecular subtyping approach. Here we cataloged and compared those published gene expression profiling signatures in gastric cancer. We summarized recent integrated genomic characterization of gastric cancer based on additional data of somatic mutation, chromosomal instability, EBV virus infection, and DNA methylation. We identified the consensus patterns across these signatures and identified the underlying molecular pathways and biological functions. The identification of molecular subtyping of gastric adenocarcinoma and the development of integrated genomics approaches for clinical applications such as prediction of clinical intervening emerge as an essential phase toward personalized medicine in treating gastric cancer. PMID:26380657

  12. Pig shipping container test sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, H.E. Jr.

    1995-01-13

    This test plan outlines testing of the integrity of the pig shipping container. It is divided into four sections: (1) drop test requirements; (2) test preparations; (3) perform drop test; and (4) post-test examination.

  13. Solanum malacoxylon toxicity to pigs.

    PubMed

    Rucksan, B E; Wells, G A; Lewis, G

    1978-08-19

    Newly weaned pigs were given Solanum malacoxylon at dose rates of 0.2 and 1.0 g per kg body-weight per week for eight weeks. The Solanum malacoxylon was given either as an aqueous extract (SM) or as an aqueous extract incubated with fresh rumen liquor (SMLR). Tubulonephrosis, dose related in severity, was evident in all treated pigs and focal calcification in kidney and lung occurred in pigs receiving the higher dose rate. There was a marked hypercalcaemia and hypophosphataemia over the trial period; the latter feature was in contrast with the hyperphosphataemia produced in sheep. Incubation of SM with rumen liquor enhanced hypophosphataemia at both dose levels in the pig but its effect on serum calcium was equivocal. PMID:695263

  14. Elodontoma in Two Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Capello, Vittorio; Lennox, Angela; Ghisleni, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Elodontoma was diagnosed in two pet guinea pigs, one involving a maxillary premolar tooth and the other affecting a mandibular incisor tooth. Diagnostic imaging, including radiographs, computed tomography, and oral endoscopy was performed in order to quantify dental disease. Diagnostic imaging was also used to guide treatment of acquired dental disease, which included intraoral restoration of normal occlusal plane and tooth extraction using an extraoral approach. These are the first histologically confirmed cases of elodontoma in guinea pigs. PMID:26415388

  15. Solanum malacoxylon poisoning in pigs.

    PubMed

    Done, S H; Tokarina, C H; Dämmrich, K; Döbereiner, J

    1976-03-01

    Solanum malacoxylon was given orally to four pigs. The animals were examined clinically and subjected to post mortem examination. Macroscopic lesions were not seen with the exception of a small calcified plaque in the endocardium of one animal. Microscopic examinations revealed slight calcification of elastic fibres in the soft tissues. The pathological changes in the bones were extensive and are described in detail. The pigs showed minimal lesions at dose levels which cause considerable systemic calcification in cattle and sheep. PMID:1265362

  16. Selective Photothermolysis to target Sebaceous Glands: Theoretical Estimation of Parameters and Preliminary Results Using a Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Fernanda Sakamoto, Apostolos Doukas, William Farinelli, Zeina Tannous, Michelle D. Shinn, Stephen Benson, Gwyn P. Williams, H. Dylla, Richard Anderson

    2011-12-01

    The success of permanent laser hair removal suggests that selective photothermolysis (SP) of sebaceous glands, another part of hair follicles, may also have merit. About 30% of sebum consists of fats with copious CH2 bond content. SP was studied in vitro, using free electron laser (FEL) pulses at an infrared CH2 vibrational absorption wavelength band. Absorption spectra of natural and artificially prepared sebum were measured from 200 nm to 3000 nm, to determine wavelengths potentially able to target sebaceous glands. The Jefferson National Accelerator superconducting FEL was used to measure photothermal excitation of aqueous gels, artificial sebum, pig skin, human scalp and forehead skin (sebaceous sites). In vitro skin samples were exposed to FEL pulses from 1620 to 1720 nm, spot diameter 7-9.5 mm with exposure through a cold 4C sapphire window in contact with the skin. Exposed and control tissue samples were stained using H and E, and nitroblue tetrazolium chloride staining (NBTC) was used to detect thermal denaturation. Natural and artificial sebum both had absorption peaks near 1210, 1728, 1760, 2306 and 2346 nm. Laser-induced heating of artificial sebum was approximately twice that of water at 1710 and 1720 nm, and about 1.5x higher in human sebaceous glands than in water. Thermal camera imaging showed transient focal heating near sebaceous hair follicles. Histologically, skin samples exposed to {approx}1700 nm, {approx}100-125 ms pulses showed evidence of selective thermal damage to sebaceous glands. Sebaceous glands were positive for NBTC staining, without evidence of selective loss in samples exposed to the laser. Epidermis was undamaged in all samples. Conclusions: SP of sebaceous glands appears to be feasible. Potentially, optical pulses at {approx}1720 nm or {approx}1210 nm delivered with large beam diameter and appropriate skin cooling in approximately 0.1 s may provide an alternative treatment for acne.

  17. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Cancer or Other Salivary Gland Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-10

    High-grade Salivary Gland Carcinoma; High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Malignant Mixed Cell Type Tumor

  18. Phase II Study of Oxaliplatin, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Advanced Gastric/Gastroesophageal Junction Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  19. Irinotecan, Cisplatin, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  20. Alpha-fetoprotein-producing hepatoid gastric adenocarcinoma in a child presenting with spontaneous gastric perforation.

    PubMed

    Emir, Suna; Karakurt, Neslihan; Karakuş, Esra; Şenel, Emrah; Kırsaçlıoğlu, Ceyda; Demir, Hacı Ahmet; Orhan, Diclehan

    2014-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is a rare entity in the pediatric population. Gastric hepatoid adenocarcinoma with elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is seen extremely rarely in children. A 12-year-old boy was admitted to the hospital with complaint of abdominal pain. X-ray revealed free air density below the diaphragm. Emergent laparotomy showed perforated stomach. Four weeks after the operation, he was readmitted with severe gastrointestinal obstruction symptoms. He underwent an explorative laparotomy, which revealed intestinal edema and diffuse small solid nodules covering the peritoneum. Serum AFP level was mildly elevated. Endoscopic evaluation of the upper gastrointestinal tract was performed, and a gastric mass was detected. All pathological findings were compatible with gastric carcinoma showing hepatoid differentiation. We report an unusual case of AFP-producing hepatoid gastric adenocarcinoma presenting with gastric perforation. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported case of AFP- producing hepatoid gastric adenocarcinoma presenting with gastric perforation in a child. PMID:24827954

  1. The clypeal gland: a new exocrine gland in termite imagoes (Isoptera: Serritermitidae, Rhinotermitidae, Termitidae).

    PubMed

    Křížková, Barbora; Bourguignon, Thomas; Vytisková, Blahoslava; Sobotník, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Social insects possess a rich set of exocrine organs producing diverse pheromones and defensive compounds. This is especially true for termite imagoes, which are equipped with several glands producing, among others, sex pheromones and defensive compounds protecting imagoes during the dispersal flight and colony foundation. Here, we describe the clypeal gland, a new termite exocrine organ occurring in the labro-clypeal region of imagoes of most Rhinotermitidae, Serritermitidae and Termitidae species. The clypeal gland of Coptotermes testaceus consists of class 1 (modified epidermal cell) and class 3 (bicellular gland unit) secretory cells. Ultrastructural features suggest that the gland secretes volatile compounds and proteins, probably after starting the reproduction. One peculiar feature of the gland is the presence of multiple secretory canals in a single canal cell, a feature never observed before in other insect glands. Although the function of the gland remains unknown, we hypothesize that it could produce secretion signalling the presence of functional reproductives or their need to be fed. PMID:25280798

  2. Production of ghrelin by the stomach of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Junya; Aoyagi, Keishiro; Sato, Takahiro; Kojima, Masayasu; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Poor nutrition and weight loss are important factors contributing to poor quality of life (QOL) after gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer. Ghrelin is a hormone produced by the stomach that, plays a role in appetite increase and fat storage. The present study aims to clarify the location of ghrelin mRNA in the stomach, changes in blood ghrelin concentrations after gastrectomy and whether or not they are associated with the reconstruction method in patients with gastric cancer. We collected seven normal mucosa samples from different parts of six totally resected stomachs with gastric cancer. We extracted RNA from the normal mucosa, synthesized cDNA from total RNA (1 μg), and then quantified ghrelin mRNA using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Ghrelin blood concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits in 74 patients with gastric cancer (total gastrectomy (TG), n=23; distal gastrectomy (DG), n=30; proximal gastrectomy (PG), n=11; pylorus preserving gastrectomy (PPG), n=10). In order, the ghrelin gene was expressed most frequently in the gastric body, followed by the fornix, cardia, antrum and pylorus ring. Blood ghrelin concentrations after surgery similarly changed in all groups. The average blood ghrelin concentrations were significantly higher in the DG and PPG groups than in the TG group on postoperative days (POD) 1, 7, 30, 90 and 180. However, blood ghrelin concentrations did not significantly differ between the DG and TG groups on POD 270 and 360. Cells that produce ghrelin are supposed to be located mostly in the fundic gland of the stomach. We speculate that the production of ghrelin from other organs increases from around nine months after total gastrectomy. Therefore, evaluating the nutritional status and the weight of patients at nine months after total gastrectomy is important to help these patients improve their QOL. PMID:24858413

  3. Methyl Donor Deficiency Affects Fetal Programming of Gastric Ghrelin Cell Organization and Function in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Blaise, Sébastien; Pourié, Grégory; Tomasetto, Catherine; Audonnet, Sandra; Ortiou, Sandrine; Koziel, Violette; Rio, Marie-Christine; Daval, Jean-Luc; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Beck, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Methyl donor deficiency (MDD) during pregnancy influences intrauterine development. Ghrelin is expressed in the stomach of fetuses and influences fetal growth, but MDD influence on gastric ghrelin is unknown. We examined the gastric ghrelin system in MDD-induced intrauterine growth retardation. By using specific markers and approaches (such as periodic acid–Schiff, bromodeoxyuridine, homocysteine, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling, immunostaining, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction), we studied the gastric oxyntic mucosa cellular organization and ghrelin gene expression in the mucosa in 20-day-old fetuses and weanling pups, and plasma ghrelin concentration in weanling rat pups of dams either normally fed or deprived of choline, folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 during gestation and suckling periods. MDD fetuses weighed less than controls; the weight deficit reached 57% at weaning (P < 0.001). Both at the end of gestation and at weaning, they presented with an aberrant gastric oxyntic mucosa formation with loss of cell polarity, anarchic cell migration, abnormal progenitor differentiation, apoptosis, and signs of surface layer erosion. Ghrelin cells were abnormally located in the pit region of oxyntic glands. At weaning, plasma ghrelin levels were decreased (−28%; P < 0.001) despite unchanged mRNA expression in the stomach. This decrease was associated with lower body weight. Taken together, these data indicate that one mechanism through which MDD influences fetal programming is the remodeling of gastric cellular organization, leading to dysfunction of the ghrelin system and dramatic effects on growth. PMID:19948829

  4. Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Regulates Gastric Epithelial Cell Development and Proliferation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Masahiko; Mao, Maria; Keeley, Theresa M.; El–Zaatari, Mohamad; Lee, Hyuk–Joon; Eaton, Kathryn A.; Samuelson, Linda C.; Merchant, Juanita L.; Goldenring, James R.; Todisco, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS We investigated the role of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in the regulation of gastric epithelial cell growth and differentiation by generating transgenic mice that express the BMP inhibitor noggin in the stomach. METHODS The promoter of the mouse H+/K+-ATPase β-subunit gene, which is specifically expressed in parietal cells, was used to regulate expression of noggin in the gastric epithelium of mice. The transgenic mice were analyzed for noggin expression, tissue morphology, cellular composition of the gastric mucosa, gastric acid content, and plasma levels of gastrin. Tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemical, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblot, microtitration, and radioimmunoassay analyses. RESULTS In the stomachs of the transgenic mice, phosphorylation of Smad1, 5, and 8 decreased, indicating inhibition of BMP signaling. Mucosa were of increased height, with dilated glands, cystic structures, reduced numbers of parietal cells, and increased numbers of cells that coexpressed intrinsic factor, trefoil factor 2, and griffonia simplicifolialectin II, compared with wild-type mice. In the transgenic mice, levels of the H+/K+-ATPase α-subunit protein and messenger RNA were reduced, whereas those of intrinsic factor increased. The transgenic mice were hypochloridric and had an increased number of Ki67- and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells; increased levels of plasma gastrin; increased expression of transforming growth factor-α, amphiregulin, and gastrin; and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2. CONCLUSIONS Inhibiting BMP signaling in the stomachs of mice by expression of noggin causes loss of parietal cells, development of transitional cells that express markers of mucus neck and zymogenic lineages, and activation of proliferation. BMPs are therefore important regulators of gastric epithelial cell homeostasis. PMID:20826155

  5. A new gastric ulcer model induced by ischemia-reperfusion in the rat: role of leukocytes on ulceration in rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Wada, K; Kamisaki, Y; Kitano, M; Kishimoto, Y; Nakamoto, K; Itoh, T

    1996-01-01

    A new model of gastric ulcer involving damage to the muscularis mucosae was developed by clamping the celiac artery in rat to induce ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury. Although erosions with falling off of the gastric mucosa were observed immediately, 24 and 36 hours after the I-R, gastric ulcers involving the injury of muscularis mucosae were observed in the area of gastric glands at 48 and 72 hours after initiation of injury. Administration of omeprazol, a proton pump inhibitor, or pentoxifylline, an anti-leukocyte drug, just after the initiation of injury significantly decreased the total area of ulcers at 72 hours. A combination of omeprazol and pentoxifylline was more effective than either drug alone. An anti-leukocyte adhesion molecule (anti-CD18 antibody) also showed significant inhibitory effect on the development of ulcers at 72 hours and the infiltration of leukocytes into both submucosa and mucosa. These results indicate that in our model, gastric acid together with leukocytes contribute to the development of ulcers following erosions. This model may be used to investigate the mechanisms of the development of gastric ulcer and evaluate antiulcer drugs in a preclinical setting. PMID:8913334

  6. Gastric partitioning gastrojejunostomy in unresectable distal gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sung Joon; Lee, Ha Gyoon

    2004-04-01

    The main purpose of bypass surgery in patients with unresectable distal gastric cancer is to improve their quality of life (QoL). However, the result of conventional gastroenterostomy is dismal including continuous bleeding due to the contact of food material on the tumor surface and early obstruction of the stoma by tumor growth. Developing more effective surgery is warranted to improve the QoL of these patients. Among the 1158 patients with gastric cancer who underwent surgery from March 1993 to July 2002 at Hanyang University Medical Center, 54 (4.7%) had unresectable cancers. Various types of gastrojejunostomy (G-Jstomy), including conventional G-Jstomy (CGJ) (n = 18), antral exclusion G-Jstomy (n = 7), and gastric partitioning G-Jstomy (GPGJ) (n = 17), as well as exploratory laparotomy only (n = 12) were performed in these unresectable cases. In this study, survival and postoperative QoL were compared for the CGJ and GPGJ groups. The median survivals were 120 and 209 days for the CGJ and GPGJ groups, respectively (p = 0.046). The rates of postoperative body weight loss compared to the preoperative weight were 9.3% and 3.1% in the CGJ and GPGJ groups, respectively; the difference showed borderline significance (p = 0.067). The volume of blood transfusion was much less during the postoperative period than during the preoperative period in the GPGJ group but not in the CGJ group. The GPGJ procedure minimized food contact on the tumor surface, which was confirmed by an upper gastrointestinal barium meal series. GPGJ can be recommended as the procedure of choice for bypass surgery in patients with unresectable distal gastric cancer considering their improved survival and postoperative QoL compared to those who underwent CGJ. PMID:14994143

  7. Use of lectin microarray to differentiate gastric cancer from gastric ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Li; Li, Yang-Guang; Lv, Yong-Chen; Guan, Xiao-Hui; Ji, Hui-Fan; Chi, Bao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility of lectin microarray for differentiating gastric cancer from gastric ulcer. METHODS: Twenty cases of human gastric cancer tissue and 20 cases of human gastric ulcer tissue were collected and processed. Protein was extracted from the frozen tissues and stored. The lectins were dissolved in buffer, and the sugar-binding specificities of lectins and the layout of the lectin microarray were summarized. The median of the effective data points for each lectin was globally normalized to the sum of medians of all effective data points for each lectin in one block. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric cancer tissues and their corresponding gastric ulcer tissues were subjected to Ag retrieval. Biotinylated lectin was used as the primary antibody and HRP-streptavidin as the secondary antibody. The glycopatterns of glycoprotein in gastric cancer and gastric ulcer specimens were determined by lectin microarray, and then validated by lectin histochemistry. Data are presented as mean ± SD for the indicated number of independent experiments. RESULTS: The glycosylation level of gastric cancer was significantly higher than that in ulcer. In gastric cancer, most of the lectin binders showed positive signals and the intensity of the signals was stronger, whereas the opposite was the case for ulcers. Significant differences in the pathological score of the two lectins were apparent between ulcer and gastric cancer tissues using the same lectin. For MPL and VVA, all types of gastric cancer detected showed stronger staining and a higher positive rate in comparison with ulcer, especially in the case of signet ring cell carcinoma and intra-mucosal carcinoma. GalNAc bound to MPL showed a significant increase. A statistically significant association between MPL and gastric cancer was observed. As with MPL, there were significant differences in VVA staining between gastric cancer and ulcer. CONCLUSION: Lectin microarray can differentiate the different

  8. Pathogenesis of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus isolate (US/Iowa/18984/2013) in 3-week-old weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Madson, D M; Magstadt, D R; Arruda, P H E; Hoang, H; Sun, D; Bower, L P; Bhandari, M; Burrough, E R; Gauger, P C; Pillatzki, A E; Stevenson, G W; Wilberts, B L; Brodie, J; Harmon, K M; Wang, C; Main, R G; Zhang, J; Yoon, K J

    2014-11-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is associated with clinical diarrhea in naïve swine of all ages. This report describes timing of antibody generation and disease progression following infection with a US PEDV isolate by assessing fecal viral shedding, morphometric analysis of intestinal lesions, and magnitude of immunohistochemical staining. Sixty-three, 3-week-old pigs were randomly allocated into control (n=27) and challenged (n=36) groups. Challenged pigs were administered 1 mL of 1 × 10(3) PFU/mL of US/Iowa/18984/2013 PEDV isolate by oro-gastric gavage. Three control and four challenged pigs were necropsied on days post-inoculation (dpi) 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and weekly thereafter, until study termination on dpi 35. Clinical disease, fecal shedding, body weight, and temperature were monitored during the study period. Diarrhea was observed in challenged pigs beginning for some on dpi 2, affecting a majority of pigs by dpi 6 and subsiding by dpi 10. Average daily gain was significantly lower (P<0.001) for one week post-infection in challenged pigs. PEDV was detected in feces by PCR on dpi 1 and continued in a subset of pigs until dpi 24. PEDV-specific antigen was detected in villous enterocytes of challenged pigs by immunohistochemistry (IHC) on dpi 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14. Microscopic lesions included severe diffuse atrophic enteritis with significantly reduced (P<0.001) villous length observed on dpi 3, 4, and 7. Under the conditions of this study, fecal shedding of PEDV and IHC staining can precede and continue beyond the observation of clinical signs, thus increasing the risk of viral transmission. PMID:25278366

  9. Gastric Hamartomatous Polyps—Review and Update

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Monika; Yang, Xiu; Zhang, Xuchen

    2016-01-01

    Gastric polyps are frequently encountered on endoscopic examinations. While many of these represent true epithelial lesions, some of the polyps may result from underlying stromal or lymphoid proliferations or even heterotopic tissue. Histologic examination is essential for accurate typing of the polyps to predict malignant potential and underlying possible genetic abnormalities. The focus of this review is on gastric hamartomatous polyps, which are relatively rare and diagnostically challenging. Though most of the gastric hamartomatous polyps are benign, certain types are associated with increased malignant potential. These include certain polyps associated with specific genetic familial polyposis syndromes and gastric inverted hamartomatous polyps. Identification of these polyps can result in the prevention or early diagnosis of gastric carcinoma and also help in the identification of family members with polyposis syndromes. The aim of this review is to categorize gastric hamartomatous polyps and aid in the identification of high-risk categories. PMID:27081323

  10. [Intra-gastric penetration of an adjustable gastric band].

    PubMed

    Ablassmaier, B; Opitz, I; Jacobi, C A; Müller, J M

    2001-07-01

    Between November 1995 and August 2000 we performed adjustable silicone gastric banding laparoscopically in 252 patients. The body mass index varied from 37 to 86 kg/m2. We report on a 38-year-old woman who was operated on in 1997 with a body mass index of 47 kg/m2 (167 cm, 132 kg). The postoperative follow-up was uneventful until January 2000. The patient lost weight until she weighed 78 kg. Then she complained of diffuse epigastric pain. Gastroscopy revealed gastritis. Omeprazol was prescribed. No amelioration occurred. Endoscopic control showed partial intragastric migration of the band. After laparoscopic removal of the band, the patient was free of symptoms. Band erosion is a possible complication of adjustable gastric banding. As is known from intragastric penetration of the Angelchik prosthesis, the clinical symptoms of this complication may be mild. Since the follow-up of most patients with gastric banding is less than 5 years, more complications similar to that one described may be diagnosed in the future. PMID:11490764

  11. Human Gastric Epithelial Cells Contribute to Gastric Immune Regulation by Providing Retinoic Acid to Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bimczok, Diane; Kao, John Y.; Zhang, Min; Cochrun, Steven; Mannon, Peter; Peter, Shajan; Wilcox, Charles M.; Mönkemüller, Klaus E.; Harris, Paul R.; Grams, Jayleen M.; Stahl, Richard D.; Smith, Phillip D.; Smythies, Lesley E.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of chronic gastritis caused by H. pylori, the gastric mucosa has received little investigative attention as a unique immune environment. Here, we analyzed whether retinoic acid (RA), an important homeostatic factor in the small intestinal mucosa, also contributes to gastric immune regulation. We report that human gastric tissue contains high levels of the RA precursor molecule, retinol, and that gastric epithelial cells express both RA biosynthesis genes and RA response genes, indicative of active RA biosynthesis. Moreover, primary gastric epithelial cells cultured in the presence of retinol synthesized RA in vitro and induced RA biosynthesis in co-cultured monocytes through an RA-dependent mechanism, suggesting that gastric epithelial cells may also confer the ability to generate RA on gastric DCs. Indeed, DCs purified from gastric mucosa had similar levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and RA biosynthesis gene expression as small intestinal DCs, although gastric DCs lacked CD103. In H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa, gastric RA biosynthesis gene expression was severely disrupted, which may lead to reduced RA signaling and thus contribute to disease progression. Collectively, our results support a critical role for RA in human gastric immune regulation. PMID:25249167

  12. Diversity of the Gastric Microbiota in Thoroughbred Racehorses Having Gastric Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hee-Jin; Ho, Hungwui; Hwang, Hyeshin; Kim, Yongbaek; Han, Janet; Lee, Inhyung; Cho, Seongbeom

    2016-04-28

    Equine gastric ulcer syndrome is one of the most frequently reported diseases in thoroughbred racehorses. Although several risk factors for the development of gastric ulcers have been widely studied, investigation of microbiological factors has been limited. In this study, the presence of Helicobacter spp. and the gastric microbial communities of thoroughbred racehorses having mild to severe gastric ulcers were investigated. Although Helicobacter spp. were not detected using culture and PCR techniques from 52 gastric biopsies and 52 fecal samples, the genomic sequences of H. pylori and H. ganmani were detected using nextgeneration sequencing techniques from 2 out of 10 representative gastric samples. The gastric microbiota of horses was mainly composed of Firmicutes (50.0%), Proteobacteria (18.7%), Bacteroidetes (14.4%), and Actinobacteria (9.7%), but the proportion of each phylum varied among samples. There was no major difference in microbial composition among samples having mild to severe gastric ulcers. Using phylogenetic analysis, three distinct clusters were observed, and one cluster differed from the other two clusters in the frequency of feeding, amount of water consumption, and type of bedding. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the gastric microbiota of thoroughbred racehorses having gastric ulcer and to evaluate the microbial diversity in relation to the severity of gastric ulcer and management factors. This study is important for further exploration of the gastric microbiota in racehorses and is ultimately applicable to improving animal and human health. PMID:26809803

  13. Effects of ezrin knockdown on the structure of gastric glandular epithelia.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Saori; Yamamoto, Hiroto; Tetsui, Takahito; Kobayakawa, Yuka; Hatano, Ryo; Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Hattori, Takanori; Sugihara, Hiroyuki; Asano, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Ezrin, an adaptor protein that cross-links plasma membrane-associated proteins with the actin cytoskeleton, is concentrated on apical surfaces of epithelial cells, especially in microvilli of the small intestine and stomach. In the stomach, ezrin is predominantly expressed on the apical canalicular membrane of parietal cells. Transgenic ezrin knockdown mice in which the expression level of ezrin was reduced to <7% compared with the wild-type suffered from achlorhydria because of impairment of membrane fusion between tubulovesicles and apical membranes. We observed, for the first time, hypergastrinemia and foveolar hyperplasia in the gastric fundic region of the knockdown mice. Dilation of fundic glands was observed, the percentage of parietal and chief cells was reduced, and that of mucous-secreting cells was increased. The parietal cells of knockdown mice contained dilated tubulovesicles and abnormal mitochondria, and subsets of these cells contained abnormal vacuoles and multilamellar structures. Therefore, lack of ezrin not only causes achlorhydria and hypergastrinemia but also changes the structure of gastric glands, with severe perturbation of the secretory membranes of parietal cells. PMID:26329936

  14. Gastric duplication cyst: a rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Doepker, Matthew P.; Ahmad, Syed A.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric duplication cysts are an uncommon finding, especially in the adult population. Presenting symptoms can be non-specific, but can include abdominal pain, nausea and emesis. In this report, we present a 28-year-old female diagnosed with a communicating gastric cyst with both gastric and duodenal mucosa, along with pancreatic tissue and no evidence of dysplasia or malignancy. The clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment are described and compared to findings in the literature. PMID:27150283

  15. Gastric duplication cyst: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Doepker, Matthew P; Ahmad, Syed A

    2016-01-01

    Gastric duplication cysts are an uncommon finding, especially in the adult population. Presenting symptoms can be non-specific, but can include abdominal pain, nausea and emesis. In this report, we present a 28-year-old female diagnosed with a communicating gastric cyst with both gastric and duodenal mucosa, along with pancreatic tissue and no evidence of dysplasia or malignancy. The clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment are described and compared to findings in the literature. PMID:27150283

  16. Nutrient induced type 2 and chemical induced type 1 experimental diabetes differently modulate gastric GLP-1 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Olga; Broide, Efrat; Ben-Yehudah, Gilad; Cantrell, Dror; Shirin, Haim; Rapoport, Micha J

    2015-01-01

    T2DM patients demonstrate reduced GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) expression in their gastric glands. Whether induced T2DM and T1DM differently affect the gastric GLP-1R expression is not known. This study assessed extrapancreatic GLP-1R system in glandular stomach of rodents with different types of experimental diabetes. T2DM and T1DM were induced in Psammomys obesus (PO) by high-energy (HE) diet and by streptozotocin (STZ) in Sprague Dawly (SD) rats, respectively. GLP-1R expression was determined in glandular stomach by RT PCR and immunohistomorphological analysis. The mRNA expression and cellular association of the GLP-1R in principal glands were similar in control PO and SD rats. However, nutrient and chemical induced diabetes resulted in opposite alterations of glandular GLP-1R expression. Diabetic PO demonstrated increased GLP-1R mRNA expression, intensity of cellular GLP-1R immunostaining, and frequency of GLP-1R positive cells in the neck area of principal glands compared with controls. In contrast, SD diabetic rats demonstrated decreased GLP-1 mRNA, cellular GLP-1R immunoreactivity, and frequency of GLP-1R immunoreactive cells in the neck area compared with controls. In conclusion, nutrient and chemical induced experimental diabetes result in distinct opposite alterations of GLP-1R expression in glandular stomach. These results suggest that induced T1DM and T2DM may differently modulate GLP-1R system in enteropancreatic axis. PMID:25893200

  17. Eccrine sweat gland development and sweat secretion.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chang-Yi; Schlessinger, David

    2015-09-01

    Eccrine sweat glands help to maintain homoeostasis, primarily by stabilizing body temperature. Derived from embryonic ectoderm, millions of eccrine glands are distributed across human skin and secrete litres of sweat per day. Their easy accessibility has facilitated the start of analyses of their development and function. Mouse genetic models find sweat gland development regulated sequentially by Wnt, Eda and Shh pathways, although precise subpathways and additional regulators require further elucidation. Mature glands have two secretory cell types, clear and dark cells, whose comparative development and functional interactions remain largely unknown. Clear cells have long been known as the major secretory cells, but recent studies suggest that dark cells are also indispensable for sweat secretion. Dark cell-specific Foxa1 expression was shown to regulate a Ca(2+) -dependent Best2 anion channel that is the candidate driver for the required ion currents. Overall, it was shown that cholinergic impulses trigger sweat secretion in mature glands through second messengers - for example InsP3 and Ca(2+) - and downstream ion channels/transporters in the framework of a Na(+) -K(+) -Cl(-) cotransporter model. Notably, the microenvironment surrounding secretory cells, including acid-base balance, was implicated to be important for proper sweat secretion, which requires further clarification. Furthermore, multiple ion channels have been shown to be expressed in clear and dark cells, but the degree to which various ion channels function redundantly or indispensably also remains to be determined. PMID:26014472

  18. Meibomian glands and ocular surface inflammation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomo; Teramukai, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this review was to systematically analyze publications related to the role of meibomian gland disease in ocular surface inflammation, with special reference to meibomitis as an inflammatory form of meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). Meibomian gland inflammation is often present with the ocular surface inflammation in conditions such as blepharokeratoconjunctivitis, ocular rosacea, and phlyctenular keratitis, but its contribution is often overlooked, especially in younger subjects. This can result in misdiagnosis, mistreatment, and, sometimes, severe visual impairment. We identified a related disease entity, seen predominantly in young patients, of ocular surface inflammation associated with meibomitis, which we termed meibomitis-related keratoconjunctivitis. Its specific clinical features are similar to those observed in the above-mentioned diseases, and the inflammatory form of MGD was found to be closely involved in the ocular surface inflammation seen in those four diseases, based on our statistical evaluation. The diagnosis and management of meibomitis, an inflammatory form of MGD, is vital for the successful treatment of the induced ocular surface inflammation. We propose that the ocular surface and the adnexal meibomian glands should be considered as one unit, i.e., the "meibomian gland and ocular surface" (MOS), when encountered in the clinical setting. PMID:25881997

  19. Occurrence of antennal glands in ants.

    PubMed

    Renthal, Robert; Velasquez, Daniel; Olmos, David; Vinson, S Bradleigh

    2008-11-01

    A previous report of the discovery of exocrine glands in the antennal club of queens and workers of Solenopsis invicta Buren, 1972 left open the question of the extent to which similar glands occur in the Formicidae family. We wanted to know if these antennal glands are unique to Solenopsis, or they are found in a wider taxonomic group. Using scanning electron microscopy, we examined the antennae of 41 ant species. Presence of the antennal glands was indicated by a characteristic circumferential ring of pores in a distal antennal segment of workers. Pores were found in the 9th antennal segment of all 26 species of Solenopsis examined. Pores were absent in the following: Monomorium minimum, M. pharaonis, Pheidole sp., Crematogaster sp., Linepithema humile, Forelius sp., Dorymyrmex sp., Paratrechina sp., Oecophylla smaragdina, Campanotus sp., Ectatomma ruidum, E. tuberlatum, and Pseudomyrmex ferruginea. However, pores were found in the antennal club of Tetramorium bicarinatum workers and queens. After KOH digestion of T. bicarinatum antennae, internal canals were observed in both workers and queens, and the canals are connected to spherical reservoirs in queens. T. bicarinatum was the only non-Solenopsis species examined, which showed evidence for antennal glands in the distal funiculus. PMID:18655135

  20. Gastric Syphilis and Membranous Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Roh, Min; Sohn, Joo Hyun; Kim, Tae Yeob; Kim, Sung Jong; Kim, Ji Soong; Chung, Sung Jun; Pyo, Ju Yeon; Oh, Young-Ha

    2015-05-01

    Syphilis is a chronic systemic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. Gastric involvement and nephrotic syndrome are uncommon but well documented complications of syphilis, but the co-occurrence of these two complications in the same patient is extremely rare. Thus, because of their nonspecific presentation, suspicion of gastric syphilis (GS) and nephrotic syndrome is essential for diagnosis. Patients should be investigated thoroughly and a diagnosis made based on clinical, endoscopic, and histological findings, in order to initiate appropriate therapy. We report of a 34-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain and a diagnosis of GS and syphilis-associated membranous glomerulonephritis confirmed by gastroscopy and kidney biopsy, who was treated successfully with penicillin G benzathine. This case report provides information on the typical features of GS that should help raise awareness of this rare disease entity among clinicians, resulting in earlier diagnosis and administration of appropriate therapy. PMID:26064828

  1. Gastric Syphilis and Membranous Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Min; Kim, Tae Yeob; Kim, Sung Jong; Kim, Ji Soong; Chung, Sung Jun; Pyo, Ju Yeon; Oh, Young-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis is a chronic systemic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. Gastric involvement and nephrotic syndrome are uncommon but well documented complications of syphilis, but the co-occurrence of these two complications in the same patient is extremely rare. Thus, because of their nonspecific presentation, suspicion of gastric syphilis (GS) and nephrotic syndrome is essential for diagnosis. Patients should be investigated thoroughly and a diagnosis made based on clinical, endoscopic, and histological findings, in order to initiate appropriate therapy. We report of a 34-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain and a diagnosis of GS and syphilis-associated membranous glomerulonephritis confirmed by gastroscopy and kidney biopsy, who was treated successfully with penicillin G benzathine. This case report provides information on the typical features of GS that should help raise awareness of this rare disease entity among clinicians, resulting in earlier diagnosis and administration of appropriate therapy. PMID:26064828

  2. Immunocytochemical localization of atrial natriuretic factor in the heart and salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Cantin, M; Gutkowska, J; Thibault, G; Milne, R W; Ledoux, S; MinLi, S; Chapeau, C; Garcia, R; Hamet, P; Genest, J

    1984-01-01

    Antibodies produced in the mouse by repeated intraperitoneal injections of partly purified atrial natriuretic factor (low molecular weight peptide (LMWP) and high molecular weight peptide (HMWP)) have been used to localize these factors by immunohistochemistry (immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase method) and by immunocytochemistry (protein A-gold technique) in the heart of rats and of a variety of animal species including man and in the rat salivary glands. Immunofluorescence and the immunoperoxidase method gave identical results; in the rat, atrial cardiocytes gave a positive reaction at both nuclear poles while ventricular cardiocytes were consistently negative. The cardiocytes of the right atrial appendage were more intensely reactive than those localized in the left appendage. A decreasing gradient of intensity was observed from the subpericardial to the subendocardial cardiocytes. The cardiocytes of the interatrial septum were only lightly granulated. Sodium deficiency and thirst (deprivation of drinking water for 5 days) produced, as already shown at the ultrastructural level, a marked increase in the reactivity of all cardiocytes from both atria with the same gradient of intensity as in control animals. Cross-reactivity of intragranular peptides with the rat antibodies allowed visualization of specific granules in a variety of animal species (mouse, guinea pig, rabbit, rat, dog) and in human atrial appendages. No reaction could be elicited in the frog atrium and ventricle although, in this species, specific granules have been shown to be present by electron microscopy in all cardiac chambers. With the protein A-gold technique, at the ultrastructural level, single labeling (use of one antibody on one face of a fine section) or double labeling (use of two antibodies on the two faces of a fine section) showed that the two peptides are localized simultaneously in all three types (A, B and D) of specific granules. In the rat salivary glands

  3. Involvement of leukotrienes in acute gastric damage.

    PubMed

    Boughton-Smith, N K

    1989-01-01

    The leukotrienes have potent inflammatory actions which could be of importance in gastric mucosal integrity. In animals, LTC4 produces vasoconstriction in the gastric mucosa. Furthermore, acute gastric damage produced by ethanol is accompanied by marked increases in the mucosal formation of LTC4 and LTB4. Depending on the extent of protection, prostaglandins either have no effect or prevent the increases in leukotriene formation which accompany ethanol-induced damage. Various non-specific inhibitors of leukotriene synthesis prevent ethanol and indomethacin-induced damage to the gastric mucosa. However, a novel selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor (BW A4C) had no effect on these models of acute gastric damage at doses which completely inhibited gastric mucosal leukotriene synthesis. These studies cast doubt on the role of the leukotrienes in these models of acute gastric damage. However, the potent biological actions of the leukotrienes may be of importance in the pathogenesis of other forms of gastric damage, or as mediators of chronic gastric ulceration or inflammation. PMID:2657289

  4. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. PMID:27579191

  5. The psyche and gastric functions.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Gerardo; Compare, Debora

    2014-01-01

    Although the idea that gastric problems are in some way related to mental activity dates back to the beginning of the last century, until now it has received scant attention by physiologists, general practitioners and gastroenterologists. The major breakthrough in understanding the interactions between the central nervous system and the gut was the discovery of the enteric nervous system (ENS) in the 19th century. ENS (also called 'little brain') plays a crucial role in the regulation of the physiological gut functions. Furthermore, the identification of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the development of specific CRF receptor antagonists have permitted to characterize the neurochemical basis of the stress response. The neurobiological response to stress in mammals involves three key mechanisms: (1) stress is perceived and processed by higher brain centers; (2) the brain mounts a neuroendocrine response by way of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) and the autonomic nervous system (ANS), and (3) the brain triggers feedback mechanisms by HPA and ANS stimulation to restore homeostasis. Various stressors such as anger, fear, painful stimuli, as well as life or social learning experiences affect both the individual's physiologic and gastric function, revealing a two-way interaction between brain and stomach. There is overwhelming experimental and clinical evidence that stress influences gastric function, thereby outlining the pathogenesis of gastric diseases such as functional dyspepsia, gastroesophageal reflux disease and peptic ulcer disease. A better understanding of the role of pathological stressors in the modulation of disease activity may have important pathogenetic and therapeutic implications. PMID:24732184

  6. Transcutaneous approach for the removal of parotid gland stones.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hee-Kyun; Park, Hong-Ju; Oh, Je-Seok; Jung, Seunggon; Kook, Min-Suk

    2014-11-01

    Salivary stones in the parotid gland can be treated with a wide range of methods. Stones close to the opening of the duct can be easily removed through the oral cavity, whereas the entire salivary gland may need to be removed if stones are located close to the parotid gland. In such cases, surgical removal of the parotid gland may be lengthy and may produce facial nerve injury. We report a simple extraoral approach used for the removal of parotid gland stones located close to the parotid gland by precisely identifying the location of stones in 2 patients with parotid sialolithiasis. PMID:25318444

  7. Diagnosis and management of endocrine gland neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1989-05-01

    Functional and nonfunctional neoplasms of the endocrine glands constitute some of the more challenging diagnostic and therapeutic problems in veterinary cancer medicine. The clinical signs are usually the result of an overproduction of hormones that are normally biosynthesized by the neoplastic endocrine gland (orthoendocrine syndromes), as opposed to those that are the result of hormones that are not normally biosynthesized and secreted by those cells that have undergone neoplastic transformation (paraendocrine syndromes, also known as endocrine paraneoplastic syndromes or ectopic hormone syndromes). The biological effects produced by a neoplasm may be out of proportion to the actual size of the tumor. This report focuses on the clinical signs and syndromes associated with neoplasms of the thyroid, adrenal glands and pancreas. Discussion will focus on the mechanisms producing the clinical signs, diagnosis, staging, therapy and prognosis. 2 tabs.

  8. Giant pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Takahama, Ademar; da Cruz Perez, Danyel Elias; Magrin, José; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo

    2008-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common type of all benign and malignant salivary gland tumors, involving more frequently the parotid gland. It is a benign tumor with a slow and continuous growth that without treatment can reach an enormous size. We present a case of a giant pleomorphic adenoma in a 78-year-old man with a history of more than 30 years of a growing lesion in the parotid gland. Clinical examination revealed a giant mass on the right side of the face, however without any sign of facial nerve damage. The tumor was completely resected by total parotidectomy and preservation of the facial nerve. Macroscopically, the tumor measured 28 cm and weighed 4.0 Kg. On the histological examination there was a predominance of epithelial and myoepithelial cells in a hyaline and myxoid stroma. It was not found any area of malignant transformation. In the post-operatory the aesthetic and functional results were excellent. PMID:18167483

  9. Cadmium effects on the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Jancic, Snezana A; Stosic, Bojan Z

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium has been listed as one of the 126 priority pollutants and a category I carcinogen. Carcinogenic effects of cadmium on the lungs, testicles, and prostate are widely recognized, but there has been insufficient research on the effect of cadmium on the thyroid gland. Cadmium has the affinity to accumulate not only in the liver, kidneys, and pancreas but also in the thyroid gland. It has been established that cadmium blood concentration correlates positively with its accumulation in the thyroid gland. Women of fertile age have higher cadmium blood and urine concentrations than men. In spite of its redox inertia, cadmium brings about oxidative stress and damage to the tissue by indirect mechanisms. Mitochondria are considered to be the main intracellular targets for cadmium. Colloid cystic goiter, adenomatoid follicular hyperplasia with low-grade dysplasia and thyroglobulin hypo- and asecretion, and parafollicular cell diffuse and nodular hyperplasia and hypertrophy are often found in chronic cadmium toxicity. PMID:24388198

  10. Mucocele of the anterior lingual salivary glands (glands of Blandin and Nuhn): report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Sugerman, P B; Savage, N W; Young, W G

    2000-10-01

    The anterior lingual salivary glands (glands of Blandin and Nuhn) are mixed mucous and serous glands that are embedded within the musculature of the anterior tongue ventrum. Five cases of mucocele of the glands of Blandin and Nuhn are presented. These mucoceles on the anterior tongue ventrum were exophytic and resembled pyogenic granulomata, polyps, or squamous papillomata. In 2 cases, the onset of the mucocele was associated with trauma to the anterior tongue. All cases were mucus extravasation phenomena. A history of trauma and recovery of mucus with fine needle aspiration are helpful in the clinical diagnosis of mucocele of the glands of Blandin and Nuhn, as are the following characteristics of the mucocele: rapid onset, increase and reduction in size, bluish color, and fluid-filled consistency. During surgery, the glands that are deep in the tongue musculature are commonly left behind, resulting in persistence of the lesion. Careful clinical evaluation of these lesions and preoperative awareness of the surgical anatomy of the glands of Blandin and Nuhn may minimize the need for repeated surgical procedures. PMID:11027386

  11. Mistakes in ultrasound examination of salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography is the first imaging method applied in the case of diseases of the salivary glands. The article discusses basic mistakes that can be made during an ultrasound examination of these structures. The reasons for these mistakes may be examiner-dependent or may be beyond their control. The latter may include, inter alia, difficult conditions during examination (technical or patient-related), similarity of ultrasound images in different diseases, the lack of clinical and laboratory data as well as the lack of results of other examinations, their insufficient number or incorrectness. Doctor-related mistakes include: the lack of knowledge of normal anatomy, characteristics of ultrasound images in various salivary gland diseases and statistical incidence of diseases, but also attaching excessive importance to such statistical data. The complex anatomical structures of the floor of the oral cavity may be mistaken for benign or malignant tumors. Fragments of correct anatomical structures (bones, arterial wall fibrosis, air bubbles in the mouth) can be wrongly interpreted as deposits in the salivary gland or in its excretory duct. Correct lymph nodes in the parotid glands may be treated as pathologic structures. Lesions not being a simple cyst, e.g. lymphoma, benign or malignant tumors of the salivary glands or metastatic lymph nodes, can be mistaken for one. The image of disseminated focal changes, both anechoic and solid, is not pathognomonic for specific diseases in the salivary glands. However, in part, it occurs typically and requires an extended differential diagnosis. Small focal changes and infiltrative lesions pose a diagnostic problem because their etiology cannot be safely suggested on the basis of an ultrasound examination itself. The safest approach is to refer patients with abnormal focal changes for an ultrasoundguided fine-needle aspiration biopsy. PMID:27446603

  12. Mistakes in ultrasound examination of salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Białek, Ewa J; Jakubowski, Wiesław

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasonography is the first imaging method applied in the case of diseases of the salivary glands. The article discusses basic mistakes that can be made during an ultrasound examination of these structures. The reasons for these mistakes may be examiner-dependent or may be beyond their control. The latter may include, inter alia, difficult conditions during examination (technical or patient-related), similarity of ultrasound images in different diseases, the lack of clinical and laboratory data as well as the lack of results of other examinations, their insufficient number or incorrectness. Doctor-related mistakes include: the lack of knowledge of normal anatomy, characteristics of ultrasound images in various salivary gland diseases and statistical incidence of diseases, but also attaching excessive importance to such statistical data. The complex anatomical structures of the floor of the oral cavity may be mistaken for benign or malignant tumors. Fragments of correct anatomical structures (bones, arterial wall fibrosis, air bubbles in the mouth) can be wrongly interpreted as deposits in the salivary gland or in its excretory duct. Correct lymph nodes in the parotid glands may be treated as pathologic structures. Lesions not being a simple cyst, e.g. lymphoma, benign or malignant tumors of the salivary glands or metastatic lymph nodes, can be mistaken for one. The image of disseminated focal changes, both anechoic and solid, is not pathognomonic for specific diseases in the salivary glands. However, in part, it occurs typically and requires an extended differential diagnosis. Small focal changes and infiltrative lesions pose a diagnostic problem because their etiology cannot be safely suggested on the basis of an ultrasound examination itself. The safest approach is to refer patients with abnormal focal changes for an ultrasoundguided fine-needle aspiration biopsy. PMID:27446603

  13. Upregulation of the Non-Coding RNA OTUB1-isoform 2 Contributes to Gastric Cancer Cell Proliferation and Invasion and Predicts Poor Gastric Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-qin; Zhang, Qiong-yan; Weng, Wei-wei; Wu, Yong; Yang, Yu-si; Shen, Chen; Chen, Xiao-Chen; Wang, Lei; Liu, Kai-jing; Xu, Mi-die; Sheng, Wei-qi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The deubiquitinase OTUB1 plays critical oncogenic roles and facilitates tumor progression in cancer. However, less is known regarding the aberrant expression, clinical significance and biological functions of the non-coding RNA OTUB1-isoform 2. We aimed to evaluate the OTUB1-isoform 2 levels in gastric cancer and their possible correlation with clinicopathologic features and patient survival to reveal its biological effects in gastric cancer progression. Methods: Total RNA extraction was performed on 156 gastric cancer case samples, and RT-qPCR was conducted. Chi-square test analysis was used to calculate the correlation between pathological parameters and the OTUB1-isoform 2 mRNA levels. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards analyses were used to analyze the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates. Nuclear and cytoplasmic RNAs were isolated to detect the subcellular localization of OTUB1-isoform 2. We also assessed whether overexpression of OTUB1-isoform 2 influenced in vitro cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, tumor cell invasion and migration, as well as in vivo nude mouse xenograft and metastasis models. Results: The OTUB1-isoform 2 expression levels were higher in the gastric cancer samples than in the paratumorous gland samples. OTUB1-isoform 2 expression levels tightly correlated with tumor size, lymph node metastasis and TNM staging. Higher OTUB1-isoform 2 expression levels led to significantly poorer OS and DFS rates, and a multivariate analysis revealed that OTUB1-isoform 2 was an independent risk factor for DFS. OTUB1-isoform 2 was predominantly localized in the cell nucleus. Ectopic overexpression of OTUB1-isoform 2 in gastric cancer cells stimulated proliferation by inducing G1-S transition, suppression of cell apoptosis and promotion of tumor cell invasion and migration. Finally, OTUB1-isoform 2 overexpression promoted tumor growth and tumor metastasis in nude mice models. Conclusions: Our study suggests

  14. Complete agenesis of major salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Berta, E; Bettega, G; Jouk, P S; Billy, G; Nugues, F; Morand, B

    2013-10-01

    A 4 year-old female patient was treated for persistent right-sided dacryocystitis and xerostomia. MRI was performed to screen for a dry syndrome; which resulted in the diagnosis of agenesis of the parotid and submandibular glands as well as lacrimal duct malformation. An MRI of each parent was normal. The mother's history revealed 4 days of pyrexia during the 8th week of amenorrhea. This was an isolated case, with no family history, characterized by a febrile episode during pregnancy at the period of main salivary gland genesis. Epigenetic mechanisms could be implicated. PMID:23993206

  15. Historical overview of imaging the meibomian glands

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, William; Srinivasan, Sruthi; Jones, Lyndon

    2012-01-01

    Growing knowledge of the role of the meibomian glands in dry eye disease and contact lens discomfort has resulted in a surge of interest in visualizing these glands within the eyelids. This manuscript provides an overview of the many different visualization methods that have evolved over the past 30–40 years. Some of the visualization methods covered in this review include lid transillumination, video and non-contact meibography, and imaging methods employing confocal microscopy, optical coherence tomography and ultrasound. This review has also highlighted all the studies to date that have employed meibography as part of their methods. An overview of the available meibography dropout grading systems will also be provided.

  16. Imaging of the thyroid and parathyroid glands.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Bianca J; Richards, Melanie L

    2011-02-01

    Current multimodal imaging techniques offer practicing providers the adequate framework to plan and accomplish care for patients with thyroid and parathyroid disorders. Available imaging modalities include ultrasonography (US), nuclear scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). US remains the most cost-effective and the safest approach for the initial evaluation of the thyroid gland. Parathyroid subtraction scintigraphy provides localization of pathologic parathyroid glands with the greatest sensitivity. Localizing imaging studies allow for surgical planning with minimal risk and morbidity to the patient. CT scan and MRI play an adjunctive role in the further characterization of neck pathology. PMID:21184899

  17. Lymphopoiesis in the chicken pineal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Cogburn, L.A.; Glick, B.

    1981-10-01

    Pineal lymphoid development was studied in two breeds of chickens from hatching until sexual maturity. No lymphocytes were found in the pineal prior to 9 days of age (da). Lymphocytes migrate through the endothelium of venules into the pineal stroma. Lymphoid tissue reached its maximal accumulation in 32-da pineal glands of both breeds. At this age, the New Hampshire (NH) breed had a larger proportion of lymphoid volume to total pineal volume (32%) than did pineal glands from White Leghorn (WL) chickens (18%).

  18. Effects of chronic normovolemic anemia on gastric microcirculation and ethanol-induced gastric damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Marroni, N; Casadevall, M; Panés, J; Piera, C; Jou, J M; Pique, J M

    1994-04-01

    The effects of chronic normovolemic anemia on gastric microcirculation and gastric mucosal susceptibility to ethanol-induced gastric damage were investigated in anesthetized rats. Blood exchange by a plasma expander during four consecutive days rendered the animals anemic with a 34% decrease in the baseline hematocrit but without affecting blood volume. Chronic anemia induced a decrease in whole blood viscosity, an increase in gastric mucosal blood flow measured by hydrogen gas clearance, a decrease in gastric vascular resistance, and a decrease in gastric hemoglobin content without changes in the gastric oxygen content, the latter two parameters being measured by reflectance spectrophotometry. Gastric mucosal blood flow was lowered by intragastric administration of 100% ethanol in both anemic and control rats, but the final blood flow was significantly higher in anemic than in control animals. Macroscopic gastric damage induced by ethanol administration was significantly lower in anemic than in control rats. We conclude that chronic normovolemic anemia increases gastric mucosal blood flow and leads a protecting mechanism against gastric mucosal damage induced by absolute ethanol. PMID:8149840

  19. Analysis of the Distribution of Mucins in Adult Human Gastric Mucosa and Its Functional Significance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mucins are complex composition of carbohydrates seen in the epithelial cells lining the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Normal distribution of such mucins in different part of the GIT and its alteration in various inflammatory, benign and malignant lesions of GIT has aroused interest in the field of histochemistry. Aim By applying variety of histochemical techniques an attempt has been made to draw a map of mucin secretion by the different epithelial cell types in different parts of the stomach. Materials and Methods Fifty samples were taken each from different parts of the stomach like fundus, body and pylorus, from dissected fresh specimens (total of 150 specimens). Tissue samples were subjected for routine process and studied for histological and different histochemical staining. Results Mucin pattern in adult predominantly secretes neutral mucosubstances. Surface epithelium shows predominant neutral mucin while cardiac and gastric glands with foveolar cells show moderate amount. Sialomucin is present in a few cells of the surface epithelium, foveolar cells and in most of the mucous neck cells. Small amount of sialomucin and sulphomucin are found in surface epithelial foveolar cells while traces of sulphomucin are found in deep foveolar cells. Mucous neck cells secrete both sulphomucin and sialomucin. Conclusion Normal gastric mucosa adjacent to gastric ulcers and malignant tumours of stomach secretes mucins which differ histochemically and biochemically from that of normal. Early recognition of such changes could be useful in recognizing the different type of carcinomas and their prognosis. PMID:27042436

  20. Effects of a new histamine H2-receptor antagonist, Z-300, on gastric secretion and gastro-duodenal lesions in rats: comparison with roxatidine.

    PubMed

    Okabe, S; Takagi, K; Igata, H; Kato, S; Shimosako, K; Yamaji, Y; Seiki, M

    1992-07-01

    We examined the effects of a new compound, N-[3-[3-(piperidinomethyl)phenoxy]-propyl]-2-(2-hydroxyethyl-1- thio)acetamido.2-(4-hydroxy benzoyl)benzoate (Z-300), on the histamine H2-receptor, gastric secretion in rats and dogs, and acute gastro-duodenal lesions or chronic gastric ulcers in rats. Roxatidine acetate hydrochloride (roxatidine), a known histamine H2-receptor antagonist, was used as a reference compound. The pA2 values for Z-300 and roxatidine for the isolated guinea pig atrium were 6.8 and 7.0, respectively. These agents at less than 10(-5) M did not affect the contraction of guinea pig ileum in response to carbachol. Z-300, administered either orally or parenterally, significantly inhibited the basal and histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion in rats. Gastric acid secretion stimulated by histamine, pentagastrin or carbachol in Heidenhain pouch dogs was also significantly inhibited by the compound. The effect persisted for greater than 7 hr in the case of histamine-stimulation. Oral Z-300 significantly protected the gastric mucosa from water-immersion stress-, indomethacin-, aspirin- and HCl.ethanol-induced lesions and protected the duodenal mucosa against mepirizole- and cysteamine-induced ulcers. These effects on gastric secretion and lesion formation were, as a whole, stronger than those observed with roxatidine. Z-300, but not roxatidine, significantly accelerated the spontaneous healing of acetic acid ulcers induced in rats and prevented the delay in ulcer healing caused by indomethacin. The mechanism of action of Z-300 on acute lesions and chronic ulcers appears to be mostly related to its potent antisecretory and mucosal-protective activities. PMID:1359178

  1. What Are the Treatments for Adrenal Gland Disorders?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for adrenal gland disorders? Skip sharing on social media links Share ... a variety of surgical and medical treatments for adrenal gland disorders. These include 1 : Surgery to remove tumors ...

  2. What's New in Salivary Gland Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for salivary gland cancer What’s new in salivary gland cancer research and treatment? Medical ... they hope to use this information to develop new treatments that work better and cause fewer side ...

  3. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed without..., swine, and goats shall not be saved for edible purposes. (d) The udders from cows officially...

  4. Salivary Gland Biopsy Shows Promise to Helping to Diagnose Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Science News Salivary Gland Biopsy Shows Promise to Helping to Diagnose Parkinson’s - Mar ... team performed a procedure called a needle core biopsy of the submandibular glands in 15 people who ...

  5. Lifting the Mist on Gastric Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Varga, Julia; Greten, Florian R

    2016-01-01

    In a recent issue of Cancer Cell, Hayakawa et al. (2015) demonstrate that Mist1(+) gastric stem cells are supported by a specialized niche composed of Cxcl12(+) endothelium and Wnt5a-producing Cxcr4(+) innate lymphoid cells. In diffuse-type gastric cancer this perivascular stem cell niche is expanded and can be exploited for cancer therapy. PMID:26748749

  6. Gastric cancer with pregnancy: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Sahar; Chakravarti, Seema

    2011-01-01

    Gastric cancer with pregnancy is quite rare, and is often diagnosed at advanced stages with poor prognosis. This highlights the need to improve diagnosis by means of early endoscopy. We herein report two cases of advanced gastric cancer during pregnancy who sadly died within five weeks of diagnosis, to alert clinicians to this rare disease.

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Toshiro; Asaka, Masahiro

    2004-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has an association with histological gastritis, gastric atrophy, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma in the stomach. Gastric cancer occurs in only a minority of infected individuals, however. Such clinical diversities are caused by variations of H. pylori pathogenicity, host susceptibility, environmental factors, and interactions of these factors. By three prospective epidemiological studies, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization (IARC/WHO) concluded in 1994 that H. pylori had a causal linkage to gastric carcinogenesis and is a definite carcinogen in humans. In addition, the Mongolian gerbil model with or without low-dose chemical carcinogens demonstrated that H. pylori infection could develop into gastric cancer. The experimental studies have elucidated that virulence factors of H. pylori have an interaction with gastric epithelial cell signaling related to carcinogenesis. The cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) is a major virulence gene cluster and codes the type IV secretion machinery system, forming a cylinder-like structure. The CagA protein is translocated into target cells via this secretion system and induces a hummingbird morphology, growth factor-like effect. The other gene products are probably translocated into target cells and accelerate cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Understanding the molecular mechanism of the interaction between H. pylori and gastric epithelial cells will provide us with a new strategy for effective prevention of the development of gastric cancer induced by H. pylori infection. PMID:15449106

  8. Laparoscopic gastric band removal complicated by splenosis.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Gregory; Schoucair, Ramy; Shimlati, Rasha; Rached, Linda; Khoury, George

    2016-08-01

    In any patient, the occurrence of postsplenectomy splenosis can complicate the planning of further surgeries. In our case, the gastric sleeve procedure was aborted, as it would have put the patient's life in danger. Therefore, only the gastric band was removed, eliminating future erosion. PMID:27525091

  9. Helicobacter pylori Diversity and Gastric Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this malignancy. An important goal is to identify H. pylori-infected persons at high risk for gastric cancer, so that these individuals can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. H. pylori exhibits a high level of intraspecies genetic diversity, and over the past two decades, many studies have endeavored to identify strain-specific features of H. pylori that are linked to development of gastric cancer. One of the most prominent differences among H. pylori strains is the presence or absence of a 40-kb chromosomal region known as the cag pathogenicity island (PAI). Current evidence suggests that the risk of gastric cancer is very low among persons harboring H. pylori strains that lack the cag PAI. Among persons harboring strains that contain the cag PAI, the risk of gastric cancer is shaped by a complex interplay among multiple strain-specific bacterial factors as well as host factors. This review discusses the strain-specific properties of H. pylori that correlate with increased gastric cancer risk, focusing in particular on secreted proteins and surface-exposed proteins, and describes evidence from cell culture and animal models linking these factors to gastric cancer pathogenesis. Strain-specific features of H. pylori that may account for geographic variation in gastric cancer incidence are also discussed. PMID:26814181

  10. The journey of personalizing gastric cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer ranks the fourth most prevalent malignancy yet it is the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Every year, gastric cancer adds nearly 1 million new cancer cases, and 723,000 or 10% of cancer deaths to the global cancer burden. Approximately, 405,000 or 43% of the new cases and 325,000 or 45% of the deaths are in China, making gastric cancer a particularly challenging malignancy. This thematic series discusses the molecular classifications of gastric cancer by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the Asian Cancer Research Group (ACRG) as well as the implications in personalized therapeutic choices; discusses the evolution of gastric surgery and presents perspectives on surgical techniques in treating gastric cancer; and reviews current and emerging targeted agents as well as immunotherapies in treating gastric cancer. With these advancements in molecular characterization, surgical intervention, and targeted and immunotherapies, gastric cancer will enter a personalized medicine era in the next 5 years. PMID:27581614

  11. A Simple Band for Gastric Banding.

    PubMed

    Broadbent

    1993-08-01

    The author has noted that flexible gastric bands have occasionally stenosed the gastric stoma or allowed it to dilate. A band was developed using a soft outer silicone rubber tube over a holding mechanism made out of a nylon cable tie passed within the silicone tube. This simple, easily applied band is rigid, resisting scar contracture and dilatation. PMID:10757939

  12. Nutrition and Gastric Cancer Risk: An Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data from epidemiologic, experimental, and animal studies indicate that diet plays an important role in the etiology of gastric cancer. High intake of fresh fruit and vegetable, lycopene and lycopene-containing food products, and potentially vitamin C and selenium may reduce the risk for gastric can...

  13. An Improved Method for the Estimation and Visualization of Velocity Fields from Gastric High-Resolution Electrical Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; O'Grady, Gregory; Du, Peng; Pullan, Andrew J; Cheng, Leo K

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution (HR) electrical mapping is an important clinical research tool for understanding normal and abnormal gastric electrophysiology. Analyzing velocities of gastric electrical activity in a reliable and accurate manner can provide additional valuable information for quantitatively and qualitatively comparing features across and within subjects, particularly during gastric dysrhythmias. In this study we compared three methods of estimating velocities from HR recordings to determine which method was the most reliable for use with gastric HR electrical mapping. The three methods were i) Simple finite difference ii) Smoothed finite difference and a iii) Polynomial based method. With synthetic data, the accuracy of the simple finite difference method resulted in velocity errors almost twice that of the smoothed finite difference and the polynomial based method, in the presence of activation time error up to 0.5s. With three synthetic cases under various noise types and levels, the smoothed finite difference resulted in average speed error of 3.2% and an average angle error of 2.0° and the polynomial based method had an average speed error of 3.3% and an average angle error of 1.7°. With experimental gastric slow wave recordings performed in pigs, the three methods estimated similar velocities (6.3-7.3 mm/s), but the smoothed finite difference method had a lower standard deviation in its velocity estimate than the simple finite difference and the polynomial based method, leading it to be the method of choice for velocity estimation in gastric slow wave propagation. An improved method for visualizing velocity fields is also presented. PMID:22207635

  14. Characterization of pig colonic mucins.

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, F J; Hutton, D A; Jumel, K; Pearson, J P; Harding, S E; Allen, A

    1996-01-01

    Pig colonic mucins isolated from the adherent mucus gel in the presence of proteinase inhibitors were solubilized by homogenization and the component mucins fractionated by CsC1 density-gradient centrifugation. Polymeric and reduced pig colonic mucin were both largely excluded on Sepharose CL-2B, papain-digested colonic mucin was included. The M(r) values of polymeric, reduced and digested mucins were 5.5 x 10(6), 2.1 x 10(6) and 0.6 x 10(6) respectively. This suggests that pig colonic mucin is comprised of 2-3 subunits, each subunit containing 3-4 glycosylated regions. The intrinsic viscosities of polymeric, reduced and digested mucin were 240 ml.g-1, 100 ml.g-1 and 20 ml.g-1 respectively. Polymeric pig colonic mucin comprised 16% protein per mg of glycoprotein and was rich in serine, threonine and proline (43% of total amino acids). There were approx. 150 disulphide bridges and 53 free thiol groups per mucin polymer. A seventh of the protein content was lost on reduction. This protein was particularly rich in proline and the hydrophobic amino acids. Papain-digested pig colonic mucin contained 11% protein per mg of glycoprotein and was rich in serine, threonine, glutamate and aspartate. All types of amino acids with the exception of aspartate were lost on digestion. The amino acid analysis of the proteolytically digested regions of pig colonic mucin are markedly different to the tandem repeat regions of the human mucin genes shown to be expressed in the colon. PMID:8670173

  15. VIP and its homologous increase vascular conductance in certain endocrine and exocrine glands

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, L.J.; Connors, J.M.; Hedge, G.A. )

    1988-04-01

    The effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and related structural homologues on tissue vascular conductances were investigated in anesthetized male rats. VIP, peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI), secretin, growth hormone-releasing factor (GHRF), gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), or saline was infused intravenously over 4 min. Tissue blood flows were measured during this time by use of {sup 141}Ce-labeled microspheres. Circulating thyrotropin (TSH), triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}), and thyroxine (T{sub 4}) levels were determined before and at 20 min and 2 h after treatment. Marked increases in thyroid, pancreatic, and salivary gland vascular Cs occurred during peptide infusion with the order of potency correlating with the degree of structural homology to VIP. PHI and secretin produced maximal increases in vascular Cs, which were the same as those obtained with VIP. Circulating TSH, T{sub 3}, and T{sub 4} levels were not different from values in saline-infused rats after peptide treatments that caused striking increases in thyroid vascular C. These observations indicate that the vascular beds of certain endocrine and exocrine glands are responsive to the vasodilatory action of VIP and related homologues with the order of potency corresponding to the degree of structural homology to VIP. These results are also consistent with the proposal that structural homologues of VIP act at the same vascular receptor as VIP. Alternative, the involvement of different vascular receptors, acting through the same mechanism at a level beyond the receptor site, cannot be excluded.

  16. Anticancer Effect of Lycopene in Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2015-06-01

    Gastric cancer ranks as the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Risk factors of gastric carcinogenesis include oxidative stress, DNA damage, Helicobacter pylori infection, bad eating habits, and smoking. Since oxidative stress is related to DNA damage, smoking, and H. pylori infection, scavenging of reactive oxygen species may be beneficial for prevention of gastric carcinogenesis. Lycopene, one of the naturally occurring carotenoids, has unique structural and chemical features that contributes to a potent antioxidant activity. It shows a potential anticancer activity and reduces gastric cancer incidence. This review will summarize anticancer effect and mechanism of lycopene on gastric carcinogenesis based on the recent experimental and clinical studies. PMID:26151041

  17. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer. PMID:27573782

  18. Anticancer Effect of Lycopene in Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer ranks as the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Risk factors of gastric carcinogenesis include oxidative stress, DNA damage, Helicobacter pylori infection, bad eating habits, and smoking. Since oxidative stress is related to DNA damage, smoking, and H. pylori infection, scavenging of reactive oxygen species may be beneficial for prevention of gastric carcinogenesis. Lycopene, one of the naturally occurring carotenoids, has unique structural and chemical features that contributes to a potent antioxidant activity. It shows a potential anticancer activity and reduces gastric cancer incidence. This review will summarize anticancer effect and mechanism of lycopene on gastric carcinogenesis based on the recent experimental and clinical studies. PMID:26151041

  19. Polyamines are Inhibitors of Gastric Acid Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Tushar K.; Nandi, Jyotirmoy; Pidhorodeckyj, Nykolai; Meng-Ai, Zhou

    1982-03-01

    The naturally occurring organic polycations such as spermine and spermidine inhibit histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion by bullfrog gastric mucosa in vitro; spermine is much more potent than spermidine. Unlike the H2 receptor antagonists, the polyamines are completely ineffective from the nutrient side and are effective only from the secretory side of the chambered mucosa. The polyamine effects could be reversed by increasing K+ concentration in the secretory solution. Studies with isolated gastric microsomal vesicles demonstrate that the polyamines do not inhibit the gastric H+,K+-ATPase but greatly decrease the ATPase-mediated uptake of H+ under appropriate conditions. For the latter effects the presence of polyamine within the vesicle interior was found to be essential. Our data strongly suggest an uncoupling of the gastric H+,K+-ATPase system by the polyamines. The therapeutic potential of these and similar compounds in the treatment of hyperacidity and peptic ulcer is discussed.

  20. Comparative aspects of mammary gland development and homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary glands are crucial to the reproductive strategy of mammals and the milk of domesticated ruminants serves as an important source of nutrients for the human population. The majority of mammary gland development occurs postnatally and the mammary gland undergoes cyclical periods of growth, dif...

  1. Chemical structures of manure from conventional and phytase transgenic pigs investigated by advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jingdong; Ajakaiye, Ayodele; Lan, Yeqing; Olk, Dan C; Ceballos, Michael; Zhang, Tiequan; Fan, Ming Z; Forsberg, Cecil W

    2008-03-26

    Nonpoint phosphorus (P) pollution from animal manure is becoming a serious global problem. The current solution for the swine industry includes the enzyme phytase as a component in oil meal and cereal grain-based swine diets. A long-term approach is the production of transgenic phytase pigs that express phytase in the salivary glands and secrete it in the saliva. This study provides a detailed comparison of chemical structures of manure from conventional pigs and transgenic pigs that express phytase under growing and finishing phases using new solid-state NMR techniques. Spectral editing techniques and quantitative NMR techniques were used to identify and quantify specific functional groups. Two-dimensional (1)H- (13)C heteronuclear correlation NMR was used to detect their connectivity. Manure from conventional and transgenic pigs had similar peptide, carbohydrate, and fatty acid components, while those from transgenic pigs contained more carbohydrates and fewer nonpolar alkyls. There was no consistent effect from diets with or without supplemental phosphate or growth stages. PMID:17973446

  2. Agronomic recycling of pig slurry and pig sewage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Garrido, Melisa; Sánchez García, Pablo; Faz Cano, Ángel; Büyükkılıç Yanardag, Asuman; Yanardag, Ibrahim; Kabas, Sebla; Ángeles Múñoz García, María; María Rosales Aranda, Rosa; Segura Ruíz, Juan Carlos

    2013-04-01

    Recycling pig slurry as organic fertilizer is a convenient and suitable way of waste elimination due to its low cost and high agronomic benefits. The objectives of this two year study are focused on improving and recycling pig slurry appropriately, and monitoring the soil-plant system at the same time. The evaluation of the agronomic effectiveness of different types of pig slurry (raw, solid, treated and depurated) in different doses (170 kg N ha-1 (legislated dose), 340 and 510 kg N ha-1) is innovative because the fertilizer value of each amendment can be balanced. Furthermore environmental issues such us volatilisation, leaching and salinisation have been considered for each treatment in order to set the viability of the study and to justify the treatments applied. Electrical conductivity, Kjeldhal nitrogen, sodium and potassium are the physico-chemical parameters most influenced in soils treated with doses 340 and 510 kg N ha-1. Additionally plant samples, especially halophyte, have shown the highest major and minor nutrients contents. Finally, pig slurry application in legislated doses could be considered a useful environmental practice; however, the development of the crop will be very influenced by the type of dose and amendment selected.

  3. Isoprenaline Induces Periostin Expression in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Xiao; Xi, Hong-Qing; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Yang, Shao-Wei; Lu, Yan-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Periostin mediates critical steps in gastric cancer and is involved in various signaling pathways. However, the roles of periostin in promoting gastric cancer metastasis are not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance between periostin expression and gastric cancer progression and the role of stress-related hormones in the regulation of cancer development and progression. Materials and Methods Normal, cancerous and metastatic gastric tissues were collected from patients diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer. The in vivo expression of periostin was evaluated by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescent staining. Meanwhile, human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines MKN-45 and BGC-803 were used to detect the in vitro expression of periostin by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blotting. Results Periostin is expressed in the stroma of the primary gastric tumors and metastases, but not in normal gastric tissue. In addition, we observed that periostin is located mainly in pericryptal fibroblasts, but not in the tumor cells, and strongly correlated to the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA). Furthermore, the distribution patterns of periostin were broader as the clinical staging of tumors progressed. We also identified a role of stress-related signaling in promoting cancer development and progression, and found that isoprenaline upregulated expression levels of periostin in gastric cancer cells. Conclusion These findings suggest that the distribution pattern of periostin was broader as the clinical staging of the tumor progressed and found that isoprenaline upregulated expression levels of periostin in gastric cancer cells. PMID:26996552

  4. Exsanguination due to gastric ulceration in a foal.

    PubMed

    Traub-Dagartz, J; Bayly, W; Riggs, M; Thomas, N; Pankowski, R

    1985-02-01

    An Arabian foal with a congenital heart disease died due to hemorrhage secondary to a large gastric ulcer. Previously, death of foals with gastric ulcers has been due to diffuse peritonitis resulting from gastric ulcer perforation. The foal in this case report died due to hemorrhage secondary to a large gastric ulcer. PMID:3972690

  5. Targeted therapy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Elizabeth C; Cunningham, David

    2012-09-01

    For patients with advanced gastric cancer, traditional double or triplet cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens result in a median survival of 9-11 months. As combination therapy is associated with increased survival, but also increased toxicity in a patient population whose performance status often compromised by their malignancy, development of more effective and less toxic treatment choices is mandated. Emerging data from gene expression profiling suggests that differences in pathological appearance and clinical behavior may be due the presence of unique molecular phenotypes. Characterization of the gastric cancer genomic landscape reveals the presence of multiple alterations in expression of receptor tyrosine kinases, which in conjunction with their ligands and downstream effector molecules represent potentially druggable pathways for future drug development. Treatment of HER2 positive gastric cancer with trastuzumab has led to significant gains in overall survival, and further manipulation of this pathway using the novel anti-HER2 directed agents pertuzumab and T-DM1 in addition to dual EGFR/HER2 blockade with lapatinib may yield positive results. In contrast, targeting of the EGFR pathway in combination with chemotherapy in unselected patients has not been fruitful to date, with no significant gains over standard chemotherapy yet demonstrated. Similarly, use of the anti-angiogenic monoclonal antibody bevacizumab was not successful in a large global randomized trial; however intriguing regional variations were seen with respect to efficacy of this drug, leading to calls for a second, regionally stratified study. Careful selection of patient subsets will become a key factor in future clinical trials, as novel targeted agents such as those targeting the MET/HGF and FGFR axes move forward into clinical development. It is hoped that treatment of patients in such molecularly defined groups is will lead to significant gains in survival compared to current treatment

  6. Silks produced by insect labial glands.

    PubMed

    Sehnal, Frantisek; Sutherland, Tara

    2008-01-01

    Insect silks are secreted from diverse gland types; this chapter deals with the silks produced by labial glands of Holometabola (insects with pupa in their life cycle). Labial silk glands are composed of a few tens or hundreds of large polyploid cells that secrete polymerizing proteins which are stored in the gland lumen as a semi-liquid gel. Polymerization is based on weak molecular interactions between repetitive amino acid motifs present in one or more silk proteins; cross-linking by disulfide bonds may be important in the silks spun under water. The mechanism of long-term storage of the silk dope inside the glands and its conversion into the silk fiber during spinning is not fully understood. The conversion occurs within seconds at ambient temperature and pressure, under minimal drawing force and in some cases under water. The silk filament is largely built of proteins called fibroins and in Lepidoptera and Trichoptera coated by glue-type proteins known as sericins. Silks often contain small amounts of additional proteins of poorly known function. The silk components controlling dope storage and filament formation seem to be conserved at the level of orders, while the nature of polymerizing motifs in the fibroins, which determine the physical properties of silk, differ at the level of family and even genus. Most silks are based on fibroin beta-sheets interrupted with other structures such as alpha-helices but the silk proteins of certain sawflies have predominantly a collagen-like or polyglycine II arrangement and the silks of social Hymenoptera are formed from proteins in a coiled coil arrangement. PMID:19221523

  7. GABAergic signaling in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haijie; Benitez, Sergio G; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Farias Altamirano, Luz E; Kruse, Martin; Seo, Jong Bae; Koh, Duk-Su; Muñoz, Estela M; Hille, Bertil

    2016-08-01

    Pinealocytes secrete melatonin at night in response to norepinephrine released from sympathetic nerve terminals in the pineal gland. The gland also contains many other neurotransmitters whose cellular disposition, activity, and relevance to pineal function are not understood. Here, we clarify sources and demonstrate cellular actions of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry of the gland and electrical recording from pinealocytes. GABAergic cells and nerve fibers, defined as containing GABA and the synthetic GAD67, were identified. The cells represent a subset of interstitial cells while the nerve fibers were distinct from the sympathetic innervation. The GABAA receptor subunit α1 was visualized in close proximity of both GABAergic and sympathetic nerve fibers as well as fine extensions among pinealocytes and blood vessels. The GABAB 1 receptor subunit was localized in the interstitial compartment but not in pinealocytes. Electrophysiology of isolated pinealocytes revealed that GABA and muscimol elicit strong inward chloride currents sensitive to bicuculline and picrotoxin, clear evidence for functional GABAA receptors on the surface membrane. Applications of elevated potassium solution or the neurotransmitter acetylcholine depolarized the pinealocyte membrane potential enough to open voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels leading to intracellular calcium elevations. GABA repolarized the membrane and shut off such calcium rises. In 48-72-h cultured intact glands, GABA application neither triggered melatonin secretion by itself nor affected norepinephrine-induced secretion. Thus, strong elements of GABA signaling are present in pineal glands that make large electrical responses in pinealocytes, but physiological roles need to be found. PMID:27019076

  8. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking. PMID:27193988

  9. Biphasic nature of gastric emptying.

    PubMed

    Siegel, J A; Urbain, J L; Adler, L P; Charkes, N D; Maurer, A H; Krevsky, B; Knight, L C; Fisher, R S; Malmud, L S

    1988-01-01

    The existence of a lag phase during the gastric emptying of solid foods is controversial. It has been hypothesised that among other early events, the stomach requires a period of time to process solid food to particles small enough to be handled as a liquid. At present no standardised curve fitting techniques exist for the characterisation and quantification of the lag phase or the emptying rate of solids and liquids. We have evaluated the ability of a modified power exponential function to define the emptying parameters of two different solid meals. Dual labelled meals were administered to 24 normal volunteers. The subjects received meals consisting of either Tc-99m in vivo labelled chicken liver or Tc-99m-egg, which have different densities, and In-111-DTPA in water. The emptying curves were biphasic in nature. For solids, this represented an initial delay in emptying or lag phase followed by an equilibrium emptying phase characterised by a constant rate of emptying. The curves were analysed using a modified power exponential function of the form y(t) = 1-(1-e-kt)beta, where y(t) is the fractional meal retention at time t, k is the gastric emptying rate in min-1, and beta is the extrapolated y-intercept from the terminal portion of the curve. The length of the lag phase and half-emptying time increased with solid food density (31 +/- 8 min and 77.6 +/- 11.2 min for egg and 62 +/- 16 min and 94.1 +/- 14.2 min for chicken liver, respectively). After the lag phase, both solids had similar emptying rates, and these rates were identical to those of the liquids. In vitro experiments indicated that the egg meal disintegrated much more rapidly than the chicken liver under mechanical agitation in gastric juice, lending further support to the hypothesis that the initial lag in emptying of solid food is due to the processing of food into particles small enough to pass the pylorus. We conclude that the modified power exponential model permits characterisation of the biphasic

  10. Current Perspectives on Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Marqués-Lespier, Juan M; González-Pons, María; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is third leading cause of cancer-related death. Only 28.3% of new GC cases survive more than 5 years. Although incidence has declined in the United States, an increase is estimated for 2016. Risk factors include sex (risk is higher in men), Helicobacter pylori infection, heredity, and lifestyle. GC is usually diagnosed between the ages of 60-80 years. Prognosis of GC is largely dependent on the tumor stage at diagnosis and classification as intestinal or diffuse type; diffuse-type GC has worse prognosis. Chemoprevention has been shown to decrease risk, but is currently not used clinically. PMID:27546840

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of gastric emptying disorders. Clinical usefulness of radionuclide measurements of gastric emptying

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.A.; Broderick, W.C.; Van Dyke, D.; Way, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    We studied 53 patients with severe gastrointestinal symptoms thought to be due to a gastric motility disorder. Sixty-six percent had had a previous operation on the stomach, and 21 percent had insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Based on clinical, radiographic, and endoscopic findings, 48 patients were thought to have gastroparesis, 3 were thought to have dumping, and 2 had no diagnosis. Measurement of gastric emptying of solids showed that gastric emptying was normal in 12 patients, rapid in 15 patients, and slow in 26 patients. Further evaluation showed that half of the patients with normal gastric emptying, and one third of those with rapid gastric emptying had other diseases of the gastrointestinal tract that responded well to surgery. Of those patients with dumping, diet modification was effective in 40 percent, and half of those who did not respond to dietary manipulations did well after reoperation. Nineteen patients with delayed gastric emptying were treated with metoclopramide. Sixty percent of those without previous gastric surgery responded, whereas only 25 percent of those with previous gastric surgery had good results. The rate of gastric emptying improved following reoperation in 9 (90 percent) of 10 patients with delayed gastric emptying (4 who had not responded to metoclopramide). Gastric emptying was measured again in 15 patients after treatment. The changes after treatment paralleled the clinical response. These studies indicate that gastroparesis cannot be reliably diagnosed on the basis of clinical findings and standard tests. Gastric emptying studies are essential to diagnose and treat patients thought to have gastric motility disorders, and to evaluate the results of therapy.

  12. Antibody and blood leukocyte response in Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) tick-infested dogs and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Matias P J; Aoki, Vanessa L; Sanches, Françoise P S; Aquino, Lúcia P T C T; Garcia, Marcos V; Machado, Rosângela Z; Bechara, Gervásio H

    2003-07-10

    The dog is considered to be the natural host of Rhipicephalus sanguineus and is unable to develop appreciable resistance even after repeated feedings. The guinea pig develops strong resistance after one infestation with adult ticks. Antibody (IgG) titres against tick salivary gland antigens (SGAs) and blood leukocyte numbers in dogs and guinea pigs undergoing experimental R. sanguineus tick infestations were measured to detect a possible correlation with susceptibility or resistance of hosts. Since infested dogs develop an immediate hypersensitivity reaction to R. sanguineus antigens, total and anti-R. sanguineus SGA IgE levels were also measured in this host species. IgG and IgE antibody levels were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) along three consecutive infestations of both hosts. Most dogs and guinea pigs displayed low IgG levels against R. sanguineus SGAs, though marked differences in individual response were observed. Although dog's total serum IgE levels increased significantly after infestations, no change in the amount of anti-salivary gland IgE was detected. Total and differential blood cell counts were determined in dogs and guinea pigs during primary and secondary infestation. In dogs, a tertiary infestation and a subsequent higher infestation level were also evaluated. Infested dogs did not display any alteration in blood leukocyte counts throughout the experiment. Guinea pigs, on the other hand, developed a significant basophilia during primary infestation which increased further during secondary infestation. These data reveal similarities and differences in the reactions of resistant and non-resistant hosts to ticks. They contribute for the understanding of such host-parasite relationships and will hopefully aid in the development of immune control of ticks. PMID:12860067

  13. Aquaporins in Salivary Glands: From Basic Research to Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Delporte, Christine; Bryla, Angélic; Perret, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Salivary glands are involved in saliva secretion that ensures proper oral health. Aquaporins are expressed in salivary glands and play a major role in saliva secretion. This review will provide an overview of the salivary gland morphology and physiology of saliva secretion, and focus on the expression, subcellular localization and role of aquaporins under physiological and pathophysiological conditions, as well as clinical applications involving aquaporins. This review is highlighting expression and localization of aquaporins in human, rat and mouse, the most studied species and is pointing out possible difference between major salivary glands, i.e., parotid, submandibular and sublingual glands. PMID:26828482

  14. Neutron therapy for salivary and thyroid gland cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribova, O. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Choynzonov, E. L.; Lisin, V. A.; Novikov, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the results of the combined modality treatment and radiation therapy using 6.3 MeV fast neutrons for salivary gland cancer and prognostically unfavorable thyroid gland cancer. The study group comprised 127 patients with salivary gland cancer and 46 patients with thyroid gland cancer, who received neutron therapy alone and in combination with surgery. The results obtained demonstrated that the combined modality treatment including fast neutron therapy led to encouraging local control in patients with salivary and thyroid gland cancers.

  15. Tear film and meibomian gland functions in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Zengin, N; Tol, H; Balevi, S; Gündüz, K; Okudan, S; Endoğru, H

    1996-08-01

    Tear secretion, tear film stability, and meibomian gland function (plugging, volume, and thickness) were assessed in patients with psoriasis vulgaris (n = 70). As compared to that of the healthy controls (n = 125) mean Schirmer I value of psoriatic patients was found to be in normal ranges, whereas tear film break-up time was significantly lowered. When evaluating meibomian gland function, psoriatic patients were found to have higher plugging and thickness indices but a normal volume of meibomian gland secretion. These findings suggested an obstructive type of meibomian gland dysfunction in psoriatic patients which might result from increased turnover of the epithelia lining the meibomian gland duct. PMID:8883550

  16. Aquaporins in Salivary Glands: From Basic Research to Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Delporte, Christine; Bryla, Angélic; Perret, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Salivary glands are involved in saliva secretion that ensures proper oral health. Aquaporins are expressed in salivary glands and play a major role in saliva secretion. This review will provide an overview of the salivary gland morphology and physiology of saliva secretion, and focus on the expression, subcellular localization and role of aquaporins under physiological and pathophysiological conditions, as well as clinical applications involving aquaporins. This review is highlighting expression and localization of aquaporins in human, rat and mouse, the most studied species and is pointing out possible difference between major salivary glands, i.e., parotid, submandibular and sublingual glands. PMID:26828482

  17. Oxfendazole flukicidal activity in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Pedro; Terrones, Susana; Cabrera, María; Hoban, Cristian; Ceballos, Laura; Moreno, Laura; Canton, Candela; Donadeu, Meritxell; Lanusse, Carlos; Alvarez, Luis

    2014-08-01

    Although oxfendazole (OFZ) is a well know broad-spectrum benzimidazole anthelmintic, the assessment of its potential trematodicidal activity remains unexplored. OFZ administration at single high doses has been recommended to control Taenia solium cysticercus in pigs. The current study investigated the flukicidal activity obtained after a single high (30mg/kg) oral dose of OFZ in pigs harbouring a natural Fasciola hepatica infection. Sixteen (16) local ecotype pigs were randomly allocated into two (2) experimental groups of 8 animals each named as follow: Untreated control and OFZ treated, in which animals received OFZ (Synanthic(®), Merial Ltd., 9.06% suspension) orally at 30mg/kg. At seven (7) days post-treatment, all the animals were sacrificed and direct adult liver fluke counts were performed following the WAAVP guidelines. None of the animals involved in this experiment showed any adverse event during the study. OFZ treatment as a single 30mg/kg oral dose showed a 100% efficacy against F. hepatica. In conclusion, the trial described here demonstrated an excellent OFZ activity against F. hepatica in naturally infected pigs, after its administration at a single oral dose of 30mg/kg. PMID:24713198

  18. Tear staining in pigs: a potential tool for welfare assessment on commercial farms.

    PubMed

    Telkänranta, H; Marchant-Forde, J N; Valros, A

    2016-02-01

    Tear staining or chromodacryorrhea refers to a dark stain below the inner corner of the eye, caused by porphyrin-pigmented secretion from the Harderian gland. It has been shown to be a consistent indicator of stress in rats and to correlate with social stress and a barren environment in pigs. The current study was, to our knowledge, the first to test it on commercial pig farms as a potential welfare indicator. The study was carried out on three commercial farms in Finland, in connection to a larger study on the effects of different types of manipulable objects on tail and ear biting and other behavioural parameters. Farm A was a fattening farm, on which 768 growing-finishing pigs were studied in 73 pens. Farm B had a fattening unit, in which 656 growing-finishing pigs were studied in 44 pens, and a farrowing unit, in which 29 sows and their litters totalling 303 piglets were studied in 29 pens. Farm C was a piglet-producing farm, on which 167 breeder gilts were studied in 24 pens. Data collection included individual-level scoring of tear staining; scoring of tail and ear damage in the growing-finishing pigs and breeder gilts; a novel object test for the piglets; and a novel person test for the growing-finishing pigs on Farm B and the breeder gilts on Farm C. On Farm A, tear staining was found to correlate with tail damage scores (n=768, rs=0.14, P<0.001) and ear damage scores (n=768, rs=0.16, P<0.001). In the growing-finishing pigs on Farm B, tear staining of the left eye correlated with tail damage (n=656, rs=0.12, P<0.01) and that of the right eye correlated with ear damage (n=656, rs=0.10, P<0.01). On Farm A, tear-staining sores were lower in the treatment with three different types of manipulable objects as compared with controls (mean scores 3.3 and 3.9, respectively, n=31, F29=4.2, P<0.05). In the suckling piglets on Farm B, tear staining correlated with the latency to approach a novel object (n=29, rp=0.41, P<0.05). Although correlations with tail and ear

  19. Rapid high-amplitude circumferential slow wave propagation during normal gastric pacemaking and dysrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    O'Grady, Gregory; Du, Peng; Paskaranandavadivel, Nira; Angeli, Timothy R.; Lammers, Wim JEP; Asirvatham, Samuel J.; Windsor, John A.; Farrugia, Gianrico; Pullan, Andrew J.; Cheng, Leo K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastric slow waves propagate aborally as rings of excitation. Circumferential propagation does not normally occur, except at the pacemaker region. We hypothesized that: i) the unexplained high-velocity, high-amplitude activity associated with the pacemaker region is a consequence of circumferential propagation; ii) rapid, high-amplitude circumferential propagation emerges during gastric dysrhythmias; iii) the driving network conductance might switch between ICC-MP and circular ICC-IM during circumferential propagation; iv) extracellular amplitudes and velocities are correlated. Methods An experimental-theoretical study was performed. HR gastric mapping was performed in pigs during normal activation, pacing and dysrhythmia. Activation profiles, velocities and amplitudes were quantified. ICC pathways were theoretically evaluated in a bidomain model. Extracellular potentials were modelled as a function of membrane potentials. Key Results High-velocity, high-amplitude activation was only recorded in the pacemaker region when circumferential conduction occurred. Circumferential propagation accompanied dysrhythmia in 8/8 experiments, was faster than longitudinal propagation (8.9 vs 6.9 mm/s; p=0.004), and of higher amplitude (739 vs 528 μV; p=0.007). Simulations predicted that ICC-MP could be the driving network during longitudinal propagation, whereas during ectopic pacemaking, ICC-IM could outpace and activate ICC-MP in the circumferential axis. Experimental and modeling data demonstrated a linear relationship between velocities and amplitudes (p<0.001). Conclusions & Inferences The high-velocity and high-amplitude profile of the normal pacemaker region is due to localized circumferential propagation. Rapid circumferential propagation also emerges during a range of gastric dysrhythmias, elevating extracellular amplitudes and organizing transverse wavefronts. One possible explanation for these findings is bidirectional coupling between ICC-MP and circular

  20. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Inhibits Fas Antigen-Mediated Gastric Mucosal Cell Apoptosis through Actin-Dependent Inhibition of Receptor Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Stoicov, Calin; Cai, Xun; Li, Hanchen; Klucevsek, Kristine; Carlson, Jane; Saffari, Reza; Houghton, JeanMarie

    2005-01-01

    Escape from normal apoptotic controls is thought to be essential for the development of cancer. During Helicobacter pylori infection, the leading cause of gastric cancer, activation of the Fas antigen (Fas Ag) apoptotic pathway is responsible for early atrophy and tissue loss. As disease progresses, metaplastic and dysplastic glands arise which express Fas Ag but are resistant to apoptosis and are believed to be the precursor cells for adenocarcinoma. In this report, we show that one mechanism of acquired Fas resistance is inhibition of receptor aggregation via a major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII)-mediated, actin-dependent mechanism. For these studies we used the well-described C57BL/6 mouse model of Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter felis infection. Under normal conditions, Fas Ag is expressed at low levels, and MHCII expression on gastric mucosal cells is negligible. With infection and inflammation, both receptors are upregulated, and 6.1% of gastric mucosal cells express MHCII in combination with Fas Ag. Using the rat gastric mucosal cell line RGM-1 transfected with murine Fas Ag and MHCIIαβ chains, we demonstrate that MHCII prevents Fas receptor aggregation and inhibits Fas-mediated signaling through its effects on the actin cytoskeleton. Depolymerization of actin with cytochalasin D allows receptors to aggregate and restores Fas sensitivity. These findings offer one mechanism by which gastric mucosal cells acquire Fas resistance. PMID:16177302

  1. Effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha agonist (bezafibrate) on gastric secretion and gastric cytoprotection in rats.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rahul; Asad, Mohammed; Hrishikeshavan, H Jagannath; Prasad, Satya

    2007-06-01

    The effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) on gastric secretion and gastric cytoprotection was evaluated using five different models of gastric ulcers: acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcers, pylorus ligation, ethanol-induced, indomethacin-induced and ischemia-reperfusion-induced gastric ulcers. Bezafibrate, a PPAR-alpha agonist was administered at two different doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneanally. Both doses of bezafibrate showed significant antiulcer effect in ethanol-induced, indomethacin-induced and pylorus ligation-induced gastric ulcers. Bezafibrate increased healing of ulcer in acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcer model. Both doses were also effective in preventing gastric lesions induced by ischemia-reperfusion. It was concluded that PPAR-alpha activation increases healing of gastric ulcers and also prevents development of gastric ulcers in rats. PMID:17521298

  2. A unique lineage gives rise to the meibomian gland

    PubMed Central

    Fischesser, Katy; Lunn, Matthew O.; Kao, Winston W-Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the lineage that contributes to the morphogenesis of the meibomian gland. Methods To examine which cell lineage gives rise to the meibomian gland, the expression of Pax6 as well as that of various cytokeratin markers, including keratin 14 (Krt14), Krt15, Krt4, and Krt10, was examined with immunofluorescent staining of C57BL/6J mouse eyelids from P2 to P11 pups and adult mice. Results Pax6 was localized to the cytoplasm within the acinar region of the meibomian glands during morphogenesis but was absent in the fully developed gland. Keratin 14 was expressed throughout the gland at all stages whereas keratin 15 was absent at all stages. Keratin 4, a marker of mucosal lineage, was present throughout the gland and was colocalized with keratin 10 (epidermal lineage marker) in the developing duct at P4. This colocalization region decreased as the gland developed becoming restricted to the central duct near the opening to the acini in the fully developed gland. Conclusions We identified a unique cell lineage that expresses markers characteristic of mucosal and epidermal epithelia during meibomian gland morphogenesis. This unique group of cells was located in the central duct with a concentration near the ductule orifice. The expression of these cells reduced during meibomian gland morphogenesis and may play a role in the development and homeostasis of the gland. PMID:26957900

  3. Current status of proximal gastric vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, B D

    1989-01-01

    Proximal gastric vagotomy is nearing its twentieth year in clinical use as an operation for peptic ulcer disease. No other acid-reducing operation has undergone as much scrutiny or study. At this time, the evidence of such studies and long-term follow-up strongly supports the use of proximal gastric vagotomy as the treatment of choice for chronic duodenal ulcer in patients who have failed medical therapy. Its application in treating the complications of peptic ulcer disease, which recently have come to represent an increasingly greater percentage of all operations done for peptic ulcer disease, is well-tested. However, initial series suggest that it should probably occupy a prominent role in treating some of these complications, particularly in selected patients, in the future. The operation has the well-documented ability to reduce gastric acid production, not inhibit gastric bicarbonate production, and also minimally inhibit gastric motility. The combination of these physiologic results after proximal gastric vagotomy, along with preservation of the normal antropyloroduodenal mechanism of gastrointestinal control, serve to allow patients with proximal gastric vagotomy the improved benefits of significantly fewer severe gastrointestinal side effects than are seen after other operations for peptic ulcer disease. PMID:2644897

  4. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: Indian enigma

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Vatsala; Pandey, Renu; Misra, Sri Prakash; Dwivedi, Manisha

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram negative microaerophilic bacterium which resides in the mucous linings of the stomach. It has been implicated in the causation of various gastric disorders including gastric cancer. The geographical distribution and etiology of gastric cancer differ widely in different geographical regions and H. pylori, despite being labeled as a grade I carcinogen, has not been found to be associated with gastric cancer in many areas. Studies in Asian countries such as Thailand, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Iran, Saudi Arabian countries, Israel and Malaysia, have reported a high frequency of H. pylori infection co-existing with a low incidence of gastric cancer. In India, a difference in the prevalence of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer has been noted even in different regions of the country leading to a puzzle when attempting to find the causes of these variations. This puzzle of H. pylori distribution and gastric cancer epidemiology is known as the Indian enigma. In this review we have attempted to explain the Indian enigma using evidence from various Indian studies and from around the globe. This review covers aspects of epidemiology, the various biological strains present in different parts of the country and within individuals, the status of different H. pylori-related diseases and the molecular pathogenesis of the bacterium. PMID:24587625

  5. Giant sialolith of submandibular gland: report of a case†

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Selçuk; Vuralkan, Erkan; Çobanog˘lu, Bengü; Arslan, Ahmet; Ural, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Sialolithiasis is one of the most common diseases of salivary glands in middle-aged patients. Sialoliths are localized in submandibular glands in nearly 80% of the reported cases and they are classified as ‘giant’ in case any dimension exceeds 15 mm. Giant sialolith in submandibular gland is a rare disorder. Here, an unusual case of giant sialolith in submandibular gland is reported. A 42-year-old man referred with complaints of recurrent pain and swelling in the left submandibular area. Computerized tomography revealed a calcified mass of 42 × 17 mm size within the submandibular gland. Excision was performed in the submandibular gland and a giant sialolith of 35 mm length localized in the body of the gland was detected. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient fully recovered. PMID:25848088

  6. Giant sialolith of submandibular gland: report of a case†.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Selçuk; Vuralkan, Erkan; Çobanog˘lu, Bengü; Arslan, Ahmet; Ural, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Sialolithiasis is one of the most common diseases of salivary glands in middle-aged patients. Sialoliths are localized in submandibular glands in nearly 80% of the reported cases and they are classified as 'giant' in case any dimension exceeds 15 mm. Giant sialolith in submandibular gland is a rare disorder. Here, an unusual case of giant sialolith in submandibular gland is reported. A 42-year-old man referred with complaints of recurrent pain and swelling in the left submandibular area. Computerized tomography revealed a calcified mass of 42 × 17 mm size within the submandibular gland. Excision was performed in the submandibular gland and a giant sialolith of 35 mm length localized in the body of the gland was detected. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient fully recovered. PMID:25848088

  7. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of Accessory Parotid Gland: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Das, Somdipto; Nayak, Umanath K; Buggavetti, Rahul; Sekhar, Shobana

    2016-05-01

    The accessory parotid gland is salivary gland tissue separated from the main gland at a variable distance. This gland is histologically similar to the main gland, but has a higher incidence of malignant neoplasms than the main gland. Regarding the various malignant neoplasms, studies have shown higher incidences of mucoepidermoid carcinoma, with less than 2% being adenoid cystic carcinoma. We present a case of swelling in the midcheek region that, after clinical examination, was diagnosed as a case of neoplasm of the accessory parotid gland. On the basis of auxiliary investigations including intraoperative frozen section, it was concluded that it was adenoid cystic carcinoma, grade I, and after wide surgical resection, the tumor was removed without undergoing superficial parotidectomy. The patient received postoperative radiotherapy (RT) and was followed for 14 months without any recurrence or substantial facial asymmetry. PMID:26851989

  8. Toxoplasmosis in pigs-The last 20 years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs are important to the economy of many countries because they are a source of food for humans. Infected pig meat is a source of Toxoplasma gondii infection for humans and animals in many countries. This parasite also causes mortality in pigs, especially neonatal pigs. Most pigs acquire T. gondii ...

  9. Gastric wall ischemia following massive gastric distension due to peptic pyloric stenosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Santos, Tatiana; Freitas, Carla; Pinto-de-Sousa, João

    2016-01-01

    Gastric necrosis is a rare entity mainly due to the rich collateral blood flow the stomach is supplied by. Acute gastric dilation is one of the described underlying causes, and although not fully understood, many potential alterations, such as vascular compression, herniation, volvulus, acute necrotizing gastritis, complications after abdominal surgery, anorexia, bulimia nervosa, trauma, exposure to caustic materials, diabetes, medications, infections, debilitating chronic illness, gastric outlet obstruction, aerophagia and acute pancreatitis have been described. In this report, we present a case of partial gastric ischemia with necrosis and consequent perforation of the lesser curvature of the stomach, as a result of gastric outlet obstruction due to pyloric stenosis. The patient underwent an emergency laparotomy. An atypical gastrectomy and a Heineke-Mikulicz pyloroplasty were performed. We emphasize the need for the quick recognition of this condition and for the urgent management because of the high mortality rate associated with undiagnosed gastric necrosis. PMID:26851051

  10. Gastric wall ischemia following massive gastric distension due to peptic pyloric stenosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Tatiana; Freitas, Carla; Pinto-de-Sousa, João

    2016-01-01

    Gastric necrosis is a rare entity mainly due to the rich collateral blood flow the stomach is supplied by. Acute gastric dilation is one of the described underlying causes, and although not fully understood, many potential alterations, such as vascular compression, herniation, volvulus, acute necrotizing gastritis, complications after abdominal surgery, anorexia, bulimia nervosa, trauma, exposure to caustic materials, diabetes, medications, infections, debilitating chronic illness, gastric outlet obstruction, aerophagia and acute pancreatitis have been described. In this report, we present a case of partial gastric ischemia with necrosis and consequent perforation of the lesser curvature of the stomach, as a result of gastric outlet obstruction due to pyloric stenosis. The patient underwent an emergency laparotomy. An atypical gastrectomy and a Heineke–Mikulicz pyloroplasty were performed. We emphasize the need for the quick recognition of this condition and for the urgent management because of the high mortality rate associated with undiagnosed gastric necrosis. PMID:26851051

  11. Do calories or osmolality determine gastric emptying

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.B.; Levine, A.S.; Marlette, J.M.; Morley, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Recent animal studies suggest that gastric emptying is dependent on the caloric and osmotic content of the ingested food. These studies have involved intubation with infusion of liquid meals into the stomach. Scintigraphic methods, which are non-invasive and do not alter normal physiology, are now available for precise quantitation of gastric emptying. To study the role of calories and osmolality on gastric emptying, the authors employed a standardized /sup 99m/Tc-scrambled egg meal washed with 50 cc tap water in 10 normal human volunteers. A variety of simple and complex sugars, non-absorbable complex carbohydrate (polycose), medium chain fatty acid (MCFA) and gluten were dissolved in water and ingested with the test meal. Each subject acted as his own control. Coefficient of variation in control tests in each subject 12 weeks apart was 9.9%. Results showed that incremental glucose (25-66 gm) produced a linear increase in gastric emptying (T/2 control 50 +- 3, 25 gm 60 +- 3, 50 gm 79 +- 3 and 66 gm 102 +- 3 minutes). 25 gm fructose (T/2 59 +- 3 minutes) and 25 gm polycose (T/2 59 +- 3 minutes) had similar effects to glucose. 25 gm sucrose and 25 gm gluten did not significantly differ from controls. MCFA had an effect similar to 50 gm glucose - suggesting that calories are important in gastric emptying. However, 25 gm xylose markedly prolonged gastric emptying to 80 +- 5 minutes. The rank order for osmolality for substances tested MCFA = gluten < polycose < polycose < fructose < sucrose = glucose < xylose defined no relationship to gastric emptying. The authors' results suggest that neither calories nor osmolality alone determine gastric emptying. A specific food does not necessarily have the same effect on gastric emptying in different individuals.

  12. CT and MR findings of bilateral submandibular gland aplasia associated with hypertrophied symmetrical sublingual glands herniated through mylohyoid defects

    PubMed Central

    Haktanır, A

    2012-01-01

    There are very limited reports of aplasia of bilateral submandibular glands associated with bilateral sublingual gland hypertrophy. We report the case of a 13-year-old girl with bilateral submandibular gland aplasia associated with symmetrical sublingual gland hypertrophy that herniated from bilateral mylohyoid defects and presented as bilateral masses on CT and MRI images. Prolapsed bilateral sublingual gland hypertrophy should be considered in patients with bilateral submandibular masses to avoid unnecessary biopsy or surgery. We suggest that radiological evaluation of these cases should be performed before any intervention. PMID:22184630

  13. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy study on microstructure of gallbladder mucosa in pig.

    PubMed

    Prozorowska, Ewelina; Jackowiak, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    The present light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies on porcine gallbladder mucosa provide a description of the microstructures of great functional importance such as mucosal folds, the epithelium, glands, and lymphatic nodules. The results showed the regional structural differences of the porcine gallbladder wall. Depending on the part of the gallbladder, three types of mucosal structures were described: simple and branched folds and mucosal crypts. An important structural feature found in the mucosa is connected with the structural variety of type of mucosal folds, which change from simple located in the neck, to most composed, i.e., branched or joined, in the polygonal crypts toward the fundus of the gallbladder. The morphometric analysis showed statistically significantly differences in the form and size of the folds and between the fundus, body, and neck of the gallbladder. Differences in the size of mucosal epithelium are discussed in terms of processes of synthesis and secretion of glycoproteins. Regional, species-specific differences in morphology of mucosal subepithelial glands, i.e., their secretory units and openings, and intensity of mucus secretion were described. Our results on the pig gallbladder show adaptation and/or specialization in particular areas of the mucosa for (1) secretion of mucus in the neck or body of gallbladder and (2) for cyclic volume changes, especially in the fundus of gallbladder. The description of the microstructures of mucosa in the porcine gallbladder could be useful as reference data for numerous experiments on the bile tract in the pig. PMID:25604381

  14. Exploration of steroidogenesis-related genes in testes, ovaries, adrenals, liver and adipose tissue in pigs.

    PubMed

    Robic, Annie; Feve, Katia; Louveau, Isabelle; Riquet, Juliette; Prunier, Armelle

    2016-08-01

    To explore the metabolism of steroids in the pig species, a qualitative PCR analysis was performed for the main transcript of 27 genes involved in steroid metabolism. We compared samples of testes, adipose tissue and liver from immature and peripubertal males, adrenal cortex from peripubertal males, ovaries from cyclic females and adipose tissue from peripubertal females. Some genes were shown to have a tissue-specific expression. Two of them were expressed only in testes, ovaries and adrenals: CYP11A1 and CYP11B. The CYP21 and HSD17B3 genes, were expressed respectively only in adrenals and only in testes. Very few differences were observed between transcriptional patterns of peripubertal testes and adrenal glands as well as between male and female fat tissues. However, the expression of genes involved in the sulfonation of steroids was higher in testes than in adrenals from males. Main differences between ovaries and testes were observed for HSD17B1/2/3, AKR1C-pig6 and sulfotransferase genes (SULT2A1/SULT2B1). The present study shows that the SRD5A2 and CYP21 genes were not involved in the testicular biosynthesis of androstenone. It also shows that porcine adrenal glands produce essentially corticosteroids and that fat tissue is unable to produce de novo steroids. PMID:27436769

  15. Identification of genes regulating growth and fatness traits in pig through hypothalamic transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Ole; Alves, Estefânia; Rodríguez, M. Carmen; Folch, Josep María; Noguera, José Luis; Groenen, Martien A. M.; Fernández, Ana I.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies on Iberian × Landrace (IBMAP) pig intercrosses have enabled the identification of several quantitative trait locus (QTL) regions related to growth and fatness traits; however, the genetic variation underlying those QTLs are still unknown. These traits are not only relevant because of their impact on economically important production traits, but also because pig constitutes a widely studied animal model for human obesity and obesity-related diseases. The hypothalamus is the main gland regulating growth, food intake, and fat accumulation. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify genes and/or gene transcripts involved in the determination of growth and fatness in pig by a comparison of the whole hypothalamic transcriptome (RNA-Seq) in two groups of phenotypically divergent IBMAP pigs. Around 16,000 of the ∼25.010 annotated genes were expressed in these hypothalamic samples, with most of them showing intermediate expression levels. Functional analyses supported the key role of the hypothalamus in the regulation of growth, fat accumulation, and energy expenditure. Moreover, 58,927 potentially new isoforms were detected. More than 250 differentially expressed genes and novel transcript isoforms were identified between the two groups of pigs. Twenty-one DE genes/transcripts that colocalized in previously identified QTL regions and/or whose biological functions are related to the traits of interest were explored in more detail. Additionally, the transcription factors potentially regulating these genes and the subjacent networks and pathways were also analyzed. This study allows us to propose strong candidate genes for growth and fatness based on expression patterns, genomic location, and network interactions. PMID:24280257

  16. A Simple Model for Learning Improvement: Weigh Pig, Feed Pig, Weigh Pig. Occasional Paper #23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Keston H.; Good, Megan R.; Coleman, Chris M.; Smith, Kristen L.

    2014-01-01

    Assessing learning does not by itself result in increased student accomplishment, much like a pig never fattened up because it was weighed. Indeed, recent research shows that while institutions are more regularly engaging in assessment, they have little to show in the way of stronger student performance. This paper clarifies how assessment results…

  17. Red-flag technologies in gastric neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Susana

    2013-07-01

    Given its morbidity and mortality, the early detection and diagnosis of gastric cancer is an area of intense research focus. This article reviews the emerging use of enhanced endoscopic imaging technologies in the detection and management of gastric cancer. The combined use of white-light endoscopy with enhanced imaging technologies, such as magnification narrow-band imaging, chromoendoscopy, and autofluorescence endoscopy, demonstrates promise in the improved ability to detect and delineate gastric neoplasia. However, widespread clinical use is still limited, mainly because of the restricted availability of the technologies. PMID:23735104

  18. Pigs taking wing with transposons and recombinases

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Karl J; Carlson, Daniel F; Fahrenkrug, Scott C

    2007-01-01

    Swine production has been an important part of our lives since the late Mesolithic or early Neolithic periods, and ranks number one in world meat production. Pig production also contributes to high-value-added medical markets in the form of pharmaceuticals, heart valves, and surgical materials. Genetic engineering, including the addition of exogenous genetic material or manipulation of the endogenous genome, holds great promise for changing pig phenotypes for agricultural and medical applications. Although the first transgenic pigs were described in 1985, poor survival of manipulated embryos; inefficiencies in the integration, transmission, and expression of transgenes; and expensive husbandry costs have impeded the widespread application of pig genetic engineering. Sequencing of the pig genome and advances in reproductive technologies have rejuvenated efforts to apply transgenesis to swine. Pigs provide a compelling new resource for the directed production of pharmaceutical proteins and the provision of cells, vascular grafts, and organs for xenotransplantation. Additionally, given remarkable similarities in the physiology and size of people and pigs, swine will increasingly provide large animal models of human disease where rodent models are insufficient. We review the challenges facing pig transgenesis and discuss the utility of transposases and recombinases for enhancing the success and sophistication of pig genetic engineering. 'The paradise of my fancy is one where pigs have wings.' (GK Chesterton). PMID:18047690

  19. Gastric hyperplastic polyps coexisting with early gastric cancers, adenoma and neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Karpińska-Kaczmarczyk, K; Lewandowska, M; Białek, A; Ławniczak, M; Urasińska, E

    2016-03-01

    Gastric hyperplastic polyps (GHP) constitute up to 93% of all benign epithelial polyps of the stomach. The average probability of malignant transformation in GHP is 0.6-22% in large series. The aim of the study was to present the coexistence of GHP with early gastric cancer (EGC), gastric adenoma (GA), neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (NH) and well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumour (NET G1). Three cases were studied to reveal clinical data and morphological changes and to assess the relationship between GHP and accompanying gastric neoplastic lesions. PMID:27179272

  20. Microsatellite Instability in Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia in Patients with and without Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wai K.; Kim, Jae J.; Kim, Jong G.; Graham, David Y.; Sepulveda, Antonia R.

    2000-01-01

    The role and significance of microsatellite instability (MSI) in gastric carcinogenesis remain unknown. This study determined the chronology of MSI in gastric carcinogenesis by examining intestinal metaplasia (IM) from patients with and without gastric cancer. DNA was obtained from gastric specimens of 75 patients with gastric IM (30 cancer, 26 peptic ulcer, and 19 chronic gastritis patients) and was amplified with a set of eight microsatellite markers. Eight (26.7%) tumors and seven (9.3%) IM samples (three from cancer-free patients) displayed high-level MSI (three or more loci altered). Low-level MSI (one or two loci altered) was detected in 50% of the tumors, in 40% of IM samples coexisting with cancer, and in 38% of IM tissues of cancer-free individuals. Among the 30 cancer patients, microsatellites were more frequently altered in IM coexisting with tumors that showed MSI (P = 0.003). In addition, patients with low-level MSI in the tumor tissues were more likely to have active Helicobacter pylori infection than those with stable tumors (P = 0.02). In conclusion, this study indicates that MSI occurs not only in gastric IM of patients with gastric carcinoma, but also in IM of cancer-free individuals. These data suggest that the progressive accumulation of MSI in areas of IM may contribute to gastric cancer development, representing an important molecular event in the multistep gastric carcinogenesis cascade. PMID:10666383

  1. Seatbelt syndrome with gastric mucosal breaks and intra-gastric wall air leakage.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirohito; Tsushimi, Takaaki; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Fujihara, Shintaro; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Chiyo, Taiga; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    As numerous reports were published regarding the so-called seatbelt syndrome involved in car crashes, most of them were mentioned about small intestine, duodenum and colon perforations and solid organ bleeding. No reports have been published regarding multiple gastric mucosal tears with intra-gastric wall air leakage with massive bleeding. A 65-year-old woman was admitted after a motor vehicle crash. She vomited massive fresh blood. Gastric mucosal breaks, approximately 5 cm in length, were observed. Computed tomography imaging revealed multiple gastric mucosal breaks. We report a rare case wherein a traffic accident caused a serious condition associated with massive digestive bleeding. PMID:26466695

  2. Pretreatment Gastric Lavage Reduces Postoperative Bleeding after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Gastric Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yuka; Itakura, Jun; Ueda, Ken; Suzuki, Shoko; Yasui, Yutaka; Tamaki, Nobuharu; Nakakuki, Natsuko; Takada, Hitomi; Ueda, Masako; Hayashi, Tsuguru; Kuwabara, Konomi; Takaura, Kenta; Higuchi, Mayu; Komiyama, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Tsubasa; Izumi, Namiki

    2016-01-01

    Aim For patients receiving endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), there is urgent need pertaining to the prevention of postoperative bleeding. We conducted a retrospective propensity score-matched study that evaluated whether pre-ESD gastric lavage prevents postoperative bleeding after ESD for gastric neoplasms. Methods From September 2002 to October 2015, the 760 consecutive patients receiving ESD for gastric neoplasm were enrolled and data regarding them were retrospectively analyzed. All patients received conventional preventive treatment against delayed bleeding after ESD, including the administration of proton pump inhibitor and preventive coagulation of visible vessels, at the end of the ESD procedure. Results Pre-ESD risk factors for postoperative bleeding included tumor size and no gastric lavage. Using multivariate analysis tumor size >2.0 cm (HR 2.90, 95% CI 1.65–5.10, p = 0.0002) and no gastric lavage (HR 3.20, 95% CI 1.13–9.11, p = 0.029) were found to be independent risk factors. Next, we evaluated the effect of gastric lavage on the prevention of post-ESD bleeding using a propensity score-matching method. A total of 284 subjects (142 per group) were selected. Adjusted odds ratio of gastric lavage for post-ESD bleeding was 0.25 (95% CI 0.071–0.886, p = 0.032). Conclusion Pretreatment gastric lavage reduced postoperative bleeding in patients receiving ESD for gastric neoplasm. PMID:26871449

  3. Genetic alterations in salivary gland cancers.

    PubMed

    Yin, Linda X; Ha, Patrick K

    2016-06-15

    Salivary gland cancers are an incredibly heterogeneous group of tumors that include 24 histologically distinct tumor types. The use of new genetic methods has paved the way for promising advancements in our understanding of the molecular biology underlying each type of tumor. The objective of this review was to highlight common oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and cytogenetic and epigenetic changes associated with the most common tumor types: mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, salivary duct carcinoma, mammary analogue secretory carcinoma, hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma, carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma, and acinic cell carcinoma. Recent insights into the pathogenesis of each cancer subtype have helped better define and classify these tumors. Further research in salivary gland cancers should focus on determining the key genes involved in the tumorigenesis of each distinct malignancy and identifying individualized chemotherapies directed at these targets. Cancer 2016;122:1822-31. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26928905

  4. Bilateral adrenal gland haemorrhage: an unusual cause

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vasant; Malabu, Usman; Cameron, Donald; Sangla, Kunwarjit

    2014-01-01

    Summary Our patient had drainage of a large amoebic liver abscess. This got complicated by a severe degree of hypotension, which required aggressive fluid resuscitation and hydrocortisone support. Computerised tomography (CT) of the abdomen revealed bilateral adrenal gland haemorrhage (BAH) resulting in primary adrenal gland failure, which was the cause for hypotension. Patient was on long-term warfarin for provoked deep vein thrombosis of lower limb, which was discontinued before the procedure. Thrombophilia profile indicated the presence of lupus anticoagulant factor with prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). Patient was discharged on lifelong warfarin. This case emphasises the need for strong clinical suspicion for diagnosing BAH, rare but life-threatening condition, and its association with amoebic liver abscess and anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome (APLS). Learning points Recognition of BAH as a rare complication of sepsis.APLS can rarely cause BAH. PMID:25276353

  5. Current trends in salivary gland tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Baker, Olga J

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions form a continuous intercellular barrier between epithelial cells that is required to separate tissue spaces and regulate selective movement of solutes across the epithelium. They are composed of strands containing integral membrane proteins (e.g., claudins, occludin and tricellulin, junctional adhesion molecules and the coxsackie adenovirus receptor). These proteins are anchored to the cytoskeleton via scaffolding proteins such as ZO-1 and ZO-2. In salivary glands, tight junctions are involved in polarized saliva secretion and barrier maintenance between the extracellular environment and the glandular lumen. This review seeks to provide an overview of what is currently known, as well as the major questions and future research directions, regarding tight junction expression, organization and function within salivary glands. PMID:27583188

  6. [The structure of the skin of the ear in domesticated pigs, with special reference to their use for human dermatological research. 2. Specific histology of the integument].

    PubMed

    Meyer, W; Zschemisch, N H; Godynicki, S; Neurand, K

    2001-01-01

    Based on light microscopy, the study describes the specific histology of the ear integument of the white domesticated pig. After careful tissue fixation and embedding, routine histological staining, collagen fibre staining, fat demonstration based on frozen sections, and ink injection of the integumental blood vessel system were applied. A detailed description is presented of the structure of the skin layers (epidermis, dermis, hypodermis), the ear cartilage envelopes (fascia, perichondrium), the plica scaphae, the blood vessel distribution, the architecture of the collagen fibre bundles, as well as the hair follicles and the skin glands (sebaceous glands, apocrine tubular glands). The results are discussed with regard to a direct comparison with the histological structure of the human integument, and the advantages and disadvantages of the use of the porcine ear skin as model system in human dermatological research are emphasized. PMID:11314580

  7. The pituitary gland: a brief history.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Solomon Alexander

    2007-01-01

    The functions of the pituitary gland as an important constituent of the endocrine system were not understood until the latter part of the nineteenth century and the first half of the 20th century. At one time, the pituitary was deemed to be the "leader of the endocrine orchestra," but more recent studies have shown that its secretions are influenced by external stimuli and that it is largely under the control of the hypothalamus. PMID:17690988

  8. Salivary gland malignant neoplasms: treatment and prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Borthne, A.; Kjellevold, K.; Kaalhus, O.; Vermund, H.

    1986-05-01

    A retrospective analysis of 183 patients with malignant salivary gland tumors treated between 1955 and 1978 is presented. The analysis showed that radiation therapy lowered the recurrence rates after surgery and controlled approximately one-third of the inoperable tumors. A dose-response relationship exists and the data suggest that the radiation dose should not be less than that corresponding to a CRE-value of 1950 reu (70 Gy/7 weeks). Histology, location and clinical stage are important prognostic factors.

  9. Adrenal gland denervation and diving in ducks.

    PubMed

    Mangalam, H J; Jones, D R; Lacombe, A M

    1987-06-01

    The extreme elevation in plasma levels of free norepinephrine (NE) and free epinephrine (EP), which occurs during forced diving of ducks (Anas platyrhynchos), was studied before and after denervation of the adrenal glands. In intact animals both NE and EP concentration increased by up to two orders of magnitude in a 4-min dive but by a significantly lesser amount if the duck breathed O2 before the dive. Denervating the adrenal glands reduced the amounts of both catecholamines (CA) released during dives, plasma EP decreased to 10%, and NE to 50% of values obtained before denervation. Breathing O2 before a dive virtually eliminated CA release in denervates, indicating that hypoxia was the important non-neural releasing agent. Hypoxia was also the most important neural releasing agent compared with hypercapnia, acidosis, or hypoglycemia. Adrenal denervation did not cause significant changes in heart rate, blood pressure, arterial blood gas tensions, pH, or plasma glucose during dives, although denervation caused increased variation in some of these variables. In ducks CA release in dives is largely due to decreasing arterial O2 partial pressure, and full expression of the response is dependent on intact innervation of the adrenal gland. PMID:3591985

  10. The mystery of the thymus gland.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daniel; Ellis, Harold

    2016-09-01

    The thymus is the last organ in the human body to have its mechanisms fully understood, having had its function fully delineated more than 50 years ago (Miller , Tissue Antigens 63:509-517). Prior to this, the thymus gland has had an interesting history with theories having included a role in fetal growth and development before becoming more sinisterly, a cause of sudden infant death in the late 19th century known as status lymphaticus (Paltauf , Wien Klin Wochenschr 2:877-881). Until Miller (, Lancet 278:748-749) eventually proved its primarily immunological role, the history of this mysterious gland has closely mirrored the history of medicine itself, troubling the minds of pathologists such as Virchow (, Ueber die Chlorose und die damit zusammenhängenden Anomalien im Gefässapparate, insbesondere über "Endocarditis puerperalis," vorgetragen in der Sitzung der Berliner Geburtshülflichen Gesellschaft vom 12) and Grawitz (, Deut Med Wochenschr 22:429-431), surgeons such as Astley Cooper (, The Anatomy of the Thymus Gland) and Keynes (1953, Ann R Coll Surg 12:88), and eminent medical epidemiologists such as Greenwood and Woods [, J Hyg (Lond) 26:305-326]. This article will hopefully be of interest therefore to both clinician and historian alike. Clin. Anat. 29:679-684, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27037529

  11. NUT Carcinoma of the Sublingual Gland.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, S; French, C A; Josiassen, M; Hahn, C H; Kiss, K

    2016-09-01

    NUT carcinoma (NC) is a recently described, rare and extremely aggressive cancer primarily located to supradiaphragmatic structures and affecting young individuals. NC is characterized by translocations involving the NUT gene on 15q14 with the most common translocation partner gene being BRD4 on 19p13, resulting in the t(15;19)(q14;p13) karyotype. NC is poorly differentiated and is likely to be overlooked and misdiagnosed as poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) when immunohistochemical evaluation of NUT protein expression is omitted. Previously, NC has been found in the parotid and submandibular glands and we present the first case in the sublingual gland arising in a 40-year-old woman. We discuss the diagnostic considerations for poorly differentiated carcinomas of the salivary glands and advocate the inclusion of NUT immunohistochemistry in this setting. Not only does the NC diagnosis confer a grave prognosis when treated as SCC as illustrated by the present case, but is important for the inclusion of patients in ongoing clinical trials. PMID:26586234

  12. Non-neoplastic salivary gland diseases.

    PubMed

    Arduino, P G; Carrozzo, M; Pentenero, M; Bertolusso, G; Gandolfo, S

    2006-05-01

    A wide range of non neoplastic disorders can affect the salivary glands, although the more common are: mumps, acute suppurative sialadenitis, Sjögren's syndrome and drug-induced xerostomia. Salivary dysfunction is not a normal consequence of old age, and can be due to systemic diseases, medications or head and neck radiotherapy. Diagnosis of salivary disorders begins with a careful medical history, followed by a cautious examination. While complaints of xerostomia may be indicative of a salivary gland disorder, salivary diseases can present without symptoms. Therefore, routine examination of salivary function must be part of any head, neck, and oral examination. Health-care professionals can play a vital role in identifying patients at risk for developing salivary dysfunction, and should provide appropriate preventive and interventive techniques that will help to preserving a person's health, function, and quality of life. The present work provides an overview of most of the non neoplastic disorders of the salivary glands, in which the general presentation, pathology, and treatments are discussed. PMID:16688102

  13. Salivary Gland Cancers: Biology and Systemic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Gaurav; Mehdi, Syed A; Ganti, Apar Kishor

    2015-10-01

    Salivary gland tumors are a relatively rare and heterogeneous group of tumors with variable pathologic and phenotypic characteristics. The lack of clinical outcomes data and randomized controlled trials pertaining to them makes it difficult to formulate definitive treatment protocols that could help with making decisions regarding choice of therapy. Most studies involving systemic chemotherapy have not shown promising patient outcome results. With recent advances in molecular technology, however, it is now possible to identify specific genetic alterations and biomarkers as possible targets for therapeutic purposes. For example, in mucoepidermoid carcinomas, one of the most common types of malignant salivary gland tumors, a commonly seen genetic translocation [t(11;19)(q21;p13), which involves the CRTC1 and MAML2 genes] has been found to be associated with improved survival, making it a possible prognostic marker. Also, this translocation gives rise to a fusion protein that appears to render tumors highly sensitive to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition. However, the results of phase II trials of EGFR inhibitors-as well as other targeted agents--in salivary gland tumors have been disappointing: there has been some disease stabilization but no objective responses. There remains a need for well-designed prospective clinical studies to improve management of these tumors. PMID:26470903

  14. A Neutralizing Anti-gH/gL Monoclonal Antibody Is Protective in the Guinea Pig Model of Congenital CMV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Marcy R.; Yan, Donghong; Vij, Rajesh; Hongo, Jo-Anne; Nakamura, Gerald; Vernes, Jean-Michel; Meng, Y. Gloria; Lein, Samantha; Chan, Pamela; Ross, Jed; Carano, Richard; Deng, Rong; Lewin-Koh, Nicholas; Xu, Min; Feierbach, Becket

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common cause of congenital virus infection. Congenital HCMV infection occurs in 0.2–1% of all births, and causes birth defects and developmental abnormalities, including sensorineural hearing loss and developmental delay. Several key studies have established the guinea pig as a tractable model for the study of congenital HCMV infection and have shown that polyclonal antibodies can be protective [1]–[3]. In this study, we demonstrate that an anti-guinea pig CMV (GPCMV) glycoprotein H/glycoprotein L neutralizing monoclonal antibody protects against fetal infection and loss in the guinea pig. Furthermore, we have delineated the kinetics of GPCMV congenital infection, from maternal infection (salivary glands, seroconversion, placenta) to fetal infection (fetus and amniotic fluid). Our studies support the hypothesis that a neutralizing monoclonal antibody targeting an envelope GPCMV glycoprotein can protect the fetus from infection and may shed light on the therapeutic intervention of HCMV congenital infection in humans. PMID:24722349

  15. Use of electrogastrography in preclinical studies of cholinergic and anticholinergic agents in experimental pigs.

    PubMed

    Květina, J; Tachecí, I; Pavlík, M; Kopáčová, M; Rejchrt, S; Douda, T; Kuneš, M; Bureš, J

    2016-01-01

    Electrogastrography (EGG) is a non-invasive method for the assessment of gastric myoelectrical activity. Porcine EGG is comparable with human one. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of atropine and neostigmine on the EGG in experimental pigs. Adult female pigs were administrated atropine (1.5 mg i.m., n=6) and neostigmine (0.5 mg i.m., n=6) after the baseline EGG, followed by a 90-min trial recording (MMS, Enschede, the Netherlands). Running spectral analysis was used for the evaluation. The results were expressed as dominant frequency of slow waves and EGG power (areas of amplitudes). Neostigmine increased continuously the dominant frequency and decreased significantly the EGG power. Atropine did not change the dominant frequency significantly. However, atropine increased significantly the EGG power (areas of amplitudes) from basal values to the maximum at the 10-20-min interval. After that period, the areas of amplitudes decreased significantly to the lowest values at the 60-90-min interval. In conclusion, cholinergic and anticholinergic agents affect differently EGG in experimental pigs. PMID:26674291

  16. Primary gastric rupture in 47 horses (1995–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Winfield, Laramie S.; Dechant, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective case-control study was to identify factors associated with primary gastric rupture and to investigate if there were differences between etiologies of primary gastric rupture. Compared to the general colic population, Quarter horses were under-represented and Friesians and draft breeds were over-represented in 47 cases of primary gastric ruptures. Horses with primary gastric rupture typically presented with severe clinical and clinicopathological derangements. There were 24 idiopathic gastric ruptures, 20 gastric impaction associated ruptures, and 3 perforating gastric ulcers. Thoroughbred horses were over-represented in the idiopathic gastric rupture group compared to other breeds and etiologies. This study suggests the presence of important breed predispositions for development of gastric rupture. Further study is necessary to identify if these predispositions are associated with management factors or breed-specific disorders. PMID:26345205

  17. Non-neoplastic salivary gland lesions: a 15-year study.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Harsh; Tahlan, Anita; Mundi, Irneet; Punia, R P S; Dass, Arjun

    2011-08-01

    The spectrum of salivary gland lesions is wide and the relative incidence of neoplastic versus non-neoplastic lesions is variable in different studies. A series of non-neoplastic salivary gland lesions is reviewed to analyze their spectrum and their relative frequency. This is a retrospective study of salivary gland excisions and biopsies received in our department from January 1994 to December 2008. Routine hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections of all the salivary gland excisions and biopsies received were analyzed. Of the 393 salivary gland excisions and biopsies received, 216 cases were reported as non-neoplastic (55%) and formed our study group; 177 (45%) were neoplastic. Non-neoplastic lesions were more frequent in major salivary glands (65.7%) and submandibular gland was the most commonly involved (66.2%). Lip was the most frequent site (81.7%) for minor salivary gland lesions. Inflammation was the predominant pathological finding (49.5%), of which non-specific chronic sialadenitis constituted the majority (86.9%). Sialolithiasis was present in 22 cases (20.6%); all of these cases were of non-specific chronic sialadenitis. Cysts were second in frequency (36.6%), of which mucocele was the most common (54.5%). There were 5.6% cases of benign lympho-epithelial lesions, while normal salivary gland tissue was seen in 6.5% cases. Non-neoplastic salivary gland diseases are more common than neoplastic diseases and have a wide disease spectrum. PMID:21170719

  18. Regulation and formation of the Drosophila salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Andrew, D J

    1998-04-15

    The homeotic gene, Sex combs reduced (Scr), is a master regulator of Drosophila salivary gland formation. Embryos in which Scr function is missing do not form salivary glands, and embryos in which SCR protein is expressed everywhere form extra salivary glands. However, other known proteins, including the homeotic protein Abdominal-B, the unusual zinc finger protein Teashirt, and the secreted signaling molecule Decapentaplegic (a TGF-beta family member), limit the recruitment of SCR-expressing cells to salivary glands. To learn the molecular details of how salivary gland gene expression is controlled and as a first step toward understanding how the SCR transcription factor controls salivary gland morphogenesis, we screened for genes expressed in the developing salivary gland. Among our best candidates for potential direct downstream targets of SCR in the salivary gland are the genes trachealess (trh), dCREB-A, jalapeño, and Semaphorin II (SemaII). Our genetic studies suggest distinct and important roles for each of these genes in salivary gland morphogenesis. Current work includes studying the molecular interactions between SCR and these downstream target genes and asking how target genes coordinate their activities to effect the cell biological changes required to build functional salivary glands. PMID:9599294

  19. Gastric dysreflexia after acute experimental spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tong, M.; Holmes, G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Gastric reflexes are mediated mainly by vago-vagal reflex circuits in the caudal medulla. Despite the fact that brainstem vago-vagal circuitry remains intact after spinal cord injury (SCI), patients with SCI at the cervical level most often present gastric stasis with an increased risk of reflux and aspiration of gastric contents. Using a miniature strain gauge sutured to the gastric surface; we tested gastric motility and reflexive gastric relaxation following oesophageal distension (oesophageal-gastric relaxation reflex) in animals 3 days after a severe spinal contusion at either the third or ninth thoracic spinal segment (acute T3- or T9 SCI, respectively). Both basal gastric motility and the oesophageal-gastric relaxation reflex were significantly diminished in animals with T3 SCI. Conversely, both basal gastric motility and the oesophageal-gastric relaxation reflex were not significantly reduced in T9 SCI animals compared to controls. The reduced gastric motility and oesophageal-gastric reflex in T3 SCI rats was not ameliorated by celiac sympathectomy. Our results show that gastric stasis following acute SCI is independent of altered spinal sympathetic input to the stomach caudal to the lesion. Our data suggest that SCI may alter the sensitivity of vagal reflex function, perhaps by interrupting ascending spinosolitary input to brainstem vagal nuclei. PMID:19126185

  20. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... JT, van Hillegersberg R, Dekker E, Oliveira C, Cats A, Hoogerbrugge N; Dutch Working Group on Hereditary ... JH, van Hillegersberg R, Ligtenberg M, Bleiker E, Cats A; Dutch Working Group on Hereditary Gastric Cancer. ...

  1. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. PMID:27403106

  2. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. PMID:27403106

  3. Lymphadenectomy in gastric cancer: Contentious issues

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Jakhetiya, Ashish; Sharma, Jyoti; Ray, Mukur Dipi; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-01-01

    The stomach is the sixth most common cause of cancer worldwide. Surgery is an important component of the multi-modality treatment of the gastric cancer. The extent of lymphadenectomy has been a controversial issue in the surgical management of gastric cancer. The East-Asian surgeons believe that quality-controlled extended lymphadenectomy resulting in better loco-regional control leads to survival benefit in the gastric cancer; contrary to that, many western surgeons believe that extended lymphadenectomy adds to only postoperative morbidity and mortality without significantly enhancing the overall survival. We present a comprehensive review of the lymphadenectomy in the gastric cancer based on the previously published randomized controlled trials. PMID:27152135

  4. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boniface, Megan M; Wani, Sachin B; Schefter, Tracey E; Koo, Phillip J; Meguid, Cheryl; Leong, Stephen; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Wingrove, Lisa J; McCarter, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical), and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. PMID:27217796

  5. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stomach (gastric) cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  6. Computed tomographic recognition of gastric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Balthazar, E.J.; Megibow, A.; Naidich, D.; LeFleur, R.S.

    1984-06-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in 13 consecutive patients with proven gastric varices were analyzed and correlated with the radiographic, angiographic, and gastroscopic evaluations. In 11 patients, CT clearly identified large (five) or smaller (six) varices located mainly along the posteromedial wall of the gastric fundus and proximal body of the stomach. Well defined rounded or tubular densities that enhanced during intravenous administration of contrast material and could not be distinguished from the gastric wall were identified. Dense, enhancing, round or tubular, intraluminal filling defects were seen in the cases where the stomach was distended with water. In seven patients, the CT examination correctly diagnosed the pathogenesis of gastric varices by identifying hepatic cirrhosis, calcific pancreatis, and carcinoma of the pancreas.

  7. Lymphadenectomy in gastric cancer: Contentious issues.

    PubMed

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Jakhetiya, Ashish; Sharma, Jyoti; Ray, Mukur Dipi; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-04-27

    The stomach is the sixth most common cause of cancer worldwide. Surgery is an important component of the multi-modality treatment of the gastric cancer. The extent of lymphadenectomy has been a controversial issue in the surgical management of gastric cancer. The East-Asian surgeons believe that quality-controlled extended lymphadenectomy resulting in better loco-regional control leads to survival benefit in the gastric cancer; contrary to that, many western surgeons believe that extended lymphadenectomy adds to only postoperative morbidity and mortality without significantly enhancing the overall survival. We present a comprehensive review of the lymphadenectomy in the gastric cancer based on the previously published randomized controlled trials. PMID:27152135

  8. Lessons Learned from Laparoscopic Gastric Banding.

    PubMed

    Broadbent

    1993-11-01

    The author reviews 27 laparoscopic gastric banding operations, of which 19 cases were completed. Of the 27 operations, eight were revisions of earlier laparoscopic banding. The lessons learned from these cases are highlighted. PMID:10757955

  9. Translating gastric cancer genomics into targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Ang, Yvonne L E; Yong, Wei Peng; Tan, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer is a common disease with limited treatment options and a poor prognosis. Many gastric cancers harbour potentially actionable targets, including over-expression and mutations in tyrosine kinase pathways. Agents have been developed against these targets with varying success- in particular, the use of trastuzumab in HER2-overexpressing gastric cancers has resulted in overall survival benefits. Gastric cancers also have high levels of somatic mutations, making them candidates for immunotherapy; early work in this field has been promising. Recent advances in whole genome and multi-platform sequencing have driven the development of molecular classification systems, which may in turn guide the selection of patients for targeted treatment. Moving forward, challenges will include the development of appropriate biomarkers to predict responses to targeted therapy, and the application of new molecular classifications into trial development and clinical practice. PMID:26947813

  10. Gastric Emptying Rates for Selected Athletic Drinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, Edward F.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The intent of this research was to compare the rate of gastric emptying of three commercially available athletic drinks with water and, in doing so, to determine their relative contributions of water, electrolytes, and carbohydrate to the body. (JD)

  11. Post-Gastric Bypass Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Rariy, Chevon M; Rometo, David; Korytkowski, Mary

    2016-02-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem worldwide. Obesity-related illnesses, such as coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, stroke, sleep apnea, and several forms of cancer (endometrial, breast, and colon), contribute to a significant number of deaths in the USA. Bariatric surgery, including the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) procedure, has demonstrated significant improvements in obesity and obesity-related co-morbidities and is becoming more popular as the number of obese individuals rises. Despite the reported benefits of bariatric surgery, there are potential complications that physicians need to be aware of as the number of patients undergoing these procedures continues to increase. One challenging and potentially life-threatening complication that to date is not well understood is post-RYGB surgery hypoglycemia (PGBH). In this review, we will present the definition, historical perspective, diagnostic approach, currently available treatment options, and anecdotal assessment and treatment algorithm for this disorder. PMID:26868861

  12. [The thyroid gland in Anothomia Mundini (1316)].

    PubMed

    Lamberg, B A

    2001-01-01

    Andreas Vesalius described the human thyroid lobes very distinctly in his De humani corporis fabrica in 1543 calling them glandulae laryngis. Before him Leonardo da Vinci had depicted the human thyroid gland in his anatomical drawings. The first publication which could be called a textbook of human anatomy, because it was used as the basis for cathedral teaching in human anatomy for about two centuries, was the Anothomia of Mundinus Liucius, Mondino de'Liuzzi, published in 1316. In the chapter on the blood vessels of the neck he describes two glands, which he calls amigdalae, situated under the longitudinal muscles and below the larynx. Their function should be 1) to wet the trachea; 2) to fill the grove below the larynx because the neck was broader above due to the large larynx but much slender below because of the narrower trachea. And 3): they should function as a shield for the deep arteries and veins. Later anatomists at the beginning of the 15th and the 16th century, like Achillini, Massa and Zerbus, all used the text of Mundinus but obviously they tried to locate the glands of Mundinus to the tonsils apparently only because he used the denomination amigdalae. Berengario da Carpi, however, who was a much experienced anatomist, published a large treatise Commentaria super Anothomia Mundini in which he confirms the location of the glands of Mundini below the larynx. Obviously the two glands in the neck Mundinus mentions are the two thyroid lobes. According to his description they cannot be the tonsils because 1) of their location below the larynx, and 2) their function of adequating the appearance of the neck and 3) shielding, at least to some extent, the deep vessels in the neck. Before Mundini there is no similar description of the anatomy of the human neck in the literature, so what he describes must he based upon his own experience. Furthermore, he did the autopsies himself and did not use the assistance of a prosector as the professors after him used to do

  13. Molecular identification of ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1a) and its functional role in the gastrointestinal tract of the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takio; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Saeki, Atsuki; Teraoka, Hiroki; Hiraga, Takeo; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2011-09-01

    Ghrelin stimulates gastric motility in vivo in the guinea-pig through activation of growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). In this study, we identified GHS-R1a in the guinea-pig, and examined its distribution and cellular function and compared them with those in the rat. Effects of ghrelin in different regions of gastrointestinal tract were also examined. GHS-R1a was identified in guinea-pig brain cDNA. Amino acid identities of guinea-pig GHS-R1a were 93% to horses and 85% to dogs. Expression levels of GHS-R1a mRNA were high in the pituitary and hypothalamus, moderate in the thalamus, cerebral cortex, pons, medulla oblongata and olfactory bulb, and low in the cerebellum and peripheral tissues including gastrointestinal tract. Comparison of GHS-R1a expression patterns showed that those in the brain were similar but the expression level in the gastrointestinal tract was higher in rats than in guinea-pigs. Guinea-pig GHS-R1a expressed in HEK 293 cells responded to rat ghrelin and GHS-R agonists. Rat ghrelin was ineffective in inducing mechanical changes in the stomach and colon but caused a slight contraction in the small intestine. 1,1-Dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium and electrical field stimulation (EFS) caused cholinergic contraction in the intestine, and these contractions were not affected by ghrelin. Ghrelin did not change spontaneous and EFS-evoked [(3)H]-efflux from [(3)H]-choline-loaded ileal strips. In summary, guinea-pig GHS-R1a was identified and its functions in isolated gastrointestinal strips were characterized. The distribution of GHS-R1a in peripheral tissues was different from that in rats, suggesting that the functional role of ghrelin in the guinea-pig is different from that in other animal species. PMID:21843569

  14. Familial Clustering of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Nayoung; Jang, Woncheol; Seo, Bochang; Oh, Sooyeon; Shin, Cheol Min; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This comprehensive cross-sectional study aimed to identify factors contributing to familial aggregation of gastric cancer (GC). A total of 1058 GC patients and 1268 controls were analyzed separately according to the presence or absence of a first-degree relative of GC (GC-relative). Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, residence during childhood, smoking, alcohol intake, monthly income, spicy food ingestion, Helicobacter pylori status and host cytokine polymorphisms was performed. Cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA) positivity was a distinctive risk factor for GC in the family history (FH)-positive group (odds ratio [OR], 2.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.42–4.00), while current/ex-smoker, moderate to strong spicy food ingestion, and non-B blood types were more closely associated with GC in the FH-negative group. Among the FH-positive group, alcohol consumption showed a synergistic carcinogenic effect in the at least 2 GC-relatives group compared to the 1 GC-relative group (1.71 vs. 9.58, P for interaction = 0.026), and this was dose-dependent. In the subjects with ≥2 GC-relatives, TGFB1-509T/T was a risk factor for GC (OR 23.74; 95% CI 1.37–410.91), as were rural residency in childhood, alcohol consumption, spicy food ingestion, and cagA positivity. These results suggest that subjects with FH may be a heterogeneous group in terms of gastric cancer susceptibility. Especially, subjects with ≥2 GC-relatives should undergo risk stratification including TGFB1-509T/T and alcohol consumption. PMID:27196462

  15. Robot-assisted surgery for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Procopiuc, Livia; Tudor, Ştefan; Mănuc, Mircea; Diculescu, Mircea; Vasilescu, Cătălin

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery for gastric cancer is a relatively new research field, with convincing results mostly stemming from Asian countries. The use of the robotic surgery platform, thus far assessed as a safe procedure, which is also easier to learn, sets the background for a wider spread of minimally invasive technique in the treatment of gastric cancer. This review will cover the literature published so far, analyzing the pros and cons of robotic surgery and highlighting the remaining study questions. PMID:26798433

  16. Cryptosporidium parvum pig genotype II diagnosed in pigs from the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs may represent a source of Cryptosporidium sp. infection to humans. The objective of this study was to identify the species present in pigs from the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and verify what risks pigs represent in transmission of human cryptosporidiosis, since there is no such informati...

  17. Molecular studies on pig cryptosporidiosis in Poland.

    PubMed

    Rzeżutka, A; Kaupke, A; Kozyra, I; Pejsak, Z

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidium intestinal parasites have been detected in farmed pigs worldwide. Infections are usually asymptomatic with a low number of oocysts shed in pig feces. This makes the recognition of infection difficult or unsuccessful when microscopic methods are used. The aim of this study was molecular identification of Cryptosporidium species in pig herds raised in Poland with regard to the occurrence of zoonotic species. In total, 166 pig fecal samples were tested. The examined pigs were aged 1 to 20 weeks. Overall, 39 pig farms were monitored for parasite presence. The detection and identification of Cryptosporidium DNA was performed on the basis of PCR-RFLP and nucleotide sequence analysis of the amplified 18 SSU rRNA and COWP gene fragments. Infected animals were housed in 21 (53.8%) of the pig farms monitored. The presence of Cryptosporidum was confirmed in 46 (27.7%) samples of pig feces. Among positive fecal samples, 34 (29.3%) were collected from healthy animals, and 12 (24%) from diarrheic pigs. Most infected animals (42.1%) were 2 to 3 months old. The following parasite species were detected: C. scrofarum, C. suis and C. parvum. Indeed, asymptomatic infections caused by C. scrofarum were observed in the majority of the herds. Mixed infections caused by C. suis and C. scrofarum were not common; however, they were observed in 8.6% of the positive animals. C. parvum DNA was found only in one sample collected from a diarrheic pig. The application of molecular diagnostic tools allowed for detection and identification of Cryptosporidium species in pigs. The sporadic findings of C. parvum are subsequent evidence for the contribution of pigs in the transmission of cryptosporidiosis from animals to humans. PMID:25638969

  18. Propagation of pacemaker activity in the guinea-pig antrum

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, G W; Hirst, G D S; Park, K J; Smith, C B; Sanders, K M; Ward, S M; Smith, T K

    2004-01-01

    Cyclical periods of depolarization (slow waves) underlie peristaltic contractions involved in mixing and emptying of contents in the gastric antrum. Slow waves originate from a myenteric network of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-MY). In this study we have visualized the sequence and propagation of Ca2+ transients associated with pacemaker potentials in the ICC network and longitudinal (LM) and circular muscle (CM) layers of the isolated guinea-pig gastric antrum. Gastric antrum was dissected to reveal the ICC-MY network, loaded with Fluo-4 AM and activity was monitored at 37°C. Ca2+ waves propagated throughout the ICC-MY network at an average velocity of 3.24 ± 0.12 mm s−1 at a frequency of 4.87 ± 0.16 cycles min−1 (n = 4). The propagation of the Ca2+ wave often appeared ‘step-like’, with separate regions of the network being activated after variable delays. The direction of propagation was highly variable (Δ angle of propagation 44.3 ± 10.9 deg per cycle) and was not confined to the axes of the longitudinal or circular muscle. Ca2+ waves appeared to spread out radially from the site of initiation. The initiating Ca2+ wave in ICC-MY was correlated to secondary Ca2+ waves in intramuscular interstial cells of Cajal, ICC-IM, and smooth muscle cells, and the local distortion (contraction) in a field of view. TTX (1 μm) had little effect on slow wave or pacemaker potential activity, but 2-APB (50 μm) blocked all Ca2+ waves, indicating a pivotal role for intracellular Ca2+ stores. Nicardipine (2 μm) eliminated the Ca2+ transient generated by smooth muscle, but did not affect the fast upstroke associated with ICC-MY. These results indicate that slow waves follow a sequence of activation, beginning with the ICC-MY and ICC-IM network, followed later by a sustained Ca2+ transient in the muscle layers that is responsible for contraction. PMID:14754999

  19. WILD PIG ATTACKS ON HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J.

    2013-04-12

    Attacks on humans by wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have been documented since ancient times. However, studies characterizing these incidents are lacking. In an effort to better understand this phenomenon, information was collected from 412 wild pig attacks on humans. Similar to studies of large predator attacks on humans, data came from a variety of sources. The various attacks compiled occurred in seven zoogeographic realms. Most attacks occurred within the species native range, and specifically in rural areas. The occurrence was highest during the winter months and daylight hours. Most happened under non-hunting circumstances and appeared to be unprovoked. Wounded animals were the chief cause of these attacks in hunting situations. The animals involved were typically solitary, male and large in size. The fate of the wild pigs involved in these attacks varied depending upon the circumstances, however, most escaped uninjured. Most human victims were adult males traveling on foot and alone. The most frequent outcome for these victims was physical contact/mauling. The severity of resulting injuries ranged from minor to fatal. Most of the mauled victims had injuries to only one part of their bodies, with legs/feet being the most frequent body part injured. Injuries were primarily in the form of lacerations and punctures. Fatalities were typically due to blood loss. In some cases, serious infections or toxemia resulted from the injuries. Other species (i.e., pets and livestock) were also accompanying some of the humans during these attacks. The fates of these animals varied from escaping uninjured to being killed. Frequency data on both non-hunting and hunting incidents of wild pig attacks on humans at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, showed quantitatively that such incidents are rare.

  20. Laparoscopic Proximal Gastrectomy With Gastric Tube Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Norio; Toujigamori, Manabu; Shiroshita, Hidefumi; Etoh, Tsuyoshi; Inomata, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There is no standardized method of reconstruction in laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy (LPG). We present a novel technique of reconstruction with a long, narrow gastric tube in LPG for early gastric cancer (EGC). Methods: During the laparoscopic procedure, the upper part of the stomach is fully mobilized with perigastric and suprapancreatic lymphadenectomy, and then the abdominal esophagus is transected. After a minilaparotomy is created, the entire stomach is pulled outside. A long, narrow gastric tube (20 cm long, 3 cm wide) is created with a linear stapler. The proximal part of the gastric tube is formed into a cobra head shape for esophagogastric tube anastomosis, which is then performed with a 45-mm linear stapler under laparoscopic view. The end of the esophagus is fixed on the gastric tube to prevent postoperative esophageal reflux. Results: Thirteen patients with early proximal gastric cancer underwent the procedure. The mean operative time was 283 min, and median blood loss was 63 ml. There were no conversions to open surgery, and no intraoperative complications. Conclusion: This new technique of reconstruction after LPG is simple and feasible. The procedure has the potential of becoming a standard reconstruction technique after LPG for proximal EGC. PMID:27547027