Sample records for pilot scale bioreactor

  1. Treatment of a denim producing textile industry wastewater using pilot-scale membrane bioreactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. O. Yigit; N. Uzal; H. Koseoglu; I. Harman; H. Yukseler; U. Yetis; G. Civelekoglu; M. Kitis

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of a pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) system for the treatment of a highly concentrated mixed wastewater from wet processes (dyeing, finishing, and sizing) of a denim producing textile industry. The MBR system, containing a submerged hollow fiber membrane module in the aeration tank, was operated aerobically for about 3 months

  2. Pilot-scale experiment on anaerobic bioreactor landfills in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianguo; Yang, Guodong; Deng, Zhou; Huang, Yunfeng; Huang, Zhonglin; Feng, Xiangming; Zhou, Shengyong; Zhang, Chaoping

    2007-01-01

    Developing countries have begun to investigate bioreactor landfills for municipal solid waste management. This paper describes the impacts of leachate recirculation and recirculation loadings on waste stabilization, landfill gas (LFG) generation and leachate characteristics. Four simulated anaerobic columns, R1-R4, were each filled with about 30 tons of waste and recirculated weekly with 1.6, 0.8 and 0.2m(3) leachate and 0.1m(3) tap water. The results indicated that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) half-time of leachate from R1 was about 180 days, which was 8-14 weeks shorter than that of R2-R4. A large amount of LFG was first produced in R1, and its generation rate was positively correlated to the COD or volatile fatty acid concentrations of influent leachates after the 30th week. By the 50th week of recirculation, the waste in R1 was more stabilized, with 931.2 kg COD or 175.6 kg total organic carbon released and with the highest landfill gas production. However, this contributed mainly to washout by leachate, which also resulted in the reduction of LFG generation potential and accumulation of ammonia and/or phosphorus in the early stage. Therefore, the regimes of leachate recirculation should be adjusted to the phases of waste stabilization to enhance efficiency of energy recovery. Integrated with the strategy of in situ leachate management, extra pre-treatment or post-treatment methods to remove the nutrients are recommended. PMID:17015005

  3. Pilot-scale experiment on anaerobic bioreactor landfills in China

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jianguo [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, PR China (China)], E-mail: jianguoj@tsinghua.edu.cn; Yang, Guodong; Deng, Zhou; Huang, Yunfeng [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, PR China (China); Huang, Zhonglin; Feng, Xiangming; Zhou, Shengyong; Zhang, Chaoping [Xiaping Solid Waste Landfill, Shenzhen 518019, PR China (China)

    2007-07-01

    Developing countries have begun to investigate bioreactor landfills for municipal solid waste management. This paper describes the impacts of leachate recirculation and recirculation loadings on waste stabilization, landfill gas (LFG) generation and leachate characteristics. Four simulated anaerobic columns, R1-R4, were each filled with about 30 tons of waste and recirculated weekly with 1.6, 0.8 and 0.2 m{sup 3} leachate and 0.1 m{sup 3} tap water. The results indicated that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) half-time of leachate from R1 was about 180 days, which was 8-14 weeks shorter than that of R2-R4. A large amount of LFG was first produced in R1, and its generation rate was positively correlated to the COD or volatile fatty acid concentrations of influent leachates after the 30th week. By the 50th week of recirculation, the waste in R1 was more stabilized, with 931.2 kg COD or 175.6 kg total organic carbon released and with the highest landfill gas production. However, this contributed mainly to washout by leachate, which also resulted in the reduction of LFG generation potential and accumulation of ammonia and/or phosphorus in the early stage. Therefore, the regimes of leachate recirculation should be adjusted to the phases of waste stabilization to enhance efficiency of energy recovery. Integrated with the strategy of in situ leachate management, extra pre-treatment or post-treatment methods to remove the nutrients are recommended.

  4. A catalytic multistage fixed-bed tower bioreactor in an industrial-scale pilot plant for alcohol production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Bakoyianis; A. A. Koutinas

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the development of an industrial-scale, multistage fixed-bed tower (MFBT) bioreactor using the promoter mineral kissiris for industrial alcohol producing using free cells. Specifically, the authors examined the parameters needed to maintain operational stability from batch to batch for long periods. Pilot plant operations used one- and two-stage fixed-bed, 7,000-L bioreactors. Likewise a 100,000-L, multistage fixed-bed tower system

  5. Achieving "Final Storage Quality" of municipal solid waste in pilot scale bioreactor landfills.

    PubMed

    Valencia, R; van der Zon, W; Woelders, H; Lubberding, H J; Gijzen, H J

    2009-01-01

    Entombed waste in current sanitary landfills will generate biogas and leachate when physical barriers fail in the future, allowing the intrusion of moisture into the waste mass contradicting the precepts of the sustainability concept. Bioreactor landfills are suggested as a sustainable option to achieve Final Storage Quality (FSQ) status of waste residues; however, it is not clear what characteristics the residues should have in order to stop operation and after-care monitoring schemes. An experiment was conducted to determine the feasibility to achieve FSQ status (Waste Acceptance Criteria of the European Landfill Directive) of residues in a pilot scale bioreactor landfill. The results of the leaching test were very encouraging due to their proximity to achieve the proposed stringent FSQ criterion after 2 years of operation. Furthermore, residues have the same characteristics of alternative waste stabilisation parameters (low BMP, BOD/COD ratio, VS content, SO4(2-)/Cl- ratio) established by other researchers. Mass balances showed that the bioreactor landfill simulator was capable of practically achieving biological stabilisation after 2 years of operation, while releasing approximately 45% of the total available (organic and inorganic) carbon and nitrogen into the liquid and gas phases. PMID:18406126

  6. Influence of supplemental heat addition on performance of pilot-scale bioreactor landfills.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Mohamed; Kennedy, Kevin; Narbaitz, Roberto; Warith, Mostafa; Sartaj, Majid

    2014-02-01

    Implementation of supplemental heat addition as a means of improving bioreactor landfill performance was investigated. The experimental work was conducted with two pilot-scale bioreactor setups (control cell and heated cell) operated for 280 days. Supplemental heat was introduced by recirculating leachate heated up to 35 °C compared to the control which used similar quantities of leachate at room temperature (21 ± 1 °C). The temporal and spatial effects of recirculating heated leachate on the landfill internal temperature were determined, and performance was assessed in terms of leachate parameters and biogas production. Recirculation of heated leachate helped establish balanced anaerobic microbial consortia that led to earlier (70 days) and greater (1.4-fold) organic matter degradation rates, as well as threefold higher methane production compared to the non-heated control. Despite the significant enhancements in performance resulting from supplemental heat addition, heated leachate recirculation did not significantly impact waste temperatures, and the effects were mainly restricted to short periods after recirculation and mostly at the upper layers of the waste. These findings suggest that improvements in bioreactor landfill performance may be achieved without increasing the temperature of the whole in-place waste, but rather more economically by raising the temperature at the leachate/waste interface which is also exposed to the maximum moisture levels within the waste matrix. PMID:23780222

  7. Performance of a pilot-scale submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) in treating bathing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xia, Siqing; Guo, Jifeng; Wang, Rongchang

    2008-10-01

    Bathing wastewater was treated by a pilot-scale submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) for more than 60 days. The results showed that the removal rates of main pollutants of wastewater such as COD(Cr), LAS, NH(4)(+)-N and total nitrogen (TN) were above 93%, 99%, 99%, and 90%, respectively. The results of denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) indicated that the bacteria were stable. The abundant nitrobacteria intercepted by the membrane led to the high removal rate of ammonia and TN. FISH and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis revealed that some specific phylogenetic group of bacteria, the Pseudomonas sp. Ochrobactrum anthropi sp. and Enterobacter sp. probably played a major role in the development of the mature biofilms, which led to the severe irreversible membrane biofouling. PMID:18359626

  8. Verification of energy dissipation rate scalability in pilot and production scale bioreactors using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Chris; Natarajan, Venkatesh; Antoniou, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Suspension mammalian cell cultures in aerated stirred tank bioreactors are widely used in the production of monoclonal antibodies. Given that production scale cell culture operations are typically performed in very large bioreactors (? 10,000 L), bioreactor scale-down and scale-up become crucial in the development of robust cell-culture processes. For successful scale-up and scale-down of cell culture operations, it is important to understand the scale-dependence of the distribution of the energy dissipation rates in a bioreactor. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations can provide an additional layer of depth to bioreactor scalability analysis. In this communication, we use CFD analyses of five bioreactor configurations to evaluate energy dissipation rates and Kolmogorov length scale distributions at various scales. The results show that hydrodynamic scalability is achievable as long as major design features (# of baffles, impellers) remain consistent across the scales. Finally, in all configurations, the mean Kolmogorov length scale is substantially higher than the average cell size, indicating that catastrophic cell damage due to mechanical agitation is highly unlikely at all scales. PMID:24616386

  9. Pilot-scale nitrogen removal from leachate by ex situ nitrification and in situ denitrification in a landfill bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Faqian; Sun, Bin; Li, Qian; Deng, Xiaoya; Hu, Jian; Wu, Weixiang

    2014-04-01

    A combined process consisting of ex situ nitrification and in situ denitrification in landfill refuse was studied in pilot scale for nitrogen removal from municipal landfill leachate. The results showed that above 80% of partial nitrification ratio and an average COD loading rate of 1.50 kg m(-3) d(-1) were steadily maintained under DO concentrations of 1.0-1.7 mg L(-1) in the aerobic reactor. Quantitative PCR results indicated that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria being sensitive to DO fluctuations lead to partial nitrification when free ammonia inhibition was weak. Nitrified landfill leachate could be denitrified in the landfill bioreactor with maximum total oxidizing nitrogen removal rate of 67.2 g N t(-1) TSwaste d(-1). Clone and sequencing analysis of denitrifying bacterial nirS gene inferred that heterotrophic denitrifier Azoarcus tolulyticu was the primary nitrogen converter in the landfill bioreactor. The obtained results will provide valuable information for optimizing the design and operation of a landfill bioreactor. PMID:24397889

  10. Heat flux as an on-line indicator of metabolic activity in pilot scale bioreactor during the production of Bacillus thuringiensis var. galleriae-based biopesticides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. K. I Anderson; Kunthala Jayaraman; D Voisard; Ian W Marison; U. von Stockar

    2002-01-01

    The effective biotechnological process development depends on the system for monitoring the activity of the culture during cultivation. The feasibility of monitoring the metabolic flux during the cultivation of Bacillus thuringiensis var. galleriae (Btg) in pilot scale bioreactor was studied. All possible sources of heat generation and transfer in the system were accounted to determine the metabolic heat flux caused

  11. A pilot scale anoxic/oxic membrane bioreactor (A/O MBR) for woolen mill dyeing wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiang; Fan, Yao-bo; Wei, Yuan-song

    2003-07-01

    A pilot-scale (10 m3/d) anoxic/oxic membrane bioreactor (A/O MBR) was tested for dyeing wastewater treatment of woolen mill without wasting sludge in 125 days operation. Results showed that the effluent quality was excellent, i.e. effluent COD less than 25 mg/L, BOD5 under 5 mg/L, turbidity lower than 0.65 NTU, and colour less than 30 DT, and met with the reuse water standard of China. The removal rates of COD, BOD5, colour, and turbidity were 92.4%, 98.4%, 74% and 98.9%, respectively. Constant-flux operation mode was carried out in this study, and backwash was effective for reducing membrane fouling and maintaining constant flux. Membrane fouling had heavy impact on energy consumption. More attention should be paid on pipe selection and design for the sidestream MBR system, too. PMID:12974303

  12. Correlation between mass transfer coefficient kLa and relevant operating parameters in cylindrical disposable shaken bioreactors on a bench-to-pilot scale

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Among disposable bioreactor systems, cylindrical orbitally shaken bioreactors show important advantages. They provide a well-defined hydrodynamic flow combined with excellent mixing and oxygen transfer for mammalian and plant cell cultivations. Since there is no known universal correlation between the volumetric mass transfer coefficient for oxygen kLa and relevant operating parameters in such bioreactor systems, the aim of this current study is to experimentally determine a universal kLa correlation. Results A Respiration Activity Monitoring System (RAMOS) was used to measure kLa values in cylindrical disposable shaken bioreactors and Buckingham’s ?-Theorem was applied to define a dimensionless equation for kLa. In this way, a scale- and volume-independent kLa correlation was developed and validated in bioreactors with volumes from 2 L to 200 L. The final correlation was used to calculate cultivation parameters at different scales to allow a sufficient oxygen supply of tobacco BY-2 cell suspension cultures. Conclusion The resulting equation can be universally applied to calculate the mass transfer coefficient for any of seven relevant cultivation parameters such as the reactor diameter, the shaking frequency, the filling volume, the viscosity, the oxygen diffusion coefficient, the gravitational acceleration or the shaking diameter within an accuracy range of +/? 30%. To our knowledge, this is the first kLa correlation that has been defined and validated for the cited bioreactor system on a bench-to-pilot scale. PMID:24289110

  13. Long-term pilot scale investigation of novel hybrid ultrafiltration-osmotic membrane bioreactors

    E-print Network

    bioreactor Forward osmosis Osmotic MBR Nutrient recovery Salt rejection Direct potable reuse An osmotic time. In OMBR, water is drawn by osmosis from activated sludge through a forward osmosis (FO) membrane

  14. A zero-dimensional biofilm model for dynamic simulation of moving bed bioreactor systems: Model concepts, Peterson matrix, and application to a pilot-scale plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Plattes; E. Henry; P. M. Schosseler

    2008-01-01

    A zero-dimensional (0D) biofilm model for dynamic simulation of biological wastewater treatment systems is proposed and applied to a pilot-scale moving bed bioreactor (MBBR). The model, written in Peterson matrix format, does not describe biofilm structure in any form. Biochemical conversions in the model are based on the activated sludge model no. 1 (ASM1). Diffusional mass transport limitations are taken

  15. Comparison of pilot scale performances between membrane bioreactor and hybrid conventional wastewater treatment systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tai Il Yoon; Hyung Sool Lee; Chang Gyun Kim

    2004-01-01

    A number of municipal wastewater treatment systems were developed to improve effluent water quality, however economic aspects should be considered. In this study, one of the membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems that have recently attracted much attention was compared to combined biological and chemical processes (CBCP), focusing on effluent water qualities and economic assessment. A HANT®, modified MBR system, was composed

  16. Comparison of microbial communities in pilot-scale bioreactors treating Bayer liquor organic wastes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naomi J. McSweeney; Jason J. Plumb; Amanda L. Tilbury; Hugh J. Nyeboer; Matt E. Sumich; Anthony J. McKinnon; Peter D. Franzmann; David C. Sutton; Anna H. Kaksonen

    2011-01-01

    Western Australian bauxite deposits are naturally associated with high amounts of humic and fulvic materials that co-digest\\u000a during Bayer processing. Sodium oxalate remains soluble and can co-precipitate with aluminium hydroxide unless it is removed.\\u000a Removal of sodium oxalate requires a secondary crystallisation step followed by storage. Bioreactors treating oxalate wastes\\u000a have been developed as economically and environmentally viable treatment alternatives

  17. Pilot-scale temperate-climate treatment of domestic wastewater with a staged anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (SAF-MBR).

    PubMed

    Shin, Chungheon; McCarty, Perry L; Kim, Jeonghwan; Bae, Jaeho

    2014-05-01

    A pilot-scale staged anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (SAF-MBR) was operated continuously for 485 days, without chemical cleaning of membranes, treating primary-settled domestic wastewater with wastewater temperature between 8 and 30°C and total hydraulic retention time (HRT) between 4.6 and 6.8h. Average chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) removals averaged 81% and 85%, respectively, during the first winter at 8-15°C before full acclimation had occurred. However, subsequently when fully acclimated, summer and winter COD removals of 94% and 90% and BOD5 removals of 98% and 90%, respectively, were obtained with average effluent COD never higher than 23 mg/L nor BOD5 higher than 9 mg/L. Operational energy requirement of 0.23 kW h/m(3) could be met with primary and secondary methane production, and could be reduced further through hydraulic change. Biosolids production in all seasons averaged 0.051 g volatile suspended solids per g COD removed. PMID:24632631

  18. Microbiological Analysis of an Active Pilot-Scale Mobile Bioreactor Treating Organic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-11-26

    Samples were obtained for microbiological analysis from a granular activated carbon fluidized bed bioreactor (GAC-FBR). This GAC-FBR was in operation at a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) Site in Augusta Georgia for in situ groundwater bioremediation of organics. The samples included contaminated site groundwater, GAC-FBR effluent, and biofilm coated granular activated carbon at 5, 9, and 13 feet within the GAC-FBR column. The objective of this analysis was to correlate contaminant removal with microbiological activity within the GAC-FBR.

  19. Feasibility and simulation model of a pilot scale membrane bioreactor for wastewater treatment and reuse from Chinese traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Ren, Nan-qi; Yan, Xian-feng; Chen, Zhao-bo; Hu, Dong-xue; Gong, Man-li; Guo, Wan-qian

    2007-01-01

    The lack and pollution of water resource make wastewater reuse necessary. The pilot scale long-term tests for submerged membrane bioreactor were conducted to treat the effluents of anaerobic or aerobic treatment process for the high-strength Chinese traditional medicine wastewater. This article was focused on the feasibility of the wastewater treatment and reuse at shorter hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 5.0, 3.2 and 2.13 h. MLSS growth, membrane flux, vacuum values and chemical cleaning periods were also investigated. The experimental results of treating two-phase anaerobic treatment effluent demonstrated that the CODfilt was less than 100 mg/L when the influent COD was between 500-10000 mg/L at HRT of 5.0 h, which could satisfy the normal discharged standard in China. The experimental results to treat cross flow aerobic reactor effluent demonstrated that the average value of CODfilt was 17.28 mg/L when the average value of influent COD was 192.84 mg/L at HRT of 2.13 h during 106 d, which could completely meet the normal standard for water reuse. The maximum MLSS and MLVSS reached 24000 and 14500 mg/L at HRT of 3.2 h respectively. Membrane flux had maximal resume degrees of 94.7% at vacuum value of 0.02 MPa after cleaning. Chemical cleaning periods of membrane module were 150 d. A simulation model of operational parameters was also established based on the theory of back propagation neural network and linear regression of traditional mathematical model. The simulation model showed that the optimum operational parameters were suggested as follows: HRT was 5.0 h, SRT was 100 d, the range of COD loading rate was between 10.664-20.451 kg/(m3xd), the range of MLSS was between 7543-13694 mg/L. PMID:17915718

  20. Start-up period investigation of pilot-scale submerged membrane electro-bioreactor (SMEBR) treating raw municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Shadi W; Elektorowicz, Maria; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A

    2014-02-01

    Submerged membrane electro-bioreactor (SMEBR) is a new hybrid technology for wastewater treatment employing electrical field and microfiltration in a nutrient-removing activated sludge process. A pilot SMEBR system was located at the wastewater treatment plant in the City of l'Assomption (Quebec, Canada) with the objective of investigating the start-up period performance under variable organic loadings and environmental conditions with respect to effluent quality, membrane fouling, and sludge properties. The pilot SMEBR facility was fed with the raw de-gritted municipal wastewater. At steady state operation, the removal efficiencies of ammonia (as NH3(+)-N), phosphorus (as PO4(3-)-P), and COD were 99%, 99%, and 92%, respectively. No substantial increase in the monitored transmembrane pressure as 0.02kPad(-1) was reported. The time necessary to filter 100mL of the sludge sample has decreased by 78% after treatment whilst the sludge volume index averaged 119mLg(-1). Energy requirements were in the range of 1.1-1.6kWhm(-3) of wastewater. It was concluded that the SMEBR is a very competitive technology when compared to conventional membrane systems as it can enhance treatment performance to an appreciable extent, remove phosphorus and reduce fouling. PMID:24290298

  1. Pilot-scale passive bioreactors for the treatment of acid mine drainage: efficiency of mushroom compost vs. mixed substrates for metal removal.

    PubMed

    Song, Hocheol; Yim, Gil-Jae; Ji, Sang-Woo; Neculita, Carmen Mihaela; Hwang, Taewoon

    2012-11-30

    Pilot-scale field-testing of passive bioreactors was performed to evaluate the efficiency of a mixture of four substrates (cow manure compost, mushroom compost, sawdust, and rice straw) relative to mushroom compost alone, and of the effect of the Fe/Mn ratio, during the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) over a 174-day period. Three 141 L columns, filled with either mushroom compost or the four substrate mixture (in duplicate), were set-up and fed with AMD from a closed mine site, in South Korea, using a 4-day hydraulic retention time. In the former bioreactor, effluent deterioration was observed over 1-2 months, despite the good efficiency predicted by the physicochemical characterization of mushroom compost. Steady state effluent quality was then noted for around 100 days before worsening in AMD source water occurred in response to seasonal variations in precipitation. Such changes in AMD quality resulted in performance deterioration in all reactors followed by a slow recovery toward the end of testing. Both substrates (mushroom compost and mixtures) gave satisfactory performance in neutralizing pH (6.1-7.8). Moreover, the system was able to consistently reduce sulfate from day 49, after the initial leaching out from organic substrates. Metal removal efficiencies were on the order of Al (?100%) > Fe (68-92%) > Mn (49-61%). Overall, the mixed substrates showed comparable performance to mushroom compost, while yielding better effluent quality upon start-up. The results also indicated mushroom compost could release significant amounts of Mn and sulfate during bioreactor operation. PMID:22892144

  2. Evaluation and characterization during the anaerobic digestion of high-strength kitchen waste slurry via a pilot-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiaolan; Huang, Zhenxing; Ruan, Wenquan; Yan, Lintao; Miao, Hengfeng; Ren, Hongyan; Zhao, Mingxing

    2015-10-01

    The anaerobic digestion of high-strength kitchen waste slurry via a pilot-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) was investigated at two different operational modes, including no sludge discharge and daily sludge discharge of 20L. The AnMBR provided excellent and reliable permeate quality with high COD removal efficiencies over 99%. The obvious accumulations of long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) and Ca(2+) were found in the anaerobic digester by precipitation and agglomeration. Though the physicochemical process contributed to attenuating the free LCFAs toxicity on anaerobic digestion, the digestion efficiency was partly influenced for the low bioavailability of those precipitates. Moreover, higher organic loading rate (OLR) of 5.8kg COD/(m(3)d) and digestion efficiency of 78% were achieved as the AnMBR was stably operated with sludge discharge, where the membrane fouling propensity was also alleviated, indicating the crucial significance of SRT control on the treatment of high-strength kitchen waste slurry via AnMBRs. PMID:26141283

  3. Pilot-scale experience with biological nutrient removal and biomass yield reduction in a liquid-solid circulating fluidized bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Nabin; Nakhla, George; Zhu, Jesse; Islam, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    A pilot-scale liquid-solid circulating fluidized bed (LSCFB) bioreactor was developed at the Adelaide Pollution Control Plant, London, Ontario, Canada, to study its commercial viability for biological nutrient removal. Lava rock particles of 600 microm were used as a biomass carrier media. The LSCFB removed approximately 90% organic, 80% nitrogen, and 70% phosphorus at loading rates of 4.12 kg COD/m3 x d, 0.26 kg N/m3 x d, and 0.052 kg P/m3 x d, and an empty bed contact time of 1.5 hours. Effluent characterized by < 1.0 mg NH4-N/L, < 5.0 mg NO3-N/ L, < 1.0 mg PO4-P/L, < 10 mg TN/L, < 10 mg SBOD/L, and 10 to 15 mg volatile suspended solids (VSS)/L can easily meet the criteria for nonpotable reuse of treated wastewater. The system removed nutrients without using any chemicals, and the secondary clarifier removed suspended solids removal without chemicals. A significant reduction (approximately 75%) in biomass yield to 0.12 to 0.16 g VSS/g chemical oxygen demand (COD) was observed, primarily because of long biological solids retention time (SRT) of 20 to 39 days and a combination of anoxic and aerobic COD consumption. PMID:20942332

  4. Critical flux and chemical cleaning-in-place during the long-term operation of a pilot-scale submerged membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chun-Hai; Huang, Xia; Ben Aim, Roger; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Amy, Gary

    2011-01-01

    The critical flux and chemical cleaning-in-place (CIP) in a long-term operation of a pilot-scale submerged membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment were investigated. Steady filtration under high flux (30 L/(m(2) h)) was successfully achieved due to effective membrane fouling control by sub-critical flux operation and chemical CIP with sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) in both trans-membrane pressure (TMP) controlling mode (cleaning with high concentration NaClO of 2000-3000 mg/L in terms of effective chorine was performed when TMP rose to 15 kPa) and time controlling mode (cleanings were performed weekly and monthly respectively with low concentration NaClO (500-1000 mg/L) and high concentration NaClO (3000 mg/L)). Microscopic analysis on membrane fibers before and after high concentration NaClO was also conducted. Images of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that NaClO CIP could effectively remove gel layer, the dominant fouling under sub-critical flux operation. Porosity measurements indicated that NaClO CIP could partially remove pore blockage fouling. The analyses from fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) with attenuated total reflectance accessory (ATR) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) demonstrated that protein-like macromolecular organics and inorganics were the important components of the fouling layer. The analysis of effluent quality before and after NaClO CIP showed no obvious effect on effluent quality. PMID:20947121

  5. Biological nutrient removal from leachate using a pilot liquid–solid circulating fluidized bed bioreactor (LSCFB)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmed Eldyasti; Nabin Chowdhury; George Nakhla; Jesse Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Biological treatment of landfill leachate is a concern due to toxicity, high ammonia, low biodegradable organic matter concentrations, and low carbon-to-nitrogen ratio. To study the reliability and commercial viability of leachate treatment using an integrated liquid–solid circulating fluidized bed bioreactor (LSCFB), a pilot-scale LSCFB was established at the Adelaide Pollution Control Plant, London, Ontario, Canada. Anoxic and aerobic columns were

  6. Microbial community analysis of a full-scale DEMON bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Alejandro; Muñoz-Palazon, Barbara; Garcia-Ruiz, Maria-Jesus; Osorio, Francisco; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jesus

    2015-03-01

    Full-scale applications of autotrophic nitrogen removal technologies for the treatment of digested sludge liquor have proliferated during the last decade. Among these technologies, the aerobic/anoxic deammonification process (DEMON) is one of the major applied processes. This technology achieves nitrogen removal from wastewater through anammox metabolism inside a single bioreactor due to alternating cycles of aeration. To date, microbial community composition of full-scale DEMON bioreactors have never been reported. In this study, bacterial community structure of a full-scale DEMON bioreactor located at the Apeldoorn wastewater treatment plant was analyzed using pyrosequencing. This technique provided a higher-resolution study of the bacterial assemblage of the system compared to other techniques used in lab-scale DEMON bioreactors. Results showed that the DEMON bioreactor was a complex ecosystem where ammonium oxidizing bacteria, anammox bacteria and many other bacterial phylotypes coexist. The potential ecological role of all phylotypes found was discussed. Thus, metagenomic analysis through pyrosequencing offered new perspectives over the functioning of the DEMON bioreactor by exhaustive identification of microorganisms, which play a key role in the performance of bioreactors. In this way, pyrosequencing has been proven as a helpful tool for the in-depth investigation of the functioning of bioreactors at microbiological scale. PMID:25245398

  7. A pilot investigation into membrane bioreactor using mesh filter for treating low-strength municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Kun; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Li, Wen-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2012-10-01

    A pilot-scale submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) using nylon mesh as filter was investigated for treatment of low-strength municipal wastewater (average influent COD=145.7±59.9 mg/L). During the operation, biomass was effectively retained by the nylon mesh with biofilm attached, and a low effluent turbidity of below 2 NTU was obtained. The average COD and NH(4)(+)-N removal efficiencies reached 86.3% and 98.1%, respectively, at a hydraulic retention time of 5 h. A sludge concentration of 4.15±0.15 g/L was maintained in the system without excess sludge discharge, attributed to the prolonged solid retention time and low organic loading rate. The low sludge concentration was also beneficial for mitigating the filter fouling. Thus, this mesh filter MBR provides a low-cost, efficient and simple approach to treat municipal wastewater, and shows a high potential for application in rural and sparsely populated areas. PMID:22595097

  8. Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators

  9. Bridging the gap between membrane bio-reactor (MBR) pilot and plant studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chang-Wei Kang; Jinsong Hua; Jing Lou; Wenjun Liu; Edward Jordan

    2008-01-01

    An integrated numerical approach was developed and implemented to study the hydrodynamic characteristics of pilot and plant systems of membrane bio-reactor (MBR). The approach incorporated Eulerian multiphase model, porous medium scheme, and also successfully took into account the vertically dependent filtration flux and the effect of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) on mixed liquor viscosity. Utilizing this integrated numerical approach,

  10. Biological nutrient removal from leachate using a pilot liquid-solid circulating fluidized bed bioreactor (LSCFB).

    PubMed

    Eldyasti, Ahmed; Chowdhury, Nabin; Nakhla, George; Zhu, Jesse

    2010-09-15

    Biological treatment of landfill leachate is a concern due to toxicity, high ammonia, low biodegradable organic matter concentrations, and low carbon-to-nitrogen ratio. To study the reliability and commercial viability of leachate treatment using an integrated liquid-solid circulating fluidized bed bioreactor (LSCFB), a pilot-scale LSCFB was established at the Adelaide Pollution Control Plant, London, Ontario, Canada. Anoxic and aerobic columns were used to optimize carbon and nutrient removal capability from leachate using 600 microm lava rock with a total porosity of 61%, at empty bed contact times (EBCTs) of 0.55, 0.49, and 0.41 d. The LSCFB achieved COD, nitrogen, and phosphorus removal efficiencies of 85%, 80%, and 70%, respectively at a low carbon-to-nitrogen ratio of 3:1 and nutrients loading rates of 2.15 kg COD/(m(3) d), 0.70 kg N/(m(3) d), and 0.014 kg P/(m(3) d), as compared with 60-77% COD and 70-79% nitrogen removal efficiencies achieved by upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and moving bed bioreactor (MBBR), respectively. The LSCFB effluent characterized by

  11. Small-scale, hydrogen-oxidizing-denitrifying bioreactor for treatment of nitrate-contaminated drinking water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Buckwalter, S.P.; Repert, D.A.; Miller, D.N.

    2005-01-01

    Nitrate removal by hydrogen-coupled denitrification was examined using flow-through, packed-bed bioreactors to develop a small-scale, cost effective system for treating nitrate-contaminated drinking-water supplies. Nitrate removal was accomplished using a Rhodocyclus sp., strain HOD 5, isolated from a sole-source drinking-water aquifer. The autotrophic capacity of the purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium made it particularly adept for this purpose. Initial tests used a commercial bioreactor filled with glass beads and countercurrent, non-sterile flow of an autotrophic, air-saturated, growth medium and hydrogen gas. Complete removal of 2 mM nitrate was achieved for more than 300 days of operation at a 2-h retention time. A low-cost hydrogen generator/bioreactor system was then constructed from readily available materials as a water treatment approach using the Rhodocyclus strain. After initial tests with the growth medium, the constructed system was tested using nitrate-amended drinking water obtained from fractured granite and sandstone aquifers, with moderate and low TDS loads, respectively. Incomplete nitrate removal was evident in both water types, with high-nitrite concentrations in the bioreactor output, due to a pH increase, which inhibited nitrite reduction. This was rectified by including carbon dioxide in the hydrogen stream. Additionally, complete nitrate removal was accomplished with wastewater-impacted surface water, with a concurrent decrease in dissolved organic carbon. The results of this study using three chemically distinct water supplies demonstrate that hydrogen-coupled denitrification can serve as the basis for small-scale remediation and that pilot-scale testing might be the next logical step.

  12. Scale-down of microalgae cultivations in tubular photo-bioreactors--a conceptual approach.

    PubMed

    Rosello Sastre, Rosa; Csögör, Zsuzsa; Perner-Nochta, Iris; Fleck-Schneider, Pascale; Posten, Clemens

    2007-10-31

    Rational design of large-scale bioreactors is still suffering from inadequate scale-up of technical parameters from lab to large scale and from missing kinetic information concerning the physiological reactions of the specific strain under cultivation. Therefore, simulations of processes expected in large-scale have to be carried out as far as possible and experiments have to be performed in small-scale reactors mimicking the situation in large scale. This procedure is referred to as scale-down. In this paper a concept to accomplish this task is proposed. Firstly, interactions between light transfer, fluid dynamics, and microbial metabolism are described. Secondly, a procedure is given to decompose the interactions by simulation on the one hand and by finding physiological parameters in model reactors on the other. Light transfer can be calculated by Monte Carlo methods, while fluid dynamics is handled by CFD. Ideally illuminated model photo-bioreactors and pilot reactors with enforced flow field are proposed to measure physiological parameters especially induced by light/dark cycles generated by interaction of turbulences and light attenuation. PMID:17561299

  13. Oxygen-controlled Biosurfactant Production in a Bench Scale Bioreactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frederico de Araujo Kronemberger; Lidia Maria Melo Santa Anna; Ana Carolina Loureiro Brito Fernandes; Reginaldo Ramos de Menezes; Cristiano Piacsek Borges; Denise Maria Guimarães Freire

    2008-01-01

    Rhamnolipids have been pointed out as promising biosurfactants. The most studied microorganisms for the aerobic production\\u000a of these molecules are the bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas. The aim of this work was to produce a rhamnolipid-type biosurfactant in a bench-scale bioreactor by one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from oil environments. To study the microorganism growth and production dependency on

  14. Exploring the potential of membrane bioreactors to enhance metals removal from wastewater: pilot experiences.

    PubMed

    Fatone, F; Eusebi, A L; Pavan, P; Battistoni, P

    2008-01-01

    The potential of membrane bioreactors to enhance the removal of selected metals from low loaded sewages has been explored. A 1400 litre pilot plant, equipped with an industrial submerged module of hollow fibre membranes, has been used in three different configurations: membrane bioreactor, operating in sequencing batch modality, for the treatment of real mixed municipal/industrial wastewater; membrane-assisted biosorption reactor, for the treatment of real leachate from municipal landfills; continuously fed membrane bioreactor, for the treatment of water charged with cadmium and nickel ions. The results show that: (a) in treating wastewaters with low levels of heavy metals (< one milligram per litre concentration), operating high sludge ages is not an effective strategy to significantly enhance the metals removal; (b) Hg and Cd are effectively removed already in conventional systems with gravitational final clarifiers, while Cu, Cr, Ni can rely on a additional performance in membrane bioreactors; (c) the further membrane effect is remarkable for Cu and Cr, while it is less significant for Ni. Basically, similar membrane effects recur in three different experimental applications that let us estimate the potential of membrane system to retain selected metal complexes. The future development of the research will investigate the relations between the membrane effect and the manipulable filtration parameters (i.e., permeate flux, solids content, filtration cycle). PMID:18359988

  15. Pilot study of a submerged membrane bioreactor for water reclamation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jian-Jun; Oo, Maung Htun; Tao, Guihe; Kekre, Kiran A; Hashimoto, Tomotaka

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the operational conditions of newly developed MBR modules for water reclamation under tropical conditions. MUDC-620A MBR modules with hollow fibre PVDF membranes from Asahi-Kasei Chemicals were used in the study. The pilot plant with capacity of 50 m(3)/d was operated continuously (24-hour) over four months on site of Ulu Pandan Water Reclamation Plant (UPWRP) in Singapore. During the study, the MLSS in membrane tank was in the range of 6,840 approximately 9,540 mg/L. Filtration operation mode of the membrane unit was 9 minutes on production and 1 minute backwash. The air scouring for the membranes was 0.18-0.30 Nm(3)/h per m(2) membrane area all of the time. Trials on different membrane fluxes were conducted to obtain the sustainable flux. The analytical results showed that COD, TOC, T-N and NH4-N of the treated water were <30 mg/L, 5-7 mg/L, <13 mg/L and <0.1 mg/L, respectively, which met the requirement of Industrial Water for reuse. TMP was in the range of 12-40 kPa and could be recovered after cleaning with 2,000 mg/L sodium hypochlorite solution. Sludge clogging could be a challenge for long-term operation with the current module design. It was concluded that it was feasible for MUDC-620A MBR to operate at a net flux of 25-29 LMH (or 0.6-0.7 m/d) for treating the municipal wastewater at UPWRP. PMID:19955652

  16. Pilot Scale Advanced Fogging Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Rick L. Demmer; Don T. Fox; Kip E. Archiblad

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in 2006 developed a useful fog solution using three different chemical constituents. Optimization of the fog recipe and use of commercially available equipment were identified as needs that had not been addressed. During 2012 development work it was noted that low concentrations of the components hampered coverage and drying in the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory’s testing much more so than was evident in the 2006 tests. In fiscal year 2014 the Idaho National Laboratory undertook a systematic optimization of the fogging formulation and conducted a non-radioactive, pilot scale demonstration using commercially available fogging equipment. While not as sophisticated as the equipment used in earlier testing, the new approach is much less expensive and readily available for smaller scale operations. Pilot scale testing was important to validate new equipment of an appropriate scale, optimize the chemistry of the fogging solution, and to realize the conceptual approach.

  17. Dynamic Single-Use Bioreactors Used in Modern Liter- and m(3)- Scale Biotechnological Processes: Engineering Characteristics and Scaling Up.

    PubMed

    Löffelholz, Christian; Kaiser, Stephan C; Kraume, Matthias; Eibl, Regine; Eibl, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    During the past 10 years, single-use bioreactors have been well accepted in modern biopharmaceutical production processes targeting high-value products. Up to now, such processes have mainly been small- or medium-scale mammalian cell culture-based seed inoculum, vaccine or antibody productions. However, recently first attempts have been made to modify existing single-use bioreactors for the cultivation of plant cells and tissue cultures, and microorganisms. This has even led to the development of new single-use bioreactor types. Moreover, due to safety issues it has become clear that single-use bioreactors are the "must have" for expanding human stem cells delivering cell therapeutics, the biopharmaceuticals of the next generation. So it comes as no surprise that numerous different dynamic single-use bioreactor types, which are suitable for a wide range of applications, already dominate the market today. Bioreactor working principles, main applications, and bioengineering data are presented in this review, based on a current overview of greater than milliliter-scale, commercially available, dynamic single-use bioreactors. The focus is on stirred versions, which are omnipresent in R&D and manufacturing, and in particular Sartorius Stedim's BIOSTAT family. Finally, we examine development trends for single-use bioreactors, after discussing proven approaches for fast scaling-up processes. PMID:23609177

  18. Study on hydraulic characteristics in a submerged membrane bioreactor process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rui Liu; Xia Huang; Chengwen Wang; Lvjun Chen; Yi Qian

    2000-01-01

    Hydraulic characteristics in a membrane bioreactor are of significance for retarding membrane fouling and maintaining stable operation. Cross flow velocity along the membrane surface and its effect on transmembrane pressure change were experimentally investigated using two pilot-scale submerged membrane bioreactors. A simulation model for calculating cross flow velocity was then developed. Cross flow velocity was a function of aeration intensity.

  19. Air-lift bioreactors for algal growth on flue gas: Mathematical modeling and pilot-plant studies

    SciTech Connect

    Vunjak-Novakovic, G.; Kim, Y.; Wu, X.X.; Berzin, I.; Merchuk, J.C. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (US)

    2005-08-03

    Air-lift reactors (ALRs) have great potential for industrial bioprocesses, because of the low level and homogeneous distribution of hydrodynamic shear. One growing field of application is the flue-gas treatment using algae for the absorption of CO{sub 2}, In this paper, we discuss the requirements for photosynthetic biomass growth in an ALR. The effects of the operating variables are analyzed using a mathematical model that accounts for the effects of ALR geometry, fluid flow, and illumination on the biomass growth. On the basis of the ALR principles and the specific requirements of photosynthetic processes, we developed a 'triangular' ALR configuration that is particularly suitable for algal growth. We describe the design and operation of this novel bioreactor and present the first series of experimental data obtained for two different algal species in a pilot-scale unit supplied with flue gases from a small power plant. The measured removal efficiency of CO{sub 2} was significant (82.3 12.5% on sunny days and 50.1 6.5% on cloudy days) and consistent with the increase in the algal biomass.

  20. Enhanced production of carboxymethylcellulase of a marine microorganism, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis A-53 in a pilot-scaled bioreactor by a recombinant Escherichia coli JM109/A-53 from rice bran.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Bo-Hwa; Kim, Bo-Kyung; Lee, Jin-Woo

    2013-05-01

    A gene encoding the carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) of a marine bacterium, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis A-53, was cloned in Escherichia coli JMB109 and the recombinant strain was named as E. coli JMB109/A-53. The optimal conditions of rice bran, ammonium chloride, and initial pH of the medium for cell growth, extracted by Design Expert Software based on response surface methodology, were 100.0 g/l, 7.5 g/l, and 7.0, respectively, whereas those for production of CMCase were 100.0 g/l, 7.5 g/l, and 8.0. The optimal temperatures for cell growth and the production of CMCase by E. coli JM109/A-53 were found to be and 40 and 35 °C, respectively. The optimal agitation speed and aeration rate of a 7 l bioreactor for cell growth were 400 rpm and 1.5 vvm, whereas those for production of CMCase were 400 rpm and 0.5 vvm. The optimal inner pressure for cell growth was 0.06 MPa, which was the same as that for production of CMCase. The production of CMCase by E. coli JM109/A-53 under optimized conditions was 880.2 U/ml, which was 2.9 times higher than that before optimization. In this study, rice bran and ammonium chloride were developed as carbon and nitrogen source for production of CMCase by a recombinant E. coli JM109/A-53 and the productivity of E. coli JM109/A-53 was 5.9 times higher than that of B. subtilis subp. subtilis A-53. PMID:23334472

  1. Pilot-scale LIDS demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Amrhein, G.T. (Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH (United States). Research and Development Div.)

    1991-08-09

    This paper describes the results of a pilot-scale demonstration of the LIDS process sponsored by the Ohio Coal Development office (OCDO) and Babcock Wilcox (B W)- LIDS (Limestone Injection with Dry Scrubbing) combines the technologies of furnace sorbent injection and dry scrubbing. The result is a reduction of reagent costs and an increase in sorbent utilization and S0[sub 2] removal beyond what is possible if the technologies are used separately. Furnace sorbent injection using limestone is only capable of about 30% S0[sub 2] reduction and so has limited application. Dry scrubbing is capable of achieving high levels Of S0[sub 2] removal using expensive pebble lime as the sorbent, but is limited by stoichiometry (Ca/S) to use on low sulfur coal. By combining dry scrubbing with furnace sorbent injection, limestone can be used as the reagent and the process is applicable to higher sulfur coals. This is possible because: (1) the reaction that occurs during furnace injection significantly reduces the S0[sub 2] concentration entering the dry scrubber, and (2) the unused limestone from furnace injection is calcined to lime and makes an excellent dry scrubbing reagent. The project successfully demonstrated that LIDS is a viable, low-cost option for controlling SO[sub 2] emissions from coal-fired utility boilers.

  2. Photoautotrophic culture of Coffea arabusta somatic embryos: development of a bioreactor for large-scale plantlet conversion from cotyledonary embryos.

    PubMed

    Afreen, F; Zobayed, S M A; Kozai, T

    2002-07-01

    Somatic embryos were developed from in vitro-grown leaf discs of Coffea arabusta in modified Murashige and Skoog medium under 30 micromol m(-2) s(-1) photosynthetic photon flux (PPF). Cotyledonary stage embryos were selected from the 14-week-old cultures and were placed under a high (100 micromol m(-2) s(-1) PPF for 14 d. These pretreated embryos were grown photoautotrophically in three different types of culture systems: Magenta vessel; RITA-bioreactor (modified to improve air exchange); and a specially designed temporary root zone immersion bioreactor system (TRI-bioreactor) with forced ventilation. The aims of the study were to achieve large-scale embryo-to-plantlet conversion, and to optimize growth of plantlets under photoautotrophic conditions. The plantlet conversion percentage was highest (84 %) in the TRI-bioreactor and lowest in the modified RITA-bioreactor (20 %). Growth and survival of converted plantlets following 45 d of photoautotrophic culture in each of the three culture systems were studied. Fresh and dry masses of leaves and roots of plantlets developed in the TRI-bioreactor were significantly greater than those of plantlets developed in the modified RITA-bioreactor or Magenta vessel. The net photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence and chlorophyll contents were also highest in plantlets grown in the TRI-bioreactor. Normal stomata were observed in leaves of plantlets grown in the TRI-bioreactor, whereas they could be abnormal in plantlets from the modified RITA-bioreactor. Survival of the plants after transfer from culture followed a similar pattern and was highest in the group grown in the TRI-bioreactor, followed by plants grown in the modified RITA-bioreactor and Magenta vessel. In addition, ex vitro growth of plants transferred from the TRI-bioreactor was faster than that of plants from the other culture systems. PMID:12125769

  3. Flat sheet or hollow fibre — comparison of full-scale membrane bio-reactor configurations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pawel Krzeminski; José Antonio Gil; Arjen F. van Nieuwenhuijzen; Jaap H. J. M. van der Graaf; Jules B. van Lier

    2012-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) are widely used for wastewater treatment and reuse applications. Selection of a membrane configuration is a crucial step in the design process and has a high impact on further plant operations. Despite increasing experience with full-scale applications, practical knowledge concerning the impact of different membrane configurations on process performance and operational costs is still lacking. This paper

  4. Molecular analysis of methanogens involved in methanogenic degradation of tetramethylammonium hydroxide in full-scale bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Whang, Liang-Ming; Hu, Tai-Ho; Liu, Pao-Wen Grace; Hung, Yu-Ching; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Wu, Yi-Ju; Chang, Shao-Hsiung

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated methanogenic communities involved in degradation of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) in three full-scale bioreactors treating TMAH-containing wastewater. Based on the results of terminal-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and quantitative PCR analyses targeting the methyl-coenzyme M reductase alpha subunit (mcrA) genes retrieved from three bioreactors, Methanomethylovorans and Methanosarcina were the dominant methanogens involved in the methanogenic degradation of TMAH in the bioreactors. Furthermore, batch experiments were conducted to evaluate mcrA messenger RNA (mRNA) expression during methanogenic TMAH degradation, and the results indicated that a higher level of TMAH favored mcrA mRNA expression by Methansarcina, while Methanomethylovorans could only express considerable amount of mcrA mRNA at a lower level of TMAH. These results suggest that Methansarcina is responsible for methanogenic TMAH degradation at higher TMAH concentrations, while Methanomethylovorans may be important at a lower TMAH condition. PMID:25261128

  5. Power consumption and maximum energy dissipation in a milliliter-scale bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Hortsch, Ralf; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Mean power consumption and maximum local energy dissipation were measured as function of operating conditions of a milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactor (V = 12 mL) with a gas-inducing impeller. A standard laboratory-scale stirred tank bioreactor (V = 1,200 mL) with Rushton turbines was used as reference. The measured power characteristics (Newton number as function of Reynolds number) were the same on both scales. The changeover between laminar and turbulent flow regime was observed at a Reynolds number of 3,000 with the gas-inducing stirrer on a milliliter-scale. The Newton number (power number) in the turbulent flow regime was 3.3 on a milliliter-scale, which is close to values reported for six-blade Rushton turbines of standard bioreactors. Maximum local energy dissipation (epsilon(max)) was measured using a clay/polymer flocculation system. The maximum local energy dissipation in the milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactor was reduced compared with the laboratory-scale stirred tank at the same mean power input per unit mass (epsilon(ø)), yielding epsilon(max)/epsilon(ø) approximately 10 compared with epsilon(max)/epsilon(ø) approximately 16. Hence, the milliliter-scale stirred tank reactor distributes power more uniformly in the reaction medium. These results are in good agreement with literature data, where a decreasing epsilon(max)/epsilon(ø) with increasing ratio of impeller diameter to reactor diameter is found (d/D = 0.7 compared with d/D = 0.4). Based on these data, impeller speeds can now be easily adjusted to achieve the same maximum local energy dissipation at different scales. This enables a more reliable and robust scale-up of bioprocesses from milliliter-scale to liter-scale reactors. PMID:19941326

  6. New milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactors for the cultivation of mycelium forming microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Hortsch, Ralf; Stratmann, Ansgar; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2010-06-15

    A novel milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactor was developed for the cultivation of mycelium forming microorganisms on a 10 milliliter-scale. A newly designed one-sided paddle impeller is driven magnetically and rotates freely on an axis in an unbaffled reaction vessel made of polystyrene. A rotating lamella is formed which spreads out along the reactor wall. Thus an enhanced surface-to-volume ratio of the liquid phase is generated where oxygen is introduced via surface aeration. Volumetric oxygen transfer coefficients (k(L)a) > 0.15 s(-1) were measured. The fast moving liquid lamella efficiently prevents wall growth and foaming. Mean power consumption and maximum local energy dissipation were measured as function of operating conditions in the milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactor (V = 10 mL) and compared to a standard laboratory-scale stirred tank bioreactor with six-bladed Rushton turbines (V = 2,000 mL). Mean power consumption increases with increasing impeller speed and shows the same characteristics and values on both scales. The maximum local energy dissipation of the milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactor was reduced compared to the laboratory-scale at the same mean volumetric power input. Hence the milliliter impeller distributes power more uniformly in the reaction medium. Based on these data a reliable and robust scale-up of fermentation processes is possible. This was demonstrated with the cultivation of the actinomycete Streptomyces tendae on both scales. It was shown that the process performances were equivalent with regard to biomass concentration, mannitol consumption and production of the pharmaceutical relevant fungicide nikkomycin Z up to a process time of 120 h. A high parallel reproducibility was observed on the milliliter-scale (standard deviation < 8%) with up to 48 stirred tank bioreactors operated in a magnetic inductive drive. Rheological behavior of the culture broth was measured and showed a highly viscous shear-thinning non-Newtonian behavior. The newly developed one-sided paddle impellers operated in unbaffled reactors on a 10 milliliter-scale with a magnetic inductive drive for up to 48 parallel bioreactors allows for the first time the parallel bioprocess development with mycelium forming microorganisms. This is especially important since these kinds of cultivations normally exhibit process times of 100 h and more. Thus the operation of parallel stirred tank reactors will have the potential to reduce process development times drastically. PMID:20198653

  7. [Pilot scale research on impacts of leachate recirculation on its ultimate treatment].

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhou; Jiang, Jian-guo; Huang, Zhong-lin; Feng, Xiang-ming; Zhou, Sheng-yong; Yang, Guo-dong

    2006-06-01

    Two pilot scale simulated columns, with and without leachate recirculation, were erected to study impacts of leachate recirculation of traditional anaerobic bioreactor landfill on leachate ultimate treatment methods. The results indicate that recirculation can remove organic pollutants visibly, but it isn't effective to inbiodegradable components, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) pollutants. After recircualted for 44 weeks, test column has a BODs removal ratio of 98.5%. BOD5/COD value of outflow is only 0.07. BOD5/TN and BOD5/TP are 0.13 and 11 respectively, which are much lower than the adequate value for anaerobic microorganisms. It's difficult to treat this kind of leachate by traditional biological methods. When a bioreactor landfill is being designed, leachate characteristics after recirculated should be well considered and adequate leachate treatment, landfill and recirculation schemes should be chosen to take full advantage of waste stack decontamination effects. PMID:16921969

  8. Screening of phenylpyruvic acid producers and optimization of culture conditions in bench scale bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Coban, Hasan B; Demirci, Ali; Patterson, Paul H; Elias, Ryan J

    2014-11-01

    Alpha keto acids are deaminated forms of amino acids that have received significant attention as feed and food additives in the agriculture and medical industries. To date, their production has been commonly performed at shake-flask scale with low product concentrations. In this study, production of phenylpyruvic acid (PPA), which is the alpha keto acid of phenylalanine was investigated. First, various microorganisms were screened to select the most efficient producer. Thereafter, growth parameters (temperature, pH, and aeration) were optimized in bench scale bioreactors to maximize both PPA and biomass concentration in bench scale bioreactors, using response surface methodology. Among the four different microorganisms evaluated, Proteus vulgaris was the most productive strain for PPA production. Optimum temperature, pH, and aeration conditions were determined as 34.5 °C, 5.12, and 0.5 vvm for PPA production, whereas 36.9 °C, pH 6.87, and 0.96 vvm for the biomass production. Under these optimum conditions, PPA concentration was enhanced to 1,054 mg/L, which was almost three times higher than shake-flask fermentation concentrations. Moreover, P. vulgaris biomass was produced at 3.25 g/L under optimum conditions. Overall, this study demonstrated that optimization of growth parameters improved PPA production in 1-L working volume bench-scale bioreactors compared to previous studies in the literature and was a first step to scale up the production to industrial production. PMID:24861313

  9. Large-scale biodiesel production from microalga Chlorella protothecoides through heterotrophic cultivation in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiufeng; Xu, Han; Wu, Qingyu

    2007-11-01

    An integrated approach of biodiesel production from heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides focused on scaling up fermentation in bioreactors was reported in this study. Through substrate feeding and fermentation process controls, the cell density of C. protothecoides achieved 15.5 g L(-1) in 5 L, 12.8 g L(-1) in 750 L, and 14.2 g L(-1) in 11,000 L bioreactors, respectively. Resulted from heterotrophic metabolism, the lipid content reached 46.1%, 48.7%, and 44.3% of cell dry weight in samples from 5 L, 750 L, and 11,000 L bioreactors, respectively. Transesterification of the microalgal oil was catalyzed by immobilized lipase from Candidia sp. 99-125. With 75% lipase (12,000 U g(-1), based on lipid quantity) and 3:1 molar ratio of methanol to oil batch-fed at three times, 98.15% of the oil was converted to monoalkyl esters of fatty acids in 12 h. The expanded biodiesel production rates were 7.02 g L(-1), 6.12 g L(-1), and 6.24 g L(-1) in 5 L, 750 L, and 11,000 L bioreactors, respectively. The properties of biodiesel from Chlorella were comparable to conventional diesel fuel and comply with the US Standard for Biodiesel (ASTM 6751). These results suggest that it is feasible to expand heterotrophic Chlorella fermentation for biodiesel production at the industry level. PMID:17497732

  10. Application of a membrane bioreactor system for opto-electronic industrial wastewater treatment - a pilot study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. K. Chen; J. N. Chen; C. H. Ni; G. T. Lin; C. Y. Chang

    The membrane bioreactor (MBR) system has become more and more attractive in the field of wastewater treatment. It is particularly attractive in situations where long solids retention times are required, such as nitrifying bacteria, and physical retention is critical to achieving more efficiency for biological degradation of pollutants. Although it is a new technology, the MBR process has been applied

  11. Full-scale study on dynamic state membrane bio-reactor with modified intermittent aeration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hong S. Kim; In S. Seo; Youn K. Kim; Ji Y. Kim; Hyo W. Ahn; In S. Kim

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate the performance of a newly developed dynamic state membrane bio-reactor (MBR) with MIA, a full-scale plant with the capacity of 210 m3\\/d was operated for treating sewage. Due to the MIA, the effect of residual oxygen could be completely removed during the non-aeration period and recycle ratio could be reduced to 1 recycle-to-influent ratio. Even though

  12. Small-scale, hydrogen-oxidizing-denitrifying bioreactor for treatment of nitrate-contaminated drinking water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard L. Smith; Seanne P. Buckwalter; Deborah A. Repert; Daniel N. Miller

    2005-01-01

    Nitrate removal by hydrogen-coupled denitrification was examined using flow-through, packed-bed bioreactors to develop a small-scale, cost effective system for treating nitrate-contaminated drinking-water supplies. Nitrate removal was accomplished using a Rhodocyclus sp., strain HOD 5, isolated from a sole-source drinking-water aquifer. The autotrophic capacity of the purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium made it particularly adept for this purpose. Initial tests used a

  13. A new microfluidic concept for parallel operated milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Gabi; Hortsch, Ralf; Kaufmann, Klaus; Arnold, Matthias; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Parallel miniaturized stirred tank bioreactors are an efficient tool for "high-throughput bioprocess design." As most industrial bioprocesses are pH-controlled and/or are operated in a fed-batch mode, an exact scale-down of these reactions with continuous dosing of fluids into the miniaturized bioreactors is highly desirable. Here, we present the development, characterization, and application of a novel concept for a highly integrated microfluidic device for a bioreaction block with 48 parallel milliliter-scale stirred tank reactors (V = 12 mL). The device consists of an autoclavable fluidic section to dispense up to three liquids individually per reactor. The fluidic section contains 144 membrane pumps, which are magnetically driven by a clamped-on actuator section. The micropumps are designed to dose 1.6 ?L per pump lift. Each micropump enables a continuous addition of liquid with a flow rate of up to 3 mL h(-1) . Viscous liquids up to a viscosity of 8.2 mPa s (corresponds to a 60% v/v glycerine solution) can be pumped without changes in the flow rates. Thus, nearly all feeding solutions can be delivered, which are commonly used in bioprocesses. The functionality of the first prototype of this microfluidic device was demonstrated by double-sided pH-controlled cultivations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on signals of fluorimetric sensors embedded at the bottom of the bioreactors. Furthermore, fed-batch cultivations with constant and exponential feeding profiles were successfully performed. Thus, the presented novel microfluidic device will be a useful tool for parallel and, thus, efficient optimization of controlled fed-batch bioprocesses in small-scale stirred tank bioreactors. This can help to reduce bioprocess development times drastically. PMID:21523927

  14. TREATMENT OF PULP AND PAPER (P&P) EFFLUENTS USING SUBMERGED MEMBRANE BIOREACTOR TECHNOLOGY (SMBR)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. N. Sitabule

    A 10 Flat sheet membranes SMBR pilot plant trial was operated at Sappi - Stanger Mill to determine: • the feasibility of SMBR technology for the treatment of Sappi - Stanger Mill final effluent • optimum operating conditions of MBR technology • Collect full scale design data. The Pilot scale trial unit consisted of stainless steel bio-reactor with a working

  15. Enhanced leachate recirculation and stabilization in a pilot landfill bioreactor in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Shih; Hung, Jui-Min; Lu, Chih-Jen

    2012-08-01

    This study focused on the treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) by modification and recirculation of leachate from a simulated landfill bioreactor. Hydrogen peroxide was added to recirculated leachate to maintain a constant oxygen concentration as the leachate passed again through the simulated landfill bioreactor. The results showed that leachate recirculation increased the dissolved oxygen concentration in the test landfill bioreactor. Over a period of 405 days, the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)) in the collected leachate reduced by 99.7%, whereas the chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduced by 96%. The BOD(5)/COD ratio at the initial stage of 0.9 improved to 0.09 under aerobic conditions (leachate recirculation with added hydrogen peroxide) compared with the anaerobic test cell 0.11 (leachate recirculation alone without hydrogen peroxide). The pH increased from 5.5 to 7.6, and the degradation rate of organic carbon was 93%. Leachate recirculation brings about the biodegradation of MSW comparatively faster than the conventional landfill operation. The addition of a constant concentration of hydrogen peroxide was found to further increase the biodegradation. This increased biodegradation rate ultimately enables an MSW landfill to reach a stable state sooner and free up the land for further reuse. PMID:22767874

  16. Development of an Intermediate-Scale Aerobic Bioreactor to Regenerate Nutrients from Inedible Crop Residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, Barry W.; Strayer, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    Three Intermediate-Scale Aerobic Bioreactors were designed, fabricated, and operated. They utilized mixed microbial communities to bio-degrade plant residues. The continuously stirred tank reactors operated at a working volume of 8 L, and the average oxygen mass transfer coefficient, k(sub L)a, was 0.01 s(exp -1). Mixing time was 35 s. An experiment using inedible wheat residues, a replenishment rate of 0.125/day, and a solids loading rate of 20 gdw/day yielded a 48% reduction in biomass. Bioreactor effluent was successfully used to regenerate a wheat hydroponic nutrient solution. Over 80% of available potassium, calcium, and other minerals were recovered and recycled in the 76-day wheat growth experiment.

  17. Pilot-scale semisolid fermentation of straw.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, G A; Han, Y W; Anderson, A W

    1978-01-01

    Semisolid fermentation of ryegrass straw to increase its animal feed value was successfully performed on a pilot scale. The pilot plant, which could handle 100 kg of straw per batch, was designed so that all major operations could take place in one vessel. The straw was hydrolyzed at 121 degrees C for 30 min with 0.5 N H2SO4 (7:3 liquid:solid), treated with ammonia to raise the pH to 5.0, inoculated with Candida utilis, and fermented in a semisolid state (70% moisture). During fermentation the straw was held stationary with air blown up through it. Batch fermentation times were 12 to 29 h. Semisolid fermentation did not require agitation and supported abundant growth at 20 to 40 degrees C even at near zero oxygen tensions. Fermentation increased the protein content, crude fat content, and in vitro rumen digestibility of the straw. Images PMID:565187

  18. Pilot-scale testing of microbubble flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Fundamental investigations into the effect of bubble size on coal flotation have established that the use of microbubbles can improve the recovery of fine coal during flotation while, at the same time, increasing the rejection of ash-forming mineral matter. When used in conjunction with the quiescent conditions provided by a column, the microbubble flotation process has been demonstrated on a laboratory scale to be capable of producing superclean coal containing less than 1 or 2% ash and very little pyritic sulfur. The main objective of this project is to demonstrate the microbubble column flotation process on a pilot-scale. A 500 lb/hr pilot plant is being constructed for the purpose of: 910 demonstrating the feasibility of the microbubble flotation process for producing superclean coal, (2) collecting scale-up data for designing commercial-scale microbubble flotation columns, and (3) collecting cost data for an economic evaluation of the process. In addition to micronized coal, the process is also being tested on coarse coal and refuse pond material. 20 figs.

  19. Heavy metals mobility in full-scale bioreactor landfill: initial stage.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xian; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2008-01-01

    Selected heavy metals (HMs) including Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn initially released from a full-scale bioreactor landfill were monitored over the first 20 months of operation. At the initial landfill stage, the leachate exhibited high HMs release, high organic matter content (27000-43000gl(-1) of TOC) and low pH (5-6). By the fifth month of landfilling, the methanogenic stage had been established, and HMs release was reduced below the Chinese National Standards. Total released HMs accounted for less than 1% of landfill deposited during the investigated period. Most landfill HMs were inorganic. Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra data and model calculations using Visual MINTEQ indicated that humic substances strongly affected the mobility of organic fractions of HMs in the methanogenic landfill. The initial rates of HMs release could be enhanced by recycling the leachate back to bioreactor landfill, but the total quantity released may be reduced by early establishment of methanogenic stage in bioreactor landfill. PMID:17723237

  20. On-line monitoring of oxygen in Tubespin, a novel, small-scale disposable bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kui; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Huang, Li; Wang, Yi-Ting; Lei, Yun; Rong, Jing; Qian, Chui-Wen; Xie, Qiu-Ling; Wang, Yi-Fei; Hong, An; Xiong, Sheng

    2011-08-01

    A novel, optical sensor was fixed in a new type of disposable bioreactor, Tubespin, for the on-line (real-time) monitoring of dissolved oxygen concentrations during cell culture. The cell density, viability and volumetric mass transfer coefficient were also determined to further characterize the bioreactors. The k(L)a value of the Tubespin at standard conditions was 24.3 h(-1), while that of a spinner flask was only 2.7 h(-1). The maximum cell density in the Tubespin bioreactor reached 6 × 10(6) cells mL(-1), which was two times higher than the cell density in a spinner flask. Furthermore, the dynamic dissolved oxygen level was maintained above 90% air-saturation in the Tubespin, while the value was only 1.9% in a spinner flask. These results demonstrate the competitive advantage of using the Tubespin system over spinner flasks for process optimization and scale-down studies of oxygen transfer and cell growth. PMID:21574065

  1. Large-scale clinical-grade retroviral vector production in a fixed-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuyan; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; Bartido, Shirley; Hermetet, Gregory; Sadelain, Michel; Rivière, Isabelle

    2015-04-01

    The successful genetic engineering of patient T cells with ?-retroviral vectors expressing chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors for phase II clinical trials and beyond requires the large-scale manufacture of high-titer vector stocks. The production of retroviral vectors from stable packaging cell lines using roller bottles or 10- to 40-layer cell factories is limited by a narrow harvest window, labor intensity, open-system operations, and the requirement for significant incubator space. To circumvent these shortcomings, we optimized the production of vector stocks in a disposable fixed-bed bioreactor using good manufacturing practice-grade packaging cell lines. High-titer vector stocks were harvested over 10 days, representing a much broader harvest window than the 3-day harvest afforded by cell factories. For PG13 and 293Vec packaging cells, the average vector titer and the vector stocks' yield in the bioreactor were higher by 3.2- to 7.3-fold, and 5.6- to 13.1-fold, respectively, than those obtained in cell factories. The vector production was 10.4 and 18.6 times more efficient than in cell factories for PG13 and 293Vec cells, respectively. Furthermore, the vectors produced from the fixed-bed bioreactors passed the release test assays for clinical applications. Therefore, a single vector lot derived from 293Vec is suitable to transduce up to 500 patients cell doses in the context of large clinical trials using chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors. These findings demonstrate for the first time that a robust fixed-bed bioreactor process can be used to produce ?-retroviral vector stocks scalable up to the commercialization phase. PMID:25751502

  2. COMMERCIAL-SCALE AEROBIC-ANAEROBIC BIOREACTOR LANDFILL OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sequential aerobic-anaerobic treatment system has been applied at a commercial scale (3,000 ton per day) municipal solid waste landfill in Kentucky, USA since 2001. In this system, the uppermost layer of landfilled waste is aerated and liquid waste including leachate, surface w...

  3. Scale-up of virus-like particles production: effects of sparging, agitation and bioreactor scale on cell growth, infection kinetics and productivity.

    PubMed

    Maranga, Luis; Cunha, António; Clemente, João; Cruz, Pedro; Carrondo, Manuel J T

    2004-01-01

    The baculovirus-insect cells expression system was used for the production of self-forming Porcine parvovirus (PPV) like particles (virus-like particles, VLPs) in serum-free medium. At 2l bioreactor scale an efficient production was achieved by infecting the culture at a concentration of 1.5 x 10(6)cells/ml using a low multiplicity of infection of 0.05 pfu per cell. In a continuous bioreactor, it was shown that the uninfected insect cells were not sensitive to local shear stress values up to 2.25 N/m2 at high Reynolds numbers (1.5 x 10(4)) in sparging conditions. Uninfected insect cells can be grown at scaled-up bioreactor at high agitation and sparging rates as long as vortex formation is avoided and bubble entrapment is minimized. An efficient process scale-up to 25 l bioreactor was made using constant shear stress criteria for scale-up. The kinetics of baculovirus infection at low multiplicity of infection, either at different cell concentration or at different scales, are very reproducible, despite the different turbulence conditions present in the bioreactor milieu. The results suggest that the infection kinetics is controlled by the rate of baculovirus-cell receptor attachment and is independent of the bioreactor hydrodynamic conditions. Furthermore, the achieved specific and volumetric productivities were higher at the 25 l scale when compared to the smaller scale bioreactor. Different rates of cell lysis after infection were observed and seem to fully explain both the shift in optimal harvest time and the increase in cell specific productivity. The results emphasize the importance of integrated strategies and engineering concepts in process development at bioreactor stage with the baculovirus insect cell system. PMID:14687971

  4. Application of bioreactor design principles and multivariate analysis for development of cell culture scale down models.

    PubMed

    Tescione, Lia; Lambropoulos, James; Paranandi, Madhava Ram; Makagiansar, Helena; Ryll, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A bench scale cell culture model representative of manufacturing scale (2,000 L) was developed based on oxygen mass transfer principles, for a CHO-based process producing a recombinant human protein. Cell culture performance differences across scales are characterized most often by sub-optimal performance in manufacturing scale bioreactors. By contrast in this study, reduced growth rates were observed at bench scale during the initial model development. Bioreactor models based on power per unit volume (P/V), volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kL a), and oxygen transfer rate (OTR) were evaluated to address this scale performance difference. Lower viable cell densities observed for the P/V model were attributed to higher sparge rates and reduced oxygen mass transfer efficiency (kL a) of the small scale hole spargers. Increasing the sparger kL a by decreasing the pore size resulted in a further decrease in growth at bench scale. Due to sensitivity of the cell line to gas sparge rate and bubble size that was revealed by the P/V and kL a models, an OTR model based on oxygen enrichment and increased P/V was selected that generated endpoint sparge rates representative of 2,000 L scale. This final bench scale model generated similar growth rates as manufacturing. In order to take into account other routinely monitored process parameters besides growth, a multivariate statistical approach was applied to demonstrate validity of the small scale model. After the model was selected based on univariate and multivariate analysis, product quality was generated and verified to fall within the 95% confidence limit of the multivariate model. PMID:25042258

  5. A specific pilot-scale membrane hybrid treatment system for municipal wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dinh Duc; Ngo, Huu Hao; Kim, Sa Dong; Yoon, Yong Soo

    2014-10-01

    A specifically designed pilot-scale hybrid wastewater treatment system integrating an innovative equalizing reactor (EQ), rotating hanging media bioreactor (RHMBR) and submerged flat sheet membrane bioreactor (SMBR) was evaluated for its effectiveness in practical, long-term, real-world applications. The pilot system was operated at a constant flux, but with different internal recycle flow rates (Q) over a long-term operating of 475 days. At 4 Q internal recycle flow rate, BOD5, CODCr, NH4(+)-N, T-N, T-P and TSS was highly removed with efficiencies up to 99.88 ± 0.05%, 95.01 ± 1.62%, 100%, 90.42 ± 2.43%, 73.44 ± 6.03%, and 99.93 ± 0.28%, respectively. Furthermore, the effluent quality was also superior in terms of turbidity (<1 NTU), color (<15 TCU) and taste (inoffensive). The results indicated that with providing only chemically cleaned-in-place (CIP) during the entire period of operation, the membrane could continuously maintain a constant permeate flux of 22.77 ± 2.19 L/m(2)h. In addition, the power consumption was also found to be reasonably low (0.92-1.62 k Wh/m(3)). PMID:25033324

  6. Effects of granular activated carbon on methane removal performance and methanotrophic community of a lab-scale bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Choi, Sun-Ah; Yi, Taewoo; Kim, Tae Gwan; Lee, Sang-Don; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Two identical lab-scale bioreactor systems were operated to examine the effects of granular activated carbon (GAC) on methane removal performance and methanotrophic community. Both bioreactor systems removed methane completely at a CH4 loading rate of 71.2 g-CH4·d(-1) for 17 days. However, the methane removal efficiency declined to 88% in the bioreactor without GAC, while the bioreactor amended with GAC showed greater methane removal efficiency of 97% at a CH4 loading rate of 107.5 g-CH4·d(-1). Although quantitative real-time PCR showed that methanotrophic populations were similar levels of 5-10 × 10(8) pmoA gene copy number·VSS(-1) in both systems, GAC addition changed the methanotrophic community composition of the bioreactor systems. Microarray assay revealed that GAC enhanced the type I methanotrophic genera including Methylobacter, Methylomicrobium, and Methylomonas of the system, which suggests that GAC probably provided a favorable environment for type I methanotrophs. These results indicated that GAC is a promising support material in bioreactor systems for CH4 mitigation. PMID:25560265

  7. A laboratory and pilot plant scaled continuous stirred reactor separator for the production of ethanol from sugars, corn grits/starch or biomass streams

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, M.C.; Lei, Shuiwang; Zhou, Chongde

    1995-10-01

    An improved bio-reactor has been developed to allow the high speed, continues, low energy conversion of various substrates to ethanol. The Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS) incorporates gas stripping of the ethanol using a recalculating gas stream between cascading stirred reactors in series. We have operated a 4 liter lab scale unit, and built and operated a 24,000 liter pilot scale version of the bioreactor. High rates of fermentation are maintained in the reactor stages using a highly flocculent yeast strain. Ethanol is recovered from the stripping gas using a hydrophobic solvent absorber (isothermal), after which the gas is returned to the bioreactor. Ethanol can then be removed from the solvent to recover a highly concentrated ethanol product. We have applied the lab scale CSRS to sugars (glucose/sucrose), molasses, and raw starch with simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of the starch granules (SSF). The pilot scale CSRS has been operated as a cascade reactor using dextrins as a feed. Operating data from both the lab and pilot scale CSRS are presented. Details of how the system might be applied to cellulosics, with some preliminary data are also given.

  8. Large-scale production of lentiviral vector in a closed system hollow fiber bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Jonathan; Beltzer, Jim; Fury, Brian; Wilczek, Katarzyna; Tobin, Steve; Falconer, Danny; Nolta, Jan; Bauer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are widely used in the field of gene therapy as an effective method for permanent gene delivery. While current methods of producing small scale vector batches for research purposes depend largely on culture flasks, the emergence and popularity of lentiviral vectors in translational, preclinical and clinical research has demanded their production on a much larger scale, a task that can be difficult to manage with the numbers of producer cell culture flasks required for large volumes of vector. To generate a large scale, partially closed system method for the manufacturing of clinical grade lentiviral vector suitable for the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), we developed a method employing a hollow fiber bioreactor traditionally used for cell expansion. We have demonstrated the growth, transfection, and vector-producing capability of 293T producer cells in this system. Vector particle RNA titers after subsequent vector concentration yielded values comparable to lentiviral iPSC induction vector batches produced using traditional culture methods in 225?cm2 flasks (T225s) and in 10-layer cell factories (CF10s), while yielding a volume nearly 145 times larger than the yield from a T225 flask and nearly three times larger than the yield from a CF10. Employing a closed system hollow fiber bioreactor for vector production offers the possibility of manufacturing large quantities of gene therapy vector while minimizing reagent usage, equipment footprint, and open system manipulation.

  9. Extractive membrane bioreactors for detoxification of chemical industry wastes: process development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew G Livingston; Jean-Pierre Arcangeli; Andrew T Boam; Shengfu Zhang; Manuel Marangon; Luisa M Freitas dos Santos

    1998-01-01

    Pilot scale trials of an emerging membrane technology, the extractive membrane bioreactor (EMB) are described. An EMB unit was installed at a chemical production facility to treat a spent caustic scrubber liquor containing monochlorobenzene (MCB). In its first configuration with 60m2 of membrane area the pilot unit worked well, destroying 98–99% of the organics in the MCB waste stream at

  10. Feasibility study to upgrade a textile wastewater treatment plant by a hollow fibre membrane bioreactor for effluent reuse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Malpei; L. Bonomo; A. Rozzi

    2003-01-01

    A pilot plant membrane bioreactor has been tested in parallel with a full-scale activated sludge wastewater treatment plant fed on the wastewater from a textile factory. The possibility to upgrade the final effluent for internal reuse was investigated. The pilot and full-scale plants are located in a textile factory (Boselli & C., Olgiate Comasco, North Italy) which manufactures and finishes

  11. Disposable bioreactors for plant micropropagation and mass plant cell culture.

    PubMed

    Ducos, Jean-Paul; Terrier, Bénédicte; Courtois, Didier

    2009-01-01

    Different types of bioreactors are used at Nestlé R&D Centre - Tours for mass propagation of selected plant varieties by somatic embryogenesis and for large scale culture of plants cells to produce metabolites or recombinant proteins. Recent studies have been directed to cut down the production costs of these two processes by developing disposable cell culture systems. Vegetative propagation of elite plant varieties is achieved through somatic embryogenesis in liquid medium. A pilot scale process has recently been set up for the industrial propagation of Coffea canephora (Robusta coffee). The current production capacity is 3.0 million embryos per year. The pre-germination of the embryos was previously conducted by temporary immersion in liquid medium in 10-L glass bioreactors. An improved process has been developed using a 10-L disposable bioreactor consisting of a bag containing a rigid plastic box ('Box-in-Bag' bioreactor), insuring, amongst other advantages, a higher light transmittance to the biomass due to its horizontal design. For large scale cell culture, two novel flexible plastic-based disposable bioreactors have been developed from 10 to 100 L working volumes, validated with several plant species ('Wave and Undertow' and 'Slug Bubble' bioreactors). The advantages and the limits of these new types of bioreactor are discussed, based mainly on our own experience on coffee somatic embryogenesis and mass cell culture of soya and tobacco. PMID:19475375

  12. On the fluid dynamics of a laboratory scale single-use stirred bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Odeleye, A O O; Marsh, D T J; Osborne, M D; Lye, G J; Micheletti, M

    2014-05-24

    The commercial success of mammalian cell-derived recombinant proteins has fostered an increase in demand for novel single-use bioreactor (SUB) systems that facilitate greater productivity, increased flexibility and reduced costs (Zhang et al., 2010). These systems exhibit fluid flow regimes unlike those encountered in traditional glass/stainless steel bioreactors because of the way in which they are designed. With such disparate hydrodynamic environments between SUBs currently on the market, traditional scale-up approaches applied to stirred tanks should be revised. One such SUB is the Mobius(®) 3 L CellReady, which consists of an upward-pumping marine scoping impeller. This work represents the first experimental study of the flow within the CellReady using a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) approach, combined with a biological study into the impact of these fluid dynamic characteristics on cell culture performance. The PIV study was conducted within the actual vessel, rather than using a purpose-built mimic. PIV measurements conveyed a degree of fluid compartmentalisation resulting from the up-pumping impeller. Both impeller tip speed and fluid working volume had an impact upon the fluid velocities and spatial distribution of turbulence within the vessel. Cell cultures were conducted using the GS-CHO cell-line (Lonza) producing an IgG4 antibody. Disparity in cellular growth and viability throughout the range of operating conditions used (80-350 rpm and 1-2.4 L working volume) was not substantial, although a significant reduction in recombinant protein productivity was found at 350 rpm and 1 L working volume (corresponding to the highest Reynolds number tested in this work). The study shows promise in the use of PIV to improve understanding of the hydrodynamic environment within individual SUBs and allows identification of the critical hydrodynamic parameters under the different flow regimes for compatibility and scalability across the range of bioreactor platforms. PMID:24864128

  13. On the fluid dynamics of a laboratory scale single-use stirred bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Odeleye, A.O.O.; Marsh, D.T.J.; Osborne, M.D.; Lye, G.J.; Micheletti, M.

    2014-01-01

    The commercial success of mammalian cell-derived recombinant proteins has fostered an increase in demand for novel single-use bioreactor (SUB) systems that facilitate greater productivity, increased flexibility and reduced costs (Zhang et al., 2010). These systems exhibit fluid flow regimes unlike those encountered in traditional glass/stainless steel bioreactors because of the way in which they are designed. With such disparate hydrodynamic environments between SUBs currently on the market, traditional scale-up approaches applied to stirred tanks should be revised. One such SUB is the Mobius® 3 L CellReady, which consists of an upward-pumping marine scoping impeller. This work represents the first experimental study of the flow within the CellReady using a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) approach, combined with a biological study into the impact of these fluid dynamic characteristics on cell culture performance. The PIV study was conducted within the actual vessel, rather than using a purpose-built mimic. PIV measurements conveyed a degree of fluid compartmentalisation resulting from the up-pumping impeller. Both impeller tip speed and fluid working volume had an impact upon the fluid velocities and spatial distribution of turbulence within the vessel. Cell cultures were conducted using the GS-CHO cell-line (Lonza) producing an IgG4 antibody. Disparity in cellular growth and viability throughout the range of operating conditions used (80–350 rpm and 1–2.4 L working volume) was not substantial, although a significant reduction in recombinant protein productivity was found at 350 rpm and 1 L working volume (corresponding to the highest Reynolds number tested in this work). The study shows promise in the use of PIV to improve understanding of the hydrodynamic environment within individual SUBs and allows identification of the critical hydrodynamic parameters under the different flow regimes for compatibility and scalability across the range of bioreactor platforms. PMID:24864128

  14. Cell culture experiments planned for the space bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cross, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Culturing of cells in a pilot-scale bioreactor remains to be done in microgravity. An approach is presented based on several studies of cell culture systems. Previous and current cell culture research in microgravity which is specifically directed towards development of a space bioprocess is described. Cell culture experiments planned for a microgravity sciences mission are described in abstract form.

  15. TREATMENT OF MUNICIPAL WASTEWATERS BY THE FLUIDIZED BED BIOREACTOR PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 2-year, large-scale pilot investigation was conducted at the City of Newburgh Water Pollution Control Plant, Newburgh, NY, to demonstrate the application of the fluidized bed bioreactor process to the treatment of municipal wastewaters. The experimental effort investigated the ...

  16. Large Scale Expansion of Human Umbilical Cord Cells in a Rotating Bed System Bioreactor for Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Reichardt, Anne; Polchow, Bianca; Shakibaei, Mehdi; Henrich, Wolfgang; Hetzer, Roland; Lueders, Cora

    2013-01-01

    Widespread use of human umbilical cord cells for cardiovascular tissue engineering requires production of large numbers of well-characterized cells under controlled conditions. In current research projects, the expansion of cells to be used to create a tissue construct is usually performed in static cell culture systems which are, however, often not satisfactory due to limitations in nutrient and oxygen supply. To overcome these limitations dynamic cell expansion in bioreactor systems under controllable conditions could be an important tool providing continuous perfusion for the generation of large numbers of viable pre-conditioned cells in a short time period. For this purpose cells derived from human umbilical cord arteries were expanded in a rotating bed system bioreactor for up to 9 days. For a comparative study, cells were cultivated under static conditions in standard culture devices. Our results demonstrated that the microenvironment in the perfusion bioreactor was more favorable than that of the standard cell culture flasks. Data suggested that cells in the bioreactor expanded 39 fold (38.7 ± 6.1 fold) in comparison to statically cultured cells (31.8 ± 3.0 fold). Large-scale production of cells in the bioreactor resulted in more than 3 x 108 cells from a single umbilical cord fragment within 9 days. Furthermore cell doubling time was lower in the bioreactor system and production of extracellular matrix components was higher. With this study, we present an appropriate method to expand human umbilical cord artery derived cells with high cellular proliferation rates in a well-defined bioreactor system under GMP conditions. PMID:23847691

  17. Scale-up cultivation of Chlorella ellipsoidea from indoor to outdoor in bubble column bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Kai; Hu, Yi-Ru; Wang, Feng; Stiles, Amanda R; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2014-03-01

    The cultivation of Chlorella ellipsoidea in bubble column bioreactors was investigated at different scales under indoor and outdoor conditions. The algal cells were able to quickly adapt to the outdoor conditions and achieved a growth rate of 31.55mg L(-1)day(-1). Due to differences in light and temperature, the outdoor culture produced a higher percentage of unsaturated fatty acids compared to the indoor cultures, while the amino acid composition was unaffected. The overall cost of the biomass produced by the 200L outdoor cultivation (58.70US$/kg-dry weight) was estimated to be more than 7 times lower than that of the 20L indoor cultivation (431.39US$/kg-dry weight). Together these results provide a basis for the cultivation of C. ellipsoidea for the large-scale production of biofuels, high-value nutrients and/or recombinant proteins. PMID:24495537

  18. Anaerobic digestibility of the waste activated sludge discharged from large-scale membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiyong; Wen, Xianghua; Xu, Meilan; Qi, Meng; Huang, Xia

    2012-12-01

    Anaerobic digestibility of the waste activated sludge (WAS) discharged from large-scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) and conventional activated sludge processes (CASs) were compared using batch trials. Four wastewater treatment plants were sampled. Results showed that the sludge from MBRs had poor anaerobic digestibility as it had lower volatile solid (VS) reduction rate and lower maximum biogas production rate. The partial sludge stabilization during the long sludge retention time (SRT) typically applied in MBRs was the possible reason. On the other hand, the difference in wastewater composition had a great impact on the properties of activated sludge and the downstream sludge digestion. Inorganic matter accumulation in the WAS may hinder the access of microorganisms to substrate. The humic-like substances accumulating in the activated sludge was expected to contribute to the worse digestibility and these substances were observed to be released during anaerobic digestion through three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectra. PMID:23131311

  19. Full-scale validation of an air scour control system for energy savings in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Monclús, Hèctor; Dalmau, Montserrat; Gabarrón, Sara; Ferrero, Giuliana; Rodríguez-Roda, Ignasi; Comas, Joaquim

    2015-08-01

    Membrane aeration represents between 35 and 50% of the operational cost of membrane bioreactors (MBR). New automatic control systems and/or module configurations have been developed for aeration optimization. In this paper, we briefly describe an innovative MBR air scour control system based on permeability evolution and present the results of a full-scale validation that lasted over a 1-year period. An average reduction in the air scour flow rate of 13% was achieved, limiting the maximum reduction to 20%. This averaged reduction corresponded to a decrease in energy consumption for membrane aeration of 14% (0.025 kWh m(-3)) with maximum saving rates of 22% (0.04 kWh m(-3)). Permeability and fouling rate evolution were not affected by the air scour control system, as very similar behavior was observed for these variables for both filtration lines throughout the entire experimental evaluation period of 1 year. PMID:25965883

  20. Development, parallelization, and automation of a gas-inducing milliliter-scale bioreactor for high-throughput bioprocess design (HTBD).

    PubMed

    Puskeiler, R; Kaufmann, K; Weuster-Botz, D

    2005-03-01

    A novel milliliter-scale bioreactor equipped with a gas-inducing impeller was developed with oxygen transfer coefficients as high as in laboratory and industrial stirred-tank bioreactors. The bioreactor reaches oxygen transfer coefficients of >0.4 s(-1). Oxygen transfer coefficients of >0.2 s(-1) can be maintained over a range of 8- to 12-mL reaction volume. A reaction block with integrated heat exchangers was developed for 48-mL-scale bioreactors. The block can be closed with a single gas cover spreading sterile process gas from a central inlet into the headspace of all bioreactors. The gas cover simultaneously acts as a sterile barrier, making the reaction block a stand-alone device that represents an alternative to 48 parallel-operated shake flasks on a much smaller footprint. Process control software was developed to control a liquid-handling system for automated sampling, titration of pH, substrate feeding, and a microtiter plate reader for automated atline pH and atline optical density analytics. The liquid-handling parameters for titration agent, feeding solution, and cell samples were optimized to increase data quality. A simple proportional pH-control algorithm and intermittent titration of pH enabled Escherichia coli growth to a dry cell weight of 20.5 g L(-1) in fed-batch cultivation with air aeration. Growth of E. coli at the milliliter scale (10 mL) was shown to be equivalent to laboratory scale (3 L) with regard to growth rate, mu, and biomass yield, Y(XS). PMID:15669089

  1. A qualitative outline to industrialize alcohol production by catalytic multistage fixed bed tower (MFBT) bioreactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Koutinas; V. Bakoyianis; T. Argiriou; M. Kanellaki; S. Voliotis

    1997-01-01

    The possibility for industrialization of the catalytic Multistage Fixed Bed Tower (MFBT) bioreactor using the mineral kissiris\\u000a as a promoting material is examined in a large-scale pilot plant using 7000 and 100,000 L bioreactors separately. The stability\\u000a of kissiris’ structure, the viability of culture, and the formation of volatile compounds were studied from batch to batch.\\u000a This mineral, being a

  2. Application of bioreactor systems for large scale production of horticultural and medicinal plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Y. Paek; D. Chakrabarty; E. J. Hahn

    2005-01-01

    Automation of micropropagation via organogenesis or somatic embryogenesis in a bioreactor has been advanced as a possible way of reducing costs. Micropropagation by conventional techniques is typically a labour-intensive means of clonal propagation. The paper describes lower cost and less labour-intensive clonal propagation through the use of modified air-lift, bubble column, bioreactors (a balloon-type bubble bioreactor), together with temporary immersion

  3. Process configurations adapted to membrane bioreactors for enhanced biological phosphorous and nitrogen removal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boris Lesjean; Regina Gnirss; Christian Adam

    2002-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorous (Bio-P) removal process was adapted to membrane bioreactor (MBR). One bench-scale pilot plant (BSP, 200–250 L) and two medium-scale pilot plants (2\\/\\/MSP, 1000–3000 L each) were operated under several configurations, including pre-denitrification and post-denitrification without addition of carbon source, and two solid retention times (SRT) of 15 and 26 d, in parallel to the full-scale Bio-P removal

  4. PILOT-SCALE EVALUATION OF INCINERATING LISTED WASTES FROM SPECIFICSOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot-Scale incineration testing was conducted at the United StatesEnvironmental Protection Agency's Incineration Research Facility(IRF) to support the development of best demonstrated availabletechnology (BDAT) standards for the treatment of several hazardouswastes from specific...

  5. Design and operating experiences of full-scale municipal membrane bioreactors in Japan.

    PubMed

    Itokawa, H; Tsuji, K; Yamashita, K; Hashimoto, T

    2014-01-01

    In Japan, membrane bioreactor (MBRs) have been installed in 17 small-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the past 8 years, together with two recently installed MBRs for larger-scale WWTPs. In this study, design and operating data were collected from 17 of them as part of a follow-up survey, and aspects including system design, biological treatment, membrane operation, problems and costs were overviewed. Because most of the MBRs were designed according to standardized guidance, system configuration of the plants was similar; pre-denitrification using the Modified Ludzack-Ettinger (MLE) process with membrane units submerged in aerobic tanks, following a fine screen and flow equalization tank. This led to effluent quality with biochemical oxygen demand and T-N of less than 3.5 and 7.4 mg/L, respectively, for nine plants on an annual average basis. It was a common practice in extremely under-loaded plants to operate the membrane systems intermittently. Frequency of recovery cleaning events was plant-specific, mostly ranging from 1 to 5 times/year. Cost evaluation revealed that specific construction costs for the small-scale MBRs were no more than for oxidation ditch plants. Although specific energy consumption values tended to be high in the under-loaded plants, the demonstration MBR, where several energy reducing measures had been incorporated, attained specific energy consumption of 0.39 kWh/m(3) under full-capacity operation. PMID:24622560

  6. High-strength nitrogen removal of opto-electronic industrial wastewater in membrane bioreactor - a pilot study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. K. Chen; C. H. Ni; J. N. Chen; J. Lin

    The membrane bioreactor (MBR) system has become more and more attractive in the field of wastewater treatment. It is particularly attractive in situations where long solids retention times are required, such as nitrifying bacteria, and physical retention critical to achieving more efficiency for biological degradation of pollutant. Although it is a new technology, the MBR process has been applied for

  7. Bacteriophage predation regulates microbial abundance and diversity in a full-scale bioreactor treating industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Orr H; Kushmaro, Ariel; Brenner, Asher

    2010-03-01

    Changes in the microbial community composition of a full-scale membrane bioreactor treating industrial wastewater were studied over a period of 462 days using a series of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Frequent changes in the relative abundance of specific taxonomic groups were observed, which could not be explained by changes in the reactor's conditions or wastewater composition. Phage activity was proposed to drive some of the observed changes. Bacterial hosts were isolated from a biomass sample obtained towards the end of the study period, and specific phage counts were carried out for some of the isolated hosts using stored frozen biomass samples as the phage inocula. Plaque-forming unit concentrations were shown to change frequently over the study period, in correlation with changes in the relative abundance of taxonomic groups closely related by 16S rRNA gene sequence to the isolated strains. Quantitative PCR was used to verify changes in the abundance of a taxonomic group closely related to one of the isolated hosts, showing good agreement with the changes in relative abundance in the clone libraries of that group. The emerging pattern was consistent with the 'killing the winner' hypothesis, although alternative interaction mechanisms could not be ruled out. This is the first time that phage-host interactions in a complex microbial community are demonstrated over an extended period, and possibly the first in situ demonstration of 'killing the winner' stochastic behavior. PMID:19924159

  8. Scaled-up manufacturing of recombinant antibodies produced by plant cells in a 200-L orbitally-shaken disposable bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Raven, Nicole; Rasche, Stefan; Kuehn, Christoph; Anderlei, Tibor; Klöckner, Wolf; Schuster, Flora; Henquet, Maurice; Bosch, Dirk; Büchs, Jochen; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    Tobacco BY-2 cells have emerged as a promising platform for the manufacture of biopharmaceutical proteins, offering efficient protein secretion, favourable growth characteristics and cultivation in containment under a controlled environment. The cultivation of BY-2 cells in disposable bioreactors is a useful alternative to conventional stainless steel stirred-tank reactors, and orbitally-shaken bioreactors could provide further advantages such as simple bag geometry, scalability and predictable process settings. We carried out a scale-up study, using a 200-L orbitally-shaken bioreactor holding disposable bags, and BY-2 cells producing the human monoclonal antibody M12. We found that cell growth and recombinant protein accumulation were comparable to standard shake flask cultivation, despite a 200-fold difference in cultivation volume. Final cell fresh weights of 300-387?g/L and M12 yields of ?20?mg/L were achieved with both cultivation methods. Furthermore, we established an efficient downstream process for the recovery of M12 from the culture broth. The viscous spent medium prevented clarification using filtration devices, but we used expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatography with SP Sepharose as an alternative for the efficient capture of the M12 antibody. EBA was introduced as an initial purification step prior to protein A affinity chromatography, resulting in an overall M12 recovery of 75-85% and a purity of >95%. Our results demonstrate the suitability of orbitally-shaken bioreactors for the scaled-up cultivation of plant cell suspension cultures and provide a strategy for the efficient purification of antibodies from the BY-2 culture medium. PMID:25117428

  9. The Characterization of Grade PCEA Recycle Graphite Pilot Scale Billets

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Pappano, Peter J [ORNL

    2010-10-01

    Here we report the physical properties of a series specimens machined from pilot scale (~ 152 mm diameter x ~305 mm length) grade PCEA recycle billets manufactured by GrafTech. The pilot scale billets were processed with increasing amounts of (unirradiated) graphite (from 20% to 100%) introduced to the formulation with the goal of determining if large fractions of recycle graphite have a deleterious effect on properties. The properties determined include Bulk Density, Electrical Resistivity, Elastic (Young s) Modulus, and Coefficient of Thermal Expansion. Although property variations were observed to be correlated with the recycle fraction, the magnitude of the variations was noted to be small.

  10. Modelling and dynamic simulation of a moving bed bioreactor for the treatment of municipal wastewater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Plattes; E. Henry; P. M. Schosseler; A. Weidenhaupt

    2006-01-01

    A model for the dynamic simulation of a pilot scale moving bed bioreactor (MBBR) used for the treatment of municipal wastewater is proposed. The proposed MBBR model includes attachment of particulates to the biofilm and detachment of biofilm into the bulk liquid. The biofilm growth kinetics are modelled with the activated sludge model no. 1 (ASM1). Diffusional mass transport limitations

  11. Empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient for a rectangular internal-loop airlift bioreactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient was developed for a pilot scale internal-loop rectangular airlift bioreactor that was designed for biotechnology. The empirical correlation combines classic turbulence theory, Kolmogorov’s isotropic turbulence theory with Higbie’s pen...

  12. Mathematical modeling of ultrasound in tissue engineering: From bioreactors to the cellular scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louw, Tobias M.

    Tissue engineering seeks to provide a means to treat injuries that are beyond the body's natural ability to repair without the issues associated with allografts. Autologous cells are cultured in a bioreactor which controls the cellular environment (including mechanical stimulation) for optimal tissue growth. We investigate ultrasound as an effective means of mechanical stimulation by predicting the ultrasonic field in a bioreactor, as well as ultrasonic bioeffects at the cellular level. The Transfer Matrix Angular Spectrum Approach was found to be the most accurate and computationally efficient bioreactor model. Three critical factors influence experimental results: (1) the diameter of the tissue engineering scaffold greatly affects the ultrasonic field; (2) the position of the ultrasonic transducer and liquid level in the tissue culture well determines the maximum pressure amplitude in the bioreactor, but the pressure can be controlled by measuring the transducer input electrical impedance and manipulating the applied voltage; and (3) the position of pressure nodes are influenced by ultrasonic frequency and liquid level; this will affect the response of cells to applied ultrasound. On the cellular level, it was shown that chondrocytes respond to ultrasound with frequency dependence. A predicted resonance frequency near 5MHz matched experimental results showing maximum expression of load inducible genes at 5MHz. Mechanical stresses are concentrated near the nucleus at resonance, alluding to the possibility that the nucleus may directly sense ultrasonic stimulation. We postulate that ultrasound influences the transport of p-ERK to the nucleus or causes minor chromatin reorganization, leading to the observed frequency dependent gene expression. We linked in vitro ultrasonic stimulation to in vivo mechanical stimulation generated by natural movement. The chondrocyte's response to impact is under-damped, and the cell oscillates with a frequency close to the model predicted resonance. It appears that ultrasound applied close to the cell's resonant frequency effectively recreates the mechanical stimulation experienced by cells during natural movement. Ultrasonic bioreactors may therefore reproduce physiological conditions just as well as more complex bioreactors.

  13. Using a membrane bioreactor to reclaim wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Cicek, N.; Franco, J.P.; Suidan, M.T. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Urbain, V. [Centre International de Recherche Sur l`Eau et l`Environnement, Le Pecq (France)

    1998-11-01

    A pilot-scale membrane bioreactor sufficiently purified simulated municipal wastewater for indirect recharge to groundwater or nonpotable uses. Throughout more than 500 days of steady-state operation, total organic carbon concentrations of <1.1 mg/L and chemical oxygen demand of <3.5 mg/L were consistently achieved. No suspended solids were detected in the effluent during this period. The treated water was fully nitrified, resulting in low ammonia and organic nitrogen concentrations but high nitrate concentrations. Cyclic oxic-anoxic operation of an additional denitrification process would be necessary to meet potable water reuse standards. Phosphorus was fully used in the bioreactor for biological growth. Heterotrophic bacteria and MS-2 viruses were completely retained by the membrane system, reducing the extent of final disinfection required.

  14. Pilot?scale devices for remediation of munitions contaminated soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Arienzo; S. D. Comfort; M. Zerkoune; Z. M. Li; P. J. Shea

    1998-01-01

    An equipment is described for the remediation of (TNT) contaminated soil in pilot scale setting. Devices were developed for the preparation of soil samples and for the removal of water from soil after treatment of a soil slurry in a 60 L air?lift reactor, which was a prototype of larger commercial unit. The method was applied to clean up TNT?polluted

  15. Advanced Remote Maintenance Design for Pilot-Scale Centrifugal Contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Law; David Meikrantz; Troy Garn; Lawrence Macaluso

    2011-02-01

    Advanced designs of used nuclear fuel recycling processes and radioactive waste treatment processes are expected to include more ambitious goals for aqueous based separations including; higher separations efficiency, high-level waste minimization, and a greater focus on continuous processes to minimize cost and footprint. Therefore, annular centrifugal contactors are destined to play a more important role for such future processing schemes. Pilot-scale testing will be an integral part of development of many of these processes. An advanced design for remote maintenance of pilot-scale centrifugal contactors has been developed and a prototype module fabricated and tested for a commercially available pilot-scale centrifugal contactor (CINC V-02, 5-cm rotor diameter). Advanced design features include air actuated clamps for holding the motor-rotor assembly in place, an integral electrical connection, upper flange o-rings, a welded bottom plate, a lifting bale, and guide pins. These design features will allow for rapid replacement of the motor rotor assembly, which can be accomplished while maintaining process equilibrium. Hydraulic testing of a three-stage prototype unit was also performed to verify that design changes did not impact performance of the centrifugal contactors. Details of the pilot-scale remote maintenance design, results of testing in a remote mockup test facility, and results of hydraulic testing of the advanced design are provided.

  16. Pilot-scale testing of microbubble flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.; Mankosa, M.J.

    1990-08-01

    The main objective of this project was to demonstrate the microbubble column flotation process in a process development unit (PDU). The project was divided into several different stages. The first involved continuous bench-scale testing in order to identify the operating parameters which most strongly influence column performance. These included feed rate, countercurrent wash water rate, aeration rate, frother addition, collector addition and froth depth. Several tests were also conducted using different feed particle size distributions. Based on the results from these tests, several PDU-scale columns were designed and constructed. These cells ranged from 6 to 14 inches in diameter and were approximately 15 feet high. The second stage consisted of testing of the PDU-scale columns for the purpose of: (1) demonstrating the feasibility of the microbubble flotation process for producing superclean coal, (2) demonstrating the ability of the microbubble column to process refuse streams (i.e., cyclone overflow material), (3) comparison with conventional techniques for coarse coal flotation, (4) collecting scale-up data for the design of commercial-scale columns. In the final stage, a comprehensive scale-up procedure was developed based on the fundamental principles of flotation. Expressions were developed which describe the flotation rate constant, mean retention time, fractional air hold-up and column mixing. These relationships were incorporated into a scale-up procedure based on known principles of chemical engineering reactor design. PDU-scale test results were used to validate the scale-up procedure. 95 refs., 141 figs., 23 tabs.

  17. Pilot-scale testing of microbubble flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.; Mankosa, M.J.

    1990-08-01

    The main objective of this project was to demonstrate the microbubble column flotation process in a process development unit (PDU). In order to accomplish this task, the project was divided into several different stages. The first involved continuous bench-scale testing in order to identify the operating parameters which most strongly influence column performance. These included feed rate, countercurrent wash water rate, aeration rate, frother addition, collector addition and froth depth. Several tests were also conducted using different feed particle size distributions. Based on the results from these tests, several PDU-scale columns were designed and constructed. The second stage consisted of testing of the PDU-scale columns for the purpose of: (i) demonstrating the feasibility of the microbubble flotation process for producing superclean coal, (ii) demonstrating the ability of the microbubble column to process refuse streams (i.e., cyclone overflow material), (iii) comparison with conventional techniques for coarse coal flotation, and (iv) collecting scale-up data for the design of commercial-scale columns. Detailed results from each of these series of tests are presented. In the final stage of this work a comprehensive scale-up procedure was developed based on the fundamental principles of flotation. Expressions were developed which describe the flotation rate constant, mean retention time, fractional air hold-up and column mixing. These relationships were incorporated into a scale-up procedure based on known principles of chemical engineering reactor design. PDU-scale test results were used to validate the scale-up procedure. 95 refs., 141 figs., 23 tabs.

  18. Mass propagation of shoots of Stevia rebaudiana using a large scale bioreactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Motomu Akita; Takeo Shigeoka; Yoko Koizumi; Michio Kawamura

    1994-01-01

    A procedure for the mass propagation of multiple shoots of Stevia rebaudiana is described. Isolated shoot primordia were used as the inoculum to obtain clusters of shoot primordia. Such clusters were grown in a 500 liter bioreactor to obtain shoots. A total of 64.6 Kg of shoots were propagated from 460 g of the inoculated shoot primordia. These shoots were

  19. Zero Nuisance Piggeries: long-term performance of MBR (membrane bioreactor) for dilute swine wastewater treatment using submerged membrane bioreactor in semi-industrial scale.

    PubMed

    Prado, Nolwenn; Ochoa, Juan; Amrane, Abdeltif

    2009-04-01

    Effective aerobic/anoxic treatment of piggery manure wastewater was achieved in a real farm scale using a small piggery (72 pigs) with reuse of the treated water. The experimental procedure was followed for 9 months. Fresh manure (FM) is formed by daily flush on piggeries and biologically treated after centrifuge pre-treatment. For upgrade liquid/solid separation and pathogen retention in biological treatment, a membrane system was used with the aim of effluent reuse in flush. Despite an evolution of FM through time, centrifuge pre-treatment and bioreactor performances stayed at high level. An elimination of 86% of the suspended solids occurred through pre-treatment, and nitrogen and COD biological degradation remains at 90% all time long. Moreover, interestingly about half of the soluble part of phosphorus (20% of the global phosphorus content) was biologically removed via the recirculation between the anoxic and the aerobic tank which acted as an intermittent aerobic/anoxic sequence. A part of COD was proved not biodegradable and was accumulated via the reuse of the treated water for flushing purpose. This accumulation justifies washing of the biomass between two runs in purpose to enhance the treated water quality and also to meet the membrane tolerance. The membrane was proved reliable as far as the maintenance procedure was respected. Maintenance cleaning had to be operated as soon as the TransMembrane Pressure (TMP) achieved 50 mbar and curative washing was necessary if the TMP increased over 90 mbar or between 2 runs. The temperature was proved to influence both the bioactivity and the membrane fouling kinetic. Finally, it was demonstrated that the process was sustainable for long-term management of swine wastewater at semi-industrial scale. PMID:19136138

  20. FIELD-SCALE TESTING OF A TWO-STAGE BIOREACTOR FOR REMOVAL OF CREOSOTE AND PENTACHLOROPHENOL FROM GROUNDWATER: CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-stage, field-scale bioreactor system was used to determine the efficacy of bioremediation of creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP)-contaminated ground water at the abandoned American Creosote Works (ACW) site in Pensacola, Florida. n separate 15-day runs of the field-scale (...

  1. Production and Isolation of Azaspiracid-1 and -2 from Azadinium spinosum Culture in Pilot Scale Photobioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Jauffrais, Thierry; Kilcoyne, Jane; Séchet, Véronique; Herrenknecht, Christine; Truquet, Philippe; Hervé, Fabienne; Bérard, Jean Baptiste; Nulty, Cíara; Taylor, Sarah; Tillmann, Urban; Miles, Christopher O.; Hess, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Azaspiracid (AZA) poisoning has been reported following consumption of contaminated shellfish, and is of human health concern. Hence, it is important to have sustainable amounts of the causative toxins available for toxicological studies and for instrument calibration in monitoring programs, without having to rely on natural toxin events. Continuous pilot scale culturing was carried out to evaluate the feasibility of AZA production using Azadinium spinosum cultures. Algae were harvested using tangential flow filtration or continuous centrifugation. AZAs were extracted using solid phase extraction (SPE) procedures, and subsequently purified. When coupling two stirred photobioreactors in series, cell concentrations reached 190,000 and 210,000 cell·mL?1 at steady state in bioreactors 1 and 2, respectively. The AZA cell quota decreased as the dilution rate increased from 0.15 to 0.3 day?1, with optimum toxin production at 0.25 day?1. After optimization, SPE procedures allowed for the recovery of 79 ± 9% of AZAs. The preparative isolation procedure previously developed for shellfish was optimized for algal extracts, such that only four steps were necessary to obtain purified AZA1 and -2. A purification efficiency of more than 70% was achieved, and isolation from 1200 L of culture yielded 9.3 mg of AZA1 and 2.2 mg of AZA2 of >95% purity. This work demonstrated the feasibility of sustainably producing AZA1 and -2 from A. spinosum cultures. PMID:22822378

  2. Pilot-scale tests of HEME and HEPA dissolution process

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, Z.H.; Strege, D.K.

    1994-06-01

    A series of pilot-scale demonstration tests for the dissolution of High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME`s) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (HEPA) were performed on a 1/5th linear scale. These fiberglass filters are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to decontaminate the effluents from the off-gases generated during the feed preparation process and vitrification. When removed, these filters will be dissolved in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The contaminated fiberglass is converted to an aqueous stream which will be transferred to the waste tanks. The filter metal structure will be rinsed with process water before its disposal as low-level solid waste. The pilot-scale study reported here successfully demonstrated a simple one step process using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The proposed process requires the installation of a new water spray ring with 30 nozzles. In addition to the reduced waste generated, the total process time is reduced to 48 hours only (66% saving in time). The pilot-scale tests clearly demonstrated that the dissolution process of HEMEs has two stages - chemical digestion of the filter and mechanical erosion of the digested filter. The digestion is achieved by a boiling 5 wt% caustic solutions, whereas the mechanical break down of the digested filter is successfully achieved by spraying process water on the digested filter. An alternate method of breaking down the digested filter by increased air sparging of the solution was found to be marginally successful are best. The pilot-scale tests also demonstrated that the products of dissolution are easily pumpable by a centrifugal pump.

  3. Application of inverse fluidization in wastewater treatment: From laboratory to full-scale bioreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Karamanev, D.G. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal (Canada); Nikolov, L.N. [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria)

    1996-12-31

    The inverse fluidization is a new multiphase gas-liquid or gas-liquid-solid system. The first studies of two phase (liquid-solid) inverse fluidization were originally published independently by Shimodaira et al. [6], Nikolov et al. [5] and Fan et al. [2]. The main difference between the classic and inverse fluidization is that the solid particle density in the inverse fluidized bed is less than the density of the continuous fluid and therefore the bed is fluidized by a downflow of the fluid. Schematic illustration of both classic and inverse fluidized beds is shown in Figure 1. One of the most important recent applications of fluidized beds is in the field of bioreactor engineering. It is well known that almost all types of microorganisms spontaneously attach themselves to any inert solid surface in contact with the liquid growth media. The microorganisms use exopolysaccharide {open_quotes}bridges{close_quotes} to attach themselves to the solid support and to each other. This structure of microorganisms and exopolysaccharides is known as biofilm. The fluidized bed bioreactors are used primarily for processes in which the fluidized particles are used as an inert solid support. There is a problem when the biofilm microorganisms multiply and the biofilm thickness increase. This limits diffusion of oxygen and/or the organic substrate to the deeper layers of the biofilm. Starvation of the microorganisms at the base of the biofilm causes pieces of the biofilm to detach (Figure 2) and leads to ineffective bioreactor operation. The maximal biofilm thickness at which no diffusional limitation is observed (phase 3 in Figure 2), is usually around 100 {mu}m. Therefore, to operate the bioreactor efficiently, the biofilm thickness should be approximately 100 {mu}m. The use of inverse fluidization can solve this problem. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  4. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Laptop computer sits atop the Experiment Control Computer for a NASA Bioreactor. The flight crew can change operating conditions in the Bioreactor by using the graphical interface on the laptop. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  5. Removal of selected pharmaceuticals, fragrances and endocrine disrupting compounds in a membrane bioreactor and conventional wastewater treatment plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Clara; B. Strenn; O. Gans; E. Martinez; N. Kreuzinger; H. Kroiss

    2005-01-01

    Eight pharmaceuticals, two polycyclic musk fragrances and nine endocrine disrupting chemicals were analysed in several waste water treatment plants (WWTPs). A membrane bioreactor in pilot scale was operated at different solid retention times (SRTs) and the results obtained are compared to conventional activated sludge plants (CASP) operated at different SRTs. The SRT is an important design parameter and its impact

  6. Modelling and dynamic simulation of a moving bed bioreactor using respirometry for the estimation of kinetic parameters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Plattes; D. Fiorelli; S. Gillé; C. Girard; E. Henry; F. Minette; O. O’Nagy; P. M. Schosseler

    2007-01-01

    Respirometry was used for the characterization of active autotrophic and heterotrophic biomass in a pilot scale moving bed bioreactor (MBBR). For this purpose biofilm samples attached to the carrier elements of the MBBR were transferred to a static gas\\/static liquid type respirometer with intermittent aeration. Known amounts of ammonia nitrogen and acetate were added to the respirometer. The dissolved oxygen

  7. A two-compartment bioreactor system made of commercial parts for bioprocess scale-down studies: impact of oscillations on Bacillus subtilis fed-batch cultivations.

    PubMed

    Junne, Stefan; Klingner, Arne; Kabisch, Johannes; Schweder, Thomas; Neubauer, Peter

    2011-08-01

    This study describes an advanced version of a two-compartment scale-down bioreactor that simulates inhomogeneities present in large-scale industrial bioreactors on the laboratory scale. The system is made of commercially available parts and is suitable for sterilization with steam. The scale-down bioreactor consists of a usual stirred tank bioreactor (STR) and a plug flow reactor (PFR) equipped with static mixer modules. The PFR module with a working volume of 1.2 L is equipped with five sample ports, and pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) sensors. The concept was applied using the non-sporulating Bacillus subtilis mutant strain AS3, characterized by a SpoIIGA gene knockout. In a fed-batch process with a constant feed rate, it is found that oscillating substrate and DO concentration led to diminished glucose uptake, ethanol formation and an altered amino acid synthesis. Sampling at the PFR module allowed the detection of dynamics at different concentrations of intermediates, such as pyruvic acid, lactic acid and amino acids. Results indicate that the carbon flux at excess glucose and low DO concentrations is shifted towards ethanol formation. As a result, the reduced carbon flux entering the tricarboxylic acid cycle is not sufficient to support amino acid synthesis following the oxaloacetic acid branch point. PMID:21751400

  8. Mycelium differentiation and development of Streptomyces coelicolor in lab-scale bioreactors: programmed cell death, differentiation, and lysis are closely linked to undecylprodigiosin and actinorhodin production.

    PubMed

    Rioseras, Beatriz; López-García, María Teresa; Yagüe, Paula; Sánchez, Jesús; Manteca, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Streptomycetes are mycelium-forming bacteria that produce two thirds of clinically relevant secondary metabolites. Secondary metabolite production is activated at specific developmental stages of Streptomyces life cycle. Despite this, Streptomyces differentiation in industrial bioreactors tends to be underestimated and the most important parameters managed are only indirectly related to differentiation: modifications to the culture media, optimization of productive strains by random or directed mutagenesis, analysis of biophysical parameters, etc. In this work the relationship between differentiation and antibiotic production in lab-scale bioreactors was defined. Streptomyces coelicolor was used as a model strain. Morphological differentiation was comparable to that occurring during pre-sporulation stages in solid cultures: an initial compartmentalized mycelium suffers a programmed cell death, and remaining viable segments then differentiate to a second multinucleated antibiotic-producing mycelium. Differentiation was demonstrated to be one of the keys to interpreting biophysical fermentation parameters and to rationalizing the optimization of secondary metabolite production in bioreactors. PMID:24240146

  9. Mycelium differentiation and development of Streptomyces coelicolor in lab-scale bioreactors: Programmed cell death, differentiation, and lysis are closely linked to undecylprodigiosin and actinorhodin production

    PubMed Central

    Rioseras, Beatriz; López-García, María Teresa; Yagüe, Paula; Sánchez, Jesús; Manteca, Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Streptomycetes are mycelium-forming bacteria that produce two thirds of clinically relevant secondary metabolites. Secondary metabolite production is activated at specific developmental stages of Streptomyces life cycle. Despite this, Streptomyces differentiation in industrial bioreactors tends to be underestimated and the most important parameters managed are only indirectly related to differentiation: modifications to the culture media, optimization of productive strains by random or directed mutagenesis, analysis of biophysical parameters, etc. In this work the relationship between differentiation and antibiotic production in lab-scale bioreactors was defined. Streptomyces coelicolor was used as a model strain. Morphological differentiation was comparable to that occurring during pre-sporulation stages in solid cultures: an initial compartmentalized mycelium suffers a programmed cell death, and remaining viable segments then differentiate to a second multinucleated antibiotic-producing mycelium. Differentiation was demonstrated to be one of the keys to interpreting biophysical fermentation parameters and to rationalizing the optimization of secondary metabolite production in bioreactors. PMID:24240146

  10. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Close-up view of the interior of a NASA Bioreactor shows the plastic plumbing and valves (cylinders at right center) to control fluid flow. The rotating wall vessel is at top center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  11. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Biotechnology Refrigerator that preserves samples for use in (or after culturing in) the NASA Bioreactor. The unit is shown extracted from a middeck locker shell and with thermal blankets partially removed. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  12. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Exterior view of the NASA Bioreactor Engineering Development Unit flown on Mir. The rotating wall vessel is behind the window on the face of the large module. Control electronics are in the module at left; gas supply and cooling fans are in the module at back. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  13. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Biotechnology Refrigerator that preserves samples for use in (or after culturing in) the NASA Bioreactor. The unit is shown extracted from a middeck locker shell. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  14. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Electronics control module for the NASA Bioreactor. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  15. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Interior of a Biotechnology Refrigerator that preserves samples for use in (or after culturing in) the NASA Bioreactor. The unit is shown extracted from a middeck locker shell. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  16. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Interior view of the gas supply for the NASA Bioreactor. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  17. Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  18. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The heart of the bioreactor is the rotating wall vessel, shown without its support equipment. Volume is about 125 mL. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  19. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Astronaut John Blaha replaces an exhausted media bag and filled waste bag with fresh bags to continue a bioreactor experiment aboard space station Mir in 1996. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. This image is from a video downlink. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC).

  20. Application of a 22L scale membrane bioreactor and cross-flow ultrafiltration to obtain purified chondroitin.

    PubMed

    Schiraldi, Chiara; Alfano, Alberto; Cimini, Donatella; Rosa, Mario De; Panariello, Andrea; Restaino, Odile F; Rosa, Mario De

    2012-07-01

    Recently, the possibility of producing fructosylated chondroitin from the capsular polysaccharide of Escherichia coli O5:K4:H4, in fed-batch and microfiltration experiments was assessed on a 2 L bioreactor. In this work, a first scale-up step was set on a 22 L membrane reactor with modified baffles to insert ad hoc designed microfiltration modules permanently inside the bioreactor vessel. Moreover, the downstream polysaccharide purification process, recently established on the A¨?KTA cross-flow instrument, was translated to a UNIFLUX-10, a tangential flow filtration system suitable for prepilot scale. In particular, the microfiltered permeates obtained throughout the fermentation, and the supernatant recovered from the centrifuged broth at the end of the process, were treated as two separate samples in the following ultrafiltration procedure, and the differences in the two streams and how these affected the ultrafiltration/diafiltration process performance were analysed. The total amount of K4 capsular polysaccharide was about 85% in the broth and 15% in the microfiltered permeates. However, the downstream treatment was more efficient when applied to the latter. The major contaminant, the lipopolysaccharide, could easily be separated by a mild hydrolysis that also results in the elimination of the unwanted fructosyl residue, which is linked to the C-3 of glucuronic acid residues. The tangential ultrafiltration/diafiltration protocols developed in a previous work were effectively scaled-up, and therefore in this research proof of principle was established for the biotechnological production of chondroitin from the wild-type strain E. coli O5:K4:H4. The complete downstream procedure yielded about 80% chondroitin with 90% purity. PMID:22619212

  1. A greenhouse-scale photosynthetic microbial bioreactor for carbon sequestration in magnesium carbonate minerals.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, Jenine; Power, Ian M; Harrison, Anna L; Dipple, Gregory M; Southam, Gordon

    2014-08-19

    A cyanobacteria dominated consortium collected from an alkaline wetland located near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada accelerated the precipitation of platy hydromagnesite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O] in a linear flow-through experimental model wetland. The concentration of magnesium decreased rapidly within 2 m of the inflow point of the 10-m-long (?1.5 m(2)) bioreactor. The change in water chemistry was monitored over two months along the length of the channel. Carbonate mineralization was associated with extra-cellular polymeric substances in the nutrient-rich upstream portion of the bioreactor, while the lower part of the system, which lacked essential nutrients, did not exhibit any hydromagnesite precipitation. A mass balance calculation using the water chemistry data produced a carbon sequestration rate of 33.34 t of C/ha per year. Amendment of the nutrient deficiency would intuitively allow for increased carbonation activity. Optimization of this process will have application as a sustainable mining practice by mediating magnesium carbonate precipitation in ultramafic mine tailings storage facilities. PMID:25072950

  2. Biomass Production of Hairy Roots of Artemisia annua and Arachis hypogaea in a Scaled-Up Mist Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Ganapathy; Liu, Chunzhao; Towler, Melissa J.

    2014-01-01

    Hairy roots have the potential to produce a variety of valuable small and large molecules. The mist reactor is a gas phase bioreactor that has shown promise for low-cost culture of hairy roots. Using a newer, disposable culture bag, mist reactor performance was studied with two species, Artemisia annua L. and Arachis hypogaea (peanut), at scales from 1 to 20 L. Both species of hairy roots when grown at 1 L in the mist reactor showed growth rates that surpassed that in shake flasks. From the information gleaned at 1 L, Arachis was scaled further to 4 and then 20 L. Misting duty cycle, culture medium flow rate, and timing of when flow rate was increased were varied. In a mist reactor increasing the misting cycle or increasing the medium flow rate are the two alternatives for increased delivery of liquid nutrients to the root bed. Longer misting cycles beyond 2–3 min were generally deemed detrimental to growth. On the other hand, increasing the medium flow rate to the sonic nozzle especially during the exponential phase of root growth (weeks 2–3) was the most important factor for increasing growth rates and biomass yields in the 20 L reactors. A. hypogaea growth in 1 L reactors was ? = 0.173 day?1 with biomass yield of 12.75 g DWL?1. This exceeded that in shake flasks at ? = 0.166 day?1 and 11.10 g DWL?1. Best growth rate and biomass yield at 20 L was ? = 0.147 and 7.77 g DWL?1, which was mainly achieved when medium flow rate delivery was increased. The mist deposition model was further evaluated using this newer reactor design and when the apparent thickness of roots (+hairs) was taken into account, the empirical data correlated with model predictions. Together these results establish the most important conditions to explore for future optimization of the mist bioreactor for culture of hairy roots. PMID:20687140

  3. Bioreactor principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Cells cultured on Earth (left) typically settle quickly on the bottom of culture vessels due to gravity. In microgravity (right), cells remain suspended and aggregate to form three-dimensional tissue. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  4. Two-phase methanization of food wastes in pilot scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joon Pyo Lee; Jin Suk Lee; Soon Chul Park

    1999-01-01

    A 5 ton\\/d pilot scale two-phase anaerobic digester was constructed and tested to treat Korean food wastes in Anyang city near\\u000a Seoul.\\u000a \\u000a The easily degradable presorted food waste was efficiently treated in the two-phase anaerobic digestion process. The waste\\u000a contained in plastic bags was shredded and then screened for the removal of inert materials such as fabrics and plastics,\\u000a and

  5. Manganese and Sulfate Removal from a Synthetic Mine Drainage Through Pilot Scale Bioreactor Batch Experiments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. D. KarathanasisJ; J. D. Edwards; C. D. Barton

    2010-01-01

    Mine drainage is a significant problem in the Appalachian Plateau due to elevated metal and solute concentrations. Most metals\\u000a may be removed by oxidation\\/precipitation or natural buffering, but Mn is more difficult to remove due to its higher solubility.\\u000a Some mine drainages in southeastern Kentucky have average sulfate and Mn concentrations exceeding 1,300 and 30 mg L?1, respectively. Manganese does not readily

  6. Computational study of culture conditions and nutrient supply in a hollow membrane sheet bioreactor for large-scale bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Khademi, Ramin; Mohebbi-Kalhori, Davod; Hadjizadeh, Afra

    2014-03-01

    Successful bone tissue culture in a large implant is still a challenge. We have previously developed a porous hollow membrane sheet (HMSh) for tissue engineering applications (Afra Hadjizadeh and Davod Mohebbi-Kalhori, J Biomed. Mater. Res. Part A [2]). This study aims to investigate culture conditions and nutrient supply in a bioreactor made of HMSh. For this purpose, hydrodynamic and mass transport behavior in the newly proposed hollow membrane sheet bioreactor including a lumen region and porous membrane (scaffold) for supporting and feeding cells with a grooved section for accommodating gel-cell matrix was numerically studied. A finite element method was used for solving the governing equations in both homogenous and porous media. Furthermore, the cell resistance and waste production have been included in a 3D mathematical model. The influences of different bioreactor design parameters and the scaffold properties which determine the HMSh bioreactor performance and various operating conditions were discussed in detail. The obtained results illustrated that the novel scaffold can be employed in the large-scale applications in bone tissue engineering. PMID:24077884

  7. Microbial community analysis of a full-scale membrane bioreactor treating industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, D; Ramdhani, N; Bux, F

    2008-01-01

    A Kubotatrade mark submerged membrane bio-reactor was applied to treat wastewater from a sugar manufacturing industry. To achieve optimal results, fundamental and extended understanding of the microbiology is important. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to evaluate the microbial community present. The majority of cells visualized in the sludge flocs by staining with the DNA fluorochrome DAPI, hybridized strongly with a bacterial probe. Probes specific for the alpha-, beta-, and gamma-subclasses of proteobacteria and high G + C Gram positive bacteria were used to characterize the community structures by in situ hybridization. Sampling was carried out over 12 weeks and samples were fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde for gram positive organisms and ice cold ethanol for gram negative organisms. The activated sludge population usually constitutes about 80 to 90% of proteobacteria. However, in this study it was found that a relatively small amount of proteobacteria was present within the system. No positive hybridization signal was observed with any of the applied eubacterial family- level probes. PMID:19001712

  8. Heavy-metal toxicity phenomena in laboratory-scale ANFLOW bioreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, A.L.

    1982-04-01

    An energy-conserving wastewater treatment system was developed based on an anaerobic, upflow (ANFLOW) bioreactor. Since many applications of the ANFLOW process could involve the treatment of wastewaters containing heavy metals, the potentially toxic effects of these metals on the biological processes occurring in ANFLOW columns (primarily acetogenesis and methanogenesis) were investigated. Both step and pulse inputs of zinc ranging from 100 to 1000 mg/L were added to synthetic wastewaters being treated in ANFLOW columns with 0.057-m/sup 3/ volumes. Column responses were used to develop descriptive models for toxicity phenomena in such systems. It was found that an inhibition function could be defined and used to modify a model based on plugflow with axial dispersion and first-order kinetics for soluble substrate removal. The inhibitory effects of zinc on soluble substrate removal were found to be predominantly associated with its sorption by biosolids. Sorption initially occurred in the lower regions of the column, but was gradually observed in higher regions as the sorption capacity of the lower regions was exhausted. Sorption phenomena could be described with the Freundlich equation. Sorption processes were accompanied by shifts of biological processes to regions higher in the columns. A regenerative process was observed when feeding of wastewaters without zinc was resumed. It was postulated that regeneration could be based on sloughing of layers of biofilms, or other biosolids involved in zinc sorption, followed by continued growth of lower layers of biofilms not involved in heavy-metal sorption.

  9. Analysis of microbial community composition in a lab-scale membrane distillation bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Q; Shuwen, G; Zhang, J; Fane, AG; Kjelleberg, S; Rice, SA; McDougald, D

    2015-01-01

    Aims Membrane distillation bioreactors (MDBR) have potential for industrial applications where wastewater is hot or waste heat is available, but the role of micro-organisms in MDBRs has never been determined, and thus was the purpose of this study. Methods and Results Microbial communities were characterized by bacterial and archaeal 16S and eukaryotic 18S rRNA gene tag-encoded pyrosequencing of DNA obtained from sludge. Taxonomy-independent analysis revealed that bacterial communities had a relatively low richness and diversity, and community composition strongly correlated with conductivity, total nitrogen and bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Taxonomy-dependent analysis revealed that Rubrobacter and Caldalkalibacillus were abundant members of the bacterial community, but no archaea were detected. Eukaryotic communities had a relatively high richness and diversity, and both changes in community composition and abundance of the dominant genus, Candida, correlated with bound EPS. Conclusions Thermophilic MDBR communities were comprised of a low diversity bacterial community and a highly diverse eukaryotic community with no archea detected. Communities exhibited low resilience to changes in operational parameters. Specifically, retenatate nutrient composition and concentration was strongly correlated with the dominant species. Significance and Impact of the Study This study provides an understanding of microbial community diversity in an MDBR, which is fundamental to the optimization of reactor performance. PMID:25604265

  10. Photosynthetic biomass and H2 production by green algae: from bioengineering to bioreactor scale-up.

    PubMed

    Hankamer, Ben; Lehr, Florian; Rupprecht, Jens; Mussgnug, Jan H; Posten, Clemens; Kruse, Olaf

    2007-09-01

    The development of clean borderless fuels is of vital importance to human and environmental health and global prosperity. Currently, fuels make up approximately 67% of the global energy market (total market = 15 TW year(-1)) (Hoffert et al. 1998). In contrast, global electricity demand accounts for only 33% (Hoffert et al. 1998). Yet, despite the importance of fuels, almost all CO(2) free energy production systems under development are designed to drive electricity generation (e.g. clean-coal technology, nuclear, photovoltaic, wind, geothermal, wave and hydroelectric). In contrast, and indeed almost uniquely, biofuels also target the much larger fuel market and so in the future will play an increasingly important role in maintaining energy security (Lal 2005). Currently, the main biofuels that are at varying stages of development include bio-ethanol, liquid carbohydrates [e.g. biodiesel or biomass to liquid (BTL) products], biomethane and bio-H(2). This review is focused on placing bio-H(2) production processes into the context of the current biofuels market and summarizing advances made both at the level of bioengineering and bioreactor design. PMID:18251920

  11. Modeling full-scale osmotic membrane bioreactor systems with high sludge retention and low salt concentration factor for wastewater reclamation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Hyuk; Park, Beomseok; Shon, Ho Kyong; Kim, Suhan

    2015-08-01

    A full-scale model was developed to find optimal design parameters for osmotic membrane bioreactor (OMBR) and reverse osmosis (RO) hybrid system for wastewater reclamation. The model simulates salt accumulation, draw solution dilution and water flux in OMBR with sludge concentrator for high retention and low salt concentration factor. The full-scale OMBR simulation results reveal that flat-sheet module with spacers exhibits slightly higher flux than hollow-fiber; forward osmosis (FO) membrane with high water permeability, low salt permeability, and low resistance to salt diffusion shows high water flux; an optimal water recovery around 50% ensures high flux and no adverse effect on microbial activity; and FO membrane cost decreases and RO energy consumption and product water concentration increases at higher DS flow rates and concentrations. The simulated FO water flux and RO energy consumption ranges from 3.03 to 13.76LMH and 0.35 to 1.39kWh/m(3), respectively. PMID:25840775

  12. WHEY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE PRODUCTION IN A PILOT SCALE TWO-STAGE DIAFILTRATION PROCESS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Barba; F. Beolchini; D. Cifoni; F. Veglió

    2001-01-01

    A pilot scale two-stage batch diafiltration process for whey protein concentrate (WPC) production is presented in this work. This process has two main advantages: a significant water saving with respect to a single-stage diafiltration process and a membrane surface saving with respect to a continuous multistage process. Every unit operation of the process has been experimented in a pilot scale

  13. Gasification of pelletized biomass in a pilot scale downdraft gasifier.

    PubMed

    Simone, Marco; Barontini, Federica; Nicolella, Cristiano; Tognotti, Leonardo

    2012-07-01

    This work presents a pilot-scale investigation aimed at assessing the feasibility and reliability of biomass pellet gasification. Wood sawdust and sunflower seeds pellets were tested in a 200 kW downdraft gasifier operating with air as gasifying agent. The gasification of pelletized biomass led to rather high and unstable pressure drops, reducing the gasifier productivity and stability. Furthermore the generation of fine residues compromised the operation of wet ash removal systems. On the other hand, good syngas compositions (H(2) 17.2%, N(2) 46.0%, CH(4) 2.5%, CO 21.2%, CO(2) 12.6%, and C(2)H(4) 0.4%), specific gas production (2.2-2.4 N m(3) kg(-1)) and cold gas efficiency (67.7-70.0%) were achieved. For these reasons pelletized biomass should be considered only as complementary fuel in co-gasification with other feedstock. PMID:22537399

  14. SAES St 909 pilot scale methane cracking tests

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J. E.; Sessions, H. T. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Pilot scale (0.5 kg) SAES St 909 methane cracking tests were conducted for potential tritium process applications. Up to 1400 hours tests were done at 700 deg.C, 202.7 kPa (1520 torr) with a 0.03 sLPM feed of methane plus impurities, in a 20 vol% hydrogen, balance helium, stream. Carbon dioxide gettered by St 909 can be equated to an equivalent amount of methane gettered, but equating nitrogen to an equivalent amount of methane was nitrogen feed composition dependent. A decreased hydrogen feed increased methane getter rates while a 30 deg.C drop in one furnace zone increased methane emissions by over a factor of 30. The impact of gettered nitrogen can be somewhat minimized if nitrogen feed to the bed has been stopped and sufficient time given to recover the methane cracking rate. (authors)

  15. Pilot-scale verification test for Hanford grout

    SciTech Connect

    Bagaasen, L.M.; Powell, W.J.

    1993-02-01

    The Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) at Hanford, Washington will process the low-level fraction of selected double-shell tank (DST) wastes on the Hanford Site, to produce a cementitious waste form. This facility, which is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford), mixes liquid wastes with cementitious materials and pumps the resulting grout slurry into large [5,300 cubic meters (m{sup 3})] concrete vaults. Once in the vault, the grout cures to produce a waste form that immobilizes radioactive and hazardous constituents through chemical reactions and/or microencapsulation. Although this disposal scheme has several advantages, pouring grout into large vaults raises concerns about how to handle the heat generated from the exothermic hydration reactions that occur as the grout cures. WHC`s current strategy for addressing the problem of hydration heat is to fill the vault in stages and use forced ventilation in the airspace above the grout to speed heat removal. The varying composition of Hanford tank waste requires that each tank be processed in a separate campaign using a grout formulation specifically designed for that waste. The next tank scheduled for treatment is DST 241-AN-106. A four-phase process for developing the grout formulation development process is used to assure that the formulation will meet various processing and waste form requirements. These phases are: (1) laboratory formulation development studies and modeling with simulated wastes, (2) laboratory variability studies with simulated waste, (3) pilot-scale verification tests with simulated wastes, and (4) laboratory verification tests with actual waste. This paper presents an overview of the pilot-scale verification tests conducted as part of the grout formulation development for the 241-AN-106 tank waste. The paper specifically discusses results dealing with (1) the grout slurry critical flow rate and (2) the ability to handle grout hydration heat with forced ventilation.

  16. Odour in composting processes at pilot scale: monitoring and biofiltration.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M C; Serrano, A; Martín, M A; Chica, A F

    2014-08-01

    Although odour emissions associated with the composting process, especially during the hydrolytic stage, are widely known, their impact on surrounding areas is not easily quantifiable, For this reason, odour emissions during the first stage ofcomposting were evaluated by dynamic olfactometry at pilot scale in order to obtain results which can be extrapolated to industrial facilities. The composting was carried out in a commercial dynamic respirometer equipped with two biofilters at pilot scale filled with prunings (Populus) and mature compost obtained from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. Given that the highest odour emissions occur in the first stage of the composting process, this stage was carried out in a closed system to better control the odour emissions, whose maximum value was estimated to be 2.78 ouF S-1 during the experiments. Odour concentration, the dynamic respiration index and temperature showed the same evolution during composting, thus indicating that odour could be a key variable in the monitoring process. Other variables such as total organic carbon (CTOC) and pH were also found to be significant in this study due to their influence over odour emissions. The efficiency of the biofilters (empty bed residence time of 86 s) was determined by quantifying the odour emissions at the inlet and outlet of both biofilters. The moisture content in the biofilters was found to be an important variable for improving odour removal efficiency, while the minimum moisture percentage to obtain successful results was found to be 55% (odour removal efficiency of 95%). PMID:24956758

  17. Pilot scale test of a produced water-treatment system for initial removal of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Enid J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwon, Soondong [UT-AUSTIN; Katz, Lynn [UT-AUSTIN; Kinney, Kerry [UT-AUSTIN

    2008-01-01

    A pilot-scale test to remove polar and non-polar organics from produced water was performed at a disposal facility in Farmington NM. We used surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorbent beds and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) in combination to reduce the organic carbon content of produced water prior to reverse osmosis (RO). Reduction of total influent organic carbon (TOC) to 5 mg/L or less is desirable for efficient RO system operation. Most water disposed at the facility is from coal-bed gas production, with oil production waters intermixed. Up to 20 gal/d of produced water was cycled through two SMZ adsorbent units to remove volatile organic compounds (BTEX, acetone) and semivolatile organic compounds (e.g., napthalene). Output water from the SMZ units was sent to the MBR for removal of the organic acid component of TOC. Removal of inorganic (Mn and Fe oxide) particulates by the SMZ system was observed. The SMZ columns removed up to 40% of the influent TOC (600 mg/L). BTEX concentrations were reduced from the initial input of 70 mg/L to 5 mg/L by the SMZ and to an average of 2 mg/L after the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (input 120-170 mg/L) and TOC (input up to 45 mg/L) were up to 100% and 92%, respectively. The water pH rose from 8.5 to 8.8 following organic acid removal in the MBR; this relatively high pH was likely responsible for observed scaling of the MBR internal membrane. Additional laboratory studies showed the scaling can be reduced by metered addition of acid to reduce the pH. Significantly, organic removal in the MBR was accomplished with a very low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. An earlier engineering evaluation shows produced water treatment by the SMZ/MBR/RO system would cost from $0.13 to $0.20 per bbl at up to 40 gpm. Current estimated disposal costs for produced water are $1.75 to $4.91 per bbl when transportation costs are included, with even higher rates in some regions. Our results suggest that treatment by an SMZ/MBR/RO system may be a feasible alternative to current methods for produced water treatment and disposal.

  18. A urease bioreactor for water reclamation aboard manned spacecraft

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leonard J. Schussel; James E. Atwater

    1995-01-01

    Development of a fixed bed continuous flow bioreactor, utilizing urease immobilized on diatomaceous earth, for decomposition of aqueous urea in a spacecraft closed loop environmental life support system is described. The results of small scale bioreactor experiments investigating the effects of throughput, temperature, pH and conductivity are reported. The design and performance of a full scale bioreactor are also presented.

  19. NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Bioreactor Demonstration System (BDS) comprises an electronics module, a gas supply module, and the incubator module housing the rotating wall vessel and its support systems. Nutrient media are pumped through an oxygenator and the culture vessel. The shell rotates at 0.5 rpm while the irner filter typically rotates at 11.5 rpm to produce a gentle flow that ensures removal of waste products as fresh media are infused. Periodically, some spent media are pumped into a waste bag and replaced by fresh media. When the waste bag is filled, an astronaut drains the waste bag and refills the supply bag through ports on the face of the incubator. Pinch valves and a perfusion pump ensure that no media are exposed to moving parts. An Experiment Control Computer controls the Bioreactor, records conditions, and alerts the crew when problems occur. The crew operates the system through a laptop computer displaying graphics designed for easy crew training and operation. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. See No. 0101825 for a version with major elements labeled, and No. 0103180 for an operational schematic. 0101816

  20. Bacterial Community Dynamics in Full-Scale Activated Sludge Bioreactors: Operational and Ecological Factors Driving Community Assembly and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Valentín-Vargas, Alexis; Toro-Labrador, Gladys; Massol-Deyá, Arturo A.

    2012-01-01

    The assembling of bacterial communities in conventional activated sludge (CAS) bioreactors was thought, until recently, to be chaotic and mostly unpredictable. Studies done over the last decade have shown that specific, and often, predictable random and non-random factors could be responsible for that process. These studies have also motivated a “structure–function” paradigm that is yet to be resolved. Thus, elucidating the factors that affect community assembly in the bioreactors is necessary for predicting fluctuations in community structure and function. For this study activated sludge samples were collected during a one-year period from two geographically distant CAS bioreactors of different size. Combining community fingerprinting analysis and operational parameters data with a robust statistical analysis, we aimed to identify relevant links between system performance and bacterial community diversity and dynamics. In addition to revealing a significant ?-diversity between the bioreactors’ communities, results showed that the largest bioreactor had a less dynamic but more efficient and diverse bacterial community throughout the study. The statistical analysis also suggests that deterministic factors, as opposed to stochastic factors, may have a bigger impact on the community structure in the largest bioreactor. Furthermore, the community seems to rely mainly on mechanisms of resistance and functional redundancy to maintain functional stability. We suggest that the ecological theories behind the Island Biogeography model and the species-area relationship were appropriate to predict the assembly of bacterial communities in these CAS bioreactors. These results are of great importance for engineers and ecologists as they reveal critical aspects of CAS systems that could be applied towards improving bioreactor design and operation. PMID:22880016

  1. Multi-Scale Spatio-Temporal Modeling: Lifelines of Microorganisms in Bioreactors and Tracking Molecules in Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapin, Alexei; Klann, Michael; Reuss, Matthias

    Agent-based models are rigorous tools for simulating the interactions of individual entities, such as organisms or molecules within cells and assessing their effects on the dynamic behavior of the system as a whole. In context with bioprocess and biosystems engineering there are several interesting and important applications. This contribution aims at introducing this strategy with the aid of two examples characterized by striking distinctions in the scale of the individual entities and the mode of their interactions. In the first example a structured-segregated model is applied to travel along the lifelines of single cells in the environment of a three-dimensional turbulent field of a stirred bioreactor. The modeling approach is based on an Euler-Lagrange formulation of the system. The strategy permits one to account for the heterogeneity present in real reactors in both the fluid and cellular phases, respectively. The individual response of the cells to local variations in the extracellular concentrations is pictured by a dynamically structured model of the key reactions of the central metabolism. The approach permits analysis of the lifelines of individual cells in space and time.

  2. Serum-free scaled up expansion and differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells to osteoblasts in suspension bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Alfred, Roz; Gareau, Tia; Krawetz, Roman; Rancourt, Derrick; Kallos, Michael S

    2010-08-01

    The use of embryonic stem cell (ESC) derived cells has emerged as a potential alternative treatment for a number of degenerative diseases, including musculoskeletal diseases. Conventional ESC culturing methods use fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a major supplemental component of culture media, which is undesirable for clinical applications. These cultures are usually performed in small-scale static vessels (gelatin-coated dishes), which limit the number of cells that can be generated. It is essential to develop effective, reproducible protocols for efficient scalable production of ESC-derived cells. Here we present serum-free bioreactor protocols for (1) expansion and (2) differentiation of embryonic stem cells to osteoblasts. Cultivation of mESCs in serum-free media, supplemented with 15% knockout serum replacement (KSR) resulted in a 27.1- and 48.6-fold expansion in static culture and suspension respectively by day 5 of culture. Further induction to osteoblasts with a differentiation cocktail was verified by up-regulation of osterix and osteocalcin. Mineralization was also enhanced, as indicated by an increase in the calcium deposition by osteogenic cells by day 28. These results will serve as the basis for developing protocols with human ESCs as a new treatment alternative for musculoskeletal diseases. PMID:20564618

  3. Nitrification performance and microbial ecology of nitrifying bacteria in a full-scale membrane bioreactor treating TFT-LCD wastewater.

    PubMed

    Whang, Liang-Ming; Wu, Yi-Ju; Lee, Ya-Chin; Chen, Hong-Wei; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Chang, Ming-Yu; Cheng, Sheng-Shung; Hsu, Shu-Fu; Chang, Cheng-Huey; Shen, Wason; Huang, Chung Kai; Fu, Ryan; Chang, Barkley

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated nitrification performance and nitrifying community in one full-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating TFT-LCD wastewater. For the A/O MBR system treating monoethanolamine (MEA) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), no nitrification was observed, due presumably to high organic loading, high colloidal COD, low DO, and low hydraulic retention time (HRT) conditions. By including additional A/O or O/A tanks, the A/O/A/O MBR and the O/A/O MBR were able to perform successful nitrification. The real-time PCR results for quantification of nitrifying populations showed a high correlation to nitrification performance, and can be a good indicator of stable nitrification. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) results of functional gene, amoA, suggest that Nitrosomonas oligotropha-like AOB seemed to be important to a good nitrification in the MBR system. In the MBR system, Nitrobacter- and Nitrospira-like NOB were both abundant, but the low nitrite environment is likely to promote the growth of Nitrospira-like NOB. PMID:22595093

  4. Geophysical monitoring of a field-scale biostimulation pilot project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, J.W., Jr.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Casey, C.C.

    2006-01-01

    The USGS conducted a geophysical investigation in support of a U.S. Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southern Division field-scale biostimulation pilot project at Anoka County Riverfront Park (ACP), downgradient of the Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant, Fridley, Minnesota. The goal of the pilot project is to evaluate subsurface injection of vegetable oil emulsion (VOE) to stimulate microbial degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons. To monitor the emplacement and movement of the VOE and changes in water chemistry resulting from VOE dissolution and/or enhanced biological activity, the USGS acquired cross-hole radar zero-offset profiles, traveltime tomograms, and borehole geophysical logs during five site visits over 1.5 years. Analysis of pre- and postinjection data sets using petrophysical models developed to estimate VOE saturation and changes in total dissolved solids provides insights into the spatial and temporal distribution of VOE and ground water with altered chemistry. Radar slowness-difference tomograms and zero-offset slowness profiles indicate that the VOE remained close to the injection wells, whereas radar attenuation profiles and electromagnetic induction logs indicate that bulk electrical conductivity increased downgradient of the injection zone, diagnostic of changing water chemistry. Geophysical logs indicate that some screened intervals were located above or below zones of elevated dissolved solids; hence, the geophysical data provide a broader context for interpretation of water samples and evaluation of the biostimulation effort. Our results include (1) demonstration of field and data analysis methods for geophysical monitoring of VOE biostimulation and (2) site-specific insights into the spatial and temporal distributions of VOE at the ACP. ?? 2006 National Ground Water Association.

  5. Multimembrane Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Toohyon; Shuler, Michael L.

    1989-01-01

    Set of hydrophilic and hydrophobic membranes in bioreactor allows product of reaction to be separated, while nutrients fed to reacting cells and byproducts removed from them. Separation process requires no externally supplied energy; free energy of reaction sufficient. Membranes greatly increase productivity of metabolizing cells by continuously removing product and byproducts, which might otherwise inhibit reaction, and by continuously adding oxygen and organic nutrients.

  6. [Non-nitrification pathway for NH4+ -N removal in pilot-scale drinking water biological processes].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Ye, Lin; Li, Xu-dong; Zhang, Xiao-jian; Shi, Xu; Liu, Bo; Li, Rui-hua

    2008-04-01

    The non-nitrification pathway for NH4+ -N removal in pilot-scale drinking water biological treatment processes and its possible mechanism were investigated through calculating N and DO stoichiometric balance. With more than 2 mg/L NH4+ -N in the influent, for the fluidized bed bioreactor (FBBR), the total of NH4+ -N, NO2(-) -N, NO3(-) -N in the influent was 0.91 mg/L higher than that in the effluent, and for the biofilter, its DO consumption was 2.90 mg/L less than the stoichiometric amount. The results suggested that nitrogen loss occurred in both reactors and a part of NH4+ -N was removed through non-nitrification pathway. Because the utilization of phosphorus and organic matters was independent of nitrogen loss, the assimilation and denitrification could be excluded from the possible mechanisms. Because the very low C/N in the influent and the accumulation of NO2(-) -N in the reactors were similar with the wastewater biological processes, the "autotrophic removal of nitrogen" was regarded as the most probable non-nitrification pathway. In this mechanism, the couple of short-cut nitrification and ANAMMOX (or OLAND) leading to the transformation of NH4+ -N and NO2(-) -N into gaseous N2 was responsible for the nitrogen loss in drinking water biological processes. PMID:18637337

  7. Evaluation of parallel milliliter-scale stirred-tank bioreactors for the study of biphasic whole-cell biocatalysis with ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Dennewald, Danielle; Hortsch, Ralf; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    As clear structure-activity relationships are still rare for ionic liquids, preliminary experiments are necessary for the process development of biphasic whole-cell processes involving these solvents. To reduce the time investment and the material costs, the process development of such biphasic reaction systems would profit from a small-scale high-throughput platform. Exemplarily, the reduction of 2-octanone to (R)-2-octanol by a recombinant Escherichia coli in a biphasic ionic liquid/water system was studied in a miniaturized stirred-tank bioreactor system allowing the parallel operation of up to 48 reactors at the mL-scale. The results were compared to those obtained in a 20-fold larger stirred-tank reactor. The maximum local energy dissipation was evaluated at the larger scale and compared to the data available for the small-scale reactors, to verify if similar mass transfer could be obtained at both scales. Thereafter, the reaction kinetics and final conversions reached in different reactions setups were analysed. The results were in good agreement between both scales for varying ionic liquids and for ionic liquid volume fractions up to 40%. The parallel bioreactor system can thus be used for the process development of the majority of biphasic reaction systems involving ionic liquids, reducing the time and resource investment during the process development of this type of applications. PMID:22079751

  8. APPLYING FABRIC FILTRATION TO REFUSE-FIRED BOILERS: A PILOT-SCALE INVESTIGATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a pilot-scale investigation to determine the techno-economic feasibility of applying fabric filter dust collectors to solid refuse fired boilers. The pilot facility, installed on a slipstream of a 135,000 lb/hr boiler, was sized to handle 9000 acfm at ...

  9. The Development, Test, and Evaluation of Three Pilot Performance Reference Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Walter R.; And Others

    A set of pilot performance reference scales was developed based upon airborne Audio-Video Recording (AVR) of student performance in T-37 undergraduate Pilot Training. After selection of the training maneuvers to be studied, video tape recordings of the maneuvers were selected from video tape recordings already available from a previous research…

  10. EVALUATION OF SOLIDS DEWATERING FOR A PILOT-SCALE THIOSORBIC LIME SO2 SCRUBBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of solids dewatering for a pilot-scale thiosorbic lime SO2 scrubber. Pilot plant data showed that the dissolved magnesium in thiosorbic lime caused deterioration of solids dewatering properties. The slurry settling rate increased when the ...

  11. Pilot scale experiments on radiation vulcanization of NR latex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridwan, M.

    The potential of irradiated latex as raw material of commercial use is under testing on pilot plant scale in Indonesia which has 225 kCi Co-60 irradiation facility and can irradiate 1000 tonnes of centrifuged latex per annum. The facility was jointly designed by BATAN of Indonesia and JAERI of Japan and was jointly financed by UNDP/IAEA, Government of Japan and Government of Indonesia under UNDP/IAEA Regional Cooperative Agreement Project on Industrial Application of Isotopes and Radiation Technology. The facility is a water pool type and can accomodate 400 kCi Co-60. The Co-60 rack has two shapes, plate and cylindrical shapes. The plate shape source is used for natural rubber latex irradiation and the cylindrical one is used for other irradiation services. The vulcanization system consists of three major components : emulsification unit ( height : 650 mm, diameter 500 mm ), mixing unit ( height : 1900mm, diameter 1200 mm ) and vulcanization reactor ( height : 1800 mm, diameter 1300 mm ). The first two components are located outside shielded room while the third one-in irradiation room. The radiation vulcanization process is a much simpler energy saving process comparedto the conventional thermal process which has two vulcanization steps before and after dipping. The physical and mechanical properties of irradiated NR Latex are comparable to those of sulfur vulcanized, and depend on many factors such as irradiation dose, sensitizer content, dry rubber content and storage time.

  12. Pilot-scale LIDS demonstration. Final report No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Amrhein, G.T. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH (United States). Research and Development Div.

    1991-08-09

    This paper describes the results of a pilot-scale demonstration of the LIDS process sponsored by the Ohio Coal Development office (OCDO) and Babcock & Wilcox (B&W)- LIDS (Limestone Injection with Dry Scrubbing) combines the technologies of furnace sorbent injection and dry scrubbing. The result is a reduction of reagent costs and an increase in sorbent utilization and S0{sub 2} removal beyond what is possible if the technologies are used separately. Furnace sorbent injection using limestone is only capable of about 30% S0{sub 2} reduction and so has limited application. Dry scrubbing is capable of achieving high levels Of S0{sub 2} removal using expensive pebble lime as the sorbent, but is limited by stoichiometry (Ca/S) to use on low sulfur coal. By combining dry scrubbing with furnace sorbent injection, limestone can be used as the reagent and the process is applicable to higher sulfur coals. This is possible because: (1) the reaction that occurs during furnace injection significantly reduces the S0{sub 2} concentration entering the dry scrubber, and (2) the unused limestone from furnace injection is calcined to lime and makes an excellent dry scrubbing reagent. The project successfully demonstrated that LIDS is a viable, low-cost option for controlling SO{sub 2} emissions from coal-fired utility boilers.

  13. Supervisory control of a pilot-scale cooling loop

    SciTech Connect

    Kris Villez; Venkat Venkatasubramanian; Humberto Garcia

    2011-08-01

    We combine a previously developed strategy for Fault Detection and Identification (FDI) with a supervisory controller in closed loop. The combined method is applied to a model of a pilot-scale cooling loop of a nuclear plant, which includes Kalman filters and a model-based predictive controller as part of normal operation. The system has two valves available for flow control meaning that some redundancy is available. The FDI method is based on likelihood ratios for different fault scenarios which in turn are derived from the application of the Kalman filter. A previously introduced extension of the FDI method is used here to enable detection and identification of non-linear faults like stuck valve problems and proper accounting of the time of fault introduction. The supervisory control system is designed so to take different kinds of actions depending on the status of the fault diagnosis task and on the type of identified fault once diagnosis is complete. Some faults, like sensor bias and drift, are parametric in nature and can be adjusted without need for reconfiguration of the regulatory control system. Other faults, like a stuck valve problem, require reconfiguration of the regulatory control system. The whole strategy is demonstrated for several scenarios.

  14. Bag Bioreactor Based on Wave-Induced Motion: Characteristics and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Regine; Werner, Sören; Eibl, Dieter

    Today wave-mixed bag bioreactors are common devices in modern biotechnological processes where simple, safe and flexible production has top priority. Numerous studies that have been published on ex vivo generation of cells, viruses and therapeutic agents during the last 10 years have confirmed their suitability and even superiority to stirred bioreactors made from glass or stainless steel for animal as well as plant cell cultivations. In these studies the wave-mixed bag bioreactors enabled middle to high cell density and adequate productivity in laboratory and pilot scale. This mainly results from low-shear conditions and highly efficient oxygen transfer for cell cultures, as demonstrated for the widely used BioWave®.Starting with an overview of wave-mixed bag bioreactors and their common operation strategies, this chapter delineates engineering aspects of BioWave®, which like Wave Reactor™ and BIOSTAT®CultiBag RM originates from the prototype of a wave-mixed bag bioreactor introduced in 1998. Subsequently, the second part of the chapter focuses on reported BioWave® applications. Conditions and results from cultivations with animal cells, plant cells, microbial cells and nematodes are presented and discussed.

  15. PILOT-SCALE STUDIES ON THE INCINERATION OF ELECTRONICS INDUSTRY WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes experiments performed on a pilot-scale rotary kiln incinerator to investigate the emissions and operational behavior during the incineration of consumer electronics waste. These experiments were targeted at destroying the organic components of printed circuit ...

  16. NOX REMOVAL WITH COMBINED SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION AND SELECTIVE NONCATALYTIC REDUCTION: PILOT- SCALE TEST RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot-scale tests were conducted to develop a combined nitrogen oxide (NOx) reduction technology using both selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR). A commercially available vanadium-and titatnium-based composite honeycomb catalyst and enh...

  17. Instrumentation and Evaluation of a Pilot Scale Fluidized Bed Biomass Gasification System 

    E-print Network

    Maglinao, Amado L

    2009-12-04

    A pilot scale fluidized bed biomass gasifier developed at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas was instrumented with thermocouples, pressure transducers and motor controllers for monitoring gasification temperature and pressure, air flow...

  18. CHLORINE DECAY AND BIOFILM STUDIES IN A PILOT SCALE DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION DEAD END PIPE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine decay experiments using a pilot-scale water distribution dead end pipe system were conducted to define relationships between chlorine decay and environmental factors. These included flow rate, biomass concentration and biofilm density, and initial chlorine concentrations...

  19. Pilot-scale hybrid bio-diatomite\\/dynamic membrane reactor for slightly polluted raw water purification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhenxun Yu; Huaqiang Chu; Dawen Cao; Yanqiang Ma; Bingzhi Dong; Yong Wei

    This study investigated the performance and mechanisms of a novel pilot-scale bio-diatomite dynamic membrane reactor (BDDMR) for slightly polluted surface water treatment in continuous-flow mode. The results revealed that the pilot-scale BDDMR was very effective at reducing particle number and removing turbidity, chemical oxygen demand (CODMn), UV absorbance at 254nm (UV254), NH3-N and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) with a hydraulic

  20. Pilot-Scale Demonstration of ALTA for NOx Control in Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Fry; Devin Davis; Marc Cremer; Bradley Adams

    2008-01-01

    This report describes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and pilot-scale testing conducted to demonstrate the ability of the Advanced Layered Technology Approach (ALTA) to reduce NO emissions in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. Testing specifically focused on characterizing NO behavior with deep burner staging combined with Rich Reagent Injection (RRI). Tests were performed in a 4 MBtu\\/hr pilot-scale furnace at

  1. Pilot-Scale Fermentation and Laboratory Nutrient Studies on Mixed-Acid Fermentation

    E-print Network

    Smith, Aaron Douglas

    2011-08-08

    PILOT-SCALE FERMENTATION AND LABORATORY NUTRIENT STUDIES ON MIXED-ACID FERMENTATION A Dissertation by AARON DOUGLAS SMITH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2011 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering PILOT-SCALE FERMENTATION AND LABORATORY NUTRIENT STUDIES ON MIXED-ACID FERMENTATION A Dissertation by AARON DOUGLAS SMITH...

  2. Pilot scale experiment with MBR operated in intermittent aeration condition: analysis of biological performance.

    PubMed

    Capodici, M; Di Bella, G; Di Trapani, D; Torregrossa, M

    2015-02-01

    The effect of intermittent aeration (IA) on a MBR system was investigated. The study was aimed at analyzing different working conditions and the influence of different IA cycles on the biological performance of the MBR pilot plant, in terms of organic carbon and ammonium removal as well as extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) production. The membrane modules were placed in a separate compartment, continuously aerated. This configuration allowed to disconnect from the filtration stage the biological phenomena occurring into the IA bioreactor. The observed results highlighted good efficiencies, in terms of organic carbon and ammonium removal. It was noticed a significant soluble microbial products (SMPs) release, likely related to the higher metabolic stress that anoxic conditions exerted on the biomass. However, the proposed configuration, with the membranes in a separate compartment, allowed to reduce the EPSs in the membrane tank even during the non-aerated phase, thus lowering fouling development. PMID:25483989

  3. A pilot-scale radioactive test using in situ vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Timmerman, C.L.; Oma, K.M.

    1985-11-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing in situ vitrification (ISV) as a potential remedial action technique for previously disposed radioactive liquid drain sites. The process melts the contaminated soil to produce a durable glass and crystalline waste form and encapsulates the radionuclides. The development of this alternative technology is being performed for the US Department of Energy. The results of an ISV pilot-scale test conducted in June 1983 are discussed in which soils contaminated with actual radioactive transuranic and mixed fission product elements were vitrified. The test successfully demonstrated the containment of radionuclides during processing, both within the vitrified mass and in the off-gas system. No environmental release of radioactive material was detectable during testing operations. The vitrified soil retained >99% of all radionuclides. Losses to the offgas system varied from less than or equal to 0.03% for particulate materials (plutonium and strontium) to 0.8% for cesium, which is a more volatile element. The off-gas system effectively contained both volatile and entrained radioactive materials. Analysis of the vitrified soil revealed that all radionuclides were distributed throughout the vitrified zone, some more uniformly than others. Analysis of soil samples taken adjacent to the block indicated that no migration of radionuclides outside the vitrification zone occurred. Leaching studies have shown that the ISV process generates a highly durable waste form, comparable to Pyrex and granite. Based on geologic data from the hydration of obsidian, which is chemically similar to the ISV glass, the hydration or weathering rate is predicted to be much less than 1 mm in 10,000 yr.

  4. In situ vitrification pilot-scale radioactive test

    SciTech Connect

    Timmerman, C.L.; Oma, K.H.

    1984-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing in situ vitrification (ISV) as an in-place stabilization technique for selected liquid radioactive waste disposal sites. The process melts the wastes and surrounding soil to produce a durable glass and crystalline waste form. These ISV process development testing and evaluation studies are being conducted for the US Department of Energy. The results of an ISV pilot-scale test conducted in June of 1983 in which soils contaminated with actual radioactive transuranic and mixed fission product elements were vitrified are discussed. The primary objectives of the radioactive test were to: demonstrate containment and confinement of the radioactive material; verify equipment performance of the power and off-gas systems; identify losses to the off-gas system; and characterize the behavior of the radioactive material in the vitrified soil. The test successfully demonstrated the processing containment of radionuclides both within the vitrified mass and in the off-gas system. No environmental release of radioactive material was measured during testing operations. The vitrified soil had a greater than 99% retention of all radionuclides. Losses to the off-gas system varied from less than or equal to 0.03% for particulate materials (plutonium and strontium) to 0.8% for cesium which is a more volatile element. The off-gas system effectively contained both volatile and entrained radioactive materials. Analysis of the vitrified soil revealed that all radionuclides were distributed throughout the vitrified zone, some more uniformly than others. No migration of radionuclides outside the vitrification zone occurred, as indicated by analysis of soil samples from around the block. Previous waste form leaching studies indicate an acceptable durability of the ISV product. 8 references, 34 figures, 8 tables.

  5. Fate of Escherichia coli O157:H7 during composting of bovine manure in a laboratory-scale bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiuping; Morgan, Jennie; Doyle, Michael P

    2003-01-01

    Inactivation profiles of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in inoculated bovine manure-based compost ingredients were determined by composting these ingredients in a bioreactor under controlled conditions. A 15-liter bioreactor was constructed to determine the fate of E. coli O157:H7 and changes in pH, moisture content, temperature, and aerobic mesophilic and thermophilic bacterial counts during composting. Fresh cow manure, wheat straw, cottonseed meal, and ammonium sulfate were combined to obtain a moisture content of ca. 60% and a carbon/nitrogen ratio of 29:1. The compost ingredients were held in the bioreactor at a constant external temperature of 21 or 50 degrees C. Self-heating of the ingredients due to microbial activity occurred during composting, with stratified temperatures occurring within the bioreactor. At an external temperature of 21 degrees C, self-heating occurred for 0 to 3 days, depending on the location within the bioreactor. E. coli O157:H7 populations increased by 1 to 2 log10 CFU/g during the initial 24 h of composting and decreased by ca. 3.5 log10 CFU/g near the bottom of the bioreactor and by ca. 2 log10 CFU/g near the middle and at the top during 36 days of composting. At an external temperature of 50 degrees C. E. coli O157:H7 was inactivated rapidly (by ca. 4.9 log10 CFU/g at the top of the bioreactor, by 4.0 log10 CFU/g near the middle, and by 5.9 log10 CFU/g near the bottom) within 24 h of composting. When inoculated at an initial level of ca. 10(7) CFU/g. E. coli O157:H7 survived for 7 days but not for 14 days at all three sampling locations, as indicated by either direct plating or enrichment culture. At the top of the bioreactor a relatively constant moisture content of 60% was maintained, whereas the moisture content near the bottom decreased steadily to 37 to 45% over 14 days of composting. The pH of the composting mixture decreased to ca. 6 within 1 to 3 days and subsequently increased to 8 to 9. Results obtained in this study indicate that large populations (10(4) to 10(7) CFU/g) of E coli O157:H7 survived for 36 days during composting in a bioreactor at an external temperature of 21 degrees C but were inactivated to undetectable levels after 7 to 14 days when the external temperature of the bioreactor was 50 degrees C. Hence, manure contaminated with large populations (e.g., 10(7) CFU/g) of E. coli O157:H7 should be composted for more than 1 week, and preferably for 2 weeks, when held at a minimum temperature of 50 degrees C. PMID:12540177

  6. Cr(VI) and COD removal from landfill leachate by polyculture constructed wetland at a pilot scale.

    PubMed

    Madera-Parra, C A; Peña, M R; Peña, E J; Lens, P N L

    2014-09-26

    Four subsurface horizontal-flow constructed wetlands (CWs) at a pilot scale planted with a polyculture of the tropical plants Gynerium sagittatum (Gs), Colocasia esculenta (Ce) and Heliconia psittacorum (He) were evaluated for 7 months. The CW cells with an area of 17.94 m(2) and 0.60 m (h) each and 0.5 m of gravel were operated at continuous gravity flow (Q?=?0.5 m(3) day(-1)) and a theoretical HRT of 7 days each and treating landfill leachate for the removal of filtered chemical oxygen demand (CODf), BOD5, TKN, NH4 (+), NO3 (-), PO4 (3-)-P and Cr(VI). Three CWs were divided into three sections, and each section (5.98 m(2)) was seeded with 36 cuttings of each species (plant density of six cuttings per square metre). The other unit was planted randomly. The final distributions of plants in the bioreactors were as follows: CW I (He-Ce-Gs), CW II (randomly), CW III (Ce-Gs-He) and CW IV (Gs-He-Ce). The units received effluent from a high-rate anaerobic pond (BLAAT®). The results show a slightly alkaline and anoxic environment in the solid-liquid matrix (pH?=?8.0; 0.5-2 mg L(-1) dissolved oxygen (DO)). CODf removal was 67 %, BOD5 80 %, and TKN and NH4 (+) 50-57 %; NO3 (-) effluents were slightly higher than the influent, PO4 (3-)-P (38 %) and Cr(VI) between 50 and 58 %. CW IV gave the best performance, indicating that plant distribution may affect the removal capacity of the bioreactors. He and Gs were the plants exhibiting a translocation factor (TF) of Cr(VI) >1. The evaluated plants demonstrated their suitability for phytoremediation of landfill leachate, and all of them can be categorized as Cr(VI) accumulators. The CWs also showed that they could be a low-cost operation as a secondary system for treatment of intermediated landfill leachate (LL). PMID:25253061

  7. Pilot-scale cooling tower to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies for cooling system makeup water.

    PubMed

    Chien, S H; Hsieh, M K; Li, H; Monnell, J; Dzombak, D; Vidic, R

    2012-02-01

    Pilot-scale cooling towers can be used to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies when using particular cooling system makeup water and particular operating conditions. To study the potential for using a number of different impaired waters as makeup water, a pilot-scale system capable of generating 27,000 kJ?h heat load and maintaining recirculating water flow with a Reynolds number of 1.92 × 10(4) was designed to study these critical processes under conditions that are similar to full-scale systems. The pilot-scale cooling tower was equipped with an automatic makeup water control system, automatic blowdown control system, semi-automatic biocide feeding system, and corrosion, scaling, and biofouling monitoring systems. Observed operational data revealed that the major operating parameters, including temperature change (6.6 °C), cycles of concentration (N = 4.6), water flow velocity (0.66 m?s), and air mass velocity (3660 kg?h m(2)), were controlled quite well for an extended period of time (up to 2 months). Overall, the performance of the pilot-scale cooling towers using treated municipal wastewater was shown to be suitable to study critical processes (corrosion, scaling, biofouling) and evaluate cooling water management strategies for makeup waters of complex quality. PMID:22380105

  8. Fermentation Bench-scale to pilot-scale capabilities for the conversion of biomass to sugars, fuels, and chemicals

    E-print Network

    Fermentation Bench-scale to pilot-scale capabilities for the conversion of biomass to sugars, fuels 40 30 20 10 0 Concentration(g/L) 0 2 4 6 Time (days) Fermentation applications · Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation testing - Different enzyme mixtures - Pretreated lignocellulosic feedstocks at low and high solids

  9. Pilot-scale cooling tower to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies for cooling system makeup water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, S. H.; Hsieh, M. K.; Li, H.; Monnell, J.; Dzombak, D.; Vidic, R.

    2012-02-01

    Pilot-scale cooling towers can be used to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies when using particular cooling system makeup water and particular operating conditions. To study the potential for using a number of different impaired waters as makeup water, a pilot-scale system capable of generating 27 000 kJ/h heat load and maintaining recirculating water flow with a Reynolds number of 1.92 × 104 was designed to study these critical processes under conditions that are similar to full-scale systems. The pilot-scale cooling tower was equipped with an automatic makeup water control system, automatic blowdown control system, semi-automatic biocide feeding system, and corrosion, scaling, and biofouling monitoring systems. Observed operational data revealed that the major operating parameters, including temperature change (6.6 °C), cycles of concentration (N = 4.6), water flow velocity (0.66 m/s), and air mass velocity (3660 kg/h m2), were controlled quite well for an extended period of time (up to 2 months). Overall, the performance of the pilot-scale cooling towers using treated municipal wastewater was shown to be suitable to study critical processes (corrosion, scaling, biofouling) and evaluate cooling water management strategies for makeup waters of complex quality.

  10. Nitrogen removal and spatial distribution of denitrifier and anammox communities in a bioreactor for mine drainage treatment.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Roger B; Winbjörk, Harry; Hellman, Maria; Hallin, Sara

    2014-12-01

    Mine drainage water may contain high levels of nitrate (NO3(-)) due to undetonated nitrogen-based explosives. The removal of NO3(-) and nitrite (NO2(-)) in cold climates through the microbial process of denitrification was evaluated using a pilot-scale fixed-bed bioreactor (27 m(3)). Surface water was diverted into the above-ground bioreactor filled with sawdust, crushed rock, and sewage sludge. At hydraulic residence times of ca.15 h and with the addition of acetate, NO3(-) and NO2(-) were removed to below detection levels at a NO3(-) removal rate of 5-10 g N m(-3) (bioreactor material) d(-1). The functional groups contributing to nitrogen removal in the bioreactor were studied by quantifying nirS and nirK present in denitrifying bacteria, nosZI and nosZII genes from the nitrous oxide - reducing community, and a taxa-specific part of the16S rRNA gene for the anammox community. The abundances of nirS and nirK were almost 2 orders of magnitude greater than the anammox specific 16S rRNA gene, indicating that denitrification was the main process involved in nitrogen removal. The spatial distribution of the quantified genes was heterogeneous in the bioreactor, with trends observed in gene abundance as a function of depth, distance from the bioreactor inlet, and along specific flowpaths. There was a significant relationship between the abundance of nirS, nirK, and nosZI genes and depth in the bioreactor, such that the abundance of organisms containing these genes may be controlled by oxygen diffusion and substrate supply in the partially or completely water-saturated material. Among the investigated microbial functional groups, nirS and anammox bacterial 16S rRNA genes exhibited a systematic trend of decreasing and increasing abundance, respectively, with distance from the inlet, which suggested that the functional groups respond differently to changing environmental conditions. The greater abundance of nirK along central flowpaths may indicate that the bioreactor design favored preferential flow along these flowpaths, away from the sides of the bioreactor. An improved bioreactor design should consider the role of preferential flowpaths and the heterogeneous distribution of the genetic potential for denitrification, nitrous oxide reduction and anammox on bioreactor function. PMID:25233117

  11. Performance of a pilot?scale, three?stage constructed wetland system for domestic wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bilal Tunçsiper; Selma Ayaz; Lütfi Akça; Kemal Gunes

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of season, organic matter loadings, hydraulic conditions, recycling, and rapid drainage on water quality in a pilot?scale, three?stage subsurface flow constructed wetland (SSF CW) system. The pilot CW system consisted of a vertical flow?gravel filtration (v?GF) wetland in the first stage, a horizontal?subsurface flow (h?SSF) bed planted with Iris in the second stage, and a

  12. Swine manure-based pilot-scale algal biomass production system for fuel production and wastewater treatment--a case study.

    PubMed

    Min, Min; Hu, Bing; Mohr, Michael J; Shi, Aimin; Ding, Jinfeng; Sun, Yong; Jiang, Yongcheng; Fu, Zongqiang; Griffith, Richard; Hussain, Fida; Mu, Dongyan; Nie, Yong; Chen, Paul; Zhou, Wenguang; Ruan, Roger

    2014-02-01

    Integration of wastewater treatment with algae cultivation is one of the promising ways to achieve an economically viable and environmentally sustainable algal biofuel production on a commercial scale. This study focused on pilot-scale algal biomass production system development, cultivation process optimization, and integration with swine manure wastewater treatment. The areal algal biomass productivity for the cultivation system that we developed ranged from 8.08 to 14.59 and 19.15-23.19 g/m(2) × day, based on ash-free dry weight and total suspended solid (TSS), respectively, which were higher than or comparable with those in literature. The harvested algal biomass had lipid content about 1.77-3.55%, which was relatively low, but could be converted to bio-oil via fast microwave-assisted pyrolysis system developed in our lab. The lipids in the harvested algal biomass had a significantly higher percentage of total unsaturated fatty acids than those grown in lab conditions, which may be attributed to the observed temperature and light fluctuations. The nutrient removal rate was highly correlated to the biomass productivity. The NH?-N, TN, COD, and PO?-P reduction rates for the north-located photo-bioreactor (PBR-N) in July were 2.65, 3.19, 7.21, and 0.067 g/m(2) × day, respectively, which were higher than those in other studies. The cultivation system had advantages of high mixotrophic growth rate, low operating cost, as well as reduced land footprint due to the stacked-tray bioreactor design used in the study. PMID:24203276

  13. Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone Yuan Ma-scale reactors were operated at the LaPrairie Wastewater Treatment plant (one control and one ozonated, Dominic Frigon Department of Civil EngineeringINTRODUCTION Activated sludge treatment processes produce

  14. BIOENERGY AND BIOFUELS Performance of a pilot-scale continuous flow microbial

    E-print Network

    BIOENERGY AND BIOFUELS Performance of a pilot-scale continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell fed-scale (1,000 L) continuous flow micro- bial electrolysis cell was constructed and tested for current performance. Keywords Biohydrogen . Biomethane . Bioelectricity. Microbial electrolysis cell . Bioenergy

  15. PILOT SCALE PROCESS EVALUATION OF REBURNING FOR IN-FURNACE NOX REDUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of coal and natural gas reburning application tests to a pilot scale 3.0 MWt furnace to provide the scaling information required for commercial application of reburning to pulverized-coal-fired boilers. Initial parametric studies had been conducted in a 2...

  16. The Student-Teacher Relationship Scale: Results of a Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pianta, Robert C.; Nimetz, Sheri L.

    This study reports the results of a pilot study of the relationship between teachers and students. The study used a newly developed measure: The Student-Teacher Relationship Scale (STRS). In a sample of 72 kindergarten children, the STRS was found to have three factors: Secure, Change, and Insecure. The total scale and the subscales based on these…

  17. Anaerobic Granular Sludge Bioreactor Technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon McHugh; Caroline O'Reilly; Thérèse Mahony; Emer Colleran; Vincent O'Flaherty

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a mature wastewater treatment technology, with worldwide application. The predominantly applied bioreactor designs, such as the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket and expanded granular sludge bed, are based on the spontaneous formation of granular sludge. Despite the exploitation of granular reactors at full-scale for more than two decades, the mechanisms of granulation are not completely understood and numerous

  18. High-solids anaerobic digestion: comparison of three pilot scales.

    PubMed

    Guendouz, J; Buffière, P; Cacho, J; Carrère, M; Delgenes, J-P

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments were undertaken in three different experimental set-ups in order to compare them: an industrial 21-m3 pilot reactor, a new 40-l laboratory pilot reactor and bmp type plasma bottles. Three consecutive batch dry digestion tests of municipal solid waste were performed under mesophilic conditions with the same feedstock in all vessels. Biogas and methane production at the end of the tests were similar (around 200 m3 CH4STP/tVS) for both pilot reactors and were different from the bottle tests. The dynamics of methane production and VFA accumulation concurred. However, the maximal levels of VFA transitory accumulation varied between reactors and between runs in a same reactor. Ammonia levels were similar in both reactors. These results show that the new reactor accurately imitates the conditions found in the larger one. Adaptation of microorganisms to the waste and operating conditions was also pointed out along the consecutive batches. Thermophilic semi-continuous tests were performed in both reactors with similar conditions. The methane production efficiencies were similar. PMID:19029716

  19. Construction and economics of a pilot/full-scale biological trickling filter reactor for the removal of volatile organic compounds from polluted air.

    PubMed

    Deshusses, M A; Webster, T S

    2000-11-01

    The design and the construction of an actual 8.7-m3 pilot/full-scale biotrickling filter for waste air treatment is described and compared with a previous conceptual scale-up of a laboratory reactor. The reactor construction costs are detailed and show that about one-half of the total reactor costs ($97,000 out of $178,000) was for personnel and engineering time, whereas approximately 20% was for monitoring and control equipment. A detailed treatment cost analysis demonstrated that, for an empty bed contact time of 90 sec, the overall treatment costs (including capital charges) were as low as $8.7/1000 m3air in the case where a nonchlorinated volatile organic compound (VOC) was treated, and $14/1000 m3air for chlorinated compounds such as CH2Cl2. Comparison of these costs with conventional air pollution control techniques demonstrates excellent perspectives for more field applications of biotrickling filters. As the specific costs of building and operating biotrickling filter reactors decrease with increasing size of the reactor, the cost benefit of biotrickling filtration is expected to increase for full technical-scale bioreactors. PMID:11111339

  20. Nitrosamines in pilot-scale and full-scale wastewater treatment plants with ozonation.

    PubMed

    Gerrity, Daniel; Pisarenko, Aleksey N; Marti, Erica; Trenholm, Rebecca A; Gerringer, Fred; Reungoat, Julien; Dickenson, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Ozone-based treatment trains offer a sustainable option for potable reuse applications, but nitrosamine formation during ozonation poses a challenge for municipalities seeking to avoid reverse osmosis and high-dose ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Six nitrosamines were monitored in full-scale and pilot-scale wastewater treatment trains. The primary focus was on eight treatment trains employing ozonation of secondary or tertiary wastewater effluents, but two treatment trains with chlorination or UV disinfection of tertiary wastewater effluent and another with full advanced treatment (i.e., reverse osmosis and advanced oxidation) were also included for comparison. N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) were the most prevalent nitrosamines in untreated (up to 89 ng/L and 67 ng/L, respectively) and treated wastewater. N-nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) were detected at one facility each, while N-nitrosodipropylamine (NDPrA) and N-nitrosodibutylamine (NDBA) were less than their method reporting limits (MRLs) in all samples. Ozone-induced NDMA formation ranging from <10 to 143 ng/L was observed at all but one site, but the reasons for the variation in formation remain unclear. Activated sludge, biological activated carbon (BAC), and UV photolysis were effective for NDMA mitigation. NMOR was also removed with activated sludge but did not form during ozonation. PMID:25037928

  1. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Topical report: Bioreactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, R.; Klasson, K.T.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the proposed research is to develop a technically and economically feasible process for biologically producing H{sub 2} from synthesis gas while, at the same time, removing harmful sulfur gas compounds. Six major tasks are being studied: culture development, where the best cultures are selected and conditions optimized for simultaneous hydrogen production and sulfur gas removal; mass transfer and kinetic studies in which equations necessary for process design are developed; bioreactor design studies, where the cultures chosen in Task 1 are utilized in continuous reaction vessels to demonstrate process feasibility and define operating conditions; evaluation of biological synthesis gas conversion under limiting conditions in preparation for industrial demonstration studies; process scale-up where laboratory data are scaled to larger-size units in preparation for process demonstration in a pilot-scale unit; and economic evaluation, where process simulations are used to project process economics and identify high cost areas during sensitivity analyses. The purpose of this report is to present results from bioreactor studies involving H{sub 2} production by water gas shift and H{sub 2}S removal to produce elemental sulfur. Many of the results for H{sub 2} production by Rhodospirillum rubrum have been presented during earlier contracts. Thus, this report concentrates mainly on H{sub 2}S conversion to elemental sulfur by R. rubrum.

  2. Membrane bio-reactor for textile wastewater treatment plant upgrading.

    PubMed

    Lubello, C; Gori, R

    2005-01-01

    Textile industries carry out several fiber treatments using variable quantities of water, from five to forty times the fiber weight, and consequently generate large volumes of wastewater to be disposed of. Membrane Bio-reactors (MBRs) combine membrane technology with biological reactors for the treatment of wastewater: micro or ultrafiltration membranes are used for solid-liquid separation replacing the secondary settling of the traditional activated sludge system. This paper deals with the possibility of realizing a new section of one existing WWTP (activated sludge + clariflocculation + ozonation) for the treatment of treating textile wastewater to be recycled, equipped with an MBR (76 l/s as design capacity) and running in parallel with the existing one. During a 4-month experimental period, a pilot-scale MBR proved to be very effective for wastewater reclamation. On average, removal efficiency of the pilot plant (93% for COD, and over 99% for total suspended solids) was higher than the WWTP ones. Color was removed as in the WWTP. Anionic surfactants removal of pilot plant was lower than that of the WWTP (90.5 and 93.2% respectively), while the BiAS removal was higher in the pilot plant (98.2 vs. 97.1). At the end cost analysis of the proposed upgrade is reported. PMID:16235750

  3. ON-SITE ENGINEERING REPORT OF THE SLURRY-PHASE BIOLOGICAL REACTOR FOR PILOT-SCALE TESTING ON CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of pilot-scale bioslurry treatment on creosote-contaminated soil was evaluated. ive reactors containing 66 L of slurry (30% soil by weight), were operated in parallel. he soil was a sandy soil with minor gravel content. he pilot-scale phase utilized an inoculum of...

  4. ON-SITE ENGINEERING REPORT OF THE SLURRY-PHASE BIOLOGICAL REACTOR FOR PILOT-SCALE TESTING ON CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of pilot-scale bioslurry treatment on creosote-contaminated soil was evaluated. Five reactors containing 66 L of slurry (30% soil by weight), were operated in parallel. The soil was a sandy soil with minor gravel content. The pilot-scale phase utilized an inoculum...

  5. Complexity and Pilot Workload Metrics for the Evaluation of Adaptive Flight Controls on a Full Scale Piloted Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Schaefer, Jacob; Burken, John J.; Larson, David; Johnson, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Flight research has shown the effectiveness of adaptive flight controls for improving aircraft safety and performance in the presence of uncertainties. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA)'s Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) project designed and conducted a series of flight experiments to study the impact of variations in adaptive controller design complexity on performance and handling qualities. A novel complexity metric was devised to compare the degrees of simplicity achieved in three variations of a model reference adaptive controller (MRAC) for NASA's F-18 (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) Full-Scale Advanced Systems Testbed (Gen-2A) aircraft. The complexity measures of these controllers are also compared to that of an earlier MRAC design for NASA's Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) project and flown on a highly modified F-15 aircraft (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). Pilot comments during the IRAC research flights pointed to the importance of workload on handling qualities ratings for failure and damage scenarios. Modifications to existing pilot aggressiveness and duty cycle metrics are presented and applied to the IRAC controllers. Finally, while adaptive controllers may alleviate the effects of failures or damage on an aircraft's handling qualities, they also have the potential to introduce annoying changes to the flight dynamics or to the operation of aircraft systems. A nuisance rating scale is presented for the categorization of nuisance side-effects of adaptive controllers.

  6. Use of sorbents for air toxics control in a pilot-scale COHPAC baghouse

    SciTech Connect

    Butz, J.R.; Chang, R.; Waugh, E.G.; Jensen, B.K.; Lapatnick, L.N.

    1999-07-01

    With funding from EPRI and Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE and G), ADA Technologies has been operating a COHPAC (COmpact Hybrid PArticulate Collector) pulse-jet pilot plant at PSE and G's Hudson station in Jersey City, NJ to expand the application of COHPAC in anticipation of hazardous air pollutants (HAP) regulations. The pilot extracts a slipstream of flue gas from downstream of Hudson's full-scale ESP (a four-field Research Cottrell unit). A series of tests has been run over the past two and one-half years to evaluate the injection of dry sorbents upstream of the COHPAC pilot for removal of acid gases and mercury from the flue gas slipstream. The COHPAC baghouse subsequently removes the sorbent material from the flue gas. Gas samples were taken upstream of sorbent injection and downstream of the pilot to characterize the ability of the sorbents to remove targeted HAPs. The operation of the pilot was also monitored during testing to characterize the impact of sorbent injection on the performance of the baghouse. Data collected during 1998 are compared to data from 1997, when the pilot was operated at a higher air-to-cloth ratio.

  7. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

  8. Pilot-scale production of lipase using palm oil mill effluent as a basal medium and its immobilization by selected materials.

    PubMed

    Asih, Devi Ratna; Alam, Md Zahangir; Alam, Zahangir; Salleh, Md Noor; Salleh, Noor; Salihu, Aliyu

    2014-01-01

    A pilot-scale production of lipase using palm oil mill effluent (POME) as a fermentation basal medium was carried out, and parameters for immobilization of the produced lipase were optimized. Lipase production in a 300-L bioreactor was performed using two proposed strategies, constant power per volume (P/V) and constant tip speed. Moreover, lipase immobilization on different materials was also investigated. Lipase production was performed using liquid-state bioconversion of POME as the medium and Candida cylindracea as the inoculum. The fermentation medium was composed of 1% total suspended solids (TSS) of POME, 0.5% (w/v) peptone, 0.7% (v/v) Tween-80, and 2.2% inoculum. The medium composition was decided on the basis of the medium optimization results of a previous study. The fermentation was carried out for 48 h at 30°C and pH 6. The maximum lipase production was 5.72U/mL and 21.34 U/mL, obtained from the scale-up strategies of constant tip speed and P/V, respectively. Four accessible support materials were screened for their potential use in immobilization. The most suitable support material was found to be activated carbon, with a maximum immobilization of 94%. PMID:25017863

  9. Fate of sex hormones in two pilot-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants: conventional treatment.

    PubMed

    Esperanza, Mar; Suidan, Makram T; Marfil-Vega, Ruth; Gonzalez, Cristina; Sorial, George A; McCauley, Paul; Brenner, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The fate of seven sex hormones (estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), ethinylestradiol (EE2), testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone) was determined in two pilot-scale wastewater treatment plants operated under conventional loading conditions. The levels of hormones in both the liquid and the solid matrixes of the plants were determined. Each of the two 20-l/h pilot-scale plants consisted of a primary clarifier followed by a three-stage aeration tank and a final clarifier. The primary sludge and the waste activated sludge (WAS) were digested anaerobically in one pilot plant and aerobically in the other. The pilot plants were fed a complex synthetic wastewater spiked with the hormones. Levels of testosterone, androstenedione and progesterone were close to method detection limit (MDL) concentrations in the final and digester effluents (both liquid and solid phases) and were considered as completely removed. Average mass flux removals from the liquid streams (plant influent minus secondary clarifier effluent) for the natural estrogens were 82% for E1, 99% for E2, and 89% for (E1+E2). An average overall removal of only 42% was achieved for EE2. These values reflect removals averaged for the two pilot plants. PMID:17083962

  10. PILOT-SCALE EVALUATION OF LIMB (LIMESTONE INJECTION MULTISTAGE BURNER) TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of pilot-scale studies of sulfur capture in the EPA's Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) process and the effect of LIMB on particulate properties and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) performance. The sulfur capture studies showed that hydrated l...

  11. EVALUATION OF PILOT-SCALE AIR POLLUTION CONTROL DEVICES ON A MUNICIPAL WATERFALL INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project report describes the results of a program for the testing of two pilot-scale pollution control devices, a fabric filter, and a venturi scrubber at the Braintree, Massachusetts Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator. It includes operation, sampling, and analytical efforts a...

  12. Pilot-scale fractionation of whey proteins with supercritical CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new pilot-scale process is being developed and optimized for the separation of whey proteins into two enriched, highly functional fractions that are free of contaminants. The fractionation of whey protein isolate (WPI), which contains approximately 32% alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) and 61% beta-lac...

  13. FATE OF SEX HORMONES IN TWO PILOT-SCALE MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS: CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of seven sex hormones (estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), ethinylestradiol (EE2), testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone) was determined in two pilot-scale wastewater treatment plants operated under conventional loading conditions. The levels of hormon...

  14. HYDROTHERMAL TREATMENT OF WHEAT STRAW ON PILOT PLANT SCALE Anders Thygesena

    E-print Network

    with water in counter flow at water-straw ratio of 5 kg/kg. By hydrothermal treatment of the straw at 190°CHYDROTHERMAL TREATMENT OF WHEAT STRAW ON PILOT PLANT SCALE Anders Thygesena , Mette Hedegaard/h was designed and constructed for continuous wet oxidation and hydrothermal treatment of plant fiber biomass

  15. Performance characteristics of a hybrid membrane pilot-scale plant for oilfield-produced wastewater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiangli Qiao; Zhenjia Zhang; Jialiang Yu; Xiaofeng Ye

    2008-01-01

    Oilfield produced wastewater is a complicated system containing high levels of oil, SS (total suspended solid), sulfide, reductive substances and salinity, etc. The current treatment process operating in Daqing oilfield cannot treat the oily wastewater to satisfy the discharging standard to surrounding environment or the water quality for injection into low-osmosis oilfield. In this paper, a pilot-scale plant involving aeration

  16. A Small-Scale Pilot Study into Language Difficulties in Children Who Offend

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Games, Fran; Curran, Anita; Porter, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This small-scale pilot research project investigates the prevalence of Speech Language and Communication Difficulties in a sample of children attending a Youth Offending Service in the UK. Using the CELF-4, approximately 90% of the sample displayed some form of language difficulty and, overall, this population displayed mild to moderate…

  17. Computation of the airflow in a pilot scale clean room using K- ? turbulence models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivier Rouaud; Michel Havet

    2002-01-01

    This work deals with the assessment of the airflow in a food-processing clean room. The flow pattern inside the working area of a pilot scale clean room was numerically investigated using a computational fluid dynamics code based on a finite volume formulation. Two versions of the k-? turbulence model were tested: the standard and the RNG version. The analysis of

  18. Pilot scale thermal treatment of pig slurry for the inactivation of animal virus pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claire Turner; Stuart M. Williams; Colin H. Burton; Trevor R. Cumby; Philip J. Wilkinson; John W. Farrent

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot scale treatment plant that has been designed and built for the thermal inactivation in pig slurry of two viruses that infect pigs ? African swine fever virus (ASFV) and swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV). The plant treats pig slurry continuously at a rate of up to 100 litres\\/hour and functions by heating the slurry, maintaining

  19. CHARACTERISTICS OF PILOT- AND FULL-SCALE HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATOR ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review encompasses ash characterization data from 16 different hazardous waste incinerators, both pilot- and full-scale, treating a variety of waste streams. Its focus is on 14 volatile organic compounds, 18 semivolatile organics, and 13 metals for which analyses were most f...

  20. OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE OF THE EPA OWNED BENCH SCALE PILOT PLANT FOR EVALUATING SCR DENOX CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the use of EPA's bench-scale pilot plant to evaluate catalysts used in the ammonia (NH3)-based technology and process for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides. A key objective was to establish the performance of SCR catalysts on U.S. uels and...

  1. Removal of Salmonella Enteritidis from commercial† unpasteurized liquid egg white using pilot scale crossflow tangential microfiltration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of a pilot-scale cross-flow microfiltration (MF) process for removal of Salmonella enteritidis from liquid egg white (LEW) was evaluated. To facilitate MF, 110 L of unpasteurized LEW from a local egg breaking plant was first wedge screened, homogenized and then diluted (1:2 w/w) w...

  2. SYSTEMS RELIABILITY AND PERFORMANCE: PILOT-SCALE INCINERATION OF CHLORINATED BENZENES AT THE COMBUSTION RESEARCH FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of 34 test burns was conducted between August 1983 and January 1984 in the pilot-scale rotary kiln incineration system at the USEPA Combustion Research Facility (CRF), using chlorinated benzenes as surrogate Principal Organic Hazardous Components (POHCs), over a range of...

  3. REBURNING THERMAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN A TWO-DIMENSIONAL PILOT-SCALE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes an experimental investigation of the thermal and chemical processes influencing NOx reduction by natural gas reburning in a two-dimensional pilot-scale combustion system. Reburning effectiveness for initial NOx levels of 50-500 ppm and reburn stoichiometric ra...

  4. EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL STABILITY POHC INCINERABILITY RANKING IN A PILOT-SCALE ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of pilot-scale incineration tests was performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility to evaluate the thermal stability-based POHC incinerability ranking. In the tests, mixtures of 12 P0HCs with predicted incinerability spanning the range af most to least difficult to ...

  5. Characterization of simulated low-level waste grout produced in a pilot-scale test

    SciTech Connect

    Lokken, R.O.; Reimus, M.A.; Martin, P.F.C.; Geldart, S.E.

    1988-02-01

    The objectives of a pilot-scale grout test were to determine the homogeneity of the grout produced under conditions similar to those planned for the TGF, to evaluate performance of candidate grout processing equipment for the TGF, and to evaluate properties of grout that was produced during continuous operation over an extended time period and cured in a large monolith. This report addresses the first and third objectives. Tests were conducted on pilot-scale grout slurry, simulated waste solution, dry solids blend samples, and cured grout samples. Grout slurry collected at two points during the pilot-scale test and slurry produced in the laboratory were characterized by measuring rheology, drainable liquid, and penetration resistance. Cured grout samples included samples collected during the pilot-scale test and cured in the laboratory, samples produced in the laboratory, samples obtained from tubes inserted into the monolith, and samples from cored sections of the monolith. Tests conducted on the cured samples included compressive strength, density, ultrasonic pulse velocity, leachability, and microstructural characterization. 10 refs., 12 figs., 16 tabs.

  6. Developing Functional Foods Using Red Palm Olein: Pilot-Scale Studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. S. Sidhu; S. N. Al-Hooti; J. M. Al-Saqer; H. A. Al-Amiri; M. Al-Foudari; A. Al-Othman; A. Ahmad; L. Al-Haji; N. Ahmed; I. B. Mansor; J. Minal

    2004-01-01

    Red palm olein (RPOL) is newly developed edible oil rich in phytonutrients like vitamin E, carotenoids, ubiquinones, and sterols. Red palm olein and red palm shortening (RPS), when used in the pilot-scale production of extruded snacks, digestive biscuits and pan bread, enhanced the foods' contents of these health-promoting phytochemicals. The antioxidant provitamin A (?-carotene) contents in snacks and digestive biscuits

  7. Pilot scale membrane separation of electroplating waste water by reverse osmosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xijun Chai; Guohua Chen; Yue Po-Lock; Yongli Mi

    1997-01-01

    Electroplating waste water containing copper was treated by means of reverse osmosis (RO) membrane separation on a pilot scale. The copper concentration in the untreated waste water was 340 ppm. After the treatment, the concentration in the treated water was below 4 ppm which is the Hong Kong government discharge limit. It is shown that, by increasing transmembrane pressure drop,

  8. PILOT-SCALE EVALUATION OF NEW RESIN APPLICATION EQUIPMENT FOR FIBER- REINFORCED PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of a pilot-scale evaluation of new resin application equipment for fiber- reinforced plastics. The study, an evaluation and comparison of styrene emissions, utilized Magnum's FIT(TM) nozzle with conventional spray guns and flow coaters (operated at both ...

  9. Data envelopment analysis for assessing optimal operation of an immersed membrane bioreactor equipped with a draft tube for domestic wastewater reclamation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amos Bick; Fei Yang; Semion Shandalov; Gideon Oron

    2007-01-01

    Membrane fouling can be minimized by air lifting that plays a key role in cake removal from membrane surface. This study presents the results of tests that were carried out at Kiryat Sde-Boker, Israel, and focuses on the influence of hydrodynamic conditions on membrane fouling in a pilot-scale Immersed Membrane Bio-Reactor (IMBR) using a hollow fiber membrane module of ZW-10

  10. A new computational control strategy for leachate management in bioreactor landfills.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Mohamed; Kennedy, Kevin; Narbaitz, Roberto; Warith, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    A novel computational measurement-based control strategy (CMCS) was developed to manage leachate recirculation based on monitoring ofkey system parameters. The proposed framework identifies the operational phase ofthe controlled bioreactor, and accordingly determines quantities ofleachate, buffer, supplemental water, and nutritional amendments required to provide the temporally changing landfill microbial consortia with their growth requirements. The CMCS was tested in a pilot-scale bioreactor cell (0.5 m3) for a period of nine months, and compared to a conventional open-loop leachate control scheme (fixed recirculation rate of produced leachate) in an identical cell. Overall, positive results confirmed the applicability and benefits of the control strategy to optimize the leachate recirculation and manipulation processes. Throughout the 21 operational cycles of the controlled bioreactor cell, the maximum specific daily recirculation volume (24 L/t/d) was sixfold the minimum volume determined. The amounts of inoculum/nutrient, buffer, and supplemental water were also computed cyclically, and ranged between 2% and 11%, 1% and 9%, and 3% and 16% of the total volume recycled, respectively. The recirculated volumes of leachate and other amendments were highly variable, and did not follow any predictable trends. In general, CMCS achieved proper control with a minimal use of resources, e.g. it utilized about 55% less buffer compared with the leachate neutralization practice commonly used in lab- and pilot-scale studies. The greater degradation rates of organic matter combined with relative increases in biogas production (1.7-fold greater) demonstrate that calculation-based recirculation stimulated the methanogenic activity and accelerated the bioreactor evolution. PMID:24600869

  11. Physical-chemical treatment of rainwater runoff in recovery and recycling companies: Pilot-scale optimization.

    PubMed

    Blondeel, Evelyne; Depuydt, Veerle; Cornelis, Jasper; Chys, Michael; Verliefde, Arne; Hulle, Stijin Wim Henk Van

    2015-09-19

    Pilot-scale optimisation of different possible physical-chemical water treatment techniques was performed on the wastewater originating from three different recovery and recycling companies in order to select a (combination of) technique(s) for further full-scale implementation. This implementation is necessary to reduce the concentration of both common pollutants (such as COD, nutrients and suspended solids) and potentially toxic metals, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and poly-chlorinated biphenyls frequently below the discharge limits. The pilot-scale tests (at 250 L h(-1) scale) demonstrate that sand anthracite filtration or coagulation/flocculation are interesting as first treatment techniques with removal efficiencies of about 19% to 66% (sand anthracite filtration), respectively 18% to 60% (coagulation/flocculation) for the above mentioned pollutants (metals, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and poly chlorinated biphenyls). If a second treatment step is required, the implementation of an activated carbon filter is recommended (about 46% to 86% additional removal is obtained). PMID:26191983

  12. Laboratory and pilot plant scale study on the electrochemical oxidation of landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Anglada, Angela; Urtiaga, Ana M; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2010-09-15

    Kinetic data regarding COD oxidation were measured in a laboratory scale cell and used to scale-up an electro-oxidation process for landfill leachate treatment by means of boron-doped diamond anodes. A pilot-scale reactor with a total BDD anode area of 1.05 m(2) was designed. Different electrode gaps in the laboratory and pilot plant cells resulted in dissimilar reactor hydrodynamics. Consequently, generalised dimensionless correlations concerning mass transfer were developed in order to define the mass transfer conditions in both electrochemical systems. These correlations were then used in the design equations to validate the scale-up procedure. A series of experiments with biologically pre-treated landfill leachate were done to accomplish this goal. The evolution of ammonia and COD concentration could be well predicted. PMID:20542632

  13. Production of Phytochemicals in Plant Cell Bioreactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saurabh Chattopadhyay; A. K. Srivastava; V. S. Bisaria

    Plant cell culture provides a viable alternative over whole plant cultivation for the production of useful phytochemicals.\\u000a In order to successfully cultivate the plant cells at large scale, some engineering parameters such as cell aggregation, mixing,\\u000a aeration and shear sensitivity are taken into account for selection of a suitable bioreactor. Increased productivity in a\\u000a bioreactor can be achieved by selection

  14. Performance Evaluation of Pilot Scale Sulfur-Oxidizing Denitrification for Treatment of Metal Plating Wastewater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANGEL S. P. FLORES III; EUN-MI GWON; DONG-MIN SIM; GRACE NISOLA; MELVIN M. GALERA; SEUNG-SE CHON; WOOK-JIN CHUNG; DAE-WON PAK; ZOU SAM AHN

    2006-01-01

    A full-scale and two pilot-scale upflow sulfur-oxidizing denitrification (SOD) columns were evaluated using metal plating wastewater as feed. The sludge was autotrophically enriched, and inoculated in the SOD columns attached to the effluent line of three metal plating wastewater treatment facilities. The effects of activated carbon and aeration were also studied, and found effective for the removal of suspended solids

  15. Pilot-scale production of mysid shrimp in a static water system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pedro M. Domingues; Philip E. Turk; Jose P. Andrade; Phillip G. Lee

    1998-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the potential for large scale culture of the mysid shrimp Mysidopsis almyra. Reproduction was consistent, as newly hatched mysids were always present in the culture trays. At the end of 45 day preliminary trials, the populations in the culture trays had increased 323.3% and 256.6%. A larger pilot-scale system connected to a biological filtration tank

  16. Uptake of NO X by activated carbons: bench-scale and pilot-plant testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. K. Neathery; A. M. Rubel; J. M. Stencel

    1997-01-01

    The possibility of selectively removing NOx from gas containing CO2, N2, O2, H2O, SO2 and NOx has been examined using bench-scale and pilot-scale experimentation. These results have shown that NO can be selectively sequestered from the gas if the oxygen concentration is high enough and the SO2 concentration is low enough. Oxygen enhances the amount of NO removed, and promotes

  17. Removal of ammonia nitrogen in wastewater by microwave radiation: A pilot-scale study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li Lin; Jing Chen; Zuqun Xu; Songhu Yuan; Menghua Cao; Huangcheng Liu; Xiaohua Lu

    2009-01-01

    A large removal of ammonia nitrogen in wastewater has been achieved by microwave (MW) radiation in our previous bench-scale study. This study developed a continuous pilot-scale MW system to remove ammonia nitrogen in real wastewater. A typical high concentration of ammonia nitrogen contaminated wastewater, the coke-plant wastewater from a Coke company, was treated. The output power of the microwave reactor

  18. Studies of a membrane aerated bioreactor for wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Semmens; Denise Hanus

    1999-01-01

    This study was undertaken specifically to collect engineering and process performance information on the behaviour of a membrane supported bio-film in a well-characterised bioreactor. A novel membrane aerated bioreactor has been tested in the laboratory on synthetic sewage, and also piloted for the treatment of primary effluent at a local municipal wastewater treatment plant. The reactor's design employs gas-permeable, hollow-fibre

  19. PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, D.

    2009-05-28

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin hydraulic cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Sixteen of these cycles were completed in the 24-inch IX Column (1/2 scale column). Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 3 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale IX system. The RF resin bed showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. The hydraulic and chemical performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins. The pilot-scale testing indicates that the RF resin is durable and should hold up to many hydraulic cycles in actual radioactive Cesium (Cs) separation.

  20. Optimization of limestone sizing for CFB combustors: Results of pilot plant and bench-scale testing

    SciTech Connect

    Alliston, M.; Edvardsson, C.; Wu, S.; Probst, S. [Tampella Power Corp., Williamsport, PA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A grant to study the performance of limestones in a Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor was obtained in 1991 from the Pennsylvania Energy Development Authority (PEDA) by Tampella Power Corporation (TPC). The overall objective of this PEDA project was to carry out a systematic pilot plant tests at TPC`s pilot plant in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, in systematic order to identify ways of improving sulfur capture and limestone utilization through better control of the size distribution and residence time of the limestone particles in the furnace. It was also an objective to determine if bench scale testing could be of value in predicting CFB sorbent behavior. The pilot plant and bench test results were incorporated into an empirical Correlation which accounts for the size distribution and residence time of solids in CFB boiler.

  1. Molecular Assessment of Inoculated and Indigenous Bacteria in Biofilms from a Pilot-Scale Perchlorate-Reducing Bioreactor

    E-print Network

    and disposal of large quantities of ammonium perchlorate, primarily used as oxidizers in rocket propellants and munitions [17, 27]. As many as 75 perchlorate release sites in 22 states have been identified in the United

  2. WRDA SEDIMENT DECONTAMINATION PILOT-SCALE DATA REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal and non-thermal decontamination technologies have been undergoing demonstrations at the bench through full/commercial-scale levels. The decontamination program is being conducted under the auspices of the Water Resources Development Acts (92, 96) working in conjunction wi...

  3. MGP soil remediation in a slurry-phase system: A pilot-scale test

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bill Y.; Srivastava, V.J.; Paterek, J.R.; Pradhan, S.P. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Pope, J.R. [Elizabethtown Gas Co., Union, NJ (United States); Hayes, T.D.; Linz, D.G. [Gas Research Institute, Chicago, IL (United States); Jerger, D.E. [OHM Corp., Findlay, OH (United States)

    1993-12-31

    An overall protocol for remediating manufactured gas plant (MGP) soils generally includes bench-scale evaluation of the technology, pilot-scale demonstration, and full-scale implementation. This paper summarizes the results of the bench-scale and pilot-scale study for treating an MGP soil with IGT`s integrated Chemical/Biological Treatment (CBT) or Manufactured Gas Plant Remediation (MGP-REM) process in the slurry-phase mode of application. MGP soils are contaminated primarily with polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). An MGP site in New Jersey was the subject of this study. Soils from the site were used for the bench-scale evaluation of the integrated Chemical/Biological Treatment. The bench-scale study started with biological pre-treatment followed by chemical treatment and biological polishing. Results of the bench-scale study showed that this process was effective in degrading EPA Total as well as EPA Carcinogenic PAHs. A test matrix was developed to assess this technology at a pilot-scale facility. The test matrix consisted of at least eight semi-continuous runs designed to evaluate the effects of PAH concentration, total solids concentration, residence time, and a number of chemical reagent additions. An operating permit for 14 days was obtained to evaluate the process primarily for air emission data and secondarily for PAH degradation data. The PAH data showed that the MGP-REM process was very effective in degrading carcinogenic PAHs even under sub-optimal operating conditions. The field data also showed that the emissions of volatile organic compounds were well below the regulatory limits.

  4. Pilot-scale study on nitrogen and aromatic compounds removal in printing and dyeing wastewater by reinforced hydrolysis-denitrification coupling process and its microbial community analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Ren, Hongqiang; Yin, Erqin; Tang, Siyuan; Li, Yi; Cao, Jiashun

    2015-06-01

    Aiming to efficiently dispose printing and dyeing wastewater with "high organic nitrogen and aromatic compounds, but low carbon source quality", the reinforced anaerobic hydrolysis-denitrification coupling process, based on improved UASB reactors and segregated collection-disposition strategy, was designed and applied at the pilot scale. Results showed that the coupling process displayed efficient removal for these two kinds of pollutants (nitrogen and aromatics), since the concentration of NH3-N (shortened as ? (NH3-N))?bioreactors and some kinds of VFAs-producing, denitrifying and aromatic ring opening microorganisms were discovered. Further, the nirK and bcrA genes quantification also indicated the coupling process owned outstanding denitrification and aromatic compound-degrading potential, which demonstrates that the coupling process owns admirable applicability for this kind of wastewater treatment. PMID:25613804

  5. Performance of a pilot-scale nitrifying trickling filter treating municipal aerated lagoon effluent.

    PubMed

    Coats, Erik R; Watson, Ben; Lee, Kiersten; Hammer, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Colfax, WA, operates an aerated lagoon to achieve compliance with its National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit, which currently requires biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and total suspended solids (TSS) removal. However, ammonia removal may soon be required, and Colfax is considering a nitrifying trickling filter (NTF) that would allow them to also maintain the lagoons. To obtain data from which to ultimately design a full-scale system, a four-year NTF pilot study was performed. Results demonstrated that an NTF would be an effective, reliable NH3 removal method and could produce effluent NH3 concentrations < 1.0 mg/L. NTF performance was characterized by zero- and first-order kinetics; zero-order rates correlated with influent NH3 concentrations and mass load. Utilizing data from these investigations it was determined that the pilot NTF could be reduced by 19%, which demonstrates the value of pilot testing. Finally, pilot data was evaluated to provide a data set that will be useful to engineers designing full-scale NTFs. PMID:25630125

  6. Characterization of double-shell slurry feed grout produced in a pilot-scale test

    SciTech Connect

    Lokken, R.O.; Martin, P.F.C.; Shade, J.W.

    1992-12-01

    Current plans for disposal of the low-level fraction of selected double-shell tank (DST) wastes at Hanford, Washington include grouting. Grout disposal in this context is the process of mixing low-level liquid waste with cementitious powders. and pumping the resultant slurry to near-surface, underground concrete vaults. Once the slurry is in the vaults. the hydration reactions that occur result in the formation of a highly impermeable solid product that binds and encapsulates the radioactive and hazardous constituents. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) operates the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Pacific Northwest Laboratory(a) (PNL) provides support to the Grout Disposal Program through laboratory support activities, radioactive grout leach testing. performance assessments, and pilot-scale tests. A pilot-scale test was conducted in November 1988 using a simulated Double-Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF) waste. The main objective of the pilot-scale test was to demonstrate the processability of a DSSF grout formulation that was developed using laboratory equipment and to provide information on scale-up. The dry blend used in this test included 47 wt% class F fly ash, 47 wt% blast furnace slag, and 6 wt% type I/II portland cement. The dry blend was mixed with the simulated waste at a ratio of 9 lb/gal and pumped to a 2800-gal, insulated tank at about 10.4 gpm. Samples of simulated DSSF waste. dry blend, grout slurry, and cured grout were obtained during and after the pilot-scale test for testing and product characterization. Major conclusions of these activities are included.

  7. INVESTIGATING SUSPENSION OF MST SLURRIES IN A PILOT-SCALE WASTE TANK

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Restivo, M.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Qureshi, Z.

    2011-01-24

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is for the pumps to suspend the MST particles so that MST can be removed from the tank. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations).

  8. Large-scale data mining pilot project in human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R.; Fidelis, R.; Slezak, T.

    1997-05-01

    This whitepaper briefly describes a new, aggressive effort in large- scale data Livermore National Labs. The implications of `large- scale` will be clarified Section. In the short term, this effort will focus on several @ssion-critical questions of Genome project. We will adapt current data mining techniques to the Genome domain, to quantify the accuracy of inference results, and lay the groundwork for a more extensive effort in large-scale data mining. A major aspect of the approach is that we will be fully-staffed data warehousing effort in the human Genome area. The long term goal is strong applications- oriented research program in large-@e data mining. The tools, skill set gained will be directly applicable to a wide spectrum of tasks involving a for large spatial and multidimensional data. This includes applications in ensuring non-proliferation, stockpile stewardship, enabling Global Ecology (Materials Database Industrial Ecology), advancing the Biosciences (Human Genome Project), and supporting data for others (Battlefield Management, Health Care).

  9. The design of pilot scale releases of CO{sub 2} into the deep ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, E.E.; Herzog, H.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Energy Lab.; Golomb, D. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA (United States); Masutani, S.M. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The sequestration of CO{sub 2} in the deep ocean has been proposed as a way to mitigate potential global climate change. In the past few years many laboratory and modeling studies have been performed on ocean disposal of CO{sub 2}, including the assessment of its environmental impact. However, these studies must be validated/complemented with field studies. As a first step, pilot scale field tests would focus on the various physical-chemical interactions that occur between seawater and CO{sub 2}. In this paper the authors discuss key issues involved with the design, ocean engineering, measurements, siting, and costs of such pilot scale releases of CO{sub 2}.

  10. Pilot-scale base hydrolysis processing of HMX-based plastic-bonded explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Flesner, R.L.; Dell`orco, P.C.; Spontarelli, T.; Bishop, R.L.; Skidmore, C.; Uher, K.J.; Kramer, J.F.

    1996-07-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated that many energetic materials can be rendered non-energetic via reaction with sodium hydroxide or ammonia. This process is known as base hydrolysis. A pilot scale reactor has been developed to process up to 20 kg of plastic bonded explosive in a single batch operation. In this report, we discuss the design and operation of the pilot scale reactor for the processing of PBX 9404, a standard Department of Energy plastic bonded explosive containing HMX and nitrocellulose. Products from base hydrolysis, although non-energetic, still require additional processing before release to the environment Decomposition products, destruction efficiencies, and rates of reaction for base hydrolysis will be presented. Hydrothermal processing, previously known as supercritical water oxidation, has been proposed for converting organic products from hydrolysis to carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide. Base hydrolysis in combination with hydrothermal processing may yield a viable alternative to open burning/open detonation for destruction of many energetic materials.

  11. Modeling the Pyrochemical Reduction of Spent UO2 Fuel in a Pilot-Scale Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Steven D. Herrmann; Michael F. Simpson

    2006-08-01

    A kinetic model has been derived for the reduction of oxide spent nuclear fuel in a radial flow reactor. In this reaction, lithium dissolved in molten LiCl reacts with UO2 and fission product oxides to form a porous, metallic product. As the reaction proceeds, the depth of the porous layer around the exterior of each fuel particle increases. The observed rate of reaction has been found to be only dependent upon the rate of diffusion of lithium across this layer, consistent with a classic shrinking core kinetic model. This shrinking core model has been extended to predict the behavior of a hypothetical, pilot-scale reactor for oxide reduction. The design of the pilot-scale reactor includes forced flow through baskets that contain the fuel particles. The results of the modeling indicate that this is an essential feature in order to minimize the time needed to achieve full conversion of the fuel.

  12. Interpretation of pilot-scale, fluidized bed behavior using chaotic time series analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, T.A.; Flynn, T.J. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH (United States). Research and Development Div.; Daw, C.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Halow, J.S. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

    1993-06-01

    In this paper, we apply conventional and chaotic time series analyses to the interpretation of pressure-drop measurements from a 250 kW, pilot-scale, bubbling fluidized bed combustor. Our results demonstrate that such analyses can be useful for discriminating different types of fluidization in a practical combustor and offer a basis for improving fluidized bed monitoring and control. A new comparative index that reflects the multivariate structure in pressure-drop measurements is proposed for detecting variations in the fluidized state. We also propose standards for acquiring fluidized bed pressure-drop measurements in pilot and commercial-scale facilities as well as three potential commercial uses. Recent findings regarding the effect of pressure tap location and design on the measured signal fidelity are discussed.

  13. Alternative energy efficient membrane bioreactor using reciprocating submerged membrane.

    PubMed

    Ho, J; Smith, S; Roh, H K

    2014-01-01

    A novel membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot system, using membrane reciprocation instead of air scouring, was operated at constant high flux and daily fluctuating flux to demonstrate its application under peak and diurnal flow conditions. Low and stable transmembrane pressure was achieved at 40 l/m(2)/h (LMH) by use of repetitive membrane reciprocation. The results reveal that the inertial forces acting on the membrane fibers effectively propel foulants from the membrane surface. Reciprocation of the hollow fiber membrane is beneficial for the constant removal of solids that may build up on the membrane surface and inside the membrane bundle. The membrane reciprocation in the reciprocating MBR pilot consumed less energy than coarse air scouring used in conventional MBR systems. Specific energy consumption for the membrane reciprocation was 0.072 kWh/m(3) permeate produced at 40 LMH flux, which is 75% less than for a conventional air scouring system as reported in literature without consideration of energy consumption for biological aeration (0.29 kWh/m(3)). The daily fluctuating flux test confirmed that the membrane reciprocation is effective to handle fluctuating flux up to 50 LMH. The pilot-scale reciprocating MBR system successfully demonstrated that fouling can be controlled via 0.43 Hz membrane reciprocation with 44 mm or higher amplitude. PMID:25521136

  14. Bioremediation of heavy metals using biostimulation in laboratory bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Fulekar, M H; Sharma, Jaya; Tendulkar, Akalpita

    2012-12-01

    The present research study investigates bioremediation potential of biostimulated microbial culture isolated from heavy metals waste disposal contaminated site located at Bhayander (east), Mumbai, India. The physicochemical and microbial characterization including heavy metal contaminants have been studied at waste disposal site. The microorganisms adapted at heavy metal-contaminated environment were isolated, cultured, and biostimulated in minimal salt medium under aerobic conditions in a designed and developed laboratory bioreactor. Heavy metals such as Fe, Cu, and Cd at a selected concentration of 25, 50, and 100 ?g/ml were taken in bioreactor wherein biostimulated microbial culture was added for bioremediation of heavy metals under aerobic conditions. The remediation of heavy metals was studied at an interval of 24 h for a period of 21 days. The biostimulated microbial consortium has been found effective for remediation of Cd, Cu, and Fe at higher concentration, i.e., 100 mg/l up to 98.5%, 99.6%, and 100%, respectively. Fe being a micronutrient was remediated completely compared to Cu and Cd. During the bioaccumulation of heavy metals by microorganisms, environmental parameters such as pH, total alkalinity, electronic conductivity, biological oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, etc. were monitored and assessed. The pilot scale study would be applicable to remediate heavy metals from waste disposal contaminated site to clean up the environment. PMID:22270588

  15. Evaluation of anthrax vaccine production by Bacillus anthracis Sterne 34F 2 in stirred suspension culture using a miniature bioreactor: A useful scale-down tool for studies on fermentations at high containment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tarit K. Mukhopadhyay; Nigel Allison; Susan Charlton; Michael J. Hudson; Bassam Hallis; Annemarie King; Rebecca Baker; Sara Noonan; Joanne McGlashan; Katie West; M. Susana Levy; John M. Ward; Gary J. Lye

    2010-01-01

    The licensed UK anthrax vaccine is produced by static cultures of Bacillus anthracis Sterne 34F2 in glass Thompson bottles, each batch consisting of multiple bottles grown for 24–28h. In this work, a novel miniature bioreactor was used as a scale-down tool to investigate the possible transfer of anthrax vaccine production from static culture to stirred tank operation and to explore

  16. Pilot-Scale Tests of Direct Dimethyl Ether Synthesis from Biomass-Derived Syngas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuping Li; Tiejun Wang; Xiuli Yin; Chuangzhi Wu; Longlong Ma; Haibin Li; Xinghua Zhang; Yongxing Lv

    2009-01-01

    Direct conversion of biomass-derived syngas to dimethyl ether (DME) at pilot-scale of 100 t\\/a was carried out in a fixed-bed tubular reactor over Cu\\/Zn\\/Al\\/HZSM-5 catalyst. The bio-syngas was obtained by pyrolysis and gasification of corncob under O2-rich air in fixed-bed reactors. The effects of gasification, synthesis temperature and gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of bio-syngas on DME synthesis were investigated

  17. Monitoring Granulation Rate Processes Using Three PAT Tools in a Pilot-Scale Fluidized Bed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ai Tee Tok; Xueping Goh; Wai Kiong Ng; Reginald B. H. Tan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to analyze and compare the responses of three Process Analytical Technology (PAT) techniques\\u000a applied simultaneously to monitor a pilot-scale fluidized bed granulation process. Real-time measurements using focused beam\\u000a reflectance measurement (Lasentec FBRM) and near-infra red spectroscopy (Bruker NIR) were taken by inserting in-line probes\\u000a into the fluidized bed. Non-intrusive acoustic emission measurements (Physical Acoustic

  18. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation of a pilot-scale annular bubble column photocatalytic reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. K. Pareek; S. J. Cox; M. P. Brungs; B. Young; A. A. Adesina

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of an 18-l pilot-scale photocatalytic reactor has been investigated using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) approach. The granular Eulerian model was used to describe the multiphase flow system. Solid recirculation was predicted while liquid velocity vectors were influenced by the gas flow. The companion radiation transport equation was iteratively solved using a finite-volume-based discrete ordinate method. The first-order

  19. Pilot-scale Experiment for Purification of CO from Industrial Tail Gases by Pressure Swing Adsorption

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yubao CHEN; Ping NING; Youchang XIE; Yunhua CHEN; Hao SUN; Zhiyun LIU

    2008-01-01

    Using pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology to purify carbon monoxide (CO) discharged from industrial gases is a high-efficiency and economical method. In this article, a four-bed PSA experiment for CO purification was improved and optimized, in which a set of 120 m3·h?1 pilot-scale PSA device was developed to purify CO from industrial tail gases, a set of control systems suitable

  20. Water Treatment and Performance Characteristics Evaluation of a Pilot-Scale Recirculating Aquaculture System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yan Zaisheng; Liu Changfa; Wang Shihe; He Jie; Liu Yuan; Zhang Liyong; Zhang Junxin

    2008-01-01

    To minimize the impact on the environment and land requirements, a pilot-scale recirculating aquaculture system was engineered and investigated in a greenhouse. The system included a three-step particulates separation device, fluidized bed reactors (FBR), UV treatment and cooling. Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) were raised from initial mean weight 4.9 plusmn 0.6g to final mean weight 35.8 plusmn 14.6g after 140

  1. Pilot-scale study of efficient vermicomposting of agro-industrial wastes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vaidyanathan Vinoth Kumar; M. Shanmugaprakash; J. Aravind; S. Karthick Raja Namasivayam

    2012-01-01

    Pilot-scale vermicomposting was explored using Eudrilus eugeniae for 90 days with 45 days preliminary decomposition using different agro-industrial wastes as substrates. Spent wash and pressmud were mixed together (referred to as PS) and then combined with cow dung (CD) at five different ratios of PS:CD, namely, 25:75 (T1), 50:50 (T2), 75:25 (T3), 85:15 (T4) and 100 (T5), with two replicates

  2. Natural and Man-Made Chemicals in North American Soils--Continental-Scale Pilot Study Completed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Geological Survey of Canada recently completed a continental-scale pilot study for a proposed geochemical survey of North American soils. This survey will provide baseline soil chemistry data against which future changes in soil composition can be measured and that can be used by Federal, State/Provincial, and local agencies when making risk-assessment and land-use decisions.

  3. Air Emission Flux from Contaminated Dredged Materials Stored in a Pilot-Scale Confined Disposal Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Ravikrishna; K. T. Valsaraj; D. D. Reible; L. J. Thibodeaux; C. B. Price; J. M. Brannon; T. E. Myers; S. Yost

    2001-01-01

    A pilot-scale field simulation was conducted to estimate the air emissions from contaminated dredged material stored in a confined disposal facility (CDF). Contaminated dredged material with a variety of organic chemicals, obtained from Indiana Harbor Canal, was used in the study. It was placed in an outdoor CDF simulator (i.e., a lysi-meter of dimensions 4 ft x 4 ft x

  4. Pilot-Scale and Removal From Boiler Emission Using Indirect-Plasma and Chemical Hybrid Process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshiaki Yamamoto; Hidekatsu Fujishima; Masaaki Okubo; Tomoyuki Kuroki

    2010-01-01

    Pilot-scale simultaneous NOx and SOx removal from boiler emission was performed using an indirect-plasma and chemical hybrid process. The flue-gas flow rate was in the range of 450-1470 Nm3\\/h, the gas temperature was 280??C, the NOx concentration was 30 ppm for city-gas firing, and both NOx and SOx concentrations were 70 and 35 ppm for heavy-oil firing, respectively. Radical injection

  5. Ex situ electroreclamation of heavy metals contaminated sludge: Pilot scale study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ge?rald J. Zagury; Yves Dartiguenave; Jean-Claude Setier

    1999-01-01

    The ex situ remediation of heavy metals-contaminated industrial sludge by electroreclamation (I = 2.5 A) was studied at pilot scale. This research focused on acidification of sludge and electrochemically induced migration of metals, emphasizing their partitioning prior to electroreclamation. The sludge was preacidified to an initial pH of 4.5. After treatment, a very low anode reservoir pH (near 0) was

  6. Macrophyte growth in a pilot-scale constructed wetland for industrial wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. R. Hadad; M. A. Maine; C. A. Bonetto

    2006-01-01

    A pilot-scale wetland was constructed to assess the feasibility of treating the wastewater from a tool industry in Santo Tomé, Santa Fe, Argentina. The wastewater had high conductivity and pH, and contained Cr, Ni and Zn. This paper describes the growth of vegetation in the experimental wetland and the nutrient and metal removal.The wetland was 6×3×0.4m. Water discharge was 1000ld?1

  7. Pilot-scale tests to optimize the treatment of net-alkaline mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min; Kwon, Hyunho

    2011-01-01

    A pilot-scale plant consisting of an oxidation basin (OB), a neutralization basin (NB), a reaction basin (RB), and a settling basin (SB) was designed and built to conduct pilot-scale experiments. With this system, the effects of aeration and pH on ferrous oxidation and on precipitation of the oxidized products were studied systemically. The results of pilot-scale tests showed that aeration at 300 L/min was optimum for oxidation of Fe(II) in the OB, and the efficiency of oxidation of Fe(II) increased linearly with increasing retention time. However, Fe(II) was still present in the subsequent basins-NB, RB, and SB. Results from pilot-scale tests in which neutralization was excluded were used to obtain rate constants for heterogeneous and homogeneous oxidation. Oxidation of Fe(II) reached almost 100% when the pH of the mine drainage was increased to more than 7.5, and there was a linear relationship between total rate constant, log (K(total)), and pH. Absorbance changes for samples from the NB under different pH conditions were measured to determine the precipitation properties of suspended solids in the SB. Because ferrous remained in the inflow to the SB, oxidation of Fe(II) was dominant initially, resulting in increased absorbance, and the rate of precipitation was slow. However, the absorbance of the suspension in the SB rapidly dropped when pH was higher than 7.5. PMID:21046432

  8. Gasification of an Indonesian subbituminous coal in a pilot-scale coal gasification system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yongseung Yun; Seok Woo Chung

    2007-01-01

    Indonesian Roto Middle subbituminous coal was gasified in a pilot-scale dry-feeding gasification system and the produced syngas\\u000a was purified with hot gas filtering and by low temperature desulfurization to the quality that can be utilized as a feedstock\\u000a for chemical conversion. Roto middle coal produced syngas that has a typical composition of 36–38% CO, 14–16% H2, and 5–8% CO2. Particulates

  9. Biological nitrogen removal from municipal landfill leachate in a pilot scale suspended carrier biofilm process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U Welander; T Henrysson; T Welander

    1998-01-01

    Leachate from a municipal landfill receiving both household and industrial waste was treated in pilot scale suspended carrier biofilm reactors for removal of nitrogen and organic matter. Nitrification was studied in two parallel aerated reactors, filled to 60% (v\\/v) with two different models of carrier media with specific surface areas of 210 and 390m2\\/m3 media, respectively. Denitrification was carried out

  10. Pilot-scale study of efficient coagulation sedimentation of micro-polluted water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liang Shen; Li Cheng; Heli Wang; Xinying Lian; Jingxian Qi

    2010-01-01

    This pilot-scale study is based on an efficient coagulation sedimentation process technology used for micro-polluted water treatment of Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal(BHGC). The best coagulant among PAC, Al2(SO4)3 and FeCl3 and its optimal dosage were studied in coagulation sedimentation jar test. The best coagulant was PAC, and its optimal dosage was 40 mg\\/L. The coagulation sedimentation jar test showed that the

  11. Treatment of Selenium in Simulated Refinery Effluent Using a Pilot-Scale Constructed Wetland Treatment System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael M. Spacil; John H. Rodgers Jr; James W. Castle; Cynthia L. Murray Gulde; James E. Myers

    Effective and reliable treatment is needed to treat selenium (Se) in petroleum refinery effluents to meet water discharge\\u000a limits established under the Clean Water Act through the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. As a byproduct of\\u000a petroleum refining processes, effluent containing Se may be produced due to geochemistry of the formations from which petroleum\\u000a is derived. Pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment

  12. Sonoelectrochemical treatment of water polluted with trichloroacetic acid: From sonovoltammetry to pre-pilot plant scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D. Esclapez; V. Sáez; D. Milán-Yáñez; I. Tudela; O. Louisnard; J. González-García

    2010-01-01

    The sonoelectrochemical treatment of aqueous solutions of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) has been scaled-up from the voltammetric analysis to pre-pilot stage. The degradation in absence of ultrasound field has yield to a poor performance which has been improved in presence of ultrasound. The sonovoltametry study has provided the range of potentials and\\/or current densities to be used with the lowest current

  13. Advanced Oxidation Processes for Treating Groundwater Contaminated With TCE and PCE: Pilot-Scale Evaluations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Marco Aieta; Kevin M. Reagan; John S. Lang; Laurent McReynolds; Joon-Wun Kang; William H. Glaze

    1988-01-01

    This article presents the results of a pilot-scale evaluation of an advanced oxidation process that utilizes hydrogen peroxide and ozone. Treatment efficiency was determined as a function of the hydrogen peroxide-to-ozone dosage ratio, ozone dosage, and contact time. The ozone mass transfer characteristics of the process were also investigated. Comparison with other treatment technologies indicates that advanced oxidation can be

  14. Pilot-Scale Evaluation of Hyperbaric Filtration of Ultra Fine Clean Coal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. G. GROPPO; B. K. PAREKH

    1996-01-01

    A pilot scale evaluation of continuous pressure filtration was conducted on minus 200 mesh clean coal recovered by column flotation using an Andritz-Ruthner trailer mounted hyperbaric filter. Results showed that increasing vessel pressure for a given cake formation angle (CFA), increased cake thickness and throughput, while decreasing cake moisture. Baseline testing concluded that filter operating parameters-of 3 bar pressure, 1.5

  15. 106-AN grout pilot-scale test HGTP-93-0501-02

    SciTech Connect

    Bagaasen, L M

    1993-05-01

    The Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) at Hanford, Washington will process the low-level fraction of selected double-shell tank (DST) wastes into a cementitious waste form. This facility, which is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), mixes liquid waste with cementitious materials to produce a waste form that immobilizes hazardous constituents through chemical reactions and/or microencapsulation. Over 1,000,000 gal of Phosphate/Sulfate Waste were solidified in the first production campaign with this facility. The next tank scheduled for treatment is 106-AN. After conducting laboratory studies to select the grout formulation, part of the normal formulation verification process is to conduct tests using the 1/4-scale pilot facilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The major objectives of these pilot-scale tests were to determine if the proposed grout formulation could be processed in the pilot-scale equipment and to collect thermal information to help determine the best way to manage the grout hydration heat.

  16. Membrane bio-reactor for advanced textile wastewater treatment and reuse.

    PubMed

    Lubello, C; Gori, R

    2004-01-01

    Textile wastewater contains slowly- or non-biodegradable organic substances whose removal or transformation calls for advanced tertiary treatments downstream Activated Sludge Treatment Plants (ASTP). This work is focused on the treatment of textile industry wastewater using Membrane Bio-reactor (MBR) technology. An experimental activity was carried out at the Baciacavallo Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) (Prato, Italy) to verify the efficiency of a pilot-scale MBR for the treatment of municipal wastewater, in which textile industry wastewater predominates. In the Baciacavallo WWTP the biological section is followed by a coagulation-flocculation treatment and ozonation. During the 5 months experimental period, the pilot-scale MBR proved to be very effective for wastewater reclamation. On average, removal efficiency of the pilot plant (93% for COD, 96% for ammonium and 99% for total suspended solids) was higher than the WWTP ones. Color was removed as in the WWTP. Anionic surf actants removal of pilot plant and WWTP were very similar (92.5 and 93.3% respectively), while the non-ionic surfactants removal was higher in the pilot plant (99.2 vs. 97.1). In conclusion the MBR technology demonstrated to be effective for textile wastewater reclamation, leading both to an improvement of pollutants removal and to a draw-plate simplification. PMID:15344781

  17. Response of Corynebacterium glutamicum exposed to oscillating cultivation conditions in a two- and a novel three-compartment scale-down bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Anja; Maya Mart?nez-Iturralde, Nina; Spann, Robert; Neubauer, Peter; Junne, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The oscillatory conditions in substrate and oxygen supply that typically occur on a large (industrial) scale are usually simulated in two-compartment scale-down reactors. In this study, the performance of nutrient-limited fed-batch cultivations of Corynebacterium glutamicum in a standard two-compartment reactor (two-CR) is compared to the performance in a novel three-compartment reactor (three-CR). The three-CR is designed to mimic three distinct zones of an industrial scale bioreactor that occur if the feed addition is installed at the bottom of the fluid phase. Our findings show that lactate and succinate appear in concentrations two-fold higher in the three-CR cultivation than in the two-CR cultivation. Similar results are revealed for the amino acids glycine, threonine, glutamate, and glutamine. In contrast to the two-CR cultivation, no intracellular accumulation of pyruvate is observed in the three-CR cultivation, since the carbon fluxes are directed toward lactate. As previously reported, the expression of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is increased in the context of oxygen deprivation. Thus, C. glutamicum adapts to the oscillating environment in the three-CR. This successful adaptation is revealed by a flow cytometric analysis of BOX-stained cells and a series of electrooptical at line measurements of cell polarisability. Both methods indicate a higher polarisability of cells in the three-CR cultivation. PI-staining does not indicate any membrane damage or accelerated cell death in either system. However, although the strain shows robustness, the product yield of lysine is reduced in scale-down cultivations as compared to cultivations at homogeneous conditions, which underlines the relevance of process optimization. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2015;112: 1220-1231. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25728062

  18. Production of recombinant proteins in microalgae at pilot greenhouse scale.

    PubMed

    Gimpel, Javier A; Hyun, James S; Schoepp, Nathan G; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-02-01

    Recombinant protein production in microalgae chloroplasts can provide correctly folded proteins in significant quantities and potentially inexpensive costs compared to other heterologous protein production platforms. The best results have been achieved by using the psbA promoter and 5' untranslated region (UTR) to drive the expression of heterologous genes in a psbA-deficient, non-photosynthetic, algal host. Unfortunately, using such a strategy makes the system unviable for large scale cultivation using natural sunlight for photosynthetic growth. In this study we characterized eight different combinations of 5' regulatory regions and psbA coding sequences for their ability to restore photosynthesis in a psbA-deficient Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, while maintaining robust accumulation of a commercially viable recombinant protein driven by the psbA promoter/5'UTR. The recombinant protein corresponded to bovine Milk Amyloid A (MAA), which is present in milk colostrum and could be used to prevent infectious diarrhea in mammals. This approach allowed us to identify photosynthetic strains that achieved constitutive production of MAA when grown photosynthetically in 100?L bags in a greenhouse. Under these conditions, the maximum MAA expression achieved was 1.86% of total protein, which corresponded to 3.28?mg/L of culture medium. Within our knowledge, this is the first report of a recombinant protein being produced this way in microalgae. PMID:25116083

  19. Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing of surfactants for environmental restoration of chlorinated solvent DNAPLs

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.E. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Fountain, J.C. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This project is composed of two phases and has the objective of demonstrating surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) as a practical remediation technology at DOE sites with ground water contaminated by dense, non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), in particular, chlorinated solvents. The first phase of this project, Laboratory and Pilot Field Scale Testing, which is the subject of the work so far, involves (1) laboratory experiments to examine the solubilization of multiple component DNAPLs, e.g., solvents such as perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), by dilute surfactant solutions, and (2) a field test to demonstrate SEAR technology on a small scale and in an existing well.

  20. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger. Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing

    SciTech Connect

    Jankura, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants - while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of a addressing the emission of SO{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase I and Phase II requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variable than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides the Final Test Plan for the first coal tested in the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.

  1. PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, D

    2007-01-09

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12-inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24-inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24-inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

  2. PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, D

    2006-11-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12 inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24 inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24 inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

  3. Ultrasonic pilot-scale reactor for enzymatic bleaching of cotton fabrics.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Idalina; Herrero-Yniesta, Victor; Perales Arce, Iratxe; Escrigas Castañeda, Monica; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur; Silva, Carla

    2014-07-01

    The potential of ultrasound-assisted technology has been demonstrated by several laboratory scale studies. However, their successful industrial scaling-up is still a challenge due to the limited pilot and commercial sonochemical reactors. In this work, a pilot reactor for laccase-hydrogen peroxide cotton bleaching assisted by ultrasound was scaled-up. For this purpose, an existing dyeing machine was transformed and adapted by including piezoelectric ultrasonic devices. Laboratory experiments demonstrated that both low frequency, high power (22 kHz, 2100 W) and high frequency, low power ultrasounds (850 kHz, 400 W) were required to achieve satisfactory results. Standard half (4 g/L H2O2 at 90 °C for 60 min) and optical (8 g/L H2O2 at 103 °C for 40 min) cotton bleaching processes were used as references. Two sequential stages were established for cotton bleaching: (1) laccase pretreatment assisted by high frequency ultrasound (850 kHz, 400 W) and (2) bleaching using high power ultrasound (22 kHz, 2100 W). When compared with conventional methods, combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide cotton bleaching with ultrasound energy improved the whitening effectiveness. Subsequently, less energy (temperature) and chemicals (hydrogen peroxide) were needed for cotton bleaching thus resulting in costs reduction. This technology allowed the combination of enzyme and hydrogen peroxide treatment in a continuous process. The developed pilot-scale reactor offers an enhancement of the cotton bleaching process with lower environmental impact as well as a better performance of further finishing operations. PMID:24618529

  4. Comparison of lab-scale and pilot-scale hybrid anaerobic solid–liquid systems operated in batch and semi-continuous modes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Y. Wang; H. Zhang; O. Stabnikova; J. H. Tay

    2005-01-01

    The hybrid anaerobic solid–liquid (HASL) system was developed for food waste bioconversion. Lab-scale and pilot-scale HASL systems were operated in batch and semi-continuous modes. High efficiencies for conversion of food waste into biogas were shown for both the lab-scale and pilot-scale HASL systems. Semi-continuous mode of HASL system was more effective than batch process. Methane production was 0.49ll?1day?1 and 0.71ll?1day?1

  5. Bioreactor rotating wall vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells.

  6. Solar photocatalytic degradation of some hazardous water-soluble pesticides at pilot-plant scale.

    PubMed

    Oller, I; Gernjak, W; Maldonado, M I; Pérez-Estrada, L A; Sánchez-Pérez, J A; Malato, S

    2006-12-01

    The technical feasibility and performance of photocatalytic degradation of six water-soluble pesticides (cymoxanil, methomyl, oxamyl, dimethoate, pyrimethanil and telone) have been studied at pilot-plant scale in two well-defined systems which are of special interest because natural solar UV light can be used: heterogeneous photocatalysis with titanium dioxide and homogeneous photocatalysis by photo-Fenton. TiO(2) photocatalysis tests were performed in a 35L solar pilot plant with three Compound Parabolic Collectors (CPCs) under natural illumination and a 75L solar pilot plant with four CPC units was used for homogeneous photocatalysis tests. The initial pesticide concentration studied was 50 mg L(-1) and the catalyst concentrations employed were 200 mg L(-1) of TiO(2) and 20 mg L(-1) of iron. Both toxicity (Vibrio fischeri, Biofix) and biodegradability (Zahn-Wellens test) of the initial pesticide solutions were also measured. Total disappearance of the parent compounds and nearly complete mineralization were attained with all pesticides tested. Treatment time, hydrogen peroxide consumption and release of heteroatoms are discussed. PMID:16839679

  7. Flow characteristics of a pilot-scale high temperature, short time pasteurizer.

    PubMed

    Tomasula, P M; Kozempel, M F

    2004-09-01

    In this study, we present a method for determining the fastest moving particle (FMP) and residence time distribution (RTD) in a pilot-scale high temperature, short time (HTST) pasteurizer to ensure that laboratory or pilot-scale HTST apparatus meets the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance standards for pasteurization of milk and can be used for obtaining thermal inactivation data. The overall dimensions of the plate in the pasteurizer were 75 x 115 mm, with a thickness of 0.5 mm and effective diameter of 3.0 mm. The pasteurizer was equipped with nominal 21.5- and 52.2-s hold tubes, and flow capacity was variable from 0 to 20 L/h. Tracer studies were used to determine FMP times and RTD data to establish flow characteristics. Using brine milk as tracer, the FMP time for the short holding section was 18.6 s and for the long holding section was 36 s at 72 degrees C, compared with the nominal times of 21.5 and 52.2 s, respectively. The RTD study indicates that the short hold section was 45% back mixed and 55% plug flow for whole milk at 72 degrees C. The long hold section was 91% plug and 9% back mixed for whole milk at 72 degrees C. This study demonstrates that continuous laboratory and pilot-scale pasteurizers may be used to study inactivation of microorganisms only if the flow conditions in the holding tube are established for comparison with commercial HTST systems. PMID:15375033

  8. Sonoelectrochemical treatment of water polluted with trichloroacetic acid: from sonovoltammetry to pre-pilot plant scale.

    PubMed

    Esclapez, M D; Sáez, V; Milán-Yáñez, D; Tudela, I; Louisnard, O; González-García, J

    2010-08-01

    The sonoelectrochemical treatment of aqueous solutions of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) has been scaled-up from the voltammetric analysis to pre-pilot stage. The degradation in absence of ultrasound field has yield to a poor performance which has been improved in presence of ultrasound. The sonovoltametry study has provided the range of potentials and/or current densities to be used with the lowest current efficiency penalty. Sonoelectrolyses at batch scale (carried out with a horn-transducer 24 kHz positioned at about 3 cm from the surface of the electrode) achieved little improvement in the degradation. However, when a specifically designed sonoelectrochemical reactor (not optimized) was used during the scale-up, the presence of ultrasound field provided better results (fractional conversion 97%, degradation efficiency 26%, selectivity 0.92 and current efficiency 8%) at lower ultrasonic intensities and volumetric flow. PMID:20022544

  9. Pilot-scale subcritical solvent extraction of curcuminoids from Curcuma long L.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hye-Lim; Chung, Myong-Soo

    2015-10-15

    Curcuminoids consisted curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, were extracted from turmeric using subcritical solvent by varying conditions of temperature (110-150°C), time (1-10min), pressure (5-100atm), solid-to-solvent ratio, and mixing ratio of solvent. Preliminary lab-scale experiments were conducted to determine the optimum extraction temperature and mixing ratio of water and ethanol for the pilot-scale extraction. The maximum yield of curcuminoids in the pilot-scale system was 13.58% (curcumin 4.94%, demethoxycurcumin 4.73%, and bisdemethoxycurcumin 3.91% in dried extracts) at 135°C/5min with water/ethanol mixture (50:50, v/v) as a solvent. On the other hand, the extraction yields of curcuminoids were obtained as 10.49%, 13.71% and 13.96% using the 50%, 95% and 100% ethanol, respectively, at the atmospheric condition (60°C/120min). Overall results showed that the subcritical solvent extraction is much faster and efficient extraction method considering extracted curcuminoids contents and has a potential to develop a commercial process for the extraction of curcuminoids. PMID:25952841

  10. Removal of ammonia nitrogen in wastewater by microwave radiation: a pilot-scale study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Chen, Jing; Xu, Zuqun; Yuan, Songhu; Cao, Menghua; Liu, Huangcheng; Lu, Xiaohua

    2009-09-15

    A large removal of ammonia nitrogen in wastewater has been achieved by microwave (MW) radiation in our previous bench-scale study. This study developed a continuous pilot-scale MW system to remove ammonia nitrogen in real wastewater. A typical high concentration of ammonia nitrogen contaminated wastewater, the coke-plant wastewater from a Coke company, was treated. The output power of the microwave reactor was 4.8 kW and the handling capacity of the reactor was about 5m(3) per day. The ammonia removal efficiencies under four operating conditions, including ambient temperature, wastewater flow rate, aeration conditions and initial concentration were evaluated in the pilot-scale experiments. The ammonia removal could reach about 80% for the real coke-plant wastewater with ammonia nitrogen concentrations of 2400-11000 mg/L. The running cost of the MW technique was a little lower than the conventional steam-stripping method. The continuous microwave system showed the potential as an effective method for ammonia nitrogen removal in coke-plant water treatment. It is proposed that this process is suitable for the treatment of toxic wastewater containing high concentrations of ammonia nitrogen. PMID:19304377

  11. Pilot-scale ex situ electrokinetic restoration of saline greenhouse soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Do-Hyung Kim; Jung-Min Cho; Kitae Baek

    Purpose  This study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using an ex situ electrokinetic system for the restoration of saline\\u000a greenhouse soil.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  An experiment was conducted in a pilot-scale reactor (1?×?1?×?0.25 m) during 14 days.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results and discussion  Chloride accumulated in the top layer through pore-water evaporation. There was no removal of the nitrate in the top layer\\u000a because of the

  12. Sensitivity analyses and simulations of a full-scale experimental membrane bioreactor system using the activated sludge model No. 3 (ASM3).

    PubMed

    Ruiz, L M; Rodelas, P; Pérez, J I; Gómez, M A

    2015-01-01

    An ASM3-based model was implemented in the numerical software MATHEMATICA where sensitivity analyses and simulations of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system were carried out. These results were compared with those obtained using the commercial simulator WEST. Predicted values did not show significant variations between both software and simulations showed that the most influential operational conditions were influent flow rate and concentrations and bioreactor volumes. On the other hand, sensitivity analyses were carried out with both software programs for the same five outputs: COD, ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the effluent, total suspended solids concentration and oxygen uptake rate in the aerobic bioreactor. Similar results were in general obtained in both cases and according to these analyses, the most significant inputs over the model predictions were growth and storage heterotrophic biomass yields and decay coefficient. Other parameters related to the hydrolysis process or to the autotrophic biomass also significantly influenced model outputs. PMID:25594125

  13. Disposable bioreactors for inoculum production and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Eibl, Regine; Löffelholz, Christian; Eibl, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Disposable bioreactors have been increasingly implemented over the past ten years. This relates to both R & D and commercial manufacture, in particular, in animal cell-based processes. Among the numerous disposable bioreactors which are available today, wave-mixed bag bioreactors and stirred bioreactors are predominant. Whereas wave-mixed bag bioreactors represent the system of choice for inoculum production, stirred systems are often preferred for protein expression. For this reason, the authors present protocols instructing the reader how to use the wave-mixed BIOSTAT CultiBag RM 20 L for inoculum production and the stirred UniVessel SU 2 L for recombinant protein production at benchtop scale. All methods described are based on a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) suspension cell line expressing the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP). PMID:24297422

  14. Start-up and maturation phases of a full-scale, high-rate anaerobic pond bioreactor(®) plus improved facultative ponds to treat municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Peña, M R; Aponte, A; Toro, A F

    2015-01-01

    Results of the start-up and maturation phases of a full-scale, high-rate anaerobic pond bioreactor (HRAPB)(®) plus improved facultative ponds (IFPs) to treat municipal wastewater are presented (CODt: 759 mg L(-1), CODf: 219 mg L(-1), S-SO4(2-): 102 mg L(-1), and Cr(+): 1,500 ?gL(-1)). The start-up of the HRAPB(®) comprised, first, the application of a selective pressure increasing up-flow velocity rates. Second, batch stages between successive rates were allowed until 70% of the initial CODf was removed. The IFPs were left in batch and ended when in-pond Chlorophyll-a concentration reached 800 ?gL(-1). Subsequently, the system underwent gradual maturation and reached effluent concentrations of CODt: 223 mg L(-1), CODf: 50 mg L(-1), and Cr(+): 60 ?gL(-1). The actual efficiency of the system compared with the expected design efficiency was lower given the characteristics of the influent wastewater biochemical oxygen demand/chemical oxygen demand ratios < 0.4, presence of Cr(+) >1,000 ?gL(-1), and variations in both conductivity (500-4,500 ?Scm(-1)) and pH (6.5-10.5 units). Nonetheless, the system exhibited an adaptation state in less than 1.5 months and yielded an ST/SV ratio of 0.46, and specific methanogenic activity of 0.43 g-CH4-CODg(-1)SV(-1)d(-1) for HRAPB(®); the in-pond Chlorophyll-a was on average 1,200 ?gL(-1) in the IFPs, which demonstrated the robustness of these eco-technologies in tropical conditions. PMID:25746640

  15. EVALUATION OF PILOT-SCALE AIR POLLUTION CONTROL DEVICES ON A REFUSE AND COAL-FIRED BOILER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project report describes the operation of pilot-scale air pollution control devices to gather data on air pollution efficiency versus several different operating parameters on various waste-as-fuel combustio processes. It also includes a test of a full scale fabric filter use...

  16. Instrumented Bioreactors BIOMATERIALS

    E-print Network

    ultrasonic imaging for determining extracellular matrix (ECM) content. Our bioreactor houses five cubic prepared reference samples with varying concentrations of the components of the extracellular matrix. We hydrogel-based engineered tissues. Ultrasonic sensors have been incorporated to monitor extracellular

  17. Space Bioreactor Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (editor)

    1987-01-01

    The first space bioreactor has been designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and a slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small (500 ml) bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption, and control of low shear stress on cells. Applications of microcarrier cultures, development of the first space bioreactor flight system, shear and mixing effects on cells, process control, and methods to monitor cell metabolism and nutrient requirements are among the topics covered.

  18. Bioreactors for H2 production by purple nonsulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Markov, Sergei A; Weaver, Paul F

    2008-03-01

    Two types of laboratory-scale bioreactors were designed for H(2) production by purple nonsulfur bacteria. The bioreactors employed a unique type of hydrogenase activity found in some photosynthetic bacteria that functions in darkness to shift CO (and H2O) into H(2) (and CO2). The mass transport of gaseous CO into an aqueous bacterial suspension was the rate-limiting step and the main challenge for bioreactor design. Hollow-fiber and bubble-train bioreactors employing immobilized and free-living bacteria have proven effective for enhancing the mass transfer of CO. The hollow-fiber bioreactor was designed so that both a growth medium and CO (10% in N(2)) passed from the inside of the fibers to the outside within the bioreactor. Bacteria were immobilized on the outer surface of the hollow fibers. Hydrogen production from CO at an average rate of 125 ml g cdw(-1) h(-1) (maximum rate of 700 ml g cdw(-1) h(-1)) was observed for more than 8 months. The bubble-train bioreactor was built using polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing, wound helically on a vertical cylindrical supporting structure. Small bubbles containing CO were injected continuously through a needle/septum connection from the gas reservoir (20% CO). Up to 140 ml g cdw(-1) h(-1) of H(2) production activity was observed using this bioreactor for more than 10 days. PMID:18425614

  19. Ph.D. viva voce examination of Mr. Vikrant Sarin ( 2005CHZ8243) Title : Wastewater treatment using membrane bioreactor

    E-print Network

    Kumar, M. Jagadesh

    Ph.D. viva voce examination of Mr. Vikrant Sarin ( 2005CHZ8243) Title : Wastewater treatment using membrane bioreactor Abstract Membrane Bioreactor combines membranes with biological processes for treatment involves using MBR Pilot Plant for studying the treat ability of Municipal Wastewater and Industrial

  20. Creative use of pilot points to address site and regional scale heterogeneity in a variable-density model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dausman, Alyssa M.; Doherty, John; Langevin, Christian D.

    2010-01-01

    Pilot points for parameter estimation were creatively used to address heterogeneity at both the well field and regional scales in a variable-density groundwater flow and solute transport model designed to test multiple hypotheses for upward migration of fresh effluent injected into a highly transmissive saline carbonate aquifer. Two sets of pilot points were used within in multiple model layers, with one set of inner pilot points (totaling 158) having high spatial density to represent hydraulic conductivity at the site, while a second set of outer points (totaling 36) of lower spatial density was used to represent hydraulic conductivity further from the site. Use of a lower spatial density outside the site allowed (1) the total number of pilot points to be reduced while maintaining flexibility to accommodate heterogeneity at different scales, and (2) development of a model with greater areal extent in order to simulate proper boundary conditions that have a limited effect on the area of interest. The parameters associated with the inner pilot points were log transformed hydraulic conductivity multipliers of the conductivity field obtained by interpolation from outer pilot points. The use of this dual inner-outer scale parameterization (with inner parameters constituting multipliers for outer parameters) allowed smooth transition of hydraulic conductivity from the site scale, where greater spatial variability of hydraulic properties exists, to the regional scale where less spatial variability was necessary for model calibration. While the model is highly parameterized to accommodate potential aquifer heterogeneity, the total number of pilot points is kept at a minimum to enable reasonable calibration run times.

  1. Aerosol characteristics in the offgas from a pilot-scale sluicing operation

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Whyatt, G.A.; Beckette, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    A pilot-scale study was performed to simulate conditions anticipated during sluicing operations to retrieve waste in single-shell Tank 241-C-106 at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The objective of the study was to identify and characterize the potential aerosol source term at the inlet of the headspace exhaust ventilation system during sluicing operations. The information is needed to support decisions for components to be used in the full-scale operation. A secondary objective was to qualitatively evaluate the visibility during sluicing. Three simulated sluicing tests were performed in the 336 Building`s quarter-scale waste tank facility located at Hanford. Scaling relationships were used to guide modifications to the quarter-scale tank to accommodate tests that simulated tank geometry, sluicing, and ventilation conditions in the full-scale tank. Simulated sluicing fluids were targeted on solid and liquid surfaces during the tests. Test conditions were monitored, and aerosol measurements were made in the offgas ventilation duct. Also during the tests, an in-tank camera was used to monitor visibility.

  2. Second-order chlorine decay and trihalomethanes formation in a pilot-scale water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Yang, Y Jeffrey; Yu, Jieze; Zhang, Tu-qiao; Mao, Xinwei; Shao, Weiyun

    2012-08-01

    It is well known that model-building of chlorine decay in real water distribution systems is difficult because chlorine decay is influenced by many factors (e.g., bulk water demand, pipe-wall demand, piping material, flow velocity, and residence time). In this paper, experiments were run to investigate the kinetic model of chlorine decay and the formation model of trihalomethanes (THMs) in pilot-scale water distribution systems. Experimental results show that the rate constants of chlorine decay, including wall decay and bulk decay, increasing with temperature. Moreover, the kinetic model of chlorine decay and the formation model of THMs describe experiment data of pilot-scale water distribution systems. The effect of different piping material on chlorine decay and THMs formation were also investigated. The rate constants of chlorine decay are ranked in order: stainless steel pipe, ductile iron pipe, and last, polyethelene pipe because wall decay is the largest in stainless steel pipe than that in other piping material. Correspondingly, the rate of THMs formation follows the order of stainless steel pipe, ductile iron pipe, and last, polyethelene pipe because of less chlorine in bulk water reacting with the trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). PMID:22953450

  3. [Pilot-scale cultivation of Spirulina plantensis with digested piggery wastewater ].

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing-qing; Liu, Rui; Luo, Jin-fei; Wang, Gen-rong; Chen, Lii-jun; Liu, Xiao

    2014-09-01

    The swine waste pretreated with coagulation sedimentation was used for the outdoor pilot-scale cultivation of Spirulina platensis isolated from digested piggery wastewater (DPW) in a raceway pond. The growth of S. platensis and removal of nitrogen/ phosphorus were studied, moreover, the conversion efficiency of total nitrogen (TN) or total phosphorus (TP) from DPW to S. platensis was calculated. On this basis, the existing problems and countermeasures during outdoor pilot-scale culture were analyzed and summarized combined with the laboratory research. We conducted 6 batches culture experiments, only 3 of which could reach the S. platensis harvest requirements (D560 >0. 8). Meanwhile, the 3 successful batches achieved removal of COD, ammonia nitrogen, TN, TP with corresponding 28. 6% -48. 5% , 0.4% -48. 5% , 41. 8% -48. 6% , 14. 3% -94. 5% , and the conversion efficiency of TN or TP from DPW to S. platensis reached 12. 1% -98. 5% , 21.2% -83.7% , respectively. High concentration of ammonia nitrogen and insect attack of remaining egg hatching in the pretreated swine waste were the main factors to cause the slow-growing of the 3 batches of S. platensis. Therefore, it is highly necessary for the removal of ammonia nitrogen with biological treatment technology and insect eggs with membrane to achieve a stable high productivity. PMID:25518669

  4. Development of a pilot scale anaerobic digester for biogas production from cow manure and whey mix.

    PubMed

    Comino, Elena; Rosso, Maurizio; Riggio, Vincenzo

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents results from anaerobic digestion of cow manure and whey mix. A pilot scale anaerobic digester, 128 l in volume, has been developed, to operate under batch and fed-batch conditions. The versatile and unique characteristics of the instrument allowed testing the methane production directly in the farm. The digester performance was evaluated with two calibration tests, the main for a period of 56 days. The study test was divided into three phases, one for each type of feeding operation (batch, fed-batch, batch). The initial phase of digestion resulted in 57 l-CH(4)/kg-VS, the second phase had a yield of 86.6 l-CH(4)/kg-VS and the third one had a production of 67 l-CH(4)/kg-VS. The total methane yield was equal to 211.4 l-CH(4)/kg-VS. Using the obtained pilot plant results to a real scale diary production cycle, it was possible to evaluate an electricity production equal to 8.86 kwh per 1 t/d. The conducted tests did show that there is a good potential to the use of a cow manure and whey biomass mix for biogas production. PMID:19559606

  5. Integrated treatment of landfill leachates including electrooxidation at pilot plant scale.

    PubMed

    Urtiaga, Ane; Rueda, Ana; Anglada, Angela; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2009-07-30

    This paper reports the integration of advanced and conventional technologies to deal with the treatment of landfill leachates. The raw leachate, with average values of COD=4430 mg/L and N-NH(4)(+)=1225 mg/L, was first treated on site by an activated sludge large-scale process reducing the former parameters to 1750 mg/L (av.) of COD and 750 mg/L (av.) of N-NH(4)(+). Next, 50 L/h of the effluent were pumped to a pilot plant that included Fenton oxidation followed by an electrooxidation unit, provided with boron doped diamond anodes (anode area=1.05 m(2)); almost complete removal of the organic matter and ammonium nitrogen was achieved. Comparison of the results with those obtained in the laboratory (70 cm(2) of anode area) was performed observing a similar performance in the kinetics of COD removal, while differences were found in the ammonium removal rates. The specific energy consumption necessary to electro-oxidize the organic load below the disposal limit (COD<160 mg/L) at pilot plant scale was 35 kWh/m(3). PMID:19117670

  6. INVESTIGATING SUSPENSION OF MST, CST, AND SIMULATED SLUDGE SLURRIES IN A PILOT-SCALE WASTE TANK

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.

    2011-05-24

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending and resuspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is for the pumps to resuspend the MST, CST, and simulated sludge particles so that they can be removed from the tank, and to suspend the MST so it can contact strontium and actinides. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5, B3, and B1). Previous testing showed that three Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank, and to resuspend MST that has settled in a waste tank at nominal 45 C for four weeks. The conclusions from this analysis are: (1) Three SMPs will be able to resuspend more than 99.9% of the MST and CST that has settled for four weeks at nominal 45 C. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 84% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (2) Three SMPs will be able to resuspend more than 99.9% of the MST, CST, and simulated sludge that has settled for four weeks at nominal 45 C. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 82% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (3) A contact time of 6-12 hours is needed for strontium sorption by MST in a jet mixed tank with cooling coils, which is consistent with bench-scale testing and actinide removal process (ARP) operation.

  7. UV/chlorine control of drinking water taste and odour at pilot and full-scale.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ding; Bolton, James R; Andrews, Susan A; Hofmann, Ron

    2015-10-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) can be used to destroy taste and odour-causing compounds in drinking water. This work investigated both pilot- and full-scale performance of the novel ultraviolet (UV)/chlorine AOP for the destruction of geosmin, 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and caffeine (as a surrogate) in two different surface waters. The efficiency of the UV/chlorine process at pH 7.5 and 8.5 was comparable to that of the UV/hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2) process under parallel conditions, and was superior at pH 6.5. Caffeine was found to be a suitable surrogate for geosmin and MIB, and could be used as a more economical alternative to geosmin or MIB spiking for site-specific full-scale testing. PMID:26025188

  8. Near-Tank Treatment of Hanford Tank Waste: Pilot-Scale Testing - 12107

    SciTech Connect

    Schonewill, P.P.; Edwards, M.K.; Shimskey, R.W.; Peterson, R.A. [Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Smith, C.; Tranbarger, R. [Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group, Pasco, Washington 99301 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    In order to reduce the number of high level waste canisters that will have to be produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, supplemental waste treatment technologies are being investigated. One such technology is the Near-Tank Treatment System, which uses continuous sludge leaching, filtration, and ion exchange to process the waste in a simple, compact system. The Near Tank Treatment System is ideally suited for handling Hanford tanks with large amounts of boehmite, a difficult aluminum phase to dissolve. A pilot-scale Near Tank Treatment System was constructed and tested with a boehmite and iron oxyhydroxide waste simulant to evaluate the robustness and effectiveness of the system. The data from the pilot-scale tests were also used to assess scale-up from previously performed bench-scale tests. It should be noted that any work involving the use of simulated HLW has inherent limitations. For this work, every attempt was made to ensure that the simulant mimicked the actual waste performance as closely as possible. However, there are always limitations in the ability to The NTTS Demonstration Test established that all the subsystems could be operated concurrently to process the waste simulant. The NTTS had a stable performance during the Demonstration Test that required very little external manipulation once a steady state was achieved. The CSL demonstrated effectively 90% dissolution of the hard to leach boehmite phase. The cross flow filtration system was able to deliver decontaminated salt solution to the NTCR system. The NTCR system exceeded the design basis by providing effluent below the detection limit beyond the design basis required time. The NTTS system was successfully demonstrated and has shown that leaching and decontamination of the subsequent permeate can be readily achieved using relatively small footprint equipment in an at tank application. (authors)

  9. Scaling Down to Scale Up: A Health Economic Analysis of Integrating Point-of-Care Syphilis Testing into Antenatal Care in Zambia during Pilot and National Rollout Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Ncube, Alexander Tshaka; Sweeney, Sedona; Fleischer, Colette; Mumba, Grace Tembo; Gill, Michelle M.; Strasser, Susan; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Terris-Prestholt, Fern

    2015-01-01

    Maternal syphilis results in an estimated 500,000 stillbirths and neonatal deaths annually in Sub-Saharan Africa. Despite the existence of national guidelines for antenatal syphilis screening, syphilis testing is often limited by inadequate laboratory and staff services. Recent availability of inexpensive rapid point-of-care syphilis tests (RST) can improve access to antenatal syphilis screening. A 2010 pilot in Zambia explored the feasibility of integrating RST within prevention of mother-to-child-transmission of HIV services. Following successful demonstration, the Zambian Ministry of Health adopted RSTs into national policy in 2011. Cost data from the pilot and 2012 preliminary national rollout were extracted from project records, antenatal registers, clinic staff interviews, and facility observations, with the aim of assessing the cost and quality implications of scaling up a successful pilot into a national rollout. Start-up, capital, and recurrent cost inputs were collected, including costs of extensive supervision and quality monitoring during the pilot. Costs were analysed from a provider’s perspective, incremental to existing antenatal services. Total and unit costs were calculated and a multivariate sensitivity analysis was performed. Our accompanying qualitative study by Ansbro et al. (2015) elucidated quality assurance and supervisory system challenges experienced during rollout, which helped explain key cost drivers. The average unit cost per woman screened during rollout ($11.16) was more than triple the pilot unit cost ($3.19). While quality assurance costs were much lower during rollout, the increased unit costs can be attributed to several factors, including higher RST prices and lower RST coverage during rollout, which reduced economies of scale. Pilot and rollout cost drivers differed due to implementation decisions related to training, supervision, and quality assurance. This study explored the cost of integrating RST into antenatal care in pilot and national rollout settings, and highlighted important differences in costs that may be observed when moving from pilot to scale-up. PMID:25970443

  10. Manufacturing Cost Analysis for YSZ-Based FlexCells at Pilot and Full Scale Production Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Swartz; Lora Thrun; Robin Kimbrell; Kellie Chenault

    2011-05-01

    Significant reductions in cell costs must be achieved in order to realize the full commercial potential of megawatt-scale SOFC power systems. The FlexCell designed by NexTech Materials is a scalable SOFC technology that offers particular advantages over competitive technologies. In this updated topical report, NexTech analyzes its FlexCell design and fabrication process to establish manufacturing costs at both pilot scale (10 MW/year) and full-scale (250 MW/year) production levels and benchmarks this against estimated anode supported cell costs at the 250 MW scale. This analysis will show that even with conservative assumptions for yield, materials usage, and cell power density, a cost of $35 per kilowatt can be achieved at high volume. Through advancements in cell size and membrane thickness, NexTech has identified paths for achieving cell manufacturing costs as low as $27 per kilowatt for its FlexCell technology. Also in this report, NexTech analyzes the impact of raw material costs on cell cost, showing the significant increases that result if target raw material costs cannot be achieved at this volume.

  11. PILOT SCALE TESTING OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE MIXING FOR THE SRS SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS - 11224

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Restivo, M.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.; Steeper, T.

    2011-01-25

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and select actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the requirements for the pumps to suspend the MST particles so that they can contact the strontium and actinides in the liquid and be removed from the tank. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of SRS Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations). The conclusions from this work follow: (i) Neither two standard slurry pumps nor two quad volute slurry pumps will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. (ii) Two Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. However, the testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is close to the maximum discharge velocity of the pump (within 12%). (iii) Three SMPs will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 66% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (iv) Three SMPs are needed to resuspend MST that has settled in a waste tank at nominal 45 C for four weeks. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 77% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. Two SMPs are not sufficient to resuspend MST that settled under these conditions.

  12. Estimation of soil air permeability components at a laboratory-scale pilot.

    PubMed

    Boudouch, Otmane; Esrael, Daoud; Kacem, Mariem; Benadda, Belkacem

    2012-01-01

    Soil air permeability is a key parameter in the design of soil vapour extraction. The purpose of this study is to verify the applicability of different analytical solutions, developed to determine soil characteristics in field conditions, to estimate soil air permeability in a small-scale pilot, since field testing may be expensive. A laboratory tridirectional pilot and a unidirectional column were designed in order to achieve the objectives of this work. Use of a steady-state unconfined analytical solution was found to be an appropriate method to determine soil air permeability components for the pilot conditions. Using pressure data collected under open, steady-state conditions, the average values of radial and vertical permeability were found to be, respectively, 9.97 x 10(-7) and 8.74 x 10(-7) cm2. The use of semi-confined analytical solutions may not be suitable to estimate soil parameters since a significant difference was observed between simulated and observed vacuums. Air permeability was underestimated when transient solutions were used, in comparison with methods based on steady-state solutions. The air radial and vertical permeability was found to be, respectively, 7.06 x 10(-7) and 4.93 x 10(-7) cm2, in the open scenario, and 2.30 x 10(-7) and 1.51 x 10(-7) cm2 in the semi-confined scenario. However, a good estimate of soil porosity was achieved using the two transient methods. The average values were predicted to be 0.482, in the open scenario, and 0.451 in the semi-confined scenario, which was in good agreement with the real value. PMID:23393962

  13. Pilot-scale treatment and cooling tower reuse of gasification wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Galegher, S.J.; Mann, M.D.; Willson, W.G.; Mayer, G.G.; Hendrikson, J.G.

    1985-03-01

    The principal goal of the gasification research program at the University of North Dakota Energy Research Center (UNDERC) is to develop environmental data for effluent streams for fixed-bed gasification processes using low rank coals (LRC). Current efforts involve the treatment of gas liquor wastewater streams, and subsequent reuse in process cooling towers. The relatively large volume of wastewater produced in the fixed-bed gasification of LRC's makes the reuse of this stream in an evaporative cooling tower a desirable approach. However, the use of gas liquor as cooling tower makeup presents both operating and environmental concerns. At UNDERC a series of cooling tower wastewater reuse tests have been performed using water pretreated to various degrees. Wastewater for each test was produced in a pilot slagging fixed-bed gasifier (SFBG) at UNDERC using North Dakota lignite from the Indian Head mine. During the first phase of testing SFBG wastewater was treated by solvent extraction and steam stripping, to reduce levels of phenolic compounds and ammonia, prior to use as makeup to a pilot mechanical draft cooling tower. In later tests, this extracted and stripped wastewater (SGL) was further treated by biological oxidation and by granular activated carbon adsorption in pilot equipment at UNDERC before being fed to the cooling tower. The final test in this series involved the use of this extensively treated wastewater with the addition of chemical corrosion and scale inhibitors as cooling tower makeup. High carbon steel corrosion rates, biological and organic fouling rates, foaming, and volatile organic stripping rates were observed in the test using stripped gas liquor from slagging fixed-bed gasification.

  14. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 200-BP-5 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump and treat testing at the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. This treatability test plan has been prepared in response to an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), as documented in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et al. 1989a) Change Control Form M-13-93-03 (Ecology et al. 1994) and a recent 200 NPL Agreement Change Control Form (Appendix A). The agreement also requires that, following completion of the activities described in this test plan, a 200-BP-5 Operable Unit Interim Remedial Measure (IRM) Proposed Plan be developed for use in preparing an Interim Action Record of Decision (ROD). The IRM Proposed Plan will be supported by the results of this treatability test plan, as well as by other 200-BP-5 Operable Unit activities (e.g., development of a qualitative risk assessment). Once issued, the Interim Action ROD will specify the interim action(s) for groundwater contamination at the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. The treatability test approach is to conduct a pilot-scale pump and treat test for each of the two contaminant plumes associated with the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit. Primary contaminants of concern are {sup 99}Tc and {sup 60}Co for underwater affected by past discharges to the 216-BY Cribs, and {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239/240}Pu, and Cs for groundwater affected by past discharges to the 216-B-5 Reverse Well. The purpose of the pilot-scale treatability testing presented in this testplan is to provide the data basis for preparing an IRM Proposed Plan. To achieve this objective, treatability testing must: Assess the performance of groundwater pumping with respect to the ability to extract a significant amount of the primary contaminant mass present in the two contaminant plumes.

  15. Organic matter removal during pilot-scale soil aquifer treatment for domestic wastewater in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Ascúntar-Ríos, D; Madera-Parra, C A; Peña-Varón, M R; Sharma, S K

    2014-01-01

    The potential of enhancing water uses using soil aquifer treatment (SAT) is an interesting alternative for tropical regions, limited only by lack of knowledge on its performance in local conditions and the feasibility of adapting this technology. A SAT pilot study was conducted to analyze the phenomena associated with the transformation of organic matter (OM) from domestic wastewater. Chemically enhanced primary effluent collected at the Cañaveralejo wastewater treatment plant (Cali, Colombia) was used to feed pilot-scale SAT units at a rate of 1.25 m.d?¹. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal in a 5.0 m length and 0.1 m diameter column packed with sand was 64.4%, while a similar column packed with a Mollisol soil from Valle del Cauca region yielded 56.2%. Oxygen availability was an important factor in OM degradation, given that the sand column degraded OM aerobically and the soil column degraded OM under oxic as well as anoxic conditions. SAT acted as a reliable barrier for DOC in tropical conditions. Nevertheless, operational problems such as clogging indicated that probably Mollisol soil may not be the suitable for SAT or that this particular effluent requires further pre-treatment before SAT. PMID:25098874

  16. Effect on orange juice of batch pasteurization in an improved pilot-scale microwave oven.

    PubMed

    Cinquanta, L; Albanese, D; Cuccurullo, G; Di Matteo, M

    2010-01-01

    The effects on orange juice batch pasteurization in an improved pilot-scale microwave (MW) oven was evaluated by monitoring pectin methyl-esterase (PME) activity, color, carotenoid compounds and vitamin C content. Trials were performed on stirred orange juice heated at different temperatures (60, 70, 75, and 85 degrees C) during batch process. MW pilot plant allowed real-time temperature control of samples using proportional integrative derivative (PID) techniques based on the infrared thermography temperature read-out. The inactivation of heat sensitive fraction of PME, that verifies orange juice pasteurization, showed a z-value of 22.1 degrees C. Carotenoid content, responsible for sensorial and nutritional quality in fresh juices, decreased by about 13% after MW pasteurization at 70 degrees C for 1 min. Total of 7 carotenoid compounds were quantified during MW heating: zeaxanthin and beta-carotene content decreased by about 26%, while no differences (P < 0.05) were found for beta-cryptoxanthin in the same trial. A slight decrease in vitamin C content was monitored after MW heating. Results showed that MW heating with a fine temperature control could result in promising stabilization treatments. PMID:20492165

  17. Pilot-scale study of the solar detoxification of VOC-contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Mehos, M.; Turchi, C. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Pacheco, J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Boegel, A.J.; Merrill, T.; Stanley, R. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-08-01

    The Solar Detoxification Field Experiment was designed to investigate the photocatalytic decomposition of organic contaminants in groundwater at a Superfund site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The process uses ultraviolet (UV) energy, available in sunlight, in conjunction with the photocatalyst, titanium dioxide, to decompose organic chemicals into nontoxic compounds. The field experiment was developed by three federal laboratories: the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNLA), and LLNL. The US Department of Energy funded the experiment. The objectives of the pilot-scale study included the advancement of the solar technology into a nonlaboratory waste-remediation environment the compilation of test data to help guide laboratory research and future demonstrations and the development of safe operational procedures. Results of the pilot study are discussed, emphasizing the effect of several process variables on the system performance. These variables include alkalinity, catalyst loading, flow velocity through the reactor, and incident solar UV radiation. The performance of the solar detoxification process are discussed as it relates to concentrating and nonconcentrating collectors.

  18. NASA Classroom Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Exploration of space provides a compelling need for cell-based research into the basic mechanisms that underlie the profound changes that occur in terrestrial life that is transitioned to low gravity environments. Toward that end, NASA developed a rotating bioreactor in which cells are cultured while continuously suspended in a cylinder in which the culture medium rotates with the cylinder. The randomization of the gravity vector accomplished by the continuous rotation, in a low shear environment, provides an analog of microgravity. Because cultures grown in bioreactors develop structures and functions that are much closer to those exhibited by native tissue than can be achieved with traditional culture methods, bioreactors have contributed substantially to advancing research in the fields of cancer, diabetes, infectious disease modeling for vaccine production, drug efficacy, and tissue engineering. NASA has developed a Classroom Bioreactor (CB) that is built from parts that are easily obtained and assembled, user-friendly and versatile. It can be easily used in simple school settings to examine the effect cultures of seeds or cells. An educational brief provides assembly instructions and lesson plans that describes activities in science, math and technology that explore free fall, microgravity, orbits, bioreactors, structure-function relationships and the scientific method.

  19. Design and analysis of a pilot scale biofiltration system for odorous air

    SciTech Connect

    Classen, J.J.; Young, J.S.; Bottcher, R.W.; Westerman, P.W.

    2000-02-01

    Three pilot-scale biofilters and necessary peripheral equipment were built to clean odorous air from the pit of a swine gestation building at North Carolina State University. A computer measured temperatures, flow rates, and pressure drops. It also controlled and measured the moisture content of a biofilter medium comprised of a 3:1 mixture of yard waste compost to wood chips mixture (by volume). The system was evaluated to ensure that the biofilters would be useful for performing scientific experiments concerning the reduction of swine odor on future research projects. The capability of the biofilters to remove odor was measured using a cotton swatch absorption method and an odor panel. The average odor reductions measured by odor intensity, irritation intensity, and unpleasantness for five tests were 61%, 58%, and 84%, respectively. No significant differences in odor reduction performance were found between the biofilters.

  20. Anaerobic Treatment of Palm Oil Mill Effluent in Pilot-Scale Anaerobic EGSB Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Mahmood, Qaisar; Qiu, Jiang-Ping; Li, Yin-Sheng; Chang, Yoon-Seong; Li, Xu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Large volumes of untreated palm oil mill effluent (POME) pose threat to aquatic environment due to the presence of very high organic content. The present investigation involved two pilot-scale anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactors, continuously operated for 1 year to treat POME. Setting HRT at 9.8?d, the anaerobic EGSB reactors reduced COD from 71179?mg/L to 12341?mg/L and recycled half of sludge by a dissolved air flotation (DAF). The average effluent COD was 3587?mg/L with the consistent COD removal efficiency of 94.89%. Adding cationic polymer (PAM) dose of 30?mg/L to DAF unit and recycling its half of sludge caused granulation of anaerobic sludge. Bacilli and small coccid bacteria were the dominant microbial species of the reactor. The reactor produced 27.65?m3 of biogas per m3 of POME which was utilized for electricity generation. PMID:26167485

  1. Antibacterial and enzymatic activity of microbial community during wastewater treatment by pilot scale vermifiltration system.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sudipti; Rajpal, Ankur; Bhargava, Renu; Pruthi, Vikas; Bhatia, Akansha; Kazmi, A A

    2014-08-01

    The present study investigated microbial community diversity and antibacterial and enzymatic properties of microorganisms in a pilot-scale vermifiltration system during domestic wastewater treatment. The study included isolation and identification of diverse microbial community by culture-dependent method from a vermifilter (VF) with earthworms and a conventional geofilter (GF) without earthworms. The results of the four months study revealed that presence of earthworms in VF could efficiently remove biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total and fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci and other pathogens. Furthermore, the burrowing activity of earthworms promoted the aeration conditions in VF which led to the predominance of the aerobic microorganisms, accounting for complex microbial community diversity. Antibacterial activity of the isolated microorganisms revealed the mechanism behind the removal of pathogens, which is reported for the first time. Specifically, cellulase, amylase and protease activity is responsible for biodegradation and stabilization of organic matter. PMID:24907572

  2. [Pilot-scale study on riparian mixed plant zones treating polluted river water].

    PubMed

    Li, Rui-hua; Guan, Yun-tao; He, Miao; Hu, Hong-yin; Jiang, Zhan-peng

    2006-04-01

    The polluted river water is treated with pilot-scale riparian zones of no aquatic plant, Vetiveria zizanioides + submerged plants, and weed+ Typha angustifolia L. + Phragmites communis. It is shown that the vegetation water zones are better than the no vegetation water zone and Vetiveria zizanioides + submerged plants zone is the best in improving water quality. The average removals of the Vetiveria zizanioides + submerged plant zone is 43.5% COD, 71.1% ammonia and 69.3% total phosphorus respectively. The dissolved oxygen (DO) and temperature of effluents from the three water zones are also investigated. It shows that DO of effluent from the vegetation zones are more stable than that of effluent from the no vegetation zone, and the temperature of the effluent from the vegetation zones are lower than that from the no vegetation zones. The submerged plants have special role in water quality improvement, and should be studied further. PMID:16767981

  3. Torrefaction of cedarwood in a pilot scale rotary kiln and the influence of industrial flue gas.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yanyang; Liu, Rujie; Yang, Qing; Yang, Haiping; Shao, Jingai; Draper, Christopher; Zhang, Shihong; Chen, Hanping

    2015-02-01

    Torrefaction of cedarwood was performed in a pilot-scale rotary kiln at various temperatures (200, 230, 260 and 290°C). The torrefaction properties, the influence on the grindability and hydroscopicity of the torrefied biomass were investigated in detail as well as the combustion performance. It turned out that, compared with raw biomass, the grindability and the hydrophobicity of the torrefied biomass were significantly improved, and the increasing torrefaction temperature resulted in a decrease in grinding energy consumption and an increase in the proportion of smaller-sized particles. The use of industrial flue gas had a significant influence on the behavior of cedarwood during torrefaction and the properties of the resultant solid products. To optimize the energy density and energy yield, the temperature of torrefaction using flue gas should be controlled within 260°C. Additionally, the combustion of torrefied samples was mainly the combustion of chars, with similar combustion characteristics to lignite. PMID:25497055

  4. Slag Characterization: A Necessary Tool for Modeling and Simulating Refractory Corrosion on a Pilot Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregurek, D.; Wenzl, C.; Reiter, V.; Studnicka, H. L.; Spanring, A.

    2014-09-01

    The slag in pyrometallurgical operations plays a major role affecting the life of furnace refractory. As such, comprehensive mineralogical and chemical slag examination, physical property determination including the slag melting point or liquidus, and viscosity are necessary for precise understanding of a slag. At the RHI Technology Center Leoben, Austria, the main objective of slag characterization work is to reach a better understanding of refractory corrosion. This corrosion testwork is performed at the laboratory and pilot scale. Typically, corrosion tests are performed in an induction furnace or rotary kiln, with the main purpose being the improved selection of the most suitable refractory products to improve refractory performance in operating metallurgical furnaces. This article focuses on characterization of samples of six non-ferrous, customer-provided slags. This includes slag from a copper Peirce-Smith converter, a short rotary furnace for lead smelting, a titania-processing furnace, and a Ni-Cu top blowing rotary converter (TBRC) plant.

  5. Pilot-scale vermicomposting of pineapple wastes with earthworms native to Accra, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Mainoo, Nana O K; Barrington, Suzelle; Whalen, Joann K; Sampedro, Luis

    2009-12-01

    Pineapple wastes, an abundant organic waste in Accra, Ghana, were vermicomposted using native earthworms (Eudrilus eugeniae Kinberg) collected from the banks of streams and around bath houses of this city. Triplicate pilot-scale vermidigesters containing about 90 earthworms and three other control boxes with no earthworms were fed pineapple pulp or peels, and the loss of wet mass was monitored over 20 weeks. In a second experiment, a 1:1 mixture of pineapple peels and pulp (w/w) was fed to triplicate pilot-scale vermicomposters and control boxes during a 20 week period. One month after feeding ended, the vermicompost and composted (control) waste was air dried and analyzed. During the first experiment, the vermicomposted pineapple pulp and peels lost 99% and 87% of their wet mass, respectively, indicating the potential for vermicomposting. Fresh pineapple waste exhibited an initial pH of 4.4, but after 24 weeks, the vermicompost and compost had acquired a neutral to alkaline pH of 7.2-9.2. The vermicompost contained as much as 0.4% total N, 0.4% total P and 0.9% total K, and had a C:N ratio of 9-10. A reduction of 31-70% in the Escherichia coli plus Salmonella loads and 78-88% in the Aspergillus load was observed during vermicomposting. The rapid breakdown of pineapple wastes by E. eugeniae demonstrated the viability of vermicomposting as a simple and low cost technology recycling this waste into a soil amendment that could be used by the 2500 vegetable producers of Accra and its surrounding areas. PMID:19620003

  6. Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick; Zacher, Alan

    2007-09-28

    The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.

  7. Pilot-scale grout production test with a simulated low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Fow, C.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Treat, R.L.; Hymas, C.R.

    1987-05-01

    Plans are underway at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to convert the low-level fraction of radioactive liquid wastes to a grout form for permanent disposal. Grout is a mixture of liquid waste and grout formers, including portland cement, fly ash, and clays. In the plan, the grout slurry is pumped to subsurface concrete vaults on the Hanford Site, where the grout will solidify into large monoliths, thereby immobilizing the waste. A similar disposal concept is being planned at the Savannah River Laboratory site. The underground disposal of grout was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory between 1966 and 1984. Design and construction of grout processing and disposal facilities are underway. The Transportable Grout Facility (TGF), operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) for the Department of Energy (DOE), is scheduled to grout Phosphate/Sulfate N Reactor Operations Waste (PSW) in FY 1988. Phosphate/Sulfate Waste is a blend of two low-level waste streams generated at Hanford's N Reactor. Other wastes are scheduled to be grouted in subsequent years. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is verifying that Hanford grouts can be safely and efficiently processed. To meet this objective, pilot-scale grout process equipment was installed. On July 29 and 30, 1986, PNL conducted a pilot-scale grout production test for Rockwell. During the test, 16,000 gallons of simulated nonradioactive PSW were mixed with grout formers to produce 22,000 gallons of PSW grout. The grout was pumped at a nominal rate of 15 gpm (about 25% of the nominal production rate planned for the TGF) to a lined and covered trench with a capacity of 30,000 gallons. Emplacement of grout in the trench will permit subsequent evaluation of homogeneity of grout in a large monolith. 12 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Bench- and pilot-scale thermal desorption treatability studies on pesticide-contaminated soils from Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    SciTech Connect

    Swanstrom, C.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Besmer, M. [Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Denver, CO (United States)

    1995-03-09

    Thermal desorption is being considered as a potential remediation technology for pesticide-contaminated soils at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) in Denver, Colorado. From 1988 through 1992, numerous laboratory- and bench-scale indirect-heated thermal desorption (IHTD) treatability studies have been performed on various soil medium groups from the arsenal. RMA has contracted Argonne National Laboratory to conduct a pilot-scale direct-fired thermal desorption (DFTD) treatability study on pesticide-contaminated RMA soil. The purpose of this treatability study is to evaluate the overall effectiveness of the DFTD technology on contaminated RMA soils and to provide data upon which future conceptual design assumptions and cost estimates for a full-scale system can be made. The equipment used in the DFTD treatability study is of large enough scale to provide good full-scale design parameters and operating conditions. The study will also provide valuable-emissions and materials-handling data. Specifically this program will determine if DFTD can achieve reductions in soil contamination below the RMA preliminary remediation goals (PRGs), define system operating conditions for achieving the PRGs, and determine the fate of arsenic and other hazardous metals at these operating conditions. This paper intends to compare existing data from a bench-scale IHTD treatability study using equipment operated in the batch mode to new data from a pilot-scale DFTD operated in a parallel-flow continuous mode. Delays due to materials-handling problems and permit issues have delayed the start of the pilot-scale DFTD testing. The first pilot-scale test is scheduled for the flat week in January 1995. The available data will be presented March 9, 1995, at the Seventh Annual Gulf Coast Environmental Conference in Houston, Texas.

  9. PILOT-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF A SLURRY-PHASE BIOLOGICAL REACTOR FOR CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL - APPLICATION ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, a pilot-scale demonstration of a slurry-phase bioremediation process was performed May 1991 at the EPA?s Test & Evaluation Facility in Cincinnati, OH. In this...

  10. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: PILOT-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF A SLURRY-PHASE BIOLOGICAL REACTOR FOR CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents a pilot-scale test of a slurry-phase biological reactor for treatment of creosote-contaminated soil. he technology used was a reactor system in which an aqueous slurry of soil was mixed with appropriate nutrients and seeded with microorganisms to enhance the...

  11. INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN A PILOT-SCALE OZONE BUBBLE-DIFFUSER CONTACTOR - II: MODEL VALIDATION AND APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ADR model developed in Part I of this study was successfully validated with experimenta data obtained for the inactivation of C. parvum and C. muris oocysts with a pilot-scale ozone-bubble diffuser contactor operated with treated Ohio River water. Kinetic parameters, required...

  12. Towards direct potable reuse with forward osmosis: Technical assessment of long-term process performance at the pilot scale

    E-print Network

    Towards direct potable reuse with forward osmosis: Technical assessment of long-term process 26 April 2013 Available online 23 May 2013 Keywords: Forward osmosis Osmotic dilution Reverse osmosis the performance of forward osmosis (FO) at the pilot scale to achieve simultaneous seawater desalination

  13. SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF TRACE METALS IN FLUE GAS PARTICULATE FROM A PILOT-SCALE ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distributions of nine trace metals in flue gas particulate by particle size range were determined as part of a pilot-scale hazardous waste incineration test program. hese tests were conducted in the rotary kiln incinerator system at the U.S. EPA's Incineration Research Facili...

  14. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT, SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION TEST: SHIRCO PILOT-SCALE INFRARED INCINERATION SYSTEM ROSE TOWNSHIP DEMODE ROAD SUPERFUND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of the Shirco pilot-scale infrared thermal destruction system has been evaluated at the Rose Township, Demode Road Superfund Site and is presented in the report. he waste tested consisted of solvents, organics and heavy metals in an illegal dump site. olume I give...

  15. Partial degradation of five pesticides and an industrial pollutant by ozonation in a pilot-plant scale reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. I. Maldonado; S. Malato; L. A. Pérez-Estrada; W. Gernjak; I. Oller; Xavier Doménech; José Peral

    2006-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of a mixture of several pesticides (alachlor, atrazine, chlorfenvinphos, diuron and isoproturon), considered PS (priority substances) by the European Commission, and an intermediate product of the pharmaceutical industry (?-methylphenylglycine, MPG) chosen as a model industrial pollutant, have been degraded at pilot-plant scale using ozonation. This study is part of a large research project [CADOX Project, A Coupled Advanced

  16. Mathematical and experimental pilot-scale study of coal reburning for NO sub x control in cyclone boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Farzan, H.; Wessel, R.A.

    1991-06-01

    The purpose of this pilot-scale study was to examine the effectiveness of reburning for NO{sub x} reduction and to assess the potential side effects. In addition, the potential of a high-sulfur Illinois coal for cyclone reburning application was evaluated. (VC)

  17. DETERMINATION OF SEX HORMONES AND NONYLPHENOL ETHOXYLATES IN THE AQUEOUS MATRIXES OF TWO PILOT-SCALE MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two analytical methods were developed and refined for the detection and quantitation of two groups of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the liquid matrixes of two pilot-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants. The targeted compounds are seven sex hormones (estradiol, ...

  18. Underground tank vitrification: A pilot-scale in situ vitrification test of a tank containing a simulated mixed waste sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.E.; Powell, T.D.; Tixier, J.S.; Miller, M.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Owczarski, P.C. [Science Applications International Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This report documents research on sludge vitrification. The first pilot scale in-situ vitrification test of a simulated underground tank was successfully completed by researchers at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The vitrification process effectively immobilized the vast majority of radionuclides simulants and toxic metals were retained in the melt and uniformly distributed throughout the monolith.

  19. Melting characteristics during the vitrification of MSWI fly ash with a pilot-scale diesel oil furnace

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qi Wang; Shulei Tian; Qunhui Wang; Qifei Huang; Jie Yang

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash is becoming an important issue in China. A pilot-scale experiment was carried out to treat MSWI fly ash by using a diesel oil furnace (DOF) for more than 6 months. The effects of melting temperature on volume reduction, weight loss, compositional changes, and toxicity of leach water for molten slag have

  20. A comparative study on the anaerobic membrane bioreactor performance during the treatment of domestic wastewaters of various origins.

    PubMed

    Saddoud, A; Ellouze, M; Dhouib, A; Sayadi, S

    2006-09-01

    This study examined the practical performance of a cross-flow ultrafiltration membrane coupled to an anaerobic bioreactor, for treatment of raw domestic wastewater (RDW), at a pilot-scale plant. Wastewaters used in this study originated from two different domestic wastewater treatment plans (DWTPs) (Sfax and Ksour Essef). During the treatment in the membrane bioreactor (MBR) of the RDW originating from Sfax DWTP, the bioreactor did not reach its stationary phase because the anaerobic biomass was unable to adapt to the wastewater. This was explained by the considerable fluctuations in the domestic wastewater composition and a possible contamination of Sfax wastewater by industrial discharges. However, the treatment of RDW originating from Ksour Essef (DWTP) was successful. In both cases, the treatment led to a total removal of all tested pathogens. The quality of treated wastewater fits largely with WHO guidelines for unrestricted irrigation. The phytotoxicity and the microtoxicity tests, using Lepidium sativum and Vibrio fischeri respectively, demonstrated that wastewater from Sfax exhibited higher toxicity than that from Ksour Sssef. PMID:17067125

  1. Greywater treatment in a submerged membrane bioreactor with gravitational filtration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mona Lamine; Dalila Samaali; Ahmed Ghrabi

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the practical performance of a submerged membrane bioreactor treating low-load greywater. A 17?L laboratory-scale bioreactor with a flat-plate microfiltration membrane (polyethylene; pore size 0.4??m) was operated to treat the effluent from the showers of the student housing complex at the Tunis Agriculture University (Tunisia). Permeate was intermittently withdrawn at constant transmembrane pressure induced by water level difference.

  2. Microliter-bioreactor array with buoyancy-driven stirring for human hematopoietic stem cell culture

    E-print Network

    Meinhart, Carl

    Microliter-bioreactor array with buoyancy-driven stirring for human hematopoietic stem cell culture of hematopoietic stem cell HSC cultures. Exploring a wide range of experimental conditions at the microliter scale-scale bioreactors for stem cell production at the clinical level. The controlled stirring inside the wells

  3. Enclosed outdoor photobioreactors: light regime, photosynthetic efficiency, scale-up, and future prospects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcel Janssen; Johannes Tramper; Luuc R. Mur

    2003-01-01

    Enclosed outdoor photobioreactors need to be developed and designed for large-scale production of phototrophic microorganisms. Both light regime and photosynthetic efficiency were analyzed in characteristic examples of state-of-the-art pilot-scale photobioreactors. In this study it is shown that productivity of photobioreactors is determined by the light regime inside the bioreactors. In addition to light regime, oxygen accumulation and shear stress limit

  4. Impact of colloidal and soluble organic material on membrane performance in membrane bioreactors for municipal wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Rosenberger; C. Laabs; B. Lesjean; R. Gnirss; G. Amy; M. Jekel; J.-C. Schrotter

    2006-01-01

    Two parallel membrane bioreactors (2m3 each) were operated over a period of 2 years. Both pilots were optimised for nitrification, denitrification, and enhanced biological phosphorous elimination, treating identical municipal wastewater under comparable operating conditions. The only constructional difference between the pilots was the position of the denitrification zone (pre-denitrification in pilot 1 and post-denitrification in pilot 2). Despite identical modules

  5. Fixed-bed bioreactor system for the microbial solubilization of coal

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.; Strandberg, G.W.

    1987-09-14

    A fixed-bed bioreactor system for the conversion of coal into microbially solubilized coal products. The fixed-bed bioreactor continuously or periodically receives coal and bio-reactants and provides for the large scale production of microbially solubilized coal products in an economical and efficient manner. An oxidation pretreatment process for rendering coal uniformly and more readily susceptible to microbial solubilization may be employed with the fixed-bed bioreactor. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Bioreactors Stem Cells

    E-print Network

    Schüler, Axel

    Keywords Bioreactors Stem Cells Regenerative Medicine Tissue Engineering Pharmacology » Prof. M.; yeZhelyev, M.; eMMrich, F.; o'regan, r.; bader, a. Quantum dots for human mesenchymal stem cells and mechanical forces mediated to the cells by the matrix. The in vivo extracellular matrix constitutes

  7. Characterization of ash deposition and heat transfer behavior of coals during combustion in a pilot-scale facility and full-scale utility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sushil Gupta; Rajender Gupta; Gary Bryant; Terry Wall; Shinji Watanabe; Takashi Kiga; Kimihito Narukawa

    2009-01-01

    Experimental measurements as well as theoretical models were used to investigate the impact of mineral matter of three coals on ash deposition and heat transfer for pulverized coal fired boilers. The ash deposition experiments were conducted in a pulverized fuel combustion pilot-scale facility and a full-scale unit. A mathematical model with input from computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy analysis of coal

  8. Characterization of pilot-scale dilute acid pretreatment performance using deacetylated corn stover

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising process technology for the deconstruction of low-lignin lignocellulosic biomass, capable of producing high yields of hemicellulosic sugars and enhancing enzymatic yields of glucose as part of a biomass-to-biofuels process. However, while it has been extensively studied, most work has historically been conducted at relatively high acid concentrations of 1 - 4% (weight/weight). Reducing the effective acid loading in pretreatment has the potential to reduce chemical costs both for pretreatment and subsequent neutralization. Additionally, if acid loadings are sufficiently low, capital requirements associated with reactor construction may be significantly reduced due to the relaxation of requirements for exotic alloys. Despite these benefits, past efforts have had difficulty obtaining high process yields at low acid loadings without supplementation of additional unit operations, such as mechanical refining. Results Recently, we optimized the dilute acid pretreatment of deacetylated corn stover at low acid loadings in a 1-ton per day horizontal pretreatment reactor. This effort included more than 25 pilot-scale pretreatment experiments executed at reactor temperatures ranging from 150 – 170°C, residence times of 10 – 20 minutes and hydrolyzer sulfuric acid concentrations between 0.15 – 0.30% (weight/weight). In addition to characterizing the process yields achieved across the reaction space, the optimization identified a pretreatment reaction condition that achieved total xylose yields from pretreatment of 73.5%?±?1.5% with greater than 97% xylan component balance closure across a series of five runs at the same condition. Feedstock reactivity at this reaction condition after bench-scale high solids enzymatic hydrolysis was 77%, prior to the inclusion of any additional conversion that may occur during subsequent fermentation. Conclusions This study effectively characterized a range of pretreatment reaction conditions using deacetylated corn stover at low acid loadings and identified an optimum reaction condition was selected and used in a series of integrated pilot scale cellulosic ethanol production campaigns. Additionally, several issues exist to be considered in future pretreatment experiments in continuous reactor systems, including the formation of char within the reactor, as well as practical issues with feeding herbaceous feedstock into pressurized systems. PMID:24548527

  9. [Effect of pilot UASB-SFSBR-MAP process for the large scale swine wastewater treatment].

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Chen, Chong-Jun; Chen, Ying-Xu; Wu, Wei-Xiang

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a treatment process consisted of UASB, step-fed sequencing batch reactor (SFSBR) and magnesium ammonium phosphate precipitation reactor (MAP) was built to treat the large scale swine wastewater, which aimed at overcoming drawbacks of conventional anaerobic-aerobic treatment process and SBR treatment process, such as the low denitrification efficiency, high operating costs and high nutrient losses and so on. Based on the treatment process, a pilot engineering was constructed. It was concluded from the experiment results that the removal efficiency of COD, NH4(+) -N and TP reached 95.1%, 92.7% and 88.8%, the recovery rate of NH4(+) -N and TP by MAP process reached 23.9% and 83.8%, the effluent quality was superior to the discharge standard of pollutants for livestock and poultry breeding (GB 18596-2001), mass concentration of COD, TN, NH4(+) -N, TP and SS were not higher than 135, 116, 43, 7.3 and 50 mg x L(-1) respectively. The process developed was reliable, kept self-balance of carbon source and alkalinity, reached high nutrient recovery efficiency. And the operating cost was equal to that of the traditional anaerobic-aerobic treatment process. So the treatment process could provide a high value of application and dissemination and be fit for the treatment pf the large scale swine wastewater in China. PMID:23745404

  10. Developing eThread Pipeline Using SAGA-Pilot Abstraction for Large-Scale Structural Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Ragothaman, Anjani; Feinstein, Wei; Jha, Shantenu; Kim, Joohyun

    2014-01-01

    While most of computational annotation approaches are sequence-based, threading methods are becoming increasingly attractive because of predicted structural information that could uncover the underlying function. However, threading tools are generally compute-intensive and the number of protein sequences from even small genomes such as prokaryotes is large typically containing many thousands, prohibiting their application as a genome-wide structural systems biology tool. To leverage its utility, we have developed a pipeline for eThread—a meta-threading protein structure modeling tool, that can use computational resources efficiently and effectively. We employ a pilot-based approach that supports seamless data and task-level parallelism and manages large variation in workload and computational requirements. Our scalable pipeline is deployed on Amazon EC2 and can efficiently select resources based upon task requirements. We present runtime analysis to characterize computational complexity of eThread and EC2 infrastructure. Based on results, we suggest a pathway to an optimized solution with respect to metrics such as time-to-solution or cost-to-solution. Our eThread pipeline can scale to support a large number of sequences and is expected to be a viable solution for genome-scale structural bioinformatics and structure-based annotation, particularly, amenable for small genomes such as prokaryotes. The developed pipeline is easily extensible to other types of distributed cyberinfrastructure. PMID:24995285

  11. Formation of ethyl acetate from whey by Kluyveromyces marxianus on a pilot scale.

    PubMed

    Löser, Christian; Urit, Thanet; Stukert, Anton; Bley, Thomas

    2013-01-10

    Whey arising in huge amounts during milk processing is a valuable renewable resource in the field of White Biotechnology. Kluyveromyces marxianus is able to convert whey-borne lactose into ethyl acetate, an environmentally friendly solvent. Formation of ethyl acetate as a bulk product is triggered by iron (Fe). K. marxianus DSM 5422 was cultivated aerobically in whey-borne medium originally containing 40 ?g/L Fe, supplemented with 1, 3 or 10 mg/L Fe in the pre-culture, using an 1 L or 70 L stirred reactor. The highest Fe content in the pre-culture promoted yeast growth in the main culture causing a high sugar consumption for growth and dissatisfactory formation of ethyl acetate, while the lowest Fe content limited yeast growth and promoted ester synthesis but slowed down the process. An intermediate Fe dose (ca. 0.5 ?g Fe/g sugar) lastly represented a compromise between some yeast growth, a quite high yield of ethyl acetate and an acceptable duration of the process. The mass of ethyl acetate related to the sugar consumed amounted to 0.113, 0.265 and 0.239 g/g in the three processes corresponding to 21.9%, 51.4% and 46.3% of the theoretically maximum yield. The performance on a pilot scale was somewhat higher than on lab scale. PMID:23089728

  12. Integrated production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) with municipal wastewater and sludge treatment at pilot scale.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Sagastume, F; Hjort, M; Cirne, D; Gérardin, F; Lacroix, S; Gaval, G; Karabegovic, L; Alexandersson, T; Johansson, P; Karlsson, A; Bengtsson, S; Arcos-Hernández, M V; Magnusson, P; Werker, A

    2015-04-01

    A pilot-scale process was operated over 22 months at the Brussels North Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) in order to evaluate polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production integration with services of municipal wastewater and sludge management. Activated sludge was produced with PHA accumulation potential (PAP) by applying feast-famine selection while treating the readily biodegradable COD from influent wastewater (average removals of 70% COD, 60% CODsol, 24% nitrogen, and 46% phosphorus). The biomass PAP was evaluated to be in excess of 0.4gPHA/gVSS. Batch fermentation of full-scale WWTP sludge at selected temperatures (35, 42 and 55 °C) produced centrate (6-9.4 gCODVFA/L) of consistent VFA composition, with optimal fermentation performance at 42 °C. Centrate was used to accumulate PHA up to 0.39 gPHA/gVSS. The centrate nutrients are a challenge to the accumulation process but producing a biomass with 0.5 gPHA/gVSS is considered to be realistically achievable within the typically available carbon flows at municipal waste management facilities. PMID:25638407

  13. Immobilization of simulated high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass: Pilot scale demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.A.; Hutson, N.D.; Zamecnik, J.R.; Carter, J.T.

    1991-12-31

    The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS), operated by the Savannah River Laboratory, is a pilot scale facility used in support of the start-up and operation of the Department of Energy`s Defense Waste Processing Facility. The IDMS has successfully demonstrated, on an engineering scale (one-fifth), that simulated high level radioactive waste (HLW) sludge can be chemically treated with formic acid to adjust both its chemical and physical properties, and then blended with simulated precipitate hydrolysis aqueous (PHA) product and borosilicate glass frit to produce a melter feed which can be processed into a durable glass product. The simulated sludge, PHA and frit were blended, based on a product composition program, to optimize the loading of the waste glass as well as to minimize those components which can cause melter processing and/or glass durability problems. During all the IDMS demonstrations completed thus far, the melter feed and the resulting glass that has been produced met all the required specifications, which is very encouraging to future DWPF operations. The IDMS operations also demonstrated that the volatile components of the melter feed (e.g., mercury, nitrogen and carbon, and, to a lesser extent, chlorine, fluorine and sulfur) did not adversely affect the melter performance or the glass product.

  14. Cultivation of Chlorella sp. using raw dairy wastewater for nutrient removal and biodiesel production: Characteristics comparison of indoor bench-scale and outdoor pilot-scale cultures.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weidong; Wang, Zhongming; Wang, Xuewei; Yuan, Zhenhong

    2015-09-01

    The biomass productivity and nutrient removal capacity of simultaneous Chlorella sp. cultivation for biodiesel production and nutrient removal in raw dairy wastewater (RDW) in indoor bench-scale and outdoor pilot-scale photobioreactors were compared. Results from the current work show that maximum biomass productivity in indoor bench-scale cultures can reach 260mgL(-1)day(-1), compared to that of 110mgL(-1)day(-1) in outdoor pilot-scale cultures. Maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorous (TP) removal rate obtained in indoor conditions was 88.38, 38.34, and 2.03mgL(-1)day(-1), respectively, this compared to 41.31, 6.58, and 2.74mgL(-1)day(-1), respectively, for outdoor conditions. Finally, dominant fatty acids determined to be C16/C18 in outdoor pilot-scale cultures indicated great potential for scale up of Chlorella sp. cultivation in RDW for high quality biodiesel production coupling with RDW treatment. PMID:26056780

  15. Pyrosequence analysis of bacterial communities in aerobic bioreactors treating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Stephen D.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Two aerobic, lab-scale, slurry-phase bioreactors were used to examine the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil and the associated bacterial communities. The two bioreactors were operated under semi-continuous (draw-and-fill) conditions at a residence time of 35 days, but one was fed weekly and the other monthly. Most of the quantified PAHs, including high-molecular-weight compounds, were removed to a greater extent in the weekly-fed bioreactor, which achieved total PAH removal of 76%. Molecular analyses, including pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, revealed significant shifts in the soil bacterial communities after introduction to the bioreactors and differences in the abundance and types of bacteria in each of the bioreactors. The weekly-fed bioreactor displayed a more stable bacterial community with gradual changes over time, whereas the monthly-fed bioreactor community was less consistent and may have been more strongly influenced by the influx of untreated soil during feeding. Phylogenetic groups containing known PAH-degrading bacteria previously identified through stable-isotope probing of the untreated soil were differentially affected by bioreactor conditions. Sequences from members of the Acidovorax and Sphingomonas genera, as well as the uncultivated ‘‘Pyrene Group 2’’ were abundant in the bioreactors. However, the relative abundances of sequences from the Pseudomonas, Sphingobium, and Pseudoxanthomonas genera, as well as from a group of unclassified anthracene degraders, were much lower in the bioreactors compared to the untreated soil. PMID:21369833

  16. Hydrodynamics of non-Newtonian liquids in external-loop airlift bioreactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Gavrilescu; R. Z. Tudose

    1997-01-01

    Gas holdup investigation was performed in two external-loop airlift bioreactors of laboratory (VL=1.189·10х m 1.880·10х m3; HR=1.16 m 1.56 m; HD= 1.10 m; AD\\/AR= 0.111 m 1.000) and pilot scale (VL=0.157т.170 m3; HR=4.3ц.7 m; HD=4.0ц.4 m;AD\\/AR=0.04т.1225), respectively, using as liquid phase non-Newtonian starch solutions of different concentration with K=0.061х.518 Pa sn and n=0.86т.39 and fermentation broths of P. chrysogenum, S.

  17. Applicability of passive compost bioreactors for treatment of extremely acidic and saline waters in semi-arid climates.

    PubMed

    Biermann, Vera; Lillicrap, Adam M; Magana, Claudia; Price, Barry; Bell, Richard W; Oldham, Carolyn E

    2014-05-15

    Extremely acidic and saline groundwater occurs naturally in south-western Australia. Discharge of this water to surface waters has increased following extensive clearing of native vegetation for agriculture and is likely to have negative environmental impacts. The use of passive treatment systems to manage the acidic discharge and its impacts is complicated by the region's semi-arid climate with hot dry summers and resulting periods of no flow. This study evaluates the performance of a pilot-scale compost bioreactor treating extremely acidic and saline drainage under semi-arid climatic conditions over a period of 2.5 years. The bioreactor's substrate consisted of municipal waste organics (MWO) mixed with 10 wt% recycled limestone. After the start-up phase the compost bioreactor raised the pH from ?3.7 to ?7 and produced net alkaline outflow for 126 days. The bioreactor removed up to 28 g/m(2)/d CaCO3 equivalent of acidity and acidity removal was found to be load dependent during the first and third year. Extended drying over summer combined with high salinity caused the formation of a salt-clay surface layer on top of the substrate, which was both beneficial and detrimental for bioreactor performance. The surface layer prevented the dehydration of the substrate and ensured it remained waterlogged when the water level in the bioreactor fell below the substrate surface in summer. However, when flow resumed the salt-clay layer acted as a barrier between the water and substrate decreasing performance efficiency. Performance increased again when the surface layer was broken up indicating that the negative climatic impacts can be managed. Based on substrate analysis after 1.5 years of operation, limestone dissolution was found to be the dominant acidity removal process contributing up to 78-91% of alkalinity generation, while bacterial sulfate reduction produced at least 9-22% of the total alkalinity. The substrate might last up to five years before the limestone is exhausted and would need to be replenished. The MWO substrate was found to release metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni and Cr) and cannot be recommended for use in passive treatment systems unless the risk of metal release is addressed. PMID:24602863

  18. Characterization of double-shell slurry feed grout produced in a pilot-scale test. Hanford Grout Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lokken, R.O.; Martin, P.F.C.; Shade, J.W.

    1992-12-01

    Current plans for disposal of the low-level fraction of selected double-shell tank (DST) wastes at Hanford, Washington include grouting. Grout disposal in this context is the process of mixing low-level liquid waste with cementitious powders. and pumping the resultant slurry to near-surface, underground concrete vaults. Once the slurry is in the vaults. the hydration reactions that occur result in the formation of a highly impermeable solid product that binds and encapsulates the radioactive and hazardous constituents. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) operates the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Pacific Northwest Laboratory(a) (PNL) provides support to the Grout Disposal Program through laboratory support activities, radioactive grout leach testing. performance assessments, and pilot-scale tests. A pilot-scale test was conducted in November 1988 using a simulated Double-Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF) waste. The main objective of the pilot-scale test was to demonstrate the processability of a DSSF grout formulation that was developed using laboratory equipment and to provide information on scale-up. The dry blend used in this test included 47 wt% class F fly ash, 47 wt% blast furnace slag, and 6 wt% type I/II portland cement. The dry blend was mixed with the simulated waste at a ratio of 9 lb/gal and pumped to a 2800-gal, insulated tank at about 10.4 gpm. Samples of simulated DSSF waste. dry blend, grout slurry, and cured grout were obtained during and after the pilot-scale test for testing and product characterization. Major conclusions of these activities are included.

  19. PILOT-SCALE TESTING OF THE SUSPENSION OF MST, CST, AND SIMULATED SLUDGE SLURRIES IN A SLUDGE TANK

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.

    2011-08-02

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Following strontium, actinide, and cesium removal, the concentrated solids will be transported to a sludge tank (i.e., monosodium titanate (MST)/sludge solids to Tank 42H or Tank 51H and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to Tank 40H) for eventual transfer to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for mixing MST, CST, and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the pump requirements for mixing MST and CST with sludge in a sludge tank and to determine whether segregation of particles occurs during settling. Tank 40H and Tank 51H have four Quad Volute pumps; Tank 42H has four standard pumps. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of Tank 40H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 40H. The pump locations correspond to the current locations in Tank 40H (Risers B2, H, B6, and G). The pumps are pilot-scale Quad Volute pumps. Additional settling tests were conducted in a 30 foot tall, 4 inch inner diameter clear column to investigate segregation of MST, CST, and simulated sludge particles during settling.

  20. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING/FEASIBILTY SUDIES FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    SPRITZER.M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The key potential advantage of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reacting and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carried out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an activated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperature is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of two high-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide. The economics for plants processing 40 tpd sewage sludge solids augmented with grease trap waste are favorable over a significant range of cost parameters such as sludge disposal credit and capital financing. Hydrogen production costs for SWPO plants of this size are projected to be about $3/GJ or less. Economics may be further improved by future developments such as pumping of higher solids content sludges and improved gasifier nozzle designs to reduce char and improve hydrogen yields. The easiest market entry for SWPO is expected to be direct sales to municipal wastewater treatment plants for use with sewage sludge in conjunction with trap grease, as both of these wastes are ubiquitous and have reasonably well-defined negative value (i.e., the process can take credit for reduction of well-defined disposal costs for these streams). Additionally, waste grease is frequently recovered at municipal wastewater treatment plants where it is already contaminated with sewage. SWPO should also be favorable to other market applications in which low or negative value, high water content biomass is available in conjunction with a low or negative value fuel material. For biomass slurries primary candidates are sewage sludge, manure sludge, and shredded and/or composted organic municipal solid waste (MSW) slurries. For the high heating value stream primary candidates are trap grease, waste plastic or rubber slurries, and coal or coke slurries. Phase II of the SWPO program will be focused on verifying process improvements identified during Phase I, and then performing extended duration testing with the GA pilot plant. Tests of at least 1

  1. HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-09-16

    The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

  2. Baffled membrane bioreactor (BMBR) for efficient nutrient removal from municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Katsuki; Nishisako, Rie; Miyoshi, Taro; Shimada, Ryusuke; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2008-02-01

    Submerged membrane bioreactors (MBRs) are now widely used for various types of wastewater treatment. One drawback of submerged MBRs is the difficulty in removing nitrogen because intensive aeration is usually carried out in the tank and the MBRs must therefore be operated under aerobic conditions. In this study, the feasibility of treating municipal wastewater by a baffled membrane bioreactor (BMBR), particularly in terms of nitrogen removal, was examined. Simultaneous nitrification/denitrification in a single and small reaction tank was possible by inserting baffles into a normal submerged MBR as long as wastewater was fed in the appropriate way. To examine the applicability of the BMBR, pilot-scale experiments were carried out using real municipal wastewater. Although neither external carbon addition nor mixed liquor circulation was carried out in the operation of the BMBR, average removal rates of total organic carbon (TOC), total phosphorus (T-P) and total nitrogen (T-N) reached 85%, 97% and 77%, respectively, with the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4.7h. Permeability of the membrane could be maintained at a high level throughout the operation. It was found that denitrification was the limiting step in removal of nitrogen in the BMBR in this study. Various types of monitoring carried out in the BMBR also demonstrated the possibility of further improvements in its performance. PMID:17919677

  3. Electrochemical pilot scale study for reduction of 2,4-DNT.

    PubMed

    Doppalapudi, R; Palaniswamy, D; Sorial, G; Maloney, S

    2003-01-01

    An electrochemical pilot scale reactor was used to treat simulated munitions wastewater containing 100 mg/L of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT). Experiments were conducted by using a glassy carbon (zero porosity) coated graphite cylinder as the cathode and a platinum wire as the anode. All experiments were conducted under dissolved oxygen concentration of less than 1.5 mg/L. Initially, simulating batch conditions were conducted to obtain the optimum operating conditions for the reactor. During this batch-mode study, the effects of various parameters such as applied current, electrolyte concentration, and type of electrolyte on the reduction of DNT were evaluated. Results obtained showed that the rates of reduction of DNT increased with an increase in current or concentration of electrolyte. Based on the results obtained from the batch simulation experiments, continuous flow experiments were conducted at three different currents. The ionic strength of the feed solution was maintained at 0.027 M. A current of 200 mA was found to provide a stable reduction of DNT at the 80% level for a period of 14 days after which reactor cleaning is necessary for removal of solids that were formed within the reactor. End products determined for the continuous flow experiments showed 100% molar balance conversion. PMID:12830957

  4. A pilot scale demonstration of the DWPF process control and product verification strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, N.D.; Jantzen, C.M.; Beam, D.C.

    1992-06-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been designed and constructed to immobilize Savannah River Site high level liquid waste within a durable borosilicate glass matrix for permanent storage. The DWPF will be operated to produce a glass product which must meet a number of product property constraints which are dependent upon the final product composition. During actual operations, the DWPF will control the properties of the glass product by the controlled blending of the waste streams with a glass-forming frit to produce the final melter feed slurry. The DWPF will verify control of the glass product through analysis of vitrified samples of slurry material. In order to demonstrate the DWPF process control and product verification strategy, a pilot-scale vitrification research facility was operated in three discrete batches using simulated DWPF waste streams. All of the DWPF process control methodologies were followed and the glass produce from each experiment was leached according to the Product Consistency Test. Results of the campaign are summarized.

  5. A pilot scale demonstration of the DWPF process control and product verification strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, N.D.; Jantzen, C.M.; Beam, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been designed and constructed to immobilize Savannah River Site high level liquid waste within a durable borosilicate glass matrix for permanent storage. The DWPF will be operated to produce a glass product which must meet a number of product property constraints which are dependent upon the final product composition. During actual operations, the DWPF will control the properties of the glass product by the controlled blending of the waste streams with a glass-forming frit to produce the final melter feed slurry. The DWPF will verify control of the glass product through analysis of vitrified samples of slurry material. In order to demonstrate the DWPF process control and product verification strategy, a pilot-scale vitrification research facility was operated in three discrete batches using simulated DWPF waste streams. All of the DWPF process control methodologies were followed and the glass produce from each experiment was leached according to the Product Consistency Test. Results of the campaign are summarized.

  6. Evaluation and modeling of biochemical methane potential (BMP) of landfilled solid waste: a pilot scale study.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, M Sinan; Demir, Ahmet; Varank, Gamze

    2009-11-01

    The main goal of this study was to present a comparison of landfill performance with respect to solids decomposition. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) test was used to determine the initial and the remaining CH(4) potentials of solid wastes during 27 months of landfilling operation in two pilot scale landfill reactors. The initial methane potential of solid wastes filled to the reactors was around 0.347 L/CH(4)/g dry waste, which decreased with operational time of landfill reactors to values of 0.117 and 0.154 L/CH(4)/g dry waste for leachate recirculated (R1) and non-recirculated (R2) reactors, respectively. Results indicated that the average rate constant increased by 32% with leachate recirculation. Also, the performance of the system was modeled using the BMP data for the samples taken from reactors at varying operational times by MATLAB program. The first-order rate constants for R1 and R2 reactors were 0.01571 and 0.01195 1/d, respectively. The correlation between the model and the experimental parameters was more than 95%, showing the good fit of the model. PMID:19553105

  7. Quality and quantity of leachate in aerobic pilot-scale landfills.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, Memmet Sinan; Demir, Ahmet; Ozkaya, Bestamin

    2006-08-01

    In this study, two pilot-scale aerobic landfill reactors with (A1) and without (A2) leachate recirculation are used to obtain detailed information on the quantity and quality of leachate in aerobic landfills. The observed parameters of leachate quality are pH, chloride (Cl-), chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), and nitrate (NO3(-)-N). pH values of the leachate increased to 7 after 50 days in reactor A1 and after 70 days in reactor A2. Cl- concentrations increased rapidly to 6100 (A1) and 6900 (A2) mg/L after 80 days, from initial values of 3000 and 2800 mg/L, respectively. COD and BOD values decreased rapidly in the A1 landfill reactor, indicating the rapid oxidation of organic matter. The BOD/COD ratio indicates that leachate recirculation slightly increases the degradation of solid waste in aerobic landfills. NH3-N concentrations decreased as a result of the nitrification process. Denitrification occurred in parts of the reactors as a result of intermittent aeration; this process causes a decrease in NO3(-) concentrations. There is a marked difference between the A1 and A2 reactors in terms of leachate quantity. Recirculated leachate made up 53.3% of the leachate generated from the A1 reactor during the experiment, while leachate quantity decreased by 47.3% with recirculation when compared with the aerobic dry landfill reactor. PMID:16788857

  8. Air emission flux from contaminated dredged materials stored in a pilot-scale confined disposal facility.

    PubMed

    Ravikrishna, R; Valsaraj, K T; Reible, D D; Thibodeaux, L J; Price, C B; Brannon, J M; Meyers, T E; Yost, S

    2001-03-01

    A pilot-scale field simulation was conducted to estimate the air emissions from contaminated dredged material stored in a confined disposal facility (CDF). Contaminated dredged material with a variety of organic chemicals, obtained from Indiana Harbor Canal, was used in the study. It was placed in an outdoor CDF simulator (i.e., a lysimeter of dimensions 4 ft x 4 ft x 2 ft). A portable, dynamic flux chamber was used to periodically measure emissions of various polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A weather station was set up to monitor and record the meteorological conditions during the experiment. The fluxes of several PAHs were monitored over time for 6 1/2 months. Initial 6-hr average fluxes varied from 2 to 20 ng/cm2/hr for six different PAHs. The flux values declined rapidly for all compounds soon after placement of the dredged material in the CDE Chemical concentrations derived from flux values were generally of low magnitude compared with ambient standards. Data obtained from the experiment were compared against those predicted using models for air emissions. Model simulations showed that initially the flux was largely from exposed pore water from saturated (wet) sediment, whereas the long-term flux was controlled by diffusion through the pore air of the unsaturated sediment. Model predictions generally overestimated the measured emissions. A rainfall event was simulated, and the dredged material was reworked to simulate that typical of a CDF operation. Increased flux was observed upon reworking the dredged material. PMID:11266100

  9. Pilot scale-SO{sub 2} control by dry sodium bicarbonate injection and an electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Pliat, M.J.; Wilder, J.M. [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    2007-10-15

    A 500 actual cubic feet gas per minute (acfm) pilot-scale SO{sub 2} control study was undertaken to investigate flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by dry sodium sorbents in 400{sup o}F (204.5{sup o}C) flue gases emitted from a coal fired boiler with flue gas concentrations between 350 and 2500 ppm SO{sub 2}. Powdered sodium alkaline reagents were injected into the hot flue gas downstream of the air preheater and the spent reagents were collected using an electrostatic precipitator. Three different sorbents were used: processed sodium bicarbonate of two particle sizes; solution mined sodium bicarbonate, and processed sodium sesquicarbonate. SO{sub 2} concentrations were measured upstream of the reagent injection, 25-ft (7.62 m) downstream of the injection point, and downstream of the electrostatic precipitator. SO{sub 2} collection efficiencies ranged from 40 to 80% using sodium bicarbonate stoichiometric ratios from 0.5 to 3.0. Much of the in-duct SO{sub 2} removal occurred during the first second of reagent reaction time, indicating that the sulfur dioxide-sodium reaction rates may be faster than have been measured for fixed bed measurements reported in the literature.

  10. Disinfection of bacterial biofilms in pilot-scale cooling tower systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Wei; Sileika, Tadas; Warta, Richard; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Packman, Aaron I

    2011-04-01

    The impact of continuous chlorination and periodic glutaraldehyde treatment on planktonic and biofilm microbial communities was evaluated in pilot-scale cooling towers operated continuously for 3 months. The system was operated at a flow rate of 10,080 l day(-1). Experiments were performed with a well-defined microbial consortium containing three heterotrophic bacteria: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Flavobacterium sp. The persistence of each species was monitored in the recirculating cooling water loop and in biofilms on steel and PVC coupons in the cooling tower basin. The observed bacterial colonization in cooling towers did not follow trends in growth rates observed under batch conditions and, instead, reflected differences in the ability of each organism to remain attached and form biofilms under the high-through flow conditions in cooling towers. Flavobacterium was the dominant organism in the community, while P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae did not attach well to either PVC or steel coupons in cooling towers and were not able to persist in biofilms. As a result, the much greater ability of Flavobacterium to adhere to surfaces protected it from disinfection, whereas P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae were subject to rapid disinfection in the planktonic state. PMID:21547755

  11. Development of pilot scale nanofiltration system for yeast industry wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, Ahmad; Jahanshahi, Mohsen; Peyravi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of the yeast industry wastewater was investigated by nanofiltration (NF) membrane process on a pilot scale. Two wastewaters were used as feed: (i) dilute wastewater with COD 2000 mg/L and (ii) concentrate wastewater with COD 8000 mg/L. The permeate flux, COD retention, color and electrical conductivity (EC) removal were evaluated in relation to trans-membrane pressure and long-term filtration. A linear growth in permeate flux was found with increasing in trans-membrane pressure for wastewaters. In addition, the COD retention, color and EC removal increased with trans-membrane pressure enhancement. The results obtained from the long-term nanofiltration of dilute wastewater indicated that the permeate flux decreased from 2300 L/day to 1250 L/day and COD retention increased from 86% to 92%. The quality of the permeate in term of COD is lower than the discharge standard in river (200 mg/L). Thus, this process is useful for treatment of wastewaters produced by yeast industry. PMID:24593865

  12. Development of pilot scale nanofiltration system for yeast industry wastewater treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of the yeast industry wastewater was investigated by nanofiltration (NF) membrane process on a pilot scale. Two wastewaters were used as feed: (i) dilute wastewater with COD 2000 mg/L and (ii) concentrate wastewater with COD 8000 mg/L. The permeate flux, COD retention, color and electrical conductivity (EC) removal were evaluated in relation to trans-membrane pressure and long-term filtration. A linear growth in permeate flux was found with increasing in trans-membrane pressure for wastewaters. In addition, the COD retention, color and EC removal increased with trans-membrane pressure enhancement. The results obtained from the long-term nanofiltration of dilute wastewater indicated that the permeate flux decreased from 2300 L/day to 1250 L/day and COD retention increased from 86% to 92%. The quality of the permeate in term of COD is lower than the discharge standard in river (200 mg/L). Thus, this process is useful for treatment of wastewaters produced by yeast industry. PMID:24593865

  13. Pilot-Scale Test of Counter-Current Ion Exchange (CCIX) Using UOP IONSIV IE-911

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, Dennis W. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Fondeur, Fernando (Savannah River Technology Center); Dennis, Richard (Severn Trent Services); Pike, Jeff (Westinghouse Savannah River Company); Leugemors, Robert K. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Taylor, Paul W. (SONALYSTS); Hang, Thong (Savannah River Technology Center)

    2001-09-24

    A pilot-scale test of a moving-bed configuration of a UOP IONSIV? IE-911 ion-exchange column was performed over 17 days at Severn Trent Services facilities. The objectives of the test, in order of priority, were to determine if aluminosilicate precipitation caused clumping of IE-911 particles in the column, to observe the effect on aluminum-hydroxide precipitation of water added to a simulant-filled column, to evaluate the extent of particle attrition, and to measure the expansion of the mass-transfer zone under the influence of column pulsing. The IE-911 moved through the column with no apparent clumping during the test, although analytical results indicate that little if any aluminosilicate precipitated onto the particles. A precipitate of aluminum hydroxide was not produced when water was added to the simulant-filled column, indicating that this upset scenario is probably of little concern. Particle-size distributions remained relatively constant with time and position in the column, indicating that particle attrition was not significant. The expansion of the mass-transfer zone could not be accurately measured because of the slow loading kinetics of the IE-911 and the short duration of the test; however, the information obtained indicates that back-mixing of sorbent is not extensive.

  14. Pilot scale thermal treatment of pig slurry for the inactivation of animal virus pathogens.

    PubMed

    Turner, C; Williams, S M; Burton, C H; Cumby, T R; Wilkinson, P J; Farrent, J W

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes a pilot scale treatment plant that has been designed and built for the thermal inactivation in pig slurry of two viruses that infect pigs--African swine fever virus (ASFV) and swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV). The plant treats pig slurry continuously at a rate of up to 100 litres/hour and functions by heating the slurry, maintaining at least 99.99% of the slurry at the required temperature for a minimum period of 5 minutes, and then recovering the heat to raise the temperature of the incoming slurry. Results obtained indicated that SVDV was inactivated in pig slurry to below detectable levels with an alkaline pH (pH 7.5 to 8, as is usually the case) at a temperature of between 50 and 55 degrees C. In acidified slurry (pH 6.4), inactivation occurred between 55 and 60 degrees C. The difference in inactivation temperatures was probably due to the presence of free ammonia in the unacidified slurry. ASFV was inactivated by operating the plant at a temperature of 53 degrees C at a pH of 8. PMID:10565423

  15. A pilot-scale homogenization-assisted negative pressure cavitation extraction of Astragalus polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Wei, Fu-Yao; Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Fu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Wei

    2014-06-01

    This paper reported a new, green and effective extraction technique for polysaccharides, namely homogenization-assisted negative pressure cavitation extraction (HNPCE), which succeeded in the extraction of Astragalus polysaccharides (APs). Central composite design and kinetic model were applied to optimize the extraction conditions, and the optimal parameters were obtained as follows: homogenization time 70s, negative pressure -0.068MPa, extraction temperature 64.8°C, ratio of water to material 13.4 and extraction time 53min. The proposed method exhibited considerable predominance in terms of higher APs yield (16.74%) with much lower temperature and shorter duration, as against the reported hot water extraction method (14.33% of APs yield with 100°C and 3h). Moreover, FT-IR results showed that HNPCE method did not alter the primary structure of polysaccharides. Furthermore, the pilot-scale application of HNPCE was successfully performed with 16.62% of APs yield. Thus, HNPCE is an excellent alternative method for the extraction of polysaccharides from Astragalus or other plant materials in industry. PMID:24661891

  16. Influence of operating parameters on cake formation in pilot scale pulse-jet bag filter

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Mahmood; Krammer, Gernot; Khan, Rafi Ullah; Tahir, M. Suleman

    2012-01-01

    Bag filters are commonly used for fine particles removal in off-gas purification. There dust laden gas pervades through permeable filter media starting at a lower pressure drop limit leaving dust (called filter cake) on the filter media. The filter cakeformation is influenced by many factors including filtration velocity, dust concentration, pressure drop limits, and filter media resistance. Effect of the stated parameters is investigated experimentally in a pilot scale pulse-jet bag filter test facility where lime stone dust is separated from air at ambient conditions. Results reveal that filtration velocity significantly affects filter pressure drop as well as cake properties; cake density and specific cake resistance. Cake density is slightly affected by dust concentration. Specific resistance of filter cake increases with velocity, slightly affected by dust concentration, changes inversely with the upper pressure drop limit and decreases over a prolonged use (aging). Specific resistance of filter media is independent of upper pressure drop limit and increases linearly over a prolonged use. PMID:24415802

  17. Startup pattern and performance enhancement of pilot-scale biofilm process for raw water pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang-Feng; Feng, Li-Juan; Yang, Qi; Zhu, Liang; Xu, Jian; Xu, Xiang-Yang

    2014-11-01

    The quality of raw water is getting worse in developing countries because of the inadequate treatment of municipal sewage, industrial wastewater and agricultural runoff. Aiming at the biofilm enrichment and pollutant removal, two pilot-scale biofilm reactors were built with different biological carriers. Results showed that compared with the blank carrier, the biofilm was easily enriched on the biofilm precoated carrier and less nitrite accumulation occurred. The removal efficiencies of NH4(+)-N, DOC and UV254 increased under the aeration condition, and a optimum DO level for the adequate nitrification was 1.0-2.6mgL(-1) with the suitable temperature range of 21-22°C. Study on the trihalomethane prediction model indicated that the presentence of algae increased the risk of disinfection by-products production, which could be effectively controlled via manual algae removing and light shading. In this study, the performance of biofilm pretreatment process could be enhanced under the optimized condition of DO level and biofilm carrier. PMID:25233473

  18. [Pilot scale study on emergent treatment for As (III) pollution in water source].

    PubMed

    Yao, Juan-juan; Gao, Nai-yun; Xia, Sheng-ji; Chen, Bei-bei

    2010-02-01

    Based on the conventional water treatment processes widely used in China, a pilot scale study was performed to investigate emergent treatment for arsenite pollution in water source. The results show that As removal efficiency can only reach to 71.85% by conventional water treatment process. The removal efficiencies of dissolved arsenic and total arsenic by mixing, first flocculation, second flocculation, sedimentation, filtration units were 36.00%, 5.42%, 9.30%, 14.95%, 7.88% and 9.10%, -3.62%, 2.74%, 55.12%, 8.51% respectively, when the concentration of As(III) in raw water was 150 microg/L. The arsenic concentration in treated water can not be effectively controlled below 10 microg/L. Hence, the pre-oxidation is necessary. The pre-chlorination-enhanced coagulation process can effectively deal with the sudden As(III) pollution. But for lower chlorine dosage, both ammonia concentration and different pre-chlorination sites have significant effects on arsenic removal, which should be taken into account. Potassium permanganate pre-oxidation-enhanced coagulation process can be more effectively deal with the sudden As(III) pollution than pre-chlorination. Moreover the different pre-oxidation sites have no obvious effect on arsenic removal. As a result, potassium permanganate is recommended as an oxidant for As(III). PMID:20391697

  19. Characterization of membrane foulants in a pilot-scale tunnel construction wastewater treatment process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Oh; Jeong, Se-Uk; Cho, Hyun Uk; Cho, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Young Mo

    2014-11-01

    A pilot-scale combination of a microfiltration (MF) and a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane system was applied on-site to treat tunnel construction wastewater. The MF membrane system initially removed contaminants (turbidity of less than 0.3 NTU) in the form of particulate materials in the feed water, thereby allowing the combined MF-RO system to efficiently remove more than 99% of known organic and inorganic contaminants and qualify the reclaimed water for reuse. The MF membrane autopsy analysis using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) revealed that the dominant foulants were inorganic deposits involving Si, Al and Fe, comprising the main components of cement materials, as well as deposits involving heavy metals such as Mn, Cu and Zn in the form of particles. Thus, thick cake contaminants shown by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) images might be induced via suspended solids consisting of cement and clay materials and metals. PMID:25222740

  20. Benzalkonium runoff from roofs treated with biocide products - In situ pilot-scale study.

    PubMed

    Gromaire, M C; Van de Voorde, A; Lorgeoux, C; Chebbo, G

    2015-09-15

    Roof maintenance practices often involve the application of biocide products to fight against moss, lichens and algae. The main component of these products is benzalkonium chloride, a mixture of alkyl benzyl dimethyl ammonium chlorides with mainly C12 and C14 alkyl chain lengths, which is toxic for the aquatic environment. This paper describes, on the basis of an in-situ pilot scale study, the evolution of roof runoff contamination over a one year period following the biocide treatment of roof frames. Results show a major contamination of roof runoff immediately after treatment (from 5 to 30 mg/L), followed by an exponential decrease. 175-375 mm of cumulated rainfall is needed before the runoff concentrations become less than EC50 values for fish (280 ?g/l). The residual concentration in the runoff water remains above 4 ?g/L even after 640 mm of rainfall. The level of benzalkonium ions leaching depends on the roofing material, with lower concentrations and total mass leached from ceramic tiles than from concrete tiles, and on the state of the tile (new or worn out). Mass balance calculations indicate that a large part of the mass of benzalkonium compounds applied to the tiles is lost, probably due to biodegradation processes. PMID:26081434

  1. Demonstration of the waste tire pyrolysis process on pilot scale in a continuous auger reactor.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Juan Daniel; Murillo, Ramón; García, Tomás; Veses, Alberto

    2013-10-15

    This work shows the technical feasibility for valorizing waste tires by pyrolysis using a pilot scale facility with a nominal capacity of 150 kWth. A continuous auger reactor was operated to perform thirteen independent experiments that conducted to the processing of more than 500 kg of shredded waste tires in 100 h of operation. The reaction temperature was 550°C and the pressure was 1 bar in all the runs. Under these conditions, yields to solid, liquid and gas were 40.5 ± 0.3, 42.6 ± 0.1 and 16.9 ± 0.3 wt.% respectively. Ultimate and proximate analyses as well as heating value analysis were conducted for both the solid and liquid fraction. pH, water content, total acid number (TAN), viscosity and density were also assessed for the liquid and compared to the specifications of marine fuels (standard ISO 8217). Gas chromatography was used to calculate the composition of the gaseous fraction. It was observed that all these properties remained practically invariable along the experiments without any significant technical problem. In addition, the reaction enthalpy necessary to perform the waste tire pyrolysis process (907.1 ± 40.0 kJ/kg) was determined from the combustion and formation enthalpies of waste tire and conversion products. Finally, a mass balance closure was performed showing an excellent reliability of the data obtained from the experimental campaign. PMID:23995560

  2. Pilot-scale production of mesoporous silica-based adsorbent for CO2 capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hou Chuan; Lu, Chungsying; Bai, Hsunling; Hwang, Jyh Feng; Lee, Hsiu Hsia; Chen, Wang; Kang, Yuhao; Chen, Shing-Ting; Su, Fengsheng; Kuo, Shih-Chun; Hu, Fang-Chun

    2012-07-01

    This study presents a pilot-scale spray drying system designed to manufacture spherical mesoporous silica particles (MSP) that is capable of producing up to 100 g per hour. The MSP fabricated via a nozzle pressure of 4 kg/cm2 and a drying temperature of 200 °C possess a high specific area of 1012 m2/g, a narrow pore size distribution with an average pore diameter of 2.4 nm, and large pore volume of 0.81 cm3/g. They were further modified with a tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA-MSP) to enhance CO2 adsorption selectivity from gas streams. The adsorption capacity of 15% CO2 on TEPA-MSP was significantly influenced by adsorption temperature and water vapor of air streams, and reached a maximum of 87.05 mg/g (1.98 mmol/g) at 60 °C and 129.19 mg/g (2.94 mmol/g) at a water vapor of 6.98%. The adsorption capacities and the physicochemical properties of TEPA-MSP were preserved through 20 cycles of adsorption-desorption operation. A comparative study revealed that the TEPA-MSP had better adsorption performance of 15% CO2 than the TEPA-modified granular activated carbon and zeolite. These results suggest that the TEPA-MSP can be stably employed in the prolonged cyclic CO2 adsorption and that they possess good potential for CO2 capture from flue gas.

  3. Pesticide removal from cotton farm tailwater by a pilot-scale ponded wetland.

    PubMed

    Rose, Michael T; Sanchez-Bayo, Francisco; Crossan, Angus N; Kennedy, Ivan R

    2006-06-01

    A pilot-scale, ponded wetland consisting of an open pond and a vegetated pond in series was constructed on a cotton farm in northern New South Wales, Australia, and assessed for its potential to remove pesticides from irrigation tailwater. Ten incubation periods ranging from 7 to 13 days each were conducted over two cotton growing seasons to monitor removal of residues of four pesticides applied to the crop. Residue reductions ranging 22-53% and 32-90% were observed in the first and second seasons respectively. Average half-lives during this first season were calculated as 21.3 days for diuron, 25.4 days for fluometuron and 26.4 days for aldicarb over the entire wetland. During the second season of monitoring, pesticide half-lives were significantly reduced, with fluometuron exhibiting a half-life of 13.8 days, aldicarb 6.2 days and endosulfan 7.5 days in the open pond. Further significant reductions were observed in the vegetated pond and also following an algal bloom in the open pond, as a result of which aldicarb and endosulfan were no longer quantifiable. Partitioning onto sediment was found to be a considerable sink for the insecticide endosulfan. These results demonstrate that macrophytes and algae can reduce the persistence of pesticides in on-farm water and provide some data for modelling. PMID:16330067

  4. Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous

    SciTech Connect

    Dick Wingerson

    2004-12-15

    PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

  5. Biomass effects on oxygen transfer in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Germain, E; Nelles, F; Drews, A; Pearce, P; Kraume, M; Reid, E; Judd, S J; Stephenson, T

    2007-03-01

    Ten biomass samples from both municipal and industrial pilot and full scale submerged membrane bioreactors (MBRs) with mixed liquor suspended solids concentrations (MLSS) ranging from 7.2 to 30.2g L(-1) were studied at six air-flow rates (0.7, 1.3, 2.3, 3, 4.4 and 6m(3)m(-3)h(-1)). Statistical analyses were applied to identify the relative impacts of the various bulk biomass characteristics on oxygen transfer. Of the biomass characteristics studied, only solids concentration (correlated with viscosity), the carbohydrate fraction of the EPS (EPS(c)) and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration of the SMP (SMP(COD)) were found to affect the oxygen transfer parameters k(L)a(20) (the oxygen transfer coefficient) and alpha-factor. The relative influence on k(L)a(20) was MLSS>aeration>EPS(c)>SMP(COD) and on alpha-factor was MLSS>SMP(COD)>EPS(c)>aeration. Both k(L)a(20) and alpha-factor increased with increasing aeration and EPS(c) and decreased with increasing MLSS and SMP(COD). MLSS was found to be the main parameter controlling the oxygen transfer. PMID:17217981

  6. Design and Construction of Equipment to Make Adsorption at Pilot Plant Scale of Heavy Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Piraján, Juan C.; Rangel, David; Amaya, Bibiana; Vargas, Edgar M.; Giraldo, Liliana

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this paper was to illustrate the procedure to obtain activated carbon from lignocellulosic residues through chemical and physical paths. A general surface characterization was made and aqueous solution isotherms were obtained in order to evaluate the behaviour of each carbon atom in solutions contaminated with selective ions. The other purpose was to show a simple way to perform a scale-up process of an absorber from the laboratory level to an industrial level, using the breaking curves in fixed beds developed through the continuous pursuit of the Pb(II) and Cr(VI) ions concentration in the effluent of the bed. Activated carbon was used to study the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cr(VI). Isotherms of aqueous adsorption were determined. This model was developed in order to examine its efficiency and to compare it with an experimental model made in the laboratory, which rendered very similar results. The main characteristic of the feasibility of the application of this design is the fact that neither tedious calculations nor mass transfer coefficients are required in order to construct the above-mentioned curves. The model was developed by applying concepts such as mass transfer zone (MTZ) and length of unused bed (LUB), which are the dynamical basis understanding for the adsorption process in fixed beds. As a complementary item of the experiment, within a pilot plant scale, a filter was developed in order to achieve flexibility when manipulating the most important adsorption parameters and to enable the control of the variables involved in the process that change the operating conditions.

  7. Evapotranspiration from pilot-scale constructed wetlands planted with Phragmites australis in a Mediterranean environment.

    PubMed

    Milani, Mirco; Toscano, Attilio

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the results of evapotranspiration (ET) experiments carried out in Southern Italy (Sicily) in a pilot-scale constructed wetland (CW) made of a combination of vegetated (Phragmites australis) and unvegetated sub-surface flow beds. Domestic wastewater from a conventional wastewater treatment plant was used to fill the beds. Microclimate data was gathered from an automatic weather station close to the experimental plant. From June to November 2009 and from April to November 2010, ET values were measured as the amount of water needed to restore the initial volume in the beds after a certain period. Cumulative reference evapotranspiration (ET(0)) was similar to the cumulative ET measured in the beds without vegetation (ET(con)), while the Phragmites ET (ET (phr) ) was significantly higher underlining the effect of the vegetation. The plant coefficient of P. australis (K(p)) was very high (up to 8.5 in August 2009) compared to the typical K(c) for agricultural crops suggesting that the wetland environment was subjected to strong "clothesline" and "oasis" effects. According to the FAO 56 approach, K(p) shows different patterns and values in relation to growth stages correlating significantly to stem density, plant height and total leaves. The mean Water Use Efficiency (WUE) value of P. australis was quite low, about 2.27 g L(-1), probably due to the unlimited water availability and the lack of the plant's physiological adaptations to water conservation. The results provide useful and valid information for estimating ET rates in small-scale constructed wetlands since ET is a relevant issue in arid and semiarid regions. In these areas CW feasibility for wastewater treatment and reuse should also be carefully evaluated for macrophytes in relation to their WUE values. PMID:23383642

  8. Biological reduction of nitrate wastewater using fluidized-bed bioreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.F. Jr.; Hancher, C.W.; Patton, B.D.; Kowalchuk, M.

    1981-01-01

    There are a number of nitrate-containing wastewater sources, as concentrated as 30 wt % NO/sub 3//sup -/ and as large as 2000 m/sup 3//d, in the nuclear fuel cycle as well as in many commercial processes such as fertilizer production, paper manufacturing, and metal finishing. These nitrate-containing wastewater sources can be successfully biologically denitrified to meet discharge standards in the range of 10 to 20 gN(NO/sub 3//sup -/)/m/sup 3/ by the use of a fluidized-bed bioreactor. The major strain of denitrification bacteria is Pseudomonas which was derived from garden soil. In the fluidized-bed bioreactor the bacteria are allowed to attach to 0.25 to 0.50-mm-diam coal particles, which are fluidized by the upward flow of influent wastewater. Maintaining the bacteria-to-coal weight ratio at approximately 1:10 results in a bioreactor bacteria loading of greater than 20,000 g/m/sup 3/. A description is given of the results of two biodenitrification R and D pilot plant programs based on the use of fluidized bioreactors capable of operating at nitrate levels up to 7000 g/m/sup 3/ and achieving denitrification rates as high as 80 gN(NO/sub 3//sup -/)/d per liter of empty bioreactor volume. The first of these pilot plant programs consisted of two 0.2-m-diam bioreactors, each with a height of 6.3 m and a volume of 208 liters, operating in series. The second pilot plant was used to determine the diameter dependence of the reactors by using a 0.5-m-diam reactor with a height of 6.3 m and a volume of 1200 liters. These pilot plants operated for a period of six months and two months respectively, while using both a synthetic waste and the actual waste from a gaseous diffusion plant operated by Goodyear Atomic Corporation.

  9. Nitrite effect on the phosphorus uptake activity of phosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) in pilot-scale SBR and MBR reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gürkan Sin; Kwinten Niville; Giulia Bachis; Tao Jiang; Ingmar Nopens; Stijn van Hulle; Peter A Vanrolleghem

    Batch tests were performed to investigate the nitrite effect on the P-uptake of biomass grown in pilot-scale SBR and MBR sys- tems. The results showed that the nitrite has an inhibitory effect on the aerobic P-uptake of the SBR and the MBR biomasses. The degree of inhibition was observed to be 65 % and 37 % at 10 mg NO2-N\\/?

  10. Ammonia and Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacterial Communities in a Pilot-Scale Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John M. Regan; Gregory W. Harrington; Daniel R. Noguera

    2002-01-01

    Nitrification in drinking water distribution systems is a common operational problem for many utilities that use chloramines for secondary disinfection. The diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite- oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in the distribution systems of a pilot-scale chloraminated drinking water treatment system was characterized using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and 16S rRNA gene (ribosomal DNA (rDNA))

  11. Pilot-scale NOx and SOx removal from boiler emission using indirect plasma and chemical hybrid process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshiaki YAMAMOTO; Hidekatsu FUJISHIMA; M. Okuba; Tomoyuki KUROKI

    2005-01-01

    The pilot-scale simultaneous NOx and SOx removal from boiler emission was performed using an indirect plasma and a chemical hybrid process. The flue gas flow rate was in the range of 450-1,470 Nm3\\/hr, the gas temperature of 280 °C, and NOx concentration of 30 ppm for city gas firing, and 70 ppm of NOx and 35 ppm of SOx for

  12. MSWI bottom ash used as basement at two pilot-scale roads: Comparison of leachate chemistry and reactive transport modeling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurent De Windt; David Dabo; Sofia Lidelöw; Rabia Badreddine; Anders Lagerkvist

    2011-01-01

    The recycling of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash as aggregates for road basement requires assessing the long-term evolution of leachate chemistry. The Dåva (Sweden) and Hérouville (France) pilot-scale roads were monitored during 6 and 10years, respectively. Calculated saturation indices were combined to batch test modeling to set a simplified geochemical model of the bottom ash materials. A common reactive

  13. Monitoring wolves ( Canis lupus ) by non-invasive genetics and camera trapping: a small-scale pilot study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marco Galaverni; Davide Palumbo; Elena Fabbri; Romolo Caniglia; Claudia Greco; Ettore Randi

    Monitoring populations of elusive large carnivores like wolves (Canis lupus), which are often distributed at low density in widespread forested areas, is difficult or exceedingly expensive. Aiming\\u000a to assess the power of two indirect monitoring methods, non-invasive genetic sampling and camera trapping, we designed a small-scale\\u000a pilot study that was carried out from 2006 to 2008 in and around the

  14. Pilot-Scale MultiStage Countercurrent Extraction of Scutellarein from Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand-Mazz

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhipeng Xie; Xuesong Liu; Yong Chen; Longhu Wang

    2009-01-01

    A low-temperature, timesaving, lower solvent consumption, and energy cost and multi-stage countercurrent extraction (MCCE) technique was developed for pilot-scale production of scutellarein from Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand-Mazz. The optimum conditions of MCCE process were obtained using the orthogonal array design method, i.e., 70% (v\\/v) of ethanol water solution, 16 L\\/kg of solvent to herbal sample ratio, 45°C of extraction temperature and

  15. Pilot-scale manufacture and marketing of Quarg cheese: implications for future U.S. market potential

    E-print Network

    Battaglia, Ann Christine

    1986-01-01

    ) which selectively concentrates milk (5t1) Into a pre- cheese retentate to be formed directly Into Quarg (20, 27). The concentration effects of UF ellmlnate the need for skim milk powders previously used to Increase Quarg yield (6, 35... production by direct ultrafiltration of skim milk and by the Pasilac process 12 4. Schematic diagram of pilot scale Quarg manufacture 24 5. Initial Quarg questionnaire 27 6. Promotional sign-1 used during Quarg demonstration 7. Promotional sign-2 used...

  16. Novel membrane bioreactor (MBR) coupled with a nonwoven fabric filter for household wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xianghao Ren; H. K. Shon; Namjung Jang; Young Geun Lee; Minsu Bae; Jongho Lee; Kwangmyeung Cho; In S. Kim

    2010-01-01

    Conventional and modified membrane bioreactors (MBRs) are increasingly used in small-scale wastewater treatment. However, their widespread applications are hindered by their relatively high cost and operational complexity. In this study, we investigate a new concept of wastewater treatment using a nonwoven fabric filter bag (NFFB) as the membrane bioreactor. Activated sludge is charged in the nonwoven fabric filter bag and

  17. Final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC appendices, Volume 4, Appendix V-C

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This is the the final verification run data package for pilot scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. Included are data on volatiles, semivolatiles, and TCLP volatiles.

  18. Scale-up of anaerobic 1,3-propanediol production by Clostridium butyricum DSP1 from crude glycerol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As the production of biofuels from raw materials continuously increases, optimization of production processes is necessary. A very important issue is the development of wasteless methods of biodiesel production. One way of utilization of glycerol generated in biodiesel production is its microbial conversion to 1,3-PD (1,3-propanediol). Results The study investigated the scale-up of 1,3-PD synthesis from crude glycerol by Clostridium butyricum. Batch fermentations were carried out in 6.6 L, 42 L and 150 L bioreactors. It was observed that cultivation of C. butyricum on a pilot scale did not decrease the efficiency of 1,3-PD production. The highest concentrations of 1,3-PD, 37 g/L for batch fermentation and 71 g/L for fed-batch fermentation, were obtained in the 6.6 L bioreactor. The kinetic parameters of 1,3-PD synthesis from crude glycerol established for batch fermentation were similar regarding all three bioreactor capacities. During fed-batch fermentation, the concentration of 1,3-PD in the 150 L bioreactor was lower and the substrate was not completely utilized. That suggested the presence of multifunctional environmental stresses in the 150 L bioreactor, which was confirmed by protein analysis. Conclusion The values of effectivity parameters for 1,3-PD synthesis in batch fermentations carried out in 6.6 L, 42 L and 150 L bioreactors were similar. The parameters obtained during fed-batch fermentations in the 150 L bioreactor differed in the rate and percentage of substrate utilization. The analysis of cell proteins demonstrated that a number of multifunctional stresses occurred during fed-batch fermentations in the 150 L bioreactor, which suggests the possibility of identifying the key stages in the biochemical process where inhibition of 1,3-PD synthesis pathways can be observed. PMID:24555775

  19. Design challenges for space bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshan, P. K.; Petersen, G. R.

    1989-01-01

    The design of bioreactors for operation under conditions of microgravity presents problems and challenges. Absence of a significant body force such as gravity can have profound consequences for interfacial phenomena. Marangoni convection can no longer be overlooked. Many speculations on the advantages and benefits of microgravity can be found in the literature. Initial bioreactor research considerations for space applications had little regard for the suitability of the designs for conditions of microgravity. Bioreactors can be classified in terms of their function and type of operation. The complex interaction of parameters leading to optimal design and operation of a bioreactor is illustrated by the JSC mammalian cell culture system. The design of a bioreactor is strongly dependent upon its intended use as a production unit for cell mass and/or biologicals or as a research reactor for the study of cell growth and function. Therefore a variety of bioreactor configurations are presented in rapid summary. Following this, a rationale is presented for not attempting to derive key design parameters such as the oxygen transfer coefficient from ground-based data. A set of themes/objectives for flight experiments to develop the expertise for design of space bioreactors is then proposed for discussion. These experiments, carried out systematically, will provide a database from which engineering tools for space bioreactor design will be derived.

  20. Pilot-Scale Fermentation and Laboratory Nutrient Studies on Mixed-Acid Fermentation 

    E-print Network

    Smith, Aaron Douglas

    2011-08-08

    Via mixed-culture fermentation, the MixAlcoTM produces carboxylic acids, which are chemically converted into industrial chemicals and hydrocarbon fuels. Using pilot fermentation data, The Continuum Particle Distribution ...

  1. The ClinSeq Project: Piloting large-scale genome sequencing for research in genomic medicine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leslie G. Biesecker; James C. Mullikin; Flavia M. Facio; Clesson Turner; Praveen F. Cherukuri; Robert W. Blakesley; Gerard G. Bouffard; Peter S. Chines; Pedro Cruz; Nancy F. Hansen; Jamie K. Teer; Baishali Maskeri; Alice C. Young; Teri A. Manolio; Alexander F. Wilson; Toren Finkel; Paul Hwang; Andrew Arai; Alan T. Remaley; Vandana Sachdev; Robert Shamburek; Richard O. Cannon; Eric D. Green

    2009-01-01

    ClinSeq is a pilot project to investigate the use of whole-genome sequencing as a tool for clinical research. By piloting the acquisition of large amounts of DN A sequence data from individual human subjects, we are fostering the development of hypothesis-generating approaches for performing research in genomic medicine, including the exploration of issues re- lated to the genetic architecture of

  2. Performance of a pilot-scale compost biofilter treating gasoline vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, W.F.; Schroeder, E.D.; Chang, D.P.Y. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Romstad, K. [Environmental Resolutions, Inc., Novato, CA (United States)

    1997-06-01

    A pilot-scale compost biofiltration system was operated as gasoline soil vapor extraction site in Hayward, California for one year. The media was composed of equal volumes of compost and perlite, a bulking agent. Supplements added included nitrogen (as KNO{sub 3}), a gasoline degrading microbial inoculum, buffer (crushed oyster shell), and water. The biofiltration system was composed of four identical units with outside dimensions of 1.2 x 1.2 x 1.2 m (4 x 4 x 4 ft) operated in an up-flow mode. The units were configured in parallel during the first eight months and then reconfigured to two parallel systems of two units in series. Air flux values ranged from 0.29 to 1.0 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2} per min. Inlet total petroleum hydrogen hydrocarbon (TPH{sub gas}) concentrations ranged from 310 to 2,700 mg/m{sup 3}. The average empty bed contact time was 2.2 min. Following start-up, performance of the individual biofilters varied considerably for a seven-month period. The principal factor affecting performance appeared to be bed moisture content. Overall TPH{sub gas} removals reached 90% for short periods in one unit, and BTEX removals were typically above 90%. Drying resulted in channeling and loss of bed activity. Management of bed moisture content improved over the study period, and recovery of system performance was achieved without replacement of bed media. Overall TPH{sub gas} removals exceeded 90% during the final 50 days of the study.

  3. Responses of microbial community functional structures to pilot-scale uranium in situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, M.; Wu, W.-M.; Wu, L.; He, Z.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Deng, Y.; Luo, J.; Carley, J.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Gentry, T.J.; Gu, B.; Watson, D.; Jardine, P.M.; Marsh, T.L.; Tiedje, J.M.; Hazen, T.C.; Criddle, C.S.; Zhou, J.

    2010-02-15

    A pilot-scale field test system with an inner loop nested within an outer loop was constructed for in situ U(VI) bioremediation at a US Department of Energy site, Oak Ridge, TN. The outer loop was used for hydrological protection of the inner loop where ethanol was injected for biostimulation of microorganisms for U(VI) reduction/immobilization. After 2 years of biostimulation with ethanol, U(VI) levels were reduced to below drinking water standard (<30 {micro}gl{sup -1}) in the inner loop monitoring wells. To elucidate the microbial community structure and functions under in situ uranium bioremediation conditions, we used a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip) to examine the microbial functional gene composition of the sediment samples collected from both inner and outer loop wells. Our study results showed that distinct microbial communities were established in the inner loop wells. Also, higher microbial functional gene number, diversity and abundance were observed in the inner loop wells than the outer loop wells. In addition, metal-reducing bacteria, such as Desulfovibrio, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and Shewanella, and other bacteria, for example, Rhodopseudomonas and Pseudomonas, are highly abundant in the inner loop wells. Finally, the richness and abundance of microbial functional genes were highly correlated with the mean travel time of groundwater from the inner loop injection well, pH and sulfate concentration in groundwater. These results suggest that the indigenous microbial communities can be successfully stimulated for U bioremediation in the groundwater ecosystem, and their structure and performance can be manipulated or optimized by adjusting geochemical and hydrological conditions.

  4. A pilot scale ultrasonic system to enhance extraction processes with dense gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, E.; Blasco, M.; Tornero, A.; Casas, E.; Roselló, C.; Simal, S.; Acosta, V. M.; Gallego-Juárez, J. A.

    2012-05-01

    The use of dense gases (supercritical fluids) as extracting agents has been attracting wide interest for years. In particular, supercritical carbon dioxide is considered nowadays as a green and very useful solvent. Nevertheless, the extraction process has a slow dynamics. Power ultrasound represents an efficient way for accelerating and enhancing the kinetics of the process by producing strong agitation and turbulence, compressions and decompressions, and heating in the media. For this purpose, a device prototype for using ultrasound in supercritical media was developed, tested and validated in extraction processes of oil from grounded almonds (55% oil content, wet basis and 3-4 mm particle size) in a 5 L extraction unit. An amount of 1500 g of grounded almonds was placed in a cylindrical basket during the trials inside the dense gas extractor (DGE) where solvent was introduced at different flow rates, pressures and temperatures. In all cases the ultrasonic energy confirmed the enhancement and acceleration of the almond oil extraction kinetics using supercritical CO2. Presently the power ultrasound effect in such a process is being deeply analyzed in a 5 L extraction unit before scaling-up a new ultrasonic system. This technology, still under development, has been designed for a bigger dense gas pilot-plant consisting of two extractors (20 L capacity), two separation units and has the possibility of operating at a pressure up to 50 MPa. The goal of this work is to study the effect of high-power ultrasound coupled to dense gas extraction inside the basket with the product, and to present a prototype for the use of power ultrasound in extraction processes with dense gases inside a new 20 L extractor unit.

  5. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Farnum, Rachel; Perry, Robert; Wood, Benjamin

    2014-12-31

    GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2) from the flue gas of coal-fired powerplants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO2-capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a pilot-scale continuous CO2 absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. As part of that effort, an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a CO2-capture system for a 550 MW coal-fired powerplant was conducted. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP- 1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonicacid (DDBSA) were also identified foranalysis. An EH&S assessment was also completed for the manufacturing process for the GAP-1m solvent. The chemicals associated with the manufacturing process include methanol, xylene, allyl chloride, potassium cyanate, sodium hydroxide (NaOH), tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO), tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide, Karstedt catalyst, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), Aliquat 336, methyl carbamate, potassium chloride, trimethylamine, and (3-aminopropyl) dimethyl silanol. The toxicological effects of each component of both the CO2 capture system and the manufacturing process were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations are summarized. Engineering and control systems, including environmental abatement, are described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.

  6. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger: Preliminary test plan for Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing

    SciTech Connect

    Jankura, B.J.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants -- while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of addressing the emission of S0{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase 1 and Phase 2 requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The Task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variables than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The data from these tests greatly expands the IFGT performance database for coals and is needed for the technology to progress from the component engineering phase to system integration and commercialization. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides a preliminary test plan for all of the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.

  7. Letter report: Pre-conceptual design study for a pilot-scale Non-Radioactive Low-Level Waste Vitrification Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, R.A.; Morrissey, M.F.

    1996-03-01

    This report presents a pre-conceptual design study for a Non-Radioactive Low-Level Waste, Pilot-Scale Vitrification System. This pilot plant would support the development of a full-scale LLW Vitrification Facility and would ensure that the full-scale facility can meet its programmatic objectives. Use of the pilot facility will allow verification of process flowsheets, provide data for ensuring product quality, assist in scaling to full scale, and support full-scale start-up. The facility will vitrify simulated non-radioactive LLW in a manner functionally prototypic to the full-scale facility. This pre-conceptual design study does not fully define the LLW Pilot-Scale Vitrification System; rather, it estimates the funding required to build such a facility. This study includes identifying all equipment necessary. to prepare feed, deliver it into the melter, convert the feed to glass, prepare emissions for atmospheric release, and discharge and handle the glass. The conceived pilot facility includes support services and a structure to contain process equipment.

  8. Assessment of syngas composition variability in a pilot-scale downdraft biomass gasifier by an extended equilibrium model.

    PubMed

    Simone, Marco; Barontini, Federica; Nicolella, Cristiano; Tognotti, Leonardo

    2013-07-01

    A new simplified approach based on equilibrium modeling is proposed in this work to describe the correlations among syngas species experimentally observed in a pilot scale downdraft biomass gasifier operated with different feedstocks (biomass pellets and vine prunings). The modeling approach is based on experimental evidence on the presence of devolatilization products in the syngas and fluctuations of syngas composition during stationary operation, accounted for by introducing two empirical parameters, a by-pass index and a permeability index. The simplified model correctly reproduces the correlations among the main syngas species (including methane and ethylene) resulting from experimental data of pilot tests with different feedstocks and under a wide range of operating conditions. PMID:23672938

  9. No corrosion caused by coal chlorine found in AFBC pilot scale tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, K.; Pan, W.P.; Riley, J.T.; Liu, K.; Smith, S.

    2000-07-01

    Measurements of deposition and corrosion were made in the freeboard of a 3 m inner diameter pilot scale atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) during seven 1,000-hours tests using coals with chlorine (Cl) contents ranging from 0.026% up to 0.47% and sulfur contents ranging from 0.897{approximately}4.4%. Uncooled coupons of alloys 304, 309, 347 and a cooled tube of A210C medium carbon steel were exposed to the hot flue gases to investigate the effects of different coal compositions on deposition and corrosion behavior, if any. The uncooled coupons were installed at the tope of the freeboard to simulate the superheater tube conditions (1,020--1,100 F surface temperature), while the temperature of the cooled A210C test tube was controlled to match the conditions of the evaporator tubes. Specimens were removed for examination after 250, 500, 750, 1,000 hours of exposure and analyzed for deposit formation and corrosion. No chlorine was found in the corrosion scale or on the metal surfaces after any of the tests. High sulfur contents were found in the outer parts of the deposits, and appeared to be associated with calcium and magnesium suggesting that the fly ash may react further after being deposited on the surface of the metal. It was concluded that the limestone bed in the AFBC not only can capture the sulfur but also can effectively capture chlorine. This effect helps being the Cl in the AFBC flue gas down to a level of <50 ppm which is significantly lower than the 300{approximately}400 ppm expected from combustion of the coal in the absence of limestone. This reduction in chlorine species in the gas phase has possible implications for decreased corrosion problems not only in the freeboard, but also in the cold end of the boiler. No evidence was found in these tests that metal wastage or corrosion was accelerated, either directly or indirectly, by chlorine in the coal.

  10. Improvement and Validation of Pilot-Scale Emerging Pathogen Removal Studies: The Effects of Spiking Concentration and Sampling Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, B. L.; Harrington, G. W.; Hoffman, R. M.; Borchardt, M. A.

    2004-05-01

    The presence of waterborne enteric pathogens in domestic water supplies represents a potentially significant human health risk. To evaluate the removal of these pathogens in drinking water treatment processes, researchers have needed to spike raw water with at least 106 pathogens/L in order to reliably detect the pathogens in treated water. Unfortunately, occurrence surveys have shown that pathogen concentrations in raw waters are significantly smaller than 106 pathogens/L (LeChevallier and Norton, 1995; States et al., 1997). Since regulatory decisions are based on results from pilot-scale experiments, it is necessary to determine if it is appropriate to extrapolate removal capacities based on unrealistic spike doses. Recent advances have been made in sample concentration and pathogen detection that allows removal studies to be conducted at more realistic spike concentrations. The overall goal of this project is to use continuous separation channel centrifugation (CSCC) and flow cytometry with cell sorting (FCCS) to evaluate Cryptosporidium removals in water treatment processes at concentrations nearer to those found in the aquatic environment. This project evaluates Cryptosporidium removal with a unique combination of experimental, concentration, and analytical methods. In order to characterize the removal of Cryptosporidium, pilot-scale experiments will be conducted between March and April 2004 with different initial Cryptosporidium concentrations (range from 102 to 106 Cryptosporidium/L) and sampling methods (grab versus continuous). CSCC will be used for concentration of pathogens in samples collected from the pilot plant. FCCS capability will be used for Cryptosporidium detection. These methods will achieve significantly higher pathogen recoveries and more precise pathogen counts than the methods that have traditionally been used for pilot plant studies. This research will provide the water industry with a way of validating previous removal studies and insight into how pathogens log removal credits should be granted.

  11. Energy Efficient Aluminum Production - Pilot-Scale Cell Tests - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Christini

    1999-12-30

    A cermet anode that produces oxygen and a cathode material that is wetted by aluminum can provide a dimensionally stable inter-electrode distance in the Hall-Heroult cell. This can be used to greatly improve the energy and/or productivity efficiencies. The concept, which was developed and tested, uses a system of vertically interleaved anodes and cathodes. The major advantage of this concept is the significant increase in electrochemical surface area compared to a horizontal orientation of anode and cathode that is presently used in the Hall-Heroult process. This creates an additional advantage for energy reduction of 1.3 kWh/lb or a 20% productivity improvement. The voltages obtained in an optimized cell test met the energy objectives of the project for at least two weeks. An acceptable current efficiency was never proven, however, during either pilot scale or bench scale tests with the vertical plate configuration. This must be done before a vertical cell can be considered viab le. Anode corrosion rate must be reduced by at least a factor of three in order to produce commercial purity aluminum. It is recommended that extensive theoretical and bench scale investigations be done to improve anode materials and to demonstrate acceptable current efficiencies in a vertical plate cell before pilot scale work is continued.

  12. A simple eccentric stirred tank mini-bioreactor: mixing characterization and mammalian cell culture experiments.

    PubMed

    Bulnes-Abundis, David; Carrillo-Cocom, Leydi M; Aráiz-Hernández, Diana; García-Ulloa, Alfonso; Granados-Pastor, Marisa; Sánchez-Arreola, Pamela B; Murugappan, Gayathree; Alvarez, Mario M

    2013-04-01

    In industrial practice, stirred tank bioreactors are the most common mammalian cell culture platform. However, research and screening protocols at the laboratory scale (i.e., 5-100 mL) rely primarily on Petri dishes, culture bottles, or Erlenmeyer flasks. There is a clear need for simple-easy to assemble, easy to use, easy to clean-cell culture mini-bioreactors for lab-scale and/or screening applications. Here, we study the mixing performance and culture adequacy of a 30 mL eccentric stirred tank mini-bioreactor. A detailed mixing characterization of the proposed bioreactor is presented. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations are used to identify the operational conditions required for adequate mixing. Mammalian cell culture experiments were conducted with two different cell models. The specific growth rate and the maximum cell density of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultures grown in the mini-bioreactor were comparable to those observed for 6-well culture plates, Erlenmeyer flasks, and 1 L fully instrumented bioreactors. Human hematopoietic stem cells were successfully expanded tenfold in suspension conditions using the eccentric mini-bioreactor system. Our results demonstrate good mixing performance and suggest the practicality and adequacy of the proposed mini-bioreactor. PMID:23124589

  13. Sensing in tissue bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolfe, P.

    2006-03-01

    Specialized sensing and measurement instruments are under development to aid the controlled culture of cells in bioreactors for the fabrication of biological tissues. Precisely defined physical and chemical conditions are needed for the correct culture of the many cell-tissue types now being studied, including chondrocytes (cartilage), vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (blood vessels), fibroblasts, hepatocytes (liver) and receptor neurones. Cell and tissue culture processes are dynamic and therefore, optimal control requires monitoring of the key process variables. Chemical and physical sensing is approached in this paper with the aim of enabling automatic optimal control, based on classical cell growth models, to be achieved. Non-invasive sensing is performed via the bioreactor wall, invasive sensing with probes placed inside the cell culture chamber and indirect monitoring using analysis within a shunt or a sampling chamber. Electroanalytical and photonics-based systems are described. Chemical sensing for gases, ions, metabolites, certain hormones and proteins, is under development. Spectroscopic analysis of the culture medium is used for measurement of glucose and for proteins that are markers of cell biosynthetic behaviour. Optical interrogation of cells and tissues is also investigated for structural analysis based on scatter.

  14. Upscaling of an electronic nose for completely stirred tank reactor stability monitoring from pilot-scale to real-scale agricultural co-digestion biogas plant.

    PubMed

    Adam, Gilles; Lemaigre, Sébastien; Goux, Xavier; Delfosse, Philippe; Romain, Anne-Claude

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the use of an electronic nose for on-line anaerobic reactor state monitoring at the pilot-scale level and then upscaling to the full-scale level. E-nose indicator was compared to classical state indicators such as pH, alkalinity, volatile fatty acids concentration and to other gas phase compounds. Multivariate statistical process control method, based on principal component analysis and the Hotelling's T(2) statistics was used to derive an indicator representative of the reactor state. At the pilot-scale level, the e-nose indicator was relevant and could distinguish 3 process states: steady-state, transient and collapsing process. At the full-scale level, the e-nose indicator could provide the warning of the major disturbance whereas two slight disturbances were not detected and it gave one major false alarm. This work showed that gas phase relation with anaerobic process should be deeper investigated, as an e-nose could indicate the reactor state, focusing on the gas phase. PMID:25446784

  15. Construction and evaluation of simulated pilot scale landfill lysimeter in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rafizul, Islam M; Howlader, Milon Kanti; Alamgir, Muhammed

    2012-11-01

    This research concentrates the design, construction and evaluation of simulated pilot scale landfill lysimeter at KUET campus, Khulna, Bangladesh. Both the aerobic and anaerobic conditions having a base liner and two different types of cap liner were simulated. After the design of a reference cell, the construction of landfill lysimeter was started in January 2008 and completed in July 2008. In all construction process locally available civil construction materials were used. The municipal solid waste (MSW) of 2800-2985 kg having the total volume of 2.80 m(3) (height 1.6 m) and moisture content of 65% was deposited in each lysimeter by applying required compaction energy. In contrast, both the composition in terms of methane (CH(4)), carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and oxygen (O(2)) as well as the flow rate of landfill gas (LFG) generated from MSW in landfill lysimeter were measured and varied significantly in relation to the variation of lysimeter operational condition. Moreover, anaerobic lysimeter-C shows the highest composition of LFG in compare to the anaerobic lysimeter-B due to the providing of lower compaction of cap liner in anaerobic lysimeter-C. Here, it is interesting to note that in absence of compacted clay liner (CCL) and hence percolation of rainwater that facilitates rapid degradation of MSW in aerobic lysimeter-A has resulted in the highest settlement than that of anaerobic landfill lysimeter-B and C. Moreover, in case of anaerobic lysimeter-B and C, the leachate generation was lower than that of aerobic lysimeter-A due to the providing of cap liner in anaerobic lysimeter-B and C, played an important role to reduce the percolation of rainwater. The study also reveals that the leachate pollution index (LPI) has decreased in relation to the increasing of elapsed period as well as the LPI for collection system of aerobic lysimeter-A was higher than that of the collection system of anaerobic lysimeter-B and C. Finally, it can be depicted that LPI for lysimeter was significantly high and proper treatment will be necessary before discharging the lysimeter leachate into the water bodies. PMID:22464865

  16. Laboratory and Pilot Scale Evaluation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Technology for Use at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS)

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.P.; Hankins, M.G.

    1999-02-01

    Three reactive materials were evaluated to identify the optimum treatment reagent for use in a Permeable Reactive Barrier Treatment System at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). The three reactive media evaluated included high carbon steel iron filings, an iron-silica alloy in the form of a foam aggregate, and a pellicular humic acid based sorbent (Humasorb from Arctech) mixed with sand. Each material was tested in the laboratory at column scale using simulated site water. All three materials showed promise for the 903 Mound Site; however, the iron filings were determined to be the most cost effective media. In order to validate the laboratory results, the iron filings were further tested at a pilot scale (field columns) using actual site water. Pilot test results were similar to laboratory results; consequently, the iron filings were chosen for the full scale demonstration of this reactive barrier technology. Design parameters including saturated hydraulic conductivity, treatment residence time, and head loss across the media were provided to the design team in support of the final design.

  17. In-Situ Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Pilot-Scale Treatability Test at the 300 Area, Hanford Site - 8187

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vince R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

    2008-06-02

    This paper describes the pilot-scale treatability test that was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of using a polyphosphate injection approach to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ within the 300 Area aquifer at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Primary test objectives were to assess 1) direct treatment of available uranium contributing to the groundwater plume through precipitation of the uranyl phosphate mineral autunite, and 2) emplacement of secondary-treatment capacity via precipitation of the calcium phosphate mineral apatite, which acts as a long-term sorbent for uranium.

  18. A comparison of impulse drying to double felted pressing on pilot- scale shoe presses and roll presses

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1992-08-01

    Pilot-scale shoe press and roll press experiments have been conducted to compare impulse drying and double felted pressing. Both ceramic coated and Beloit Type C press rolls have been evaluated. The experiments show that impulse drying can provide significantly higher outgoing solids than double felled pressing at the same impulse. For example, at an impulse of 0.234 MPa seconds (34 psi seconds), sheets at an ingoing solids of 52% were impulse dried (using the Beloit Type C press roll) to 68% solids while optimized double felled pressing could only yield press dryness of, at most, 60%.

  19. Hanford Waste Vitrification Program process development: Melt testing subtask, pilot-scale ceramic melter experiment, run summary

    SciTech Connect

    Nakaoka, R.K.; Bates, S.O.; Elmore, M.R.; Goles, R.W.; Perez, J.M.; Scott, P.A.; Westsik, J.H.

    1996-03-01

    Hanford Waste Vitrification Program (HWVP) activities for FY 1985 have included engineering and pilot-scale melter experiments HWVP-11/HBCM-85-1 and HWVP-12/PSCM-22. Major objectives designated by HWVP fo these tests were to evaluate the processing characteristics of the current HWVP melter feed during actual melter operation and establish the product quality of HW-39 borosilicate glass. The current melter feed, defined during FY 85, consists of reference feed (HWVP-RF) and glass-forming chemicals added as frit.

  20. Final Report: Pilot-Scale X-Flow Filtration Test - Env C Plus Entrained Solids Plus Sr/TRU

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.R.

    2000-07-27

    This report discusses the results of the operation of a cross-flow filter in a pilot-scale experimental facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This filtration technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by BNFL, Inc. The plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

  1. A 12-MW-scale pilot study of in-duct scrubbing (IDS) using a rotary atomizer

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, E.A.; Murphy, K.R.; Demian, A.

    1989-11-01

    A low-cost, moderate-removal efficiency, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology was selected by the US Department of Energy for pilot demonstration in its Acid Rain Precursor Control Technology Initiative. The process, identified as In-Duct Scrubbing (IDS), applies rotary atomizer techniques developed for lime-based spray dryer FGD while utilizing existing flue gas ductwork and particulate collectors. IDS technology is anticipated to result in a dry desulfurization process with a moderate removal efficiency (50% or greater) for high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. The critical elements for successful application are: (1) adequate mixing of sorbent droplets with flue gas for efficient reaction contact, (2) sufficient residence time to produce a non-wetting product, and (3) appropriate ductwork cross-sectional area to prevent deposition of wet reaction products before particle drying is comple. The ductwork in many older plants, previously modified to meet 1970 Clean Air Act requirements for particulate control, usually meet these criteria. A 12 MW-scale IDS pilot plant was constructed at the Muskingum River Plant of the American Electric Power System. The pilot plant, which operates from a slipstrem attached to the air-preheater outlet duct from the Unit 5 boiler at the Muskingum River Plant (which burns about 4% sulfur coal), is equipped with three atomizer stations to test the IDS concept in vertical and horizontal configurations. In addition, the pilot plant is equipped to test the effect of injecting IDS off- product upstream of the atomizer, on SO{sub 2}and NO{sub x} removals.

  2. PILOT-SCALE ASSESSMENT OF CONVENTIONAL PARTICULATE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR PRESSURIZED FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and fabric filter particulate control technology for the EPA/Exxon pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) Miniplant in Linden, NJ. EPA's mobile ESP and fabric filter pilot facilities were slipstrea...

  3. Removal of emerging contaminants of industrial origin by NF\\/RO - A pilot scale study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Davor Dolar; Krešimir Košuti?; Dragana Mutavdži? Pavlovi?; Branko Kunst

    2009-01-01

    In this study a recently built NF\\/RO pilot unit for removal of emerging contaminants from a plant producing veterinary pharmaceuticals was tested. A wastewater stream of the plant, containing residuals of antibiotics and other organics was treated by three different types of reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration membranes: XLE, NF90 and HL. Target compounds selected for this study included three

  4. Effects of the Arable Stewardship Pilot Scheme on breeding birds at field and farm-scales

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Danaë K. Stevens; Richard B. Bradbury

    2006-01-01

    In the short- to medium-term, agri-environment schemes are potentially the key mechanism for reversing farmland bird declines across Europe. The Arable Stewardship Pilot Scheme (ASPS) was designed to test the delivery of resources by a suite of management options for a range of farmland taxa, in two lowland farmland regions of England (East Anglia and West Midlands). The impact of

  5. Operation of Membrane Bioreactor with Powdered Activated Carbon Addition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Choon Aun Ng; Darren Sun; Anthony G. Fane

    2006-01-01

    The effect of powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition to the activated sludge (AS) in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) has been investigated. The long term nature of the tests allowed the PAC to gradually incorporate into the biofloc forming biologically activated carbon (BAC). One series of tests involved 4 bench scale (2 L) MBRs operated at sludge retention times (SRTs) of 30

  6. BAFFLED MEMBRANE BIOREACTOR FOR SIMULTANEOUS NITRIFICATION AND DENITRIFICATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. P. Oliveira-Esquerre; Y. Watanabe

    This paper presents the results of bench-scale experiments with a novel aerobic and anoxic membrane bio-reactor (MBR). The creation of alternative aerobic and anoxic regions by surrounding the membrane module with baffles allowed denitrification to occur simultaneously to nitrification in a single reactor. The efficiency of total organic carbon (TOC) and ammonium removal was more than 99% at up to

  7. Drinking water denitrification by a membrane bio-reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alper Nuhoglu; Turgay Pekdemir; Ergun Yildiz; Bulent Keskinler; Galip Akay

    2002-01-01

    Drinking water denitrification performance of a bench scale membrane bio-reactor (MBR) was investigated as function of hydraulic and biological parameters. The reactor was a stirred tank and operated both in batch and continuous mode. The mixed denitrifying culture used in the batch mode tests was derived from the mixed liquor of a wastewater treatment plant in Erzincan province in Turkey.

  8. Application of submerged membrane bioreactor for aquaculture effluent reuse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Pulefou; V. Jegatheesan; C. Steicke; Seung-Hyun Kim

    2008-01-01

    Discharging the nutrient rich aquaculture effluents into inland water bodies and oceans is becoming a serious concern due to the adverse effect that brings in the form of eutrophication and subsequent damages to those waters. A laboratory scale biological reactor consisting of a denitrifying compartment followed by a submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) compartment was used to treat 40 L d?1

  9. Hosting the plant cells in vitro: recent trends in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Milen I; Eibl, Regine; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2013-05-01

    Biotechnological production of high-value metabolites and therapeutic proteins by plant in vitro systems has been considered as an attractive alternative of classical technologies. Numerous proof-of-concept studies have illustrated the feasibility of scaling up plant in vitro system-based processes while keeping their biosynthetic potential. Moreover, several commercial processes have been established so far. Though the progress on the field is still limited, in the recent years several bioreactor configurations has been developed (e.g., so-called single-use bioreactors) and successfully adapted for growing plant cells in vitro. This review highlights recent progress and limitations in the bioreactors for plant cells and outlines future perspectives for wider industrialization of plant in vitro systems as "green cell factories" for sustainable production of value-added molecules. PMID:23504061

  10. Membrane Bioreactor With Pressure Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efthymiou, George S.; Shuler, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Improved class of multilayer membrane bioreactors uses convention forced by differences in pressure to overcome some of diffusional limitations of prior bioreactors. In reactor of new class, flow of nutrient solution reduces adverse gradients of concentration, keeps cells supplied with fresh nutrient, and sweeps away products faster than diffusion alone. As result, overall yield and rate of reaction increased. Pressures in sweeping gas and nutrient alternated to force nutrient liquid into and out of biocatalyst layer through hyrophilic membrane.

  11. Spiral vane bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A spiral vane bioreactor of a perfusion type is described in which a vertical chamber, intended for use in a microgravity condition, has a central rotating filter assembly and has flexible membranes disposed to rotate annularly about the filter assembly. The flexible members have end portions disposed angularly with respect to one another. A fluid replenishment medium is input from a closed loop liquid system to a completely liquid filled chamber containing microcarrier beads, cells and a fluid medium. Output of spent medium is to the closed loop. In the closed loop, the output and input parameters are sensed by sensors. A manifold permits recharging of the nutrients and pH adjustment. Oxygen is supplied and carbon dioxide and bubbles are removed and the system is monitored and controlled by a microprocessor.

  12. Scale-up of stirring as foam disruption (SAFD) to industrial scale.

    PubMed

    Hoeks, Frans W J M M; Boon, Lotte A; Studer, Fabian; Wolff, Menno O; van der Schot, Freija; Vrabél, Peter; van der Lans, Rob G J M; Bujalski, Waldemar; Manelius, Asa; Blomsten, Gustav; Hjorth, Sven; Prada, Giovanna; Luyben, Karel Ch A M; Nienow, Alvin W

    2003-02-01

    Foam disruption by agitation-the stirring as foam disruption (SAFD) technique-was scaled up to pilot and production scale using Rushton turbines and an up-pumping hydrofoil impeller, the Scaba 3SHP1. The dominating mechanism behind SAFD-foam entrainment-was also demonstrated at production scale. The mechanistic model for SAFD defines a fictitious liquid velocity generated by the (upper) impeller near the dispersion surface, which is correlated with complete foam disruption. This model proved to be scalable, thus enabling the model to be used for the design of SAFD applications. Axial upward pumping impellers appeared to be more effective with respect to SAFD than Rushton turbines, as demonstrated by retrofitting a 12,000 l bioreactor, i.e. the triple Rushton configuration was compared with a mixed impeller configuration from Scaba with a 20% lower ungassed power draw. The retrofitted impeller configuration allowed 10% more broth without risking excessive foaming. In this way a substantial increase in the volumetric productivity of the bioreactor was achieved. Design recommendations for the application of SAFD are given in this paper. Using these recommendations for the design of a 30,000 l scale bioreactor, almost foamless Escherichia coli fermentations were realised. PMID:12612787

  13. Modeling sorbent injection for mercury control in baghouse filters: II--pilot-scale studies and model evaluation.

    PubMed

    Flora, Joseph R V; Hargis, Richard A; O'Dowd, William J; Pennline, Henry W; Vidic, Radisav D

    2003-04-01

    Activated carbon injection for Hg control in a 500-lb/hr pilot-scale coal-fired furnace equipped with a fabric filter for particulate control was evaluated at different operating conditions. The pilot-scale tests showed that Hg removal was improved at lower temperatures and higher C/Hg ratios. The two-stage mathematical model developed to describe Hg removal using powdered activated carbon injection upstream of a baghouse filter was used to obtain Langmuir isotherm parameters as a function of temperature by fitting the model to a subset of experimental data. The predictive capability of the model was then tested by comparing model calculations with additional experimental data from this system obtained using different operating temperatures and sorbent to Hg ratios. Model predictions were in good agreement with experimentally measured Hg removal efficiency. Based on the model predictions, Hg removal in the duct appears to be limited and higher C/Hg ratio, lower operating temperature, and longer cleaning cycle of the baghouse filter should be utilized to achieve higher Hg removal in this system. PMID:12708513

  14. A Online NIR Sensor for the Pilot-Scale Extraction Process in Fructus Aurantii Coupled with Single and Ensemble Methods

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaoning; Li, Yang; Wu, Zhisheng; Zhang, Qiao; Zheng, Zhou; Shi, Xinyuan; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2015-01-01

    Model performance of the partial least squares method (PLS) alone and bagging-PLS was investigated in online near-infrared (NIR) sensor monitoring of pilot-scale extraction process in Fructus aurantii. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used as a reference method to identify the active pharmaceutical ingredients: naringin, hesperidin and neohesperidin. Several preprocessing methods and synergy interval partial least squares (SiPLS) and moving window partial least squares (MWPLS) variable selection methods were compared. Single quantification models (PLS) and ensemble methods combined with partial least squares (bagging-PLS) were developed for quantitative analysis of naringin, hesperidin and neohesperidin. SiPLS was compared to SiPLS combined with bagging-PLS. Final results showed the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of bagging-PLS to be lower than that of PLS regression alone. For this reason, an ensemble method of online NIR sensor is here proposed as a means of monitoring the pilot-scale extraction process in Fructus aurantii, which may also constitute a suitable strategy for online NIR monitoring of CHM. PMID:25875194

  15. Long term operation of high concentration powdered activated carbon membrane bio-reactor for advanced water treatment.

    PubMed

    Seo, G T; Moon, C D; Chang, S W; Lee, S H

    2004-01-01

    A pilot scale experiment was conducted to evaluate the performance of a membrane bioreactor filled with high concentration powdered activated carbon. This hybrid system has great potential to substitute for existing GAC or O3/BAC processes in the drinking water treatment train. The system was installed at a water treatment plant located downstream of the Nakdong river basin, Korea. Effluent of rapid sand filter was used as influent of the system which consists of PAC bio-reactor, submerged MF membrane module and air supply facility. PAC concentration of 20 g/L was maintained at the beginning of the experiment and it was increased to 40 g/L. The PAC has not been changed during the operational periods. The membrane was a hollow fiber type with pore sizes of 0.1 and 0.4 microm. It was apparent that the high PAC concentration could prevent membrane fouling. 40 g/L PAC was more effective to reduce the filtration resistance than 20 g/L. At the flux of 0.36 m/d, TMP was maintained less than 40 kPa for about 3 months by intermittent suction type operation (12 min suction/3 min idling). Adsorption was the dominant role to remove DOC at the initial operational period. However the biological effect was gradually increased after around 3 months operation. Constant DOC removal could be maintained at about 40% without any trouble and then a tremendous reduction of DBPs (HAA5 and THM) higher than 85% was achieved. Full nitrification was observed at the controlled influent ammonia nitrogen concentration of 3 and 7 mg/L. pH was an important parameter to keep stable ammonia oxidation. From almost two years of operation, it is clear that the PAC membrane bioreactor is highly applicable for advanced water treatment under the recent situation of more stringent DBPs regulation in Korea. PMID:15566190

  16. Simulating the gas hydrate production test at Mallik using the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeschen, Katja; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Priegnitz, Mike; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja

    2014-05-01

    LARS, the LArge Reservoir Simulator, allows for one of the few pilot scale simulations of gas hydrate formation and dissociation under controlled conditions with a high resolution sensor network to enable the detection of spatial variations. It was designed and built within the German project SUGAR (submarine gas hydrate reservoirs) for sediment samples with a diameter of 0.45 m and a length of 1.3 m. During the project, LARS already served for a number of experiments simulating the production of gas from hydrate-bearing sediments using thermal stimulation and/or depressurization. The latest test simulated the methane production test from gas hydrate-bearing sediments at the Mallik test site, Canada, in 2008 (Uddin et al., 2011). Thus, the starting conditions of 11.5 MPa and 11°C and environmental parameters were set to fit the Mallik test site. The experimental gas hydrate saturation of 90% of the total pore volume (70 l) was slightly higher than volumes found in gas hydrate-bearing formations in the field (70 - 80%). However, the resulting permeability of a few millidarcy was comparable. The depressurization driven gas production at Mallik was conducted in three steps at 7.0 MPa - 5.0 MPa - 4.2 MPa all of which were used in the laboratory experiments. In the lab the pressure was controlled using a back pressure regulator while the confining pressure was stable. All but one of the 12 temperature sensors showed a rapid decrease in temperature throughout the sediment sample, which accompanied the pressure changes as a result of gas hydrate dissociation. During step 1 and 2 they continued up to the point where gas hydrate stability was regained. The pressure decreases and gas hydrate dissociation led to highly variable two phase fluid flow throughout the duration of the simulated production test. The flow rates were measured continuously (gas) and discontinuously (liquid), respectively. Next to being discussed here, both rates were used to verify a model of gas hydrate dissociation applying the foamy oil approach, a method earlier adopted to model the Mallik production test (see abstract Abendroth et al., this volume). Combined with a dense set of data from a cylindrical electrical resistance tomography (ERT) array (see abstract Priegnitz et al., this volume), very valuable information were gained on the spatial as well as temporal formation and dissociation of gas hydrates as well as changes in permeability and resulting pathways for the fluid flow. Here we present the set-up and execution of the experiment and discuss the results from temperature and flow measurements with respect to the gas hydrate dissociation and characteristics of resulting fluid flow. Uddin, M., Wright, F., and Coombe, D. 2011. Numerical Study of Gas Evolution and Transport Behaviours in Natural Gas-Hydrate Reservoirs. Journal of Canadian Petroleum Technology 50, 70-89.

  17. Laboratory and bin-scale tests of gas generation for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Brush, L.H.; Molecke, M.A.; Lappin, A.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Westerman, R.E. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Tong, X.; Black, J.N.P.; Grbic-Galic, D. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Vreeland, R.E. (West Chester Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Biology); Reed, D.T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United Stat

    1991-01-01

    The design-basis, defense-related, transuranic (TRU) waste to be emplaced in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) could, if sufficient H{sub 2}O and nutrients were present, produce as much as 1,500 moles of gas per drum of waste. Anoxic corrosion of Fe and Fe-base alloys and microbial degradation of cellulosics are the processes of greatest concern, but radiolysis of brine could also be important. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. A next generation, pilot-scale continuous sterilization system for fermentation media

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Junker; M. Lester; T. Brix; D. Wong; J. Nuechterlein

    2006-01-01

    A new continuous sterilization system was designed, constructed, started up, and qualified for media sterilization for secondary metabolite cultivations, bioconversions, and enzyme production. An existing Honeywell Total Distributed Control 3000-based control system was extended using redundant High performance Process Manager controllers for 98 I\\/O (input\\/output) points. This new equipment was retrofitted into an industrial research fermentation pilot plant, designed and

  19. Pilot-scale treatment of gasification wastewater and reuse in a cooling tower

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. G. Willson; G. G. Mayer; J. G. Hendrikson; S. L. Winton

    1985-01-01

    The University of North Dakota Energy Research Center has operated a 910 kg\\/hr, oxygen-blown fixed-bed gasifier to produce lignite-derived effluents for characterization, treatment, and reuse studies. Reuse of waste water in a cooling tower was investigated to define environmental and process effects as a function of pretreatment. The gasification wastewater was pretreated in pilot wastewater treatement units which simulate available

  20. Combustion behaviours of tobacco stem in a thermogravimetric analyser and a pilot-scale fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zixu; Zhang, Shihong; Liu, Lei; Li, Xiangpeng; Chen, Hanping; Yang, Haiping; Wang, Xianhua

    2012-04-01

    Despite its abundant supply, tobacco stem has not been exploited as an energy source in large scale. This study investigates the combustion behaviours of tobacco stem in a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) and a pilot-scale fluidized bed (FB). Combustion characteristics, including ignition and burnout index, and combustion reaction kinetics were studied. Experiments in the FB investigated the effects of different operating conditions, such as primary air flow, secondary air flow and feeding rates, on the bed temperature profiles and combustion efficiency. Two kinds of bed materials cinder and silica sand were used in FB and the effect of bed materials on agglomeration was studied. The results indicated that tobacco stem combustion worked well in the FB. When operation condition was properly set, the tobacco stem combustion efficiency reached 94%. In addition, compared to silica sand, cinder could inhibit agglomeration during combustion because of its high aluminium content. PMID:22374152

  1. Yearlong evaluation of performance and durability of a pilot-scale Revolving Algal Biofilm (RAB) cultivation system.

    PubMed

    Gross, Martin; Wen, Zhiyou

    2014-11-01

    Current algal cultivation has been mainly performed in open ponds or photobioreactors in which algal cells are suspended and harvested through flocculation and centrifugation. A unique attachment based Revolving Algal Biofilm (RAB) cultivation system was recently developed for easy biomass harvest with enhanced biomass productivity. The objective of this research was to evaluate the performance (durability, algal growth, and the geometry) of the RAB system at pilot-scale. A yearlong test of the RAB system was successfully conducted at a greenhouse facility at Boone, Iowa, USA. The RAB resulted in an average of 302% increase in biomass productivity compared to a standard raceway pond, with a maximum biomass productivity (ash free) of 18.9 g/m(2)-day being achieved. The RAB with a vertical configuration generated higher productivity than the triangular RAB. Collectively, the research shows that the RAB as an efficient algal culture system has great potential for being deployed at commercial scale. PMID:25189508

  2. Process efficiency and microbial monitoring in MBR (membrane bioreactor) and CASP (conventional activated sludge process) treatment of tannery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Munz, Giulio; Gualtiero, Mori; Salvadori, Laura; Claudia, Barberio; Claudio, Lubello

    2008-12-01

    In this study a pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) and a conventional activated sludge plant (CASP), treating the same tannery wastewaters and in the same operating conditions, have been compared in order to evaluate the overall treatment efficiency, the presence and distribution of Gram negative bacteria and the kinetics of nitrifying bacteria. Process efficiency was evaluated in terms of organic and nitrogen compounds: the MBR showed a higher COD removal (+4%) and a more stable and complete nitrification. The Gram negative bacteria were detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with phylogenetic probes monitoring of alpha-, beta- and gamma-Proteobacteria, of the main ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria of the Nitrobacter and Nitrospira genera. The results showed that the main differences between the two sludges were: the higher abundance of alpha- and gamma-Proteobacteria in the MBR bioreactor and the presence of AOB aggregates only on the surfaces of MBR flocs. Finally, the titrimetric (pH-stat, DO-stat) tests showed similar values of the kinetic parameters of the nitrifiers both in MBR and CASP sludge. PMID:18499451

  3. A new hybrid treatment system of bioreactors and electrocoagulation for superior removal of organic and nutrient pollutants from municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dinh Duc; Ngo, Huu Hao; Yoon, Yong Soo

    2014-02-01

    This paper evaluated a novel pilot scale hybrid treatment system which combines rotating hanging media bioreactor (RHMBR), submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) along with electrocoagulation (EC) as post treatment to treat organic and nutrient pollutants from municipal wastewater. The results indicated that the highest removal efficiency was achieved at the internal recycling ratio as 400% of the influent flow rate which produced a superior effluent quality with 0.26mgBOD5L(-1), 11.46mgCODCrL(-1), 0.00mgNH4(+)-NL(-1), and 3.81mgT-NL(-1), 0.03mgT-PL(-1). During 16months of operation, NH4(+)-N was completely eliminated and T-P removal efficiency was also up to 100%. It was found that increasing in internal recycling ratio could improve the nitrate and nitrogen removal efficiencies. Moreover, the TSS and coliform bacteria concentration after treatment was less than 5mgL(-1) and 30MPNmL(-1), respectively, regardless of internal recycling ratios and its influent concentration. PMID:24355502

  4. Development of thin-film photo-bioreactor and its application to outdoor culture of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Jun; Choi, Seung Phill; Kim, Jaoon Y H; Chang, Won Seok; Sim, Sang Jun

    2013-06-01

    Photosynthetic microalgae have received much attention as a microbial source of diverse useful biomaterials through CO(2) fixation and various types of photo-bioreactors have been developed for efficient microalgal cultivation. Herein, we developed a novel thin-film photo-bioreactor, which was made of cast polypropylene film, considering outdoor mass cultivation. To develop optimal design of photo-bioreactor, we tested performance of three shapes of thin-film photo-bioreactors (flat, horizontal and vertical tubular shapes) and various parts in the bioreactor. Collectively, vertical tubular bioreactor with H/D ratio 6:1 and cylindrical stainless steel spargers showed the most outstanding performance. Furthermore, the photo-bioreactor was successfully applied to the cultivation of other microalgae such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris. The scalability of photo-bioreactor was confirmed by gradually increasing culture volume from 4 to 25 L and the biomass productivity of each reactor was quite consistent (0.05-0.07 g/L/day) during the cultivation of H. pluvialis under indoor and outdoor conditions. Especially, we also achieved dry cell weight of 4.64 g/L and astaxanthin yield of 218.16 mg/L through long-term cultivation (100 days) under outdoor condition in 15 L photo-bioreactor using Haematococcus pluvialis, which means that the astaxanthin yield from outdoor cultivation is equal or superior to that obtained from controlled indoor condition. Therefore, these results indicate that we can apply this approach to development of optimal photo-bioreactor for the large-scale culture of microalgae and production of useful biomaterials under outdoor condition. PMID:23361185

  5. HIGH-TEMPERATURE HEAT EXCHANGER TESTING IN A PILOT-SCALE SLAGGING FURNACE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Michael E. Collings; Bruce A. Dockter; Douglas R. Hajicek; Ann K. Henderson; John P. Hurley; Patty L. Kleven; Greg F. Weber

    1999-12-01

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract, has designed, constructed, and operated a 3.0-million Btu/hr (3.2 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr) slagging furnace system (SFS). Successful operation has demonstrated that the SFS meets design objectives and is well suited for testing very high-temperature heat exchanger concepts. Test results have shown that a high-temperature radiant air heater (RAH) panel designed and constructed by UTRC and used in the SFS can produce a 2000 F (1094 C) process air stream. To support the pilot-scale work, the EERC has also constructed laboratory- and bench-scale equipment which was used to determine the corrosion resistance of refractory and structural materials and develop methods to improve corrosion resistance. DOE projects that from 1995 to 2015, worldwide use of electricity will double to approach 20 trillion kilowatt hours. This growth comes during a time of concern over global warming, thought by many policy makers to be caused primarily by increases from coal-fired boilers in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions through the use of fossil fuels. Assuming limits on CO{sub 2} emissions from coal-fired boilers are imposed in the future, the most economical CO{sub 2} mitigation option may be efficiency improvements. Unless efficiency improvements are made in coal-fired power plants, utilities may be forced to turn to more expensive fuels or buy CO{sub 2} credits. One way to improve the efficiency of a coal-fired power plant is to use a combined cycle involving a typical steam cycle along with an indirectly fired turbine cycle using very high-temperature but low-pressure air as the working fluid. At the heart of an indirectly fired turbine combined-cycle power system are very high-temperature heat exchangers that can produce clean air at up to 2600 F (1427 C) and 250 psi (17 bar) to turn an aeroderivative turbine. The overall system design can be very similar to that of a typical pulverized coal-fired boiler system, except that ceramics and alloys are used to carry the very high-temperature air rather than steam. This design makes the combined-cycle system especially suitable as a boiler-repowering technology. With the use of a gas-fired duct heater, efficiencies of 55% can be achieved, leading to reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions of 40% as compared to today's coal-fired systems. On the basis of work completed to date, the high-temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) concept appears to offer a higher-efficiency technology option for coal-fired power generation systems than conventional pulverized coal firing. Concept analyses have demonstrated the ability to achieve program objectives for emissions (10% of New Source Performance Standards, i.e., 0.003 lb/MMBtu of particulate), efficiency (47%-55%), and cost of electricity (10%-25% below today's cost). Higher-efficiency technology options for new plants as well as repowering are important to the power generation industry in order to conserve valuable fossil fuel resources, reduce the quantity of pollutants (air and water) and solid wastes generated per MW, and reduce the cost of power production in a deregulated industry. Possibly more important than their potential application in a new high-temperature power system, the RAH panel and convective air heater tube bank are potential retrofit technology options for existing coal-fired boilers to improve plant efficiencies. Therefore, further development of these process air-based high-temperature heat exchangers and their potential for commercial application is directly applicable to the development of enabling technologies in support of the Vision 21 program objectives. The objective of the work documented in this report was to improve the performance of the UTRC high-temperature heat exchanger, demonstrate the fuel flexibility of the slagging combustor, and test methods for reducing corrosion of brick and castable refractory in such combustion environments. Specif

  6. Space bioreactor: Design/process flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, John H.

    1987-01-01

    The design of the space bioreactor stems from three considerations. First, and foremost, it must sustain cells in microgravity. Closely related is the ability to take advantage of the weightlessness and microgravity. Lastly, it should fit into a bioprocess. The design of the space bioreactor is described in view of these considerations. A flow chart of the bioreactor is presented and discussed.

  7. Treatment of PCB-contaminated soil in a pilot-scale continuous decomposition system.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, S; Miyamura, A; Ebihara, A; Hosomi, M; Murakami, A

    1998-01-01

    The BCDP (Base Catalyzed Decomposition Process) is a process by which difficult-to-decompose organic chlorine compounds, such as PCBs, are chemically decomposed and dechlorinated. Pilot-plant tests for PCB contaminated soil were carried out. PCB contaminated soil (32 mg/kg-530 mg/kg) was decontaminated to a level (0.038 mg/kg-4.8 mg/kg) which satisfied the corresponding Japanese environmental standard which stipulates, "there must be no discharge of PCB containing leachate". PMID:9828344

  8. Pilot scale performance of the electro-oxidation of landfill leachate at boron-doped diamond anodes.

    PubMed

    Anglada, Angela; Urtiaga, Ane; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2009-03-15

    During the electrochemical oxidation of real wastewaters, the different species present in the effluent may interact creating complex scenarios making the prediction of the behavior of the whole system difficult. In this paper the different phenomena that occur during the electro-oxidation process of landfill leachate at a pilot plant scale with boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes are elucidated. The total BDD anode area of the pilot plant was 1.05 m2. The evolution of the concentration of chloride ions, chlorate, and inorganic carbon and the value of pH and redox potential were found to be inter-related. In turn, the concentration of chloride affected the oxidation of ammonia, which took place through indirect oxidation by active chlorine. Moreover, chloride ions competed with organic matter to be oxidized at the anode. The effect of current density was also investigated. Organic matter and ammonia oxidation were highly influenced by the applied current density value. A change in the mechanism of organic matter oxidation was observed when high current densities were applied. Two mathematical models, previously applied to the oxidation of synthetic wastewaters in the literature, were able to predict the evolution of chemical oxygen demand and ammonia for low current density values. PMID:19368210

  9. An integrated approach to assess broad-scale condition of coastal wetlands - The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Wetlands pilot survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nestlerode, J.A.; Engle, V.D.; Bourgeois, P.; Heitmuller, P.T.; Macauley, J.M.; Allen, Y.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) initiated a two-year regional pilot survey in 2007 to develop, test, and validate tools and approaches to assess the condition of northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) coastal wetlands. Sampling sites were selected from estuarine and palustrine wetland areas with herbaceous, forested, and shrub/scrub habitats delineated by the US Fish and Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory Status and Trends (NWI S&T) program and contained within northern GOM coastal watersheds. A multi-level, stepwise, iterative survey approach is being applied to multiple wetland classes at 100 probabilistically-selected coastal wetlands sites. Tier 1 provides information at the landscape scale about habitat inventory, land use, and environmental stressors associated with the watershed in which each wetland site is located. Tier 2, a rapid assessment conducted through a combination of office and field work, is based on best professional judgment and on-site evidence. Tier 3, an intensive site assessment, involves on-site collection of vegetation, water, and sediment samples to establish an integrated understanding of current wetland condition and validate methods and findings from Tiers 1 and 2. The results from this survey, along with other similar regional pilots from the Mid-Atlantic, West Coast, and Great Lakes Regions will contribute to a design and implementation approach for the National Wetlands Condition Assessment to be conducted by EPA's Office of Water in 2011. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008.

  10. Construction and validation of background data scales for the selection of pilots: a comparison of three scaling approaches

    E-print Network

    Fuentes, Rick R

    1988-01-01

    with the various approaches used in the scaling of background data. ~Pho et ' co *rn: ~sl ' ~s' d A~1' t' Mumford and Owens (1987) discussed the strengths and weaknesses associated with the four basic scaling techniques used to summarize background data... by Mumford and Owens (1987) . In addition, to rational scaling procedures and Owens' (1976) subgrouping approach, factor analytic techniques may also be used to derive psychologically meaningful biodata summary dimensions. The objective behind...

  11. Tissue grown in NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Cells from kidneys lose some of their special features in conventional culture but form spheres replete with specialized cell microvilli (hair) and synthesize hormones that may be clinically useful. Ground-based research studies have demonstrated that both normal and neoplastic cells and tissues recreate many of the characteristics in the NASA bioreactor that they display in vivo. Proximal kidney tubule cells that normally have rich apically oriented microvilli with intercellular clefts in the kidney do not form any of these structures in conventional two-dimensional monolayer culture. However, when normal proximal renal tubule cells are cultured in three-dimensions in the bioreactor, both the microvilli and the intercellular clefts form. This is important because, when the morphology is recreated, the function is more likely also to be rejuvenated. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC).

  12. Pilot-scale comparison of two hybrid-passive landfill leachate treatment systems operated in a cold climate.

    PubMed

    Speer, Sean; Champagne, Pascale; Anderson, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid-passive landfill leachate treatment systems employ active pretreatment to remove dissolved inorganic constituents and decrease the oxygen demand of the leachate prior to treatment in a passive system. In a 1-year pilot-scale study, two passive treatment systems - a peat and wood shaving biological trickle filter and a sand and gravel constructed wetland - were installed to treat leachate from the Merrick Landfill in North Bay, Ontario, Canada. Leachate was pretreated in a fixed-film aerobic reactor, which provided reductions in COD (26%), and masses of ammonia (21%), Al (69%), Ca (57%), Fe (73%) and Sr (37%). A comparison of the performance of the hybrid-passive treatment systems indicated different extents of heterotrophic nitrification; the peat and wood shaving filter removed 49% of the ammonia and nitrified 29%, while the constructed wetland removed 99% of the ammonia and nitrified 90%. Hybrid-passive landfill leachate treatment was determined to be feasible in cold climates. PMID:22104095

  13. Outdoor pilot-scale production of Nannochloropsis gaditana: influence of culture parameters and lipid production rates in tubular photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    San Pedro, A; González-López, C V; Acién, F G; Molina-Grima, E

    2014-10-01

    This work studied outdoor pilot scale production of Nannochloropsis gaditana in tubular photobioreactors. The growth and biomass composition of the strain were studied under different culture strategies: continuous-mode (varying nutrient supply and dilution rate) and two-stage cultures aiming lipid enhancement. Besides, parameters such as irradiance, specific nitrate input and dilution rate were used to obtain models predicting growth, lipid and fatty acids production rates. The range of optimum dilution rate was 0.31-0.351/day with maximum biomass, lipid and fatty acids productivities of 590, 110 and 66.8 mg/l day, respectively. Nitrate limitation led to an increase in lipid and fatty acids contents (from 20.5% to 38.0% and from 16.9% to 23.5%, respectively). Two-stage culture strategy provided similar fatty acids productivities (56.4 mg/l day) but the neutral lipids content was doubled. PMID:25108265

  14. Oxygen Limited Bioreactors System For Nitrogen Removal Using Immobilized Mix Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, B. K.; Sumino, T.; Saiki, Y.; Kazama, F.

    2005-12-01

    Recently nutrients concentrations especially nitrogen in natural water is alarming in the world wide. Most of the effort is being done on the removal of high concentration of nitrogen especially from the wastewater treatment plants. The removal efficiency is targeted in all considering the effluent discharge standard set by the national environment agency. In many cases, it does not meet the required standard and receiving water is being polluted. Eutrophication in natural water bodies has been reported even if the nitrogen concentration is low and self purification of natural systems itself is not sufficient to remove the nitrogen due to complex phenomenon. In order to recover the pristine water environment, it is very essential to explore bioreactor systems for natural water systems using immobilized mix culture. Microorganism were entrapped in Polyethylene glycol (PEG) prepolymer gel and cut into 3mm cubic immobilized pellets. Four laboratory scale micro bio-reactors having 0.1 L volumes were packed with immobilized pellets with 50% compact ratio. RUN1, RUN2, RUN3 and RUN4 were packed with immobilized pellets from reservoirs sediments, activated sludge (AS), mixed of AS, AG and biodegradable plastic and anaerobic granules (AG) respectively. Water from Shiokawa Reservoirs was feed to all reactors with supplemental ammonia and nitrite nitrogen as specified in the results and discussions. The reactors were operated dark incubated room in continuous flow mode with hydraulic retention time of 12 hours under oxygen limiting condition. Ammonium, nitrate nitrite nitrogen and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations were measured as described in APWA and AWWA (1998). Laboratory scale four bioreactors containing different combination of immobilized cell were monitored for 218 days. Influent NH4+-N and NO2--N concentration were 2.27±0.43 and 2.05±0.41 mg/l respectively. Average dissolved oxygen concentration and pH in the reactors were 0.40-2.5 mg/l and pH 6.5-7.4 respectively. The molar ratio of NO2-N and NH4+-N was varied from 0.85 to 4.1 and RUN3 has closed to Stoichiometric ratio of anaerobic ammonia oxidation process. Total nitrogen removal in all reactors was ranged from 11-79% and RUN3 showed best removal performance (Table 1). Table 1 Characteristic of N removal process Parameters RUN1 RUN2 RUN3 RUN4 Effluent TOC (mg/l) 1.22 2.08 2.33 1.97 NO2- -N/ NH4+-N converted 1.18 0.85 1.32 4.15 Average NH4+-N removal % 86 95 74 32 Average NO2- -N removal % 97 81 98 92 Average TN removal % 11 36 79 59 Four different kinds of laboratory scale nitrogen removal bio-rectors were monitored for 218 days. Comparing reactors based on observed data, the bioreactor containing mix culture (RUN3) removed the 79% of incoming total nitrogen and suggests best for nitrogen removal in the natural water systems. It is recommended that further study is required in pilot scale to understand scaling effects and other natural phenomenon.

  15. Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring and implementing new waste minimizing D and D techniques. Technology demonstrations are being conducted by LMES at a DOE gaseous diffusion processing plant, the K-25 Site, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The gaseous diffusion process employed at Oak Ridge separated uranium-235 from uranium ore for use in atomic weapons and commercial reactors. These activities contaminated concrete and other surfaces within the plant with uranium, technetium, and other constituents. The objective of current K-25 D and D research is to make available cost-effective and energy-efficient techniques to advance remediation and waste management methods at the K-25 Site and other DOE sites. To support this objective, O`Brien and Gere tested a decontamination system on K-25 Site concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous waste. A scouring system has been developed that removes fixed hazardous and radioactive surface contamination and minimizes residual waste. This system utilizes an abrasive sodium bicarbonate medium that is projected at contaminated surfaces. It mechanically removes surface contamination while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are captured and dissolved in water and treated using physical/chemical processes. Pilot-scale testing of this soda blasting system and bench and pilot-scale treatment of the generated residuals were conducted from December 1993 to September 1994.

  16. Performance evaluation of a pilot-scale permeable reactive barrier at former Naval Air Station Moffett Field, Mountain View, California: Volume 1. Final report, April 1996November 1998

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Reeter; A. Gavaskar; B. Sass; N. Gupta; J. Hicks

    1998-01-01

    A pilot scale permeable reactive barrier (PRB) or treatment wall demonstration project was initiated by the US Navy EFA West at the former Naval Air Station Moffett Field site in Mountain View, California about 3 years ago. Performance evaluations and cost-benefit analyses were performed by the US Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) and were sponsored by the Department of

  17. Pilot-scale distillation and characterization of diesel-fuel fractions of Strategic Petroleum Reserve crude oils. Interim report, December 1985February 1987

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Morris; B. K. Bailey; L. L. Stavinoha; H. N. Giles

    1987-01-01

    Little, beyond crude assay data, has been known about the properties of various fuel fractions, including diesel fuel, that might ensue in the event crude oils available at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve were actually to be refined. Accordingly, eight distinct crude-oil streams were collected from the Reserve and subjected to distillation in a pilot-scale unit. Middle distillate fractions were prepared

  18. Evaluation of the Impact of Chlorine on Mercury Oxidation in a Pilot-Scale Coal Combustor--The Effect of Coal Blending

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study has been undertaken to investigate the effect of blending PRB coal with an Eastern bituminous coal on the speciation of Hg across an SCR catalyst. In this project, a pilot-scale (1.2 MWt) coal combustor equipped with an SCR reactor for NOx control was used for evaluating ...

  19. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT, SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION TEST: SHIRCO PILOT-SCALE INFRARED INCINERATION SYSTEM ROSE TOWNSHIP DEMODE ROAD SUPERFUND SITE - VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of the Shirco pilot-scale infrared thermal destruction system has been evaluated at the Rose Township, Demode Road Superfund Site and is presented in the report. The waste tested consisted of solvents, organics and heavy metals in an illegal dump site. Volume I gi...

  20. Final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC appendices. Volume 5. Appendix V-D

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils dated September 1994 contains LEFPC Appendices, Volume 5, Appendix V - D. This appendix includes the final verification run data package (PAH, TCLP herbicides, TCLP pesticides).

  1. Superfund Technology Evaluation Report: SITE Program Demonstration Test Shirco Pilot-Scale Infrared Incineration System at the Rose Township Demode Road Superfund Site Volume I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Shirco Pilot-Scale Infrared Incineration System was evaluated during a series of seventeen test runs under varied operating conditions at the Demode Road Superfund Site located in Rose Township, Michigan. The tests sought to demonstrate the effectiveness of the unit and the t...

  2. Comparison of aluminum thermal-death-time disks with a pilot-scale pasteurizer on the thermal inactivation of Escherichia coli K12 in apple cider

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to compare thermal inactivation kinetics of Escherichia coli K12 in apple cider using conventional glass tubes, aluminum thermal-death-time (TDT) disks, and a pilot-scale pasteurizer. D-values of E. coli K12 in glass tubes and TDT disks were determined at 56, 58, and 60C. D-...

  3. Final report from VFL technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC Appendices, Volume 2, Appendix V-A

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This document contains information concerning validation of analytical data for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Floodplain soils located at the Y-12 Plant site. This volume is an appendix of compiled data from this validation process.

  4. Pilot scale-up and shelf stability of hydrogel wound dressings obtained by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Dulce María; Rodríguez, Yanet; Correa, Hector; Moreno, Ailed; Carrizales, Lila

    2012-08-01

    This study is aimed of producing pilot batches of hydrogel wound dressings by gamma radiation and evaluating their shelf stability. Six batches of 3L capacity were prepared based on poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), agar and polyethylene glycol and they were dispensed in polyester trays, covered with polyester films and sealed in two types of materials: polyethylene bags and vacuum polyethylene bags. Dressings were formed in a single step process for the hydrogel formation and sterilization at 25-30 kGy gamma radiation dose in a JS-9500 Gamma Irradiator (Nordion, Canada). The six batches were initially physicochemical characterized in terms of dimensions and appearance, gel fraction, morphology analysis, hydrogel strength, moisture retention capability and swelling capacity. They were kept under two storage conditions: room temperature (T: 30±2 °C/RH: 70± 5%) and refrigerated temperature (T: 5±3 °C) during 24 months and sterility test was performed. The appearance of membranes was transparent, clear, uncut and flexible; the gel fraction of batches was higher than 75% and the hydrogel surface showed a porous structure. There was a slow decrease of the compression rate 20% until 7 h and about 70% at 24 h. Moisture retention capability in 5 h was similar for all the batches, about 40% and 60% at 37 °C and at room temperature respectively. The swelling of hydrogels in acidic media was strong and in alkaline media the weight variation remains almost stable until 24 h and then there is a loss of weight. The six batches remained sterile during the stability study in the conditions tested. The pilot batches were consistent from batch to batch and remained stable during 24 months.

  5. Mercury and acid gas control in utility baghouses through sorbent injection -- Pilot-scale demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, E.; Jensen, B.; Lapatnick, L.; Gibbons, F.; Sjostrom, S.J.; Chang, R.

    1998-07-01

    The mercury concentration in utility flue gas is in the range of 0.1 to 1.0 part per billion. EPA and state agencies are assessing whether such low concentrations of mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities pose a significant health risk and whether mercury regulations would be necessary or appropriate. In anticipation of regulations that would impose control on mercury emissions, Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSE and G) has joined with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to evaluate carbon-based sorbents for mercury control at one of PSE and G's coal-fired power plants. While active carbon is currently injected into municipal solid-waste combustor (MWC) flue gas streams to reduce vapor phase mercury concentrations, this technique has not been rigorously tested on flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers. Due to the difference in flue gas composition and the low mercury concentrations present in utility flue gas, this technology is not directly transferable to utility applications. With new ambient standards for particulate matter and ozone in the future and inclusion of utilities in the Toxics Release Inventory, additional evaluations were conducted to determine the effectiveness of injecting calcium and sodium based sorbents upstream of a baghouse to control acid gas emissions (SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3} and HCl). Testing of sorbent injection technology is currently underway on a slipstream of flue gas from Hudson Unit 2 located in Jersey City, New Jersey. The unit is a dry-bottom, supercritical once-through design firing a low sulfur bituminous coal. The test facility (pilot) is based on a 4,000-acfm COHPAC baghouse. This paper describes the results of pilot testing of activated carbon and calcium/sodium sorbents injection technology for mercury and acid gas control.

  6. Leaching behaviour of different scrap materials at recovery and recycling companies: full-, pilot- and lab-scale investigation.

    PubMed

    Blondeel, E; Chys, M; Depuydt, V; Folens, K; Du Laing, G; Verliefde, A; Van Hulle, S W H

    2014-12-01

    Scrap material recovery and recycling companies are confronted with waste water that has a highly fluctuating flow rate and composition. Common pollutants, such as COD, nutrients and suspended solids, potentially toxic metals, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and poly chlorinated biphenyls can exceed the discharge limits. An analysis of the leaching behaviour of different scrap materials and scrap yard sweepings was performed at full-scale, pilot-scale and lab-scale in order to find possible preventive solutions for this waste water problem. The results of these leaching tests (with concentrations that frequently exceeded the Flemish discharge limits) showed the importance of regular sweeping campaigns at the company, leak proof or covered storage of specific scrap materials and oil/water separation on particular leachates. The particulate versus dissolved fraction was also studied for the pollutants. For example, up to 98% of the polyaromatic hydrocarbons, poly chlorinated biphenyls and some metals were in the particulate form. This confirms the (potential) applicability of sedimentation and filtration techniques for the treatment of the majority of the leachates, and as such the rainwater run-off as a whole. PMID:25241019

  7. Clinical Assessment of the Effect of Tetrabenazine on Functional Scales in Huntington Disease: A Pilot Open Label Study

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, Robert; Davidson, Anthony; Jankovic, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background Tetrabenazine is a monoamine depleter with a well-documented effect against chorea associated with Huntington disease (HD). There is a paucity of data about how reduction in chorea relates to better performance on motor, gait, cognitive, and psychiatric assessments. Methods We designed an open label tetrabenazine withdrawal study to test performance using validated scales. The following instruments were used to assess cognitive, behavioral, and motor function in 10 patients with documented HD: The Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Beck Depression Inventory II, Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), Jebsen Hand Test, Timed 25-foot walk, Berg Balance Test (BBT), QuickDASH, and the Unified Huntington Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) Motor, Stroop Color Word, Behavioral Assessment, Functional Checklist, and Independence Scale. Results Subjects performed significantly better while on tetrabenazine as measured by the DGI (p?=?0.041), BBT (p?=?0.007), and the UHDRS Total Motor (p?=?0.009), Maximum Chorea (p?=?0.005), and Stroop Color-Word tests (p?=?0.028). Discussion This pilot study demonstrates tetrabenazine's potential effects beyond improvement in chorea. PMID:23439575

  8. Pilot studies on scale-up biocatalysis of 7-?-xylosyl-10-deacetyltaxol and its analogues by an engineered yeast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-Cang; Zhu, Ping

    2015-06-01

    Paclitaxel content in yew tree is extremely low, causing a worldwide shortage of this important anticancer drug. Yew tree can also produce abundant 7-?-xylosyl-10-deacetyltaxol that can be bio-converted into 10-deacetyltaxol for semi-synthesis of paclitaxel. However, the bio-conversion by the screened natural microorganisms was inefficient. We have constructed the recombinant yeast with a glycoside hydrolase gene from Lentinula edodes and explored the bioconversion. Based on previously established reaction conditions, the bioconversion of 7-?-xylosyl-10-deacetyltaxol or its extract was further optimized and scaled up with the engineered yeast harvested from 200-L scale high-cell-density fermentation. The optimization included the freeze-dried cell amount, dimethyl sulfoxide concentration, addition of 0.5 % antifoam supplement, and substrate concentration. A 93-95 % bioconversion and 83 % bioconversion of 10 and 15 g/L 7-?-xylosyltaxanes in 10 L reaction volume were achieved, respectively. The yield of 10-deacetyltaxol reached 10.58 g/L in 1 L volume with 15 g/L 7-?-xylosyl-10-deacetyltaxol. The conversion efficiencies were not only much higher than those of other reports and our previous work, but also realized in 10 L reaction volume. A pilot-scale product purification was also established. Our study bridges the gap between the basic research and commercial utilization of 7-?-xylosyl-10-deacetyltaxol for the industrial production of semi-synthetic paclitaxel. PMID:25860125

  9. Assessment of the functionality of a pilot-scale reactor and its potential for electrochemical degradation of calmagite, a sulfonated azo-dye

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shirish Agarwal; Phillip Cluxton; Mark Kemper; Dionysios D. Dionysiou; Souhail R. Al-Abed

    2008-01-01

    Electrochemical degradation (ECD) is a promising technology for in situ remediation of diversely contaminated environmental matrices by application of a low level electric potential gradient. This investigation, prompted by successful bench-scale ECD of trichloroethylene, involved development, parametric characterization and evaluation of a pilot-scale electrochemical reactor for degradation of calmagite, a sulfonated azo-dye used as a model contaminant. The reactor has

  10. Degradation of diethyl phthalate in treated effluents from an MBR via advanced oxidation processes: Effects of nitrate on oxidation and a pilot?scale AOP operation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Park; C. G. Park; J. W. Lee; K. B. Ko

    2010-01-01

    The major objective of this study was to delineate the oxidation of diethyl phthalate (DEP) in water, using bench?scale UV\\/H2O2 and O3\\/H2O2 processes, and to determine the effects of nitrate (NO3 ?N, 5 mg L) on this oxidation. The oxidation of DEP was also investigated through a pilot?scale advanced oxidation process (AOP), into which a portion of the effluent from

  11. The development of the MELiSSA Pilot Plant Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godia, Francesc; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Dixon, Mike; Peiro, Enrique; Fossen, Arnaud; Lamaze, Brigitte; Brunet, Jean; Demey, Dries; Mas-Albaigès, Joan L.

    MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) is a closed artificial ecosystem intended as a tool for the development of a bio-regenerative life support system for longterm manned missions. The MELiSSA loop is formed by five interconnected compartments, organized in three different loops (solid, liquid and gas). This compartments are microbial bioreactors and higher plant chambers. The MELiSSA Pilot Plant facility has been designed to achieve the preliminary terrestrial demonstration of the MELiSSA concept at pilot scale, using animals as a model for the crew compartent. The experience gained in the operation of such a facility will be highly relevant for planning future life support systems in Space. In this communication, the latests developments in the MELiSSA Pilot Plant will be reported. Particularly, the completion of the design phase and instalation of all the different compartments will be discussed in detail. Each of the compartments had to be designed and constructed according to very specific characteristics, associated to the biological systems to be cultured, as part of the complete MELiSSA loop (anerobic, oxygenic, thermophilic, heterotrophic, autotrophic, axenic, photosynthetic, etc.). Additionally, the sizing of each reactor (ranging from 8 to 100 Liters, depending of each particular compartment) should compile with the global integration scenario proposed, and with the final goal of connection of all compartments to provide a demonstration of the MELiSSA concept, and generate data for the design and operation of future biological life support systems.

  12. Evaluation of parallel milliliter-scale stirred-tank bioreactors for the study of biphasic whole-cell biocatalysis with ionic liquids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Danielle Dennewald; Ralf Hortsch; Dirk Weuster-Botz

    As clear structure–activity relationships are still rare for ionic liquids, preliminary experiments are necessary for the process development of biphasic whole-cell processes involving these solvents. To reduce the time investment and the material costs, the process development of such biphasic reaction systems would profit from a small-scale high-throughput platform. Exemplarily, the reduction of 2-octanone to (R)-2-octanol by a recombinant Escherichia

  13. Discrete Event Model Development of Pilot Plant Scale Microalgae Facilities: An Analysis of Productivity and Costs

    E-print Network

    Stepp, Justin Wayne

    2011-10-21

    -fuel requires the implementation of efficient culturing processes to maximize production and reduce costs. Therefore, three discrete rate event simulation models were developed to analyze different scaling scenarios and determine total costs associated with each...

  14. Uncertainties in river basin data at various support scales - Example from Odense Pilot River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsgaard, J. C.; van der Keur, P.; Nilsson, B.; Müller-Wohlfeil, D.-I.; Brown, J.

    2006-08-01

    In environmental modelling studies field data usually have a spatial and temporal scale of support that is different from the one at which models operate. This calls for a methodology for rescaling data uncertainty from one support scale to another. In this paper data uncertainty is assessed for various environmental data types collected for monitoring purposes from the Odense river basin in Denmark by use of literature information, expert judgement and simple data analyses. It is demonstrated how such methodologies can be applied to data that vary in space or time such as precipitation, climate variables, discharge, surface water quality, soil parameters, groundwater abstraction, heads and groundwater quality variables. Data uncertainty is categorised and assessed in terms of probability density functions and temporal or spatial autocorrelation functions. The autocorrelation length scales are crucial when support scale is changing and it is demonstrated how the assumption used when estimating the autocorrelation parameters may limit the applicability of these autocorrelation functions.

  15. Discrete Event Model Development of Pilot Plant Scale Microalgae Facilities: An Analysis of Productivity and Costs 

    E-print Network

    Stepp, Justin Wayne

    2011-10-21

    -fuel requires the implementation of efficient culturing processes to maximize production and reduce costs. Therefore, three discrete rate event simulation models were developed to analyze different scaling scenarios and determine total costs associated with each...

  16. Pilot-scale fermentation of office paper and chicken manure to carboxylic acids

    E-print Network

    Moody, Andrew Garret

    2006-08-16

    This project focused on scaling up the laboratory fermentation of biomass to carboxylic acids. Four 1050-gallon tanks were used to simulate four-stage countercurrent fermentation. Most laboratory fermentations have been performed with 1-L fermentors...

  17. Design and installation of a next generation pilot scale fermentation system.

    PubMed

    Junker, B; Brix, T; Lester, M; Kardos, P; Adamca, J; Lynch, J; Schmitt, J; Salmon, P

    2003-01-01

    Four new fermenters were designed and constructed for use in secondary metabolite cultivations, bioconversions, and enzyme production. A new PC/PLC-based control system also was implemented using GE Fanuc PLCs, Genius I/O blocks, and Fix Dynamics SCADA software. These systems were incorporated into an industrial research fermentation pilot plant, designed and constructed in the early 1980s. Details of the design of these new fermenters and the new control system are described and compared with the existing installation for expected effectiveness. In addition, the reasoning behind selection of some of these features has been included. Key to the design was the goal of preserving similarity between the new and previously existing and successfully utilized fermenter hardware and software installations where feasible but implementing improvements where warranted and beneficial. Examples of enhancements include strategic use of Inconel as a material of construction to reduce corrosion, piping layout design for simplified hazardous energy isolation, on-line calculation and control of nutrient feed rates, and the use of field I/O modules located near the vessel to permit low-cost addition of new instrumentation. PMID:12790627

  18. FT catalyst performance: comparison between pilot-scale SBCR and CSTR systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. K. Neathery; B. H. Davis

    2003-01-01

    A considerable interest has been expressed in using slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) to carry out FT synthesis, particularly for the conversion of stranded natural gas into liquids. Historically, wall effects in small-scale SBCR reactors (diameters less than 30cm) have presented many challenges with regard to interpretation of kinetic\\/conversion data for process scale-up. In this paper, we describe a novel

  19. In-Situ Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Pilot-Scale Treatability Test at the 300 Area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, V.R.; Fruchter, J.S.; Fritz, B.G.; Mackley, R.D.; Wellman, D.M.; Williams, M.D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the pilot-scale treatability test that was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of using a polyphosphate injection approach to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ within the 300 Area aquifer at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Primary test objectives were to assess 1) direct treatment of available uranium contributing to the groundwater plume through precipitation of the uranyl-phosphate mineral autunite, and 2) emplacement of secondary-treatment capacity via precipitation of the calcium-phosphate mineral apatite, which acts as a long-term sorbent for uranium. Based on an injection design analysis that incorporated results from both bench-scale testing and site-specific characterization activities, a three-phase injection approach was selected for field-scale testing. This approach consisted of 1) an initial polyphosphate injection to facilitate direct treatment of aqueous uranium in the pore space, 2) a second phase consisting of a calcium chloride injection to provide an available calcium source for the creation of apatite, and 3) a subsequent polyphosphate injection to supply a phosphate source for the formation of apatite. The total-solution volume injected during this field test was approximately 3.8 million L (1 million gal). Results from this investigation will be used to identify implementation challenges and investigate the technology's ability to meet remedial objectives. In addition, data from this test will provide valuable information for designing a full-scale remedial action for uranium in groundwater beneath the 300 Area of the Hanford Site, and a detailed understanding of the fundamental underpinnings necessary to evaluate the efficacy and potential for utilization of the polyphosphate technology at other sites with varying geochemical and hydrodynamic conditions. (authors)

  20. A Pilot Study of the Correlation between the Numeric Rating Scale used to Evaluate "Geop" and Questionnaires on Pain Perception

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Myung Jin; Lee, Joon Ho; Jin, Hee Cheol; Lee, Jeong Seok; Kim, Yong Ik

    2015-01-01

    Background The word "geop" is a unique Korean term commonly used to describe fright, fear and anxiety, and similar concepts. The purpose of this pilot study is to examine the correlation between the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score of geop and three different questionnaires on pain perception. Methods Patients aged 20 to 70 years who visited our outpatient pain clinics were evaluated. They were requested to rate the NRS score (range: 0-100) if they felt geop. Next, they completed questionnaires on pain perception, in this case the Korean version of the Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire (PSQ), the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), and the Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale (PASS). The correlations among each variable were evaluated by statistical analyses. Results There was no statistically significant correlation between the NRS score of geop and the PSQ score (r = 0.075, P = 0.5605). The NRS score of geop showed a significant correlation with the PCS total score (r = 0.346, P = 0.0063). Among the sub-scales, Rumination (r = 0.338, P = 0.0077) and Magnification (r = 0.343, P = 0.0069) were correlated with the NRS score of geop. In addition, the NRS score of geop showed a significant correlation with the PASS total score (r = 0.475, P = 0.0001). The cognitive (r = 0.473, P = 0.0002) and fear factors (r = 0.349, P = 0.0063) also showed significant correlations with the NRS score of geop. Conclusions This study marks the first attempt to introduce the concept of "geop." The NRS score of geop showed a moderate positive correlation with the total PCS and PASS score. However, further investigations are required before the "geop" concept can be used practically in clinical fields. PMID:25589944

  1. Preparation of activated carbon from coconut shell chars in pilot-scale microwave heating equipment at 60 kW

    SciTech Connect

    Li Wei [Faculty of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Faculty of Science, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Peng Jinhui [Faculty of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)], E-mail: jhpeng_ok@yeah.net; Zhang Libo; Yang Kunbin; Xia Hongying; Zhang Shimin; Guo Shenghui [Faculty of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2009-02-15

    Experiments to prepare activated carbon by microwave heating indicated that microwave energy can decrease reaction temperature, save the energy and shorten processing time remarkably compared to conventional heating, owing to its internal and volumetric heating effects. The above results were based on the laboratory-scale experiments. It is desirable to develop a pilot-scale microwave heating equipment and investigate the parameters with the aim of technological industrialization. In the present study, the components and features of the self-invented equipment were introduced. The temperature rise curves of the chars were obtained. Iodine numbers of the activated carbons all exceed the state standard of China under the following conditions: 25 kg/h charging rate, 0.42 rev/min turning rate of ceramic tube, flow rate of steam at pressure of 0.01 MPa and 40 kW microwave heating power after 60 kW pre-activation for 30 min. Pore structure of the sample obtained at a time point of 46 h, which contained BET surface area, and pore size distributions of micropores and total pores, was tested by nitrogen adsorption at 77 K.

  2. Effects of simulated oilfield produced water on early seedling growth after treatment in a pilot-scale constructed wetland system.

    PubMed

    Pardue, Michael J; Castle, James W; Rodgers, John H; Huddleston, George M

    2015-01-01

    Seed germination and early seedling growth bioassays were used to evaluate phytotoxicity of simulated oilfield produced water (OPW) before and after treatment in a subsurface-flow, pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS). Responses to untreated and treated OPW were compared among seven plant species, including three monocotyledons: corn (Zea mays), millet (Panicum miliaceum), and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor); and four dicotyledons: lettuce (Lactuca sativa), okra (Abelmoschus esculents), watermelon (Citrullus lanatus), and soybean (Glycine max). Phytotoxicity was greater in untreated OPW than in treated OPW. Exposures to untreated and treated OPW enhanced growth in some plant species (sorghum, millet, okra, and corn) relative to a negative control and reduced growth in other plant species (lettuce, soybean, and watermelon). Early seedling growth parameters indicated that dicotyledons were more sensitive to test waters compared to monocotyledons, suggesting that morphological differences between plant species affected phytotoxicity. Results indicated the following sensitivity scale for plant species: lettuce > soybean > watermelon > corn> okra?millet >sorghum. Phytotoxicity of the treated OPW to lettuce and soybean, although concentrations of COCs were less than irrigation guideline concentrations, suggests that chemical characterization and comparison to guideline concentrations alone may not be sufficient to evaluate water for use in growing crops. PMID:25409245

  3. Application of the biorefinery concept to produce L-lactic acid from the soybean vinasse at laboratory and pilot scale.

    PubMed

    Karp, Susan G; Igashiyama, Adriana H; Siqueira, Paula F; Carvalho, Júlio C; Vandenberghe, Luciana P S; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Coral, Jefferson; Tholozan, Jean-Luc; Pandey, Ashok; Soccol, Carlos R

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid is a product that finds several applications in food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and chemical industries. The main objective of this work was the development of a bioprocess to produce L(+)-lactic acid using soybean vinasse as substrate. Among ten strains, Lactobacillus agilis LPB 56 was selected for fermentation, due to its ability to metabolize the complex oligosaccharides. Fermentation was conducted without need for supplementary inorganic nitrogen sources or yeast extract. Kinetic and yield parameters determined at laboratory scale were 0.864 and 0.0162 for YP/S and YX/S, 0.0145 g/L h (rx), 1.32 g/L h (rs) and 1.13 g/L h (rp). The use of vinasse enriched with soybean molasses provided higher lactic acid concentration (138 g/L), the best proportion of inoculum being 25% (v/v). After scale-up to a pilot plant, kinetic and yield parameters were 0.849 and 0.0353 for YP/S and YX/S, 0.0278 g/L h (rx), 0.915 g/L h (rs) and 0.863 g/L h (rp). PMID:20933391

  4. Development of a draft-tube airlift bioreactor for Botryococcus braunii with an optimized inner structure using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ling; Liu, Rui; Wang, Feng; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2012-09-01

    The key parameters of the inner structure of a cylindrical airlift bioreactor, including the ratio of the cross-section area of the downcomer to the cross-section area of the riser, clearance from the upper edge of the draft tube to the water level, and clearance from the low edge of the draft tube to the bottom of the reactor, significantly affected the biomass production of Botryococcus braunii. In order to achieve high algal cultivation performance, the optimal structural parameters of the bioreactor were determined using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The simulated results were validated by experimental data collected from the microalgal cultures in both 2 and 40-L airlift bioreactors. The CFD model developed in this study provides a powerful means for optimizing bioreactor design and scale-up without the need to perform numerous time-consuming bioreactor experiments. PMID:22750496

  5. Pilot-scale field study for ammonia removal from lagoon biogas using an acid wet scrubber.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hongjian; Wu, Xiao; Miller, Curtis; Zhu, Jun; Hadlocon, Lara Jane; Manuzon, Roderick; Zhao, Lingying

    2014-06-01

    The anaerobic activities in swine slurry storage and treatment generate biogas containing gaseous ammonia component which is a chemical agent that can cause adverse environmental impacts when released to the atmosphere. The aim of this pilot plant study was to remove ammonia from biogas generated in a covered lagoon, using a sulfuric acid wet scrubber. The data showed that, on average, the biogas contained 43.7 ppm of ammonia and its concentration was found to be exponentially related to the air temperature inside the lagoon. When the air temperature rose to 35°C and the biogas ammonia concentration reached 90 ppm, the mass transfer of ammonia/ammonium from the deeper liquid body to the interface between the air and liquid became a limiting factor. The biogas velocity was critical in affecting ammonia removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. A biogas flow velocity of 8 to 12 mm s(-1) was recommended to achieve a removal efficiency of greater than 60%. Stepwise regression revealed that the biogas velocity and air temperature, not the inlet ammonia concentration in biogas, affected the ammonia removal efficiency. Overall, when 73 g L(-1) (or 0.75 M) sulfuric acid solution was used as the scrubber solution, removal efficiencies varied from 0% to 100% with an average of 55% over a 40-d measurement period. Mass balance calculation based on ammonium-nitrogen concentration in final scrubber liquid showed that about 21.3 g of ammonia was collected from a total volume of 1169 m(3) of biogas, while the scrubber solution should still maintain its ammonia absorbing ability until its concentration reaches up to 1 M. These results showed promising use of sulfuric acid wet scrubber for ammonia removal in the digester biogas. PMID:24762182

  6. Pilot scale application of nanosized iron oxides as electron acceptors for bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Julian; Fritzsche, Andreas; Frank-Fahle, Beatrice; Lüders, Tilmann; Höss, Sebastian; Eisenmann, Heinrich; Held, Thomas; Totsche, Kai U.; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2014-05-01

    Microbial reduction of ferric iron is a major biogeochemical process in groundwater aquifer ecosystems and often associated with the degradation of organic contaminants, as bacteria couple iron reduction to the oxidation reduced carbon like e.g. BTEX. Yet in general the low bioavailability of natural iron oxides limits microbial reduction rates. However, nanosized iron oxides have an unequally enhanced bioavailability and reactivity compared to their respective bulk, macro-sized, and more crystalline materials. At the same time, nanosized iron oxides can be produced in stable colloidal suspensions, permitting efficient injections into contaminated aquifers. We examined the reactivity of nanosized synthetic colloidal iron oxides in microbial iron reduction. Application of colloidal nanoparticles led to a strong and sustainable enhancement of microbial reaction rates in batch experiments and sediment columns. Toluene oxidation was increased five-fold as compared to bulk, non-colloidal ferrihydrite as electron acceptor. Furthermore, we developed a unique approach for custom-tailoring the subsurface mobility of these particles after being injected into a contaminant plume. In a field pilot application, we injected 18 m3 of an iron oxide nanoparticle solution into a BTEX contaminated aquifer with a maximum excess pressure as low as 0.2 bar. The applied suspension showed a superior subsurface mobility, creating a reactive zone of 4 m height (corresponding to the height of the confined aquifer) and 6 m in diameter. Subsequent monitoring of BTEX, microbial BTEX degradation metabolites, ferrous iron generation, stable isotopes fractionation, microbial populations, and methanogenesis demonstrated the strong impact of our approach. Mathematic processed X-ray diffractograms and FTIR spectra provided a semi-quantitatively estimate of the long-term fate of the iron oxide colloids in the aquifer. Potential environmental risks of the injection itself were monitored with ecotoxicological investigations. Our data suggest that the injection of ferric iron nanoparticles as electron acceptors into contaminated aquifers for the enhancement of microbial contaminant degradation might develop into a novel bioremediation strategy.

  7. Pilot-scale treatment of gasification wastewater and reuse in a cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Willson, W.G.; Mayer, G.G.; Hendrikson, J.G.; Winton, S.L.

    1985-04-01

    The University of North Dakota Energy Research Center has operated a 910 kg/hr, oxygen-blown fixed-bed gasifier to produce lignite-derived effluents for characterization, treatment, and reuse studies. Reuse of waste water in a cooling tower was investigated to define environmental and process effects as a function of pretreatment. The gasification wastewater was pretreated in pilot wastewater treatement units which simulate available technology. During the first phase of the program, wastewater was pretreated by solvent extraction and steam stripping to produce phenol and ammonia concentrations comparable to those expected at the Great Plains Gasification Associates plant. This pretreated wastewater was concentrated in a cooling tower to 10 cycles of concentration. No biocides or corrosion inhibitors were added. Severe fouling of heat exchange surfaces and high corrosion rates of carbon steel were encountered. Over 90% of the phenol entering the cooling tower was found to be stripped into the cooling tower exhaust air stream. The high levels of organics remaining in this minimally treated wastewater suggested that further biological treatment and possibly polishing by carbon adsorption would be necessary to prepare a satisfactory feed. In the second phase of the program, the SGL was further treated in an activated sludge process followed by granular activated carbon adsorption. Biotreatment removed 96% of the BOD with a three-day retention time while obtaining satisfactory sludge settling rates in spite of varied influent concentrations. Biorefractory materials were adsorbed on GAC to reach an effuent COD level of 150 mg/l. This upgrading was sufficient to reduce organic emissions from the cooling tower, but corrosion rates were higher than in the previous test, again showing the necessity for corrosion inhibitors. 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Comparative study on membrane fouling between membrane-coupled moving bed biofilm reactor and conventional membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Syed, W; Zhou, H

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the performance between membrane-coupled moving bed biofilm reactor (M-MBBR) and a conventional membrane bioreactor (MBR) in parallel. Extensive tests were conducted in three pilot-scale experimental units over 6 months. Emphasis was placed on the factors that would affect the performance of membrane filtration. The results showed that the concentrations of soluble microbial product (SMP), colloidal total organic carbon and transparent exopolymer particles in the M-MBBR systems were not significantly different from those in the control MBR system. However, the fouling rates were much higher in the M-MBBR systems as compared to the conventional MBR systems. This indicates membrane fouling potential was related not only to the concentration of SMP, but also to their sources and characteristics. The addition of polyaluminum chloride could reduce the fouling rate of the moving bed biofilm reactor unit by 56.4-84.5% at various membrane fluxes. PMID:24622551

  9. Development and Validation of Information Technology Mentor Teacher Attitude Scale: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltan, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study development and validation of a teacher attitude scale toward Information Technology Mentor Teachers (ITMT). ITMTs give technological support to other teachers for integration of technology in their lessons. In the literature, many instruments have been developed to measure teachers' attitudes towards the technological tools…

  10. Performance of a bioreactor with submerged membranes for aerobic treatment of municipal waste water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Rosenberger; U. Krüger; R. Witzig; W. Manz; U. Szewzyk; M. Kraume

    2002-01-01

    Aerobic treatment of municipal waste water in a membrane bioreactor was studied for 535d. Apart from sampling, sludge was retained completely by a submerged hollow fibre membrane with a pore-size of 0.2?m. The pilot plant comprised an anoxic zone to enable denitrification. The maximum liquid hold-up of the plant was 3.9m3. In this study the reactor performance and the stability

  11. Pilot scale single stage fine coal dewatering and briquetting process. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.W. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering; Honaker, R.Q.; Ding, Y.

    1997-05-01

    The primary goal of the ongoing ICCI coal preparation research project is to reduce ash and sulfur content in coal by using fine grinding and other coal cleaning processes. The ultrafine coal particles that result from the grinding and cleaning operations are difficult to dewater, and create problems in their storage, handling and transportation. The objective of this research is to combine the dewatering and briquetting processes of fine coal preparation into a single stage operation, thereby enhancing the economic viability of utilizing fine coal. A bitumen based emulsion, Orimulsion, has proven to be an effective hydrophobic binder, which helps not only with the briquetting process but also in the expulsion of water from the coal. Encouraging results from the use of a ram extruder briquetting device led to experimentation in the production of briquettes using a lab scale roll briquetting device. In the first quarter of this reporting year, a commercially available lab scale roll briquetting machine was employed (Komarek B-100). Further testing was conducted for the rest of the year with the use of a pilot scale model (Komarek B220-A). Briquettes were produced and evaluated by comparing results developed by adjusting various parameters of the briquetting machines and feed material. Results further substantiate previous findings that curing time dictates both moisture content and strengths of briquettes, and slower roll speeds produce more robust briquettes. A statistical model was set up to determine the optimal range of operating parameters. The statistical model generated from these results provided basic relationships between the roll speed and briquette form pressure.

  12. Pilot scale single stage fine coal dewatering and briquetting process. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.W.; Ding, Y. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering; Honaker, R.Q. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The primary goal of the current coal preparation research is to reduce the ash and sulfur content from coal, using fine grinding and various coal cleaning processes to separate finely disseminated mineral matter and pyrite from coal. Small coal particles are produced by the grinding operation, thus the ultrafine coal becomes very difficult to dewater. In addition, the ultrafine coal also creates problems during its transportation, storage and handling at utility plants. The current research is seeking to combine ultrafine coal dewatering and briquetting processes into a single stage operation, using hydrophobic binders as coal dewatering and binding reagents with the help of a compaction device. From previous tests, it has been found that coal pellets with a moisture content of less than 15% and good wear and water resistance can be successfully fabricated at pressures of less than 6,000 psi using a lab scale ram extruder. The primary objective of the research described in this quarter has been to extend the lab scale ultrafine coal dewatering and briquetting process into a pilot scale operation, based on the test data obtained from earlier research. A standard roller briquetting machine was used to dewater fine coal-binder mixtures during the briquetting process. The operating parameters, including moisture content of feed, feed rate, and roller speed, were evaluated on the basis of the performance of the briquettes. Briquettes fabricated at rates of up to 108 pellets per minute exhibited satisfactory water and wear resistance, i.e., less than 7.5% cured moisture and less than 8.3% weight loss after 6 min. of tumbling. Also, coal-binder samples with moisture contents of 40 percent have been successfully dewatered and briquetted. Briquetting of fine coal was possible under current feeding conditions, however, a better feeding system must be designed to further improve the quality of dewatered coal briquettes.

  13. Prostate tumor grown in NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This prostate cancer construct was grown during NASA-sponsored bioreactor studies on Earth. Cells are attached to a biodegradable plastic lattice that gives them a head start in growth. Prostate tumor cells are to be grown in a NASA-sponsored Bioreactor experiment aboard the STS-107 Research-1 mission in 2002. Dr. Leland Chung of the University of Virginia is the principal investigator. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: NASA and the University of Virginia.

  14. Co-existence of physiologically similar sulfate-reducing bacteria in a full-scale sulfidogenic bioreactor fed with a single organic electron donor

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Shabir A.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Kuenen, J. Gijs

    2007-01-01

    A combination of culture-dependent and independent methods was used to study the co-existence of different sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in an upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor treating sulfate-rich wastewater. The wastewater was fed with ethanol as an external electron donor. Twenty six strains of SRB were randomly picked and isolated from the highest serial dilution that showed growth (i.e. 108). Repetitive enterobacterial palindromic polymerase chain reaction and whole cell protein profiling revealed a low genetic diversity, with only two genotypes among the 26 strains obtained in the pure culture. The low genetic diversity suggests the absence of micro-niches within the reactor, which might be due to a low spatial and temporal micro-heterogeneity. The total 16S rDNA sequencing of two representative strains L3 and L7 indicated a close relatedness to the genus Desulfovibrio. The two strains differed in as many as five physiological traits, which might allow them to occupy distinct niches and thus co-exist within the same habitat. Whole cell hybridisation with fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes was performed to characterise the SRB community in the reactor. The isolated strains Desulfovibrio L3 and Desulfovibrio L7 were the most dominant SRB, representing 30–35% and 25–35%, respectively, of the total SRB community. Desulfobulbus-like bacteria contributed for 20–25%, and the Desulfobacca acetoxidans-specific probe targeted approximately 15–20% of the total SRB. The whole cell hybridisation results thus revealed a consortium of four different species of SRB that can be enriched and maintained on a single energy source in a full-scale sulfidogenic reactor. PMID:17440719

  15. Competition and coexistence of sulfate-reducing bacteria, acetogens and methanogens in a lab-scale anaerobic bioreactor as affected by changing substrate to sulfate ratio

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Shabir A.; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Kuenen, J. Gijs

    2008-01-01

    The microbial population structure and function of natural anaerobic communities maintained in lab-scale continuously stirred tank reactors at different lactate to sulfate ratios and in the absence of sulfate were analyzed using an integrated approach of molecular techniques and chemical analysis. The population structure, determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and by the use of oligonucleotide probes, was linked to the functional changes in the reactors. At the influent lactate to sulfate molar ratio of 0.35 mol mol?1, i.e., electron donor limitation, lactate oxidation was mainly carried out by incompletely oxidizing sulfate-reducing bacteria, which formed 80–85% of the total bacterial population. Desulfomicrobium- and Desulfovibrio-like species were the most abundant sulfate-reducing bacteria. Acetogens and methanogenic Archaea were mostly outcompeted, although less than 2% of an acetogenic population could still be observed at this limiting concentration of lactate. In the near absence of sulfate (i.e., at very high lactate/sulfate ratio), acetogens and methanogenic Archaea were the dominant microbial communities. Acetogenic bacteria represented by Dendrosporobacter quercicolus-like species formed more than 70% of the population, while methanogenic bacteria related to uncultured Archaea comprising about 10–15% of the microbial community. At an influent lactate to sulfate molar ratio of 2 mol mol?1, i.e., under sulfate-limiting conditions, a different metabolic route was followed by the mixed anaerobic community. Apparently, lactate was fermented to acetate and propionate, while the majority of sulfidogenesis and methanogenesis were dependent on these fermentation products. This was consistent with the presence of significant levels (40–45% of total bacteria) of D. quercicolus-like heteroacetogens and a corresponding increase of propionate-oxidizing Desulfobulbus-like sulfate-reducing bacteria (20% of the total bacteria). Methanogenic Archaea accounted for 10% of the total microbial community. PMID:18305937

  16. Combustion and NO emission of high nitrogen content biomass in a pilot-scale vortexing fluidized bed combustor.

    PubMed

    Qian, F P; Chyang, C S; Huang, K S; Tso, Jim

    2011-01-01

    The combustion of biomass of various nitrogen contents and its NO emission were investigated experimentally in this study. All the experiments were conducted in an I.D. 0.45 m pilot-scale vortexing fluidized bed combustor (VFBC). Rice husk, corn, and soybean were used as feeding materials. Urea was added into the feeding materials for the purpose of adjusting nitrogen content. The effects of various operating parameters on NO emission, such as bed temperature, excess air ratio, and flow rate of secondary air, were investigated. The effects of nitrogen content of fuels on NO emissions were also investigated by using the mixtures of rice husk/soybean, rice husk/urea, corn/soybean, and corn/urea in various weight ratios. The NO concentrations at various positions in the combustor were sampled and recorded. The experimental results show that most nitric oxide is formed at just above the bed surface. Temperature and excess air ratio are the major operating parameters for NO emission. For biomass with high nitrogen content, NO emission decreases with excess air, and increases with bed temperature. Compared with char-N, volatile-N is the more dominant reactant source for NO emission. PMID:20800476

  17. Co-gasification of biosolids with biomass: Thermogravimetric analysis and pilot scale study in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ming Ming; Masnadi, Mohammad S; Grace, John R; Bi, Xiaotao T; Lim, C Jim; Li, Yonghua

    2014-10-17

    This work studied the feasibility of co-gasification of biosolids with biomass as a means of disposal with energy recovery. The kinetics study at 800°C showed that biomass, such as switchgrass, could catalyze the reactions because switchgrass ash contained a high proportion of potassium, an excellent catalyst for gasification. However, biosolids could also inhibit gasification due to interaction between biomass alkali/alkaline earth metals and biosolids clay minerals. In the pilot scale experiments, increasing the proportion of biosolids in the feedstock affected gasification performance negatively. Syngas yield and char conversion decreased from 1.38 to 0.47m(3)/kg and 82-36% respectively as the biosolids proportion in the fuel increased from 0% to 100%. Over the same range, the tar content increased from 10.3 to 200g/m(3), while the ammonia concentration increased from 1660 to 19,200ppmv. No more than 25% biosolids in the fuel feed is recommended to maintain a reasonable gasification. PMID:25459803

  18. Pilot-scale synthesis and rheological assessment of poly(methyl methacrylate) polymers: perspectives for medical application.

    PubMed

    Linan, Lamia Zuniga; Nascimento Lima, Nádson M; Filho, Rubens Maciel; Sabino, Marcos A; Kozlowski, Mark T; Manenti, Flavio

    2015-06-01

    This work presents the rheological assessment of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymers synthesized in a dedicated pilot-scale plant. This material is to be used for the construction of scaffolds via Rapid Prototyping (RP). The polymers were prepared to match the physical and biological properties required for medical applications. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC) measurements verified that the synthesized polymers were atactic, amorphous and linear in chains. Rheological properties such as viscosity, storage and loss modulus, beyond the loss factor, and creep and recovery were measured in a plate-plate sensor within the viscoelastic linear region. The results showed the relevant influence of the molecular weight on the viscosity and elasticity of the material, and how, as the molecular weight increases, the viscoelastic properties are getting closer to those of human bone. This article demonstrates that by using the implemented methodology it is possible to synthesize a polymer, with properties comparable to commercially-available PMMA. PMID:25842114

  19. Partial degradation of five pesticides and an industrial pollutant by ozonation in a pilot-plant scale reactor.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, M I; Malato, S; Pérez-Estrada, L A; Gernjak, W; Oller, I; Doménech, Xavier; Peral, José

    2006-11-16

    Aqueous solutions of a mixture of several pesticides (alachlor, atrazine, chlorfenvinphos, diuron and isoproturon), considered PS (priority substances) by the European Commission, and an intermediate product of the pharmaceutical industry (alpha-methylphenylglycine, MPG) chosen as a model industrial pollutant, have been degraded at pilot-plant scale using ozonation. This study is part of a large research project [CADOX Project, A Coupled Advanced Oxidation-Biological Process for Recycling of Industrial Wastewater Containing Persistent Organic Contaminants, Contract No.: EVK1-CT-2002-00122, European Commission, http://www.psa.es/webeng/projects/cadox/index.html] founded by the European Union that inquires into the potential coupling between chemical and biological oxidations for the removal of toxic or non-biodegradable contaminants from water. The evolution of pollutant concentration, TOC mineralization, generation of inorganic species and consumption of O3 have been followed in order to visualize the chemical treatment effectiveness. Although complete mineralization is hard to accomplish, and large amounts of the oxidant are required to lower the organic content of the solutions, the possibility of ozonation cannot be ruled out if partial degradation is the final goal wanted. In this sense, Zahn-Wellens biodegradability tests of the ozonated MPG solutions have been performed, and the possibility of a further coupling with a secondary biological treatment for complete organic removal is envisaged. PMID:16822610

  20. Pilot-scale investigation of the robustness and efficiency of a copper-based treated wood wastes recycling process.

    PubMed

    Coudert, Lucie; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy; Cooper, Paul; Gastonguay, Louis; Morris, Paul; Janin, Amélie; Reynier, Nicolas

    2013-10-15

    The disposal of metal-bearing treated wood wastes is becoming an environmental challenge. An efficient recycling process based on sulfuric acid leaching has been developed to remove metals from copper-based treated wood chips (0pilot plant scale (130-L reactor tank). After 3 × 2 h leaching steps followed by 3 × 7 min rinsing steps, up to 97.5% of As, 87.9% of Cr, and 96.1% of Cu were removed from CCA-treated wood wastes with different initial metal loading (>7.3 kgm(-3)) and more than 94.5% of Cu was removed from ACQ-, CA- and MCQ-treated wood. The treatment of effluents by precipitation-coagulation was highly efficient; allowing removals more than 93% for the As, Cr, and Cu contained in the effluent. The economic analysis included operating costs, indirect costs and revenues related to remediated wood sales. The economic analysis concluded that CCA-treated wood wastes remediation can lead to a benefit of 53.7 US$t(-1) or a cost of 35.5 US$t(-1) and that ACQ-, CA- and MCQ-treated wood wastes recycling led to benefits ranging from 9.3 to 21.2 US$t(-1). PMID:23954815

  1. TESTING OF BASELINE AND LAMINATED FILTER DISKS USING MST AND MMST WITH A PILOT SCALE ROTARY FILTER

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, D.

    2001-12-19

    Testing was completed to compare the filtration performance of modified monosodium titanate (mMST) with that of monosodium titanate (MST) with the rotary microfilter. In addition, the performance of the new laminated filter disk was compared to that of the original baseline welded filter disk. Results showed that flux rates for mMST exceeded that of MST with both the baseline and laminated filter disks in deployment concentrations of 0.2 g/L of mMST and 0.4 g/L of MST. The filtration rate of the mMST with the laminated filter disk exceeded that of the baseline filter disk. However, the baseline filter disk filtration rate for MST was greater than that of the laminated disk. The measured sample turbidity for all tests was 1.06 NTU or less. A contract was established with SpinTek Filtration{trademark} to operate a 3-disk pilot scale unit with prototypic filter disks and various feeds and two different filter disk membranes. SpinTek evaluated a set of the baseline 0.5 micron filter disks as well as a set of laminated filter disks using the same 0.5 micron filter disks. The membrane used for both disk sets was manufactured by the Pall Corporation (PMM 050). Each set of disks was run with monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST). Throughout the testing, samples of the filtrate were collected and measured for turbidity.

  2. Influence of microwave pre-treatment on sludge solubilization and pilot scale semi-continuous anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Appels, Lise; Houtmeyers, Sofie; Degrève, Jan; Van Impe, Jan; Dewil, Raf

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is widely applied for the recovery of energy from waste activated sludge. Pre-treatment methods are of high interest to increase the biodegradability of the sludge and to enhance the digestion efficiency. This paper studies the application of a microwave pre-treatment. An experimental set-up of two pilot scale semi-continuous digesters was used. During a long term experiment, one of the reactors was fed with untreated sludge, while microwave pre-treated sludge (336 kJ/kg sludge) was introduced in the second one. A solid retention time of 20 days was kept during the experiments. (Organic) dry solids, carbohydrates, proteins and volatile fatty acids were monitored during digestion. It was seen that the microwave pre-treatment resulted in an effective solubilization of the organic matter in the sludge. The changes to the sludge composition resulted in an increase in biogas production by 50%, while the methane concentration in both reactors remained stable. PMID:23211486

  3. First-order kinetics of landfill leachate treatment in a pilot-scale anaerobic sequence batch biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Contrera, Ronan Cleber; da Cruz Silva, Katia Cristina; Morita, Dione Mari; Domingues Rodrigues, José Alberto; Zaiat, Marcelo; Schalch, Valdir

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the kinetics evaluation of landfill leachate anaerobic treatment in a pilot-scale Anaerobic Sequence Batch Biofilm Reactor (AnSBBR). The experiment was carried out at room temperature (23.8 ± 2.1 °C) in the landfill area in São Carlos-SP, Brazil. Biomass from the bottom of a local landfill leachate stabilization pond was used as inoculum. After acclimated and utilizing leachate directly from the landfill, the AnSBBR presented efficiency over 70%, in terms of COD removal, with influent COD ranging from 4825 mg L(-1) to 12,330 mg L(-1). To evaluate the kinetics of landfill leachate treatment, temporal profiles of CODFilt. concentration were performed and a first-order kinetics model was adjusted for substrate consumption, obtaining an average k1 = 4.40 × 10(-5) L mgTVS(-1) d(-1), corrected to 25 °C. Considering the temperature variations, a temperature-activity coefficient ? = 1.07 was obtained. Statistical "Randomness" and "F" tests were used to successfully validate the model considered. Thus, the results demonstrate that the first-order kinetic model is adequate to model the anaerobic treatment of the landfill leachate in the AnSBBR. PMID:25127066

  4. A study on the performance of a pilot scale A2/0-MBR system in treating domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Banu, J Rajesh; Uan, Do Khac; Chung, Ik-Jae; Kaliappan, S; Yeom, Ick-Tae

    2009-11-01

    Phosphorus and nitrogen are the important eutrophication nutrients. They were removed in the anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A2/O) system through biologically. The use of pilot scale A2/O systems with immersed membranes in removing nutrients phosphorus and nitrogen were investigated over a period of 150 days. The A2/O membrane bio reactor (MBR) was operated at a flux of 17 LMH. The designed flux was increased stepwise over a period of one week. The reactor was operated with the mixed liquid suspended solids (MLSS) concentrations in the range of 7000-8000 mg l(-1). The phosphorus removal was found to be in the range of 74-84%. The ammonification was completed in the aerobic zone and the ammonia concentration was almost nil. Nitrate concentration in the anoxic zone was found to be in the range of 0.3-1.6 mg l(-1) indicating efficient denitrification. The nitrogen removal efficiency of the A2/O-MBR system was in the range of 68 to 75%. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the effluent was in the range of 8-5 mgl(-1) indicating the efficiency of membrane. During the period of reactor operation transmembrane pressure (TMP) of the reactor increased slowly from 0 to 6 -cmHg over a period of 150 days. PMID:20329390

  5. Coupling digestion in a pilot-scale UASB reactor and electrochemical oxidation over BDD anode to treat diluted cheese whey.

    PubMed

    Katsoni, Alphathanasia; Mantzavinos, Dionissios; Diamadopoulos, Evan

    2014-11-01

    The efficiency of the anaerobic treatment of cheese whey (CW) at mesophilic conditions was investigated. In addition, the applicability of electrochemical oxidation as an advanced post-treatment for the complete removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) from the anaerobically treated cheese whey was evaluated. The diluted cheese whey, having a pH of 6.5 and a total COD of 6 g/L, was first treated in a 600-L, pilot-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The UASB process, which was operated for 87 days at mesophilic conditions (32?±?2 °C) at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3 days, led to a COD removal efficiency between 66 and 97 %, while the particulate matter of the wastewater was effectively removed by entrapment in the sludge blanket of the reactor. When the anaerobic reactor effluent was post-treated over a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode at 9 and 18 A and in the presence of NaCl as the supporting electrolyte, complete removal of COD was attained after 3-4 h of reaction. During electrochemical experiments, three groups of organochlorinated compounds, namely trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetonitriles (HANs), and haloketons (HKs), as well as 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) and chloropicrin were identified as by-products of the process; these, alongside free chlorine, are thought to increase the matrix ecotoxicity to Artemia salina. PMID:24793070

  6. Fe(II) oxidation during acid mine drainage neutralization in a pilot-scale Sequencing Batch Reactor.

    PubMed

    Zvimba, J N; Mathye, M; Vadapalli, V R K; Swanepoel, H; Bologo, L

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated Fe(II) oxidation during acid mine drainage (AMD) neutralization using CaCO3 in a pilot-scale Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) of hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 90 min and sludge retention time (SRT) of 360 min in the presence of air. The removal kinetics of Fe(II), of initial concentration 1,033 ± 0 mg/L, from AMD through oxidation to Fe(III) was observed to depend on both pH and suspended solids, resulting in Fe(II) levels of 679 ± 32, 242 ± 64, 46 ± 16 and 28 ± 0 mg/L recorded after cycles 1, 2, 3 and 4 respectively, with complete Fe(II) oxidation only achieved after complete neutralization of AMD. Generally, it takes 30 min to completely oxidize Fe(II) during cycle 4, suggesting that further optimization of SBR operation based on both pH and suspended solids manipulation can result in significant reduction of the number of cycles required to achieve acceptable Fe(II) oxidation for removal as ferric hydroxide. Overall, complete removal of Fe(II) during AMD neutralization is attractive as it promotes recovery of better quality waste gypsum, key to downstream gypsum beneficiation for recovery of valuables, thereby enabling some treatment-cost recovery and prevention of environmental pollution from dumping of sludge into landfills. PMID:24056441

  7. Pilot- and bench-scale testing of faecal indicator bacteria survival in marine beach sand near point sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mika, K.B.; Imamura, G.; Chang, C.; Conway, V.; Fernandez, G.; Griffith, J.F.; Kampalath, R.A.; Lee, C.M.; Lin, C.-C.; Moreno, R.; Thompson, S.; Whitman, R.L.; Jay, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Factors affecting faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and pathogen survival/persistence in sand remain largely unstudied. This work elucidates how biological and physical factors affect die-off in beach sand following sewage spills. Methods and Results: Solar disinfection with mechanical mixing was pilot-tested as a disinfection procedure after a large sewage spill in Los Angeles. Effects of solar exposure, mechanical mixing, predation and/or competition, season, and moisture were tested at bench scale. First-order decay constants for Escherichia coli ranged between -0??23 and -1??02 per day, and for enterococci between -0??5 and -1??0 per day. Desiccation was a dominant factor for E. coli but not enterococci inactivation. Effects of season were investigated through a comparison of experimental results from winter, spring, and fall. Conclusions: Moisture was the dominant factor controlling E. coli inactivation kinetics. Initial microbial community and sand temperature were also important factors. Mechanical mixing, common in beach grooming, did not consistently reduce bacterial levels. Significance and Impact of the Study: Inactivation rates are mainly dependent on moisture and high sand temperature. Chlorination was an effective disinfection treatment in sand microcosms inoculated with raw influent. ?? 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Results of HWVP transuranic process waste treatment laboratory and pilot-scale filtration tests using specially ground zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Eakin, D.E.

    1996-03-01

    Process waste streams from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) may require treatment for cesium, strontium, and transuranic (TRU) element removal in order to meet criteria for incorporation in grout. The approach planned for cesium and strontium removal is ion exchange using a zeolite exchanger followed by filtration. Filtration using a pneumatic hydropulse filter is planned to remove TRU elements which are associated with process solids and to also remove zeolite bearing the cesium and strontium. The solids removed during filtration are recycled to the melter feed system to be incorporated into the HWVP glass product. Fluor Daniel, Inc., the architect-engineering firm for HWVP, recommended a Pneumatic Hydropulse (PHP) filter manufactured by Mott Metallurgical Corporation for use in the HWVP. The primary waste streams considered for application of zeolite contact and filtration are melter off-gas condensate from the submerged bed scrubber (SBS), and equipment decontamination solutions from the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT). Other waste streams could be treated depending on TRU element and radionuclide content. Laboratory and pilot-scale filtration tests were conducted to provide a preliminary assessment of the adequacy of the recommended filter for application to HWVP waste treatment.

  9. Pilot-scale study of sludge pretreatment by microwave and sludge reduction based on lysis-cryptic growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yawei; Xiao, Qingcong; Liu, Jibao; Yan, Hong; Wei, Yuansong

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the performance of microwave (MW)-chemical hybrid sludge treatment system, a pilot scale MW disintegration unit (treatment capacity of 500L/d) was constructed. The results showed that organic matter, nitrogen, and phosphorus were effectively released from the MW-pretreated sludge. The values of COD released were 15.91%, 15.07%, 13.83%, 19.35%, and 15.07% for the MW, MW-acid, MW-alkali, MW-H2O2, and MW-H2O2-alkali treatment processes, respectively. Additionally, for a wastewater treatment system with a capacity of 200m(3)/d, when coupled with a MW sludge pretreatment unit, the sludge production and sludge yield were greatly reduced by 38.60% and to 0.35kg VSS/kg CODconsumed, respectively. The total operating cost of the lysis-cryptic growth system was 13.64% lower than that of the CAS system without a MW unit. PMID:25935394

  10. Pilot-scale evaluation of ozone and biological activated carbon for trace organic contaminant mitigation and disinfection.

    PubMed

    Gerrity, Daniel; Gamage, Sujanie; Holady, Janie C; Mawhinney, Douglas B; Quiñones, Oscar; Trenholm, Rebecca A; Snyder, Shane A

    2011-02-01

    In an effort to validate the use of ozone for contaminant oxidation and disinfection in water reclamation, extensive pilot testing was performed with ozone/H(2)O(2) and biological activated carbon (BAC) at the Reno-Stead Water Reclamation Facility in Reno, Nevada. Three sets of samples were collected over a five-month period of continuous operation, and these samples were analyzed for a suite of trace organic contaminants (TOrCs), total estrogenicity, and several microbial surrogates, including the bacteriophage MS2, total and fecal coliforms, and Bacillus spores. Based on the high degree of microbial inactivation and contaminant destruction, this treatment train appears to be a viable alternative to the standard indirect potable reuse (IPR) configuration (i.e., membrane filtration, reverse osmosis, UV/H(2)O(2), and aquifer injection), particularly for inland applications where brine disposal is an issue. Several issues, including regrowth of coliform bacteria in the BAC process, must be addressed prior to full-scale implementation. PMID:21288550

  11. FY-97 operations of the pilot-scale glass melter to vitrify simulated ICPP high activity sodium-bearing waste

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    A 3.5 liter refractory-lined joule-heated glass melter was built to test the applicability of electric melting to vitrify simulated high activity waste (HAW). The HAW streams result from dissolution and separation of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) calcines and/or radioactive liquid waste. Pilot scale melter operations will establish selection criteria needed to evaluate the application of joule heating to immobilize ICPP high activity waste streams. The melter was fabricated with K-3 refractory walls and Inconel 690 electrodes. It is designed to be continuously operated at 1,150 C with a maximum glass output rate of 10 lbs/hr. The first set of tests were completed using surrogate HAW-sodium bearing waste (SBW). The melter operated for 57 hours and was shut down due to excessive melt temperatures resulting in low glass viscosity (< 30 Poise). Due to the high melt temperature and low viscosity the molten glass breached the melt chamber. The melter has been dismantled and examined to identify required process improvement areas and successes of the first melter run. The melter has been redesigned and is currently being fabricated for the second run, which is scheduled to begin in December 1997.

  12. Potential of duckweed in the conversion of wastewater nutrients to valuable biomass: a pilot-scale comparison with water hyacinth.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yonggui; Fang, Yang; Jin, Yanling; Huang, Jun; Bao, Shu; Fu, Tian; He, Zhiming; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Hai

    2014-07-01

    The application potential of duckweed (Lemna japonica 0234) and water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) were compared in two pilot-scale wastewater treatment systems for more than one year. The results indicated duckweed had the same total nitrogen (TN) recovery rate as water hyacinth (0.4 g/m(2)/d) and a slightly lower total phosphorus (TP) recovery rate (approximately 0.1g/m(2)/d) even though its biomass production was half that of water hyacinth. The higher content of crude protein (33.34%), amino acids (25.80%), starch (40.19%), phosphorus (1.24%), flavonoids (2.91%) and lower fiber content provided duckweed with more advantages in resource utilization. Additionally, microbial community discovered by 454 pyrosequencing indicated that less nitrifying bacteria and more nitrogen-fixing bacteria in rhizosphere of duckweed provided it with higher nitrogen recovery efficiency (60%) than water hyacinth (47%). Under the presented condition, duckweed has more application advantages than water hyacinth because it more effectively converted the wastewater nutrients into valuable biomass. PMID:24787320

  13. Hospital wastewater treatment by membrane bioreactor: performance and efficiency for organic micropollutant elimination.

    PubMed

    Kovalova, Lubomira; Siegrist, Hansruedi; Singer, Heinz; Wittmer, Anita; McArdell, Christa S

    2012-02-01

    A pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) was installed and operated for one year at a Swiss hospital. It was fed an influent directly from the hospital's sanitary collection system. To study the efficiency of micropollutant elimination in raw hospital wastewater that comprises a complex matrix with micropollutant concentrations ranging from low ng/L to low mg/L, an automated online SPE-HPLC-MS/MS analytical method was developed. Among the 68 target analytes were the following: 56 pharmaceuticals (antibiotics, antimycotics, antivirals, iodinated X-ray contrast media, antiinflamatory, cytostatics, diuretics, beta blockers, anesthetics, analgesics, antiepileptics, antidepressants, and others), 10 metabolites, and 2 corrosion inhibitors. The MBR influent contained the majority of those target analytes. The micropollutant elimination efficiency was assessed through continuous flow-proportional sampling of the MBR influent and continuous time-proportional sampling of the MBR effluent. An overall load elimination of all pharmaceuticals and metabolites in the MBR was 22%, as over 80% of the load was due to persistent iodinated contrast media. No inhibition by antibacterial agents or disinfectants from the hospital was observed in the MBR. The hospital wastewater was found to be a dynamic system in which conjugates of pharmaceuticals deconjugate and biological transformation products are formed, which in some cases are pharmaceuticals themselves. PMID:22280472

  14. Heat transport and solidification in the electromagnetic casting of aluminum alloys. Part 1: Experimental measurements on a pilot-scale caster

    SciTech Connect

    Prasso, D.C. [Intel Corp., Aloha, OR (United States); Evans, J.W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering; Wilson, I.J. [Reynolds Metals Co., Muscle Shoals, AL (United States)

    1995-12-01

    While many investigators have examined electromagnetic and magnetohydrodynamics phenomena in electromagnetic casting (EMC) of aluminum, there appears to be no published work on heat transport and solidification in such casters. This two-part series is an attempt to remedy this deficiency. The first part describes two experimental campaigns, carried out on a pilot-scale electromagnetic caster at Reynolds Metals Company, in which sacrificial thermocouples were used to obtain many data on temperature distributions within the aluminum of a pilot-scale caster and thereby to obtain the shape of the liquid metal pool (sump). The data reveal a strong dependence of temperature distribution and sump depth on casting speed but a relatively weak dependence on the flow rate of the quenching water striking the outside of the ingot.

  15. Pilot-Scale Testing of In Situ Vitrification of Arnold Engineering Development Center Site 10 Contaminated Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Timmerman, C. L.; Peterson, M. E.

    1990-02-01

    Process verification testing using in situ vitrification (ISV) was successfully performed in a pilot-scale test using soils containing fuel oils and heavy metals from Site 10 Installation Restoration Program (IRP) at the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) located in the southern portion of middle Tennessee. This effort was directed through the U.S. Department of Energy ' s Hazardous Waste Remedial Action Program (HAZWRAP) Office managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems. In situ vitrification is a thermal treatment process that converts contaminated soils and wastes into a durable product containing glass and crystalline phases. During processing, heavy metals or other inorganic constituents are retained and immobilized in the glass structure; organic constituents are typically destroyed or removed and captured by the off-gas treatment system. The objective of this test is to verify the applicability of the ISV process for stabilization of the contaminated soil at Site 10 . The pilotscale ISV testing results, reported herein, indicate that the AEDC Site 10 Fire Training Area may be successfully processed by ISV. Site 10 is a fire training pit that is contaminated with fuel oils and heavy metals from fire training exercises. Actual site material was processed by ISV to verify its feasible application to those soils . Initial feasibility bench-scale testing and analyses of the soils determined that a lower-melting, electrically conductive fluxing additive (such as sodium carbonate) is required as an additive to the soil for ISV processing to work effecti vely. The actual Site 10 soils showed a larger degree of compositional variation than the soil used for the bench-scale test . This variation dictates that each vitrification setting should be analyzed to determine the composition as. a function of depth and location . This data will dictate the amount (if any) of fluxing add itives of sodium and calci um to bring the melt composition to the recommended quantity of 5 wt% sodium and 5 wt% calcium oxide. Each variable additive adjustment would result in a vitrification melt composition of 5 wt% calcium and sodium oxide content . The pilot -scale operation created a vitrified block weighing 15 metric t onnes (t) and measuring 1.5 m (5 ft) deep and 2.4 m (8 ft) on each side. The quantity of fluxing additives and the method of placing the fluxing additives in the surface cover soil limited the operating electrical system providing power to the ISV melt. The power limitation created enhanced lateral growth of the block and resulted in a shallower depth . This method of adding fluxes demonstrated that ISV operating efficiency would be greatly improved if the fluxes were injected or mixed with the entire designated vitrification volume. However, the volume vitrified contained a sufficient quantity of hazardous contaminants to allow for an effective verification evaluation of ISV processing of the AEDC Site 10. Analytical efforts for this project were directed towards evaluating the organic destruction and thermal transport effects of ISV processing on the Site 10 contaminated soil. No thermal transport of hydrocarbon contaminants to the surrounding soil were detected. These results continue to confirm the organic destruction and nontransport mechanisms presented in this report . Off-gas releases of the hydrocarbons indicated an 89 wt% destruction efficiency by the ISV process exclusive of off-gas treatment. The destruction and removal efficiency of the overall ISV system was 99.85 wt%. Leach testing using extraction procedure (EP) toxicity and toxic characteristics leach procedure (TCLP) showed that all metals of concern were below leach testing release limits, indicating that the ISV process produces a nonhazardous product . These favorable results indicate that ISV can be used to effectively treat and remediate the contaminated soils at the AEDC Site 10 .

  16. Millimeter-Wave Measurements at 137 GHZ of DWPF Black Frit Glass Flow and Salt Layer Pooling in a Pilot Scale Melter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul P. Woskov; S. K. Sundaram; Don Miller; Gene Daniel; John Harden

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear waste vitrification in joule-heated melters would be greatly facilitated by the availability of on-line monitoring instrumentation for critical process parameters such as viscosity and salt accumulation. A field test of the applicability of millimeter-wave (MMW) technology to providing such tools was carried out on a pilot scale melter (EV-16) at the Clemson Environmental Technology Laboratory. Flow measurements of Defense

  17. Granulation of activated sludge in a pilot-scale sequencing batch reactor for the treatment of low-strength municipal wastewater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bing-Jie Ni; Wen-Ming Xie; Shao-Gen Liu; Han-Qing Yu; Ying-Zhe Wang; Gan Wang; Xian-Liang Dai

    2009-01-01

    Aerobic granulation of activated sludge was achieved in a pilot-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for the treatment of low-strength municipal wastewater (<200mgL?1 of COD, chemical oxygen demand). The volume exchange ratio and settling time of an SBR were found to be two key factors in the granulation of activated sludge grown on the low-strength municipal wastewater. After operation of 300

  18. The growth of disk abalone, Haliotis discus hannai at different culture densities in a pilot-scale recirculating aquaculture system with a baffled culture tank

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hyung-Bae Kim; Pyong-Kih Kim; Jae-Yoon Jo

    2008-01-01

    The growth rate of disk abalone, Haliotis discus hannai, energy consumption and changes in water quality were monitored in a pilot-scale recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) for 155 days. Baffles were installed in the RAS culture tanks to enlarge the attachment area and clean out solid waste materials automatically by hydraulic force only. The experimental disk abalones, of shell length 24.5±0.5mm,

  19. Nutrient Removal in Pilot-Scale Constructed Wetlands Treating Eutrophic River Water: Assessment of Plants, Intermittent Artificial Aeration and Polyhedron Hollow Polypropylene Balls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xianqiang Tang; Suiliang Huang; Miklas Scholz; Jinzhong Li

    2009-01-01

    Seven experimental pilot-scale subsurface vertical-flow constructed wetlands were designed to assess the effect of plants\\u000a [Typha latifolia L. (cattail)], intermittent artificial aeration and the use of polyhedron hollow polypropylene balls (PHPB) as part of the\\u000a wetland substrate on nutrient removal from eutrophic Jinhe River water in Tianjin, China. During the entire running period,\\u000a observations indicated that plants played a negligible

  20. Pilot-scale demonstration of the OSCAR process for high-temperature multipollutant control of coal combustion flue gas, using carbonated fly ash and mesoporous calcium carbonate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Himanshu Gupta; Theodore J. Thomas; Ah-Hyung A. Park; Mahesh V. Iyer; Puneet Gupta; Rajeev Agnihotri; Raja A. Jadhav; Harold W. Walker; Linda K. Weavers; Tarunjit Butalia; Liang-Shih Fan

    2007-01-01

    A pilot-scale study of the Ohio State Carbonation Ash Reactivation (OSCAR) process was performed to demonstrate the reactivity of two novel calcium-based sorbents toward sulfur and trace heavy metal (arsenic, selenium, and mercury) capture in the furnace sorbent injection (FSI) mode on a 0.365 m³\\/s slipstream of a bituminous coal-fired stoker boiler. The sorbents were synthesized by bubbling COâ to