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Sample records for pilz domain proteins

  1. The role of PilZ domain proteins in the virulence of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Yvonne; Ryan, Robert P; O'Donovan, Karen; He, Yong-Qiang; Jiang, Bo-Le; Feng, Jia-Xun; Tang, Ji-Liang; Dow, J Maxwell

    2008-11-01

    Cyclic di-GMP [(bis-(3'-5')-cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate)] is an almost ubiquitous second messenger in bacteria that is implicated in the regulation of a range of functions that include developmental transitions, aggregative behaviour, adhesion, biofilm formation and virulence. Comparatively little is known about the mechanism(s) by which cyclic di-GMP exerts these various regulatory effects. PilZ has been identified as a cyclic di-GMP binding protein domain; proteins with this domain are involved in regulation of specific cellular processes, including the virulence of animal pathogens. Here we have examined the role of PilZ domain proteins in virulence and the regulation of virulence factor synthesis in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), the causal agent of black rot of crucifers. The Xcc genome encodes four proteins (XC0965, XC2249, XC2317 and XC3221) that have a PilZ domain. Mutation of XC0965, XC2249 and XC3221 led to a significant reduction of virulence in Chinese radish. Mutation of XC2249 and XC3221 led to a reduction in motility whereas mutation of XC2249 and XC0965 affected extracellular enzyme production. All mutant strains were unaffected in biofilm formation in vitro. The reduction of virulence following mutation of XC3221 could not be wholly attributed to an effect on motility as mutation of pilA, which abolishes motility, has a lesser effect on virulence. PMID:19019010

  2. The Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PilZ Domain Proteins Function Differentially in Cyclic di-GMP Binding and Regulation of Virulence and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fenghuan; Tian, Fang; Chen, Huamin; Hutchins, William; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The PilZ domain proteins have been demonstrated to be one of the major types of receptors mediating cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling pathways in several pathogenic bacteria. However, little is known about the function of PilZ domain proteins in c-di-GMP regulation of virulence in the bacterial blight pathogen of rice Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. Here, the roles of PilZ domain proteins PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 in c-di-GMP binding, regulation of virulence and motility, and subcellular localization were characterized in comparison with PXO_02715, identified previously as an interactor with the c-di-GMP receptor Filp to regulate virulence. The c-di-GMP binding motifs in the PilZ domains were conserved in PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 but were less well conserved in PXO_02715. PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 but not PXO_02715 proteins bound to c-di-GMP with high affinity in vitro, and the R141 and R10 residues in the PilZ domains of PXO_00049 and PXO_02374, respectively, were crucial for c-di-GMP binding. Gene deletion of PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 resulted in significant increases in virulence and hrp gene transcription, indicating their negative regulation of virulence via type III secretion system expression. All mutants showed significant changes in sliding motility but not exopolysaccharide production and biofilm formation. In trans expression of the full-length open reading frame (ORF) of each gene in the relevant mutants led to restoration of the phenotype to wild-type levels. Moreover, PXO_00049 and PXO_02374 displayed mainly multisite subcellular localizations, whereas PXO_02715 showed nonpolar distributions in the X. oryzae pv. oryzae cells. Therefore, this study demonstrated the different functions of the PilZ domain proteins in mediation of c-di-GMP regulation of virulence and motility in X. oryzae pv. oryzae. PMID:25911481

  3. The Structural Basis of Cyclic Diguanylate Signal Transduction by PilZ Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Benach,J.; Swaminathan, S.; Tamayo, R.; Handelman, S.; Folta-Stogniew, E.; Ramos, J.; Forouhar, F.; Neely, H.; Seetharaman, J.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) controls the transition between motile and sessile growth in eubacteria, but little is known about the proteins that sense its concentration. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that PilZ domains bind c-di-GMP and allosterically modulate effector pathways. We have determined a 1.9 Angstroms crystal structure of c-di-GMP bound to VCA0042/PlzD, a PilZ domain-containing protein from Vibrio cholerae. Either this protein or another specific PilZ domain-containing protein is required for V. cholerae to efficiently infect mice. VCA0042/PlzD comprises a C-terminal PilZ domain plus an N-terminal domain with a similar beta-barrel fold. C-di-GMP contacts seven of the nine strongly conserved residues in the PilZ domain, including three in a seven-residue long N-terminal loop that undergoes a conformational switch as it wraps around c-di-GMP. This switch brings the PilZ domain into close apposition with the N-terminal domain, forming a new allosteric interaction surface that spans these domains and the c-di-GMP at their interface. The very small size of the N-terminal conformational switch is likely to explain the facile evolutionary diversification of the PilZ domain.

  4. Identification of flgZ as a Flagellar Gene Encoding a PilZ Domain Protein That Regulates Swimming Motility and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; González de Heredia, Elena; Baena, Irene; Martín-Martín, Irene; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymatic activities control c-di-GMP levels modulating planktonic versus sessile lifestyle behavior in bacteria. The PilZ domain is described as a sensor of c-di-GMP intracellular levels and the proteins containing a PilZ domain represent the best studied class of c-di-GMP receptors forming part of the c-di-GMP signaling cascade. In P. fluorescens F113 we have found two diguanylate cyclases (WspR, SadC) and one phosphodiesterase (BifA) implicated in regulation of swimming motility and biofilm formation. Here we identify a flgZ gene located in a flagellar operon encoding a protein that contains a PilZ domain. Moreover, we show that FlgZ subcellular localization depends on the c-di-GMP intracellular levels. The overexpression analysis of flgZ in P. fluorescens F113 and P. putida KT2440 backgrounds reveal a participation of FlgZ in Pseudomonas swimming motility regulation. Besides, the epistasis of flgZ over wspR and bifA clearly shows that c-di-GMP intracellular levels produced by the enzymatic activity of the diguanylate cyclase WspR and the phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm formation through FlgZ. PMID:24504373

  5. Functional divergence of FimX in PilZ binding and type IV pilus regulation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yaning; Xu, Linghui; Dong, Xueming; Yau, Yin Hoe; Ho, Chun Loong; Koh, Siew Lee; Shochat, Susana Geifman; Chou, Shan-Ho; Tang, Kai; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2012-11-01

    Type IV pili (T4P) are polar surface structures that play important roles in bacterial motility, biofilm formation, and pathogenicity. The protein FimX and its orthologs are known to mediate T4P formation in the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and some other bacterial species. It was reported recently that FimX(XAC2398) from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri interacts with PilZ(XAC1133) directly through the nonenzymatic EAL domain of FimX(XAC2398). Here we present experimental data to reveal that the strong interaction between FimX(XAC2398) and PilZ(XAC1133) is not conserved in P. aeruginosa and likely other Pseudomonas species. In vitro and in vivo binding experiments showed that the interaction between FimX and PilZ in P. aeruginosa is below the measurable limit. Surface plasmon resonance assays further confirmed that the interaction between the P. aeruginosa proteins is at least more than 3 orders of magnitude weaker than that between the X. axonopodis pv. citri pair. The N-terminal lobe region of FimX(XAC2398) was identified as the binding surface for PilZ(XAC1133) by amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange and site-directed mutagenesis studies. Lack of several key residues in the N-terminal lobe region of the EAL domain of FimX is likely to account for the greatly reduced binding affinity between FimX and PilZ in P. aeruginosa. All together, the results suggest that the interaction between PilZ and FimX in Xanthomonas species is not conserved in P. aeruginosa due to the evolutionary divergence among the FimX orthologs. The precise roles of FimX and PilZ in bacterial motility and T4P biogenesis are likely to vary among bacterial species. PMID:22942245

  6. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  7. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  8. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  9. A Cyclic di-GMP-binding Adaptor Protein Interacts with Histidine Kinase to Regulate Two-component Signaling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Linghui; Venkataramani, Prabhadevi; Ding, Yichen; Liu, Yang; Deng, Yinyue; Yong, Grace Lisi; Xin, Lingyi; Ye, Ruijuan; Zhang, Lianhui; Yang, Liang; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2016-07-29

    The bacterial messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) binds to a diverse range of effectors to exert its biological effect. Despite the fact that free-standing PilZ proteins are by far the most prevalent c-di-GMP effectors known to date, their physiological function and mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here we report that the free-standing PilZ protein PA2799 from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa interacts directly with the hybrid histidine kinase SagS. We show that PA2799 (named as HapZ: histidine kinase associated PilZ) binds directly to the phosphoreceiver (REC) domain of SagS, and that the SagS-HapZ interaction is further enhanced at elevated c-di-GMP concentration. We demonstrate that binding of HapZ to SagS inhibits the phosphotransfer between SagS and the downstream protein HptB in a c-di-GMP-dependent manner. In accordance with the role of SagS as a motile-sessile switch and biofilm growth factor, we show that HapZ impacts surface attachment and biofilm formation most likely by regulating the expression of a large number of genes. The observations suggest a previously unknown mechanism whereby c-di-GMP mediates two-component signaling through a PilZ adaptor protein. PMID:27231351

  10. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  11. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  12. Inferring Domain-Domain Interactions from Protein-Protein Interactions with Formal Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Identifying reliable domain-domain interactions will increase our ability to predict novel protein-protein interactions, to unravel interactions in protein complexes, and thus gain more information about the function and behavior of genes. One of the challenges of identifying reliable domain-domain interactions is domain promiscuity. Promiscuous domains are domains that can occur in many domain architectures and are therefore found in many proteins. This becomes a problem for a method where the score of a domain-pair is the ratio between observed and expected frequencies because the protein-protein interaction network is sparse. As such, many protein-pairs will be non-interacting and domain-pairs with promiscuous domains will be penalized. This domain promiscuity challenge to the problem of inferring reliable domain-domain interactions from protein-protein interactions has been recognized, and a number of work-arounds have been proposed. This paper reports on an application of Formal Concept Analysis to this problem. It is found that the relationship between formal concepts provides a natural way for rare domains to elevate the rank of promiscuous domain-pairs and enrich highly ranked domain-pairs with reliable domain-domain interactions. This piggybacking of promiscuous domain-pairs onto less promiscuous domain-pairs is possible only with concept lattices whose attribute-labels are not reduced and is enhanced by the presence of proteins that comprise both promiscuous and rare domains. PMID:24586450

  13. Analysis of multi-domain protein dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Amitava; Hua, Duy P; Post, Carol Beth

    2016-01-01

    Proteins with a modular architecture of multiple domains connected by linkers often exhibit diversity in the relative positions of domains while the domain tertiary structure remains unchanged. The biological function of these modular proteins, or the regulation of their activity depends on the variation in domain orientation and separation. Accordingly, careful characterization of inter-domain motion and correlated fluctuations of multi-domain systems is relevant for understanding the functional behavior of modular proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provides a powerful approach to study these motions in atomic detail. Nevertheless, the common procedure for analyzing fluctuations from MD simulations after overall rigid-body alignment fails for multi-domain proteins; it greatly overestimates correlated positional fluctuations in the presence of relative domain motion. We show here that expressing the atomic motions of a multi-domain protein as a combination of displacement within the domain reference frame and motion of the relative domains correctly separates the internal motions to allow a useful description of correlated fluctuations. We illustrate the methodology of separating the domain fluctuations and local fluctuations by application to the tandem SH2 domains of human Syk protein kinase and by characterizing an effect of phosphorylation on the dynamics. Correlated motions are assessed from a distance covariance rather than the more common vector-coordinate covariance. The approach makes it possible to calculate the proper correlations in fluctuations internal to a domain as well as between domains. PMID:26675644

  14. Protein structural domains: definition and prediction.

    PubMed

    Ezkurdia, Iakes; Tress, Michael L

    2011-11-01

    Recognition and prediction of structural domains in proteins is an important part of structure and function prediction. This unit lists the range of tools available for domain prediction, and describes sequence and structural analysis tools that complement domain prediction methods. Also detailed are the basic domain prediction steps, along with suggested strategies for different protein sequences and potential pitfalls in domain boundary prediction. The difficult problem of domain orientation prediction is also discussed. All the resources necessary for domain boundary prediction are accessible via publicly available Web servers and databases and do not require computational expertise. PMID:22045561

  15. Domains mediate protein-protein interactions and nucleate protein assemblies.

    PubMed

    Costa, S; Cesareni, G

    2008-01-01

    Cell physiology is governed by an intricate mesh of physical and functional links among proteins, nucleic acids and other metabolites. The recent information flood coming from large-scale genomic and proteomic approaches allows us to foresee the possibility of compiling an exhaustive list of the molecules present within a cell, enriched with quantitative information on concentration and cellular localization. Moreover, several high-throughput experimental and computational techniques have been devised to map all the protein interactions occurring in a living cell. So far, such maps have been drawn as graphs where nodes represent proteins and edges represent interactions. However, this representation does not take into account the intrinsically modular nature of proteins and thus fails in providing an effective description of the determinants of binding. Since proteins are composed of domains that often confer on proteins their binding capabilities, a more informative description of the interaction network would detail, for each pair of interacting proteins in the network, which domains mediate the binding. Understanding how protein domains combine to mediate protein interactions would allow one to add important features to the protein interaction network, making it possible to discriminate between simultaneously occurring and mutually exclusive interactions. This objective can be achieved by experimentally characterizing domain recognition specificity or by analyzing the frequency of co-occurring domains in proteins that do interact. Such approaches allow gaining insights on the topology of complexes with unknown three-dimensional structure, thus opening the prospect of adopting a more rational strategy in developing drugs designed to selectively target specific protein interactions. PMID:18491061

  16. Enhanced protein domain discovery using taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Coin, Lachlan; Bateman, Alex; Durbin, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Background It is well known that different species have different protein domain repertoires, and indeed that some protein domains are kingdom specific. This information has not yet been incorporated into statistical methods for finding domains in sequences of amino acids. Results We show that by incorporating our understanding of the taxonomic distribution of specific protein domains, we can enhance domain recognition in protein sequences. We identify 4447 new instances of Pfam domains in the SP-TREMBL database using this technique, equivalent to the coverage increase given by the last 8.3% of Pfam families and to a 0.7% increase in the number of domain predictions. We use PSI-BLAST to cross-validate our new predictions. We also benchmark our approach using a SCOP test set of proteins of known structure, and demonstrate improvements relative to standard Hidden Markov model techniques. Conclusions Explicitly including knowledge about the taxonomic distribution of protein domains can enhance protein domain recognition. Our method can also incorporate other context-specific domain distributions – such as domain co-occurrence and protein localisation. PMID:15137915

  17. Diversity in protein recognition by PTB domains.

    PubMed

    Forman-Kay, J D; Pawson, T

    1999-12-01

    Phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domains were originally identified as modular domains that recognize phosphorylated Asn-Pro-Xxx-p Tyr-containing proteins. Recent binding and structural studies of PTB domain complexes with target peptides have revealed a number of deviations from the previously described mode of interaction, with respect to both the sequences of possible targets and their structures within the complexes. This diversity of recognition by PTB domains extends and strengthens our general understanding of modular binding domain recognition. PMID:10607674

  18. Immunosilencing a Highly Immunogenic Protein Trimerization Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Sliepen, Kwinten; van Montfort, Thijs; Melchers, Mark; Isik, Gözde; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic proteins and protein subunit vaccines contain heterologous trimerization domains, such as the widely used GCN4-based isoleucine zipper (IZ) and the T4 bacteriophage fibritin foldon (Fd) trimerization domains. We found that these domains induced potent anti-IZ or anti-Fd antibody responses in animals when fused to an HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) immunogen. To dampen IZ-induced responses, we constructed an IZ domain containing four N-linked glycans (IZN4) to shield the underlying protein surface. When fused to two different vaccine antigens, HIV-1 Env and influenza hemagglutinin (HA), IZN4 strongly reduced the antibody responses against the IZ, but did not affect the antibody titers against Env or HA. Silencing of immunogenic multimerization domains with glycans might be relevant for therapeutic proteins and protein vaccines. PMID:25635058

  19. Domain swapping: entangling alliances between proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M J; Choe, S; Eisenberg, D

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of monomeric and dimeric diphtheria toxin (DT) reveals a mode for protein association which we call domain swapping. The structure of dimeric DT has been extensively refined against data to 2.0-A resolution and a three-residue loop has been corrected as compared with our published 2.5-A-resolution structure. The monomeric DT structure has also been determined, at 2.3-A resolution. Monomeric DT is a Y-shaped molecule with three domains: catalytic (C), transmembrane (T), and receptor binding (R). Upon freezing in phosphate buffer, DT forms a long-lived, metastable dimer. The protein chain tracing discloses that upon dimerization an unprecedented conformational rearrangement occurs: the entire R domain from each molecule of the dimer is exchanged for the R domain from the other. This involves breaking the noncovalent interactions between the R domain and the C and T domains, rotating the R domain by 180 degrees with atomic movements up to 65 A, and re-forming the same noncovalent interactions between the R domain and the C and T domains of the other chain of the dimer. This conformational transition explains the long life and metastability of the DT dimer. Several other intertwined, dimeric protein structures satisfy our definition of domain swapping and suggest that domain swapping may be the molecular mechanism for evolution of these oligomers and possibly of oligomeric proteins in general. Images PMID:8159715

  20. The architecture of the protein domain universe.

    PubMed

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2005-03-14

    Understanding the design of the universe of protein structures may provide insights into protein evolution. We study the architecture of the protein domain universe, which has been found to poses peculiar scale-free properties. We examine the origin of these scale-free properties of the graph of protein domain structures (PDUG) and determine that that the PDUG is not modular, i.e. it does not consist of modules with uniform properties. Instead, we find the PDUG to be self-similar at all scales. We further characterize the PDUG architecture by studying the properties of the hub nodes that are responsible for the scale-free connectivity of the PDUG. We introduce a measure of the betweenness centrality of protein domains in the PDUG and find a power-law distribution of the betweenness centrality values. The scale-free distribution of hubs in the protein universe suggests that a set of specific statistical mechanics models, such as the self-organized criticality model, can potentially identify the principal driving forces of protein evolution. We also find a gatekeeper protein domain, removal of which partitions the largest cluster into two large sub-clusters. We suggest that the loss of such gatekeeper protein domains in the course of evolution is responsible for the creation of new fold families. PMID:15777630

  1. Tuning Protein Autoinhibition by Domain Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae-Hyun; Muralidharan, Vasant; Vila-Perello, Miquel; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Muir, Tom W.; Palmer, Arthur G.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of many multi-domain signaling proteins requires rearrangement of autoinhibitory interdomain interactions that occlude activator binding sites. In one model for activation, the major inactive conformation exists in equilibrium with activated-like conformations that can be stabilized by ligand binding or post-translational modifications. The molecular basis for this model is established for the archetypal signaling adapter protein Crk-II by measuring the thermodynamics and kinetics of the equilibrium between autoinhibited and activated-like states using fluorescence and NMR spectroscopies, together with segmental isotopic labeling via expressed protein ligation. The results demonstrate that intramolecular domain-domain interactions both stabilize the autoinhibited state and induce the activated-like conformation. A combination of favorable interdomain interactions and unfavorable intradomain structural changes fine-tunes the population of the activated-like conformation and allows facile response to activators. This mechanism suggests a general strategy for optimization of autoinhibitory interactions of multi-domain proteins. PMID:21532593

  2. Biodiversity of voltage sensor domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Yasushi

    2007-06-01

    The six-transmembrane type voltage-gated ion channels play an essential role in neuronal excitability, muscle contraction, and secretion. The voltage sensor domain (VSD) is the key element of voltage-gated ion channels for sensing transmembrane potential, and has been studied at the levels of both biophysics and protein structure. Two recently identified proteins containing VSD without a pore domain showed unexpected biological roles: regulation of phosphatase activity and proton permeation. These proteins not only provide novel platforms to understand mechanisms of voltage sensing and ion permeation but also highlight previously unappreciated roles of membrane potential in non-neuronal cells. PMID:17347852

  3. Functional innovation from changes in protein domains and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Sillitoe, Ian; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-06-01

    Domains are the functional building blocks of proteins. In this work we discuss how domains can contribute to the evolution of new functions. Domains themselves can evolve through various mechanisms, altering their intrinsic function. Domains can also facilitate functional innovations by combining with other domains to make novel proteins. We discuss the mechanisms by which domain and domain combinations support functional innovations. We highlight interesting examples where changes in domain combination promote changes at the domain level. PMID:27309309

  4. ECOD: An Evolutionary Classification of Protein Domains

    PubMed Central

    Kinch, Lisa N.; Pei, Jimin; Shi, Shuoyong; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Grishin, Nick V.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of a protein, including both close and distant relationships, often reveals insight into its structure and function. Fast and easy access to such up-to-date information facilitates research. We have developed a hierarchical evolutionary classification of all proteins with experimentally determined spatial structures, and presented it as an interactive and updatable online database. ECOD (Evolutionary Classification of protein Domains) is distinct from other structural classifications in that it groups domains primarily by evolutionary relationships (homology), rather than topology (or “fold”). This distinction highlights cases of homology between domains of differing topology to aid in understanding of protein structure evolution. ECOD uniquely emphasizes distantly related homologs that are difficult to detect, and thus catalogs the largest number of evolutionary links among structural domain classifications. Placing distant homologs together underscores the ancestral similarities of these proteins and draws attention to the most important regions of sequence and structure, as well as conserved functional sites. ECOD also recognizes closer sequence-based relationships between protein domains. Currently, approximately 100,000 protein structures are classified in ECOD into 9,000 sequence families clustered into close to 2,000 evolutionary groups. The classification is assisted by an automated pipeline that quickly and consistently classifies weekly releases of PDB structures and allows for continual updates. This synchronization with PDB uniquely distinguishes ECOD among all protein classifications. Finally, we present several case studies of homologous proteins not recorded in other classifications, illustrating the potential of how ECOD can be used to further biological and evolutionary studies. PMID:25474468

  5. Protein Domain Decomposition Using a Graph-Theoretic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Xu, D.; Gabow, H.N.

    2000-08-20

    This paper presents a new algorithm for the decomposition of a multi-domain protein into individual structural domains. The underlying principle used is that residue-residue contacts are denser within a domain than between domains.

  6. MBT domain proteins in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonasio, Roberto; Lecona, Emilio; Reinberg, Danny

    2013-01-01

    The Malignant Brain Tumor (MBT) domain is a “chromatin reader”, a protein module that binds to post-translational modifications on histone tails that are thought to affect a variety of chromatin processes, including transcription. More specifically, MBT domains recognize mono- and di-methylated lysines at a number of different positions on histone H3 and H4 tails. Three Drosophila proteins, SCM, L(3)MBT and SFMBT contain multiple adjacent MBT repeats and have critical roles in development, maintenance of cell identity, and tumor suppression. Although they function in different pathways, these proteins all localize to chromatin in vivo and repress transcription by a currently unknown molecular mechanism that requires the MBT domains. The human genome contains several homologues of these MBT proteins, some of which have been linked to important gene regulatory pathways, such as E2F/Rb- and Polycomb-mediated repression, and to the insurgence of certain neurological tumors. Here, we review the genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology of MBT proteins and their role in development and disease. PMID:19778625

  7. Protein function annotation using protein domain family resources.

    PubMed

    Das, Sayoni; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-01-15

    As a result of the genome sequencing and structural genomics initiatives, we have a wealth of protein sequence and structural data. However, only about 1% of these proteins have experimental functional annotations. As a result, computational approaches that can predict protein functions are essential in bridging this widening annotation gap. This article reviews the current approaches of protein function prediction using structure and sequence based classification of protein domain family resources with a special focus on functional families in the CATH-Gene3D resource. PMID:26434392

  8. EH domain proteins regulate cardiac membrane protein targeting

    PubMed Central

    Gudmundsson, Hjalti; Hund, Thomas J.; Wright, Patrick J.; Kline, Crystal F.; Snyder, Jedidiah S.; Qian, Lan; Koval, Olha M.; Cunha, Shane R.; George, Manju; Rainey, Mark A.; Kashef, Farshid E.; Dun, Wen; Boyden, Penelope A.; Anderson, Mark E.; Band, Hamid; Mohler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Cardiac membrane excitability is tightly regulated by an integrated network of membrane-associated ion channels, transporters, receptors, and signaling molecules. Membrane protein dynamics in health and disease are maintained by a complex ensemble of intracellular targeting, scaffolding, recycling, and degradation pathways. Surprisingly, despite decades of research linking dysfunction in membrane protein trafficking with human cardiovascular disease, essentially nothing is known regarding the molecular identity or function of these intracellular targeting pathways in excitable cardiomyocytes. Objective We sought to discover novel pathways for membrane protein targeting in primary cardiomyocytes. Methods and Results We report the initial characterization of a large family of membrane trafficking proteins in human heart. We employed a tissue-wide screen for novel ankyrin-associated trafficking proteins and identified four members of a unique Eps15 homology (EH) domain-containing protein family (EHD1, EHD2, EHD3, EHD4) that serve critical roles in endosome-based membrane protein targeting in other cell types. We show that EHD1-4 directly associate with ankyrin, provide the first information on the expression and localization of these molecules in primary cardiomyocytes, and demonstrate that EHD1-4 are co-expressed with ankyrin-B in the myocyte perinuclear region. Notably, the expression of multiple EHD proteins is increased in animal models lacking ankyrin-B, and EHD3-deficient cardiomyocytes display aberrant ankyrin-B localization and selective loss of Na/Ca exchanger expression and function. Finally, we report significant modulation of EHD expression following myocardial infarction, suggesting that these proteins may play a key role in regulating membrane excitability in normal and diseased heart. Conclusions Our findings identify and characterize a new class of cardiac trafficking proteins, define the first group of proteins associated with the ankyrin

  9. Tetramer formation in Arabidopsis MADS domain proteins: analysis of a protein-protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MADS domain proteins are transcription factors that coordinate several important developmental processes in plants. These proteins interact with other MADS domain proteins to form dimers, and it has been proposed that they are able to associate as tetrameric complexes that regulate transcription of target genes. Whether the formation of functional tetramers is a widespread property of plant MADS domain proteins, or it is specific to few of these transcriptional regulators remains unclear. Results We analyzed the structure of the network of physical interactions among MADS domain proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. We determined the abundance of subgraphs that represent the connection pattern expected for a MADS domain protein heterotetramer. These subgraphs were significantly more abundant in the MADS domain protein interaction network than in randomized analogous networks. Importantly, these subgraphs are not significantly frequent in a protein interaction network of TCP plant transcription factors, when compared to expectation by chance. In addition, we found that MADS domain proteins in tetramer-like subgraphs are more likely to be expressed jointly than proteins in other subgraphs. This effect is mainly due to proteins in the monophyletic MIKC clade, as there is no association between tetramer-like subgraphs and co-expression for proteins outside this clade. Conclusions Our results support that the tendency to form functional tetramers is widespread in the MADS domain protein-protein interaction network. Our observations also suggest that this trend is prevalent, or perhaps exclusive, for proteins in the MIKC clade. Because it is possible to retrodict several experimental results from our analyses, our work can be an important aid to make new predictions and facilitates experimental research on plant MADS domain proteins. PMID:24468197

  10. AIDA: ab initio domain assembly for automated multi-domain protein structure prediction and domain–domain interaction prediction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Li, Zhanwen; Godzik, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Most proteins consist of multiple domains, independent structural and evolutionary units that are often reshuffled in genomic rearrangements to form new protein architectures. Template-based modeling methods can often detect homologous templates for individual domains, but templates that could be used to model the entire query protein are often not available. Results: We have developed a fast docking algorithm ab initio domain assembly (AIDA) for assembling multi-domain protein structures, guided by the ab initio folding potential. This approach can be extended to discontinuous domains (i.e. domains with ‘inserted’ domains). When tested on experimentally solved structures of multi-domain proteins, the relative domain positions were accurately found among top 5000 models in 86% of cases. AIDA server can use domain assignments provided by the user or predict them from the provided sequence. The latter approach is particularly useful for automated protein structure prediction servers. The blind test consisting of 95 CASP10 targets shows that domain boundaries could be successfully determined for 97% of targets. Availability and implementation: The AIDA package as well as the benchmark sets used here are available for download at http://ffas.burnham.org/AIDA/. Contact: adam@sanfordburnham.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25701568

  11. WW domain-containing proteins: retrospectives and the future.

    PubMed

    Salah, Zaidoun; Alian, Akram; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2012-01-01

    WW domains are protein modules that mediate protein-protein interactions through recognition of proline-rich peptide motifs (PRM) and phosphorylated serine/threonine-proline sites. WW domains are found in many different structural and signaling proteins that are involved in a variety of cellular processes, including RNA transcription and processing, protein trafficking and stability, receptor signaling, and control of the cytoskeleton. WW domain-containing proteins and complexes have been implicated in major human diseases including cancer as well as in major signaling cascades such as the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, making them targets for new diagnostics and therapeutics. In this review, we discuss how WW domains provide versatile platforms that link individual proteins into physiologically important networks and the indispensible role of WW domain-containing proteins in biology and pathology, especially tumorogenesis. PMID:22201747

  12. Fold of the conserved DTC domain in deltex proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Obiero, Josiah; Walker, John R.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2012-04-30

    Human Deltex 3-like (DTX3L) is a member of the Deltex family of proteins. Initially identified as a B-lymphoma and BAL-associated protein, DTX3L is an E3 ligase that regulates subcellular localization of its partner protein, BAL, by a dynamic nucleocytoplasmic trafficking mechanism. Unlike other members of the Deltex family of proteins, DTX3L lacks the highly basic N-terminal motif and the central proline-rich motif present in other Deltex proteins, and instead contains other unique N-terminal domains. The C-terminal domains are, however, homologous with other members of the Deltex family of proteins; these include a RING domain and a previously unidentified C-terminal domain. In this study, we report the high-resolution crystal structure of this previously uncharacterized C-terminal domain of human DTX3L, which we term the Deltex C-terminal domain.

  13. Length constraints of multi­domain proteins in metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Sarah; Song, Timothy; Nayak, Sudhir

    2010-01-01

    The increasing number of annotated genome sequences in public databases has made it possible to study the length distributions and domain composition of proteins at unprecedented resolution. To identify factors that influence protein length in metazoans, we performed an analysis of all domain­annotated proteins from a total of 49 animal species from Ensembl (v.56) or EnsemblMetazoa (v.3). Our results indicate that protein length constraints are not fixed as a linear function of domain count and can vary based on domain content. The presence of repeating domains was associated with relaxation of the constraints that govern protein length. Conversely, for proteins with unique domains, length constraints were generally maintained with increased domain counts. It is clear that mean (and median) protein length and domain composition vary significantly between metazoans and other kingdoms; however, the connections between function, domain content, and length are unclear. We incorporated Gene Ontology (GO) annotation to identify biological processes, cellular components, or molecular functions that favor the incorporation of multi­domain proteins. Using this approach, we identified multiple GO terms that favor the incorporation of multi-domain proteins; interestingly, several of the GO terms with elevated domain counts were not restricted to a single gene family. The findings presented here represent an important step in resolving the complex relationship between protein length, function, and domain content. The comparison of the data presented in this work to data from other kingdoms is likely to reveal additional differences in the regulation of protein length. PMID:20975906

  14. A non-chromatographic protein purification strategy using Src 3 homology domains as generalized capture domains.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heejae; Chen, Wilfred

    2016-09-20

    Protein purification using inverse phase transition of elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) domains is a useful alternative to chromatography. Genetic fusions of ELP domains to various proteins have the ability to reversibly transition between soluble monomers and micron-sized aggregates and this has been used to selectively purify many ELP fusions. Affinity domains can enhance this technology by using specific protein binding domains to enable ELP mediated affinity capture (EMAC) of proteins of interest (POI) that have been fused to corresponding affinity ligands. In this paper, we highlight the use of Src homology 3 (SH3) domains and corresponding peptide ligands in EMAC that have differential binding affinities towards SH3 for efficient capture and elution of proteins. Furthermore, differences between capture and elution of a monomeric and a multimeric protein were also studied. PMID:27457699

  15. Comparative Analysis of SWIRM Domain-Containing Proteins in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Yang, Songguang; Yuan, Lianyu; Cui, Yuhai; Wu, Keqiang

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin-remodeling complexes affect gene expression by using the energy of ATP hydrolysis to locally disrupt or alter the association of histones with DNA. SWIRM (Swi3p, Rsc8p, and Moira) domain is an alpha-helical domain of about 85 residues in chromosomal proteins. SWIRM domain-containing proteins make up large multisubunit complexes by interacting with other chromatin modification factors and may have an important function in plants. However, little is known about SWIRM domain-containing proteins in plants. In this study, 67 SWIRM domain-containing proteins from 6 plant species were identified and analyzed. Plant SWIRM domain proteins can be divided into three distinct types: Swi-type, LSD1-type, and Ada2-type. Generally, the SWIRM domain forms a helix-turn-helix motif commonly found in DNA-binding proteins. The genes encoding SWIRM domain proteins in Oryza sativa are widely expressed, especially in pistils. In addition, OsCHB701 and OsHDMA701 were downregulated by cold stress, whereas OsHDMA701 and OsHDMA702 were significantly induced by heat stress. These observations indicate that SWIRM domain proteins may play an essential role in plant development and plant responses to environmental stress. PMID:22924025

  16. Modelling protein functional domains in signal transduction using Maude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriram, M. G.

    2003-01-01

    Modelling of protein-protein interactions in signal transduction is receiving increased attention in computational biology. This paper describes recent research in the application of Maude, a symbolic language founded on rewriting logic, to the modelling of functional domains within signalling proteins. Protein functional domains (PFDs) are a critical focus of modern signal transduction research. In general, Maude models can simulate biological signalling networks and produce specific testable hypotheses at various levels of abstraction. Developing symbolic models of signalling proteins containing functional domains is important because of the potential to generate analyses of complex signalling networks based on structure-function relationships.

  17. Emerging Roles of JmjC Domain-Containing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Accari, Sandra L; Fisher, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins are a diverse superfamily of proteins containing a characteristic, evolutionarily conserved β-barrel structure that normally contains binding sites for Fe(II) and α-ketoglutarate. In the best studied JmjC-domain proteins, the JmjC barrel has a histone demethylase catalytic activity. Histones are evolutionarily conserved proteins intimately involved in the packaging of DNA within the nucleus of eukaryotic organisms. The N-termini ("tails") of the histone proteins are subject to a diverse array of posttranslational modifications including methylation. Unlike many of the other histone modifications which are transient, methylation was thought to be permanent, until the relatively recent identification of the first demethylases. Jumonji C domain-containing proteins were first identified with a role in the modulation of histone methylation marks. This family of proteins is broken up into seven distinct subgroups based on domain architecture and their ability to antagonize specific histone methylation marks. Their biological functions derive from their ability to regulate gene expression and include roles in cell differentiation, growth, proliferation, and stress responses. However, one subgroup remains, the largest, in which the JmjC domain has no known biochemical function. These proteins belong to the JmjC-domain-only subgroup and as their name suggests, the only bioinformatically recognizable domain they contain is the highly conserved JmjC domain. PMID:26404469

  18. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  19. Computational Methods for Domain Partitioning of Protein Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veretnik, Stella; Shindyalov, Ilya

    Analysis of protein structures typically begins with decomposition of structure into more basic units, called "structural domains". The underlying goal is to reduce a complex protein structure to a set of simpler yet structurally meaningful units, each of which can be analyzed independently. Structural semi-independence of domains is their hallmark: domains often have compact structure and can fold or function independently. Domains can undergo so-called "domain shuffling"when they reappear in different combinations in different proteins thus implementing different biological functions (Doolittle, 1995). Proteins can then be conceived as being built of such basic blocks: some, especially small proteins, consist usually of just one domain, while other proteins possess a more complex architecture containing multiple domains. Therefore, the methods for partitioning a structure into domains are of critical importance: their outcome defines the set of basic units upon which structural classifications are built and evolutionary analysis is performed. This is especially true nowadays in the era of structural genomics. Today there are many methods that decompose the structure into domains: some of them are manual (i.e., based on human judgment), others are semiautomatic, and still others are completely automatic (based on algorithms implemented as software). Overall there is a high level of consistency and robustness in the process of partitioning a structure into domains (for ˜80% of proteins); at least for structures where domain location is obvious. The picture is less bright when we consider proteins with more complex architectures—neither human experts nor computational methods can reach consistent partitioning in many such cases. This is a rather accurate reflection of biological phenomena in general since domains are formed by different mechanisms, hence it is nearly impossible to come up with a set of well-defined rules that captures all of the observed cases.

  20. Continuous and discontinuous domains: an algorithm for the automatic generation of reliable protein domain definitions.

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, A. S.; Barton, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for the fast and accurate definition of protein structural domains from coordinate data without prior knowledge of the number or type of domains. The algorithm explicitly locates domains that comprise one or two continuous segments of protein chain. Domains that include more than two segments are also located. The algorithm was applied to a nonredundant database of 230 protein structures and the results compared to domain definitions obtained from the literature, or by inspection of the coordinates on molecular graphics. For 70% of the proteins, the derived domains agree with the reference definitions, 18% show minor differences and only 12% (28 proteins) show very different definitions. Three screens were applied to identify the derived domains least likely to agree with the subjective definition set. These screens revealed a set of 173 proteins, 97% of which agree well with the subjective definitions. The algorithm represents a practical domain identification tool that can be run routinely on the entire structural database. Adjustment of parameters also allows smaller compact units to be identified in proteins. PMID:7663343

  1. The history of the CATH structural classification of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Sillitoe, Ian; Dawson, Natalie; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a historical review of the protein structure classification database CATH. Together with the SCOP database, CATH remains comprehensive and reasonably up-to-date with the now more than 100,000 protein structures in the PDB. We review the expansion of the CATH and SCOP resources to capture predicted domain structures in the genome sequence data and to provide information on the likely functions of proteins mediated by their constituent domains. The establishment of comprehensive function annotation resources has also meant that domain families can be functionally annotated allowing insights into functional divergence and evolution within protein families. PMID:26253692

  2. The history of the CATH structural classification of protein domains

    PubMed Central

    Sillitoe, Ian; Dawson, Natalie; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a historical review of the protein structure classification database CATH. Together with the SCOP database, CATH remains comprehensive and reasonably up-to-date with the now more than 100,000 protein structures in the PDB. We review the expansion of the CATH and SCOP resources to capture predicted domain structures in the genome sequence data and to provide information on the likely functions of proteins mediated by their constituent domains. The establishment of comprehensive function annotation resources has also meant that domain families can be functionally annotated allowing insights into functional divergence and evolution within protein families. PMID:26253692

  3. Small protein domains fold inside the ribosome exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Marino, Jacopo; von Heijne, Gunnar; Beckmann, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Cotranslational folding of small protein domains within the ribosome exit tunnel may be an important cellular strategy to avoid protein misfolding. However, the pathway of cotranslational folding has so far been described only for a few proteins, and therefore, it is unclear whether folding in the ribosome exit tunnel is a common feature for small protein domains. Here, we have analyzed nine small protein domains and determined at which point during translation their folding generates sufficient force on the nascent chain to release translational arrest by the SecM arrest peptide, both in vitro and in live E. coli cells. We find that all nine protein domains initiate folding while still located well within the ribosome exit tunnel. PMID:26879042

  4. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein–protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes. PMID:25635869

  5. Interaction of ion channels and receptors with PDZ domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Kornau, H C; Seeburg, P H; Kennedy, M B

    1997-06-01

    The complex anatomy of neurons demands a high degree of functional organization. Therefore, membrane receptors and ion channels are often localized to selected subcellular sites and coupled to specific signal transduction machineries. PDZ domains have come into focus as protein interaction modules that mediate the binding of a class of submembraneous proteins to membrane receptors and ion channels and thus subserve these organizational aspects. The structures of two PDZ domains have been resolved, which has led to a structural understanding of the specificity of interactions of various PDZ domains with their respective partners. The functional implications of PDZ domain interactions are now being addressed in vitro and in vivo. PMID:9232802

  6. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  7. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  8. Proteasomes and protein conjugation across domains of life

    PubMed Central

    Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Like other energy-dependent proteases, proteasomes, which are found across the three domains of life, are self-compartmentalized and important in the early steps of proteolysis. Proteasomes degrade improperly synthesized, damaged or misfolded proteins and hydrolyse regulatory proteins that must be specifically removed or cleaved for cell signalling. In eukaryotes, proteins are typically targeted for proteasome-mediated destruction through polyubiquitylation, although ubiquitin-independent pathways also exist. Interestingly, actinobacteria and archaea also covalently attach small proteins (prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup) and small archaeal modifier proteins (Samps), respectively) to certain proteins, and this may serve to target the modified proteins for degradation by proteasomes. PMID:22183254

  9. Domain stealing by receptors in a protein transport complex.

    PubMed

    Hulett, Joanne M; Walsh, Peter; Lithgow, Trevor

    2007-09-01

    The mitochondrion is an essential cellular compartment in eukaryotes. The mitochondrial proteins Tom20 and Tom22 are receptors that ensure recognition and binding of proteins imported for mitochondrial biogenesis. Comparison of the sequence for the Tom20 and Tom22 subunits in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces castellii, show a rare case of domain stealing, where in Saccharomyces castellii Tom22 has lost an acidic domain, and Tom20 has gained one. This example of domain stealing is a snapshot of evolution in action and provides excellent evidence that Tom20 and Tom22 are subunits of a single, composite receptor that binds precursor proteins for import into mitochondria. PMID:17586602

  10. Identification of structural domains in proteins by a graph heuristic.

    PubMed

    Wernisch, L; Hunting, M; Wodak, S J

    1999-05-15

    A novel automatic procedure for identifying domains from protein atomic coordinates is presented. The procedure, termed STRUDL (STRUctural Domain Limits), does not take into account information on secondary structures and handles any number of domains made up of contiguous or non-contiguous chain segments. The core algorithm uses the Kernighan-Lin graph heuristic to partition the protein into residue sets which display minimum interactions between them. These interactions are deduced from the weighted Voronoi diagram. The generated partitions are accepted or rejected on the basis of optimized criteria, representing basic expected physical properties of structural domains. The graph heuristic approach is shown to be very effective, it approximates closely the exact solution provided by a branch and bound algorithm for a number of test proteins. In addition, the overall performance of STRUDL is assessed on a set of 787 representative proteins from the Protein Data Bank by comparison to domain definitions in the CATH protein classification. The domains assigned by STRUDL agree with the CATH assignments in at least 81% of the tested proteins. This result is comparable to that obtained previously using PUU (Holm and Sander, Proteins 1994;9:256-268), the only other available algorithm designed to identify domains with any number of non-contiguous chain segments. A detailed discussion of the structures for which our assignments differ from those in CATH brings to light some clear inconsistencies between the concept of structural domains based on minimizing inter-domain interactions and that of delimiting structural motifs that represent acceptable folding topologies or architectures. Considering both concepts as complementary and combining them in a layered approach might be the way forward. PMID:10328269

  11. Sequence and structural analysis of BTB domain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stogios, Peter J; Downs, Gregory S; Jauhal, Jimmy JS; Nandra, Sukhjeen K; Privé, Gilbert G

    2005-01-01

    Background The BTB domain (also known as the POZ domain) is a versatile protein-protein interaction motif that participates in a wide range of cellular functions, including transcriptional regulation, cytoskeleton dynamics, ion channel assembly and gating, and targeting proteins for ubiquitination. Several BTB domain structures have been experimentally determined, revealing a highly conserved core structure. Results We surveyed the protein architecture, genomic distribution and sequence conservation of BTB domain proteins in 17 fully sequenced eukaryotes. The BTB domain is typically found as a single copy in proteins that contain only one or two other types of domain, and this defines the BTB-zinc finger (BTB-ZF), BTB-BACK-kelch (BBK), voltage-gated potassium channel T1 (T1-Kv), MATH-BTB, BTB-NPH3 and BTB-BACK-PHR (BBP) families of proteins, among others. In contrast, the Skp1 and ElonginC proteins consist almost exclusively of the core BTB fold. There are numerous lineage-specific expansions of BTB proteins, as seen by the relatively large number of BTB-ZF and BBK proteins in vertebrates, MATH-BTB proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans, and BTB-NPH3 proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using the structural homology between Skp1 and the PLZF BTB homodimer, we present a model of a BTB-Cul3 SCF-like E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that shows that the BTB dimer or the T1 tetramer is compatible in this complex. Conclusion Despite widely divergent sequences, the BTB fold is structurally well conserved. The fold has adapted to several different modes of self-association and interactions with non-BTB proteins. PMID:16207353

  12. POU proteins bend DNA via the POU-specific domain.

    PubMed Central

    Verrijzer, C P; van Oosterhout, J A; van Weperen, W W; van der Vliet, P C

    1991-01-01

    POU proteins constitute a family of ubiquitous as well as cell type-specific transcription factors that share the conserved POU DNA binding domain. This domain consists of two distinct subdomains, a POU-specific domain and a POU homeodomain, that are both required for high affinity sequence-specific DNA binding. In a circular permutation assay, several POU proteins, including Oct-1, Oct-2A, Oct-6 and Pit-1, demonstrated a position dependent mobility of the protein-DNA complexes, suggesting induction of DNA bending. This was confirmed by detection of relative bend direction, using pre-bent DNA, and by enhanced ligase mediated cyclization. Bending was caused by interaction with the POU domain. By contrast, binding of the POU homeodomain did not distort the DNA structure, indicating that the POU-specific domain confers DNA bending. Images PMID:1915275

  13. CDD: a Conserved Domain Database for protein classification.

    PubMed

    Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Anderson, John B; Cherukuri, Praveen F; DeWeese-Scott, Carol; Geer, Lewis Y; Gwadz, Marc; He, Siqian; Hurwitz, David I; Jackson, John D; Ke, Zhaoxi; Lanczycki, Christopher J; Liebert, Cynthia A; Liu, Chunlei; Lu, Fu; Marchler, Gabriele H; Mullokandov, Mikhail; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Simonyan, Vahan; Song, James S; Thiessen, Paul A; Yamashita, Roxanne A; Yin, Jodie J; Zhang, Dachuan; Bryant, Stephen H

    2005-01-01

    The Conserved Domain Database (CDD) is the protein classification component of NCBI's Entrez query and retrieval system. CDD is linked to other Entrez databases such as Proteins, Taxonomy and PubMed, and can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=cdd. CD-Search, which is available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/wrpsb.cgi, is a fast, interactive tool to identify conserved domains in new protein sequences. CD-Search results for protein sequences in Entrez are pre-computed to provide links between proteins and domain models, and computational annotation visible upon request. Protein-protein queries submitted to NCBI's BLAST search service at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/BLAST are scanned for the presence of conserved domains by default. While CDD started out as essentially a mirror of publicly available domain alignment collections, such as SMART, Pfam and COG, we have continued an effort to update, and in some cases replace these models with domain hierarchies curated at the NCBI. Here, we report on the progress of the curation effort and associated improvements in the functionality of the CDD information retrieval system. PMID:15608175

  14. The acidic domains of the Toc159 chloroplast preprotein receptor family are intrinsically disordered protein domains

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Toc159 family of proteins serve as receptors for chloroplast-destined preproteins. They directly bind to transit peptides, and exhibit preprotein substrate selectivity conferred by an unknown mechanism. The Toc159 receptors each include three domains: C-terminal membrane, central GTPase, and N-terminal acidic (A-) domains. Although the function(s) of the A-domain remains largely unknown, the amino acid sequences are most variable within these domains, suggesting they may contribute to the functional specificity of the receptors. Results The physicochemical properties of the A-domains are characteristic of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Using CD spectroscopy we show that the A-domains of two Arabidopsis Toc159 family members (atToc132 and atToc159) are disordered at physiological pH and temperature and undergo conformational changes at temperature and pH extremes that are characteristic of IDPs. Conclusions Identification of the A-domains as IDPs will be important for determining their precise function(s), and suggests a role in protein-protein interactions, which may explain how these proteins serve as receptors for such a wide variety of preprotein substrates. PMID:20042108

  15. Predicting PDZ domain mediated protein interactions from structure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background PDZ domains are structural protein domains that recognize simple linear amino acid motifs, often at protein C-termini, and mediate protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in important biological processes, such as ion channel regulation, cell polarity and neural development. PDZ domain-peptide interaction predictors have been developed based on domain and peptide sequence information. Since domain structure is known to influence binding specificity, we hypothesized that structural information could be used to predict new interactions compared to sequence-based predictors. Results We developed a novel computational predictor of PDZ domain and C-terminal peptide interactions using a support vector machine trained with PDZ domain structure and peptide sequence information. Performance was estimated using extensive cross validation testing. We used the structure-based predictor to scan the human proteome for ligands of 218 PDZ domains and show that the predictions correspond to known PDZ domain-peptide interactions and PPIs in curated databases. The structure-based predictor is complementary to the sequence-based predictor, finding unique known and novel PPIs, and is less dependent on training–testing domain sequence similarity. We used a functional enrichment analysis of our hits to create a predicted map of PDZ domain biology. This map highlights PDZ domain involvement in diverse biological processes, some only found by the structure-based predictor. Based on this analysis, we predict novel PDZ domain involvement in xenobiotic metabolism and suggest new interactions for other processes including wound healing and Wnt signalling. Conclusions We built a structure-based predictor of PDZ domain-peptide interactions, which can be used to scan C-terminal proteomes for PDZ interactions. We also show that the structure-based predictor finds many known PDZ mediated PPIs in human that were not found by our previous sequence-based predictor and is less dependent on

  16. The ProDom database of protein domain families.

    PubMed Central

    Corpet, F; Gouzy, J; Kahn, D

    1998-01-01

    The ProDom database contains protein domain families generated from the SWISS-PROT database by automated sequence comparisons. It can be searched on the World Wide Web (http://protein.toulouse.inra. fr/prodom.html ) or by E-mail (prodom@toulouse.inra.fr) to study domain arrangements within known families or new proteins. Strong emphasis has been put on the graphical user interface which allows for interactive analysis of protein homology relationships. Recent improvements to the server include: ProDom search by keyword; links to PROSITE and PDB entries; more sensitive ProDom similarity search with BLAST or WU-BLAST; alignments of query sequences with homologous ProDom domain families; and links to the SWISS-MODEL server (http: //www.expasy.ch/swissmod/SWISS-MODEL.html ) for homology based 3-D domain modelling where possible. PMID:9399865

  17. Molekulare Methoden zum Nachweis, zur Quantifizierung und zum Monitoring der Mykotoxinbildung lebensmittelrelevanter Pilze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisen, Rolf

    Schimmelpilze kommen ubiquitär vor und spielen besonders bei pflanzlichen Lebensmitteln und Rohprodukten eine besondere Rolle als Verderbsorganismen. Es wird geschätzt, dass 20-25 % der jährlichen Produktion an pflanzlichen Produkten durch Schimmelpilze verdorben werden (Smith et al., 1994). Viele der lebensmittelrelevanten Schimmelpilze sind zudem in der Lage, Mykotoxine, toxische Sekundärmetabolite, zu bilden, was das Ausmaß des Problems deutlich macht. Die wichtigsten mykotoxinbildenden Spezies gehören zu den Fusarien (Trichothecene, Fumonisine, Zearalenon), Aspergillen (Aflatoxin, Ochratoxin, Cyclopiazonsäure) und Penicillien (Patulin, Ochratoxin). Für viele Mykotoxine, wie die Aflatoxine, Ochratoxin, Fumonisine und Trichothecene sind Grenzwerte erlassen worden, die die Verkehrsfähigkeit betroffener Produkte regeln. Die Einhaltung der Grenzwerte kann sehr genau durch offizielle chemisch-analytische Methoden, wie HPLC, GC-MS etc. kontrolliert werden. Diese analytischen Methoden sind aber für die Anwendung eines HACCP-Ansatzes zur Kontrolle der Mykotoxinbildung nur bedingt geeignet, da sie Endpunktkontrollen darstellen und nur das über eine längere Zeit gebildete Mykotoxin bestimmen. Sie sagen daher nichts über die biologischen Bedingungen zur Zeit der Bildung durch den Pilz aus.

  18. Tandem-repeat protein domains across the tree of life

    PubMed Central

    Jernigan, Kristin K.

    2015-01-01

    Tandem-repeat protein domains, composed of repeated units of conserved stretches of 20–40 amino acids, are required for a wide array of biological functions. Despite their diverse and fundamental functions, there has been no comprehensive assessment of their taxonomic distribution, incidence, and associations with organismal lifestyle and phylogeny. In this study, we assess for the first time the abundance of armadillo (ARM) and tetratricopeptide (TPR) repeat domains across all three domains in the tree of life and compare the results to our previous analysis on ankyrin (ANK) repeat domains in this journal. All eukaryotes and a majority of the bacterial and archaeal genomes analyzed have a minimum of one TPR and ARM repeat. In eukaryotes, the fraction of ARM-containing proteins is approximately double that of TPR and ANK-containing proteins, whereas bacteria and archaea are enriched in TPR-containing proteins relative to ARM- and ANK-containing proteins. We show in bacteria that phylogenetic history, rather than lifestyle or pathogenicity, is a predictor of TPR repeat domain abundance, while neither phylogenetic history nor lifestyle predicts ARM repeat domain abundance. Surprisingly, pathogenic bacteria were not enriched in TPR-containing proteins, which have been associated within virulence factors in certain species. Taken together, this comparative analysis provides a newly appreciated view of the prevalence and diversity of multiple types of tandem-repeat protein domains across the tree of life. A central finding of this analysis is that tandem repeat domain-containing proteins are prevalent not just in eukaryotes, but also in bacterial and archaeal species. PMID:25653910

  19. Insights into Hox Protein Function from a Large Scale Combinatorial Analysis of Protein Domains

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Daniel; Dixit, Richa; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Monier, Bruno; Brun, Christine; Thor, Stefan; Vijayraghavan, K.; Perrin, Laurent; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-01-01

    Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA), we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences. PMID:22046139

  20. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Merabet, Samir; Litim-Mecheri, Isma; Karlsson, Daniel; Dixit, Richa; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Monier, Bruno; Brun, Christine; Thor, Stefan; Vijayraghavan, K; Perrin, Laurent; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-10-01

    Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA), we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences. PMID:22046139

  1. Modeling the Evolution of Protein Domain Architectures Using Maximum Parsimony

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jessica H.; Geer, Lewis Y.; Panchenko, Anna R.; Bryant, Stephen H.

    2007-01-01

    Domains are basic evolutionary units of proteins and most proteins have more than one domain. Advances in domain modeling and collection are making it possible to annotate a large fraction of known protein sequences by a linear ordering of their domains, yielding their architecture. Protein domain architectures link evolutionarily related proteins and underscore their shared functions. Here, we attempt to better understand this association by identifying the evolutionary pathways by which extant architectures may have evolved. We propose a model of evolution in which architectures arise through rearrangements of inferred precursor architectures and acquisition of new domains. These pathways are ranked using a parsimony principle, whereby scenarios requiring the fewest number of independent recombination events, namely fission and fusion operations, are assumed to be more likely. Using a data set of domain architectures present in 159 proteomes that represent all three major branches of the tree of life allows us to estimate the history of over 85% of all architectures in the sequence database. We find that the distribution of rearrangement classes is robust with respect to alternative parsimony rules for inferring the presence of precursor architectures in ancestral species. Analyzing the most parsimonious pathways, we find 87% of architectures to gain complexity over time through simple changes, among which fusion events account for 5.6 times as many architectures as fission. Our results may be used to compute domain architecture similarities, for example, based on the number of historical recombination events separating them. Domain architecture “neighbors” identified in this way may lead to new insights about the evolution of protein function. PMID:17166515

  2. Crystallographic studies on protein misfolding: Domain swapping and amyloid formation in the SH3 domain.

    PubMed

    Cámara-Artigas, Ana

    2016-07-15

    Oligomerization by 3D domain swapping is found in a variety of proteins of diverse size, fold and function. In the early 1960s this phenomenon was postulated for the oligomers of ribonuclease A, but it was not until the 1990s that X-ray diffraction provided the first experimental evidence of this special manner of oligomerization. Nowadays, structural information has allowed the identification of these swapped oligomers in over one hundred proteins. Although the functional relevance of this phenomenon is not clear, this alternative folding of protomers into intertwined oligomers has been related to amyloid formation. Studies on proteins that develop 3D domain swapping might provide some clues on the early stages of amyloid formation. The SH3 domain is a small modular domain that has been used as a model to study the basis of protein folding. Among SH3 domains, the c-Src-SH3 domain emerges as a helpful model to study 3D domain swapping and amyloid formation. PMID:26924596

  3. WAP domain proteins as modulators of mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Thomas S; Roghanian, Ali; Simpson, Alexander John; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2011-10-01

    WAP (whey acidic protein) is an important whey protein present in milk of mammals. This protein has characteristic domains, rich in cysteine residues, called 4-DSC (four-disulfide core domain). Other proteins, mainly present at mucosal surfaces, have been shown to also possess these characteristic WAP-4-DSC domains. The present review will focus on two WAP-4-DSC containing proteins, namely SLPI (secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor) and trappin-2/elafin. Although first described as antiproteases able to inhibit in particular host neutrophil proteases [NE (neutrophil elastase), cathepsin-G and proteinase-3] and as such, able to limit maladaptive tissue damage during inflammation, it has become apparent that these molecules have a variety of other functions (direct antimicrobial activity, bacterial opsonization, induction of adaptive immune responses, promotion of tissue repair, etc.). After providing information about the 'classical' antiproteasic role of these molecules, we will discuss the evidence pertaining to their pleiotropic functions in inflammation and immunity. PMID:21936824

  4. Cellular functions of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate and FYVE domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gillooly, D J; Simonsen, A; Stenmark, H

    2001-01-01

    PtdIns3P is a phosphoinositide 3-kinase product that has been strongly implicated in regulating membrane trafficking in both mammalian and yeast cells. PtdIns3P has been shown to be specifically located on membranes associated with the endocytic pathway. Proteins that contain FYVE zinc-finger domains are recruited to PtdIns3P-containing membranes. Structural information is now available concerning the interaction between FYVE domains and PtdIns3P. A number of proteins have been identified which contain a FYVE domain, and in this review we discuss the functions of PtdIns3P and its FYVE-domain-containing effector proteins in membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal regulation and receptor signalling. PMID:11284710

  5. Giant protein kinases: domain interactions and structural basis of autoregulation.

    PubMed Central

    Kobe, B; Heierhorst, J; Feil, S C; Parker, M W; Benian, G M; Weiss, K R; Kemp, B E

    1996-01-01

    The myosin-associated giant protein kinases twitchin and titin are composed predominantly of fibronectin- and immunoglobulin-like modules. We report the crystal structures of two autoinhibited twitchin kinase fragments, one from Aplysia and a larger fragment from Caenorhabditis elegans containing an additional C-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain. The structure of the longer fragment shows that the immunoglobulin domain contacts the protein kinase domain on the opposite side from the catalytic cleft, laterally exposing potential myosin binding residues. Together, the structures reveal the cooperative interactions between the autoregulatory region and the residues from the catalytic domain involved in protein substrate binding, ATP binding, catalysis and the activation loop, and explain the differences between the observed autoinhibitory mechanism and the one found in the structure of calmodulin-dependent kinase I. Images PMID:9003756

  6. LUD, a new protein domain associated with lactate utilization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A novel highly conserved protein domain, DUF162 [Pfam: PF02589], can be mapped to two proteins: LutB and LutC. Both proteins are encoded by a highly conserved LutABC operon, which has been implicated in lactate utilization in bacteria. Based on our analysis of its sequence, structure, and recent experimental evidence reported by other groups, we hereby redefine DUF162 as the LUD domain family. Results JCSG solved the first crystal structure [PDB:2G40] from the LUD domain family: LutC protein, encoded by ORF DR_1909, of Deinococcus radiodurans. LutC shares features with domains in the functionally diverse ISOCOT superfamily. We have observed that the LUD domain has an increased abundance in the human gut microbiome. Conclusions We propose a model for the substrate and cofactor binding and regulation in LUD domain. The significance of LUD-containing proteins in the human gut microbiome, and the implication of lactate metabolism in the radiation-resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans are discussed. PMID:24274019

  7. Quantifying protein–protein interactions in high throughput using protein domain microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, Alexis; Allen, John E; Gordus, Andrew; Stiffler, Michael A; Karp, Ethan S; Chang, Bryan H; MacBeath, Gavin

    2011-01-01

    Protein microarrays provide an efficient way to identify and quantify protein–protein interactions in high throughput. One drawback of this technique is that proteins show a broad range of physicochemical properties and are often difficult to produce recombinantly. To circumvent these problems, we have focused on families of protein interaction domains. Here we provide protocols for constructing microarrays of protein interaction domains in individual wells of 96-well microtiter plates, and for quantifying domain–peptide interactions in high throughput using fluorescently labeled synthetic peptides. As specific examples, we will describe the construction of microarrays of virtually every human Src homology 2 (SH2) and phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain, as well as microarrays of mouse PDZ domains, all produced recombinantly in Escherichia coli. For domains that mediate high-affinity interactions, such as SH2 and PTB domains, equilibrium dissociation constants (KDs) for their peptide ligands can be measured directly on arrays by obtaining saturation binding curves. For weaker binding domains, such as PDZ domains, arrays are best used to identify candidate interactions, which are then retested and quantified by fluorescence polarization. Overall, protein domain microarrays provide the ability to rapidly identify and quantify protein–ligand interactions with minimal sample consumption. Because entire domain families can be interrogated simultaneously, they provide a powerful way to assess binding selectivity on a proteome-wide scale and provide an unbiased perspective on the connectivity of protein–protein interaction networks. PMID:20360771

  8. The BTB domains of the potassium channel tetramerization domain proteins prevalently assume pentameric states.

    PubMed

    Smaldone, Giovanni; Pirone, Luciano; Pedone, Emilia; Marlovits, Thomas; Vitagliano, Luigi; Ciccarelli, Luciano

    2016-06-01

    Potassium channel tetramerization domain-containing (KCTD) proteins are involved in fundamental physio-pathological processes. Here, we report an analysis of the oligomeric state of the Bric-à-brack, Tram-track, Broad complex (BTB) domains of seven distinct KCTDs belonging to five major clades of the family evolution tree. Despite their functional and sequence variability, present electron microscopy data highlight the occurrence of well-defined pentameric states for all domains. Our data also show that these states coexist with alternative forms which include open pentamers. Thermal denaturation analyses conducted using KCTD1 as a model suggest that, in these proteins, different domains cooperate to their overall stability. Finally, negative-stain electron micrographs of KCTD6(BTB) in complex with Cullin3 show the presence of assemblies with a five-pointed pinwheel shape. PMID:27152988

  9. A duplicated motif controls assembly of zona pellucida domain proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovine, Luca; Qi, Huayu; Williams, Zev; Litscher, Eveline S.; Wassarman, Paul M.

    2004-04-01

    Many secreted eukaryotic glycoproteins that play fundamental roles in development, hearing, immunity, and cancer polymerize into filaments and extracellular matrices through zona pellucida (ZP) domains. ZP domain proteins are synthesized as precursors containing C-terminal propeptides that are cleaved at conserved sites. However, the consequences of this processing and the mechanism by which nascent proteins assemble are unclear. By microinjection of mutated DNA constructs into growing oocytes and mammalian cell transfection, we have identified a conserved duplicated motif [EHP (external hydrophobic patch)/IHP (internal hydrophobic patch)] regulating the assembly of mouse ZP proteins. Whereas the transmembrane domain (TMD) of ZP3 can be functionally replaced by an unrelated TMD, mutations in either EHP or IHP do not hinder secretion of full-length ZP3 but completely abolish its assembly. Because mutants truncated before the TMD are not processed, we conclude that the conserved TMD of mammalian ZP proteins does not engage them in specific interactions but is essential for C-terminal processing. Cleavage of ZP precursors results in loss of the EHP, thereby activating secreted polypeptides to assemble by using the IHP within the ZP domain. Taken together, these findings suggest a general mechanism for assembly of ZP domain proteins.

  10. A new and unexpected domain-domain interaction in the AraC protein.

    PubMed

    Cole, Stephanie Dirla; Schleif, Robert

    2012-05-01

    An interaction between the dimerization domains and DNA binding domains of the dimeric AraC protein has previously been shown to facilitate repression of the Escherichia coli araBAD operon by AraC in the absence of arabinose. A new interaction between the domains of AraC in the presence of arabinose is reported here, the regulatory consequences of which are unknown. Evidence for the interaction is the following: the dissociation rate of arabinose-bound AraC from half-site DNA is considerably faster than that of free DNA binding domain, and the affinity of the dimerization domains for arabinose is increased when half-site DNA is bound. In addition, an increase in the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan residues located in the arabinose-bound dimerization domain is observed upon binding of half-site DNA to the DNA binding domains. Direct physical evidence of the new domain-domain interaction is demonstrated by chemical crosslinking and NMR experiments. PMID:22383259

  11. Characterization of Two Dinoflagellate Cold Shock Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Beauchemin, Mathieu; Roy, Sougata; Pelletier, Sarah; Averback, Alexandra; Lanthier, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Roughly two-thirds of the proteins annotated as transcription factors in dinoflagellate transcriptomes are cold shock domain-containing proteins (CSPs), an uncommon condition in eukaryotic organisms. However, no functional analysis has ever been reported for a dinoflagellate CSP, and so it is not known if they do in fact act as transcription factors. We describe here some of the properties of two CSPs from the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum, LpCSP1 and LpCSP2, which contain a glycine-rich C-terminal domain and an N-terminal cold shock domain phylogenetically related to those in bacteria. However, neither of the two LpCSPs act like the bacterial CSP, since they do not functionally complement the Escherichia coli quadruple cold shock domain protein mutant BX04, and cold shock does not induce LpCSP1 and LpCSP2 to detectable levels, based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Both CSPs bind to RNA and single-stranded DNA in a nonspecific manner in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and both proteins also bind double-stranded DNA nonspecifically, albeit more weakly. These CSPs are thus unlikely to act alone as sequence-specific transcription factors. IMPORTANCE Dinoflagellate transcriptomes contain cold shock domain proteins as the major component of the proteins annotated as transcription factors. We show here that the major family of cold shock domain proteins in the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium do not bind specific sequences, suggesting that transcriptional control is not a predominant mechanism for regulating gene expression in this group of protists. PMID:27303711

  12. Thioaptamers Targeting Dengue Virus Type-2 Envelope Protein Domain III

    PubMed Central

    Gandham, Sai Hari A.; Volk, David E.; Rao, Lokesh G. L.; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Gorenstein, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Thioaptamers targeting the dengue-2 virus (DENV-2) envelope protein domain III (EDIII) were developed. EDIII, which contains epitopes for binding neutralizing antibodies, is the putative host-receptor binding domain and is thus an attractive target for development of vaccines, anti-viral therapeutic and diagnostic agents. Thioaptamer DENTA-1 bound to DENV-2 EDIII adjacent to a known neutralizing antibody binding site with a dissociation constant of 154 nM. PMID:25261724

  13. Formation and organization of protein domains in the immunological synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-11-01

    The cellular basis for the adaptive immune response during antigen recognition relies on a specialized protein interface known as the immunological synapse. Here, we propose a minimal mathematical model for the dynamics of the IS that encompass membrane mechanics, hydrodynamics and protein kinetics. Simple scaling laws describe the dynamics of protein clusters as a function of membrane stiffness, rigidity of the adhesive proteins, and fluid flow in the synaptic cleft. Numerical simulations complement the scaling laws by quantifying the nucleation, growth and stabilization of proteins domains on the size of the cell. Direct comparison with experiment suggests that passive dynamics suffices to describe the short-time formation and organization of protein clusters, while the stabilization and long time dynamics of the synapse is likely determined by active cytoskeleton processes triggered by receptor binding. Our study reveals that the fluid flow generated by the interplay between membrane deformation and protein binding kinetics can assist immune cells in regulating protein sorting.

  14. Pan-Cancer Analysis of Mutation Hotspots in Protein Domains.

    PubMed

    Miller, Martin L; Reznik, Ed; Gauthier, Nicholas P; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Korkut, Anil; Gao, Jianjiong; Ciriello, Giovanni; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris

    2015-09-23

    In cancer genomics, recurrence of mutations in independent tumor samples is a strong indicator of functional impact. However, rare functional mutations can escape detection by recurrence analysis owing to lack of statistical power. We enhance statistical power by extending the notion of recurrence of mutations from single genes to gene families that share homologous protein domains. Domain mutation analysis also sharpens the functional interpretation of the impact of mutations, as domains more succinctly embody function than entire genes. By mapping mutations in 22 different tumor types to equivalent positions in multiple sequence alignments of domains, we confirm well-known functional mutation hotspots, identify uncharacterized rare variants in one gene that are equivalent to well-characterized mutations in another gene, detect previously unknown mutation hotspots, and provide hypotheses about molecular mechanisms and downstream effects of domain mutations. With the rapid expansion of cancer genomics projects, protein domain hotspot analysis will likely provide many more leads linking mutations in proteins to the cancer phenotype. PMID:27135912

  15. An Algebro-Topological Description of Protein Domain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Penner, Robert Clark; Knudsen, Michael; Wiuf, Carsten; Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard

    2011-01-01

    The space of possible protein structures appears vast and continuous, and the relationship between primary, secondary and tertiary structure levels is complex. Protein structure comparison and classification is therefore a difficult but important task since structure is a determinant for molecular interaction and function. We introduce a novel mathematical abstraction based on geometric topology to describe protein domain structure. Using the locations of the backbone atoms and the hydrogen bonds, we build a combinatorial object – a so-called fatgraph. The description is discrete yet gives rise to a 2-dimensional mathematical surface. Thus, each protein domain corresponds to a particular mathematical surface with characteristic topological invariants, such as the genus (number of holes) and the number of boundary components. Both invariants are global fatgraph features reflecting the interconnectivity of the domain by hydrogen bonds. We introduce the notion of robust variables, that is variables that are robust towards minor changes in the structure/fatgraph, and show that the genus and the number of boundary components are robust. Further, we invesigate the distribution of different fatgraph variables and show how only four variables are capable of distinguishing different folds. We use local (secondary) and global (tertiary) fatgraph features to describe domain structures and illustrate that they are useful for classification of domains in CATH. In addition, we combine our method with two other methods thereby using primary, secondary, and tertiary structure information, and show that we can identify a large percentage of new and unclassified structures in CATH. PMID:21629687

  16. The mammalian autophagy initiator complex contains 2 HORMA domain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Max; Schwarten, Melanie; Decker, Christina; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard; Willbold, Dieter; Weiergräber, Oliver H

    2015-01-01

    ATG101 is an essential component of the ULK complex responsible for initiating cellular autophagy in mammalian cells; its 3-dimensional structure and molecular function, however, are currently unclear. Here we present the X-ray structure of human ATG101. The protein displays an open HORMA domain fold. Both structural properties and biophysical evidence indicate that ATG101 is locked in this conformation, in contrast to the prototypical HORMA domain protein MAD2. Moreover, we discuss a potential mode of dimerization with ATG13 as a fundamental aspect of ATG101 function. PMID:26236954

  17. ELMO Domains, Evolutionary and Functional Characterization of a Novel GTPase-activating Protein (GAP) Domain for Arf Protein Family GTPases*

    PubMed Central

    East, Michael P.; Bowzard, J. Bradford; Dacks, Joel B.; Kahn, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    The human family of ELMO domain-containing proteins (ELMODs) consists of six members and is defined by the presence of the ELMO domain. Within this family are two subclassifications of proteins, based on primary sequence conservation, protein size, and domain architecture, deemed ELMOD and ELMO. In this study, we used homology searching and phylogenetics to identify ELMOD family homologs in genomes from across eukaryotic diversity. This demonstrated not only that the protein family is ancient but also that ELMOs are potentially restricted to the supergroup Opisthokonta (Metazoa and Fungi), whereas proteins with the ELMOD organization are found in diverse eukaryotes and thus were likely the form present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor. The segregation of the ELMO clade from the larger ELMOD group is consistent with their contrasting functions as unconventional Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factors and the Arf family GTPase-activating proteins, respectively. We used unbiased, phylogenetic sorting and sequence alignments to identify the most highly conserved residues within the ELMO domain to identify a putative GAP domain within the ELMODs. Three independent but complementary assays were used to provide an initial characterization of this domain. We identified a highly conserved arginine residue critical for both the biochemical and cellular GAP activity of ELMODs. We also provide initial evidence of the function of human ELMOD1 as an Arf family GAP at the Golgi. These findings provide the basis for the future study of the ELMOD family of proteins and a new avenue for the study of Arf family GTPases. PMID:23014990

  18. TFPI cofactor function of protein S: essential role of the protein S SHBG-like domain

    PubMed Central

    Reglińska-Matveyev, Natalia; Andersson, Helena M.; Rezende, Suely M.; Dahlbäck, Björn; Crawley, James T. B.; Lane, David A.; Ahnström, Josefin

    2014-01-01

    Protein S is a cofactor for tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), accelerating the inhibition of activated factor X (FXa). TFPI Kunitz domain 3 residue Glu226 is essential for enhancement of TFPI by protein S. To investigate the complementary functional interaction site on protein S, we screened 44 protein S point, composite or domain swap variants spanning the whole protein S molecule for their TFPI cofactor function using a thrombin generation assay. Of these variants, two protein S/growth arrest–specific 6 chimeras, with either the whole sex hormone–binding globulin (SHBG)-like domain (Val243-Ser635; chimera III) or the SHBG laminin G-type 1 subunit (Ser283-Val459; chimera I), respectively, substituted by the corresponding domain in growth arrest–specific 6, were unable to enhance TFPI. The importance of the protein S SHBG-like domain (and its laminin G-type 1 subunit) for binding and enhancement of TFPI was confirmed in FXa inhibition assays and using surface plasmon resonance. In addition, protein S bound to C4b binding protein showed greatly reduced enhancement of TFPI-mediated inhibition of FXa compared with free protein S. We show that binding of TFPI to the protein S SHBG-like domain enables TFPI to interact optimally with FXa on a phospholipid membrane. PMID:24740810

  19. Fused protein domains inhibit DNA binding by LexA.

    PubMed Central

    Golemis, E A; Brent, R

    1992-01-01

    Many studies of transcription activation employ fusions of activation domains to DNA binding domains derived from the bacterial repressor LexA and the yeast activator GAL4. Such studies often implicitly assume that DNA binding by the chimeric proteins is equivalent to that of the protein donating the DNA binding moiety. To directly investigate this issue, we compared operator binding by a series of LexA-derivative proteins to operator binding by native LexA, by using both in vivo and in vitro assays. We show that operator binding by many proteins such as LexA-Myc, LexA-Fos, and LexA-Bicoid is severely impaired, while binding of other LexA-derivative proteins, such as those that carry bacterially encoded acidic sequences ("acid blobs"), is not. Our results also show that DNA binding by LexA derivatives that contain the LexA carboxy-terminal dimerization domain (amino acids 88 to 202) is considerably stronger than binding by fusions that lack it and that heterologous dimerization motifs cannot substitute for the LexA88-202 function. These results suggest the need to reevaluate some previous studies of activation that employed LexA derivatives and modifications to recent experimental approaches that use LexA and GAL4 derivatives to detect and study protein-protein interactions. Images PMID:1620111

  20. Effective Moment Feature Vectors for Protein Domain Structures

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jian-Yu; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Zhang, Yan-Ning; Chin, Francis Yuk-Lun

    2013-01-01

    Imaging processing techniques have been shown to be useful in studying protein domain structures. The idea is to represent the pairwise distances of any two residues of the structure in a 2D distance matrix (DM). Features and/or submatrices are extracted from this DM to represent a domain. Existing approaches, however, may involve a large number of features (100–400) or complicated mathematical operations. Finding fewer but more effective features is always desirable. In this paper, based on some key observations on DMs, we are able to decompose a DM image into four basic binary images, each representing the structural characteristics of a fundamental secondary structure element (SSE) or a motif in the domain. Using the concept of moments in image processing, we further derive 45 structural features based on the four binary images. Together with 4 features extracted from the basic images, we represent the structure of a domain using 49 features. We show that our feature vectors can represent domain structures effectively in terms of the following. (1) We show a higher accuracy for domain classification. (2) We show a clear and consistent distribution of domains using our proposed structural vector space. (3) We are able to cluster the domains according to our moment features and demonstrate a relationship between structural variation and functional diversity. PMID:24391828

  1. BAG4/SODD Protein Contains a Short BAG Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Briknarova, Klara; Takayama, Shinichi; Homma, Sachiko; Baker, Kelly; Cabezas, Edelmira; Hoyt, David W.; Li, Zhen; Satterthwait, Arnold C.; Ely, Kathryn R.

    2002-08-23

    BAG proteins are molecular chaperone regulators that affect diverse cellular pathways. All members share a conserved motif, called the ''BAG domain'' (BD), which binds to Hsp70/Hsc70 family proteins and modulates their activity. We have determined the solution structure of BD from BAG4/SODD (Bcl-2 ? Associated Athanogene / Silencer of Death Domains) by multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance methods and compared it to the corresponding domain in BAG1 (Briknarova et al., Nature Struct. Biol. 8:349-352). The difference between BDs from these two BAG proteins is striking and the structural comparison defines two subfamilies of mammalian BD-containing proteins. One subfamily includes the closely related BAG3, BAG4 and BAG5 proteins, and the other is represented by BAG1 which contains a structurally and evolutionarily distinct BD. BDs from both BAG1 and BAG4 are three-helix bundles; however, in BAG4, each helix in this bundle is three to four turns shorter than its counterpart in BAG1, which reduces the length of the domain by one-third. BAG4 BD thus represents a prototype of the minimal functional fragment that is capable of binding to Hsc70 and modulating its chaperone activity.

  2. Allosteric switching by mutually exclusive folding of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Radley, Tracy L; Markowska, Anna I; Bettinger, Blaine T; Ha, Jeung-Hoi; Loh, Stewart N

    2003-09-19

    Many proteins are built from structurally and functionally distinct domains. A major goal is to understand how conformational change transmits information between domains in order to achieve biological activity. A two-domain, bi-functional fusion protein has been designed so that the mechanical stress imposed by the folded structure of one subunit causes the other subunit to unfold, and vice versa. The construct consists of ubiquitin inserted into a surface loop of barnase. The distance between the amino and carboxyl ends of ubiquitin is much greater than the distance between the termini of the barnase loop. This topological constraint causes the two domains to engage in a thermodynamic tug-of-war in which only one can exist in its folded state at any given time. This conformational equilibrium, which is cooperative, reversible, and controllable by ligand binding, serves as a model for the coupled binding and folding mechanism widely used to mediate protein-protein interactions and cellular signaling processes. The position of the equilibrium can be adjusted by temperature or ligand binding and is monitored in vivo by cell death. This design forms the basis for a new class of cytotoxic proteins that can be activated by cell-specific effector molecules, and can thus target particular cell types for destruction. PMID:12963365

  3. Structural domains and main-chain flexibility in prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Blinov, N; Berjanskii, M; Wishart, D S; Stepanova, M

    2009-02-24

    In this study we describe a novel approach to define structural domains and to characterize the local flexibility in both human and chicken prion proteins. The approach we use is based on a comprehensive theory of collective dynamics in proteins that was recently developed. This method determines the essential collective coordinates, which can be found from molecular dynamics trajectories via principal component analysis. Under this particular framework, we are able to identify the domains where atoms move coherently while at the same time to determine the local main-chain flexibility for each residue. We have verified this approach by comparing our results for the predicted dynamic domain systems with the computed main-chain flexibility profiles and the NMR-derived random coil indexes for human and chicken prion proteins. The three sets of data show excellent agreement. Additionally, we demonstrate that the dynamic domains calculated in this fashion provide a highly sensitive measure of protein collective structure and dynamics. Furthermore, such an analysis is capable of revealing structural and dynamic properties of proteins that are inaccessible to the conventional assessment of secondary structure. Using the collective dynamic simulation approach described here along with a high-temperature simulations of unfolding of human prion protein, we have explored whether locations of relatively low stability could be identified where the unfolding process could potentially be facilitated. According to our analysis, the locations of relatively low stability may be associated with the beta-sheet formed by strands S1 and S2 and the adjacent loops, whereas helix HC appears to be a relatively stable part of the protein. We suggest that this kind of structural analysis may provide a useful background for a more quantitative assessment of potential routes of spontaneous misfolding in prion proteins. PMID:19178154

  4. Morbillivirus and henipavirus attachment protein cytoplasmic domains differently affect protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Bente, Dennis A; Czub, Markus; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-05-01

    The amino-terminal cytoplasmic domains of paramyxovirus attachment glycoproteins include trafficking signals that influence protein processing and cell surface expression. To characterize the role of the cytoplasmic domain in protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly in more detail, we constructed chimeric Nipah virus (NiV) glycoprotein (G) and canine distemper virus (CDV) haemagglutinin (H) proteins carrying the respective heterologous cytoplasmic domain, as well as a series of mutants with progressive deletions in this domain. CDV H retained fusion function and was normally expressed on the cell surface with a heterologous cytoplasmic domain, while the expression and fusion support of NiV G was dramatically decreased when its cytoplasmic domain was replaced with that of CDV H. The cell surface expression and fusion support functions of CDV H were relatively insensitive to cytoplasmic domain deletions, while short deletions in the corresponding region of NiV G dramatically decreased both. In addition, the first 10 residues of the CDV H cytoplasmic domain strongly influence its incorporation into virus-like particles formed by the CDV matrix (M) protein, while the co-expression of NiV M with NiV G had no significant effect on incorporation of G into particles. The cytoplasmic domains of both the CDV H and NiV G proteins thus contribute differently to the virus life cycle. PMID:26813519

  5. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  6. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1997-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  7. Structural domains of vault proteins: a role for the coiled coil domain in vault assembly.

    PubMed

    van Zon, Arend; Mossink, Marieke H; Schoester, Martijn; Scheffer, George L; Scheper, Rik J; Sonneveld, Pieter; Wiemer, Erik A C

    2002-03-01

    Vaults consist of multiple copies of three proteins (MVP, VPARP, and TEP1) and several untranslated RNAs. The function of vaults is unknown but the typical and evolutionary conserved structure indicates a role in intracellular transport. Although all vault components have been identified and characterized, not much is known about vault protein assembly. In this study we identified and analyzed structural domains involved in vault assembly with emphasis on protein-protein interactions. Using a yeast two-hybrid system, we demonstrate within MVP an intramolecular binding site and show that MVP molecules interact with each other via their coiled coil domain. We show that purified MVP is able to bind calcium, most likely at calcium-binding EF-hands. No interactions could be detected between TEP1 and other vault proteins. However, the N-terminal half of MVP binds to a specific domain in the C-terminus of VPARP. Furthermore, VPARP contains amino acid stretches mediating intramolecular binding. PMID:11855821

  8. The nuclear envelope LEM-domain protein emerin

    PubMed Central

    Berk, Jason M; Tifft, Kathryn E; Wilson, Katherine L

    2013-01-01

    Emerin, a conserved LEM-domain protein, is among the few nuclear membrane proteins for which extensive basic knowledge—biochemistry, partners, functions, localizations, posttranslational regulation, roles in development and links to human disease—is available. This review summarizes emerin and its emerging roles in nuclear “lamina” structure, chromatin tethering, gene regulation, mitosis, nuclear assembly, development, signaling and mechano-transduction. We also highlight many open questions, exploration of which will be critical to understand how this intriguing nuclear membrane protein and its “family” influence the genome. PMID:23873439

  9. Membrane shape instabilities induced by BAR domain proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    Membrane curvature has developed into a forefront of membrane biophysics. Numerous proteins involved in membrane curvature sensing and membrane curvature generation have recently been discovered, including proteins containing the crescent-shaped BAR domain as membrane binding and shaping module. Accordingly, the structure determination of these proteins and their multimeric complexes is increasingly well-understood. Substantially less understood, however, are thermodynamic and kinetic aspects and the detailed mechanisms of how these proteins interact with membranes in a curvature-dependent manner. New experimental approaches need to be combined with established techniques to be able to fill in these missing details. Here we use model membrane systems in combination with a variety of biophysical techniques to characterize mechanistic aspects of BAR domain protein function. This includes a characterization of membrane curvature sensing and membrane generation. We also establish kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of BAR protein dimerization in solution, and investigate kinetic aspects of membrane binding. We present two new approaches to investigate membrane shape instabilities and demonstrate that membrane shape instabilities can be controlled by protein binding and lateral membrane tension. This work is supported through NIH grant GM-097552 and NSF grant CBET-1053857.

  10. Cooperation of phosphoinositides and BAR domain proteins in endosomal tubulation.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki-Narikawa, Naeko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Shibasaki, Yoshikazu

    2006-11-01

    Phosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) regulate many intracellular events, including vesicular trafficking and actin remodeling, by recruiting proteins to their sites of function. PtdIns(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and related phosphoinositides are mainly synthesized by type I PtdIns-4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5Ks). We found that PIP5K induces endosomal tubules in COS-7 cells. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 6 has been shown to act upstream of PIP5K and regulate endocytic transport and tubulation. ARF GAP with coiled-coil, ankyrin repeat, and pleckstrin homology domains 1 (ACAP1) has guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein (GAP) activity for ARF6. While there were few tubules induced by the expression of ACAP1 alone, numerous endosomal tubules were induced by coexpression of PIP5K and ACAP1. ACAP1 has a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain known to bind phosphoinositide and a Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain that has been reported to detect membrane curvature. Truncated and point mutations in the ACAP1 BAR and PH domains revealed that both BAR and PH domains are required for tubulation. These results suggest that two ARF6 downstream molecules, PIP5K and ACAP1, function together in endosomal tubulation and that phosphoinositide levels may regulate endosomal dynamics. PMID:17010122

  11. EVEREST: automatic identification and classification of protein domains in all protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Portugaly, Elon; Harel, Amir; Linial, Nathan; Linial, Michal

    2006-01-01

    Background Proteins are comprised of one or several building blocks, known as domains. Such domains can be classified into families according to their evolutionary origin. Whereas sequencing technologies have advanced immensely in recent years, there are no matching computational methodologies for large-scale determination of protein domains and their boundaries. We provide and rigorously evaluate a novel set of domain families that is automatically generated from sequence data. Our domain family identification process, called EVEREST (EVolutionary Ensembles of REcurrent SegmenTs), begins by constructing a library of protein segments that emerge in an all vs. all pairwise sequence comparison. It then proceeds to cluster these segments into putative domain families. The selection of the best putative families is done using machine learning techniques. A statistical model is then created for each of the chosen families. This procedure is then iterated: the aforementioned statistical models are used to scan all protein sequences, to recreate a library of segments and to cluster them again. Results Processing the Swiss-Prot section of the UniProt Knoledgebase, release 7.2, EVEREST defines 20,230 domains, covering 85% of the amino acids of the Swiss-Prot database. EVEREST annotates 11,852 proteins (6% of the database) that are not annotated by Pfam A. In addition, in 43,086 proteins (20% of the database), EVEREST annotates a part of the protein that is not annotated by Pfam A. Performance tests show that EVEREST recovers 56% of Pfam A families and 63% of SCOP families with high accuracy, and suggests previously unknown domain families with at least 51% fidelity. EVEREST domains are often a combination of domains as defined by Pfam or SCOP and are frequently sub-domains of such domains. Conclusion The EVEREST process and its output domain families provide an exhaustive and validated view of the protein domain world that is automatically generated from sequence data. The

  12. Structure-dependent electrical conductivity of protein: its differences between alpha-domain and beta-domain structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X Y; Shao, Jian; Jiang, S X; Wang, Biao; Zheng, Yue

    2015-03-27

    Electron transports in the α-domain and β-domain of proteins have been comprehensively investigated. The structure-dependent electron transport of proteins has been experimentally measured and theoretically simulated, and both the theoretical and experimental results demonstrate significant differences in electrical conductivity between the α-domain and β-domain. By controlling the feedback system of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), the conductance of a single α-domain protein hemoglobin (Hgb) and a β-domain protein superoxide dismutase enzyme (SOD) were measured, respectively. The current signal of Hgb is obviously stronger, indicating that the α-domain is more conductive. To confirm our finding, molecular orbitals of both the β-domain in SOD and α-domain in Hgb have been analyzed based on first-principles calculations. As expected, tunneling transport and hopping in the α-domain are both more efficient, indicating that it is easier for electrons to transport through the α-domain, which are in great agreement with our experimental data. In order to explain our results, molecular structures of α- and β-domains have been carefully analyzed and show that the explanation should lie in the differences in packing mode between the α-domain and β-domain. This research should be very important to application prospects in molecular electronics. PMID:25736549

  13. Structure-dependent electrical conductivity of protein: its differences between alpha-domain and beta-domain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. Y.; Shao, Jian; Jiang, S. X.; Wang, Biao; Zheng, Yue

    2015-03-01

    Electron transports in the α-domain and β-domain of proteins have been comprehensively investigated. The structure-dependent electron transport of proteins has been experimentally measured and theoretically simulated, and both the theoretical and experimental results demonstrate significant differences in electrical conductivity between the α-domain and β-domain. By controlling the feedback system of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), the conductance of a single α-domain protein hemoglobin (Hgb) and a β-domain protein superoxide dismutase enzyme (SOD) were measured, respectively. The current signal of Hgb is obviously stronger, indicating that the α-domain is more conductive. To confirm our finding, molecular orbitals of both the β-domain in SOD and α-domain in Hgb have been analyzed based on first-principles calculations. As expected, tunneling transport and hopping in the α-domain are both more efficient, indicating that it is easier for electrons to transport through the α-domain, which are in great agreement with our experimental data. In order to explain our results, molecular structures of α- and β-domains have been carefully analyzed and show that the explanation should lie in the differences in packing mode between the α-domain and β-domain. This research should be very important to application prospects in molecular electronics.

  14. Domain formation in membranes caused by lipid wetting of protein.

    PubMed

    Akimov, Sergey A; Frolov, Vladimir A J; Kuzmin, Peter I; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Chizmadzhev, Yuri A; Cohen, Fredric S

    2008-05-01

    Formation of rafts and other domains in cell membranes is considered as wetting of proteins by lipids. The membrane is modeled as a continuous elastic medium. Thermodynamic functions of the lipid films that wet proteins are calculated using a mean-field theory of liquid crystals as adapted to biomembranes. This approach yields the conditions necessary for a macroscopic wetting film to form; its thickness could also be determined. It is shown that films of macroscopic thicknesses form around large (tens nanometers in diameter) lipid-protein aggregates; only thin adsorption films form around single proteins or small complexes. The means by which wetting films can facilitate the merger of these aggregates is considered. It is shown that a wetting film prevents a protein from leaving an aggregate. Using experimentally derived values of elastic moduli and spontaneous curvatures as well as height mismatch between aggregates and bulk membrane, we obtained numerical results, which can be compared with the experimental data. PMID:18643096

  15. TOPDOM: database of conservatively located domains and motifs in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The TOPDOM database—originally created as a collection of domains and motifs located consistently on the same side of the membranes in α-helical transmembrane proteins—has been updated and extended by taking into consideration consistently localized domains and motifs in globular proteins, too. By taking advantage of the recently developed CCTOP algorithm to determine the type of a protein and predict topology in case of transmembrane proteins, and by applying a thorough search for domains and motifs as well as utilizing the most up-to-date version of all source databases, we managed to reach a 6-fold increase in the size of the whole database and a 2-fold increase in the number of transmembrane proteins. Availability and implementation: TOPDOM database is available at http://topdom.enzim.hu. The webpage utilizes the common Apache, PHP5 and MySQL software to provide the user interface for accessing and searching the database. The database itself is generated on a high performance computer. Contact: tusnady.gabor@ttk.mta.hu. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153630

  16. Prediction of Cancer Proteins by Integrating Protein Interaction, Domain Frequency, and Domain Interaction Data Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins are known to be associated with cancer diseases. It is quite often that their precise functional role in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. A strategy to gain a better understanding of the function of these proteins is to make use of a combination of different aspects of proteomics data types. In this study, we extended Aragues's method by employing the protein-protein interaction (PPI) data, domain-domain interaction (DDI) data, weighted domain frequency score (DFS), and cancer linker degree (CLD) data to predict cancer proteins. Performances were benchmarked based on three kinds of experiments as follows: (I) using individual algorithm, (II) combining algorithms, and (III) combining the same classification types of algorithms. When compared with Aragues's method, our proposed methods, that is, machine learning algorithm and voting with the majority, are significantly superior in all seven performance measures. We demonstrated the accuracy of the proposed method on two independent datasets. The best algorithm can achieve a hit ratio of 89.4% and 72.8% for lung cancer dataset and lung cancer microarray study, respectively. It is anticipated that the current research could help understand disease mechanisms and diagnosis. PMID:25866773

  17. A strategy for shuffling numerous Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein domains.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jacqueline S; Broadwell, Andrew H; Grant, Warwick N; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2004-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis that produce Cry1Ba are toxic to Lucilia cuprina Wiedemann blow fly maggots in vivo, and when applied in quantity to sheep fleece, provide up to 6 wk protection against flystrike in the field. These strains also are toxic to Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) light brown apple moth caterpillars. B. thuringiensis expressing Cry1Db are toxic only to E. postvittana. When Cry1Ba and Cry1Db proteins are expressed within Escherichia coli, the recombinant bacteria have the same toxicity profile as the wild-type B. thuringiensis strain. In an effort to develop a Cry protein with improved blow fly toxicity, three different internal regions of Cry1Ba coding DNA, encoding all or part of domains I, II and III respectively were systematically exchanged with the corresponding region from a pool of other Cry protein coding DNAs. The chimeric products were then expressed in recombinant E. coli, and the resulting bacteria assayed for toxicity on L. cuprina and E. postvittana. Clones having insecticide bioactivity were characterized to identify the source of the replacement Cry domain. Despite successfully expressing a large number and variety of chimeric proteins within E. coli, many with measurable insecticidal activity, none of the chimeras had greater potency against L. cuprina than the wild-type Cry1Ba. Chimeric replacements involving domains I and II were rarely active, whereas a much higher proportion of domain III chimeras had some bioactivity. We conclude that shuffling of Cry coding regions through joining at the major conserved sequence motifs is an effective means for the production of a diverse number of chimeric Cry proteins but that such toxins with enhanced bioactive properties will be rare or nonexistent. PMID:15666731

  18. Uncovering Quantitative Protein Interaction Networks for Mouse PDZ Domains using Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Stiffler, Michael A.; Grantcharova, Viara P.; Sevecka, Mark; MacBeath, Gavin

    2008-01-01

    One of the principle challenges in systems biology is to uncover the networks of protein-protein interactions that underlie most biological processes. To date, experimental efforts directed at this problem have largely produced only qualitative networks that are replete with false positives and false negatives. Here, we describe a domain-centered approach – compatible with genome-wide investigations – that enables us to measure the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of recombinant PDZ domains for fluorescently-labeled peptides that represent physiologically-relevant binding partners. Using a pilot set of 22 PDZ domains, 4 PDZ domain clusters, and 20 peptides, we define a gold standard dataset by determining the KD for all 520 PDZ-peptide combinations using fluorescence polarization. We then show that microarrays of PDZ domains identify interactions of moderate to high affinity (KD ≤ 10 μM) in a high-throughput format with a false positive rate of 14% and a false negative rate of 14%. By combining the throughput of protein microarrays with the fidelity of fluorescence polarization, our domain/peptide-based strategy yields a quantitative network that faithfully recapitulates 85% of previously reported interactions and uncovers new biophysical interactions, many of which occur between proteins that are co-expressed. From a broader perspective, the selectivity data produced by this effort reveal a strong concordance between protein sequence and protein function, supporting a model in which interaction networks evolve through small steps that do not involve dramatic rewiring of the network. PMID:16637659

  19. Domain-mediated protein interaction prediction: From genome to network.

    PubMed

    Reimand, Jüri; Hui, Shirley; Jain, Shobhit; Law, Brian; Bader, Gary D

    2012-08-14

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs), involved in many biological processes such as cellular signaling, are ultimately encoded in the genome. Solving the problem of predicting protein interactions from the genome sequence will lead to increased understanding of complex networks, evolution and human disease. We can learn the relationship between genomes and networks by focusing on an easily approachable subset of high-resolution protein interactions that are mediated by peptide recognition modules (PRMs) such as PDZ, WW and SH3 domains. This review focuses on computational prediction and analysis of PRM-mediated networks and discusses sequence- and structure-based interaction predictors, techniques and datasets for identifying physiologically relevant PPIs, and interpreting high-resolution interaction networks in the context of evolution and human disease. PMID:22561014

  20. Domains of surfactant protein A that affect protein oligomerization, lipid structure and surface tension.

    PubMed

    Palaniyar, N; Ikegami, M; Korfhagen, T; Whitsett, J; McCormack, F X

    2001-05-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is an abundant protein found in pulmonary surfactant which has been reported to have multiple functions. In this review, we focus on the structural importance of each domain of SP-A in the functions of protein oligomerization, the structural organization of lipids and the surface-active properties of surfactant, with an emphasis on ultrastructural analyses. The N-terminal domain of SP-A is required for disulfide-dependent protein oligomerization, and for binding and aggregation of phospholipids, but there is no evidence that this domain directly interacts with lipid membranes. The collagen-like domain is important for the stability and oligomerization of SP-A. It also contributes shape and dimension to the molecule, and appears to determine membrane spacing in lipid aggregates such as common myelin and tubular myelin. The neck domain of SP-A is primarily involved in protein trimerization, which is critical for many protein functions, but it does not appear to be directly involved in lipid interactions. The globular C-terminal domain of SP-A clearly plays a central role in lipid binding, and in more complex functions such as the formation and/or stabilization of curved membranes. In recent work, we have determined that the maintenance of low surface tension of surfactant in the presence of serum protein inhibitors requires cooperative interactions between the C-terminal and N-terminal domains of the molecule. This effect of SP-A requires a high degree of oligomeric assembly of the protein, and may be mediated by the activity of the protein to alter the form or physical state of surfactant lipid aggregates. PMID:11369537

  1. Control of domain swapping in bovine odorant-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ramoni, Roberto; Vincent, Florence; Ashcroft, Alison E; Accornero, Paolo; Grolli, Stefano; Valencia, Christel; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian

    2002-01-01

    As revealed by the X-ray structure, bovine odorant-binding protein (OBPb) is a domain swapped dimer [Tegoni, Ramoni, Bignetti, Spinelli and Cambillau (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 863-867; Bianchet, Bains, Petosi, Pevsner, Snyder, Monaco and Amzel (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 934-939]. This contrasts with all known mammalian OBPs, which are monomers, and in particular with porcine OBP (OBPp), sharing 42.3% identity with OBPb. By the mechanism of domain swapping, monomers are proposed to evolve into dimers and oligomers, as observed in human prion. Comparison of bovine and porcine OBP sequences pointed at OBPp glycine 121, in the hinge linking the beta-barrel to the alpha-helix. The absence of this residue in OBPb might explain why the normal lipocalin beta-turn is not formed. In order to decipher the domain swapping determinants we have produced a mutant of OBPb in which a glycine residue was inserted after position 121, and a mutant of OBPp in which glycine 121 was deleted. The latter mutation did not result in dimerization, while OBPb-121Gly+ became monomeric, suggesting that domain swapping was reversed. Careful structural analysis revealed that besides the presence of a glycine in the hinge, the dimer interface formed by the C-termini and by the presence of the lipocalins conserved disulphide bridge may also control domain swapping. PMID:11931632

  2. Targeting a KH-domain protein with RNA decoys.

    PubMed Central

    Makeyev, Aleksandr V; Eastmond, Dawn L; Liebhaber, Stephen A

    2002-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins are involved in the regulation of many aspects of eukaryotic gene expression. Targeted interference with RNA-protein interactions could offer novel approaches to modulation of expression profiles, alteration of developmental pathways, and reversal of certain disease processes. Here we investigate a decoy strategy for the study of the alphaCP subgroup of KH-domain RNA-binding proteins. These poly(C)-binding proteins have been implicated in a wide spectrum of posttranscriptional controls. Three categories of RNA decoys to alphaCPs were studied: poly(C) homopolymers, native mRNA-binding sites, and a high-affinity structure selected from a combinatorial library. Native chemistry was found to be essential for alphaCP decoy action. Because alphaCP proteins are found in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, decoy cassettes were incorporated within both nuclear (U1 snRNA) and cytoplasmic (VA1 RNA) RNA frameworks. Several sequences demonstrated optimal decoy properties when assayed for protein-binding and decoy bioactivity in vitro. A subset of these transcripts was shown to mediate targeted inhibition of alphaCP-dependent translation when expressed in either the nucleus or cytoplasm of transfected cells. Significantly, these studies establish the feasibility of developing RNA decoys that can selectively target biologic functions of abundant and widely expressed RNA binding proteins. PMID:12358435

  3. Using support vector machine for improving protein-protein interaction prediction utilizing domain interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, Mudita; Shah, Anuj R.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2010-10-02

    Understanding protein interactions is essential to gain insights into the biological processes at the whole cell level. The high-throughput experimental techniques for determining protein-protein interactions (PPI) are error prone and expensive with low overlap amongst them. Although several computational methods have been proposed for predicting protein interactions there is definite room for improvement. Here we present DomainSVM, a predictive method for PPI that uses computationally inferred domain-domain interaction values in a Support Vector Machine framework to predict protein interactions. DomainSVM method utilizes evidence of multiple interacting domains to predict a protein interaction. It outperforms existing methods of PPI prediction by achieving very high explanation ratios, precision, specificity, sensitivity and F-measure values in a 10 fold cross-validation study conducted on the positive and negative PPIs in yeast. A Functional comparison study using GO annotations on the positive and the negative test sets is presented in addition to discussing novel PPI predictions in Salmonella Typhimurium.

  4. A database of domain definitions for proteins with complex interdomain geometry.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Indraneel; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2009-01-01

    Protein structural domains are necessary for understanding evolution and protein folding, and may vary widely from functional and sequence based domains. Although, various structural domain databases exist, defining domains for some proteins is non-trivial, and definitions of their domain boundaries are not available. Here, we present a novel database of manually defined structural domains for a representative set of proteins from the SCOP "multi-domain proteins" class. (http://prodata.swmed.edu/multidom/). We consider our domains as mobile evolutionary units, which may rearrange during protein evolution. Additionally, they may be visualized as structurally compact and possibly independently folding units. We also found that representing domains as evolutionary and folding units do not always lead to a unique domain definition. However, unlike existing databases, we retain and refine these "alternate" domain definitions after careful inspection of structural similarity, functional sites and automated domain definition methods. We provide domain definitions, including actual residue boundaries, for proteins that well known databases like SCOP and CATH do not attempt to split. Our alternate domain definitions are suitable for sequence and structure searches by automated methods. Additionally, the database can be used for training and testing domain delineation algorithms. Since our domains represent structurally compact evolutionary units, the database may be useful for studying domain properties and evolution. PMID:19352501

  5. Normalized Cut Algorithm for Automated Assignment of Protein Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, M. P.; Liang, S.; Zha, H.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a novel computational method for automatic assignment of protein domains from structural data. At the core of our algorithm lies a recently proposed clustering technique that has been very successful for image-partitioning applications. This grap.,l-theory based clustering method uses the notion of a normalized cut to partition. an undirected graph into its strongly-connected components. Computer implementation of our method tested on the standard comparison set of proteins from the literature shows a high success rate (84%), better than most existing alternative In addition, several other features of our algorithm, such as reliance on few adjustable parameters, linear run-time with respect to the size of the protein and reduced complexity compared to other graph-theory based algorithms, would make it an attractive tool for structural biologists.

  6. PSI-2: Structural Genomics to Cover Protein Domain Family Space

    PubMed Central

    Dessailly, Benoît H.; Nair, Rajesh; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Fajardo, J. Eduardo; Kouranov, Andrei; Lee, David; Fiser, Andras; Godzik, Adam; Rost, Burkhard; Orengo, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Summary One major objective of structural genomics efforts, including the NIH-funded Protein Structure Initiative (PSI), has been to increase the structural coverage of protein sequence space. Here, we present the target selection strategy used during the second phase of PSI (PSI-2). This strategy, jointly devised by the bioinformatics groups associated with the PSI-2 large-scale production centres, targets representatives from large, structurally uncharacterised protein domain families, and from structurally uncharacterised subfamilies in very large and diverse families with incomplete structural coverage. These very large families are extremely diverse both structurally and functionally, and are highly over-represented in known proteomes. On the basis of several metrics, we then discuss to what extent PSI-2, during its first three years, has increased the structural coverage of genomes, and contributed structural and functional novelty. Together, the results presented here suggest that PSI-2 is successfully meeting its objectives and provides useful insights into structural and functional space. PMID:19523904

  7. Prediction of human protein-protein interaction by a domain-based approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaopan; Jiao, Xiong; Song, Jie; Chang, Shan

    2016-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are vital to a number of biological processes. With computational methods, plenty of domain information can help us to predict and assess PPIs. In this study, we proposed a domain-based approach for the prediction of human PPIs based on the interactions between the proteins and the domains. In this method, an optimizing model was built with the information from InterDom, 3did, DOMINE and Pfam databases. With this model, for 147 proteins in the integrin adhesome PPI network, 736 probable PPIs have been predicted, and the corresponding confidence probabilities of these PPIs were also calculated. It provides an opportunity to visualize the PPIs by using network graphs, which were constructed with Cytoscape, so that we can indicate underlying pathways possible. PMID:26925814

  8. PROSITE, a protein domain database for functional characterization and annotation.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, Christian J A; Cerutti, Lorenzo; de Castro, Edouard; Langendijk-Genevaux, Petra S; Bulliard, Virginie; Bairoch, Amos; Hulo, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    PROSITE consists of documentation entries describing protein domains, families and functional sites, as well as associated patterns and profiles to identify them. It is complemented by ProRule, a collection of rules based on profiles and patterns, which increases the discriminatory power of these profiles and patterns by providing additional information about functionally and/or structurally critical amino acids. PROSITE is largely used for the annotation of domain features of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot entries. Among the 983 (DNA-binding) domains, repeats and zinc fingers present in Swiss-Prot (release 57.8 of 22 September 2009), 696 ( approximately 70%) are annotated with PROSITE descriptors using information from ProRule. In order to allow better functional characterization of domains, PROSITE developments focus on subfamily specific profiles and a new profile building method giving more weight to functionally important residues. Here, we describe AMSA, an annotated multiple sequence alignment format used to build a new generation of generalized profiles, the migration of ScanProsite to Vital-IT, a cluster of 633 CPUs, and the adoption of the Distributed Annotation System (DAS) to facilitate PROSITE data integration and interchange with other sources. The latest version of PROSITE (release 20.54, of 22 September 2009) contains 1308 patterns, 863 profiles and 869 ProRules. PROSITE is accessible at: http://www.expasy.org/prosite/. PMID:19858104

  9. PROSITE, a protein domain database for functional characterization and annotation

    PubMed Central

    Sigrist, Christian J. A.; Cerutti, Lorenzo; de Castro, Edouard; Langendijk-Genevaux, Petra S.; Bulliard, Virginie; Bairoch, Amos; Hulo, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    PROSITE consists of documentation entries describing protein domains, families and functional sites, as well as associated patterns and profiles to identify them. It is complemented by ProRule, a collection of rules based on profiles and patterns, which increases the discriminatory power of these profiles and patterns by providing additional information about functionally and/or structurally critical amino acids. PROSITE is largely used for the annotation of domain features of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot entries. Among the 983 (DNA-binding) domains, repeats and zinc fingers present in Swiss-Prot (release 57.8 of 22 September 2009), 696 (∼70%) are annotated with PROSITE descriptors using information from ProRule. In order to allow better functional characterization of domains, PROSITE developments focus on subfamily specific profiles and a new profile building method giving more weight to functionally important residues. Here, we describe AMSA, an annotated multiple sequence alignment format used to build a new generation of generalized profiles, the migration of ScanProsite to Vital-IT, a cluster of 633 CPUs, and the adoption of the Distributed Annotation System (DAS) to facilitate PROSITE data integration and interchange with other sources. The latest version of PROSITE (release 20.54, of 22 September 2009) contains 1308 patterns, 863 profiles and 869 ProRules. PROSITE is accessible at: http://www.expasy.org/prosite/. PMID:19858104

  10. Analysis of the HD-GYP Domain Cyclic Dimeric GMP Phosphodiesterase Reveals a Role in Motility and the Enzootic Life Cycle of Borrelia burgdorferi ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Syed Z.; Pitzer, Joshua E.; Boquoi, Tristan; Hobbs, Gerry; Miller, Michael R.; Motaleb, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    HD-GYP domain cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) phosphodiesterases are implicated in motility and virulence in bacteria. Borrelia burgdorferi possesses a single set of c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes, including a putative HD-GYP domain protein, BB0374. Recently, we characterized the EAL domain phosphodiesterase PdeA. A mutation in pdeA resulted in cells that were defective in motility and virulence. Here we demonstrate that BB0374/PdeB specifically hydrolyzed c-di-GMP with a Km of 2.9 nM, confirming that it is a functional phosphodiesterase. Furthermore, by measuring phosphodiesterase enzyme activity in extracts from cells containing the pdeA pdeB double mutant, we demonstrate that no additional phosphodiesterases are present in B. burgdorferi. pdeB single mutant cells exhibit significantly increased flexing, indicating a role for c-di-GMP in motility. Constructing and analyzing a pilZ pdeB double mutant suggests that PilZ likely interacts with chemotaxis signaling. While virulence in needle-inoculated C3H/HeN mice did not appear to be altered significantly in pdeB mutant cells, these cells exhibited a reduced ability to survive in Ixodes scapularis ticks. Consequently, those ticks were unable to transmit the infection to naïve mice. All of these phenotypes were restored when the mutant was complemented. Identification of this role of pdeB increases our understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling network in motility regulation and the life cycle of B. burgdorferi. PMID:21670168

  11. Method for identification of rigid domains and hinge residues in proteins based on exhaustive enumeration.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jaehyun; Sim, Jun; Park, Eunsung; Lee, Julian

    2015-06-01

    Many proteins undergo large-scale motions where relatively rigid domains move against each other. The identification of rigid domains, as well as the hinge residues important for their relative movements, is important for various applications including flexible docking simulations. In this work, we develop a method for protein rigid domain identification based on an exhaustive enumeration of maximal rigid domains, the rigid domains not fully contained within other domains. The computation is performed by mapping the problem to that of finding maximal cliques in a graph. A minimal set of rigid domains are then selected, which cover most of the protein with minimal overlap. In contrast to the results of existing methods that partition a protein into non-overlapping domains using approximate algorithms, the rigid domains obtained from exact enumeration naturally contain overlapping regions, which correspond to the hinges of the inter-domain bending motion. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on several proteins. PMID:25820699

  12. Clustering of protein domains for functional and evolutionary studies

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Pavle; Zucko, Jurica; Vujaklija, Dušica; Kriško, Anita; Hranueli, Daslav; Long, Paul F; Etchebest, Catherine; Basrak, Bojan; Cullum, John

    2009-01-01

    Background The number of protein family members defined by DNA sequencing is usually much larger than those characterised experimentally. This paper describes a method to divide protein families into subtypes purely on sequence criteria. Comparison with experimental data allows an independent test of the quality of the clustering. Results An evolutionary split statistic is calculated for each column in a protein multiple sequence alignment; the statistic has a larger value when a column is better described by an evolutionary model that assumes clustering around two or more amino acids rather than a single amino acid. The user selects columns (typically the top ranked columns) to construct a motif. The motif is used to divide the family into subtypes using a stochastic optimization procedure related to the deterministic annealing EM algorithm (DAEM), which yields a specificity score showing how well each family member is assigned to a subtype. The clustering obtained is not strongly dependent on the number of amino acids chosen for the motif. The robustness of this method was demonstrated using six well characterized protein families: nucleotidyl cyclase, protein kinase, dehydrogenase, two polyketide synthase domains and small heat shock proteins. Phylogenetic trees did not allow accurate clustering for three of the six families. Conclusion The method clustered the families into functional subtypes with an accuracy of 90 to 100%. False assignments usually had a low specificity score. PMID:19832975

  13. Protein kinase domain of twitchin has protein kinase activity and an autoinhibitory region.

    PubMed

    Lei, J; Tang, X; Chambers, T C; Pohl, J; Benian, G M

    1994-08-19

    Twitchin is a 753-kDa polypeptide located in the muscle A-bands of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. It consists of multiple copies of both fibronectin III and immunoglobulin C2 domains and, near the C terminus, a protein kinase domain with greatest homology to the catalytic domains of myosin light chain kinases. We have expressed and purified from Escherichia coli twitchin's protein kinase catalytic core and flanking sequences that do not include fibronectin III and immunoglobulin C2 domains. The protein was shown to phosphorylate a model substrate and to undergo autophosphorylation. The autophosphorylation occurs at a slow rate, attaining a maximum at 3 h with a stoichiometry of about 1.0 mol of phosphate/mol of protein, probably through an intramolecular mechanism. Sequence analysis of proteolytically derived phosphopeptides revealed that autophosphorylation occurred N-terminal to the catalytic core, predominantly at Thr-5910, with possible minor sites at Ser5912 and/or Ser-5913. This portion of twitchin (residues 5890-6268) was also phosphorylated in vitro by protein kinase C in the absence of calcium and phosphotidylserine, but not by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. By comparing the activities of three twitchin segments, the enzyme appears to be inhibited by the 60-amino acid residues lying just C-terminal to the kinase catalytic core. Thus, like a number of other protein kinases including myosin light chain kinases, the twitchin kinase appears to be autoregulated. PMID:8063727

  14. A conserved BURP domain defines a novel group of plant proteins with unusual primary structures.

    PubMed

    Hattori, J; Boutilier, K A; van Lookeren Campagne, M M; Miki, B L

    1998-09-01

    We have identified a new class of plant proteins containing a common C-terminal region, which we have termed the BURP domain. These proteins are defined not only by the BURP domain, but also by the overall similarity in their modular construction. The BURP domain proteins consist of either three or four modules: (i) an N-terminal hydrophobic domain -- a presumptive transit peptide, joined to (ii) a short conserved segment or other short segment, (iii) an optional segment consisting of repeated units which is unique to each member, and (iv) the C-terminal BURP domain. These individual modules appear to be combined to form two main classes of BURP domain proteins. The BURP domain proteins, despite the similarities in their primary structural features, show no obvious similarities in the tissues or conditions under which they are expressed. The presence of the conserved BURP domain in diverse plant proteins suggests an important and fundamental functional role for this domain. PMID:9790599

  15. A Database of Domain Definitions for Proteins with Complex Interdomain Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Indraneel; Kinch, Lisa N.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2009-01-01

    Protein structural domains are necessary for understanding evolution and protein folding, and may vary widely from functional and sequence based domains. Although, various structural domain databases exist, defining domains for some proteins is non-trivial, and definitions of their domain boundaries are not available. Here, we present a novel database of manually defined structural domains for a representative set of proteins from the SCOP “multi-domain proteins” class. (http://prodata.swmed.edu/multidom/). We consider our domains as mobile evolutionary units, which may rearrange during protein evolution. Additionally, they may be visualized as structurally compact and possibly independently folding units. We also found that representing domains as evolutionary and folding units do not always lead to a unique domain definition. However, unlike existing databases, we retain and refine these “alternate” domain definitions after careful inspection of structural similarity, functional sites and automated domain definition methods. We provide domain definitions, including actual residue boundaries, for proteins that well known databases like SCOP and CATH do not attempt to split. Our alternate domain definitions are suitable for sequence and structure searches by automated methods. Additionally, the database can be used for training and testing domain delineation algorithms. Since our domains represent structurally compact evolutionary units, the database may be useful for studying domain properties and evolution. PMID:19352501

  16. The X-ray structures of two mutant crystallin domains shed light on the evolution of multi-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Norledge, B V; Mayr, E M; Glockshuber, R; Bateman, O A; Slingsby, C; Jaenicke, R; Driessen, H P

    1996-03-01

    We use protein engineering and crystallography to simulate aspects of the early evolution of beta gamma-crystallins by observing how a single domain oligomerizes in response to changes in a sequence extension. The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of gamma beta-crystallin with its four-residue C-terminal extension shows that the domain does not form a symmetric homodimer analogous to the two-domain pairing in beta gamma-crystallins. Instead the C-terminal extension now forms heterologous interactions with other domains leading to the solvent exposure of the natural hydrophobic interface with a consequent loss in protein solubility. However, this domain truncated by just the C-terminal tyrosine forms a symmetric homodimer of domains in the crystal lattice. PMID:8605629

  17. West Nile virus methyltransferase domain interacts with protein kinase G

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The flaviviral nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) is a phosphoprotein, though the precise identities and roles of many specific phosphorylations remain unknown. Protein kinase G (PKG), a cGMP-dependent protein kinase, has previously been shown to phosphorylate dengue virus NS5. Methods We used mass spectrometry to specifically identify NS5 phosphosites. Co-immunoprecipitation assays were used to study protein-protein interactions. Effects on viral replication were measured via replicon system and plaque assay titering. Results We identified multiple sites in West Nile virus (WNV) NS5 that are phosphorylated during a WNV infection, and showed that the N-terminal methyltransferase domain of WNV NS5 can be specifically phosphorylated by PKG in vitro. Expressing PKG in cell culture led to an enhancement of WNV viral production. We hypothesized this effect on replication could be caused by factors beyond the specific phosphorylations of NS5. Here we show for the first time that PKG is also able to stably interact with a viral substrate, WNV NS5, in cell culture and in vitro. While the mosquito-borne WNV NS5 interacted with PKG, tick-borne Langat virus NS5 did not. The methyltransferase domain of NS5 is able to mediate the interaction between NS5 and PKG, and mutating positive residues in the αE region of the methyltransferase interrupts the interaction. These same mutations completely inhibited WNV replication. Conclusions PKG is not required for WNV replication, but does make a stable interaction with NS5. While the consequence of the NS5:PKG interaction when it occurs is unclear, mutational data demonstrates that this interaction occurs in a region of NS5 that is otherwise necessary for replication. Overall, the results identify an interaction between virus and a cellular kinase and suggest a role for a host kinase in enhancing flaviviral replication. PMID:23876037

  18. Targeting the inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein BIR3 binding domains.

    PubMed

    Jaquith, James B

    2014-05-01

    The Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) play a critical role in the regulation of cellular apoptosis and cytokine signaling. IAP family members include XIAP, cIAP1, cIAP2, NAIP, survivin, Apollon/Bruce, ML-IAP/livin and TIAP. The IAPs have been targeted using both antisense oligonucleotides and small molecule inhibitors. Several research teams have advanced compounds that bind the highly conserved BIR3 domains of the IAPs into clinical trials, as single agents and in combination with standard of care. This patent review highlights the medicinal chemistry strategies that have been applied to the development of clinical compounds. PMID:24998289

  19. Domain-Swapped Dimer of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cytochrome c551: Structural Insights into Domain Swapping of Cytochrome c Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nagao, Satoshi; Ueda, Mariko; Osuka, Hisao; Komori, Hirofumi; Kamikubo, Hironari; Kataoka, Mikio; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Hirota, Shun

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) family proteins, such as horse cyt c, Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c551 (PA cyt c551), and Hydrogenobacter thermophilus cytochrome c552 (HT cyt c552), have been used as model proteins to study the relationship between the protein structure and folding process. We have shown in the past that horse cyt c forms oligomers by domain swapping its C-terminal helix, perturbing the Met–heme coordination significantly compared to the monomer. HT cyt c552 forms dimers by domain swapping the region containing the N-terminal α-helix and heme, where the heme axial His and Met ligands belong to different protomers. Herein, we show that PA cyt c551 also forms domain-swapped dimers by swapping the region containing the N-terminal α-helix and heme. The secondary structures of the M61A mutant of PA cyt c551 were perturbed slightly and its oligomer formation ability decreased compared to that of the wild-type protein, showing that the stability of the protein secondary structures is important for domain swapping. The hinge loop of domain swapping for cyt c family proteins corresponded to the unstable region specified by hydrogen exchange NMR measurements for the monomer, although the swapping region differed among proteins. These results show that the unstable loop region has a tendency to become a hinge loop in domain-swapped proteins. PMID:25853415

  20. Enhancing protein stability by adsorption onto raftlike lipid domains.

    PubMed

    Litt, Jeffrey; Padala, Chakradhar; Asuri, Prashanth; Vutukuru, Srinavya; Athmakuri, Krishna; Kumar, Sanat; Dordick, Jonathan; Kane, Ravi S

    2009-05-27

    We demonstrate that the stability of adsorbed proteins can be enhanced by controlling the heterogeneity of the surfaceby creating raftlike domains in a soft liposomal membrane. Recent work has shown that enzymes adsorbed onto highly curved nanoscale supports can be more stable than those adsorbed on flat surfaces with nominally the same chemical structure. This effect has been attributed to a decrease in lateral interenzyme interactions on a curved surface. Exploiting this idea, we asked if adsorbing enzymes onto "patchy" surfaces composed of adsorbing and nonadsorbing regions can be used to reduce lateral interactions even on relatively flat surfaces. We demonstrate that creating domains on which an enzyme can adsorb enhances the stability of that enzyme under denaturing conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the size of these domains has a considerable effect on the degree of stability imparted by adsorption. Such biomimetic raft-inspired systems may find use in applications ranging from biorecognition to the design of novel strategies for the separation of biomolecules and controlling the interaction of multicomponent membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:19385631

  1. Trimeric transmembrane domain interactions in paramyxovirus fusion proteins: roles in protein folding, stability, and function.

    PubMed

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Smith, Stacy E; Carter, James R; Webb, Stacy R; Gibson, Kathleen M; Hellman, Lance M; Fried, Michael G; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2013-12-13

    Paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins promote membrane fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membranes, a critical early step in viral infection. Although mutational analyses have indicated that transmembrane (TM) domain residues can affect folding or function of viral fusion proteins, direct analysis of TM-TM interactions has proved challenging. To directly assess TM interactions, the oligomeric state of purified chimeric proteins containing the Staphylococcal nuclease (SN) protein linked to the TM segments from three paramyxovirus F proteins was analyzed by sedimentation equilibrium analysis in detergent and buffer conditions that allowed density matching. A monomer-trimer equilibrium best fit was found for all three SN-TM constructs tested, and similar fits were obtained with peptides corresponding to just the TM region of two different paramyxovirus F proteins. These findings demonstrate for the first time that class I viral fusion protein TM domains can self-associate as trimeric complexes in the absence of the rest of the protein. Glycine residues have been implicated in TM helix interactions, so the effect of mutations at Hendra F Gly-508 was assessed in the context of the whole F protein. Mutations G508I or G508L resulted in decreased cell surface expression of the fusogenic form, consistent with decreased stability of the prefusion form of the protein. Sedimentation equilibrium analysis of TM domains containing these mutations gave higher relative association constants, suggesting altered TM-TM interactions. Overall, these results suggest that trimeric TM interactions are important driving forces for protein folding, stability and membrane fusion promotion. PMID:24178297

  2. J-DOMAIN PROTEINS IN TOMATO AND STRAWBERRY THAT ARE HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS AND ARE EXPRESSED IN REPRODUCTIVE TISSUES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eucaryotes have a large number of proteins containing a conserved J-domain, corresponding to the N-terminal 75 amino acids of E. coli heat stress protein, DnaJ. DnaJ homologues in eucaryotes are also referred to as Hsp40. In plants, J-domain proteins have been implicated as molecular chaperones in r...

  3. Protein inter-domain linker prediction using Random Forest and amino acid physiochemical properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein chains are generally long and consist of multiple domains. Domains are distinct structural units of a protein that can evolve and function independently. The accurate prediction of protein domain linkers and boundaries is often regarded as the initial step of protein tertiary structure and function predictions. Such information not only enhances protein-targeted drug development but also reduces the experimental cost of protein analysis by allowing researchers to work on a set of smaller and independent units. In this study, we propose a novel and accurate domain-linker prediction approach based on protein primary structure information only. We utilize a nature-inspired machine-learning model called Random Forest along with a novel domain-linker profile that contains physiochemical and domain-linker information of amino acid sequences. Results The proposed approach was tested on two well-known benchmark protein datasets and achieved 68% sensitivity and 99% precision, which is better than any existing protein domain-linker predictor. Without applying any data balancing technique such as class weighting and data re-sampling, the proposed approach is able to accurately classify inter-domain linkers from highly imbalanced datasets. Conclusion Our experimental results prove that the proposed approach is useful for domain-linker identification in highly imbalanced single- and multi-domain proteins. PMID:25521329

  4. Structure of Yellow Fever Virus Envelope Protein Domain III

    PubMed Central

    Volk, David E.; May, Fiona J.; Gandham, Sai H. A.; Anderson, Anjenique; Von Lindern, Jana J.; Beasley, David W. C.; Barrett, Alan D. T.; Gorenstein, David G.

    2009-01-01

    The structure of recombinant domain III of the envelope protein (rED3) of yellow fever virus (YFV), containing the major neutralization site, was determined using NMR spectroscopy. The amino acid sequence and structure of the YFV-rED3 shows differences from ED3s of other mosquito-borne flaviviruses; in particular, the partially surface-exposed BC loop where methionine-304 and valine-324 were identified as being critical for the structure of the loop. Variations in the structure and surface chemistry of ED3 between flaviviruses affect neutralization sites and may affect host cell receptor interactions and play a role in the observed variations in viral pathogenesis and tissue tropism. PMID:19818466

  5. The BAR Domain Proteins: Molding Membranes in Fission, Fusion, and Phagy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Gang; Vajjhala, Parimala; Lee, Janet S.; Winsor, Barbara; Munn, Alan L.

    2006-01-01

    The Bin1/amphiphysin/Rvs167 (BAR) domain proteins are a ubiquitous protein family. Genes encoding members of this family have not yet been found in the genomes of prokaryotes, but within eukaryotes, BAR domain proteins are found universally from unicellular eukaryotes such as yeast through to plants, insects, and vertebrates. BAR domain proteins share an N-terminal BAR domain with a high propensity to adopt α-helical structure and engage in coiled-coil interactions with other proteins. BAR domain proteins are implicated in processes as fundamental and diverse as fission of synaptic vesicles, cell polarity, endocytosis, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, transcriptional repression, cell-cell fusion, signal transduction, apoptosis, secretory vesicle fusion, excitation-contraction coupling, learning and memory, tissue differentiation, ion flux across membranes, and tumor suppression. What has been lacking is a molecular understanding of the role of the BAR domain protein in each process. The three-dimensional structure of the BAR domain has now been determined and valuable insight has been gained in understanding the interactions of BAR domains with membranes. The cellular roles of BAR domain proteins, characterized over the past decade in cells as distinct as yeasts, neurons, and myocytes, can now be understood in terms of a fundamental molecular function of all BAR domain proteins: to sense membrane curvature, to bind GTPases, and to mold a diversity of cellular membranes. PMID:16524918

  6. The BAR domain proteins: molding membranes in fission, fusion, and phagy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Gang; Vajjhala, Parimala; Lee, Janet S; Winsor, Barbara; Munn, Alan L

    2006-03-01

    The Bin1/amphiphysin/Rvs167 (BAR) domain proteins are a ubiquitous protein family. Genes encoding members of this family have not yet been found in the genomes of prokaryotes, but within eukaryotes, BAR domain proteins are found universally from unicellular eukaryotes such as yeast through to plants, insects, and vertebrates. BAR domain proteins share an N-terminal BAR domain with a high propensity to adopt alpha-helical structure and engage in coiled-coil interactions with other proteins. BAR domain proteins are implicated in processes as fundamental and diverse as fission of synaptic vesicles, cell polarity, endocytosis, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, transcriptional repression, cell-cell fusion, signal transduction, apoptosis, secretory vesicle fusion, excitation-contraction coupling, learning and memory, tissue differentiation, ion flux across membranes, and tumor suppression. What has been lacking is a molecular understanding of the role of the BAR domain protein in each process. The three-dimensional structure of the BAR domain has now been determined and valuable insight has been gained in understanding the interactions of BAR domains with membranes. The cellular roles of BAR domain proteins, characterized over the past decade in cells as distinct as yeasts, neurons, and myocytes, can now be understood in terms of a fundamental molecular function of all BAR domain proteins: to sense membrane curvature, to bind GTPases, and to mold a diversity of cellular membranes. PMID:16524918

  7. Structure of a two-CAP-domain protein from the human hookworm parasite Necator americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2011-05-01

    The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite N. americanus refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å is presented. Major proteins secreted by the infective larval stage hookworms upon host entry include Ancylostoma secreted proteins (ASPs), which are characterized by one or two CAP (cysteine-rich secretory protein/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1) domains. The CAP domain has been reported in diverse phylogenetically unrelated proteins, but has no confirmed function. The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite Necator americanus was refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement (MR) using Na-ASP-2, a one-CAP-domain ASP, as the search model. The correct MR solution could only be obtained by truncating the polyalanine model of Na-ASP-2 and removing several loops. The structure reveals two CAP domains linked by an extended loop. Overall, the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain is more similar to Na-ASP-2 than to the amino-terminal CAP domain. A large central cavity extends from the amino-terminal CAP domain to the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain, encompassing the putative CAP-binding cavity. The putative CAP-binding cavity is a characteristic cavity in the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain that contains a His and Glu pair. These residues are conserved in all single-CAP-domain proteins, but are absent in the amino-terminal CAP domain. The conserved His residues are oriented such that they appear to be capable of directly coordinating a zinc ion as observed for CAP proteins from reptile venoms. This first structure of a two-CAP-domain ASP can serve as a template for homology modeling of other two-CAP-domain proteins.

  8. Structural organization and interactions of transmembrane domains in tetraspanin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Metcalf, Douglas G; DeGrado, William F; Hemler, Martin E

    2005-01-01

    Background Proteins of the tetraspanin family contain four transmembrane domains (TM1-4) linked by two extracellular loops and a short intracellular loop, and have short intracellular N- and C-termini. While structure and function analysis of the larger extracellular loop has been performed, the organization and role of transmembrane domains have not been systematically assessed. Results Among 28 human tetraspanin proteins, the TM1-3 sequences display a distinct heptad repeat motif (abcdefg)n. In TM1, position a is occupied by structurally conserved bulky residues and position d contains highly conserved Asn and Gly residues. In TM2, position a is occupied by conserved small residues (Gly/Ala/Thr), and position d has a conserved Gly and two bulky aliphatic residues. In TM3, three a positions of the heptad repeat are filled by two leucines and a glutamate/glutamine residue, and two d positions are occupied by either Phe/Tyr or Val/Ile/Leu residues. No heptad motif is apparent in TM4 sequences. Mutations of conserved glycines in human CD9 (Gly25 and Gly32 in TM1; Gly67 and Gly74 in TM2) caused aggregation of mutant proteins inside the cell. Modeling of the TM1-TM2 interface in CD9, using a novel algorithm, predicts tight packing of conserved bulky residues against conserved Gly residues along the two helices. The homodimeric interface of CD9 was mapped, by disulfide cross-linking of single-cysteine mutants, to the vicinity of residues Leu14 and Phe17 in TM1 (positions g and c) and Gly77, Gly80 and Ala81 in TM2 (positions d, g and a, respectively). Mutations of a and d residues in both TM1 and TM2 (Gly25, Gly32, Gly67 and Gly74), involved in intramolecular TM1-TM2 interaction, also strongly diminished intermolecular interaction, as assessed by cross-linking of Cys80. Conclusion Our results suggest that tetraspanin intra- and intermolecular interactions are mediated by conserved residues in adjacent, but distinct regions of TM1 and TM2. A key structural element that

  9. The Leptospiral Antigen Lp49 is a Two-Domain Protein with Putative Protein Binding Function

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira Giuseppe,P.; Oliveira Neves, F.; Nascimento, A.; Gomes Guimaraes, B.

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a life-threatening disease that affects populations worldwide. Currently available vaccines have limited effectiveness and therapeutic interventions are complicated by the difficulty in making an early diagnosis of leptospirosis. The genome of Leptospira interrogans was recently sequenced and comparative genomic analysis contributed to the identification of surface antigens, potential candidates for development of new vaccines and serodiagnosis. Lp49 is a membrane-associated protein recognized by antibodies present in sera from early and convalescent phases of leptospirosis patients. Its crystal structure was determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction using selenomethionine-labelled crystals and refined at 2.0 Angstroms resolution. Lp49 is composed of two domains and belongs to the all-beta-proteins class. The N-terminal domain folds in an immunoglobulin-like beta-sandwich structure, whereas the C-terminal domain presents a seven-bladed beta-propeller fold. Structural analysis of Lp49 indicates putative protein-protein binding sites, suggesting a role in Leptospira-host interaction. This is the first crystal structure of a leptospiral antigen described to date.

  10. ThreaDom: extracting protein domain boundary information from multiple threading alignments

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zhidong; Xu, Dong; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Protein domains are subunits that can fold and evolve independently. Identification of domain boundary locations is often the first step in protein folding and function annotations. Most of the current methods deduce domain boundaries by sequence-based analysis, which has low accuracy. There is no efficient method for predicting discontinuous domains that consist of segments from separated sequence regions. As template-based methods are most efficient for protein 3D structure modeling, combining multiple threading alignment information should increase the accuracy and reliability of computational domain predictions. Result: We developed a new protein domain predictor, ThreaDom, which deduces domain boundary locations based on multiple threading alignments. The core of the method development is the derivation of a domain conservation score that combines information from template domain structures and terminal and internal alignment gaps. Tested on 630 non-redundant sequences, without using homologous templates, ThreaDom generates correct single- and multi-domain classifications in 81% of cases, where 78% have the domain linker assigned within ±20 residues. In a second test on 486 proteins with discontinuous domains, ThreaDom achieves an average precision 84% and recall 65% in domain boundary prediction. Finally, ThreaDom was examined on 56 targets from CASP8 and had a domain overlap rate 73, 87 and 85% with the target for Free Modeling, Hard multiple-domain and discontinuous domain proteins, respectively, which are significantly higher than most domain predictors in the CASP8. Similar results were achieved on the targets from the most recently CASP9 and CASP10 experiments. Availability: http://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/ThreaDom/. Contact: zhng@umich.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23812990

  11. Setting the PAS, the role of circadian PAS domain proteins during environmental adaptation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Julia H. M.; Schippers, Jos H. M.

    2015-01-01

    The per-ARNT-sim (PAS) domain represents an ancient protein module that can be found across all kingdoms of life. The domain functions as a sensing unit for a diverse array of signals, including molecular oxygen, small metabolites, and light. In plants, several PAS domain-containing proteins form an integral part of the circadian clock and regulate responses to environmental change. Moreover, these proteins function in pathways that control development and plant stress adaptation responses. Here, we discuss the role of PAS domain-containing proteins in anticipation, and adaptation to environmental changes in plants. PMID:26217364

  12. The CBS domain: a protein module with an emerging prominent role in regulation.

    PubMed

    Baykov, Alexander A; Tuominen, Heidi K; Lahti, Reijo

    2011-11-18

    Regulatory CBS (cystathionine β-synthase) domains exist as two or four tandem copies in thousands of cytosolic and membrane-associated proteins from all kingdoms of life. Mutations in the CBS domains of human enzymes and membrane channels are associated with an array of hereditary diseases. Four CBS domains encoded within a single polypeptide or two identical polypeptides (each having a pair of CBS domains at the subunit interface) form a highly conserved disk-like structure. CBS domains act as autoinhibitory regulatory units in some proteins and activate or further inhibit protein function upon binding to adenosine nucleotides (AMP, ADP, ATP, S-adenosyl methionine, NAD, diadenosine polyphosphates). As a result of the differential effects of the nucleotides, CBS domain-containing proteins can sense cell energy levels. Significant conformational changes are induced in CBS domains by bound ligands, highlighting the structural basis for their effects. PMID:21958115

  13. Co-evolutionary Analysis of Domains in Interacting Proteins Reveals Insights into Domain–Domain Interactions Mediating Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jothi, Raja; Cherukuri, Praveen F.; Tasneem, Asba; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in functional genomics have helped generate large-scale high-throughput protein interaction data. Such networks, though extremely valuable towards molecular level understanding of cells, do not provide any direct information about the regions (domains) in the proteins that mediate the interaction. Here, we performed co-evolutionary analysis of domains in interacting proteins in order to understand the degree of co-evolution of interacting and non-interacting domains. Using a combination of sequence and structural analysis, we analyzed protein–protein interactions in F1-ATPase, Sec23p/Sec24p, DNA-directed RNA polymerase and nuclear pore complexes, and found that interacting domain pair(s) for a given interaction exhibits higher level of co-evolution than the noninteracting domain pairs. Motivated by this finding, we developed a computational method to test the generality of the observed trend, and to predict large-scale domain–domain interactions. Given a protein–protein interaction, the proposed method predicts the domain pair(s) that is most likely to mediate the protein interaction. We applied this method on the yeast interactome to predict domain–domain interactions, and used known domain–domain interactions found in PDB crystal structures to validate our predictions. Our results show that the prediction accuracy of the proposed method is statistically significant. Comparison of our prediction results with those from two other methods reveals that only a fraction of predictions are shared by all the three methods, indicating that the proposed method can detect known interactions missed by other methods. We believe that the proposed method can be used with other methods to help identify previously unrecognized domain–domain interactions on a genome scale, and could potentially help reduce the search space for identifying interaction sites. PMID:16949097

  14. Different evolutionary patterns of SNPs between domains and unassigned regions in human protein-coding sequences.

    PubMed

    Pang, Erli; Wu, Xiaomei; Lin, Kui

    2016-06-01

    Protein evolution plays an important role in the evolution of each genome. Because of their functional nature, in general, most of their parts or sites are differently constrained selectively, particularly by purifying selection. Most previous studies on protein evolution considered individual proteins in their entirety or compared protein-coding sequences with non-coding sequences. Less attention has been paid to the evolution of different parts within each protein of a given genome. To this end, based on PfamA annotation of all human proteins, each protein sequence can be split into two parts: domains or unassigned regions. Using this rationale, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in protein-coding sequences from the 1000 Genomes Project were mapped according to two classifications: SNPs occurring within protein domains and those within unassigned regions. With these classifications, we found: the density of synonymous SNPs within domains is significantly greater than that of synonymous SNPs within unassigned regions; however, the density of non-synonymous SNPs shows the opposite pattern. We also found there are signatures of purifying selection on both the domain and unassigned regions. Furthermore, the selective strength on domains is significantly greater than that on unassigned regions. In addition, among all of the human protein sequences, there are 117 PfamA domains in which no SNPs are found. Our results highlight an important aspect of protein domains and may contribute to our understanding of protein evolution. PMID:26833483

  15. Overexpression and purification of folded domain of prostate cancer related proteins MSMB and PSA.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Mohini; Agarwal, Nipanshu; Dinda, Amit; Yadav, Subhash C

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of domains of a human protein using recombinant DNA technology has been challenging because individual domains intend to accumulate as non-soluble aggregate when expressed separately. Studies on identifying right sequences for a domain to be able to fold independently may help understand the folding pattern and underlying protein-engineering events to isolate the functional domains of a protein. In this report, individual domains of prostate cancer related biomarkers; MSMB and PSA were overexpressed in bacterial system and purified in their folded forms using affinity chromatography. The western blotting experiment using domain specific antibodies further confirmed these proteins. The designed nucleotide sequences domains were truncated using fold index software and folding were predicted by phyre2 and I-TASSER software. Other parameters were optimized for their overexpression and purification using Co-NTA affinity chromatography. Purified domains of each protein showed secondary structures such as α + β type for PSA, α/β and β type for the each domains of PSA and MSMB respectively. This is the first report on producing PSA and MSMB individual domains in functional folded forms. This study may help produce the folded domain of many such proteins to be used for better diagnostic purpose. PMID:27038170

  16. A protein domain-based view of the virosphere-host relationship.

    PubMed

    Abroi, Aare

    2015-12-01

    Despite being an important and inseparable part of the biosphere, viruses are too often overlooked in several life sciences, including evolutionary biology, systems biology, and non-marine ecology. In this review, a protein domain-based view of viral proteomes, the proteomes of other organisms and the overlap between them is presented. The data show that in many viral species, viral proteins are not very well annotated with protein domains. Compared with viral proteomes, cellular proteomes are covered quite uniformly with respect to protein domains and show higher coverage. A tremendous number of virally coded domains exist; in fact, the number of protein domains in the characterised virosphere is approaching that found in Archaea, a well-accepted superkingdom. Proteins encoded by viruses contain virosphere-specific domains (i.e., not found in cellular proteomes) and/or many domains shared by viral and cellular proteomes. Virosphere-specific domains are structurally peculiar with respect to different structural measures, making them a clear source of structural and functional novelty. Viral families with RNA genomes tend to harbour more virosphere-specific domains than other viruses. Interestingly, host range preferences of different viral classes are, for the most part, not reflected by domains shared between viruses and different superkingdoms. The role of viruses in the genesis of the cellular domain repertoire is reviewed to bring them more confidently and firmly into the larger biological picture. PMID:26296474

  17. Fast kinase domain-containing protein 3 is a mitochondrial protein essential for cellular respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Simarro, Maria; Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo; Kedersha, Nancy; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Adelmant, Guillaume O.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Rhee, Kirsten; Tisdale, Sarah; Danial, Nika; Benarafa, Charaf; Orduna, Anonio; Anderson, Paul

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Five members of the FAST kinase domain-containing proteins are localized to mitochondria in mammalian cells. {yields} The FASTKD3 interactome includes proteins involved in various aspects of mitochondrial metabolism. {yields} Targeted knockdown of FASTKD3 significantly reduces basal and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption. -- Abstract: Fas-activated serine/threonine phosphoprotein (FAST) is the founding member of the FAST kinase domain-containing protein (FASTKD) family that includes FASTKD1-5. FAST is a sensor of mitochondrial stress that modulates protein translation to promote the survival of cells exposed to adverse conditions. Mutations in FASTKD2 have been linked to a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy that is associated with reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity, an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have confirmed the mitochondrial localization of FASTKD2 and shown that all FASTKD family members are found in mitochondria. Although human and mouse FASTKD1-5 genes are expressed ubiquitously, some of them are most abundantly expressed in mitochondria-enriched tissues. We have found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of FASTKD3 severely blunts basal and stress-induced mitochondrial oxygen consumption without disrupting the assembly of respiratory chain complexes. Tandem affinity purification reveals that FASTKD3 interacts with components of mitochondrial respiratory and translation machineries. Our results introduce FASTKD3 as an essential component of mitochondrial respiration that may modulate energy balance in cells exposed to adverse conditions by functionally coupling mitochondrial protein synthesis to respiration.

  18. Functional studies of the BTB domain in the Drosophila GAGA and Mod(mdg4) proteins.

    PubMed

    Read, D; Butte, M J; Dernburg, A F; Frasch, M; Kornberg, T B

    2000-10-15

    The BTB/POZ (BTB) domain is an approximately 120 residue sequence that is conserved at the N-terminus of many proteins in both vertebrates and invertebrates. We found that the protein encoded by a lethal allele of the Drosophila modifier of mdg4 [mod(mdg4)] gene has two mutated residues in its BTB domain. The identities of the residues at the positions of these mutations are highly conserved in the BTB domain family of proteins, and when the corresponding mutations were engineered into the BTB domain-containing GAGA protein, the activity of GAGA as a transcription activator in a transient transfection assay was severely reduced. The functional equivalence of the BTB domains was established by showing that the BTB domain of the mod(mdg4) protein can effectively substitute for that of GAGA. PMID:11024164

  19. Structure of the ERM protein moesin reveals the FERM domain fold masked by an extended actin binding tail domain.

    PubMed

    Pearson, M A; Reczek, D; Bretscher, A; Karplus, P A

    2000-04-28

    The ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) protein family link actin filaments of cell surface structures to the plasma membrane, using a C-terminal F-actin binding segment and an N-terminal FERM domain, a common membrane binding module. ERM proteins are regulated by an intramolecular association of the FERM and C-terminal tail domains that masks their binding sites. The crystal structure of a dormant moesin FERM/tail complex reveals that the FERM domain has three compact lobes including an integrated PTB/PH/ EVH1 fold, with the C-terminal segment bound as an extended peptide masking a large surface of the FERM domain. This extended binding mode suggests a novel mechanism for how different signals could produce varying levels of activation. Sequence conservation suggests a similar regulation of the tumor suppressor merlin. PMID:10847681

  20. A Simple Model of Protein Domain Swapping in Crowded Cellular Environments.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Jaie C; Dunatunga, Sachith; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2016-06-01

    Domain swapping in proteins is an important mechanism of functional and structural innovation. However, despite its ubiquity and importance, the physical mechanisms that lead to domain swapping are poorly understood. Here, we present a simple two-dimensional coarse-grained model of protein domain swapping in the cytoplasm. In our model, two-domain proteins partially unfold and diffuse in continuous space. Monte Carlo multiprotein simulations of the model reveal that domain swapping occurs at intermediate temperatures, whereas folded dimers and folded monomers prevail at low temperatures, and partially unfolded monomers predominate at high temperatures. We use a simplified amino acid alphabet consisting of four residue types, and find that the oligomeric state at a given temperature depends on the sequence of the protein. We also show that hinge strain between domains can promote domain swapping, consistent with experimental observations for real proteins. Domain swapping depends nonmonotonically on the protein concentration, with domain-swapped dimers occurring at intermediate concentrations and nonspecific interactions between partially unfolded proteins occurring at high concentrations. For folded proteins, we recover the result obtained in three-dimensional lattice simulations, i.e., that functional dimerization is most prevalent at intermediate temperatures and nonspecific interactions increase at low temperatures. PMID:27276255

  1. Functional domains of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase: regulation by autoinhibitory and visinin-like domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandiran, S.; Takezawa, D.; Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) with a catalytic domain, calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like domain was cloned and characterized from plants [Patil et al., (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 4797-4801; Takezawa et al. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 8126-8132]. The mechanisms of CCaMK activation by calcium and calcium/calmodulin were investigated using various deletion mutants. The use of deletion mutants of CCaMK lacking either one, two, or all three calcium-binding EF hands indicated that all three calcium-binding sites in the visinin-like domain were crucial for the full calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity. As each calcium-binding EF hand was deleted, there was a gradual reduction in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity from 100 to 4%. Another mutant (amino acids 1-322) which lacks both the visinin-like domain containing three EF hands and the calmodulin-binding domain was constitutively active, indicating the presence of an autoinhibitory domain around the calmodulin-binding domain. By using various synthetic peptides and the constitutively active mutant, we have shown that CCaMK contains an autoinhibitory domain within the residues 322-340 which overlaps its calmodulin-binding domain. Kinetic studies with both ATP and the GS peptide substrate suggest that the autoinhibitory domain of CCaMK interacts only with the peptide substrate binding motif of the catalytic domain, but not with the ATP-binding motif.

  2. Forced unfolding of protein domains determines cytoskeletal rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, John

    2005-03-01

    Cells have recently been shown to have a power-law dynamic shear modulus over wide frequency range; the value of the exponent being non-universal, varying from 0.1-0.25 depending on cell type. This observation has been interpreted as evidence for the Soft Glassy Rheology (SGR) model, a trap-type glass model with an effective granular temperature. We propose a simple, alternative model of cytoskeletal mechanics based on the thermally activated, forced unfolding of domains in proteins cross-linking a stressed semi-flexible polymer gel. It directly relates a cell’s mechanical response to biophysical parameters of the cytoskeleton’s molecular constituents. Simulations indicate that unfolding events in a random network display a collective self-organization, giving rise to an exponential distribution of crosslink stress that can reproduce cell viscoelasticity. The model suggests natural explanations for the observed correlation between cell rheology and intracellular static stress, including those previously explained using the tensegrity concept. Moreover, our model provides insight into potential mechanisms of mechanotransduction as well as cell shape sensing and maintenance.

  3. A multi-objective optimization approach accurately resolves protein domain architectures

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, J.S.; Vieira, F.R.J.; Zaverucha, G.; Carbone, A.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Given a protein sequence and a number of potential domains matching it, what are the domain content and the most likely domain architecture for the sequence? This problem is of fundamental importance in protein annotation, constituting one of the main steps of all predictive annotation strategies. On the other hand, when potential domains are several and in conflict because of overlapping domain boundaries, finding a solution for the problem might become difficult. An accurate prediction of the domain architecture of a multi-domain protein provides important information for function prediction, comparative genomics and molecular evolution. Results: We developed DAMA (Domain Annotation by a Multi-objective Approach), a novel approach that identifies architectures through a multi-objective optimization algorithm combining scores of domain matches, previously observed multi-domain co-occurrence and domain overlapping. DAMA has been validated on a known benchmark dataset based on CATH structural domain assignments and on the set of Plasmodium falciparum proteins. When compared with existing tools on both datasets, it outperforms all of them. Availability and implementation: DAMA software is implemented in C++ and the source code can be found at http://www.lcqb.upmc.fr/DAMA. Contact: juliana.silva_bernardes@upmc.fr or alessandra.carbone@lip6.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26458889

  4. Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2012-03-15

    The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully

  5. A 127-kDa protein (UV-DDB) binds to the cytoplasmic domain of the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Sukegawa, J; Sukegawa, I; Tomita, S; Iijima, K; Oguchi, S; Suzuki, T; Nairn, A C; Greengard, P

    1999-02-01

    Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) is an integral membrane protein with a short cytoplasmic domain of 47 amino acids. It is hoped that identification of proteins that interact with the cytoplasmic domain will provide new insights into the physiological function of APP and, in turn, into the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. To identify proteins that interact with the cytoplasmic domain of APP, we employed affinity chromatography using an immobilized synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 645-694 of APP695 and identified a protein of approximately 130 kDa in rat brain cytosol. Amino acid sequencing of the protein revealed the protein to be a rat homologue of monkey UV-DDB (UV-damaged DNA-binding protein, calculated molecular mass of 127 kDa). UV-DDB/p127 co-immunoprecipitated with APP using an anti-APP antibody from PC12 cell lysates. APP also co-immunoprecipitated with UV-DDB/p127 using an anti-UV-DDB/p127 antibody. These results indicate that UV-DDB/p127, which is present in the cytosolic fraction, forms a complex with APP through its cytoplasmic domain. In vitro binding experiments using a glutathione S-transferase-APP cytoplasmic domain fusion protein and several mutants indicated that the YENPTY motif within the APP cytoplasmic domain, which is important in the internalization of APP and amyloid beta protein secretion, may be involved in the interaction between UV-DDB/p127 and APP. PMID:9930726

  6. Crystal Structure of the Protein Kinase Domain of Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Snf1

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph,M.; Amodeo, G.; Bai, Y.; Tong, L.

    2005-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master metabolic regulator, and is an important target for drug development against diabetes, obesity, and other diseases. AMPK is a hetero-trimeric enzyme, with a catalytic ({alpha}) subunit, and two regulatory ({beta} and {gamma}) subunits. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.2 Angstrom resolution of the protein kinase domain (KD) of the catalytic subunit of yeast AMPK (commonly known as SNF1). The Snf1-KD structure shares strong similarity to other protein kinases, with a small N-terminal lobe and a large C-terminal lobe. Two negative surface patches in the structure may be important for the recognition of the substrates of this kinase.

  7. Changes in hydration structure are necessary for collective motions of a multi-domain protein.

    PubMed

    Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Conformational motions of proteins are necessary for their functions. To date, experimental studies measuring conformational fluctuations of a whole protein structure have revealed that water molecules hydrating proteins are necessary to induce protein functional motions. However, the underlying microscopic mechanism behind such regulation remains unsolved. To clarify the mechanism, multi-domain proteins are good targets because it is obvious that water molecules between domains play an important role in domain motions. Here, we show how changes in hydration structure microscopically correlate with large-amplitude motions of a multi-domain protein, through molecular dynamics simulation supported by structural analyses and biochemical experiments. We first identified collective domain motions of the protein, which open/close an active-site cleft between domains. The analyses on changes in hydration structure revealed that changes in local hydration in the depth of the cleft are necessary for the domain motion and vice versa. In particular, 'wetting'/'drying' at a hydrophobic pocket and 'adsorption'/'dissociation' of a few water molecules at a hydrophilic crevice in the cleft were induced by dynamic rearrangements of hydrogen-bond networks, and worked as a switch for the domain motions. Our results microscopically demonstrated the importance of hydrogen-bond networks of water molecules in understanding energy landscapes of protein motions. PMID:27193111

  8. Changes in hydration structure are necessary for collective motions of a multi-domain protein

    PubMed Central

    Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Conformational motions of proteins are necessary for their functions. To date, experimental studies measuring conformational fluctuations of a whole protein structure have revealed that water molecules hydrating proteins are necessary to induce protein functional motions. However, the underlying microscopic mechanism behind such regulation remains unsolved. To clarify the mechanism, multi-domain proteins are good targets because it is obvious that water molecules between domains play an important role in domain motions. Here, we show how changes in hydration structure microscopically correlate with large-amplitude motions of a multi-domain protein, through molecular dynamics simulation supported by structural analyses and biochemical experiments. We first identified collective domain motions of the protein, which open/close an active-site cleft between domains. The analyses on changes in hydration structure revealed that changes in local hydration in the depth of the cleft are necessary for the domain motion and vice versa. In particular, ‘wetting’/‘drying’ at a hydrophobic pocket and ‘adsorption’/‘dissociation’ of a few water molecules at a hydrophilic crevice in the cleft were induced by dynamic rearrangements of hydrogen-bond networks, and worked as a switch for the domain motions. Our results microscopically demonstrated the importance of hydrogen-bond networks of water molecules in understanding energy landscapes of protein motions. PMID:27193111

  9. Structural diversity in the RGS domain and its interaction with heterotrimeric G protein alpha-subunits.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, Meera; Willard, Francis S; Kimple, Adam J; Turnbull, Andrew P; Ball, Linda J; Schoch, Guillaume A; Gileadi, Carina; Fedorov, Oleg Y; Dowler, Elizabeth F; Higman, Victoria A; Hutsell, Stephanie Q; Sundström, Michael; Doyle, Declan A; Siderovski, David P

    2008-04-29

    Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins accelerate GTP hydrolysis by Galpha subunits and thus facilitate termination of signaling initiated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). RGS proteins hold great promise as disease intervention points, given their signature role as negative regulators of GPCRs-receptors to which the largest fraction of approved medications are currently directed. RGS proteins share a hallmark RGS domain that interacts most avidly with Galpha when in its transition state for GTP hydrolysis; by binding and stabilizing switch regions I and II of Galpha, RGS domain binding consequently accelerates Galpha-mediated GTP hydrolysis. The human genome encodes more than three dozen RGS domain-containing proteins with varied Galpha substrate specificities. To facilitate their exploitation as drug-discovery targets, we have taken a systematic structural biology approach toward cataloging the structural diversity present among RGS domains and identifying molecular determinants of their differential Galpha selectivities. Here, we determined 14 structures derived from NMR and x-ray crystallography of members of the R4, R7, R12, and RZ subfamilies of RGS proteins, including 10 uncomplexed RGS domains and 4 RGS domain/Galpha complexes. Heterogeneity observed in the structural architecture of the RGS domain, as well as in engagement of switch III and the all-helical domain of the Galpha substrate, suggests that unique structural determinants specific to particular RGS protein/Galpha pairings exist and could be used to achieve selective inhibition by small molecules. PMID:18434541

  10. A protein domain-based interactome network for C. elegans early embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Boxem, Mike; Maliga, Zoltan; Klitgord, Niels; Li, Na; Lemmens, Irma; Mana, Miyeko; de Lichtervelde, Lorenzo; Mul, Joram D.; van de Peut, Diederik; Devos, Maxime; Simonis, Nicolas; Yildirim, Muhammed A.; Cokol, Murat; Kao, Huey-Ling; de Smet, Anne-Sophie; Wang, Haidong; Schlaitz, Anne-Lore; Hao, Tong; Milstein, Stuart; Fan, Changyu; Tipsword, Mike; Drew, Kevin; Galli, Matilde; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Drechsel, David; Koller, Daphne; Roth, Frederick P.; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Dunker, A. Keith; Bonneau, Richard; Gunsalus, Kristin C.; Hill, David E.; Piano, Fabio; Tavernier, Jan; van den Heuvel, Sander; Hyman, Anthony A.; Vidal, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Summary Many protein-protein interactions are mediated through independently folding modular domains. Proteome-wide efforts to model protein-protein interaction or “interactome” networks have largely ignored this modular organization of proteins. We developed an experimental strategy to efficiently identify interaction domains and generated a domain-based interactome network for proteins involved in C. elegans early embryonic cell divisions. Minimal interacting regions were identified for over 200 proteins, providing important information on their domain organization. Furthermore, our approach increased the sensitivity of the two-hybrid system, resulting in a more complete interactome network. This interactome modeling strategy revealed new insights into C. elegans centrosome function and is applicable to other biological processes in this and other organisms. PMID:18692475

  11. Formation of functional cell membrane domains: the interplay of lipid- and protein-mediated interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Numerous cell membrane associated processes, including signal transduction, membrane sorting, protein processing and virus trafficking take place in membrane subdomains. Protein-protein interactions provide the frameworks necessary to generate biologically functional membrane domains. For example, coat proteins define membrane areas destined for sorting processes, viral proteins self-assemble to generate a budding virus, and adapter molecules organize multimolecular signalling assemblies, which catalyse downstream reactions. The concept of raft lipid-based membrane domains provides a different principle for compartmentalization and segregation of membrane constituents. Accordingly, rafts are defined by the physical properties of the lipid bilayer and function by selective partitioning of membrane lipids and proteins into membrane domains of specific phase behaviour and lipid packing. Here, I will discuss the interplay of these independent principles of protein scaffolds and raft lipid microdomains leading to the generation of biologically functional membrane domains. PMID:12803918

  12. Insulator function and topological domain border strength scale with architectural protein occupancy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chromosome conformation capture studies suggest that eukaryotic genomes are organized into structures called topologically associating domains. The borders of these domains are highly enriched for architectural proteins with characterized roles in insulator function. However, a majority of architectural protein binding sites localize within topological domains, suggesting sites associated with domain borders represent a functionally different subclass of these regulatory elements. How topologically associating domains are established and what differentiates border-associated from non-border architectural protein binding sites remain unanswered questions. Results By mapping the genome-wide target sites for several Drosophila architectural proteins, including previously uncharacterized profiles for TFIIIC and SMC-containing condensin complexes, we uncover an extensive pattern of colocalization in which architectural proteins establish dense clusters at the borders of topological domains. Reporter-based enhancer-blocking insulator activity as well as endogenous domain border strength scale with the occupancy level of architectural protein binding sites, suggesting co-binding by architectural proteins underlies the functional potential of these loci. Analyses in mouse and human stem cells suggest that clustering of architectural proteins is a general feature of genome organization, and conserved architectural protein binding sites may underlie the tissue-invariant nature of topologically associating domains observed in mammals. Conclusions We identify a spectrum of architectural protein occupancy that scales with the topological structure of chromosomes and the regulatory potential of these elements. Whereas high occupancy architectural protein binding sites associate with robust partitioning of topologically associating domains and robust insulator function, low occupancy sites appear reserved for gene-specific regulation within topological domains. PMID

  13. IQGAP Proteins Reveal an Atypical Phosphoinositide (aPI) Binding Domain with a Pseudo C2 Domain Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Miles J.; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R.; van Aalten, Daan M.F.; Downes, C. Peter; Batty, Ian H.

    2012-10-16

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP3). The binding affinity for PtdInsP3, together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP3 effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules.

  14. IQGAP proteins reveal an atypical phosphoinositide (aPI) binding domain with a pseudo C2 domain fold.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Miles J; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R; van Aalten, Daan M F; Downes, C Peter; Batty, Ian H

    2012-06-29

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP(3)). The binding affinity for PtdInsP(3), together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP(3) effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules. PMID:22493426

  15. Correspondence between immunological and functional domains in the transforming protein of Fujinami sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, J C; Pawson, T

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with either gag or fps portions of the wild-type Fujinami sarcoma virus transforming protein have been used to probe the structure of proteins encoded by mutant genomes constructed in vitro. The pattern of immunoreactivity suggests that the functional domain defined in genetic studies (Stone et al., Cell 37:549-558, 1984) corresponds to a discrete immunological domain in the native, wild-type Fujinami sarcoma virus protein. At least one mutation affecting both the structure and function of the proposed NH2-terminal fps-specific domain encodes a product with high specific activities in kinase assays. Furthermore, a cell line expressing high levels of this mutant protein is only moderately transformed. The striking correspondence between the immunological domain defined here and the functional domain inferred from the results of transfection experiments suggests that this non-kinase-specifying region constitutes a discrete structural as well as functional component of the viral protein. Images PMID:2991592

  16. Site on the human erythrocyte glucose transporter phosphorylated by protein kinase C resides on the protein's hydrophilic domain

    SciTech Connect

    Deziel, M.R.; McReynolds, J.H.; Lippes, H.A.; Jung, C.Y.

    1986-05-01

    A recently published model of the human erythrocyte hexose transporter deduced from the protein's primary structure proposes that the transporter is organized into two membrane domains comprising 77% of the protein's mass and three hydrophilic domains, a short segment that includes the polypeptide's N-terminus and two larger segments, one lying between the membrane domains and the other at the protein's C-terminus. Limited tryptic digestion of the transporter produces two membrane-bound fragments corresponding to the proposed membrane domains and releases a number of soluble peptides. Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectroscopic analysis of the released peptides and comparison of the peptide's masses with the transporter's amino acid sequence revealed that tryptic peptides corresponding to at least 63% of the hydrophilic domains' mass were recovered. The site of phosphorylation by protein kinase C, tagged using (/sup 32/P)-ATP, was also released from the transporter under these conditions, (in contrast to sites located within the protein's membrane domains), indicating that this site is located within one of the hydrophilic domains. Tryptic digestion at elevated ionic strength or cleavage with S. Aureus V8 protease results in the recovery of the /sup 32/P label on the carbohydrate-bearing membrane domain that is located near the protein's N-terminus, thus eliminating the C-terminal hydrophilic segment as a possible site of phosphorylation.

  17. Coupled protein domain motion in Taq polymerase revealed by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Zimei; Biehl, Ralf; Monkenbusch, Michael; Richter, Dieter; Callaway, David J. E.

    2005-01-01

    Long-range conformational changes in proteins are ubiquitous in biology for the transmission and amplification of signals; such conformational changes can be triggered by small-amplitude, nanosecond protein domain motion. Understanding how conformational changes are initiated requires the characterization of protein domain motion on these timescales and on length scales comparable to protein dimensions. Using neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE), normal mode analysis, and a statistical-mechanical framework, we reveal overdamped, coupled domain motion within DNA polymerase I from Thermus aquaticus (Taq polymerase). This protein utilizes correlated domain dynamics over 70 Å to coordinate nucleotide synthesis and cleavage during DNA synthesis and repair. We show that NSE spectroscopy can determine the domain mobility tensor, which determines the degree of dynamical coupling between domains. The mobility tensor defines the domain velocity response to a force applied to it or to another domain, just as the sails of a sailboat determine its velocity given the applied wind force. The NSE results provide insights into the nature of protein domain motion that are not appreciated by conventional biophysical techniques. PMID:16306270

  18. The cloning of Grb10 reveals a new family of SH2 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Ooi, J; Yajnik, V; Immanuel, D; Gordon, M; Moskow, J J; Buchberg, A M; Margolis, B

    1995-04-20

    SH2 domains function to bind proteins containing phosphotyrosine and are components of proteins that are important signal transducers for tyrosine kinases. We have cloned SH2 domain proteins by screening bacterial expression libraries with the tyrosine phosphorylated carboxyterminus of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Here we report the identification of a new SH2 domain protein, Grb10. Grb10 is highly related to Grb7, an SH2 domain protein that we have previously identified. In addition to an SH2 domain, Grb7 and Grb10 have a central domain with similarity to a putative C. elegans gene likely to be involved in neuronal migration. At least three forms of Grb10 exist in fibroblasts apparently due to alternate translational start sites. Grb10 undergoes serine but not tyrosine phosphorylation after EGF treatment resulting in a shift mobility in a large fraction of Grb10 molecules. However Grb10 appears to bind poorly to EGF-Receptor and the true binding partner for the Grb10 SH2 domain is unclear. Grb10 maps to mouse chromosome 11 very close to the EGF-Receptor which is remarkably similar to Grb7 that maps near the EGF-Receptor related HER2 receptor. The finding of multiple family members with evolutionarily conserved domains indicates that these SH2 domain proteins are likely to have an important, although as of yet, unidentified function. PMID:7731717

  19. Dynamics and Adaptive Benefits of Protein Domain Emergence and Arrangements during Plant Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kersting, Anna R.; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Moore, Andrew D.; Grath, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Plant genomes are generally very large, mostly paleopolyploid, and have numerous gene duplicates and complex genomic features such as repeats and transposable elements. Many of these features have been hypothesized to enable plants, which cannot easily escape environmental challenges, to rapidly adapt. Another mechanism, which has recently been well described as a major facilitator of rapid adaptation in bacteria, animals, and fungi but not yet for plants, is modular rearrangement of protein-coding genes. Due to the high precision of profile-based methods, rearrangements can be well captured at the protein level by characterizing the emergence, loss, and rearrangements of protein domains, their structural, functional, and evolutionary building blocks. Here, we study the dynamics of domain rearrangements and explore their adaptive benefit in 27 plant and 3 algal genomes. We use a phylogenomic approach by which we can explain the formation of 88% of all arrangements by single-step events, such as fusion, fission, and terminal loss of domains. We find many domains are lost along every lineage, but at least 500 domains are novel, that is, they are unique to green plants and emerged more or less recently. These novel domains duplicate and rearrange more readily within their genomes than ancient domains and are overproportionally involved in stress response and developmental innovations. Novel domains more often affect regulatory proteins and show a higher degree of structural disorder than ancient domains. Whereas a relatively large and well-conserved core set of single-domain proteins exists, long multi-domain arrangements tend to be species-specific. We find that duplicated genes are more often involved in rearrangements. Although fission events typically impact metabolic proteins, fusion events often create new signaling proteins essential for environmental sensing. Taken together, the high volatility of single domains and complex arrangements in plant genomes

  20. Dynamics and adaptive benefits of protein domain emergence and arrangements during plant genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Kersting, Anna R; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Moore, Andrew D; Grath, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Plant genomes are generally very large, mostly paleopolyploid, and have numerous gene duplicates and complex genomic features such as repeats and transposable elements. Many of these features have been hypothesized to enable plants, which cannot easily escape environmental challenges, to rapidly adapt. Another mechanism, which has recently been well described as a major facilitator of rapid adaptation in bacteria, animals, and fungi but not yet for plants, is modular rearrangement of protein-coding genes. Due to the high precision of profile-based methods, rearrangements can be well captured at the protein level by characterizing the emergence, loss, and rearrangements of protein domains, their structural, functional, and evolutionary building blocks. Here, we study the dynamics of domain rearrangements and explore their adaptive benefit in 27 plant and 3 algal genomes. We use a phylogenomic approach by which we can explain the formation of 88% of all arrangements by single-step events, such as fusion, fission, and terminal loss of domains. We find many domains are lost along every lineage, but at least 500 domains are novel, that is, they are unique to green plants and emerged more or less recently. These novel domains duplicate and rearrange more readily within their genomes than ancient domains and are overproportionally involved in stress response and developmental innovations. Novel domains more often affect regulatory proteins and show a higher degree of structural disorder than ancient domains. Whereas a relatively large and well-conserved core set of single-domain proteins exists, long multi-domain arrangements tend to be species-specific. We find that duplicated genes are more often involved in rearrangements. Although fission events typically impact metabolic proteins, fusion events often create new signaling proteins essential for environmental sensing. Taken together, the high volatility of single domains and complex arrangements in plant genomes

  1. Cytoplasmic Ig-Domain Proteins: Cytoskeletal Regulators with a Role in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Otey, Carol A.; Dixon, Richard; Stack, Christianna; Goicoechea, Silvia M.

    2009-01-01

    Immunoglobulin domains are found in a wide variety of functionally diverse transmembrane proteins, and also in a smaller number of cytoplasmic proteins. Members of this latter group are usually associated with the actin cytoskeleton, and most of them bind directly to either actin or myosin, or both. Recently, studies of inherited human disorders have identified disease-causing mutations in five cytoplasmic Ig-domain proteins: myosin-binding protein C, titin, myotilin, palladin, and myopalladin. Together with results obtained from cultured cells and mouse models, these clinical studies have yielded novel insights into the unexpected roles of Ig domain proteins in mechanotransduction and signaling to the nucleus. An emerging theme in this field is that cytoskeleton-associated Ig domain proteins are more than structural elements of the cell, and may have evolved to fill different needs in different cellular compartments. PMID:19466753

  2. BEACH-domain proteins act together in a cascade to mediate vacuolar protein trafficking and disease resistance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Teh, Ooi-kock; Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Tamura, Kentaro; Fuji, Kentaro; Tabata, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Shingenobu, Shuji; Yamada, Masashi; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Sawa, Shinichiro; Shimada, Tomoo; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2015-03-01

    Membrane trafficking to the protein storage vacuole (PSV) is a specialized process in seed plants. However, this trafficking mechanism to PSV is poorly understood. Here, we show that three types of Beige and Chediak-Higashi (BEACH)-domain proteins contribute to both vacuolar protein transport and effector-triggered immunity (ETI). We screened a green fluorescent seed (GFS) library of Arabidopsis mutants with defects in vesicle trafficking and isolated two allelic mutants gfs3 and gfs12 with a defect in seed protein transport to PSV. The gene responsible for the mutant phenotype was found to encode a putative protein belonging to group D of BEACH-domain proteins, which possess kinase domains. Disruption of other BEACH-encoding loci in the gfs12 mutant showed that BEACH homologs acted in a cascading manner for PSV trafficking. The epistatic genetic interactions observed among BEACH homologs were also found in the ETI responses of the gfs12 and gfs12 bchb-1 mutants, which showed elevated avirulent bacterial growth. The GFS12 kinase domain interacted specifically with the pleckstrin homology domain of BchC1. These results suggest that a cascade of multiple BEACH-domain proteins contributes to vacuolar protein transport and plant defense. PMID:25618824

  3. Multiple Protein Interactions Involving Proposed Extracellular Loop Domains of the Tight Junction Protein Occludin

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, Asma; Brown, G. Thomas; Tom, Jeffrey; Drake, Alex; Bui, Tam T.T.; Quan, Cliff; Mrsny, Randall J.

    2005-01-01

    Occludin is a tetraspan integral membrane protein in epithelial and endothelial tight junction (TJ) structures that is projected to have two extracellular loops. We have used peptides emulating central regions of human occludin's first and second loops, termed O-A:101–121 and O-B:210–228, respectively, to examine potential molecular interactions between these two regions of occludin and other TJ proteins. A superficial biophysical assessment of A:101–121 and O-B:210–228 showed them to have dissimilar solution conformation characteristics. Although O-A:101–121 failed to strongly interact with protein components of the human epithelial intestinal cell line T84, O-B:210–228 selectively associated with occludin, claudin-one and the junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-A. Further, the presence of O-B:210–228, but not O-A:101–121, impeded the recovery of functional TJ structures. A scrambled peptide sequences of O-B:210–228 failed to influence TJ assembly. These studies demonstrate distinct properties for these two extracellular segments of the occludin protein and provide an improved understanding of how specific domains of occludin may interact with proteins present at TJ structures. PMID:15659655

  4. Pinkbar is an epithelial-specific BAR domain protein that generates planar membrane structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pykäläinen, Anette; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Zhao, Hongxia; Saarikangas, Juha; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Jansen, Maurice; Hakanen, Janne; Koskela, Essi V.; Peränen, Johan; Vihinen, Helena; Jokitalo, Eija; Salminen, Marjo; Ikonen, Elina; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2013-05-29

    Bin/amphipysin/Rvs (BAR)-domain proteins sculpt cellular membranes and have key roles in processes such as endocytosis, cell motility and morphogenesis. BAR domains are divided into three subfamilies: BAR- and F-BAR-domain proteins generate positive membrane curvature and stabilize cellular invaginations, whereas I-BAR-domain proteins induce negative curvature and stabilize protrusions. We show that a previously uncharacterized member of the I-BAR subfamily, Pinkbar, is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, where it localizes to Rab13-positive vesicles and to the plasma membrane at intercellular junctions. Notably, the BAR domain of Pinkbar does not induce membrane tubulation but promotes the formation of planar membrane sheets. Structural and mutagenesis analyses reveal that the BAR domain of Pinkbar has a relatively flat lipid-binding interface and that it assembles into sheet-like oligomers in crystals and in solution, which may explain its unique membrane-deforming activity.

  5. Protein Domain-Level Landscape of Cancer-Type-Specific Somatic Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Rolland, Thomas; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Roth, Frederick P.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying driver mutations and their functional consequences is critical to our understanding of cancer. Towards this goal, and because domains are the functional units of a protein, we explored the protein domain-level landscape of cancer-type-specific somatic mutations. Specifically, we systematically examined tumor genomes from 21 cancer types to identify domains with high mutational density in specific tissues, the positions of mutational hotspots within these domains, and the functional and structural context where possible. While hotspots corresponding to specific gain-of-function mutations are expected for oncoproteins, we found that tumor suppressor proteins also exhibit strong biases toward being mutated in particular domains. Within domains, however, we observed the expected patterns of mutation, with recurrently mutated positions for oncogenes and evenly distributed mutations for tumor suppressors. For example, we identified both known and new endometrial cancer hotspots in the tyrosine kinase domain of the FGFR2 protein, one of which is also a hotspot in breast cancer, and found new two hotspots in the Immunoglobulin I-set domain in colon cancer. Thus, to prioritize cancer mutations for further functional studies aimed at more precise cancer treatments, we have systematically correlated mutations and cancer types at the protein domain level. PMID:25794154

  6. Cooperative folding of intrinsically disordered domains drives assembly of a strong elongated protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszka, Dominika T.; Whelan, Fiona; Farrance, Oliver E.; Fung, Herman K. H.; Paci, Emanuele; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Baldock, Clair; Baumann, Christoph G.; Brockwell, David J.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Clarke, Jane

    2015-06-01

    Bacteria exploit surface proteins to adhere to other bacteria, surfaces and host cells. Such proteins need to project away from the bacterial surface and resist significant mechanical forces. SasG is a protein that forms extended fibrils on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus and promotes host adherence and biofilm formation. Here we show that although monomeric and lacking covalent cross-links, SasG maintains a highly extended conformation in solution. This extension is mediated through obligate folding cooperativity of the intrinsically disordered E domains that couple non-adjacent G5 domains thermodynamically, forming interfaces that are more stable than the domains themselves. Thus, counterintuitively, the elongation of the protein appears to be dependent on the inherent instability of its domains. The remarkable mechanical strength of SasG arises from tandemly arrayed `clamp' motifs within the folded domains. Our findings reveal an elegant minimal solution for the assembly of monomeric mechano-resistant tethers of variable length.

  7. Towards an intelligent system for the automatic assignment of domains in globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, M J; Hegyi, H; Islam, S A; Luo, J; Russell, R B

    1995-01-01

    The automatic identification of protein domains from coordinates is the first step in the classification of protein folds and hence is required for databases to guide structure prediction. Most algorithms encode a single concept based and sometimes do not yield assignments that are consistent with the generally accepted perception. Our development of an automatic approach to identify reliably domains from protein coordinates is described. The algorithm is benchmarked against a manual identification of the domains in 284 representative protein chains. The first step is the domain assignment by distance (DAD) algorithm that considers the density of inter-residue contacts represented in a contact matrix. The algorithm yields 85% agreement with the manual assignment. The paper then considers how the reliability of these assignments could be evaluated. Finally the use of structural comparisons using the STAMP algorithm to validate domain assignment is reported on a test case. PMID:7584461

  8. Proteins with Intrinsically Disordered Domains Are Preferentially Recruited to Polyglutamine Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    O’Meally, Robert; Sonnenberg, Jason L.; Cole, Robert N.; Shewmaker, Frank P.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular protein aggregation is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases. Aggregates formed by polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded proteins, such as Huntingtin, adopt amyloid-like structures that are resistant to denaturation. We used a novel purification strategy to isolate aggregates formed by human Huntingtin N-terminal fragments with expanded polyQ tracts from both yeast and mammalian (PC-12) cells. Using mass spectrometry we identified the protein species that are trapped within these polyQ aggregates. We found that proteins with very long intrinsically-disordered (ID) domains (≥100 amino acids) and RNA-binding proteins were disproportionately recruited into aggregates. The removal of the ID domains from selected proteins was sufficient to eliminate their recruitment into polyQ aggregates. We also observed that several neurodegenerative disease-linked proteins were reproducibly trapped within the polyQ aggregates purified from mammalian cells. Many of these proteins have large ID domains and are found in neuronal inclusions in their respective diseases. Our study indicates that neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins are particularly vulnerable to recruitment into polyQ aggregates via their ID domains. Also, the high frequency of ID domains in RNA-binding proteins may explain why RNA-binding proteins are frequently found in pathological inclusions in various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26317359

  9. Ligand binding to the PDZ domains of postsynaptic density protein 95.

    PubMed

    Toto, Angelo; Pedersen, Søren W; Karlsson, O Andreas; Moran, Griffin E; Andersson, Eva; Chi, Celestine N; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2016-05-01

    Cellular scaffolding and signalling is generally governed by multidomain proteins, where each domain has a particular function. Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) is involved in synapse formation and is a typical example of such a multidomain protein. Protein-protein interactions of PSD-95 are well studied and include the following three protein ligands: (i)N-methyl-d-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit GluN2B, (ii) neuronal nitric oxide synthase and (iii) cysteine-rich protein (CRIPT), all of which bind to one or more of the three PDZ domains in PSD-95. While interactions for individual PDZ domains of PSD-95 have been well studied, less is known about the influence of neighbouring domains on the function of the respective individual domain. We therefore performed a systematic study on the ligand-binding kinetics of PSD-95 using constructs of different size for PSD-95 and its ligands. Regarding the canonical peptide-binding pocket and relatively short peptides (up to 15-mer), the PDZ domains in PSD-95 by and large work as individual binding modules. However, in agreement with previous studies, residues outside of the canonical binding pocket modulate the affinity of the ligands. In particular, the dissociation of the 101 amino acid CRIPT from PSD-95 is slowed down at least 10-fold for full-length PSD-95 when compared with the individual PDZ3 domain. PMID:26941280

  10. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon; Eom, Soo Hyun; Chun, ChangJu; Im, Young Jun

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  11. LdFlabarin, a New BAR Domain Membrane Protein of Leishmania Flagellum

    PubMed Central

    Thonnus, Magali; Salin, Bénédicte; Boissier, Fanny; Blancard, Corinne; Sauvanet, Cécile; Metzler, Christelle; Espiau, Benoît; Sahin, Annelise; Merlin, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    During the Leishmania life cycle, the flagellum undergoes successive assembly and disassembly of hundreds of proteins. Understanding these processes necessitates the study of individual components. Here, we investigated LdFlabarin, an uncharacterized L. donovani flagellar protein. The gene is conserved within the Leishmania genus and orthologous genes only exist in the Trypanosoma genus. LdFlabarin associates with the flagellar plasma membrane, extending from the base to the tip of the flagellum as a helicoidal structure. Site-directed mutagenesis, deletions and chimera constructs showed that LdFlabarin flagellar addressing necessitates three determinants: an N-terminal potential acylation site and a central BAR domain for membrane targeting and the C-terminal domain for flagellar specificity. In vitro, the protein spontaneously associates with liposomes, triggering tubule formation, which suggests a structural/morphogenetic function. LdFlabarin is the first characterized Leishmania BAR domain protein, and the first flagellum-specific BAR domain protein. PMID:24086735

  12. Destabilization of Heterologous Proteins Mediated by the GSK3β Phosphorylation Domain of the β-Catenin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yuhan; Zhang, Hongyu; Chen, Xian; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhao, Chen; Wang, Ning; Wu, Ningning; He, Yunfeng; Nan, Guoxin; Zhang, Hongmei; Wen, Sheng; Deng, Fang; Liao, Zhan; Wu, Di; Zhang, Junhui; Qin, Xinyue; Haydon, Rex C.; Luu, Hue H.; He, Tong-Chuan; Zhou, Lan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays important roles in development and cellular processes. The hallmark of canonical Wnt signaling activation is the stabilization of β-catenin protein in cytoplasm and/or nucleus. The stability of β-catenin is the key to its biological functions and is controlled by the phosphorylation of its amino-terminal degradation domain. Aberrant activation of β-catenin signaling has been implicated in the development of human cancers. It has been recently suggested that GSK3β may play an essential role in regulating global protein turnover. Here, we investigate if the GSK3β phosphorylation site-containing degradation domain of β-catenin is sufficient to destabilize heterologous proteins. Methods and Results We engineer chimeric proteins by fusing β-catenin degradation domain at the N- and/or C-termini of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). In both transient and stable expression experiments, the chimeric GFP proteins exhibit a significantly decreased stability, which can be effectively antagonized by lithium and Wnt1. An activating mutation in the destruction domain significantly stabilizes the fusion protein. Furthermore, GSK3 inhibitor SB-216763 effectively increases the GFP signal of the fusion protein. Conversely, the inhibition of Wnt signaling with tankyrase inhibitor XAV939 results in a decrease in GFP signal of the fusion proteins, while these small molecules have no significant effects on the mutant destruction domain-GFP fusion protein. Conclusion Our findings strongly suggest that the β-catenin degradation domain may be sufficient to destabilize heterologous proteins in Wnt signaling-dependent manner. It is conceivable that the chimeric GFP proteins may be used as a functional reporter to measure the dynamic status of β-catenin signaling, and to identify potential anticancer drugs that target β-catenin signaling. PMID:24335169

  13. DomHR: Accurately Identifying Domain Boundaries in Proteins Using a Hinge Region Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-yan; Lu, Long-jian; Song, Qi; Yang, Qian-qian; Li, Da-peng; Sun, Jiang-ming; Li, Tong-hua; Cong, Pei-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Motivation The precise prediction of protein domains, which are the structural, functional and evolutionary units of proteins, has been a research focus in recent years. Although many methods have been presented for predicting protein domains and boundaries, the accuracy of predictions could be improved. Results In this study we present a novel approach, DomHR, which is an accurate predictor of protein domain boundaries based on a creative hinge region strategy. A hinge region was defined as a segment of amino acids that covers part of a domain region and a boundary region. We developed a strategy to construct profiles of domain-hinge-boundary (DHB) features generated by sequence-domain/hinge/boundary alignment against a database of known domain structures. The DHB features had three elements: normalized domain, hinge, and boundary probabilities. The DHB features were used as input to identify domain boundaries in a sequence. DomHR used a nonredundant dataset as the training set, the DHB and predicted shape string as features, and a conditional random field as the classification algorithm. In predicted hinge regions, a residue was determined to be a domain or a boundary according to a decision threshold. After decision thresholds were optimized, DomHR was evaluated by cross-validation, large-scale prediction, independent test and CASP (Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction) tests. All results confirmed that DomHR outperformed other well-established, publicly available domain boundary predictors for prediction accuracy. Availability The DomHR is available at http://cal.tongji.edu.cn/domain/. PMID:23593247

  14. Structure of the GAT domain of the endosomal adapter protein Tom1.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shuyan; Ellena, Jeffrey F; Armstrong, Geoffrey S; Capelluto, Daniel G S

    2016-06-01

    Cellular homeostasis requires correct delivery of cell-surface receptor proteins (cargo) to their target subcellular compartments. The adapter proteins Tom1 and Tollip are involved in sorting of ubiquitinated cargo in endosomal compartments. Recruitment of Tom1 to the endosomal compartments is mediated by its GAT domain's association to Tollip's Tom1-binding domain (TBD). In this data article, we report the solution NMR-derived structure of the Tom1 GAT domain. The estimated protein structure exhibits a bundle of three helical elements. We compare the Tom1 GAT structure with those structures corresponding to the Tollip TBD- and ubiquitin-bound states. PMID:26977434

  15. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Tom G.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Rivas, Manuel A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit. Methods Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1%) together in three different ways 1) variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2) variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3) all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families). A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Results We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed. Conclusion We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals. PMID:27128313

  16. Two distinct domains of protein 4.1 critical for assembly of functional nuclei in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Heald, Rebecca; Lee, Gloria; Nunomura, Wataru; Gimm, J Aura; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2002-11-15

    Protein 4.1R, a multifunctional structural protein, acts as an adaptor in mature red cell membrane skeletons linking spectrin-actin complexes to plasma membrane-associated proteins. In nucleated cells protein 4.1 is not associated exclusively with plasma membrane but is also detected at several important subcellular locations crucial for cell division. To identify 4.1 domains having critical functions in nuclear assembly, 4.1 domain peptides were added to Xenopus egg extract nuclear reconstitution reactions. Morphologically disorganized, replication deficient nuclei assembled when spectrin-actin-binding domain or NuMA-binding C-terminal domain peptides were present. However, control variant spectrin-actin-binding domain peptides incapable of binding actin or mutant C-terminal domain peptides with reduced NuMA binding had no deleterious effects on nuclear reconstitution. To test whether 4.1 is required for proper nuclear assembly, 4.1 isoforms were depleted with spectrin-actin binding or C-terminal domain-specific antibodies. Nuclei assembled in the depleted extracts were deranged. However, nuclear assembly could be rescued by the addition of recombinant 4.1R. Our data establish that protein 4.1 is essential for nuclear assembly and identify two distinct 4.1 domains, initially characterized in cytoskeletal interactions, that have crucial and versatile functions in nuclear assembly. PMID:12171917

  17. Differential Occurrence of Interactions and Interaction Domains in Proteins Containing Homopolymeric Amino Acid Repeats.

    PubMed

    Pelassa, Ilaria; Fiumara, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Homopolymeric amino acids repeats (AARs), which are widespread in proteomes, have often been viewed simply as spacers between protein domains, or even as "junk" sequences with no obvious function but with a potential to cause harm upon expansion as in genetic diseases associated with polyglutamine or polyalanine expansions, including Huntington disease and cleidocranial dysplasia. A growing body of evidence indicates however that at least some AARs can form organized, functional protein structures, and can regulate protein function. In particular, certain AARs can mediate protein-protein interactions, either through homotypic AAR-AAR contacts or through heterotypic contacts with other protein domains. It is still unclear however, whether AARs may have a generalized, proteome-wide role in shaping protein-protein interaction networks. Therefore, we have undertaken here a bioinformatics screening of the human proteome and interactome in search of quantitative evidence of such a role. We first identified the sets of proteins that contain repeats of any one of the 20 amino acids, as well as control sets of proteins chosen at random in the proteome. We then analyzed the connectivity between the proteins of the AAR-containing protein sets and we compared it with that observed in the corresponding control networks. We find evidence for different degrees of connectivity in the different AAR-containing protein networks. Indeed, networks of proteins containing polyglutamine, polyglutamate, polyproline, and other AARs show significantly increased levels of connectivity, whereas networks containing polyleucine and other hydrophobic repeats show lower degrees of connectivity. Furthermore, we observed that numerous protein-protein, -nucleic acid, and -lipid interaction domains are significantly enriched in specific AAR protein groups. These findings support the notion of a generalized, combinatorial role of AARs, together with conventional protein interaction domains, in shaping

  18. Optical Control of Protein–Protein Interactions via Blue Light-Induced Domain Swapping

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The design of new optogenetic tools for controlling protein function would be facilitated by the development of protein scaffolds that undergo large, well-defined structural changes upon exposure to light. Domain swapping, a process in which a structural element of a monomeric protein is replaced by the same element of another copy of the same protein, leads to a well-defined change in protein structure. We observe domain swapping in a variant of the blue light photoreceptor photoactive yellow protein in which a surface loop is replaced by a well-characterized protein–protein interaction motif, the E-helix. In the domain-swapped dimer, the E-helix sequence specifically binds a partner K-helix sequence, whereas in the monomeric form of the protein, the E-helix sequence is unable to fold into a binding-competent conformation and no interaction with the K-helix is seen. Blue light irradiation decreases the extent of domain swapping (from Kd = 10 μM to Kd = 300 μM) and dramatically enhances the rate, from weeks to <1 min. Blue light-induced domain swapping thus provides a novel mechanism for controlling of protein–protein interactions in which light alters both the stability and the kinetic accessibility of binding-competent states. PMID:25003701

  19. Multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization of PpsR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Heintz, Udo; Meinhart, Anton; Winkler, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Crystal structures of two truncated variants of the transcription factor PpsR from R. sphaeroides are presented that enabled the phasing of a triple PAS domain construct. Together, these structures reveal the importance of α-helical PAS extensions for multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization and function. Per–ARNT–Sim (PAS) domains are essential modules of many multi-domain signalling proteins that mediate protein interaction and/or sense environmental stimuli. Frequently, multiple PAS domains are present within single polypeptide chains, where their interplay is required for protein function. Although many isolated PAS domain structures have been reported over the last decades, only a few structures of multi-PAS proteins are known. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization and function is poorly understood. The transcription factor PpsR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is such a multi-PAS domain protein that, in addition to its three PAS domains, contains a glutamine-rich linker and a C-terminal helix–turn–helix DNA-binding motif. Here, crystal structures of two N-terminally and C-terminally truncated PpsR variants that comprise a single (PpsR{sub Q-PAS1}) and two (PpsR{sub N-Q-PAS1}) PAS domains, respectively, are presented and the multi-step strategy required for the phasing of a triple PAS domain construct (PpsR{sub ΔHTH}) is illustrated. While parts of the biologically relevant dimerization interface can already be observed in the two shorter constructs, the PpsR{sub ΔHTH} structure reveals how three PAS domains enable the formation of multiple oligomeric states (dimer, tetramer and octamer), highlighting that not only the PAS cores but also their α-helical extensions are essential for protein oligomerization. The results demonstrate that the long helical glutamine-rich linker of PpsR results from a direct fusion of the N-cap of the PAS1 domain with the C-terminal extension of the N-domain that

  20. Metagenome Analysis of Protein Domain Collocation within Cellulase Genes of Goat Rumen Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Lim, SooYeon; Seo, Jaehyun; Choi, Hyunbong; Yoon, Duhak; Nam, Jungrye; Kim, Heebal; Cho, Seoae; Chang, Jongsoo

    2013-01-01

    In this study, protein domains with cellulase activity in goat rumen microbes were investigated using metagenomic and bioinformatic analyses. After the complete genome of goat rumen microbes was obtained using a shotgun sequencing method, 217,892,109 pair reads were filtered, including only those with 70% identity, 100-bp matches, and thresholds below E−10 using METAIDBA. These filtered contigs were assembled and annotated using blastN against the NCBI nucleotide database. As a result, a microbial community structure with 1431 species was analyzed, among which Prevotella ruminicola 23 bacteria and Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus B316 were the dominant groups. In parallel, 201 sequences related with cellulase activities (EC.3.2.1.4) were obtained through blast searches using the enzyme.dat file provided by the NCBI database. After translating the nucleotide sequence into a protein sequence using Interproscan, 28 protein domains with cellulase activity were identified using the HMMER package with threshold E values below 10−5. Cellulase activity protein domain profiling showed that the major protein domains such as lipase GDSL, cellulase, and Glyco hydro 10 were present in bacterial species with strong cellulase activities. Furthermore, correlation plots clearly displayed the strong positive correlation between some protein domain groups, which was indicative of microbial adaption in the goat rumen based on feeding habits. This is the first metagenomic analysis of cellulase activity protein domains using bioinformatics from the goat rumen. PMID:25049895

  1. Targeting of a histone acetyltransferase domain to a promoter enhances protein expression levels in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kwaks, T H J; Sewalt, R G A B; van Blokland, R; Siersma, T J; Kasiem, M; Kelder, A; Otte, A P

    2005-01-12

    Silencing of transfected genes in mammalian cells is a fundamental problem that probably involves the (in)accessibility status of chromatin. A potential solution to this problem is to provide a cell with protein factors that make the chromatin of a promoter more open or accessible for transcription. We tested this by targeting such proteins to different promoters. We found that targeting the p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain to strong viral or cellular promoters is sufficient to result in higher expression levels of a reporter protein. In contrast, targeting the chromatin-remodeling factor Brahma does not result in stable, higher protein expression levels. The long-term effects of the targeted p300HAT domain on protein expression levels are positively reinforced, when also anti-repressor elements are applied to flank the reporter construct. These elements were previously shown to be potent blockers of chromatin-associated repressors. The simultaneous application of the targeted p300HAT domain and anti-repressor elements conveys long-term stability to protein expression. Whereas no copy number dependency is achieved by targeting of the p300HAT domain alone, copy number dependency is improved when anti-repressor elements are included. We conclude that targeting of protein domains such as HAT domains helps to facilitate expression of transfected genes in mammalian cells. However, the simultaneous application of other genomic elements such as the anti-repressor elements prevents silencing more efficiently. PMID:15607223

  2. Recognition of the disordered p53 transactivation domain by the transcriptional adapter zinc finger domains of CREB-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Krois, Alexander S; Ferreon, Josephine C; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2016-03-29

    An important component of the activity of p53 as a tumor suppressor is its interaction with the transcriptional coactivators cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) and p300, which activate transcription of p53-regulated stress response genes and stabilize p53 against ubiquitin-mediated degradation. The highest affinity interactions are between the intrinsically disordered N-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of p53 and the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains of CBP/p300. The NMR spectra of simple binary complexes of the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains with the p53TAD suffer from exchange broadening, but innovations in construct design and isotopic labeling have enabled us to obtain high-resolution structures using fusion proteins, uniformly labeled in the case of the TAZ2-p53TAD fusion and segmentally labeled through transintein splicing for the TAZ1-p53TAD fusion. The p53TAD is bipartite, with two interaction motifs, termed AD1 and AD2, which fold to form short amphipathic helices upon binding to TAZ1 and TAZ2 whereas intervening regions of the p53TAD remain flexible. Both the AD1 and AD2 motifs bind to hydrophobic surfaces of the TAZ domains, with AD2 making more extensive hydrophobic contacts consistent with its greater contribution to the binding affinity. Binding of AD1 and AD2 is synergistic, and structural studies performed with isolated motifs can be misleading. The present structures of the full-length p53TAD complexes demonstrate the versatility of the interactions available to an intrinsically disordered domain containing bipartite interaction motifs and provide valuable insights into the structural basis of the affinity changes that occur upon stress-related posttranslational modification. PMID:26976603

  3. CATHEDRAL: A Fast and Effective Algorithm to Predict Folds and Domain Boundaries from Multidomain Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Dallman, Tim; Pearl, Frances M. G; Orengo, Christine A

    2007-01-01

    We present CATHEDRAL, an iterative protocol for determining the location of previously observed protein folds in novel multidomain protein structures. CATHEDRAL builds on the features of a fast secondary-structure–based method (using graph theory) to locate known folds within a multidomain context and a residue-based, double-dynamic programming algorithm, which is used to align members of the target fold groups against the query protein structure to identify the closest relative and assign domain boundaries. To increase the fidelity of the assignments, a support vector machine is used to provide an optimal scoring scheme. Once a domain is verified, it is excised, and the search protocol is repeated in an iterative fashion until all recognisable domains have been identified. We have performed an initial benchmark of CATHEDRAL against other publicly available structure comparison methods using a consensus dataset of domains derived from the CATH and SCOP domain classifications. CATHEDRAL shows superior performance in fold recognition and alignment accuracy when compared with many equivalent methods. If a novel multidomain structure contains a known fold, CATHEDRAL will locate it in 90% of cases, with <1% false positives. For nearly 80% of assigned domains in a manually validated test set, the boundaries were correctly delineated within a tolerance of ten residues. For the remaining cases, previously classified domains were very remotely related to the query chain so that embellishments to the core of the fold caused significant differences in domain sizes and manual refinement of the boundaries was necessary. To put this performance in context, a well-established sequence method based on hidden Markov models was only able to detect 65% of domains, with 33% of the subsequent boundaries assigned within ten residues. Since, on average, 50% of newly determined protein structures contain more than one domain unit, and typically 90% or more of these domains are already

  4. The methyltransferase domain of dengue virus protein NS5 ensures efficient RNA synthesis initiation and elongation by the polymerase domain.

    PubMed

    Potisopon, Supanee; Priet, Stéphane; Collet, Axelle; Decroly, Etienne; Canard, Bruno; Selisko, Barbara

    2014-10-01

    Viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) responsible for the replication of single-strand RNA virus genomes exert their function in the context of complex replication machineries. Within these replication complexes the polymerase activity is often highly regulated by RNA elements, proteins or other domains of multi-domain polymerases. Here, we present data of the influence of the methyltransferase domain (NS5-MTase) of dengue virus (DENV) protein NS5 on the RdRp activity of the polymerase domain (NS5-Pol). The steady-state polymerase activities of DENV-2 recombinant NS5 and NS5-Pol are compared using different biochemical assays allowing the dissection of the de novo initiation, transition and elongation steps of RNA synthesis. We show that NS5-MTase ensures efficient RdRp activity by stimulating the de novo initiation and the elongation phase. This stimulation is related to a higher affinity of NS5 toward the single-strand RNA template indicating NS5-MTase either completes a high-affinity RNA binding site and/or promotes the correct formation of the template tunnel. Furthermore, the NS5-MTase increases the affinity of the priming nucleotide ATP upon de novo initiation and causes a higher catalytic efficiency of the polymerase upon elongation. The complex stimulation pattern is discussed under the perspective that NS5 adopts several conformations during RNA synthesis. PMID:25209234

  5. The methyltransferase domain of dengue virus protein NS5 ensures efficient RNA synthesis initiation and elongation by the polymerase domain

    PubMed Central

    Potisopon, Supanee; Priet, Stéphane; Collet, Axelle; Decroly, Etienne; Canard, Bruno; Selisko, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) responsible for the replication of single-strand RNA virus genomes exert their function in the context of complex replication machineries. Within these replication complexes the polymerase activity is often highly regulated by RNA elements, proteins or other domains of multi-domain polymerases. Here, we present data of the influence of the methyltransferase domain (NS5-MTase) of dengue virus (DENV) protein NS5 on the RdRp activity of the polymerase domain (NS5-Pol). The steady-state polymerase activities of DENV-2 recombinant NS5 and NS5-Pol are compared using different biochemical assays allowing the dissection of the de novo initiation, transition and elongation steps of RNA synthesis. We show that NS5-MTase ensures efficient RdRp activity by stimulating the de novo initiation and the elongation phase. This stimulation is related to a higher affinity of NS5 toward the single-strand RNA template indicating NS5-MTase either completes a high-affinity RNA binding site and/or promotes the correct formation of the template tunnel. Furthermore, the NS5-MTase increases the affinity of the priming nucleotide ATP upon de novo initiation and causes a higher catalytic efficiency of the polymerase upon elongation. The complex stimulation pattern is discussed under the perspective that NS5 adopts several conformations during RNA synthesis. PMID:25209234

  6. Origin and evolution of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein R domain

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Aswathy; Rishishwar, Lavanya; Wang, Jianrong; Bernard, Karen F.; Conley, Andrew B.; McCarty, Nael A.; Jordan, I. King

    2013-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator protein (CFTR) is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily. CFTR is distinguished from all other members of this superfamily by its status as an ion channel as well as the presence of its unique regulatory (R) domain. We investigated the origin and subsequent evolution of the R domain along the CFTR evolutionary lineage. The R domain protein coding sequence originated via the loss of a splice donor site at the 3′ end of exon 14, leading to the subsequent read-through and capture of formerly intronic sequence as novel coding sequence. Inclusion of the remaining part of the R domain coding sequence in the CFTR transcript involved a lineage-specific gain of exonic sequence with no homology to protein coding sequences outside of CFTR and loss of two exons conserved among ABC family members. These events occurred at the base of the Gnathostome evolutionary lineage ~550–650 million years ago. The apparent origination of the R domain de novo from previously non-coding sequence is consistent with its lack of sequence similarity to other domains as well as its intrinsically disordered structure, which has important implications for its function. In particular, this lack of structure may provide for a dynamic and inducible regulatory activity based on transient physical interactions with more structured domains of the protein. Since its acquisition along the CFTR evolutionary lineage, the R domain has evolved more rapidly than any other CFTR domain; however, there is no evidence for positive (adaptive) selection in the evolution of the domain. The R domain does show a distinct pattern of relative evolutionary rates compared to other CFTR domains, which sheds additional light on the connection between its function and evolution. The regulatory function of the R domain is dependent upon a fairly small number of sites that are subject to phosphorylation, and these sites were fixed very early in R domain evolution

  7. Origin and evolution of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein R domain.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Aswathy; Rishishwar, Lavanya; Wang, Jianrong; Bernard, Karen F; Conley, Andrew B; McCarty, Nael A; Jordan, I King

    2013-07-10

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator protein (CFTR) is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily. CFTR is distinguished from all other members of this superfamily by its status as an ion channel as well as the presence of its unique regulatory (R) domain. We investigated the origin and subsequent evolution of the R domain along the CFTR evolutionary lineage. The R domain protein coding sequence originated via the loss of a splice donor site at the 3' end of exon 14, leading to the subsequent read-through and capture of formerly intronic sequence as novel coding sequence. Inclusion of the remaining part of the R domain coding sequence in the CFTR transcript involved a lineage-specific gain of exonic sequence with no homology to protein coding sequences outside of CFTR and loss of two exons conserved among ABC family members. These events occurred at the base of the Gnathostome evolutionary lineage ~550-650 million years ago. The apparent origination of the R domain de novo from previously non-coding sequence is consistent with its lack of sequence similarity to other domains as well as its intrinsically disordered structure, which has important implications for its function. In particular, this lack of structure may provide for a dynamic and inducible regulatory activity based on transient physical interactions with more structured domains of the protein. Since its acquisition along the CFTR evolutionary lineage, the R domain has evolved more rapidly than any other CFTR domain; however, there is no evidence for positive (adaptive) selection in the evolution of the domain. The R domain does show a distinct pattern of relative evolutionary rates compared to other CFTR domains, which sheds additional light on the connection between its function and evolution. The regulatory function of the R domain is dependent upon a fairly small number of sites that are subject to phosphorylation, and these sites were fixed very early in R domain evolution and

  8. Assessment of protein domain fusions in human protein interaction networks prediction: application to the human kinetochore model.

    PubMed

    Morilla, Ian; Lees, Jon G; Reid, Adam J; Orengo, Christine; Ranea, Juan A G

    2010-12-31

    In order to understand how biological systems function it is necessary to determine the interactions and associations between proteins. Some proteins, involved in a common biological process and encoded by separate genes in one organism, can be found fused within a single protein chain in other organisms. By detecting these triplets, a functional relationship can be established between the unfused proteins. Here we use a domain fusion prediction method to predict these protein interactions for the human interactome. We observed that gene fusion events are more related to physical interaction between proteins than to other weaker functional relationships such as participation in a common biological pathway. These results suggest that domain fusion is an appropriate method for predicting protein complexes. The most reliable fused domain predictions were used to build protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. These predicted PPI network models showed the same topological features as real biological networks and different features from random behaviour. We built the PPI domain fusion sub-network model of the human kinetochore and observed that the majority of the predicted interactions have not yet been experimentally characterised in the publicly available PPI repositories. The study of the human kinetochore domain fusion sub-network reveals undiscovered kinetochore proteins with presumably relevant functions, such as hubs with many connections in the kinetochore sub-network. These results suggest that experimentally hidden regions in the predicted PPI networks contain key functional elements, associated with important functional areas, still undiscovered in the human interactome. Until novel experiments shed light on these hidden regions; domain fusion predictions provide a valuable approach for exploring them. PMID:20851221

  9. SET for life: biochemical activities and biological functions of SET domain-containing proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Hans-Martin; Garruss, Alexander; Shilatifard, Ali

    2013-01-01

    SET domain-containing proteins belong to a group of enzymes named after a common domain that utilizes the cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to achieve methylation of its substrates. Many SET domain-containing proteins have been shown to display catalytic activity towards particular lysine residues on histones, but emerging evidence also indicates that various non-histone proteins are specifically targeted by this clade of enzymes. Here, we summarize the most recent findings on the biological functions of the major families of SET domain-containing proteins catalyzing the methylation of histones 3 on lysines 4, 9, 27, and 36 (H3K4, H3K9, H3K27, and H3K36) and histone 4 on lysine 20 (H4K20) as well as candidates that have been reported to regulate non-histone substrates. PMID:24148750

  10. Protein domain networks: Scale-free mixing of positive and negative exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, J. C.; Hayashida, M.; Akutsu, T.

    2006-07-01

    Many biological studies have been focused on the study of proteins, since proteins are essential for most cell functions. Although proteins are unique, they share certain common properties. For example, well-defined regions within a protein can fold independently from the rest of the protein and have their own function. They are called protein domains, and served as protein building blocks. In this article, we present a theoretical model for studying the protein domain networks, where one node of the network corresponds to one protein and two proteins are connected if they contain the same domain. The resulting distribution of nodes with a given degree, k, shows not only a power-law with negative exponent γ=-1, but it resembles the superposition of two power-law functions, one with a negative exponent and another with a positive exponent β=1. We call this distribution pattern “ scale-free mixing”. To explain the emergence of this superposition of power-laws, we propose a basic model with two main components: (1) mutation and (2) duplication of domains. Precisely, duplication gives rise to complete subgraphs (i.e., cliques) on the network, thus for several values of k a large number of nodes with degree k is produced, which explains the positive power-law branch of the degree distribution. In order to compare our model with experimental data, we generate protein domain networks with data from the UniProt Knowledgebase-Swissprot database for protein sequences and using InterPro, Pfam and Smart for domain databases. Our results indicate that the signal of this scale-free mixing pattern is also observed in the experimental data and it is conserved among organisms as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus, and Homo sapiens.

  11. Two distinct domains of protein 4.1 critical for assembly offunctional nuclei in Vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Heald, Rebecca; Lee, Gloria; Nunomura, Wataru; Gimm,J. Aura; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel AnneJ. Aura; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2002-11-15

    Protein 4.1R, a multifunctional structural protein, acts asan adaptor in mature red cell membrane skeletons linking spectrin-actincomplexes to plasma membrane-associated proteins. In nucleated cellsprotein 4.1 is not associated exclusively with plasma membrane but isalso detected at several important subcellular locations crucial for celldivision. To identify 4.1 domains having critical functions in nuclearassembly, 4.1 domain peptides were added to Xenopus egg extract nuclearreconstitution reactions. Morphologically disorganized, replicationdeficient nuclei assembled when spectrin-actin binding domain orNuMA-binding C-terminal domain peptides were present. However, controlvariant spectrin-actin binding domain peptides incapable of bindingactin, or mutant C-terminal domain peptides with reduced NuMA binding,had no deleterious effects on nuclear reconstitution. To test if 4.1 isrequired for proper nuclear assembly, 4.1 isoforms were depleted withspectrin-actin binding or C-terminal domain-specific antibodies. Nucleiassembled in depleted extracts ha d deranged phenotypes. However, nuclearassembly could be rescued by addition of recombinant 4.1R. Our dataestablishes that protein 4.1 is essential for nuclear assembly andidentifies two distinct 4.1 domains, initially characterized incytoskeletal interactions, that have crucial and versatile functions innuclear assembly.

  12. Bayesian Modeling of the Yeast SH3 Domain Interactome Predicts Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Endocytosis Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gfeller, David; Landgraf, Christiane; Panni, Simona; Paoluzi, Serena; Castagnoli, Luisa; Currell, Bridget; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Yu, Haiyuan; Winsor, Barbara; Vidal, Marc; Gerstein, Mark B.; Bader, Gary D.; Volkmer, Rudolf; Cesareni, Gianni; Drubin, David G.; Kim, Philip M.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Boone, Charles

    2009-01-01

    SH3 domains are peptide recognition modules that mediate the assembly of diverse biological complexes. We scanned billions of phage-displayed peptides to map the binding specificities of the SH3 domain family in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although most of the SH3 domains fall into the canonical classes I and II, each domain utilizes distinct features of its cognate ligands to achieve binding selectivity. Furthermore, we uncovered several SH3 domains with specificity profiles that clearly deviate from the two canonical classes. In conjunction with phage display, we used yeast two-hybrid and peptide array screening to independently identify SH3 domain binding partners. The results from the three complementary techniques were integrated using a Bayesian algorithm to generate a high-confidence yeast SH3 domain interaction map. The interaction map was enriched for proteins involved in endocytosis, revealing a set of SH3-mediated interactions that underlie formation of protein complexes essential to this biological pathway. We used the SH3 domain interaction network to predict the dynamic localization of several previously uncharacterized endocytic proteins, and our analysis suggests a novel role for the SH3 domains of Lsb3p and Lsb4p as hubs that recruit and assemble several endocytic complexes. PMID:19841731

  13. Protein reconstitution and three-dimensional domain swapping: Benefits and constraints of covalency

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Jannette; Lindman, Stina; Bauer, Mikael; Linse, Sara

    2007-01-01

    The phenomena of protein reconstitution and three-dimensional domain swapping reveal that highly similar structures can be obtained whether a protein is comprised of one or more polypeptide chains. In this review, we use protein reconstitution as a lens through which to examine the range of protein tolerance to chain interruptions and the roles of the primary structure in related features of protein structure and folding, including circular permutation, natively unfolded proteins, allostery, and amyloid fibril formation. The results imply that noncovalent interactions in a protein are sufficient to specify its structure under the constraints imposed by the covalent backbone. PMID:17962398

  14. The Ubiquitin-associated Domain of Cellular Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins Facilitates Ubiquitylation*

    PubMed Central

    Budhidarmo, Rhesa; Day, Catherine L.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular inhibitor of apoptosis (cIAP) proteins are essential RING E3 ubiquitin ligases that regulate apoptosis and inflammatory responses. cIAPs contain a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain that binds ubiquitin and is implicated in the regulation of cell survival and proteasomal degradation. Here we show that mutation of the MGF and LL motifs in the UBA domain of cIAP1 caused unfolding and increased cIAP1 multimonoubiquitylation. By developing a UBA mutant that disrupted ubiquitin binding but not the structure of the UBA domain, we found that the UBA domain enhances cIAP1 and cIAP2 ubiquitylation. We demonstrate that the UBA domain binds to the UbcH5b∼Ub conjugate, and this promotes RING domain-dependent monoubiquitylation. This study establishes ubiquitin-binding modules, such as the UBA domain, as important regulatory modules that can fine tune the activity of E3 ligases. PMID:25065467

  15. PDZ motifs in PTP-BL and RIL bind to internal protein segments in the LIM domain protein RIL.

    PubMed

    Cuppen, E; Gerrits, H; Pepers, B; Wieringa, B; Hendriks, W

    1998-03-01

    The specificity of protein-protein interactions in cellular signaling cascades is dependent on the sequence and intramolecular location of distinct amino acid motifs. We used the two-hybrid interaction trap to identify proteins that can associate with the PDZ motif-rich segment in the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-BL. A specific interaction was found with the Lin-11, Isl-1, Mec-3 (LIM) domain containing protein RIL. More detailed analysis demonstrated that the binding specificity resides in the second and fourth PDZ motif of PTP-BL and the LIM domain in RIL. Immunohistochemistry on various mouse tissues revealed a submembranous colocalization of PTP-BL and RIL in epithelial cells. Remarkably, there is also an N-terminal PDZ motif in RIL itself that can bind to the RIL-LIM domain. We demonstrate here that the RIL-LIM domain can be phosphorylated on tyrosine in vitro and in vivo and can be dephosphorylated in vitro by the PTPase domain of PTP-BL. Our data point to the presence of a double PDZ-binding interface on the RIL-LIM domain and suggest tyrosine phosphorylation as a regulatory mechanism for LIM-PDZ associations in the assembly of multiprotein complexes. These findings are in line with an important role of PDZ-mediated interactions in the shaping and organization of submembranous microenvironments of polarized cells. PMID:9487134

  16. Travelling lipid domains in a dynamic model for protein-induced pattern formation in biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Karin; Bär, Markus

    2005-06-01

    Cell membranes are composed of a mixture of lipids. Many biological processes require the formation of spatial domains in the lipid distribution of the plasma membrane. We have developed a mathematical model that describes the dynamic spatial distribution of acidic lipids in response to the presence of GMC proteins and regulating enzymes. The model encompasses diffusion of lipids and GMC proteins, electrostatic attraction between acidic lipids and GMC proteins as well as the kinetics of membrane attachment/detachment of GMC proteins. If the lipid-protein interaction is strong enough, phase separation occurs in the membrane as a result of free energy minimization and protein/lipid domains are formed. The picture is changed if a constant activity of enzymes is included into the model. We chose the myristoyl-electrostatic switch as a regulatory module. It consists of a protein kinase C that phosphorylates and removes the GMC proteins from the membrane and a phosphatase that dephosphorylates the proteins and enables them to rebind to the membrane. For sufficiently high enzymatic activity, the phase separation is replaced by travelling domains of acidic lipids and proteins. The latter active process is typical for nonequilibrium systems. It allows for a faster restructuring and polarization of the membrane since it acts on a larger length scale than the passive phase separation. The travelling domains can be pinned by spatial gradients in the activity; thus the membrane is able to detect spatial clues and can adapt its polarity dynamically to changes in the environment.

  17. Retinol Binding Protein-Albumin Domain III Fusion Protein Deactivates Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sangeun; Choi, Soyoung; Lee, Min-Goo; Lim, Chaeseung; Oh, Junseo

    2012-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is characterized by accumulation of extracellular matrix, and activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the primary source of the fibrotic neomatrix and considered as therapeutic target cells. We previously showed that albumin in pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), the key cell type for pancreatic fibrogenesis, is directly involved in the formation of vitamin A-containing lipid droplets, inhibiting PSC activation. In this study, we evaluated the anti-fibrotic activity of both albumin and retinol binding protein-albumin domain III fusion protein (R-III), designed for stellate cell-targeted delivery of albumin III, in rat primary HSCs and investigated the underlying mechanism. Forced expression of albumin or R-III in HSCs after passage 2 (activated HSCs) induced lipid droplet formation and deactivated HSCs, whereas point mutations in high-affinity fatty acid binding sites of albumin domain III abolished their activities. Exogenous R-III, but not albumin, was successfully internalized into and deactivated HSC-P2. When HSCs at day 3 after plating (pre-activated HSCs) were cultured in the presence of purified R-III, spontaneous activation of HSCs was inhibited even after passage 2, suggestive of a potential for preventive effect. Furthermore, treatment of HSCs-P2 with R-III led to a significant reduction in both cytoplasmic levels of all-trans retinoic acid and the subsequent retinoic acid signaling. Therefore, our data suggest that albumin deactivates HSCs with reduced retinoic acid levels and that R-III may have therapeutic and preventive potentials on liver fibrosis. PMID:23161170

  18. A folded and functional protein domain in an amyloid-like fibril

    PubMed Central

    Sackewitz, Mirko; von Einem, Sabrina; Hause, Gerd; Wunderlich, Michael; Schmid, Franz-Xaver; Schwarz, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the polypeptide environment on polyalanine-induced fibril formation was investigated with amyloidogenic fragments from PAPBN1, a nuclear protein controlling polyadenylation. Mutation-caused extensions of the natural 10 alanine sequence up to maximally 17 alanines result in fibril formation of PABPN1 and the development of the disease oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). We explored the influence of fibril formation on the structure and function of a one-domain protein linked to the fibril-forming part of PABPN1. The well-characterized, stably folded, one-domain protein, cold-shock protein CspB from Bacillus subtilis, was fused either to the C terminus of the entire N-terminal domain of PABPN1 or directly to peptides consisting of 10 or 17 alanine residues. The fusion protein between the N-terminal domain of PABPN1 and CspB formed fibrils in which the structure and activity of CspB were retained. In the fibrils formed by fusions in which the polyalanine sequence was directly linked to CspB, CspB was unfolded. These results indicate that the folded conformation and the function of a protein domain can be maintained in amyloid-like fibrils, and that the distance between this domain and the fibril plays an important role. PMID:18424511

  19. Putting into Practice Domain-Linear Motif Interaction Predictions for Exploration of Protein Networks

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Katja; Fournane, Sadek; Kieffer, Bruno; Masson, Murielle; Nominé, Yves; Travé, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    PDZ domains recognise short sequence motifs at the extreme C-termini of proteins. A model based on microarray data has been recently published for predicting the binding preferences of PDZ domains to five residue long C-terminal sequences. Here we investigated the potential of this predictor for discovering novel protein interactions that involve PDZ domains. When tested on real negative data assembled from published literature, the predictor displayed a high false positive rate (FPR). We predicted and experimentally validated interactions between four PDZ domains derived from the human proteins MAGI1 and SCRIB and 19 peptides derived from human and viral C-termini of proteins. Measured binding intensities did not correlate with prediction scores, and the high FPR of the predictor was confirmed. Results indicate that limitations of the predictor may arise from an incomplete model definition and improper training of the model. Taking into account these limitations, we identified several novel putative interactions between PDZ domains of MAGI1 and SCRIB and the C-termini of the proteins FZD4, ARHGAP6, NET1, TANC1, GLUT7, MARCH3, MAS, ABC1, DLL1, TMEM215 and CYSLTR2. These proteins are localised to the membrane or suggested to act close to it and are often involved in G protein signalling. Furthermore, we showed that, while extension of minimal interacting domains or peptides toward tandem constructs or longer peptides never suppressed their ability to interact, the measured affinities and inferred specificity patterns often changed significantly. This suggests that if protein fragments interact, the full length proteins are also likely to interact, albeit possibly with altered affinities and specificities. Therefore, predictors dealing with protein fragments are promising tools for discovering protein interaction networks but their application to predict binding preferences within networks may be limited. PMID:22069443

  20. Unusual domain movement in a multidomain protein in the presence of macromolecular crowders.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saikat; Chowdhury, Pramit K

    2015-08-14

    Domain movements play a fundamental and critical role in the specific biological function that multidomain proteins have evolved to perform. A significant amount of research has been carried out to investigate the effects of macromolecular crowding agents, mostly on single domain proteins, thereby furthering our appreciation for the crowding phenomenon. However similar studies on proteins having multiple domains are relatively scarce. Using the plasma protein human serum albumin (HSA) as the protein of interest, we have probed the influence of dextran based crowding agents (Dextran 6, Dextran 40, and Dextran 70) on the relative movements of domains I and II using FRET, with Trp-214 in domain II acting as the donor and acrylodan (Ac) covalently attached to Cys-34 of domain I as the acceptor. Amongst the higher molecular weight crowders, while both Dextran 70 and Dextran 40 induced a significant decrease in the distance between the aforesaid domains, however for the latter macromolecular crowder (Dextran 40), beyond 50 g L(-1), no change in domain separation was observed even up to concentrations of 175 g L(-1). On the other hand, contrary to our expectations, Dextran 6, having the highest packing density by virtue of it being the smallest crowding agent used, provided an asymmetric excluded volume which resulted in forced elongation of HSA along the Trp-Ac FRET axis. Additionally both chemical and thermal studies performed at varying concentrations of the chemical denaturant, urea, reveal unusual movements of the two domains, an aspect that can have important implications with regard to HSA being an avid transporter of fatty acids, with the binding of latter being known to invoke appreciable domain displacements. We hypothesise that we see a distinct crossover from entropy dominated depletion effects in the case of Dextran 6 to significant enthalpic contribution for Dextran 70 with Dextran 40 lying midway between these two crowders, having characteristics of both

  1. BH4 domain of bcl-2 protein is required for its proangiogenic function under hypoxic condition.

    PubMed

    Gabellini, Chiara; De Luca, Teresa; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Desideri, Marianna; Di Martile, Marta; Passeri, Daniela; Candiloro, Antonio; Biffoni, Mauro; Rizzo, Maria Giulia; Orlandi, Augusto; Del Bufalo, Donatella

    2013-11-01

    Beyond its classical role as apoptosis inhibitor, bcl-2 protein promotes tumor angiogenesis and the removal of N-terminal bcl-2 homology (BH4) domain abrogates bcl-2-induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1)-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in hypoxic cancer cells. Using M14 human melanoma cell line and its derivative clones stably overexpressing bcl-2 wild-type or deleted of its BH4 domain, we found that conditioned media (CM) from cells expressing BH4-deleted bcl-2 protein showed a reduced capability to increase in vitro human endothelial cells proliferation and differentiation, and in vivo neovascularization compared with CM from cells overexpressing wild-type bcl-2. Moreover, xenografts derived from cells expressing bcl-2 lacking BH4 domain showed a reduction of metastatic potential compared with tumors derived from wild-type bcl-2 transfectants injection. Stably expressing the Flag-tagged N-terminal sequence of bcl-2 protein, encompassing BH4 domain, we found that this domain is sufficient to enhance the proangiogenic HIF-1/VEGF axis under hypoxic condition. Indeed, lacking of BH4 domain abolishes the interaction between bcl-2 and HIF-1α proteins and the capability of exogenous bcl-2 protein to localize in the nucleus. Moreover, when endoplasmic reticulum-targeted bcl-2 protein is overexpressed in cells, this protein lost the capability to synergize with hypoxia to induce the proangiogenic HIF-1/VEGF axis as shown by wild-type bcl-2 protein. These results demonstrate that BH4 domain of bcl-2 is required for the ability of this protein to increase tumor angiogenesis and progression and indicate that bcl-2 nuclear localization may be required for bcl-2-mediated induction of HIF-1/VEGF axis. PMID:23836782

  2. The HPr Proteins from the Thermophile Bacillus stearothermophilus Can Form Domain-swapped Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Sudharsan; Razvi, Abbas; Scholtz, J. Martin; Sacchettini, James C.

    2010-07-20

    The study of proteins from extremophilic organisms continues to generate interest in the field of protein folding because paradigms explaining the enhanced stability of these proteins still elude us and such studies have the potential to further our knowledge of the forces stabilizing proteins. We have undertaken such a study with our model protein HPr from a mesophile, Bacillus subtilis, and a thermophile, Bacillus stearothermophilus. We report here the high-resolution structures of the wild-type HPr protein from the thermophile and a variant, F29W. The variant proved to crystallize in two forms: a monomeric form with a structure very similar to the wild-type protein as well as a domain-swapped dimer. Interestingly, the structure of the domain-swapped dimer for HPr is very different from that observed for a homologous protein, Crh, from B. subtilis. The existence of a domain-swapped dimer has implications for amyloid formation and is consistent with recent results showing that the HPr proteins can form amyloid fibrils. We also characterized the conformational stability of the thermophilic HPr proteins using thermal and solvent denaturation methods and have used the high-resolution structures in an attempt to explain the differences in stability between the different HPr proteins. Finally, we present a detailed analysis of the solution properties of the HPr proteins using a variety of biochemical and biophysical methods.

  3. An alternative scenario for the formation of specialized protein nano-domains (cluster phases) in biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destainville, N.

    2010-09-01

    We discuss a realistic scenario, accounting for the existence of sub-micrometric protein domains in cell membranes. At the biological level, such membrane domains have been shown to be specialized, in order to perform a determined biological task, in the sense that they gather one or a few protein species out of the hundreds of different ones that a cell membrane may contain. By analyzing the balance between mixing entropy and protein affinities, we propose that such protein sorting in distinct domains can be explained without appealing to pre-existing lipidic micro-phase separations, as in the lipid raft scenario. We show that the proposed scenario is compatible with known physical interactions between membrane proteins, even if thousands of different species coexist.

  4. Identification of domains in protein structures from the analysis of intramolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Genoni, Alessandro; Morra, Giulia; Colombo, Giorgio

    2012-03-15

    The subdivision of protein structures into smaller and independent structural domains has a fundamental importance in understanding protein evolution and function and in the development of protein classification methods as well as in the interpretation of experimental data. Due to the rapid growth in the number of solved protein structures, the need for devising new accurate algorithmic methods has become more and more urgent. In this paper, we propose a new computational approach that is based on the concept of domain as a compact and independent folding unit and on the analysis of the residue-residue energy interactions obtainable through classical all-atom force field calculations. In particular, starting from the analysis of the nonbonded interaction energy matrix associated with a protein, our method filters out and selects only those specific subsets of interactions that define possible independent folding nuclei within a complex protein structure. This allows grouping different protein fragments into energy clusters that are found to correspond to structural domains. The strategy has been tested using proper benchmark data sets, and the results have shown that the new approach is fast and reliable in determining the number of domains in a totally ab initio manner and without making use of any training set or knowledge of the systems in exam. Moreover, our method, identifying the most relevant residues for the stabilization of each domain, may complement the results given by other classification techniques and may provide useful information to design and guide new experiments. PMID:22384792

  5. Charting the Landscape of Tandem BRCT Domain-Mediated Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Nicholas T.; Mesquita, Rafael D.; Sweet, Michael; Carvalho, Marcelo A.; Li, Xueli; Liu, Yun; Nguyen, Huey; Thomas, C. Eric; Iversen, Edwin S.; Marsillac, Sylvia; Karchin, Rachel; Koomen, John; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved an intricate system to resolve DNA damage to prevent its transmission to daughter cells. This system, collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR) network, includes a large number of proteins responsible for detection of DNA damage, promotion of repair, and coordination with cell cycle progression. Because defects in this network can lead to cancer, this network constitutes a barrier against tumorigenesis. The BRCT domain is a modular protein domain critical for relaying signals in the DDR. We performed a systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions involving tandem BRCT domains (tBRCT) in the DDR by combining literature curation, yeast two hybrid (Y2H) screens, and tandem affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (TAP-MS). We identified one previously unrecognized BRCT protein and generated human protein-protein interaction network for this type of modular domain. This study also reveals several novel components in DNA damage signaling such as COMMD1 and mTORC2. Additionally, integration of tBRCT domain interactions with DDR phosphoprotein studies and analysis of kinase-substrate interactions revealed signaling subnetworks that may aid in understanding the involvement of tBRCT in disease and DNA repair. PMID:22990118

  6. Protein domain of unknown function 3233 is a translocation domain of autotransporter secretory mechanism in gamma proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Ananth; Yogeeshwari, S; Sircar, Sanchari; Agrawal, Shipra

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the enteropathogenic gram negative bacteria is one of the main causative agents of waterborne diseases like cholera. About 1/3(rd) of the organism's genome is uncharacterised with many protein coding genes lacking structure and functional information. These proteins form significant fraction of the genome and are crucial in understanding the organism's complete functional makeup. In this study we report the general structure and function of a family of hypothetical proteins, Domain of Unknown Function 3233 (DUF3233), which are conserved across gram negative gammaproteobacteria (especially in Vibrio sp. and similar bacteria). Profile and HMM based sequence search methods were used to screen homologues of DUF3233. The I-TASSER fold recognition method was used to build a three dimensional structural model of the domain. The structure resembles the transmembrane beta-barrel with an axial N-terminal helix and twelve antiparallel beta-strands. Using a combination of amphipathy and discrimination analysis we analysed the potential transmembrane beta-barrel forming properties of DUF3233. Sequence, structure and phylogenetic analysis of DUF3233 indicates that this gram negative bacterial hypothetical protein resembles the beta-barrel translocation unit of autotransporter Va secretory mechanism with a gene organisation that differs from the conventional Va system. PMID:22073138

  7. ERAD of proteins containing aberrant transmembrane domains requires ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Kit; Koay, Yee-Hui; Otsuka, Yuka; Swanton, Eileithyia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clearance of misfolded proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in a process known as ER-associated degradation (ERAD). The mechanisms through which proteins containing aberrant transmembrane domains are degraded by ERAD are poorly understood. To address this question, we generated model ERAD substrates based on CD8 with either a non-native transmembrane domain but a folded ER luminal domain (CD8TMD*), or the native transmembrane domain but a misfolded luminal domain (CD8LUM*). Although both chimeras were degraded by ERAD, we found that the location of the folding defect determined the initial site of ubiquitylation. Ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues was required for the extraction of CD8TMD* from the ER membrane during ERAD, whereas CD8LUM* continued to be degraded in the absence of cytoplasmic lysine residues. Cytoplasmic lysine residues were also required for degradation of an additional ERAD substrate containing an unassembled transmembrane domain and when a non-native transmembrane domain was introduced into CD8LUM*. Our results suggest that proteins with defective transmembrane domains are removed from the ER through a specific ERAD mechanism that depends upon ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues. PMID:26446255

  8. In planta localisation patterns of MADS domain proteins during floral development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Urbanus, Susan L; de Folter, Stefan; Shchennikova, Anna V; Kaufmann, Kerstin; Immink, Richard GH; Angenent, Gerco C

    2009-01-01

    Background MADS domain transcription factors play important roles in various developmental processes in flowering plants. Members of this family play a prominent role in the transition to flowering and the specification of floral organ identity. Several studies reported mRNA expression patterns of the genes encoding these MADS domain proteins, however, these studies do not provide the necessary information on the temporal and spatial localisation of the proteins. We have made GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN (GFP) translational fusions with the four MADS domain proteins SEPALLATA3, AGAMOUS, FRUITFULL and APETALA1 from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and analysed the protein localisation patterns in living plant tissues by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Results We unravelled the protein localisation patterns of the four MADS domain proteins at a cellular and subcellular level in inflorescence and floral meristems, during development of the early flower bud stages, and during further differentiation of the floral organs. The protein localisation patterns revealed a few deviations from known mRNA expression patterns, suggesting a non-cell autonomous action of these factors or alternative control mechanisms. In addition, we observed a change in the subcellular localisation of SEPALLATA3 from a predominantly nuclear localisation to a more cytoplasmic localisation, occurring specifically during petal and stamen development. Furthermore, we show that the down-regulation of the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL in ovular tissues is preceded by the occurrence of both AGAMOUS and SEPALLATA3 proteins, supporting the hypothesis that both proteins together suppress WUSCHEL expression in the ovule. Conclusion This approach provides a highly detailed in situ map of MADS domain protein presence during early and later stages of floral development. The subcellular localisation of the transcription factors in the cytoplasm, as observed at certain stages during

  9. PDZ Motifs in PTP-BL and RIL Bind to Internal Protein Segments in the LIM Domain Protein RIL

    PubMed Central

    Cuppen, Edwin; Gerrits, Herlinde; Pepers, Barry; Wieringa, Bé; Hendriks, Wiljan

    1998-01-01

    The specificity of protein–protein interactions in cellular signaling cascades is dependent on the sequence and intramolecular location of distinct amino acid motifs. We used the two-hybrid interaction trap to identify proteins that can associate with the PDZ motif-rich segment in the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-BL. A specific interaction was found with the Lin-11, Isl-1, Mec-3 (LIM) domain containing protein RIL. More detailed analysis demonstrated that the binding specificity resides in the second and fourth PDZ motif of PTP-BL and the LIM domain in RIL. Immunohistochemistry on various mouse tissues revealed a submembranous colocalization of PTP-BL and RIL in epithelial cells. Remarkably, there is also an N-terminal PDZ motif in RIL itself that can bind to the RIL-LIM domain. We demonstrate here that the RIL-LIM domain can be phosphorylated on tyrosine in vitro and in vivo and can be dephosphorylated in vitro by the PTPase domain of PTP-BL. Our data point to the presence of a double PDZ-binding interface on the RIL-LIM domain and suggest tyrosine phosphorylation as a regulatory mechanism for LIM-PDZ associations in the assembly of multiprotein complexes. These findings are in line with an important role of PDZ-mediated interactions in the shaping and organization of submembranous microenvironments of polarized cells. PMID:9487134

  10. Identification of pleckstrin-homology-domain-containing proteins with novel phosphoinositide-binding specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Dowler, S; Currie , R A; Campbell , D G; Deak, M; Kular, G; Downes, C P; Alessi, D R

    2000-01-01

    The second messenger phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3)] is generated by the action of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), and regulates a plethora of cellular processes. An approach for dissecting the mechanisms by which these processes are regulated is to identify proteins that interact specifically with PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3). The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain has become recognized as the specialized module used by many proteins to interact with PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3). Recent work has led to the identification of a putative phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate-binding motif (PPBM) at the N-terminal regions of PH domains that interact with this lipid. We have searched expressed sequence tag databases for novel proteins containing PH domains possessing a PPBM. Surprisingly, many of the PH domains that we identified do not bind PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3), but instead possess unexpected and novel phosphoinositide-binding specificities in vitro. These include proteins possessing PH domains that interact specifically with PtdIns(3,4)P(2) [TAPP1 (tandem PH-domain-containing protein-1) and TAPP2], PtdIns4P [FAPP1 (phosphatidylinositol-four-phosphate adaptor protein-1)], PtdIns3P [PEPP1 (phosphatidylinositol-three-phosphate-binding PH-domain protein-1) and AtPH1] and PtdIns(3,5)P(2) (centaurin-beta2). We have also identified two related homologues of PEPP1, termed PEPP2 and PEPP3, that may also interact with PtdIns3P. This study lays the foundation for future work to establish the phospholipid-binding specificities of these proteins in vivo, and their physiological role(s). PMID:11001876

  11. The Pilus Usher Controls Protein Interactions via Domain Masking and is Functional as an Oligomer

    PubMed Central

    Werneburg, Glenn T.; Henderson, Nadine S.; Portnoy, Erica B.; Sarowar, Samema; Hultgren, Scott J.; Li, Huilin; Thanassi, David G.

    2015-01-01

    The chaperone-usher (CU) pathway assembles organelles termed pili or fimbriae in Gram-negative bacteria. Type 1 pili expressed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli are prototypical structures assembled by the CU pathway. Biogenesis of pili by the CU pathway requires a periplasmic chaperone and an outer membrane protein termed the usher (FimD). We show that the FimD C-terminal domains provide the high-affinity substrate binding site, but that these domains are masked in the resting usher. Domain masking requires the FimD plug domain, which serves as a switch controlling usher activation. We demonstrate that usher molecules can act in trans for pilus biogenesis, providing conclusive evidence for a functional usher oligomer. These results reveal mechanisms by which molecular machines such as the usher regulate and harness protein-protein interactions, and suggest that ushers may interact in a cooperative manner during pilus assembly in bacteria. PMID:26052892

  12. Evolution and Quantitative Comparison of Genome-Wide Protein Domain Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Parikesit, Arli A.; Stadler, Peter F.; Prohaska, Sonja J.

    2011-01-01

    The metabolic and regulatory capabilities of an organism are implicit in its protein content. This is often hard to estimate, however, due to ascertainment biases inherent in the available genome annotations. Its complement of recognizable functional protein domains and their combinations convey essentially the same information and at the same time are much more readily accessible, although protein domain models trained for one phylogenetic group frequently fail on distantly related sequences. Pooling related domain models based on their GO-annotation in combination with de novo gene prediction methods provides estimates that seem to be less affected by phylogenetic biases. We show here for 18 diverse representatives from all eukaryotic kingdoms that a pooled analysis of the tendencies for co-occurrence or avoidance of protein domains is indeed feasible. This type of analysis can reveal general large-scale patterns in the domain co-occurrence and helps to identify lineage-specific variations in the evolution of protein domains. Somewhat surprisingly, we do not find strong ubiquitous patterns governing the evolutionary behavior of specific functional classes. Instead, there are strong variations between the major groups of Eukaryotes, pointing at systematic differences in their evolutionary constraints. PMID:24710298

  13. Effect of Interdomain Linker Length on an Antagonistic Folding-Unfolding Equilibrium between Two Protein Domains

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Thomas A.; Mills, Brandon M.; Lubin, David J.; Chong, Lillian T.; Loh, Stewart N.

    2009-01-01

    Fusion of one protein domain with another is a common event in both evolution and protein engineering experiments. When insertion is at an internal site (e.g., a surface loop or turn), as opposed to one of the termini, conformational strain can be introduced into both domains. Strain is manifested by an antagonistic folding-unfolding equilibrium between the two domains, which we previously showed can be parameterized by a coupling free-energy term (ΔGX). The extent of strain is predicted to depend primarily on the ratio of the N-to-C distance of the guest protein to the distance between ends of the surface loop in the host protein. Here, we test that hypothesis by inserting ubiquitin (Ub) into the bacterial ribonuclease barnase (Bn), using peptide linkers from zero to 10 amino acids each. ΔGX values are determined by measuring the extent to which Co2+ binding to an engineered site on the Ub domain destabilizes the Bn domain. All-atom, unforced Langevin dynamics simulations are employed to gain structural insight into the mechanism of mechanically induced unfolding. Experimental and computational results find that the two domains are structurally and energetically uncoupled when linkers are long and that ΔGX increases with decreasing linker length. When the linkers are fewer than two amino acids, strain is so great that one domain unfolds the other. However, the protein is able to refold as dimers and higher-order oligomers. The likely mechanism is a three-dimensional domain swap of the Bn domain, which relieves conformational strain. The simulations suggest that an effective route to mechanical unfolding begins with disruption of the hydrophobic core of Bn near the Ub insertion site. PMID:19038264

  14. Accurate prediction of interfacial residues in two-domain proteins using evolutionary information: implications for three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Bhaskara, Ramachandra M; Padhi, Amrita; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-07-01

    With the preponderance of multidomain proteins in eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to recognize the constituent domains and their functions. Often function involves communications across the domain interfaces, and the knowledge of the interacting sites is essential to our understanding of the structure-function relationship. Using evolutionary information extracted from homologous domains in at least two diverse domain architectures (single and multidomain), we predict the interface residues corresponding to domains from the two-domain proteins. We also use information from the three-dimensional structures of individual domains of two-domain proteins to train naïve Bayes classifier model to predict the interfacial residues. Our predictions are highly accurate (∼85%) and specific (∼95%) to the domain-domain interfaces. This method is specific to multidomain proteins which contain domains in at least more than one protein architectural context. Using predicted residues to constrain domain-domain interaction, rigid-body docking was able to provide us with accurate full-length protein structures with correct orientation of domains. We believe that these results can be of considerable interest toward rational protein and interaction design, apart from providing us with valuable information on the nature of interactions. PMID:24375512

  15. Predicting physiologically relevant SH3 domain mediated protein–protein interactions in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shobhit; Bader, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Many intracellular signaling processes are mediated by interactions involving peptide recognition modules such as SH3 domains. These domains bind to small, linear protein sequence motifs which can be identified using high-throughput experimental screens such as phage display. Binding motif patterns can then be used to computationally predict protein interactions mediated by these domains. While many protein–protein interaction prediction methods exist, most do not work with peptide recognition module mediated interactions or do not consider many of the known constraints governing physiologically relevant interactions between two proteins. Results: A novel method for predicting physiologically relevant SH3 domain-peptide mediated protein–protein interactions in S. cerevisae using phage display data is presented. Like some previous similar methods, this method uses position weight matrix models of protein linear motif preference for individual SH3 domains to scan the proteome for potential hits and then filters these hits using a range of evidence sources related to sequence-based and cellular constraints on protein interactions. The novelty of this approach is the large number of evidence sources used and the method of combination of sequence based and protein pair based evidence sources. By combining different peptide and protein features using multiple Bayesian models we are able to predict high confidence interactions with an overall accuracy of 0.97. Availability and implementation: Domain-Motif Mediated Interaction Prediction (DoMo-Pred) command line tool and all relevant datasets are available under GNU LGPL license for download from http://www.baderlab.org/Software/DoMo-Pred. The DoMo-Pred command line tool is implemented using Python 2.7 and C ++. Contact: gary.bader@utoronto.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26861823

  16. Activation and assembly of the inflammasomes through conserved protein domain families

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are oligomeric protein complexes assembled through interactions among the death domain superfamily members, in particular the CARD and PYD domains. Recent progress has shed lights on how the ASC PYD can polymerize to form filaments using multiple domain:domain interfaces, and how the caspase4 CARD can recognize LPS to activate the non-classical inflammasome pathway. Comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation and assembly require more extensive structural and biophysical dissection of the inflammasome components and complexes, in particular additional CARD or PYD filaments. Because of the variations in death domain structures and complexes observed so far, future work will undoubtedly shed lights on the mechanisms of inflammasome assembly as well as more surprises on the versatile structure and function of the death domain superfamily. PMID:25398536

  17. Characterization of a Fasciola gigantica protein carrying two DM9 domains reveals cellular relocalization property.

    PubMed

    Phadungsil, Wansika; Smooker, Peter M; Vichasri-Grams, Suksiri; Grams, Rudi

    2016-01-01

    Even at the present age of whole-organism analysis, e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, the biological roles of many proteins remain unresolved. Classified among the proteins of unknown function is a family of proteins harboring repeats of the DM9 domain, a 60-75 amino acids motif first described in a small number of Drosophila melanogaster proteins. Proteins may carry two or more DM9 domains either in combination with other domains or as their sole constituent. Here we have characterized a 16.8kDa Fasciola gigantica protein comprising two tandem repeated DM9 domains (FgDM9-1). The protein was located in the parenchyma of the immature and mature parasite and consequently it was not detected in the ES product of the parasite but only in the whole worm extract. Interestingly, extraction with SDS yielded a substantially higher amount of the protein suggesting association with insoluble cell components. In Sf9 insect cells a heterologously expressed EGFP-FgDM9-1 chimera showed cell-wide distribution but relocated to vesicle-like structures in the cytoplasm after stimulating cellular stress by bacteria, heat shock or chloroquine. These structures did not colocalize with the markers of endocytosis/phagocytosis ubiquitin, RAB7, GABARAP. The same behavior was noted for Aedes aegypti PRS1, a homologous mosquito DM9 protein as a positive control while EGFP did not exhibit such relocation in the insect cells. Cross-linking experiments on soluble recombinant FgDM9-1 indicated that the protein can undergo specific oligomerization. It is speculated that proteins carrying the DM9 domain have a role in vesicular transport in flatworms and insects. PMID:26946400

  18. Biological implications of SNPs in signal peptide domains of human proteins.

    PubMed

    Jarjanazi, Hamdi; Savas, Sevtap; Pabalan, Noel; Dennis, James W; Ozcelik, Hilmi

    2008-02-01

    Proteins destined for secretion or membrane compartments possess signal peptides for insertion into the membrane. The signal peptide is therefore critical for localization and function of cell surface receptors and ligands that mediate cell-cell communication. About 4% of all human proteins listed in UniProt database have signal peptide domains in their N terminals. A comprehensive literature survey was performed to retrieve functional and disease associated genetic variants in the signal peptide domains of human proteins. In 21 human proteins we have identified 26 disease associated mutations within their signal peptide domains, 14 mutations of which have been experimentally shown to impair the signal peptide function and thus influence protein transportation. We took advantage of SignalP 3.0 predictions to characterize the signal peptide prediction score differences between the mutant and the wild-type alleles of each mutation, as well as 189 previously uncharacterized single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found to be located in the signal peptide domains of 165 human proteins. Comparisons of signal peptide prediction outcomes of mutations and SNPs, have implicated SNPs potentially impacting the signal peptide function, and thus the cellular localization of the human proteins. The majority of the top candidate proteins represented membrane and secreted proteins that are associated with molecular transport, cell signaling and cell to cell interaction processes of the cell. This is the first study that systematically characterizes genetic variation occurring in the signal peptides of all human proteins. This study represents a useful strategy for prioritization of SNPs occurring within the signal peptide domains of human proteins. Functional evaluation of candidates identified herein may reveal effects on major cellular processes including immune cell function, cell recognition and adhesion, and signal transduction. PMID:17680692

  19. Insights into the evolution and domain structure of ataxin-2 proteins across eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ataxin-2 is an evolutionarily conserved protein first identified in humans as responsible for spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2). The molecular basis of SCA2 is the expansion of a polyglutamine tract in Ataxin-2, encoding a Lsm domain that may bind RNA and a PAM2 motif that enables interaction with the poly (A) binding protein. Although the association with SCA2 has been verified, a detailed molecular function for Ataxin-2 has not been established. Results We have undertaken a survey of Ataxin-2 proteins across all eukaryotic domains. In eukaryotes, except for vertebrates and land plants, a single ortholog was identified. Notably, with the exception of birds, two Ataxin-2 genes exist in vertebrates. Expansion was observed in land plants and a novel class lacking the LsmAD domain was identified. Large polyQ tracts appear limited to primates and insects of the orders Hymenoptera and Diptera. A common feature across Ataxin-2 orthologs is the presence of proline-rich motifs, formerly described in the human protein. Conclusion Our analysis provides valuable information on the evolution and domain structure of Ataxin-2 proteins. Proline-rich motifs that may mediate protein interactions are widespread in Ataxin-2 proteins, but expansion of polyglutamine tracts associated with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2, is present only in primates, as well as some insects. Our analysis of Ataxin-2 proteins provides also a source to examine orthologs in a number of different species. PMID:25027299

  20. A family of RS domain proteins with novel subcellular localization and trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Steven J.; Schulz, Thomas C.; Davey, Philippa; Claudianos, Charles; Russell, Carrie; Rathjen, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    We report the sequence, conservation and cell biology of a novel protein, Psc1, which is expressed and regulated within the embryonic pluripotent cell population of the mouse. The Psc1 sequence includes an RS domain and an RNA recognition motif (RRM), and a sequential arrangement of protein motifs that has not been demonstrated for other RS domain proteins. This arrangement was conserved in a second mouse protein (BAC34721). The identification of Psc1 and BAC34721 homologues in vertebrates and related proteins, more widely throughout evolution, defines a new family of RS domain proteins termed acidic rich RS (ARRS) domain proteins. Psc1 incorporated into the nuclear speckles, but demonstrated novel aspects of subcellular distribution including localization to speckles proximal to the nuclear periphery and localization to punctate structures in the cytoplasm termed cytospeckles. Integration of Psc1 into cytospeckles was dependent on the RRM. Cytospeckles were dynamic within the cytoplasm and appeared to traffic into the nucleus. These observations suggest a novel role in RNA metabolism for ARRS proteins. PMID:15741184

  1. High mobility group protein 2 functionally interacts with the POU domains of octamer transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Zwilling, S; König, H; Wirth, T

    1995-01-01

    The octamer transcription factors Oct1 and Oct2 are involved in the transcriptional regulation of both lymphoid-specific and ubiquitously expressed genes. Their activity depends critically on their interaction with distinct cellular cofactors. Therefore, we have isolated cDNAs encoding proteins that physically interact with Oct2. Here we describe the analysis of one such clone, representing the murine homologue of high mobility group (HMG) protein 2. We have mapped the interaction domains for both proteins and have shown that HMG2 and Oct2 interact via their HMG domains and POU homeodomains, respectively. This interaction is not restricted to Oct2, as other members of the octamer transcription factor family like Oct1 and Oct6 also interact with HMG2. The interaction with HMG2 results in a marked increase in the sequence-specific DNA binding activity of the Oct proteins. Interestingly, the HMG2 protein is not present in the protein-DNA complex detected by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The Oct and HMG2 proteins also interact in vivo. A chimeric protein, in which the strong transactivation domain of VP16 was fused directly to the HMG domains of HMG2, stimulated the activity of an octamer-dependent reporter construct upon cotransfection. Furthermore, the expression of antisense RNA for HMG2 specifically reduces octamer-dependent transcription. These results suggest that one of the functions of HMG2 is to support the octamer transcription factors in their role as transcriptional activators. Images PMID:7720710

  2. Exploring metazoan evolution through dynamic and holistic changes in protein families and domains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding proteome evolution is important for deciphering processes that drive species diversity and adaptation. Herein, the dynamics of change in protein families and protein domains over the course of metazoan evolution was explored. Change, as defined by birth/death and duplication/deletion ...

  3. The MDM2 RING domain and central acidic domain play distinct roles in MDM2 protein homodimerization and MDM2-MDMX protein heterodimerization.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Patrick L; Ke, Hengming; Zhang, Yanping

    2015-05-15

    The oncoprotein murine double minute 2 (MDM2) is an E3 ligase that plays a prominent role in p53 suppression by promoting its polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. In its active form, MDM2 forms homodimers as well as heterodimers with the homologous protein murine double minute 4 (MDMX), both of which are thought to occur through their respective C-terminal RING (really interesting new gene) domains. In this study, using multiple MDM2 mutants, we show evidence suggesting that MDM2 homo- and heterodimerization occur through distinct mechanisms because MDM2 RING domain mutations that inhibit MDM2 interaction with MDMX do not affect MDM2 interaction with WT MDM2. Intriguingly, deletion of a portion of the MDM2 central acidic domain selectively inhibits interaction with MDM2 while leaving intact the ability of MDM2 to interact with MDMX and to ubiquitinate p53. Further analysis of an MDM2 C-terminal deletion mutant reveals that the C-terminal residues of MDM2 are required for both MDM2 and MDMX interaction. Collectively, our results suggest a model in which MDM2-MDMX heterodimerization requires the extreme C terminus and proper RING domain structure of MDM2, whereas MDM2 homodimerization requires the extreme C terminus and the central acidic domain of MDM2, suggesting that MDM2 homo- and heterodimers utilize distinct MDM2 domains. Our study is the first to report mutations capable of separating MDM2 homo- and heterodimerization. PMID:25809483

  4. N-terminal domains of native multidomain proteins have the potential to assist de novo folding of their downstream domains in vivo by acting as solubility enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chul Woo; Han, Kyoung Sim; Ryu, Ki-Sun; Kim, Byung Hee; Kim, Kyun-Hwan; Choi, Seong Il; Seong, Baik L.

    2007-01-01

    The fusion of soluble partner to the N terminus of aggregation-prone polypeptide has been popularly used to overcome the formation of inclusion bodies in the E. coli cytosol. The chaperone-like functions of the upstream fusion partner in the artificial multidomain proteins could occur in de novo folding of native multidomain proteins. Here, we show that the N-terminal domains of three E. coli multidomain proteins such as lysyl-tRNA synthetase, threonyl-tRNA synthetase, and aconitase are potent solubility enhancers for various C-terminal heterologous proteins. The results suggest that the N-terminal domains could act as solubility enhancers for the folding of their authentic C-terminal domains in vivo. Tandem repeat of N-terminal domain or insertion of aspartic residues at the C terminus of the N-terminal domain also increased the solubility of fusion proteins, suggesting that the solubilizing ability correlates with the size and charge of N-terminal domains. The solubilizing ability of N-terminal domains would contribute to the autonomous folding of multidomain proteins in vivo, and based on these results, we propose a model of how N-terminal domains solubilize their downstream domains. PMID:17384228

  5. Dual amyloid domains promote differential functioning of the chaplin proteins during Streptomyces aerial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Capstick, David S.; Jomaa, Ahmad; Hanke, Chistopher; Ortega, Joaquin; Elliot, Marie A.

    2011-01-01

    The chaplin proteins are functional amyloids found in the filamentous Streptomyces bacteria. These secreted proteins are required for the aerial development of Streptomyces coelicolor, and contribute to an intricate rodlet ultrastructure that decorates the surfaces of aerial hyphae and spores. S. coelicolor encodes eight chaplin proteins. Previous studies have revealed that only three of these proteins (ChpC, ChpE, and ChpH) are necessary for promoting aerial development, and of these three, ChpH is the primary developmental determinant. Here, we show that the model chaplin, ChpH, contains two amyloidogenic domains: one in the N terminus and one in the C terminus of the mature protein. These domains have different polymerization properties as determined using fluorescence spectroscopy, secondary structure analyses, and electron microscopy. We coupled these in vitro assays with in vivo genetic studies to probe the connection between ChpH amyloidogenesis and its biological function. Using mutational analyses, we demonstrated that both N- and C-terminal amyloid domains of ChpH were required for promoting aerial hypha formation, while the N-terminal domain was dispensable for assembly of the rodlet ultrastructure. These results suggest that there is a functional differentiation of the dual amyloid domains in the chaplin proteins. PMID:21628577

  6. Use of a Probabilistic Motif Search to Identify Histidine Phosphotransfer Domain-Containing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Surujon, Defne; Ratner, David I

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of newly obtained proteomic information affords researchers the possibility of searching for proteins of a given structure or function. Here we describe a general method for the detection of a protein domain of interest in any species for which a complete proteome exists. In particular, we apply this approach to identify histidine phosphotransfer (HPt) domain-containing proteins across a range of eukaryotic species. From the sequences of known HPt domains, we created an amino acid occurrence matrix which we then used to define a conserved, probabilistic motif. Examination of various organisms either known to contain (plant and fungal species) or believed to lack (mammals) HPt domains established criteria by which new HPt candidates were identified and ranked. Search results using a probabilistic motif matrix compare favorably with data to be found in several commonly used protein structure/function databases: our method identified all known HPt proteins in the Arabidopsis thaliana proteome, confirmed the absence of such motifs in mice and humans, and suggests new candidate HPts in several organisms. Moreover, probabilistic motif searching can be applied more generally, in a manner both readily customized and computationally compact, to other protein domains; this utility is demonstrated by our identification of histones in a range of eukaryotic organisms. PMID:26751210

  7. Use of a Probabilistic Motif Search to Identify Histidine Phosphotransfer Domain-Containing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Surujon, Defne; Ratner, David I.

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of newly obtained proteomic information affords researchers the possibility of searching for proteins of a given structure or function. Here we describe a general method for the detection of a protein domain of interest in any species for which a complete proteome exists. In particular, we apply this approach to identify histidine phosphotransfer (HPt) domain-containing proteins across a range of eukaryotic species. From the sequences of known HPt domains, we created an amino acid occurrence matrix which we then used to define a conserved, probabilistic motif. Examination of various organisms either known to contain (plant and fungal species) or believed to lack (mammals) HPt domains established criteria by which new HPt candidates were identified and ranked. Search results using a probabilistic motif matrix compare favorably with data to be found in several commonly used protein structure/function databases: our method identified all known HPt proteins in the Arabidopsis thaliana proteome, confirmed the absence of such motifs in mice and humans, and suggests new candidate HPts in several organisms. Moreover, probabilistic motif searching can be applied more generally, in a manner both readily customized and computationally compact, to other protein domains; this utility is demonstrated by our identification of histones in a range of eukaryotic organisms. PMID:26751210

  8. Structure of the GAT domain of the endosomal adapter protein Tom1

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shuyan; Ellena, Jeffrey F.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Capelluto, Daniel G.S.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular homeostasis requires correct delivery of cell-surface receptor proteins (cargo) to their target subcellular compartments. The adapter proteins Tom1 and Tollip are involved in sorting of ubiquitinated cargo in endosomal compartments. Recruitment of Tom1 to the endosomal compartments is mediated by its GAT domain’s association to Tollip’s Tom1-binding domain (TBD). In this data article, we report the solution NMR-derived structure of the Tom1 GAT domain. The estimated protein structure exhibits a bundle of three helical elements. We compare the Tom1 GAT structure with those structures corresponding to the Tollip TBD- and ubiquitin-bound states. PMID:26977434

  9. Engineered staphylococcal protein A's IgG-binding domain with cathepsin L inhibitory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovic, Tomaz . E-mail: tomaz.bratkovic@ffa.uni-lj.si; Berlec, Ales; Popovic, Tatjana; Lunder, Mojca; Kreft, Samo; Urleb, Uros; Strukelj, Borut

    2006-10-13

    Inhibitory peptide of papain-like cysteine proteases, affinity selected from a random disulfide constrained phage-displayed peptide library, was grafted to staphylococcal protein A's B domain. Scaffold protein was additionally modified in order to allow solvent exposed display of peptide loop. Correct folding of fusion proteins was confirmed by CD-spectroscopy and by the ability to bind the Fc-region of rabbit IgG, a characteristic of parent domain. The recombinant constructs inhibited cathepsin L with inhibitory constants in the low-micromolar range.

  10. Insights into common functional domains of tospovirus NSm proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Direct demonstration of tospovirus gene function has been impeded by the absence of reliable reverse genetics systems for this virus genus. Use of a Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based expression system has demonstrated that the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) NSm protein supports cell-to-cell moveme...

  11. Novel Mechanism of Regulation of Tomato Bushy Stunt Virus Replication by Cellular WW-Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Daniel; Kovalev, Nikolay; Qin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Replication of (+)RNA viruses depends on several co-opted host proteins but is also under the control of cell-intrinsic restriction factors (CIRFs). By using tombusviruses, small model viruses of plants, we dissect the mechanism of inhibition of viral replication by cellular WW-domain-containing proteins, which act as CIRFs. By using fusion proteins between the WW domain and the p33 replication protein, we show that the WW domain inhibits the ability of p33 to bind to the viral RNA and to other p33 and p92 replication proteins leading to inhibition of viral replication in yeast and in a cell extract. Overexpression of WW-domain protein in yeast also leads to reduction of several co-opted host factors in the viral replicase complex (VRC). These host proteins, such as eEF1A, Cdc34 E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, and ESCRT proteins (Bro1p and Vps4p), are known to be involved in VRC assembly. Simultaneous coexpression of proviral cellular factors with WW-domain protein partly neutralizes the inhibitory effect of the WW-domain protein. We propose that cellular WW-domain proteins act as CIRFs and also as regulators of tombusvirus replication by inhibiting the assembly of new membrane-bound VRCs at the late stage of infection. We suggest that tombusviruses could sense the status of the infected cells via the availability of cellular susceptibility factors versus WW-domain proteins for binding to p33 replication protein that ultimately controls the formation of new VRCs. This regulatory mechanism might explain how tombusviruses could adjust the efficiency of RNA replication to the limiting resources of the host cells during infections. IMPORTANCE Replication of positive-stranded RNA viruses, which are major pathogens of plants, animals, and humans, is inhibited by several cell-intrinsic restriction factors (CIRFs) in infected cells. We define here the inhibitory roles of the cellular Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase and its WW domain in plant-infecting tombusvirus

  12. Identification of a novel human zinc finger protein that specifically interacts with the activation domain of lentiviral Tat proteins.

    PubMed

    Fridell, R A; Harding, L S; Bogerd, H P; Cullen, B R

    1995-06-01

    Transcriptional activation of HIV-1 gene expression by the viral Tat protein requires the interaction of a cellular cofactor with the Tat activation domain. This domain has been shown to consist of the cysteine-rich and core motifs of HIV-1 Tat and is functionally conserved in the distantly related Tat proteins of HIV-2 and EIAV. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified a novel human gene product, termed HT2A, that specifically and precisely binds to the activation domain of HIV-1 Tat and that can also interact with the HIV-2 and EIAV Tat proteins in vivo. We present data further demonstrating that the interaction between the activation domain of HIV-1 Tat and the HT2A protein can be readily detected in the mammalian cell nucleus. Sequence analysis demonstrates that HT2A is a novel member of the C3HC4 or ring finger family of zinc finger proteins that includes several known oncogenes and transcription factors. Overall, these data suggest that HT2A may play a significant role in mediating the biological activity of the HIV-1 Tat protein in vivo. PMID:7778269

  13. Selection on Network Dynamics Drives Differential Rates of Protein Domain Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mannakee, Brian K.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.

    2016-01-01

    The long-held principle that functionally important proteins evolve slowly has recently been challenged by studies in mice and yeast showing that the severity of a protein knockout only weakly predicts that protein’s rate of evolution. However, the relevance of these studies to evolutionary changes within proteins is unknown, because amino acid substitutions, unlike knockouts, often only slightly perturb protein activity. To quantify the phenotypic effect of small biochemical perturbations, we developed an approach to use computational systems biology models to measure the influence of individual reaction rate constants on network dynamics. We show that this dynamical influence is predictive of protein domain evolutionary rate within networks in vertebrates and yeast, even after controlling for expression level and breadth, network topology, and knockout effect. Thus, our results not only demonstrate the importance of protein domain function in determining evolutionary rate, but also the power of systems biology modeling to uncover unanticipated evolutionary forces. PMID:27380265

  14. Metazoans evolved by taking domains from soluble proteins to expand intercellular communication network.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Inhae; Bowie, James U; Kim, Sanguk

    2015-01-01

    A central question in animal evolution is how multicellular animals evolved from unicellular ancestors. We hypothesize that membrane proteins must be key players in the development of multicellularity because they are well positioned to form the cell-cell contacts and to provide the intercellular communication required for the creation of complex organisms. Here we find that a major mechanism for the necessary increase in membrane protein complexity in the transition from non-metazoan to metazoan life was the new incorporation of domains from soluble proteins. The membrane proteins that have incorporated soluble domains in metazoans are enriched in many of the functions unique to multicellular organisms such as cell-cell adhesion, signaling, immune defense and developmental processes. They also show enhanced protein-protein interaction (PPI) network complexity and centrality, suggesting an important role in the cellular diversification found in complex organisms. Our results expose an evolutionary mechanism that contributed to the development of higher life forms. PMID:25923201

  15. The conserved KNOX domain mediates specificity of tobacco KNOTTED1-type homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, T; Nishimura, A; Tamaoki, M; Kuba, M; Tanaka, H; Iwahori, S; Matsuoka, M

    1999-01-01

    Overproduction of the tobacco KNOTTED1-type homeodomain proteins NTH1, NTH15, and NTH23 in transgenic tobacco plants causes mild, severe, and no morphological alterations, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the homeodomains and adjacent ELK domains are highly conserved, and the N-terminal KNOX domains also are moderately conserved. To investigate the contributions of both the conserved and divergent regions to the severity of morphological alterations, we generated chimeric proteins by exchanging different regions of NTH1, NTH15, and NTH23. The severity of the abnormal phenotype was dependent upon the synergistic action of both the N terminus, containing the KNOX domain, and the C terminus, containing the ELK homeodomain. Detailed analysis focusing on the C terminus revealed that the C-terminal half of the ELK domain is more effective in inducing the abnormal phenotypes than are the homeodomains. For the N terminus, severe morphological alterations were induced by exchanging a part of the KNOX domain of NTH1 with the corresponding region of NTH15. This limited region in the KNOX domain of all homeodomain proteins includes a predicted alpha-helical region, but only that in NTH15 is predicted to form a typical amphipathic structure. We discuss the possibility, based on these results, that the secondary structure of the KNOX domain is important for the induction of abnormal morphology in transgenic tobacco plants. PMID:10449577

  16. Flexible DNA binding of the BTB/POZ-domain protein FBI-1.

    PubMed

    Pessler, Frank; Hernandez, Nouria

    2003-08-01

    POZ-domain transcription factors are characterized by the presence of a protein-protein interaction domain called the POZ or BTB domain at their N terminus and zinc fingers at their C terminus. Despite the large number of POZ-domain transcription factors that have been identified to date and the significant insights that have been gained into their cellular functions, relatively little is known about their DNA binding properties. FBI-1 is a BTB/POZ-domain protein that has been shown to modulate HIV-1 Tat trans-activation and to repress transcription of some cellular genes. We have used various viral and cellular FBI-1 binding sites to characterize the interaction of a POZ-domain protein with DNA in detail. We find that FBI-1 binds to inverted sequence repeats downstream of the HIV-1 transcription start site. Remarkably, it binds efficiently to probes carrying these repeats in various orientations and spacings with no particular rotational alignment, indicating that its interaction with DNA is highly flexible. Indeed, FBI-1 binding sites in the adenovirus 2 major late promoter, the c-fos gene, and the c-myc P1 and P2 promoters reveal variously spaced direct, inverted, and everted sequence repeats with the consensus sequence G(A/G)GGG(T/C)(C/T)(T/C)(C/T) for each repeat. PMID:12750370

  17. Signal Activation and Inactivation by the Gα Helical Domain: A Long-Neglected Partner in G Protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dohlman, Henrik G.; Jones, Janice C.

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding proteins (G proteins) are positioned at the top of many signal transduction pathways. The G protein α subunit is composed of two domains, one that resembles Ras and another that is composed entirely of α helices. Historically, most attention has focused on the Ras-like domain, but emerging evidence reveals that the helical domain is an active participant in G protein signaling. PMID:22649098

  18. Genetic identification of an autoinhibitor in CDPK, a protein kinase with a calmodulin-like domain.

    PubMed

    Harper, J F; Huang, J F; Lloyd, S J

    1994-06-14

    CDPKs are a family of calcium (Ca2+)-dependent protein kinases which are defined by a carboxyl-terminal calmodulin-like domain. Mutational analysis indicates that the junction domain, which joins the kinase and calmodulin-like domains, contains an autoinhibitor. CDPK isoform AK1 from Arabidopsis was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein sandwiched between glutathione S-transferase and six consecutive histidines at the N- and C-terminal ends, respectively. This fusion, called AK1-6H, was purified and displayed kinase activity which was stimulated up to 127-fold by Ca2+, with a typical specific activity of 2000 nmol min-1 mg-1, using syntide-2 as peptide substrate. A truncation which deletes the calmodulin-like domain, as in mutant delta C-6H, disrupts Ca2+ activation and leaves the enzyme with a basal level of activity. Delta C-6H could be activated 87-fold by preincubation with a purified polyclonal IgG which was raised against a junction domain fusion. A further deletion of the junction domain, as in mutant delta JC, results in a constitutively active enzyme. This indicates that the junction domain in delta C-6H can function as an autoinhibitor. Its function as an autoinhibitor in a full-length enzyme was confirmed by site-specific mutagenesis, as shown by mutant KJM23-6H, which had a six-residue substitution in the junction domain between A422 and A432. Both delta JC and KJM23-6H encoded Ca(2+)-independent enzymes which had specific activities greater than 70% that of a fully active AK1-6H and displayed equivalent Km values for ATP and syntide-2. Inhibition studies on delta JC, using peptides based on the autoinhibitory domains of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, are consistent with a model where the junction domain contains a similar pseudosubstrate-type autoinhibitor. PMID:8003490

  19. Membrane Anchoring of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases by Convergent Acquisition of a Novel Protein Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A. G.; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluis; Luque, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Four distinct aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) found in some cyanobacterial species contain a novel protein domain that bears two putative transmembrane helices. This CAAD domain is present in glutamyl-, isoleucyl-, leucyl-, and valyl-tRNA synthetases, the latter of which has probably recruited the domain more than once during evolution. Deleting the CAAD domain from the valyl-tRNA synthetase of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 did not significantly modify the catalytic properties of this enzyme, suggesting that it does not participate in its canonical tRNA-charging function. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the function of the CAAD domain is structural, mediating the membrane anchorage of the enzyme, although membrane localization of aaRSs has not previously been described in any living organism. Synthetases containing the CAAD domain were localized in the intracytoplasmic thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria and were largely absent from the plasma membrane. The CAAD domain was necessary and apparently sufficient for protein targeting to membranes. Moreover, localization of aaRSs in thylakoids was important under nitrogen limiting conditions. In Anabaena, a multicellular filamentous cyanobacterium often used as a model for prokaryotic cell differentiation, valyl-tRNA synthetase underwent subcellular relocation at the cell poles during heterocyst differentiation, a process also dependent on the CAAD domain. PMID:21965654

  20. PDZ Affinity Chromatography: A general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ~ 90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ-domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins. PMID:24607360

  1. Identification of a novel contactin-associated transmembrane receptor with multiple domains implicated in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Peles, E; Nativ, M; Lustig, M; Grumet, M; Schilling, J; Martinez, R; Plowman, G D; Schlessinger, J

    1997-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTPbeta) expressed on the surface of glial cells binds to the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored recognition molecule contactin on neuronal cells leading to neurite outgrowth. We describe the cloning of a novel contactin-associated transmembrane receptor (p190/Caspr) containing a mosaic of domains implicated in protein-protein interactions. The extracellular domain of Caspr contains a neurophilin/coagulation factor homology domain, a region related to fibrinogen beta/gamma, epidermal growth factor-like repeats, neurexin motifs as well as unique PGY repeats found in a molluscan adhesive protein. The cytoplasmic domain of Caspr contains a proline-rich sequence capable of binding to a subclass of SH3 domains of signaling molecules. Caspr and contactin exist as a complex in rat brain and are bound to each other by means of lateral (cis) interactions in the plasma membrane. We propose that Caspr may function as a signaling component of contactin, enabling recruitment and activation of intracellular signaling pathways in neurons. The binding of RPTPbeta to the contactin-Caspr complex could provide a mechanism for cell-cell communication between glial cells and neurons during development. PMID:9118959

  2. Engineering FKBP-Based Destabilizing Domains to Build Sophisticated Protein Regulation Systems

    PubMed Central

    An, Wenlin; Jackson, Rachel E.; Hunter, Paul; Gögel, Stefanie; van Diepen, Michiel; Liu, Karen; Meyer, Martin P.; Eickholt, Britta J.

    2015-01-01

    Targeting protein stability with small molecules has emerged as an effective tool to control protein abundance in a fast, scalable and reversible manner. The technique involves tagging a protein of interest (POI) with a destabilizing domain (DD) specifically controlled by a small molecule. The successful construction of such fusion proteins may, however, be limited by functional interference of the DD epitope with electrostatic interactions required for full biological function of proteins. Another drawback of this approach is the remaining endogenous protein. Here, we combined the Cre-LoxP system with an advanced DD and generated a protein regulation system in which the loss of an endogenous protein, in our case the tumor suppressor PTEN, can be coupled directly with a conditionally fine-tunable DD-PTEN. This new system will consolidate and extend the use of DD-technology to control protein function precisely in living cells and animal models. PMID:26717575

  3. Transmembrane and coiled-coil domain family 1 is a novel protein of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Kho, Yik-Shing; Wang, Zhe; Chiang, Yan Ting; Ng, Gary K H; Shaw, Pang-Chui; Wang, Yuzhuo; Qi, Robert Z

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a continuous membrane network in eukaryotic cells comprising the nuclear envelope, the rough ER, and the smooth ER. The ER has multiple critical functions and a characteristic structure. In this study, we identified a new protein of the ER, TMCC1 (transmembrane and coiled-coil domain family 1). The TMCC family consists of at least 3 putative proteins (TMCC1-3) that are conserved from nematode to human. We show that TMCC1 is an ER protein that is expressed in diverse human cell lines. TMCC1 contains 2 adjacent transmembrane domains near the C-terminus, in addition to coiled-coil domains. TMCC1 was targeted to the rough ER through the transmembrane domains, whereas the N-terminal region and C-terminal tail of TMCC1 were found to reside in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the cytosolic region of TMCC1 formed homo- or hetero-dimers or oligomers with other TMCC proteins and interacted with ribosomal proteins. Notably, overexpression of TMCC1 or its transmembrane domains caused defects in ER morphology. Our results suggest roles of TMCC1 in ER organization. PMID:24454821

  4. Structural Basis for Ubiquitin Recognition by the Otu1 Ovarian Tumor Domain Protein

    SciTech Connect

    T Messick; N Russel; A Iwata; K Sarachan; R Shiekhattar; I Shanks; F Reyes-Turcu; K Wilkinson; R Marmorstein

    2011-12-31

    Ubiquitination of proteins modifies protein function by either altering their activities, promoting their degradation, or altering their subcellular localization. Deubiquitinating enzymes are proteases that reverse this ubiquitination. Previous studies demonstrate that proteins that contain an ovarian tumor (OTU) domain possess deubiquitinating activity. This domain of {approx}130 amino acids is weakly similar to the papain family of proteases and is highly conserved from yeast to mammals. Here we report structural and functional studies on the OTU domain-containing protein from yeast, Otu1. We show that Otu1 binds polyubiquitin chain analogs more tightly than monoubiquitin and preferentially hydrolyzes longer polyubiquitin chains with Lys{sup 48} linkages, having little or no activity on Lys{sup 63}- and Lys{sup 29}-linked chains. We also show that Otu1 interacts with Cdc48, a regulator of the ER-associated degradation pathway. We also report the x-ray crystal structure of the OTU domain of Otu1 covalently complexed with ubiquitin and carry out structure-guided mutagenesis revealing a novel mode of ubiquitin recognition and a variation on the papain protease catalytic site configuration that appears to be conserved within the OTU family of ubiquitin hydrolases. Together, these studies provide new insights into ubiquitin binding and hydrolysis by yeast Otu1 and other OTU domain-containing proteins.

  5. Fusion protein based on Grb2-SH2 domain for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Yuriko; Furukawa, Takako; Arano, Yasushi; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Saga, Tsuneo

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Grb2 mediates EGFR signaling through binding to phosphorylate EGFR with SH2 domain. {yields} We generated fusion proteins containing 1 or 2 SH2 domains of Grb2 added with TAT. {yields} The one with 2 SH2 domains (TSSF) interfered ERK phosphorylation. {yields} TSSF significantly delayed the growth of EGFR overexpressing tumor in a mouse model. -- Abstract: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is one of the very attractive targets for cancer therapy. In this study, we generated fusion proteins containing one or two Src-homology 2 (SH2) domains of growth factor receptor bound protein 2 (Grb2), which bind to phosphorylated EGFR, added with HIV-1 transactivating transcription for cell membrane penetration (termed TSF and TSSF, respectively). We examined if they can interfere Grb2-mediated signaling pathway and suppress tumor growth as expected from the lack of SH3 domain, which is necessary to intermediate EGFR-Grb2 cell signaling, in the fusion proteins. The transduction efficiency of TSSF was similar to that of TSF, but the binding activity of TSSF to EGFR was higher than that of TSF. Treatment of EGFR-overexpressing cells showed that TSSF decreased p42-ERK phosphorylation, while TSF did not. Both the proteins delayed cell growth but did not induce cell death in culture. TSSF also significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo under consecutive administration. In conclusion, TSSF showed an ability to inhibit EGFR-Grb2 signaling and could have a potential to treat EGFR-activated cancer.

  6. Analysis of the overall structure of the multi-domain amyloid precursor protein (APP).

    PubMed

    Coburger, Ina; Dahms, Sven O; Roeser, Dirk; Gührs, Karl-Heinz; Hortschansky, Peter; Than, Manuel E

    2013-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its processing by the α-, β- and γ-secretases is widely believed to play a central role during the development of Alzheimer´s disease. The three-dimensional structure of the entire protein, its physiologic function and the regulation of its proteolytic processing remain, however, largely unclear to date. To gain a deeper understanding of the structure of APP that underlies all of its functions, we first cloned and recombinantly expressed different constructs in E. coli. Using limited proteolysis followed by mass spectrometry and Edman degradation as well as analytical gel permeation chromatography coupled static light scattering, we experimentally analyzed the structural domain boundaries and determined that the large ectodomain of APP consists of exactly two rigidly folded domains - the E1-domain (Leu18-Ala190) and the E2-domain (Ser295-Asp500). Both, the acidic domain (AcD) connecting E1 and E2 as well as the juxtamembrane region (JMR) connecting E2 to the single transmembrane helix are highly flexible and extended. We identified in-between the E1-domain and the AcD an additional domain of conservation and partial flexibility that we termed extension domain (ED, Glu191-Glu227). Using Bio-layer interferometry, pull-down assays and analytical gel filtration experiments we demonstrated that the E1-domain does not tightly interact with the E2-domain, both in the presence and in the absence of heparin. APP hence forms an extended molecule that is flexibly tethered to the membrane. Its multi-domain architecture enables together with the many known functionalities the concomitant performance of several, independent functions, which might be regulated by cellular, compartment specific pH-changes. PMID:24324731

  7. Improvement in Protein Domain Identification Is Reached by Breaking Consensus, with the Agreement of Many Profiles and Domain Co-occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Juliana; Zaverucha, Gerson; Vaquero, Catherine; Carbone, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Traditional protein annotation methods describe known domains with probabilistic models representing consensus among homologous domain sequences. However, when relevant signals become too weak to be identified by a global consensus, attempts for annotation fail. Here we address the fundamental question of domain identification for highly divergent proteins. By using high performance computing, we demonstrate that the limits of state-of-the-art annotation methods can be bypassed. We design a new strategy based on the observation that many structural and functional protein constraints are not globally conserved through all species but might be locally conserved in separate clades. We propose a novel exploitation of the large amount of data available: 1. for each known protein domain, several probabilistic clade-centered models are constructed from a large and differentiated panel of homologous sequences, 2. a decision-making protocol combines outcomes obtained from multiple models, 3. a multi-criteria optimization algorithm finds the most likely protein architecture. The method is evaluated for domain and architecture prediction over several datasets and statistical testing hypotheses. Its performance is compared against HMMScan and HHblits, two widely used search methods based on sequence-profile and profile-profile comparison. Due to their closeness to actual protein sequences, clade-centered models are shown to be more specific and functionally predictive than the broadly used consensus models. Based on them, we improved annotation of Plasmodium falciparum protein sequences on a scale not previously possible. We successfully predict at least one domain for 72% of P. falciparum proteins against 63% achieved previously, corresponding to 30% of improvement over the total number of Pfam domain predictions on the whole genome. The method is applicable to any genome and opens new avenues to tackle evolutionary questions such as the reconstruction of ancient domain

  8. Improvement in Protein Domain Identification Is Reached by Breaking Consensus, with the Agreement of Many Profiles and Domain Co-occurrence.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Juliana; Zaverucha, Gerson; Vaquero, Catherine; Carbone, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    Traditional protein annotation methods describe known domains with probabilistic models representing consensus among homologous domain sequences. However, when relevant signals become too weak to be identified by a global consensus, attempts for annotation fail. Here we address the fundamental question of domain identification for highly divergent proteins. By using high performance computing, we demonstrate that the limits of state-of-the-art annotation methods can be bypassed. We design a new strategy based on the observation that many structural and functional protein constraints are not globally conserved through all species but might be locally conserved in separate clades. We propose a novel exploitation of the large amount of data available: 1. for each known protein domain, several probabilistic clade-centered models are constructed from a large and differentiated panel of homologous sequences, 2. a decision-making protocol combines outcomes obtained from multiple models, 3. a multi-criteria optimization algorithm finds the most likely protein architecture. The method is evaluated for domain and architecture prediction over several datasets and statistical testing hypotheses. Its performance is compared against HMMScan and HHblits, two widely used search methods based on sequence-profile and profile-profile comparison. Due to their closeness to actual protein sequences, clade-centered models are shown to be more specific and functionally predictive than the broadly used consensus models. Based on them, we improved annotation of Plasmodium falciparum protein sequences on a scale not previously possible. We successfully predict at least one domain for 72% of P. falciparum proteins against 63% achieved previously, corresponding to 30% of improvement over the total number of Pfam domain predictions on the whole genome. The method is applicable to any genome and opens new avenues to tackle evolutionary questions such as the reconstruction of ancient domain

  9. delta-Opioid receptors exhibit high efficiency when activating trimeric G proteins in membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Bourova, Lenka; Kostrnova, Alexandra; Hejnova, Lucie; Moravcova, Zuzana; Moon, Hyo-Eun; Novotny, Jiri; Milligan, Graeme; Svoboda, Petr

    2003-04-01

    Low-density membrane fragments (domains) were separated from the bulk of plasma membranes of human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells expressing a delta-opioid (DOP) receptor-Gi1alpha fusion protein by drastic homogenization and flotation on equilibrium sucrose density gradients. The functional activity of trimeric G proteins and capacity of the DOP receptor to stimulate both the fusion protein-linked Gi1alpha and endogenous pertussis-toxin sensitive G proteins was measured as d-Ala2, d-Leu5-enkephalin stimulated high-affinity GTPase or guanosine-5'-[gamma-35S]triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding. The maximum d-Ala2-d-Leu5 enkephalin (DADLE)-stimulated GTPase was two times higher in low-density membrane fragments than in bulk of plasma membranes; 58 and 27 pmol/mg/min, respectively. The same difference was obtained for [35S]GTPgammaS binding. Contrarily, the low-density domains contained no more than half the DOP receptor binding sites (Bmax = 6.6 pmol/mg versus 13.6 pmol/mg). Thus, when corrected for expression levels of the receptor, low-density domains exhibited four times higher agonist-stimulated GTPase and [35S]GTPgammaS binding than the bulk plasma membranes. The regulator of G protein signaling RGS1, enhanced further the G protein functional activity but did not remove the difference between domain-bound and plasma membrane pools of G protein. The potency of the agonist in functional studies and the affinity of specific [3H]DADLE binding to the receptor were, however, the same in both types of membranes - EC50 = 4.5 +/- 0.1 x 10(-8) and 3.2 +/- 1.4 x 10(-8) m for GTPase; Kd = 1.2 +/- 0.1 and 1.3 +/- 0.1 nm for [3H]DADLE radioligand binding assay. Similar results were obtained when sodium bicarbonate was used for alkaline isolation of membrane domains. By contrast, detergent-insensitive membrane domains isolated following treatment of cells with Triton X100 exhibited no DADLE-stimulated GTPase or GTPgammaS binding. Functional coupling between the DOP receptor

  10. Fusion protein of retinol-binding protein and albumin domain III reduces liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hongsik; Jeong, Hyeyeun; Park, Sangeun; Yoo, Wonbaek; Choi, Soyoung; Choi, Kyungmin; Lee, Min-Goo; Lee, Mihwa; Cha, DaeRyong; Kim, Young-Sik; Han, Jeeyoung; Kim, Wonkon; Park, Sun-Hwa; Oh, Junseo

    2015-01-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in liver fibrosis, and inactivating HSCs has been considered a promising therapeutic approach. We previously showed that albumin and its derivative designed for stellate cell-targeting, retinol-binding protein–albumin domain III fusion protein (referred to as R-III), inactivate cultured HSCs. Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of albumin/R-III in HSCs and examined the anti-fibrotic potential of R-III in vivo. R-III treatment and albumin expression downregulated retinoic acid (RA) signaling which was involved in HSC activation. RA receptor agonist and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase overexpression abolished the anti-fibrotic effect of R-III and albumin, respectively. R-III uptake into cultured HSCs was significantly decreased by siRNA-STRA6, and injected R-III was localized predominantly in HSCs in liver. Importantly, R-III administration reduced CCl4- and bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis. R-III also exhibited a preventive effect against CCl4-inducd liver fibrosis. These findings suggest that the anti-fibrotic effect of albumin/R-III is, at least in part, mediated by downregulation of RA signaling and that R-III is a good candidate as a novel anti-fibrotic drug. PMID:25864124