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Sample records for pip-5 kinase ialpha

  1. Contribution of PIP-5 kinase I{alpha} to raft-based Fc{gamma}RIIA signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Szymanska, Ewelina; Korzeniowski, Marek; Raynal, Patrick; Sobota, Andrzej; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna

    2009-04-01

    Receptor Fc{gamma}IIA (Fc{gamma}RIIA) associates with plasma membrane rafts upon activation to trigger signaling cascades leading to actin polymerization. We examined whether compartmentalization of PI(4,5)P{sub 2} and PI(4,5)P{sub 2}-synthesizing PIP5-kinase I{alpha} to rafts contributes to Fc{gamma}RIIA signaling. A fraction of PIP5-kinase I{alpha} was detected in raft-originating detergent-resistant membranes (DRM) isolated from U937 monocytes and other cells. The DRM of U937 monocytes contained also a major fraction of PI(4,5)P{sub 2}. PIP5-kinase I{alpha} bound PI(4,5)P{sub 2}, and depletion of the lipid displaced PIP5-kinase I{alpha} from the DRM. Activation of Fc{gamma}RIIA in BHK transfectants led to recruitment of the kinase to the plasma membrane and enrichment of DRM in PI(4,5)P{sub 2}. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that in resting cells the kinase was associated with the plasma membrane, cytoplasmic vesicles and the nucleus. After Fc{gamma}RIIA activation, PIP5-kinase I{alpha} and PI(4,5)P{sub 2} co-localized transiently with the activated receptor at distinct cellular locations. Immunoelectron microscopy studies revealed that PIP5-kinase I{alpha} and PI(4,5)P{sub 2} were present at the edges of electron-dense assemblies containing activated Fc{gamma}RIIA in their core. The data suggest that activation of Fc{gamma}RIIA leads to membrane rafts coalescing into signaling platforms containing PIP5-kinase I{alpha} and PI(4,5)P{sub 2}.

  2. The lipid kinase PIP5K1C regulates pain signaling and sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Brittany D.; Loo, Lipin; Street, Sarah E.; Ma, Anqi; Taylor-Blake, Bonnie; Stashko, Michael A.; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P.; Frye, Stephen V.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Numerous pain-producing (pronociceptive) receptors signal via phosphatidylinositol 4,5- bisphosphate (PIP2) hydrolysis. However, it is currently unknown which lipid kinases generate PIP2 in nociceptive dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and if these kinases regulate pronociceptive receptor signaling. Here, we found that phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5 kinase type 1C (PIP5K1C) is expressed at higher levels than any other PIP5K and, based on experiments with Pip5k1c+/− mice, generates at least half of all PIP2 in DRG neurons. Additionally, Pip5k1c haploinsufficiency reduces pronociceptive receptor signaling and TRPV1 sensitization in DRG neurons as well as thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity in mouse models of chronic pain. We identified a novel small molecule inhibitor of PIP5K1C (UNC3230) in a high-throughput screen. UNC3230 lowered PIP2 levels in DRG neurons and attenuated hypersensitivity when administered intrathecally or into the hindpaw. Our studies reveal that PIP5K1C regulates PIP2- dependent nociceptive signaling and suggest that PIP5K1C is a novel therapeutic target for chronic pain. PMID:24853942

  3. Mys protein regulates protein kinase A activity by interacting with regulatory type Ialpha subunit during vertebrate development.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Tomoya; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Kawakami, Koichi; Yamashita, Masakane

    2010-02-12

    During embryonic development, protein kinase A (PKA) plays a key role in cell fate specification by antagonizing the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. However, the mechanism by which PKA activity is regulated remains unknown. Here we show that the Misty somites (Mys) protein regulates the level of PKA activity during embryonic development in zebrafish. We isolate PKA regulatory type Ialpha subunit (Prkar1a) as a protein interacting with Mys by pulldown assay in HEK293 cells followed by mass spectrometry analysis. We show an interaction between endogenous Mys and Prkar1a in the zebrafish embryo. Mys binds to Prkar1a in its C terminus region, termed PRB domain, and activates PKA in vitro. Conversely, knockdown of Mys in zebrafish embryos results in reduction in PKA activity. We also show that knockdown of Mys induces ectopic activation of Hh target genes in the eyes, neural tube, and somites downstream of Smoothened, a protein essential for transduction of Hh signaling activity. The altered patterning of gene expression is rescued by activation of PKA. Together, our results reveal a molecular mechanism of regulation of PKA activity that is dependent on a protein-protein interaction and demonstrate that PKA activity regulated by Mys is indispensable for negative regulation of the Hh signaling pathway in Hh-responsive cells. PMID:20018846

  4. SIRT1 Regulates Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Release by Enhancing PIP5Kγ Activity through Deacetylation of Specific Lysine Residues in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Akieda-Asai, Sayaka; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Ikegami, Koji; Kahyo, Tomoaki; Yao, Ikuko; Hatanaka, Takahiro; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Sugiyama, Rika; Yokozeki, Takeaki; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Koike, Morio; Ikeda, Kyoji; Chiba, Takuya; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Song, Si-Young; Matsuno, Akira; Mizutani, Akiko; Sawabe, Motoji; Chao, Moses V.; Tanaka, Masashi; Kanaho, Yasunori; Natsume, Tohru; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Date, Yukari; McBurney, Michael W.; Guarente, Leonard; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2010-01-01

    Background SIRT1, a NAD-dependent deacetylase, has diverse roles in a variety of organs such as regulation of endocrine function and metabolism. However, it remains to be addressed how it regulates hormone release there. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report that SIRT1 is abundantly expressed in pituitary thyrotropes and regulates thyroid hormone secretion. Manipulation of SIRT1 level revealed that SIRT1 positively regulated the exocytosis of TSH-containing granules. Using LC/MS-based interactomics, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K)γ was identified as a SIRT1 binding partner and deacetylation substrate. SIRT1 deacetylated two specific lysine residues (K265/K268) in PIP5Kγ and enhanced PIP5Kγ enzyme activity. SIRT1-mediated TSH secretion was abolished by PIP5Kγ knockdown. SIRT1 knockdown decreased the levels of deacetylated PIP5Kγ, PI(4,5)P2, and reduced the secretion of TSH from pituitary cells. These results were also observed in SIRT1-knockout mice. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicated that the control of TSH release by the SIRT1-PIP5Kγ pathway is important for regulating the metabolism of the whole body. PMID:20668706

  5. A dPIP5K Dependent Pool of Phosphatidylinositol 4,5 Bisphosphate (PIP2) Is Required for G-Protein Coupled Signal Transduction in Drosophila Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Shweta; Kumari, Kamalesh; Nair, Amit; Trivedi, Deepti; Raghu, Padinjat

    2015-01-01

    Multiple PIP2 dependent molecular processes including receptor activated phospholipase C activity occur at the neuronal plasma membranes, yet levels of this lipid at the plasma membrane are remarkably stable. Although the existence of unique pools of PIP2 supporting these events has been proposed, the mechanism by which they are generated is unclear. In Drosophila photoreceptors, the hydrolysis of PIP2 by G-protein coupled phospholipase C activity is essential for sensory transduction of photons. We identify dPIP5K as an enzyme essential for PIP2 re-synthesis in photoreceptors. Loss of dPIP5K causes profound defects in the electrical response to light and light-induced PIP2 dynamics at the photoreceptor membrane. Overexpression of dPIP5K was able to accelerate the rate of PIP2 synthesis following light induced PIP2 depletion. Other PIP2 dependent processes such as endocytosis and cytoskeletal function were unaffected in photoreceptors lacking dPIP5K function. These results provide evidence for the existence of a unique dPIP5K dependent pool of PIP2 required for normal Drosophila phototransduction. Our results define the existence of multiple pools of PIP2 in photoreceptors generated by distinct lipid kinases and supporting specific molecular processes at neuronal membranes. PMID:25633995

  6. Thiazolidinediones inhibit REG I{alpha} gene transcription in gastrointestinal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Akiyo; Takahashi, Iwao; Takasawa, Shin; Nata, Koji; Noguchi, Naoya; Ikeda, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Shervani, Nausheen J.; Suzuki, Iwao; Uruno, Akira; Unno, Michiaki; Okamoto, Hiroshi Sugawara, Akira

    2009-02-13

    REG (Regenerating gene) I{alpha} protein functions as a growth factor for gastrointestinal cancer cells, and its mRNA expression is strongly associated with a poor prognosis in gastrointestinal cancer patients. We here demonstrated that PPAR{gamma}-agonist thiazolidinediones (TZDs) inhibited cell proliferation and REG I{alpha} protein/mRNA expression in gastrointestinal cancer cells. TZDs inhibited the REG I{alpha} gene promoter activity, via its cis-acting element which lacked PPAR response element and could not bind to PPAR{gamma}, in PPAR{gamma}-expressing gastrointestinal cancer cells. The inhibition was reversed by co-treatment with a specific PPAR{gamma}-antagonist GW9662. Although TZDs did not inhibit the REG I{alpha} gene promoter activity in PPAR{gamma}-non-expressing cells, PPAR{gamma} overexpression in the cells recovered their inhibitory effect. Taken together, TZDs inhibit REG I{alpha} gene transcription through a PPAR{gamma}-dependent pathway. The TZD-induced REG I{alpha} mRNA reduction was abolished by cycloheximide, indicating the necessity of novel protein(s) synthesis. TZDs may therefore be a candidate for novel anti-cancer drugs for patients with gastrointestinal cancer expressing both REG I{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}.

  7. Type I phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase homo- and heterodimerization determines its membrane localization and activity.

    PubMed

    Lacalle, Rosa Ana; de Karam, Juan C; Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Artetxe, Ibai; Peregil, Rosa M; Sot, Jesús; Rojas, Ana M; Goñi, Félix M; Mellado, Mario; Mañes, Santos

    2015-06-01

    Type I phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5KIs; α, β, and γ) are a family of isoenzymes that produce phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] using phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate as substrate. Their structural homology with the class II lipid kinases [type II phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase (PIP4KII)] suggests that PIP5KI dimerizes, although this has not been formally demonstrated. Neither the hypothetical structural dimerization determinants nor the functional consequences of dimerization have been studied. Here, we used Förster resonance energy transfer, coprecipitation, and ELISA to show that PIP5KIβ forms homo- and heterodimers with PIP5KIγ_i2 in vitro and in live human cells. Dimerization appears to be a general phenomenon for PIP5KI isoenzymes because PIP5KIβ/PIP5KIα heterodimers were also detected by mass spectrometry. Dimerization was independent of actin cytoskeleton remodeling and was also observed using purified proteins. Mutagenesis studies of PIP5KIβ located the dimerization motif at the N terminus, in a region homologous to that implicated in PIP4KII dimerization. PIP5KIβ mutants whose dimerization was impaired showed a severe decrease in PI(4,5)P2 production and plasma membrane delocalization, although their association to lipid monolayers was unaltered. Our results identify dimerization as an integral feature of PIP5K proteins and a central determinant of their enzyme activity. PMID:25713054

  8. Daam2-PIP5K is a regulatory pathway for Wnt signaling and therapeutic target for remyelination in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Kyoung; Chaboub, Lesley S; Zhu, Wenyi; Zollinger, Daniel; Rasband, Matthew N; Fancy, Stephen P J; Deneen, Benjamin

    2015-03-18

    Wnt signaling plays an essential role in developmental and regenerative myelination of the CNS; however, contributions of proximal regulators of the Wnt receptor complex to these processes remain undefined. To identify components of the Wnt pathway that regulate these processes, we applied a multifaceted discovery platform and found that Daam2-PIP5K comprise a novel pathway regulating Wnt signaling and myelination. Using dorsal patterning of the chick spinal cord we found that Daam2 promotes Wnt signaling and receptor complex formation through PIP5K-PIP2. Analysis of Daam2 function in oligodendrocytes (OLs) revealed that it suppresses OL differentiation during development, after white matter injury (WMI), and is expressed in human white matter lesions. These findings suggest a pharmacological strategy to inhibit Daam2-PIP5K function, application of which stimulates remyelination after WMI. Put together, our studies integrate information from multiple systems to identify a novel regulatory pathway for Wnt signaling and potential therapeutic target for WMI. PMID:25754822

  9. Daam2-PIP5K Is a Regulatory Pathway for Wnt Signaling and Therapeutic Target for Remyelination in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Kyoung; Chaboub, Lesley S.; Zhu, Wenyi; Zollinger, Daniel; Rasband, Matthew N.; Fancy, Stephen P.J.; Deneen, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Wnt signaling plays an essential role in developmental and regenerative myelination of the CNS; however, contributions of proximal regulators of the Wnt receptor complex to these processes remain undefined. To identify components of the Wnt pathway that regulate these processes, we applied a multifaceted discovery platform and found that Daam2-PIP5K comprise a novel pathway regulating Wnt signaling and myelination. Using dorsal patterning of the chick spinal cord we found that Daam2 promotes Wnt signaling and receptor complex formation through PIP5K-PIP2. Analysis of Daam2 function in oligodendrocytes (OLs) revealed that it suppresses OL differentiation during development, after white matter injury (WMI), and is expressed in human white matter lesions. These findings suggest a pharmacological strategy to inhibit Daam2-PIP5K function, application of which stimulates remyelination after WMI. Put together, our studies integrate information from multiple systems to identify a novel regulatory pathway for Wnt signaling and potential therapeutic target for WMI. PMID:25754822

  10. Nuclear pool of phosphatidylinositol 4 phosphate 5 kinase 1α is modified by polySUMO-2 during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Rajarshi; Bhowmick, Debajit; Bhargava, Varsha; Bhar, Kaushik; Siddhanta, Anirban

    2013-09-20

    Phosphatidylinositol 4 phosphate 5 kinase 1α (PIP5K) is mainly localized in the cytosol and plasma membrane. Studies have also indicated its prominent association with nuclear speckles. The exact nature of this nuclear pool of PIP5K is not clear. Using biochemical and microscopic techniques, we have demonstrated that the nuclear pool of PIP5K is modified by SUMO-1 in HEK-293 cells stably expressing PIP5K. Moreover, this SUMOylated pool of PIP5K increased during apoptosis. PolySUMO-2 chain conjugated PIP5K was detected by pull-down experiment using affinity-tagged RNF4, a polySUMO-2 binding protein, during late apoptosis. PMID:23994136

  11. An electrostatic switch displaces phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases from the membrane during phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Fairn, Gregory D.; Ogata, Koji; Botelho, Roberto J.; Stahl, Philip D.; Anderson, Richard A.; De Camilli, Pietro; Meyer, Tobias; Wodak, Shoshana

    2009-01-01

    Plasmalemmal phosphatidylinositol (PI) 4,5-bisphosphate (PI4,5P2) synthesized by PI 4-phosphate (PI4P) 5-kinase (PIP5K) is key to the polymerization of actin that drives chemotaxis and phagocytosis. We investigated the means whereby PIP5K is targeted to the membrane and its fate during phagosome formation. Homology modeling revealed that all PIP5K isoforms feature a positively charged face. Together with the substrate-binding loop, this polycationic surface is proposed to constitute a coincidence detector that targets PIP5Ks to the plasmalemma. Accordingly, manipulation of the surface charge displaced PIP5Ks from the plasma membrane. During particle engulfment, PIP5Ks detached from forming phagosomes as the surface charge at these sites decreased. Precluding the change in surface charge caused the PIP5Ks to remain associated with the phagosomal cup. Chemically induced retention of PIP5K-γ prevented the disappearance of PI4,5P2 and aborted phagosome formation. We conclude that a bistable electrostatic switch mechanism regulates the association/dissociation of PIP5Ks from the membrane during phagocytosis and likely other processes. PMID:19951917

  12. Eimeria maxima phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase: locus sequencing, characterization, and cross-phylum comparison.

    PubMed

    Goh, Mei-Yen; Pan, Mei-Zhen; Blake, Damer P; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Song, Beng-Kah

    2011-03-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K) may play an important role in host-cell invasion by the Eimeria species, protozoan parasites which can cause severe intestinal disease in livestock. Here, we report the structural organization of the PIP5K gene in Eimeria maxima (Weybridge strain). Two E. maxima BAC clones carrying the E. maxima PIP5K (EmPIP5K) coding sequences were selected for shotgun sequencing, yielding a 9.1-kb genomic segment. The EmPIP5K coding region was initially identified using in silico gene-prediction approaches and subsequently confirmed by mapping rapid amplification of cDNA ends and RT-PCR-generated cDNA sequence to its genomic segment. The putative EmPIP5K gene was located at position 710-8036 nt on the complimentary strand and comprised of 23 exons. Alignment of the 1147 amino acid sequence with previously annotated PIP5K proteins from other Apicomplexa species detected three conserved motifs encompassing the kinase core domain, which has been shown by previous protein deletion studies to be necessary for PIP5K protein function. Phylogenetic analysis provided further evidence that the putative EmPIP5K protein is orthologous to that of other Apicomplexa. Subsequent comparative gene structure characterization revealed events of intron loss/gain throughout the evolution of the apicomplexan PIP5K gene. Further scrutiny of the genomic structure revealed a possible trend towards "intron gain" between two of the motif regions. Our findings offer preliminary insights into the structural variations that have occurred during the evolution of the PIP5K locus and may aid in understanding the functional role of this gene in the cellular biology of apicomplexan parasites. PMID:20938684

  13. Expression of the rat liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-Ialpha) gene is regulated by Sp1 and nuclear factor Y: chromosomal localization and promoter characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, M L; Harrison, W R; Elder, F F; Cook, G A; Park, E A

    1999-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT)-I catalyses the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from CoA to carnitine for translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Expression of the 'liver' isoform of the CPT-I gene (CPT-Ialpha) is subject to developmental, hormonal and tissue-specific regulation. To understand the basis for control of CPT-Ialpha gene expression, we have characterized the proximal promoter of the CPT-Ialpha gene. Here, we report the sequence of 6839 base pairs of the promoter and the localization of the rat CPT-Ialpha gene to region q43 on chromosome 1. Our studies show that the first 200 base pairs of the promoter are sufficient to drive transcription of the CPT-Ialpha gene. Within this region are two sites that bind both Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors. In addition, nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) binds the proximal promoter. Mutation at the Sp1 or NF-Y sites severely decreases transcription from the CPT-Ialpha promoter. Other protein binding sites were identified within the first 200 base pairs of the promoter by DNase I footprinting, and these elements contribute to CPT-Ialpha gene expression. Our studies demonstrate that CPT-Ialpha is a TATA-less gene which utilizes NF-Y and Sp proteins to drive basal expression. PMID:10333485

  14. Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinases 1 and 2 are involved in the regulation of vacuole morphology during Arabidopsis thaliana pollen development.

    PubMed

    Ugalde, José-Manuel; Rodriguez-Furlán, Cecilia; Rycke, Riet De; Norambuena, Lorena; Friml, Jiří; León, Gabriel; Tejos, Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    The pollen grains arise after meiosis of pollen mother cells within the anthers. A series of complex structural changes follows, generating mature pollen grains capable of performing the double fertilization of the female megasporophyte. Several signaling molecules, including hormones and lipids, have been involved in the regulation and appropriate control of pollen development. Phosphatidylinositol 4-phophate 5-kinases (PIP5K), which catalyze the biosynthesis of the phosphoinositide PtdIns(4,5)P2, are important for tip polar growth of root hairs and pollen tubes, embryo development, vegetative plant growth, and responses to the environment. Here, we report a role of PIP5Ks during microgametogenesis. PIP5K1 and PIP5K2 are expressed during early stages of pollen development and their transcriptional activity respond to auxin in pollen grains. Early male gametophytic lethality to certain grade was observed in both pip5k1(-/-) and pip5k2(-/-) single mutants. The number of pip5k mutant alleles is directly related to the frequency of aborted pollen grains suggesting the two genes are involved in the same function. Indeed PIP5K1 and PIP5K2 are functionally redundant since homozygous double mutants did not render viable pollen grains. The loss of function of PIP5K1 and PIP5K2results in defects in vacuole morphology in pollen at the later stages and epidermal root cells. Our results show that PIP5K1, PIP5K2 and phosphoinositide signaling are important cues for early developmental stages and vacuole formation during microgametogenesis. PMID:27457979

  15. CTLA-4 recombinant protein genetically fused to canine Fcepsilon receptor Ialpha enhances allergen specific lymphocyte responses in experimentally sensitized dogs.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Sho; Tsukui, Toshihiro; Masuda, Kenichi; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2004-06-01

    Vaccination with a recombinant antigen fused to a targeting molecule is a potential strategy for inducing efficient immune responses. For the therapeutic purpose of allergic diseases in dogs, a DNA construct which expresses recombinant fusion protein with two functional domains, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen (CTLA-4) and Fcepsilon receptor Ialpha, was developed to bridge antigen-presenting cells and IgE-allergen complex. The recombinant fusion protein expressed by the DNA construct was demonstrated to retain the ability to bind monocytes in PBMC and dog IgE, respectively. Additionally, the recombinant protein induced enhancement of allergen-induced lymphoproliferation in experimentally sensitized dogs under conditions of suboptimal allergen stimulation. These results indicated that the DNA construct could enhance allergen-induced immune responses in vivo, implying its usefulness for perspective application in immunotherapy in dogs. PMID:15240934

  16. skittles, a Drosophila phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase, is required for cell viability, germline development and bristle morphology, but not for neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, B A; Prokopenko, S N; Breuer, S; Zhang, B; Paululat, A; Bellen, H J

    1998-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol pathway is implicated in the regulation of numerous cellular functions and responses to extracellular signals. An important branching point in the pathway is the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate by the phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K) to generate the second messenger phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate (PIP2). PIP5K and PIP2 have been implicated in signal transduction, cytoskeletal regulation, DNA synthesis, and vesicular trafficking. We have cloned and generated mutations in a Drosophila PIP5K type I (skittles). Our analysis indicates that skittles is required for cell viability, germline development, and the proper structural development of sensory bristles. Surprisingly, we found no evidence for PIP5KI involvement in neural secretion. PMID:9832529

  17. Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-Kinase Isoforms Exhibit Acyl Chain Selectivity for Both Substrate and Lipid Activator*

    PubMed Central

    Shulga, Yulia V.; Anderson, Richard A.; Topham, Matthew K.; Epand, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate is mostly produced in the cell by phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5K) and has a crucial role in numerous signaling events. Here we demonstrate that in vitro all three isoforms of PIP5K, α, β, and γ, discriminate among substrates with different acyl chains for both the substrates phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) and phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) although to different extents, with isoform γ being the most selective. Fully saturated dipalmitoyl-PtdIns4P was a poor substrate for all three isoforms, but both the 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl and the 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl forms of PtdIns4P were good substrates. Vmax was greater for the 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl form compared with the 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl form, although for PIP5Kβ the difference was small. For the α and γ isoforms, Km was much lower for 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl PtdIns4P, making this lipid the better substrate of the two under most conditions. Activation of PIP5K by phosphatidic acid is also acyl chain-dependent. Species of phosphatidic acid with two unsaturated acyl chains are much better activators of PIP5K than those containing one saturated and one unsaturated acyl chain. PtdIns is a poor substrate for PIP5K, but it also shows acyl chain selectivity. Curiously, there is no acyl chain discrimination among species of phosphatidic acid in the activation of the phosphorylation of PtdIns. Together, our findings indicate that PIP5K isoforms α, β, and γ act selectively on substrates and activators with different acyl chains. This could be a tightly regulated mechanism of producing physiologically active unsaturated phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate species in the cell. PMID:22942276

  18. Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate 5-Kinase β Controls Recruitment of Lipid Rafts into the Immunological Synapse.

    PubMed

    Kallikourdis, Marinos; Trovato, Anna Elisa; Roselli, Giuliana; Muscolini, Michela; Porciello, Nicla; Tuosto, Loretta; Viola, Antonella

    2016-02-15

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) is critical for T lymphocyte activation serving as a substrate for the generation of second messengers and the remodeling of actin cytoskeleton necessary for the clustering of lipid rafts, TCR, and costimulatory receptors toward the T:APC interface. Spatiotemporal analysis of PIP2 synthesis in T lymphocytes suggested that distinct isoforms of the main PIP2-generating enzyme, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K), play a differential role on the basis of their distinct localization. In this study, we analyze the contribution of PIP5Kβ to T cell activation and show that CD28 induces the recruitment of PIP5Kβ to the immunological synapse, where it regulates filamin A and lipid raft accumulation, as well as T cell activation, in a nonredundant manner. Finally, we found that Vav1 and the C-terminal 83 aa of PIP5Kβ are pivotal for the PIP5Kβ regulatory functions in response to CD28 stimulation. PMID:26773155

  19. Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate 5-Kinases in the Regulation of T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Porciello, Nicla; Kunkl, Martina; Viola, Antonella; Tuosto, Loretta

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate kinases (PIP5Ks) are critical regulators of T cell activation being the main enzymes involved in the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2). PIP2 is indeed a pivotal regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, thus controlling T cell polarization and migration, stable adhesion to antigen-presenting cells, spatial organization of the immunological synapse, and co-stimulation. Moreover, PIP2 also serves as a precursor for the second messengers inositol triphosphate, diacylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate, which are essential for the activation of signaling pathways regulating cytokine production, cell cycle progression, survival, metabolism, and differentiation. Here, we discuss the impact of PIP5Ks on several T lymphocyte functions with a specific focus on the role of CD28 co-stimulation in PIP5K compartimentalization and activation. PMID:27242793

  20. Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate 5-Kinases in the Regulation of T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Porciello, Nicla; Kunkl, Martina; Viola, Antonella; Tuosto, Loretta

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate kinases (PIP5Ks) are critical regulators of T cell activation being the main enzymes involved in the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2). PIP2 is indeed a pivotal regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, thus controlling T cell polarization and migration, stable adhesion to antigen-presenting cells, spatial organization of the immunological synapse, and co-stimulation. Moreover, PIP2 also serves as a precursor for the second messengers inositol triphosphate, diacylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate, which are essential for the activation of signaling pathways regulating cytokine production, cell cycle progression, survival, metabolism, and differentiation. Here, we discuss the impact of PIP5Ks on several T lymphocyte functions with a specific focus on the role of CD28 co-stimulation in PIP5K compartimentalization and activation. PMID:27242793

  1. Arabidopsis phosphatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase 2 is involved in root gravitropism through regulation of polar auxin transport by affecting the cycling of PIN proteins.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yu; Jia, Wen-Jing; Chu, Yu-Jia; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2012-03-01

    Phosphatidylinositol monophosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K) catalyzes the synthesis of PI-4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P(2)) by phosphorylation of PI-4-phosphate at the 5 position of the inositol ring, and is involved in regulating multiple developmental processes and stress responses. We here report on the functional characterization of Arabidopsis PIP5K2, which is expressed during lateral root initiation and elongation, and whose expression is enhanced by exogenous auxin. The knockout mutant pip5k2 shows reduced lateral root formation, which could be recovered with exogenous auxin, and interestingly, delayed root gravity response that could not be recovered with exogenous auxin. Crossing with the DR5-GUS marker line and measurement of free IAA content confirmed the reduced auxin accumulation in pip5k2. In addition, analysis using the membrane-selective dye FM4-64 revealed the decelerated vesicle trafficking caused by PtdIns(4,5)P(2) reduction, which hence results in suppressed cycling of PIN proteins (PIN2 and 3), and delayed redistribution of PIN2 and auxin under gravistimulation in pip5k2 roots. On the contrary, PtdIns(4,5)P(2) significantly enhanced the vesicle trafficking and cycling of PIN proteins. These results demonstrate that PIP5K2 is involved in regulating lateral root formation and root gravity response, and reveal a critical role of PIP5K2/PtdIns(4,5)P(2) in root development through regulation of PIN proteins, providing direct evidence of crosstalk between the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway and auxin response, and new insights into the control of polar auxin transport. PMID:21894193

  2. The large conductance, voltage-dependent, and calcium-sensitive K+ channel, Hslo, is a target of cGMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Alioua, A; Tanaka, Y; Wallner, M; Hofmann, F; Ruth, P; Meera, P; Toro, L

    1998-12-01

    Native large conductance, voltage-dependent, and Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels are activated by cGMP-dependent protein kinase. Two possible mechanisms of kinase action have been proposed: 1) direct phosphorylation of the channel and 2) indirect via PKG-dependent activation of a phosphatase. To scrutinize the first possibility, at the molecular level, we used the human pore-forming alpha-subunit of the Ca2+-sensitive K+ channel, Hslo, and the alpha-isoform of cGMP-dependent protein kinase I. In cell-attached patches of oocytes co-expressing the Hslo channel and the kinase, 8-Br-cGMP significantly increased the macroscopic currents. This increase in current was due to an increase in the channel voltage sensitivity by approximately 20 mV and was reversed by alkaline phosphatase treatment after patch excision. In inside-out patches, however, the effect of purified kinase was negative in 12 of 13 patches. In contrast, and consistent with the intact cell experiments, purified kinase applied to the cytoplasmic side of reconstituted channels increased their open probability. This stimulatory effect was absent when heat-denatured kinase was used. Biochemical experiments show that the purified kinase incorporates gamma-33P into the immunopurified Hslo band of approximately 125 kDa. Furthermore, in vivo phosphorylation largely attenuates this labeling in back-phosphorylation experiments. These results demonstrate that the alpha-subunit of large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels is substrate for G-Ialpha kinase in vivo and support direct phosphorylation as a mechanism for PKG-Ialpha-induced activation of maxi-K channels. PMID:9830046

  3. Mechanism of substrate specificity of phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases.

    PubMed

    Muftuoglu, Yagmur; Xue, Yi; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Dianqing; Ha, Ya

    2016-08-01

    The phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK) family of enzymes is primarily responsible for converting singly phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol derivatives to phosphatidylinositol bisphosphates. As such, these kinases are central to many signaling and membrane trafficking processes in the eukaryotic cell. The three types of phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases are homologous in sequence but differ in catalytic activities and biological functions. Type I and type II kinases generate phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate from phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate, respectively, whereas the type III kinase produces phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate from phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. Based on crystallographic analysis of the zebrafish type I kinase PIP5Kα, we identified a structural motif unique to the kinase family that serves to recognize the monophosphate on the substrate. Our data indicate that the complex pattern of substrate recognition and phosphorylation results from the interplay between the monophosphate binding site and the specificity loop: the specificity loop functions to recognize different orientations of the inositol ring, whereas residues flanking the phosphate binding Arg244 determine whether phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate is exclusively bound and phosphorylated at the 5-position. This work provides a thorough picture of how PIPKs achieve their exquisite substrate specificity. PMID:27439870

  4. Contributions of protein kinases and β-arrestin to termination of protease-activated receptor 2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Seo, Jong Bae; Deng, Yi; Asbury, Charles L.; Hille, Bertil

    2016-01-01

    Activated Gq protein–coupled receptors (GqPCRs) can be desensitized by phosphorylation and β-arrestin binding. The kinetics and individual contributions of these two mechanisms to receptor desensitization have not been fully distinguished. Here, we describe the shut off of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). PAR2 activates Gq and phospholipase C (PLC) to hydrolyze phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) into diacylglycerol and inositol trisphosphate (IP3). We used fluorescent protein–tagged optical probes to monitor several consequences of PAR2 signaling, including PIP2 depletion and β-arrestin translocation in real time. During continuous activation of PAR2, PIP2 was depleted transiently and then restored within a few minutes, indicating fast receptor activation followed by desensitization. Knockdown of β-arrestin 1 and 2 using siRNA diminished the desensitization, slowing PIP2 restoration significantly and even adding a delayed secondary phase of further PIP2 depletion. These effects of β-arrestin knockdown on PIP2 recovery were prevented when serine/threonine phosphatases that dephosphorylate GPCRs were inhibited. Thus, PAR2 may continuously regain its activity via dephosphorylation when there is insufficient β-arrestin to trap phosphorylated receptors. Similarly, blockers of protein kinase C (PKC) and G protein–coupled receptor kinase potentiated the PIP2 depletion. In contrast, an activator of PKC inhibited receptor activation, presumably by augmenting phosphorylation of PAR2. Our interpretations were strengthened by modeling. Simulations supported the conclusions that phosphorylation of PAR2 by protein kinases initiates receptor desensitization and that recruited β-arrestin traps the phosphorylated state of the receptor, protecting it from phosphatases. Speculative thinking suggested a sequestration of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5 kinase (PIP5K) to the plasma membrane by β-arrestin to explain why knockdown of β-arrestin led to

  5. Multistep Compositional Remodeling of Supported Lipid Membranes by Interfacially Active Phosphatidylinositol Kinases.

    PubMed

    Tabaei, Seyed R; Guo, Feng; Rutaganira, Florentine U; Vafaei, Setareh; Choong, Ingrid; Shokat, Kevan M; Glenn, Jeffrey S; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-05-17

    The multienzyme catalytic phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol (PI) in a supported lipid membrane platform is demonstrated for the first time. One-step treatment with PI 4-kinase IIIβ (PI4Kβ) yielded PI 4-phosphate (PI4P), while a multistep enzymatic cascade of PI4Kβ followed by PIP 5-kinase produced PI-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2 or PIP2). By employing quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, we were able to track membrane association of kinase enzymes for the first time as well as detect PI4P and PI(4,5)P2 generation based on subsequent antibody binding to the supported lipid bilayers. Pharmacologic inhibition of PI4Kβ by a small molecule inhibitor was also quantitatively assessed, yielding an EC50 value that agrees well with conventional biochemical readout. Taken together, the development of a PI-containing supported membrane platform coupled with surface-sensitive measurement techniques for kinase studies opens the door to exploring the rich biochemistry and pharmacological targeting of membrane-associated phosphoinositides. PMID:27118725

  6. Post-synaptic density-95 promotes calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated Ser847 phosphorylation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yasuo; Song, Tao; Sugimoto, Katsuyoshi; Horii, Mariko; Araki, Nobukazu; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Tezuka, Tohru; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Tokuda, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    Post-synaptic density-95 (PSD-95) is a neuronal scaffolding protein that associates with N -methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and links them to intracellular signalling molecules. In neurons, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) binds selectively to the second PDZ domain (PDZ2) of PSD-95, thereby exhibiting physiological activation triggered via NMDA receptors. We have demonstrated previously that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIalpha (CaM-K IIalpha) directly phosphorylates nNOS at residue Ser(847), and can attenuate the catalytic activity of the enzyme in neuronal cells [Komeima, Hayashi, Naito and Watanabe (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 28139-28143]. In the present study, we examined how CaM-K II participates in the phosphorylation by analysing the functional interaction between nNOS and PSD-95 in cells. The results showed that PSD-95 directly promotes the nNOS phosphorylation at Ser(847) induced by endogenous CaM-K II. In transfected cells, this effect of PSD-95 required its dual palmitoylation and the PDZ2 domain, but did not rely on its guanylate kinase domain. CaM-K Ialpha and CaM-K IV failed to phosphorylate nNOS at Ser(847) in transfected cells. Thus PSD-95 mediates cellular trafficking of nNOS, and may be required for the efficient phosphorylation of nNOS at Ser(847) by CaM-K II in neuronal cells. PMID:12630910

  7. Oncoprotein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2001-02-27

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  8. Protein kinases as mediators of fluid shear stress stimulated signal transduction in endothelial cells: a hypothesis for calcium-dependent and calcium-independent events activated by flow.

    PubMed

    Berk, B C; Corson, M A; Peterson, T E; Tseng, H

    1995-12-01

    Fluid shear stress regulates endothelial cell function, but the signal transduction mechanisms involved in mechanotransduction remain unclear. Recent findings demonstrate that several intracellular kinases are activated by mechanical forces. In particular, members of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family are stimulated by hyperosmolarity, stretch, and stress such as heat shock. We propose a model for mechanotransduction in endothelial cells involving calcium-dependent and calcium-independent protein kinase pathways. The calcium-dependent pathway involves activation of phospholipase C, hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), increases in intracellular calcium and stimulation of kinases such as calcium-calmodulin and C kinases (PKC). The calcium-independent pathway involves activation of a small GTP-binding protein and stimulation of calcium-independent PKC and MAP kinases. The calcium-dependent pathway mediates the rapid, transient response to fluid shear stress including activation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and ion transport. In contrast, the calcium-independent pathway mediates a slower response including the sustained activation of NOS and changes in cell morphology and gene expression. We propose that focal adhesion complexes link the calcium-dependent and calcium-independent pathways by regulating activity of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) 5-kinase (which regulates PIP2 levels) and p125 focal adhesion kinase (FAK, which phosphorylates paxillin and interacts with cytoskeletal proteins). This model predicts that dynamic interactions between integrin molecules present in focal adhesion complexes and membrane events involved in mechanotransduction will be integrated by calcium-dependent and calcium-independent kinases to generate intracellular signals involved in the endothelial cell response to flow. PMID:8666584

  9. Down-regulation of class II phosphoinositide 3-kinase alpha expression below a critical threshold induces apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Elis, Winfried; Triantafellow, Ellen; Wolters, Natalie M; Sian, Katie R; Caponigro, Giordano; Borawski, Jason; Gaither, L Alex; Murphy, Leon O; Finan, Peter M; Mackeigan, Jeffrey P

    2008-04-01

    Members of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) family collectively control multiple cellular responses, including proliferation, growth, chemotaxis, and survival. These diverse effects can partly be attributed to the broad range of downstream effectors being regulated by the products of these lipid kinases, the 3'-phosphoinositides. However, an additional layer of complexity is introduced by the existence of multiple PI3K enzyme isoforms. Much has been learned over the last years on the roles of the classes I and III PI3K members in cellular signaling, but little is known about the isoform-specific tasks done by the class II PI3Ks (C2alpha, beta, and gamma). In this study, we used quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and RNA interference in mammalian cells to gain further insight into the function of these lesser studied PI3K enzymes. We find that PI3K-C2alpha, but not PI3K-C2beta, has an important role in controlling cell survival and by using a panel of RNA interference reagents, we were able to determine a critical threshold of PI3K-C2alpha mRNA levels, below which the apoptotic program is switched on, via the intrinsic cell death pathway. In addition, knockdown of PI3K-C2alpha to levels that by themselves do not induce apoptosis sensitize cells to the anticancer agent Taxol (paclitaxel). Lastly, we report that lowering the levels of PI3K-C2alpha in a number of cancer cell lines reduces their proliferation and cell viability, arguing that PI3K inhibitors targeting not only the class Ialpha isoform but also class IIalpha may contribute to an effective anticancer strategy. PMID:18403640

  10. Prokaryotic Diacylglycerol Kinase and Undecaprenol Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, Wade D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) and undecaprenol kinase (UDPK) are the lone members of a family of multispan membrane enzymes that are very small, lack relationships to any other family of proteins—including water soluble kinases, and that exhibit an unusual structure and active site architecture. Escherichia coli DAGK plays an important role in recycling diacylglycerol produced as a byproduct of biosynthesis of molecules located in the periplasmic space. UDPK seems to play an analogous role in Gram-positive bacteria, where its importance is evident by the fact that UDPK is essential for biofilm formation by the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans. DAGK has also long served as a model system for studies of membrane protein biocatalysis, folding, stability, and structure. This review explores our current understanding of the microbial physiology, enzymology, structural biology, and folding of the prokaryotic diacylglycerol kinase family, which is based on over 40 years of studies. PMID:22224599

  11. Protein Kinases and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna M.; Messing, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    Although drugs of abuse have different chemical structures and interact with different protein targets, all appear to usurp common neuronal systems that regulate reward and motivation. Addiction is a complex disease that is thought to involve drug-induced changes in synaptic plasticity due to alterations in cell signaling, gene transcription, and protein synthesis. Recent evidence suggests that drugs of abuse interact with and change a common network of signaling pathways that include a subset of specific protein kinases. The best studied of these kinases are reviewed here and include extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5, protein kinase C, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Fyn tyrosine kinase. These kinases have been implicated in various aspects of drug addiction including acute drug effects, drug self-administration, withdrawal, reinforcement, sensitization, and tolerance. Identifying protein kinase substrates and signaling pathways that contribute to the addicted state may provide novel approaches for new pharma-cotherapies to treat drug addiction. PMID:18991950

  12. KEA: kinase enrichment analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lachmann, Alexander; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Multivariate experiments applied to mammalian cells often produce lists of proteins/genes altered under treatment versus control conditions. Such lists can be projected onto prior knowledge of kinase–substrate interactions to infer the list of kinases associated with a specific protein list. By computing how the proportion of kinases, associated with a specific list of proteins/genes, deviates from an expected distribution, we can rank kinases and kinase families based on the likelihood that these kinases are functionally associated with regulating the cell under specific experimental conditions. Such analysis can assist in producing hypotheses that can explain how the kinome is involved in the maintenance of different cellular states and can be manipulated to modulate cells towards a desired phenotype. Summary: Kinase enrichment analysis (KEA) is a web-based tool with an underlying database providing users with the ability to link lists of mammalian proteins/genes with the kinases that phosphorylate them. The system draws from several available kinase–substrate databases to compute kinase enrichment probability based on the distribution of kinase–substrate proportions in the background kinase–substrate database compared with kinases found to be associated with an input list of genes/proteins. Availability: The KEA system is freely available at http://amp.pharm.mssm.edu/lib/kea.jsp Contact: avi.maayan@mssm.edu PMID:19176546

  13. From Phosphosites to Kinases.

    PubMed

    Munk, Stephanie; Refsgaard, Jan C; Olsen, Jesper V; Jensen, Lars J

    2016-01-01

    Kinases play a pivotal role in propagating the phosphorylation-mediated signaling networks in living cells. With the overwhelming quantities of phosphoproteomics data being generated, the number of identified phosphorylation sites (phosphosites) is ever increasing. Often, proteomics investigations aim to understand the global signaling modulation that takes place in different biological conditions investigated. For phosphoproteomics data, identifying the kinases central to mediating this response is key. This has prompted several efforts to catalogue the immense amounts of phosphorylation data and known or predicted kinases responsible for the modifications. However, barely 20 % of the known phosphosites are assigned to a kinase, initiating various bioinformatics efforts that attempt to predict the responsible kinases. These algorithms employ different approaches to predict kinase consensus sequence motifs, mostly based on large scale in vivo and in vitro experiments. The context of the kinase and the phosphorylated proteins in a biological system is equally important for predicting association between the enzymes and substrates, an aspect that is also being tackled with available bioinformatics tools. This chapter summarizes the use of the larger phosphorylation databases, and approaches that can be applied to predict kinases that phosphorylate individual sites or that are globally modulated in phosphoproteomics datasets. PMID:26584935

  14. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mirshafiey, Abbas; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Asghari, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication and their function as relay points for signaling pathways. They have a key role in numerous processes that control cellular proliferation and differentiation, regulate cell growth and cellular metabolism, and promote cell survival and apoptosis. Recently, the role of RTKs including TCR, FLT-3, c-Kit, c-Fms, PDGFR, ephrin, neurotrophin receptor, and TAM receptor in autoimmune disorder, especially rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis has been suggested. In multiple sclerosis pathogenesis, RTKs and their tyrosine kinase enzymes are selective important targets for tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) agents. TKIs, compete with the ATP binding site of the catalytic domain of several tyrosine kinases, and act as small molecules that have a favorable safety profile in disease treatment. Up to now, the efficacy of TKIs in numerous animal models of MS has been demonstrated, but application of these drugs in human diseases should be tested in future clinical trials. PMID:25337443

  15. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Influences PIN Polarization by Controlling Clathrin-Mediated Membrane Trafficking in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Ischebeck, Till; Werner, Stephanie; Krishnamoorthy, Praveen; Lerche, Jennifer; Meijón, Mónica; Stenzel, Irene; Löfke, Christian; Wiessner, Theresa; Im, Yang Ju; Perera, Imara Y.; Iven, Tim; Feussner, Ivo; Busch, Wolfgang; Boss, Wendy F.; Teichmann, Thomas; Hause, Bettina; Persson, Staffan; Heilmann, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    The functions of the minor phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] during vegetative plant growth remain obscure. Here, we targeted two related phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinases (PI4P 5-kinases) PIP5K1 and PIP5K2, which are expressed ubiquitously in Arabidopsis thaliana. A pip5k1 pip5k2 double mutant with reduced PtdIns(4,5)P2 levels showed dwarf stature and phenotypes suggesting defects in auxin distribution. The roots of the pip5k1 pip5k2 double mutant had normal auxin levels but reduced auxin transport and altered distribution. Fluorescence-tagged auxin efflux carriers PIN-FORMED (PIN1)–green fluorescent protein (GFP) and PIN2-GFP displayed abnormal, partially apolar distribution. Furthermore, fewer brefeldin A–induced endosomal bodies decorated by PIN1-GFP or PIN2-GFP formed in pip5k1 pip5k2 mutants. Inducible overexpressor lines for PIP5K1 or PIP5K2 also exhibited phenotypes indicating misregulation of auxin-dependent processes, and immunolocalization showed reduced membrane association of PIN1 and PIN2. PIN cycling and polarization require clathrin-mediated endocytosis and labeled clathrin light chain also displayed altered localization patterns in the pip5k1 pip5k2 double mutant, consistent with a role for PtdIns(4,5)P2 in the regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Further biochemical tests on subcellular fractions enriched for clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) indicated that pip5k1 and pip5k2 mutants have reduced CCV-associated PI4P 5-kinase activity. Together, the data indicate an important role for PtdIns(4,5)P2 in the control of clathrin dynamics and in auxin distribution in Arabidopsis. PMID:24326589

  16. Pyruvate kinase blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... break down faster than normal, a condition called hemolytic anemia . This test helps diagnose pyruvate kinase deficiency (PKD) . ... Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 32. Gallagher PG. Hemolytic anemias: red cell membrane and metabolic defects In: Goldman ...

  17. Activity-based kinase profiling of approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Daisuke; Yokota, Koichi; Gouda, Masaki; Narumi, Yugo; Ohmoto, Hiroshi; Nishiwaki, Eiji; Akita, Kensaku; Kirii, Yasuyuki

    2013-02-01

    The specificities of nine approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, gefitinib, erlotinib, lapatinib, sorafenib, sunitinib, and pazopanib) were determined by activity-based kinase profiling using a large panel of human recombinant active kinases. This panel consisted of 79 tyrosine kinases, 199 serine/threonine kinases, three lipid kinases, and 29 disease-relevant mutant kinases. Many potential targets of each inhibitor were identified by kinase profiling at the K(m) for ATP. In addition, profiling at a physiological ATP concentration (1 mm) was carried out, and the IC(50) values of the inhibitors against each kinase were compared with the estimated plasma-free concentration (calculated from published pharmacokinetic parameters of plasma C(trough) and C(max) values). This analysis revealed that the approved kinase inhibitors were well optimized for their target kinases. This profiling also implicates activity at particular off-target kinases in drug side effects. Thus, large-scale kinase profiling at both K(m) and physiological ATP concentrations could be useful in characterizing the targets and off-targets of kinase inhibitors. PMID:23279183

  18. Phosphatidylinositol kinase from rabbit reticulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tuazon, P.T.; Heng, A.B.W.; Traugh, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase was isolated from the postribosomal supernatant of rabbit reticulocytes. This activity was identified by the formation of a product that comigrated with phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP) when purified PI was phosphorylated in the presence of (/sup 32/P)ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. Three major peaks of PI kinase activity were resolved by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The first peak eluted at 50-100 mM NaCl together with several serine protein kinases, casein kinase (CK) I and protease activated kinase (PAK) I and II. The PI kinase was subsequently separated from the protein kinases by chromatography on phosphocellulose. The second peak eluted at 125-160 mM NaCl and contained another lipid kinase activity that produced a product which comigrated with phosphatidic acid on thin layer chromatography. The third peak, which eluted at 165-200 mM NaCl, partly comigrated with casein kinase (CK) II and an active protein kinase(s) which phosphorylated mixed histone and histone I. CK II and the histone kinase activities were also separated by chromatography on phosphocelluslose. The different forms of PI kinase were characterized and compared with respect to substrate and salt requirements.

  19. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Linn, Anning

    1996-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK.

  20. Targeting cancer with kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Stefan; Rahal, Rami; Stransky, Nicolas; Lengauer, Christoph; Hoeflich, Klaus P.

    2015-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors have played an increasingly prominent role in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. Currently, more than 25 oncology drugs that target kinases have been approved, and numerous additional therapeutics are in various stages of clinical evaluation. In this Review, we provide an in-depth analysis of activation mechanisms for kinases in cancer, highlight recent successes in drug discovery, and demonstrate the clinical impact of selective kinase inhibitors. We also describe the substantial progress that has been made in designing next-generation inhibitors to circumvent on-target resistance mechanisms, as well as ongoing strategies for combining kinase inhibitors in the clinic. Last, there are numerous prospects for the discovery of novel kinase targets, and we explore cancer immunotherapy as a new and promising research area for studying kinase biology. PMID:25932675

  1. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2005-03-08

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  2. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit; Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2005-01-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  3. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1999-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  4. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  5. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1998-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  6. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2003-02-04

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  7. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, M.; Hibi, M.; Lin, A.

    1997-02-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE is disclosed. The polypeptide has serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences. The method of detection of JNK is also provided. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites. 44 figs.

  8. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  9. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Lin, Anning

    1999-11-30

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  10. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2004-03-16

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  11. Cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are protein kinases characterized by needing a separate subunit - a cyclin - that provides domains essential for enzymatic activity. CDKs play important roles in the control of cell division and modulate transcription in response to several extra- and intracellular cues. The evolutionary expansion of the CDK family in mammals led to the division of CDKs into three cell-cycle-related subfamilies (Cdk1, Cdk4 and Cdk5) and five transcriptional subfamilies (Cdk7, Cdk8, Cdk9, Cdk11 and Cdk20). Unlike the prototypical Cdc28 kinase of budding yeast, most of these CDKs bind one or a few cyclins, consistent with functional specialization during evolution. This review summarizes how, although CDKs are traditionally separated into cell-cycle or transcriptional CDKs, these activities are frequently combined in many family members. Not surprisingly, deregulation of this family of proteins is a hallmark of several diseases, including cancer, and drug-targeted inhibition of specific members has generated very encouraging results in clinical trials. PMID:25180339

  12. Protein Kinase Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Promotes Obesity-induced Hyperinsulinemia.

    PubMed

    Roth Flach, Rachel J; Danai, Laura V; DiStefano, Marina T; Kelly, Mark; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jurczyk, Agata; Sharma, Rohit B; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K; Bortell, Rita; Alonso, Laura C; Czech, Michael P

    2016-07-29

    Previous studies revealed a paradox whereby mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) acted as a negative regulator of insulin sensitivity in chronically obese mice, yet systemic deletion of Map4k4 did not improve glucose tolerance. Here, we report markedly reduced glucose-responsive plasma insulin and C-peptide levels in whole body Map4k4-depleted mice (M4K4 iKO) as well as an impaired first phase of insulin secretion from islets derived from M4K4 iKO mice ex vivo After long-term high fat diet (HFD), M4K4 iKO mice pancreata also displayed reduced β cell mass, fewer proliferating β cells and reduced islet-specific gene mRNA expression compared with controls, although insulin content was normal. Interestingly, the reduced plasma insulin in M4K4 iKO mice exposed to chronic (16 weeks) HFD was not observed in response to acute HFD challenge or short term treatment with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. Furthermore, the improved insulin sensitivity in obese M4K4 iKO mice was abrogated by high exogenous insulin over the course of a euglycemic clamp study, indicating that hypoinsulinemia promotes insulin sensitivity in chronically obese M4K4 iKO mice. These results demonstrate that protein kinase Map4k4 drives obesity-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in part by promoting insulin secretion from β cells in mice. PMID:27226575

  13. A High-Throughput Radiometric Kinase Assay.

    PubMed

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Peterson, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant kinase signaling has been implicated in a number of diseases. While kinases have become attractive drug targets, only a small fraction of human protein kinases have validated inhibitors. Screening of libraries of compounds against a kinase or kinases of interest is routinely performed during kinase inhibitor development to identify promising scaffolds for a particular target and to identify kinase targets for compounds of interest. Screening of more focused compound libraries may also be conducted in the later stages of inhibitor development to improve potency and optimize selectivity. The dot blot kinase assay is a robust, high-throughput kinase assay that can be used to screen a number of small-molecule compounds against one kinase of interest or several kinases. Here, a protocol for a dot blot kinase assay used for measuring insulin receptor kinase activity is presented. This protocol can be readily adapted for use with other protein kinases. PMID:26501904

  14. Redox Regulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thu H.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent one of the largest families of genes found in eukaryotes. Kinases mediate distinct cellular processes ranging from proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Ligand-mediated activation of receptor kinases can lead to the production of endogenous H2O2 by membrane-bound NADPH oxidases. In turn, H2O2 can be utilized as a secondary messenger in signal transduction pathways. This review presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in redox regulation of protein kinases and its effects on signaling cascades. In the first half, we will focus primarily on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), whereas the latter will concentrate on downstream non-receptor kinases involved in relaying stimulant response. Select examples from the literature are used to highlight the functional role of H2O2 regarding kinase activity, as well as the components involved in H2O2 production and regulation during cellular signaling. In addition, studies demonstrating direct modulation of protein kinases by H2O2 through cysteine oxidation will be emphasized. Identification of these redox-sensitive residues may help uncover signaling mechanisms conserved within kinase subfamilies. In some cases, these residues can even be exploited as targets for the development of new therapeutics. Continued efforts in this field will further basic understanding of kinase redox regulation, and delineate the mechanisms involved in physiologic and pathological H2O2 responses. PMID:23639002

  15. MAP kinase dynamics in yeast.

    PubMed

    van Drogen, F; Peter, M

    2001-09-01

    MAP kinase pathways play key roles in cellular responses towards extracellular signals. In several cases, the three core kinases interact with a scaffold molecule, but the function of these scaffolds is poorly understood. They have been proposed to contribute to signal specificity, signal amplification, or subcellular localization of MAP kinases. Several MAP kinases translocate to the nucleus in response to their activation, suggesting that nuclear transport may provide a regulatory mechanism. Here we describe new applications for Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) and Fluorescence Loss In Photobleaching (FLIP), to study dynamic translocations of MAPKs between different subcellular compartments. We have used these methods to measure the nuclear/cytoplasmic dynamics of several yeast MAP kinases, and in particular to address the role of scaffold proteins for MAP-kinase signaling. PMID:11730324

  16. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P; Zorzano, A

    1997-08-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) has been cloned and characterized in a wide range of organisms. PI 3-kinases are activated by a diversity of extracellular stimuli and are involved in multiple cell processes such as cell proliferation, protein trafficking, cell motility, differentiation, regulation of cytoskeletal structure, and apoptosis. It has recently been shown that PI 3-kinase is a crucial second messenger in the signaling of myogenesis. Two structurally unrelated highly specific inhibitors of PI 3-kinase-wortmannin and LY294002-block the morphological and biochemical differentiation program of different skeletal-muscle cell models. Moreover, L6E9 myoblasts overexpressing a dominant-negative mutant of PI 3-kinase p85 regulatory subunit (Δp85) are unable to differentiate. Furthermore, PI 3-kinase is specifically involved in the insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-dependent myogenic pathway. Indeed, the ability of IGF-I, des-1,3-IGF-I, and IGF-II to promote cell fusion and muscle-specific protein expression is impaired after treatment with PI 3-kinase inhibitors or in cells overexpressing Δp85. The identification of additional key downstream elements of the IGF/PI 3-kinase myogenic cascade is crucial to a detailed understanding of the process of muscle differentiation and may generate new tools for skeletal and cardiac muscle regeneration therapies. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:198-202). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. PMID:21235885

  17. [Kinase inhibitors and their resistance].

    PubMed

    Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto

    2015-08-01

    Kinase cascades are involved in all stages of tumorigenesis through modulation of transformation and differentiation, cell-cycle progression, and motility. Advances in molecular targeted drug development allow the design and synthesis of inhibitors targeting cancer-associated signal transduction pathways. Potent selective inhibitors with low toxicity can benefit patients especially with several malignancies harboring an oncogenic driver addictive signal. This article evaluates information on solid tumor-related kinase signals and inhibitors, including receptor tyrosine kinase or serine/threonine kinase signals that lead to successful application in clinical settings. In addition, the resistant mechanisms to the inhibitors is summarized. PMID:26281685

  18. Adenylate kinase complements nucleoside diphosphate kinase deficiency in nucleotide metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Q; Inouye, M

    1996-01-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase is a ubiquitous nonspecific enzyme that evidently is designed to catalyze in vivo ATP-dependent synthesis of ribo- and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates from the corresponding diphosphates. Because Escherichia coli contains only one copy of ndk, the structural gene for this enzyme, we were surprised to find that ndk disruption yields bacteria that are still viable. These mutant cells contain a protein with a small amount NDP kinase activity. The protein responsible for this activity was purified and identified as adenylate kinase. This enzyme, also called myokinase, catalyzes the reversible ATP-dependent synthesis of ADP from AMP. We found that this enzyme from E. coli as well as from higher eukaryotes has a broad substrate specificity displaying dual enzymatic functions. Among the nucleoside monophosphate kinases tested, only adenylate kinase was found to have NDP kinase activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of NDP kinase activity associated with adenylate kinase. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8650159

  19. MAP kinase-interacting kinases--emerging targets against cancer.

    PubMed

    Diab, Sarah; Kumarasiri, Malika; Yu, Mingfeng; Teo, Theodosia; Proud, Christopher; Milne, Robert; Wang, Shudong

    2014-04-24

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-interacting kinases (Mnks) regulate the initiation of translation through phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). Mnk-mediated eIF4E activation promotes cancer development and progression. While the phosphorylation of eIF4E is necessary for oncogenic transformation, the kinase activity of Mnks seems dispensable for normal development. For this reason, pharmacological inhibition of Mnks could represent an ideal mechanism-based and nontoxic therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of Mnk biological roles, structures, and functions, as well as clinical implications. Importantly, we propose different strategies for identification of highly selective small molecule inhibitors of Mnks, including exploring a structural feature of their kinase domain, DFD motif, which is unique within the human kinome. We also argue that a combined targeting of Mnks and other pathways should be considered given the complexity of cancer. PMID:24613018

  20. Neuronal migration and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the six-layered structure of the mammalian cortex via the inside-out pattern of neuronal migration is fundamental to neocortical functions. Extracellular cues such as Reelin induce intracellular signaling cascades through the protein phosphorylation. Migrating neurons also have intrinsic machineries to regulate cytoskeletal proteins and adhesion properties. Protein phosphorylation regulates these processes. Moreover, the balance between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is modified by extracellular cues. Multipolar-bipolar transition, radial glia-guided locomotion and terminal translocation are critical steps of radial migration of cortical pyramidal neurons. Protein kinases such as Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) involve these steps. In this review, I shall give an overview the roles of protein kinases in neuronal migration. PMID:25628530

  1. Protein Crystals of Raf Kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This image shows crystals of the protein raf kinase grown on Earth (photo a) and on USML-2 (photo b). The space-grown crystals are an order of magnitude larger. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter of New Century Pharmaceuticals

  2. Isolation of chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Macioszek, J.; Anderson, L.E. ); Anderson, J.B. )

    1990-09-01

    We report here a method for the isolation of high specific activity phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) from chloroplasts. The enzyme has been purified over 200-fold from pea (Pisum sativum L.) stromal extracts to apparent homogeneity with 23% recovery. Negative cooperativity is observed with the two enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase/glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) couple restored from the purified enzymes when NADPH is the reducing pyridine nucleotide, consistent with earlier results obtained with crude chloroplastic extracts. Michaelis Menten kinetics are observed when 3-phosphoglycerate is held constant and phosphoglycerate kinase is varied, which suggests that phosphoglycerate kinase-bound 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate may be the preferred substrate for glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase in the chloroplast.

  3. Tyrosine kinase gene rearrangements in epithelial malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alice T.; Hsu, Peggy P.; Awad, Mark M.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements that lead to oncogenic kinase activation are observed in many epithelial cancers. These cancers express activated fusion kinases that drive the initiation and progression of malignancy, and often have a considerable response to small-molecule kinase inhibitors, which validates these fusion kinases as ‘druggable’ targets. In this Review, we examine the aetiologic, pathogenic and clinical features that are associated with cancers harbouring oncogenic fusion kinases, including anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), ROS1 and RET. We discuss the clinical outcomes with targeted therapies and explore strategies to discover additional kinases that are activated by chromosomal rearrangements in solid tumours. PMID:24132104

  4. Multi-kinase inhibitors, AURKs and cancer.

    PubMed

    Cicenas, Jonas; Cicenas, Erikas

    2016-05-01

    Inhibitors that impact function of kinases are valuable both for the biological research as well as therapy of kinase-associated diseases, such as different cancers. There are quite a number of inhibitors, which are quite specific for certain kinases and several of them are either already approved for the cancer therapy or are in clinical studies of various phases. However, that does not mean that each single kinase inhibitor is suitable for targeted therapy. Some of them are not effective others might be toxic or fail some other criteria for the use in vivo. On the other hand, even in case of successful therapy, many responders eventually develop resistance to the inhibitors. The limitations of various single kinase inhibitors can be fought using compounds which target multiple kinases. This tactics can increase effectiveness of the inhibitors by the synergistic effect or help to diminish the likelihood of drug resistance. To date, several families of kinases are quite popular targets of the inhibition in cancers, such as tyrosine kinases, cycle-dependent kinases, mitogen-activated protein kinases, phosphoinositide 3-kinases as well as their pathway "players" and aurora kinases. Aurora kinases play an important role in the control of the mitosis and are often altered in diverse human cancers. Here, we will describe the most interesting multi-kinase inhibitors which inhibit aurora kinases among other targets and their use in preclinical and clinical cancer studies. PMID:27038473

  5. Discovering the first tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Tony

    2015-01-01

    In the middle of the 20th century, animal tumor viruses were heralded as possible models for understanding human cancer. By the mid-1970s, the molecular basis by which tumor viruses transform cells into a malignant state was beginning to emerge as the first viral genomic sequences were reported and the proteins encoded by their transforming genes were identified and characterized. This was a time of great excitement and rapid progress. In 1978, prompted by the discovery from Ray Erikson’s group that the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) v-Src–transforming protein had an associated protein kinase activity specific for threonine, my group at the Salk Institute set out to determine whether the polyomavirus middle T-transforming protein had a similar kinase activity. Here, I describe the experiments that led to the identification of a kinase activity associated with middle T antigen and our serendipitous discovery that this activity was specific for tyrosine in vitro, and how this in turn led to the fortuitous observation that the v-Src–associated kinase activity was also specific for tyrosine. Our finding that v-Src increased the level of phosphotyrosine in cellular proteins in RSV-transformed cells confirmed that v-Src is a tyrosine kinase and transforms cells by phosphorylating proteins on tyrosine. My colleague Bart Sefton and I reported these findings in the March issue of PNAS in 1980. Remarkably, all of the experiments in this paper were accomplished in less than one month. PMID:26130799

  6. Modelling the 2-kinase domain of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase on adenylate kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, L; Vertommen, D; Depiereux, E; Hue, L; Rider, M H; Feytmans, E

    1997-01-01

    Simultaneous multiple alignment of available sequences of the bifunctional enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase revealed several segments of conserved residues in the 2-kinase domain. The sequence of the kinase domain was also compared with proteins of known three-dimensional structure. No similarity was found between the kinase domain of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase and 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase. This questions the modelling of the 2-kinase domain on bacterial 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase that has previously been proposed [Bazan, Fletterick and Pilkis (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 9642-9646]. However, sequence similarities were found between the 2-kinase domain and several nucleotide-binding proteins, the most similar being adenylate kinase. A structural model of the 2-kinase domain based on adenylate kinase is proposed. It accommodates all the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies carried out to date on residues in the 2-kinase domain. It also allows residues potentially involved in catalysis and/or substrate binding to be predicted. PMID:9032445

  7. A Mathematical Exploration of MAP Kinase Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Rhys; Balazsi, Gabor

    2008-03-01

    Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP) kinase pathways are highly conserved from yeast to humans and are implicated in cell survival and cell death. Signaling through these pathways starts with the phosphorylation of the most upstream component (MAP kinase kinase kinase, MAPKKK), continues with phosphorylation of a MAP kinase kinase (MAPKK), and ends with phosphorylation of the target MAP kinase (MAPK). Theoretical studies over the past few decades have generated important insights into the dynamical behavior and signal processing capability of these pathways, including bistability, oscillations, signal amplification, etc. Prompted by the possibility of complex behavior in simpler signaling units than a full MAP kinase pathway, we investigate the possibility of In-Band Detection (IBD) within a single step of the cascade. We show that a basal rate of target phosphorylation can lead to IBD in a simpler system than the one described before, and define a precise relationship between the various reaction rates that is necessary to obtain IBD.

  8. MAP kinase cascades: scaffolding signal specificity.

    PubMed

    van Drogen, Frank; Peter, Matthias

    2002-01-22

    Scaffold proteins organize many MAP kinase pathways by interacting with several components of these cascades. Recent studies suggest that scaffold proteins provide local activation platforms that contribute to signal specificity by insulating different MAP kinase pathways. PMID:11818078

  9. Attenuation of pattern recognition receptor signaling is mediated by a MAP kinase kinase kinase.

    PubMed

    Mithoe, Sharon C; Ludwig, Christina; Pel, Michiel J C; Cucinotta, Mara; Casartelli, Alberto; Mbengue, Malick; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Robatzek, Silke; Pieterse, Corné M J; Aebersold, Ruedi; Menke, Frank L H

    2016-03-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) play a key role in plant and animal innate immunity. PRR binding of their cognate ligand triggers a signaling network and activates an immune response. Activation of PRR signaling must be controlled prior to ligand binding to prevent spurious signaling and immune activation. Flagellin perception in Arabidopsis through FLAGELLIN-SENSITIVE 2 (FLS2) induces the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and immunity. However, the precise molecular mechanism that connects activated FLS2 to downstream MAPK cascades remains unknown. Here, we report the identification of a differentially phosphorylated MAP kinase kinase kinase that also interacts with FLS2. Using targeted proteomics and functional analysis, we show that MKKK7 negatively regulates flagellin-triggered signaling and basal immunity and this requires phosphorylation of MKKK7 on specific serine residues. MKKK7 attenuates MPK6 activity and defense gene expression. Moreover, MKKK7 suppresses the reactive oxygen species burst downstream of FLS2, suggesting that MKKK7-mediated attenuation of FLS2 signaling occurs through direct modulation of the FLS2 complex. PMID:26769563

  10. Src kinase regulation by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Roskoski, Robert . E-mail: biocrr@lsuhsc.edu

    2005-05-27

    Src and Src-family protein-tyrosine kinases are regulatory proteins that play key roles in cell differentiation, motility, proliferation, and survival. The initially described phosphorylation sites of Src include an activating phosphotyrosine 416 that results from autophosphorylation, and an inhibiting phosphotyrosine 527 that results from phosphorylation by C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and Csk homologous kinase. Dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine 527 increases Src kinase activity. Candidate phosphotyrosine 527 phosphatases include cytoplasmic PTP1B, Shp1 and Shp2, and transmembrane enzymes include CD45, PTP{alpha}, PTP{epsilon}, and PTP{lambda}. Dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine 416 decreases Src kinase activity. Thus far PTP-BL, the mouse homologue of human PTP-BAS, has been shown to dephosphorylate phosphotyrosine 416 in a regulatory fashion. The platelet-derived growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinase mediates the phosphorylation of Src Tyr138; this phosphorylation has no direct effect on Src kinase activity. The platelet-derived growth factor receptor and the ErbB2/HER2 growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinases mediate the phosphorylation of Src Tyr213 and activation of Src kinase activity. Src kinase is also a substrate for protein-serine/threonine kinases including protein kinase C (Ser12), protein kinase A (Ser17), and CDK1/cdc2 (Thr34, Thr46, and Ser72). Of the three protein-serine/threonine kinases, only phosphorylation by CDK1/cdc2 has been demonstrated to increase Src kinase activity. Although considerable information on the phosphoprotein phosphatases that catalyze the hydrolysis of Src phosphotyrosine 527 is at hand, the nature of the phosphatases that mediate the hydrolysis of phosphotyrosine 138 and 213, and phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues has not been determined.

  11. The JAK kinases: not just another kinase drug discovery target.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Andrew F

    2008-08-01

    There are four members of the JAK family of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in the human genome. Since their discovery in 1989, great strides have been made in the understanding of their role in normal intracellular signalling. Importantly, their roles in pathologies ranging from cancer to immune deficiencies have placed them front and centre as potential drug targets. The recent discovery of the role of activating mutations in the kinase-like domain (KLD) of JAK2 in the development of polycythemia rubra vera, and the elaboration of KLD mutation as a broader mechanism by which cells might become hyperproliferative has sparked enormous interest in the development of JAK selective drug candidates. I review herein the progress that has been made in the discovery of JAK-targeted inhibitors, and discuss the challenges that face the development of these drugs for use in the clinic. PMID:18721891

  12. Protein Kinase A: A Master Kinase of Granulosa Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Pawan; Little-Ihrig, Lynda; Chandran, Uma; Law, Nathan C.; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary; Zeleznik, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of protein kinase A (PKA) by follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) transduces the signal that drives differentiation of ovarian granulosa cells (GCs). An unresolved question is whether PKA is sufficient to initiate the complex program of GC responses to FSH. We compared signaling pathways and gene expression profiles of GCs stimulated with FSH or expressing PKA-CQR, a constitutively active mutant of PKA. Both FSH and PKA-CQR stimulated the phosphorylation of proteins known to be involved in GC differentiation including CREB, ß-catenin, AKT, p42/44 MAPK, GAB2, GSK-3ß, FOXO1, and YAP. In contrast, FSH stimulated the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase but PKA-CQR did not. Microarray analysis revealed that 85% of transcripts that were up-regulated by FSH were increased to a comparable extent by PKA-CQR and of the transcripts that were down-regulated by FSH, 76% were also down-regulated by PKA-CQR. Transcripts regulated similarly by FSH and PKA-CQR are involved in steroidogenesis and differentiation, while transcripts more robustly up-regulated by PKA-CQR are involved in ovulation. Thus, PKA, under the conditions of our experimental approach appears to function as a master upstream kinase that is sufficient to initiate the complex pattern of intracellular signaling pathway and gene expression profiles that accompany GC differentiation. PMID:27324437

  13. Activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase by insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Ruderman, N B; Kapeller, R; White, M F; Cantley, L C

    1990-01-01

    Insulin action appears to require the protein-tyrosine kinase domain of the beta subunit of the insulin receptor. Despite this, the identities and biochemical functions of the cellular targets of this tyrosine kinase are unknown. A phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) that phosphorylates the D-3 position of the inositol ring associates with several protein-tyrosine kinases. Here we report that PI 3-kinase activity is immunoprecipitated from insulin-stimulated CHO cells by antiphosphotyrosine and anti-insulin receptor antibodies. Insulin as low as 0.3 nM increased immunoprecipitable PI 3-kinase activity within 1 min. Increases in activity were much greater in CHO cells expressing the human insulin receptor (100,000 receptors per cell) than in control CHO cells (2000 receptors per cell). During insulin stimulation, various lipid products of the PI 3-kinase either appeared or increased in quantity in intact cells, suggesting that the appearance of immunoprecipitable PI 3-kinase reflects an increase in its activity in vivo. These results indicate that insulin at physiological concentrations regulates the PI 3-kinase and suggest that this regulation involves a physical association between the insulin receptor and the PI 3-kinase and tyrosyl phosphorylation. Images PMID:2154747

  14. Regulation and function of yeast PAS kinase

    PubMed Central

    Grose, Julianne H.; Sundwall, Eleanor; Rutter, Jared

    2016-01-01

    The inability to coordinate cellular metabolic processes with the cellular and organismal nutrient environment leads to a variety of disorders, including diabetes and obesity. Nutrient-sensing protein kinases, such as AMPK and mTOR, play a pivotal role in metabolic regulation and are promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of disease. In this Extra View, we describe another member of the nutrient-sensing protein kinase group, PAS kinase, which plays a role in the regulation of glucose utilization in both mammals and yeast. PAS kinase deficient mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced weight gain, insulin resistance and hepatic triglyceride hyperaccumulation, suggesting a role for PAS kinase in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism in mammals. Likewise, PAS kinase deficient yeast display altered glucose partitioning, favoring glycogen biosynthesis at the expense of cell wall biosynthesis. As a result, PAS kinase deficient yeast are sensitive to cell wall perturbing agents. This partitioning of glucose in response to PAS kinase activation is due to phosphorylation of Ugp1, the enzyme primarily responsible for UDP-glucose production. The two yeast PAS kinase homologs, Psk1 and Psk2, are activated by two stimuli, cell integrity stress and nonfermentative carbon sources. We review what is known about yeast PAS kinase and describe a genetic screen that may help elucidate pathways involved in PAS kinase activation and function. PMID:19440050

  15. Myogenic signaling of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase requires the serine-threonine kinase Akt/protein kinase B

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bing-Hua; Aoki, Masahiro; Zheng, Jenny Z.; Li, Jian; Vogt, Peter K.

    1999-01-01

    The oncogene p3k, coding for a constitutively active form of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), strongly activates myogenic differentiation. Inhibition of endogenous PI 3-kinase activity with the specific inhibitor LY294002, or with dominant-negative mutants of PI 3-kinase, interferes with myotube formation and with the expression of muscle-specific proteins. Here we demonstrate that a downstream target of PI 3-kinase, serine-threonine kinase Akt, plays an important role in myogenic differentiation. Expression of constitutively active forms of Akt dramatically enhances myotube formation and expression of the muscle-specific proteins MyoD, creatine kinase, myosin heavy chain, and desmin. Transdominant negative forms of Akt inhibit myotube formation and the expression of muscle-specific proteins. The inhibition of myotube formation and the reduced expression of muscle-specific proteins caused by the PI 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 are completely reversed by constitutively active forms of Akt. Wild-type cellular Akt effects a partial reversal of LY294002-induced inhibition of myogenic differentiation. This result suggests that Akt can substitute for PI 3-kinase in the stimulation of myogenesis; Akt may be an essential downstream component of PI 3-kinase-induced muscle differentiation. PMID:10051597

  16. Oncoprotein protein kinase antibody kit

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2008-12-23

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  17. Mevalonate kinase deficiency: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Leslie A; Schulert, Grant S

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a recessively inherited autoinflammatory disorder with a spectrum of manifestations, including the well-defined clinical phenotypes of hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome and mevalonic aciduria. Patients with MKD have recurrent attacks of hyperinflammation associated with fever, abdominal pain, arthralgias, and mucocutaneous lesions, and more severely affected patients also have dysmorphisms and central nervous system anomalies. MKD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, with the degree of residual enzyme activity largely determining disease severity. Mevalonate kinase is essential for the biosynthesis of nonsterol isoprenoids, which mediate protein prenylation. Although the precise pathogenesis of MKD remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests that deficiency in protein prenylation leads to innate immune activation and systemic hyperinflammation. Given the emerging understanding of MKD as an autoinflammatory disorder, recent treatment approaches have largely focused on cytokine-directed biologic therapy. Herein, we review the current genetic and pathologic understanding of MKD, its various clinical phenotypes, and the evolving treatment approach for this multifaceted disorder. PMID:27499643

  18. High-Throughput Kinase Profiling: A More Efficient Approach towards the Discovery of New Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Miduturu, Chandrasekhar V.; Deng, Xianming; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Yang, Wannian; Brault, Laurent; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Chung, Eunah; Yang, Qingkai; Schwaller, Juerg; Knapp, Stefan; King, Randall W.; Lee, Jiing-Dwan; Herrgard, Sanna; Zarrinkar, Patrick; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Selective protein kinase inhibitors have only been developed against a small number of kinase targets. Here we demonstrate that “high-throughput kinase profiling” is an efficient method for the discovery of lead compounds for established as well as unexplored kinase targets. We screened a library of 118 compounds constituting two distinct scaffolds (furan-thiazolidinediones and pyrimido-diazepines) against a panel of 353 kinases. A distinct kinase selectivity profile was observed for each scaffold. Selective inhibitors were identified with submicromolar cellular activity against PIM1, ERK5, ACK1, MPS1/PLK1–3 and Aurora A,B kinases. In addition, we identified potent inhibitors for so far unexplored kinases such as DRAK1, HIPK2 and DCAMKL1 that await further evaluation. This inhibitor-centric approach permits comprehensive assessment of a scaffold of interest and represents an efficient and general strategy for identifying new selective kinase inhibitors. PMID:21802008

  19. The Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKAPKs) in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Moens, Ugo; Kostenko, Sergiy; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are implicated in several cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, cell survival, cell motility, metabolism, stress response and inflammation. MAPK pathways transmit and convert a plethora of extracellular signals by three consecutive phosphorylation events involving a MAPK kinase kinase, a MAPK kinase, and a MAPK. In turn MAPKs phosphorylate substrates, including other protein kinases referred to as MAPK-activated protein kinases (MAPKAPKs). Eleven mammalian MAPKAPKs have been identified: ribosomal-S6-kinases (RSK1-4), mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK1-2), MAPK-interacting kinases (MNK1-2), MAPKAPK-2 (MK2), MAPKAPK-3 (MK3), and MAPKAPK-5 (MK5). The role of these MAPKAPKs in inflammation will be reviewed. PMID:24705157

  20. Labeling and Identification of Direct Kinase Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Scott M.; White, Forest M.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying kinase substrates is an important step in mapping signal transduction pathways, but remains a difficult and time-consuming process. Analog-sensitive kinases (AS-kinases) have been used to selectively tag and identify direct kinase substrates in lysates from whole cells. In this approach a gamma-thiol ATP-analog and AS-kinase are used to selectively thiophosphorylate target proteins. Thiophosphate is used as a chemical handle to purify peptides from a tryptic digest, and target proteins are identified by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Here, we describe an updated strategy for labeling AS-kinase substrates, solid-phase capture of thiophosphorylated peptides, incorporation of stable-isotopic labeling in cell culture (SILAC) for filtering nonspecific background peptides, enrichment of phosphorylated target peptides to identify low-abundance targets, and analysis by LC-MS/MS. PMID:22669844

  1. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  2. Long Wavelength Monitoring of Protein Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Oien, Nathan P.; Nguyen, Luong T.; Jernigan, Finith E.; Priestman, Melanie A.

    2014-01-01

    A family of long wavelength protein kinase fluorescent reporters is described in which the probing wavelength is pre-programmed using readily available fluorophores. These agents can assess protein kinase activity within the optical window of tissue, as exemplified by monitoring endogenous cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity (1) in erythrocyte lysates and (2) in intact erythrocytes using a light-activatable reporter. PMID:24604833

  3. Tec family kinases in inflammation and disease.

    PubMed

    Horwood, Nicole J; Urbaniak, Ania M; Danks, Lynett

    2012-04-01

    Over the last decade, the Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (Btk, Tec, Bmx, Itk, and Rlk) have been shown to play a key role in inflammation and bone destruction. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been the most widely studied due to the critical role of this kinase in B-cell development and recent evidence showing that blocking Btk signaling is effective in ameliorating lymphoma progression and experimental arthritis. This review will examine the role of TFK in myeloid cell function and the potential of targeting these kinases as a therapeutic intervention in autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22449071

  4. MST kinases in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian MST kinase family, which is related to the Hippo kinase in Drosophila melanogaster, includes five related proteins: MST1 (also called STK4), MST2 (also called STK3), MST3 (also called STK24), MST4, and YSK1 (also called STK25 or SOK1). MST kinases are emerging as key signaling molecules that influence cell proliferation, organ size, cell migration, and cell polarity. Here we review the regulation and function of these kinases in normal physiology and pathologies, including cancer, endothelial malformations, and autoimmune disease. PMID:26370497

  5. A new “angle” on kinase inhibitor design: Prioritizing amphosteric activity above kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Meyerowitz, Justin G; Weiss, William A; Gustafson, W Clay

    2015-01-01

    The MYCN oncoprotein has remained an elusive target for decades. We recently reported a new class of kinase inhibitors designed to disrupt the conformation of Aurora kinase A enough to block its kinase-independent interaction with MYCN, resulting in potent degradation of MYCN. These studies provide proof-of-principle for a new method of targeting enzyme activity-independent functions of kinases and other enzymes. PMID:27308435

  6. Sensitive kinase assay linked with phosphoproteomics for identifying direct kinase substrates.

    PubMed

    Xue, Liang; Wang, Wen-Horng; Iliuk, Anton; Hu, Lianghai; Galan, Jacob A; Yu, Shuai; Hans, Michael; Geahlen, Robert L; Tao, W Andy

    2012-04-10

    Our understanding of the molecular control of many disease pathologies requires the identification of direct substrates targeted by specific protein kinases. Here we describe an integrated proteomic strategy, termed kinase assay linked with phosphoproteomics, which combines a sensitive kinase reaction with endogenous kinase-dependent phosphoproteomics to identify direct substrates of protein kinases. The unique in vitro kinase reaction is carried out in a highly efficient manner using a pool of peptides derived directly from cellular kinase substrates and then dephosphorylated as substrate candidates. The resulting newly phosphorylated peptides are then isolated and identified by mass spectrometry. A further comparison of these in vitro phosphorylated peptides with phosphopeptides derived from endogenous proteins isolated from cells in which the kinase is either active or inhibited reveals new candidate protein substrates. The kinase assay linked with phosphoproteomics strategy was applied to identify unique substrates of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a protein-tyrosine kinase with duel properties of an oncogene and a tumor suppressor in distinctive cell types. We identified 64 and 23 direct substrates of Syk specific to B cells and breast cancer cells, respectively. Both known and unique substrates, including multiple centrosomal substrates for Syk, were identified, supporting a unique mechanism that Syk negatively affects cell division through its centrosomal kinase activity. PMID:22451900

  7. Diacylglycerol kinases in membrane trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shuwei; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) belong to a family of cytosolic kinases that regulate the phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DAG), converting it into phosphatidic acid (PA). There are 10 known mammalian DGK isoforms, each with a different tissue distribution and substrate specificity. These differences allow regulation of cellular responses by fine-tuning the delicate balance of cellular DAG and PA. DGK isoforms are best characterized as mediators of signal transduction and immune function. However, since recent studies reveal that DAG and PA are also involved in the regulation of endocytic trafficking, it is therefore anticipated that DGKs also plays an important role in membrane trafficking. In this review, we summarize the literature discussing the role of DGK isoforms at different stages of endocytic trafficking, including endocytosis, exocytosis, endocytic recycling, and transport from/to the Golgi apparatus. Overall, these studies contribute to our understanding of the involvement of PA and DAG in endocytic trafficking, an area of research that is drawing increasing attention in recent years. PMID:27057419

  8. Rho Kinases and Cardiac Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toru; Liao, James K

    2016-06-24

    Hypertensive cardiac remodeling is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis, which can lead to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. The Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCKs) are members of the serine/threonine protein kinase family, which mediates the downstream effects of the small GTP-binding protein RhoA. There are 2 isoforms: ROCK1 and ROCK2. They have different functions in different types of cells and tissues. There is growing evidence that ROCKs contribute to the development of cardiovascular diseases, including cardiac fibrosis, hypertrophy, and subsequent heart failure. Recent experimental studies using ROCK inhibitors, such as fasudil, have shown the benefits of ROCK inhibition in cardiac remodeling. Mice lacking each ROCK isoform also exhibit reduced myocardial fibrosis in a variety of pathological models of cardiac remodeling. Indeed, clinical studies with fasudil have suggested that ROCKs could be potential novel therapeutic targets for cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the roles of ROCKs in the development of cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy and discuss their therapeutic potential for deleterious cardiac remodeling. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1491-1498). PMID:27251065

  9. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases with Intracellular Pseudokinase Domains

    PubMed Central

    Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Shi, Fumin; Park, Jin H.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    As with other groups of protein kinases, approximately 10% of the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) in the human proteome contain intracellular pseudokinases that lack one or more conserved catalytically important residues. These include ErbB3, a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family, and a series of unconventional Wnt receptors. We recently showed that, despite its reputation as a pseudokinase, the ErbB3 tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) does retain significant – albeit weak – kinase activity. This led us to suggest that a subgroup of RTKs may be able to signal even with very inefficient kinases. Recent work suggests that this is not the case, however. Other pseudokinase RTKs have not revealed significant kinase activity, and mutations that impair ErbB3’s weak kinase activity have not so far been found to exhibit signaling defects. These findings therefore point to models in which the TKDs of pseudokinase RTKs participate in receptor signaling by allosterically regulating associated kinases (such as ErbB3 regulation of ErbB2) and/or function as regulated ‘scaffolds’ for other intermolecular interactions central to signal propagation. Further structural and functional studies – particularly of the pseudokinase RTKs involved in Wnt signaling – are required to shed new light on these intriguing signaling mechanisms. PMID:23863174

  10. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... National (UK) Information Centre for Metabolic Diseases National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Pyruvate kinase deficiency of red cells Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  11. Aurora Kinase Inhibitors: Current Status and Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Bavetsias, Vassilios; Linardopoulos, Spiros

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora kinase family comprises of cell cycle-regulated serine/threonine kinases important for mitosis. Their activity and protein expression are cell cycle regulated, peaking during mitosis to orchestrate important mitotic processes including centrosome maturation, chromosome alignment, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis. In humans, the Aurora kinase family consists of three members; Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C, which each share a conserved C-terminal catalytic domain but differ in their sub-cellular localization, substrate specificity, and function during mitosis. In addition, Aurora-A and Aurora-B have been found to be overexpressed in a wide variety of human tumors. These observations led to a number of programs among academic and pharmaceutical organizations to discovering small molecule Aurora kinase inhibitors as anti-cancer drugs. This review will summarize the known Aurora kinase inhibitors currently in the clinic, and discuss the current and future directions. PMID:26734566

  12. Sphingosine kinase regulation and cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Karliner, Joel S.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of sphingosine kinase/sphingosine-1-phosphate (SK/S1P)-mediated signalling has been recognized as critical for cardioprotection in response to acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Incubation of S1P with cultured cardiac myocytes subjected to hypoxia or treatment of isolated hearts either before ischaemia or at the onset of reperfusion (pharmacologic pre- or postconditioning) results in reduced myocyte injury. Synthetic agonists active at S1P receptors mimic these responses. Gene-targeted mice null for the SK1 isoform whose hearts are subjected to ischaemia/reperfusion injury exhibit increased infarct size and respond poorly either to ischaemic pre- or postconditioning. Measurements of cardiac SK activity and S1P parallel these observations. Ischaemic postconditioning combined with sphingosine and S1P rescues the heart from prolonged ischaemia. These observations may have considerable relevance for future therapeutic approaches to acute and chronic myocardial injury. PMID:19017750

  13. Insulin-induced Drosophila S6 kinase activation requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase B.

    PubMed Central

    Lizcano, Jose M; Alrubaie, Saif; Kieloch, Agnieszka; Deak, Maria; Leevers, Sally J; Alessi, Dario R

    2003-01-01

    An important mechanism by which insulin regulates cell growth and protein synthesis is through activation of the p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (S6K). In mammalian cells, insulin-induced PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) activation, generates the lipid second messenger PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3), which is thought to play a key role in triggering the activation of S6K. Although the major components of the insulin-signalling pathway are conserved in Drosophila, recent studies suggested that S6K activation does not require PI3K in this system. To investigate further the role of dPI3K (Drosophila PI3K) in dS6K (Drosophila S6K) activation, we examined the effect of two structurally distinct PI3K inhibitors on insulin-induced dS6K activation in Kc167 and S2 Drosophila cell lines. We found that both inhibitors prevented insulin-stimulated phosphorylation and activation of dS6K. To investigate further the role of the dPI3K pathway in regulating dS6K activation, we also used dsRNAi (double-stranded RNA-mediated interference) to decrease expression of dPI3K and the PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3) phosphatase dPTEN ( Drosophila phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) in Kc167 and S2 cells. Knock-down of dPI3K prevented dS6K activation, whereas knock-down of dPTEN, which would be expected to increase PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3) levels, stimulated dS6K activity. Moreover, when the expression of the dPI3K target, dPKB (Drosophila protein kinase B), was decreased to undetectable levels, we found that insulin could no longer trigger dS6K activation. This observation provides the first direct demonstration that dPKB is required for insulin-stimulated dS6K activation. We also present evidence that the amino-acid-induced activation of dS6K in the absence of insulin, thought to be mediated by dTOR (Drosophila target of rapamycin), which is unaffected by the inhibition of dPI3K by wortmannin. The results of the present study support the view that, in Drosophila cells, dPI3K and dPKB, as well d

  14. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase-gamma induces Xenopus oocyte maturation via lipid kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Hehl, S; Stoyanov, B; Oehrl, W; Schönherr, R; Wetzker, R; Heinemann, S H

    2001-01-01

    Type-I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) were characterized as a group of intracellular signalling proteins expressing both protein and lipid kinase activities. Recent studies implicate PI3Ks as mediators of oocyte maturation, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly defined. Here we used the Xenopus oocyte expression system as a model to investigate a possible contribution of the gamma-isoform of PI3K (PI3Kgamma) in the different pathways leading to cell-cycle progression by monitoring the time course of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD). Expression of a constitutive active PI3Kgamma (PI3Kgamma-CAAX) induced GVBD and increased the levels of phosphorylated Akt/protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Furthermore, PI3Kgamma-CAAX accelerated progesterone-induced GVBD, but had no effect on GVBD induced by insulin. The effects of PI3Kgamma-CAAX could be suppressed by pre-incubation of the oocytes with LY294002, PD98059 or roscovitine, inhibitors of PI3K, MEK (MAPK/extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase kinase) and cdc2/cyclin B kinase, respectively. Mutants of PI3Kgamma-CAAX, in which either lipid kinase or both lipid and protein kinase activities were altered or eliminated, did not induce significant GVBD. Our data demonstrate that expression of PI3Kgamma in Xenopus oocytes accelerates their progesterone-induced maturation and that lipid kinase activity is required to induce this effect. PMID:11736661

  15. Mitotic regulation by NIMA-related kinases

    PubMed Central

    O'Regan, Laura; Blot, Joelle; Fry, Andrew M

    2007-01-01

    The NIMA-related kinases represent a family of serine/threonine kinases implicated in cell cycle control. The founding member of this family, the NIMA kinase of Aspergillus nidulans, as well as the fission yeast homologue Fin1, contribute to multiple aspects of mitotic progression including the timing of mitotic entry, chromatin condensation, spindle organization and cytokinesis. Mammals contain a large family of eleven NIMA-related kinases, named Nek1 to Nek11. Of these, there is now substantial evidence that Nek2, Nek6, Nek7 and Nek9 also regulate mitotic events. At least three of these kinases, as well as NIMA and Fin1, have been localized to the microtubule organizing centre of their respective species, namely the centrosome or spindle pole body. Here, they have important functions in microtubule organization and mitotic spindle assembly. Other Nek kinases have been proposed to play microtubule-dependent roles in non-dividing cells, most notably in regulating the axonemal microtubules of cilia and flagella. In this review, we discuss the evidence that NIMA-related kinases make a significant contribution to the orchestration of mitotic progression and thereby protect cells from chromosome instability. Furthermore, we highlight their potential as novel chemotherapeutic targets. PMID:17727698

  16. Dynamic architecture of a protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    McClendon, Christopher L.; Kornev, Alexandr P.; Gilson, Michael K.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases are dynamically regulated signaling proteins that act as switches in the cell by phosphorylating target proteins. To establish a framework for analyzing linkages between structure, function, dynamics, and allostery in protein kinases, we carried out multiple microsecond-scale molecular-dynamics simulations of protein kinase A (PKA), an exemplar active kinase. We identified residue–residue correlated motions based on the concept of mutual information and used the Girvan–Newman method to partition PKA into structurally contiguous “communities.” Most of these communities included 40–60 residues and were associated with a particular protein kinase function or a regulatory mechanism, and well-known motifs based on sequence and secondary structure were often split into different communities. The observed community maps were sensitive to the presence of different ligands and provide a new framework for interpreting long-distance allosteric coupling. Communication between different communities was also in agreement with the previously defined architecture of the protein kinase core based on the “hydrophobic spine” network. This finding gives us confidence in suggesting that community analyses can be used for other protein kinases and will provide an efficient tool for structural biologists. The communities also allow us to think about allosteric consequences of mutations that are linked to disease. PMID:25319261

  17. [Mitogen-activated protein kinases in atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Bryk, Dorota; Olejarz, Wioletta; Zapolska-Downar, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular signalling cascades, in which MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinases) intermediate, are responsible for a biological response of a cell to an external stimulus. MAP kinases, which include ERK1/2 (extracellular signalling-regulated kinase), JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) and p 38 MAPK, regulate the activity of many proteins, enzymes and transcription factors and thus have a wide spectrum of biological effects. Many basic scientific studies have defined numerous details of their pathway organization and activation. There are also more and more studies suggesting that individual MAP kinases probably play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. They may mediate inflammatory processes, endothelial cell activation, monocyte/macrophage recruitment and activation, smooth muscle cell proliferation and T-lymphocyte differentiation, all of which represent crucial mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The specific inhibition of an activity of the respective MAP kinases may prove a new therapeutic approach to attenuate atherosclerotic plaque formation in the future. In this paper, we review the current state of knowledge concerning MAP kinase-dependent cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying atherosclerosis. PMID:24491891

  18. Functional analysis of anomeric sugar kinases.

    PubMed

    Conway, Louis P; Voglmeir, Josef

    2016-09-01

    Anomeric sugar kinases perform fundamental roles in the metabolism of carbohydrates. Under- or overexpression of these enzymes, or mutations causing functional impairments can give rise to diseases such as galactosaemia and so the study of this class of kinase is of critical importance. In addition, anomeric sugar kinases which are naturally promiscuous, or have been artificially made so, may find application in the synthesis of libraries of drug candidates (for example, antibiotics), and natural or unnatural oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. In this review, we provide an overview of the biological functions of these enzymes, the tools which have been developed to investigate them, and the current frontiers in their study. PMID:27351442

  19. Differential AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Recognition Mechanism of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuya; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-24

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) is a known activating kinase for AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In vitro, CaMKKβ phosphorylates Thr(172) in the AMPKα subunit more efficiently than CaMKKα, with a lower Km (∼2 μm) for AMPK, whereas the CaMKIα phosphorylation efficiencies by both CaMKKs are indistinguishable. Here we found that subdomain VIII of CaMKK is involved in the discrimination of AMPK as a native substrate by measuring the activities of various CaMKKα/CaMKKβ chimera mutants. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that Leu(358) in CaMKKβ/Ile(322) in CaMKKα confer, at least in part, a distinct recognition of AMPK but not of CaMKIα. PMID:27151216

  20. Rac-1 and Raf-1 kinases, components of distinct signaling pathways, activate myotonic dystrophy protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.; Wang, W.; Walch, E. T.; Dunne, P. W.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) is a serine-threonine protein kinase encoded by the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus on human chromosome 19q13.3. It is a close relative of other kinases that interact with members of the Rho family of small GTPases. We show here that the actin cytoskeleton-linked GTPase Rac-1 binds to DMPK, and coexpression of Rac-1 and DMPK activates its transphosphorylation activity in a GTP-sensitive manner. DMPK can also bind Raf-1 kinase, the Ras-activated molecule of the MAP kinase pathway. Purified Raf-1 kinase phosphorylates and activates DMPK. The interaction of DMPK with these distinct signals suggests that it may play a role as a nexus for cross-talk between their respective pathways and may partially explain the remarkable pleiotropy of DM.

  1. Inositol phosphate pathway controls transcription of telomeric expression sites in trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Cestari, Igor; Stuart, Ken

    2015-05-26

    African trypanosomes evade clearance by host antibodies by periodically changing their variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat. They transcribe only one VSG gene at a time from 1 of about 20 telomeric expression sites (ESs). They undergo antigenic variation by switching transcription between telomeric ESs or by recombination of the VSG gene expressed. We show that the inositol phosphate (IP) pathway controls transcription of telomeric ESs and VSG antigenic switching in Trypanosoma brucei. Conditional knockdown of phosphatidylinositol 5-kinase (TbPIP5K) or phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphatase (TbPIP5Pase) or overexpression of phospholipase C (TbPLC) derepresses numerous silent ESs in T. brucei bloodstream forms. The derepression is specific to telomeric ESs, and it coincides with an increase in the number of colocalizing telomeric and RNA polymerase I foci in the nucleus. Monoallelic VSG transcription resumes after reexpression of TbPIP5K; however, most of the resultant cells switched the VSG gene expressed. TbPIP5K, TbPLC, their substrates, and products localize to the plasma membrane, whereas TbPIP5Pase localizes to the nucleus proximal to telomeres. TbPIP5Pase associates with repressor/activator protein 1 (TbRAP1), and their telomeric silencing function is altered by TbPIP5K knockdown. These results show that specific steps in the IP pathway control ES transcription and antigenic switching in T. brucei by epigenetic regulation of telomere silencing. PMID:25964327

  2. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Hartig, Monika B; Prokisch, Holger; Meitinger, Thomas; Klopstock, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a hereditary progressive disorder and the most frequent form of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). PKAN patients present with a progressive movement disorder, dysarthria, cognitive impairment and retinitis pigmentosa. In magnetic resonance imaging, PKAN patients exhibit the pathognonomic "eye of the tiger" sign in the globus pallidus which corresponds to iron accumulation and gliosis as shown in neuropathological examinations. The discovery of the disease causing mutations in PANK2 has linked the disorder to coenzyme A (CoA) metabolism. PANK2 is the only one out of four PANK genes encoding an isoform which localizes to mitochondria. At least two other NBIA genes (PLA2G6, C19orf12) encode proteins that share with PANK2 a mitochondrial localization and all are suggested to play a role in lipid homeostasis. With no causal therapy available for PKAN until now, only symptomatic treatment is possible. A multi-centre retrospective study with bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation in patients with NBIA revealed a significant improvement of dystonia. Recently, studies in the PANK Drosophila model "fumble" revealed improvement by the compound pantethine which is hypothesized to feed an alternate CoA biosynthesis pathway. In addition, pilot studies with the iron chelator deferiprone that crosses the blood brain barrier showed a good safety profile and some indication of efficacy. An adequately powered randomized clinical trial will start in 2012. This review summarizes clinical presentation, neuropathology and pathogenesis of PKAN. PMID:22515741

  3. Genetics Home Reference: mevalonate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... cytoskeleton), gene activity (expression), and protein production and modification. Most MVK gene mutations that cause mevalonate kinase ... What are the different ways in which a genetic condition can be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic ...

  4. How versatile are inositol phosphate kinases?

    PubMed Central

    Shears, Stephen B

    2004-01-01

    This review assesses the extent and the significance of catalytic versatility shown by several inositol phosphate kinases: the inositol phosphate multikinase, the reversible Ins(1,3,4) P (3)/Ins(3,4,5,6) P (4) kinase, and the kinases that synthesize diphosphoinositol polyphosphates. Particular emphasis is placed upon data that are relevant to the situation in vivo. It will be shown that catalytic promiscuity towards different inositol phosphates is not typically an evolutionary compromise, but instead is sometimes exploited to facilitate tight regulation of physiological processes. This multifunctionality can add to the complexity with which inositol signalling pathways interact. This review also assesses some proposed additional functions for the catalytic domains, including transcriptional regulation, protein kinase activity and control by molecular 'switching', all in the context of growing interest in 'moonlighting' (gene-sharing) proteins. PMID:14567754

  5. Pyruvate kinase and the "high ATP syndrome".

    PubMed Central

    Staal, G E; Jansen, G; Roos, D

    1984-01-01

    The erythrocytes of a patient with the so-called "high ATP syndrome" were characterized by a high ATP content and low 2,3-diphosphoglycerate level. The pyruvate kinase activity was specifically increased (about twice the normal level). After separation of the erythrocytes according to age by discontinuous Percoll density centrifugation, the pyruvate kinase activity was found to be increased in all Percoll fractions. Pyruvate kinase of the patient's cells was characterized by a decreased K0.5 for the substrate phosphoenolpyruvate and no inhibition by ATP. The Michaelis constant (Km) value for ADP, the nucleotide specificity, the thermostability, pH optimum, and immunological specific activity were normal. It is concluded that the high pyruvate kinase activity is due to a shift in the R(elaxed) in equilibrium T(ight) equilibrium to the R(elaxed) form. PMID:6736249

  6. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted using cINahl®, Pubmed, and cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms: ocular toxicities, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, ophthalmology, adverse events, eye, and vision. Data Synthesis Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity. Conclusions Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems. Implications for Nursing Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity. PMID:26906134

  7. Kinase-interacting substrate screening is a novel method to identify kinase substrates

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Mutsuki; Hamaguchi, Tomonari; Shohag, Md. Hasanuzzaman; Kozawa, Kei; Kato, Katsuhiro; Zhang, Xinjian; Yura, Yoshimitsu; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Kataoka, Chikako; Nishioka, Tomoki

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases play pivotal roles in numerous cellular functions; however, the specific substrates of each protein kinase have not been fully elucidated. We have developed a novel method called kinase-interacting substrate screening (KISS). Using this method, 356 phosphorylation sites of 140 proteins were identified as candidate substrates for Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase/ROCK2), including known substrates. The KISS method was also applied to additional kinases, including PKA, MAPK1, CDK5, CaMK1, PAK7, PKN, LYN, and FYN, and a lot of candidate substrates and their phosphorylation sites were determined, most of which have not been reported previously. Among the candidate substrates for Rho-kinase, several functional clusters were identified, including the polarity-associated proteins, such as Scrib. We found that Scrib plays a crucial role in the regulation of subcellular contractility by assembling into a ternary complex with Rho-kinase and Shroom2 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We propose that the KISS method is a comprehensive and useful substrate screen for various kinases. PMID:26101221

  8. Identifying Kinase Substrates via a Heavy ATP Kinase Assay and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Müller, André C; Giambruno, Roberto; Weißer, Juliane; Májek, Peter; Hofer, Alexandre; Bigenzahn, Johannes W; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Jessen, Henning J; Bennett, Keiryn L

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro kinase screens play an essential role in the discovery of kinase substrates, however, many suffer from biological and technical noise or necessitate genetically-altered enzyme-cofactor systems. We describe a method that combines stable γ-[(18)O2]-ATP with classical in vitro kinase assays within a contemporary quantitative proteomic workflow. Our approach improved detection of known substrates of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL1; and identified potential, new in vitro substrates. PMID:27346722

  9. Identifying Kinase Substrates via a Heavy ATP Kinase Assay and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Müller, André C.; Giambruno, Roberto; Weißer, Juliane; Májek, Peter; Hofer, Alexandre; Bigenzahn, Johannes W.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Jessen, Henning J.; Bennett, Keiryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro kinase screens play an essential role in the discovery of kinase substrates, however, many suffer from biological and technical noise or necessitate genetically-altered enzyme-cofactor systems. We describe a method that combines stable γ-[18O2]-ATP with classical in vitro kinase assays within a contemporary quantitative proteomic workflow. Our approach improved detection of known substrates of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL1; and identified potential, new in vitro substrates. PMID:27346722

  10. Seeding collaborations to advance kinase science with the GSK Published Kinase Inhibitor Set (PKIS).

    PubMed

    Drewry, David H; Willson, Timothy M; Zuercher, William J

    2014-01-01

    To catalyze research on historically untargeted protein kinases, we created the PKIS, an annotated set of 367 small molecule kinase inhibitors. The set has been widely distributed to academic collaborators as an open access tool. It has been used to identify chemical starting points for development of chemical probes for orphan kinases and to investigate kinase signaling in high content phenotypic assays. Access to the set comes with few restrictions other than the requirement that assay results be released into the public domain for the benefit of the entire research community. Examples from the efforts of several collaborators are summarized. PMID:24283969

  11. Protein kinase domain of twitchin has protein kinase activity and an autoinhibitory region.

    PubMed

    Lei, J; Tang, X; Chambers, T C; Pohl, J; Benian, G M

    1994-08-19

    Twitchin is a 753-kDa polypeptide located in the muscle A-bands of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. It consists of multiple copies of both fibronectin III and immunoglobulin C2 domains and, near the C terminus, a protein kinase domain with greatest homology to the catalytic domains of myosin light chain kinases. We have expressed and purified from Escherichia coli twitchin's protein kinase catalytic core and flanking sequences that do not include fibronectin III and immunoglobulin C2 domains. The protein was shown to phosphorylate a model substrate and to undergo autophosphorylation. The autophosphorylation occurs at a slow rate, attaining a maximum at 3 h with a stoichiometry of about 1.0 mol of phosphate/mol of protein, probably through an intramolecular mechanism. Sequence analysis of proteolytically derived phosphopeptides revealed that autophosphorylation occurred N-terminal to the catalytic core, predominantly at Thr-5910, with possible minor sites at Ser5912 and/or Ser-5913. This portion of twitchin (residues 5890-6268) was also phosphorylated in vitro by protein kinase C in the absence of calcium and phosphotidylserine, but not by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. By comparing the activities of three twitchin segments, the enzyme appears to be inhibited by the 60-amino acid residues lying just C-terminal to the kinase catalytic core. Thus, like a number of other protein kinases including myosin light chain kinases, the twitchin kinase appears to be autoregulated. PMID:8063727

  12. Kinase inhibitor profiling reveals unexpected opportunities to inhibit disease-associated mutant kinases

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Devarajan, Karthik; Liang, Shuguang; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y.; Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Small-molecule kinase inhibitors have typically been designed to inhibit wild-type kinases rather than the mutant forms that frequently arise in diseases such as cancer. Mutations can have serious clinical implications by increasing kinase catalytic activity or conferring therapeutic resistance. To identify opportunities to repurpose inhibitors against disease-associated mutant kinases, we conducted a large-scale functional screen of 183 known kinase inhibitors against 76 recombinant, mutant kinases. The results revealed lead compounds with activity against clinically important mutant kinases including ALK, LRRK2, RET, and EGFR as well as unexpected opportunities for repurposing FDA-approved kinase inhibitors as leads for additional indications. Furthermore, using T674I PDGFRα as an example, we show how single-dose screening data can provide predictive structure-activity data to guide subsequent inhibitor optimization. This study provides a resource for the development of inhibitors against numerous disease-associated mutant kinases and illustrates the potential of unbiased profiling as an approach to compound-centric inhibitor development. PMID:26776524

  13. A Molecular Brake in the Kinase Hinge Region Regulates the Activity of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,H.; Ma, J.; Li, W.; Eliseenkova, A.; Xu, C.; Neubert, T.; Miller, W.; Mohammadi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Activating mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) cause cancer and skeletal disorders. Comparison of the crystal structures of unphosphorylated and phosphorylated wild-type FGFR2 kinase domains with those of seven unphosphorylated pathogenic mutants reveals an autoinhibitory 'molecular brake' mediated by a triad of residues in the kinase hinge region of all FGFRs. Structural analysis shows that many other RTKs, including PDGFRs, VEGFRs, KIT, CSF1R, FLT3, TEK, and TIE, are also subject to regulation by this brake. Pathogenic mutations activate FGFRs and other RTKs by disengaging the brake either directly or indirectly.

  14. Redundant kinase activation and resistance of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Fu, Li-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown dramatic effects against that tumors harboring EGFR activating mutations in the EGFR intracytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain and resulted in cell apoptosis. Unfortunately, a number of patients ultimately developed resistance by multiple mechanisms. Thus, elucidation of the mechanism of resistance to EGFR-TKIs can provide strategies for blocking or reversing the situation. Recent studies suggested that redundant kinase activation plays pivotal roles in escaping from the effects of EGFR-TKIs. Herein, we aimed to characterize several molecular events involved in the resistance to EGFR-TKIs mediated by redundant kinase activation. PMID:25520855

  15. Fibronectin phosphorylation by ecto-protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, Sumi; Sugiyama, Yayoi; Imada, Masaru )

    1988-12-01

    The presence of membrane-associated, extracellular protein kinase (ecto-protein kinase) and its substrate proteins was examined with serum-free cultures of Swiss 3T3 fibroblast. When cells were incubated with ({gamma}-{sup 32})ATP for 10 min at 37{degree}C, four proteins with apparent molecular weights between 150 and 220 kDa were prominently phosphorylated. These proteins were also radiolabeled by lactoperoxidase catalyzed iodination and were sensitive to mild tryptic digestion, suggesting that they localized on the cell surface or in the extracellular matrix. Phosphorylation of extracellular proteins with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in intact cell culture is consistent with the existence of ecto-protein kinase. Anti-fibronectin antibody immunoprecipitated one of the phosphoproteins which comigrated with a monomer and a dimer form of fibronectin under reducing and nonreducing conditions of electrophoresis, respectively. The protein had affinity for gelatin as demonstrated by retention with gelatin-conjugated agarose. This protein substrate of ecto-protein kinase was thus concluded to be fibronectin. The sites of phosphorylation by ecto-protein kinase were compared with those of intracellularly phosphorylated fibronectin by the analysis of radiolabeled amino acids and peptides. Ecto-protein kinase phosphorylated fibronectin at serine and threonine residues which were distinct from the sites of intracellular fibronectin phosphorylation.

  16. Ubiquitin-Mediated Degradation of Aurora Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lindon, Catherine; Grant, Rhys; Min, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    The Aurora kinases are essential regulators of mitosis in eukaryotes. In somatic cell divisions of higher eukaryotes, the paralogs Aurora kinase A (AurA) and Aurora kinase B (AurB) play non-overlapping roles that depend on their distinct spatiotemporal activities. These mitotic roles of Aurora kinases depend on their interactions with different partners that direct them to different mitotic destinations and different substrates: AurB is a component of the chromosome passenger complex that orchestrates the tasks of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, while AurA has many known binding partners and mitotic roles, including a well-characterized interaction with TPX2 that mediates its role in mitotic spindle assembly. Beyond the spatial control conferred by different binding partners, Aurora kinases are subject to temporal control of their activation and inactivation. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis is a critical route to irreversible inactivation of these kinases, which must occur for ordered transition from mitosis back to interphase. Both AurA and AurB undergo targeted proteolysis after anaphase onset as substrates of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase, even while they continue to regulate steps during mitotic exit. Temporal control of Aurora kinase destruction ensures that AurB remains active at the midbody during cytokinesis long after AurA activity has been largely eliminated from the cell. Differential destruction of Aurora kinases is achieved despite the fact that they are targeted at the same time and by the same ubiquitin ligase, making these substrates an interesting case study for investigating molecular determinants of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis in higher eukaryotes. The prevalence of Aurora overexpression in cancers and their potential as therapeutic targets add importance to the task of understanding the molecular determinants of Aurora kinase stability. Here, we review what is known about ubiquitin-mediated targeting

  17. Mediator kinase module and human tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Alison D.; Oldenbroek, Marieke; Boyer, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is a conserved multi-subunit signal processor through which regulatory informatiosn conveyed by gene-specific transcription factors is transduced to RNA Polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, MED13, MED12, CDK8 and Cyclin C (CycC) comprise a four-subunit “kinase” module that exists in variable association with a 26-subunit Mediator core. Genetic and biochemical studies have established the Mediator kinase module as a major ingress of developmental and oncogenic signaling through Mediator, and much of its function in signal-dependent gene regulation derives from its resident CDK8 kinase activity. For example, CDK8-targeted substrate phosphorylation impacts transcription factor half-life, Pol II activity and chromatin chemistry and functional status. Recent structural and biochemical studies have revealed a precise network of physical and functional subunit interactions required for proper kinase module activity. Accordingly, pathologic change in this activity through altered expression or mutation of constituent kinase module subunits can have profound consequences for altered signaling and tumor formation. Herein, we review the structural organization, biological function and oncogenic potential of the Mediator kinase module. We focus principally on tumor-associated alterations in kinase module subunits for which mechanistic relationships as opposed to strictly correlative associations are established. These considerations point to an emerging picture of the Mediator kinase module as an oncogenic unit, one in which pathogenic activation/deactivation through component change drives tumor formation through perturbation of signal-dependent gene regulation. It follows that therapeutic strategies to combat CDK8-driven tumors will involve targeted modulation of CDK8 activity or pharmacologic manipulation of dysregulated CDK8-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:26182352

  18. Non-degradative Ubiquitination of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ball, K. Aurelia; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Lewinski, Mary K.; Guatelli, John; Verschueren, Erik; Krogan, Nevan J.; Jacobson, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports other regulatory roles for protein ubiquitination in addition to serving as a tag for proteasomal degradation. In contrast to other common post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, little is known about how non-degradative ubiquitination modulates protein structure, dynamics, and function. Due to the wealth of knowledge concerning protein kinase structure and regulation, we examined kinase ubiquitination using ubiquitin remnant immunoaffinity enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry to identify ubiquitinated kinases and the sites of ubiquitination in Jurkat and HEK293 cells. We find that, unlike phosphorylation, ubiquitination most commonly occurs in structured domains, and on the kinase domain, ubiquitination is concentrated in regions known to be important for regulating activity. We hypothesized that ubiquitination, like other post-translational modifications, may alter the conformational equilibrium of the modified protein. We chose one human kinase, ZAP-70, to simulate using molecular dynamics with and without a monoubiquitin modification. In Jurkat cells, ZAP-70 is ubiquitinated at several sites that are not sensitive to proteasome inhibition and thus may have other regulatory roles. Our simulations show that ubiquitination influences the conformational ensemble of ZAP-70 in a site-dependent manner. When monoubiquitinated at K377, near the C-helix, the active conformation of the ZAP-70 C-helix is disrupted. In contrast, when monoubiquitinated at K476, near the kinase hinge region, an active-like ZAP-70 C-helix conformation is stabilized. These results lead to testable hypotheses that ubiquitination directly modulates kinase activity, and that ubiquitination is likely to alter structure, dynamics, and function in other protein classes as well. PMID:27253329

  19. Phospho-kinase profile of colorectal tumors guides in the selection of multi-kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Montero, Juan Carlos; Corrales-Sanchez, Verónica; Morales, Jorge Carlos; Núñez, Luz-Elena; Morís, Francisco; Pandiella, Atanasio; Ocaña, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases play a central role in the oncogenesis of colorectal tumors and are attractive druggable targets. Detection of activated kinases within a tumor could open avenues for drug selection and optimization of new kinase inhibitors. By using a phosphokinase arrays with human colorectal tumors we identified activated kinases, including the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR), components of the PI3K/mTOR pathway (AKT and S6), and STAT, among others. A pharmacological screening with kinase inhibitors against these proteins helped us to identify a new kinase inhibitor, termed EC-70124 that showed the highest anti-proliferative activity in cell lines. EC-70124 also inhibited cell migration and biochemical experiments demonstrated its effect targeting the PI3K/mTOR pathway. This drug also arrested cells at G2/M and induced apoptosis. Experiments in combination with standard chemotherapy used in the clinical setting indicated a synergistic effect. EC-70124 also reduced tumor growth in vivo and inhibited pS6 in the implanted tumors. In conclusion, by studying the kinase profile of colorectal tumors, we identified relevant activated pathways, and a new multi-kinase compound with significant antitumor properties. PMID:26418718

  20. Phospho-kinase profile of colorectal tumors guides in the selection of multi-kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Heras, Gemma; Cuenca-López, María Dolores; Montero, Juan Carlos; Corrales-Sanchez, Verónica; Morales, Jorge Carlos; Núñez, Luz-Elena; Morís, Francisco; Pandiella, Atanasio; Ocaña, Alberto

    2015-10-13

    Protein kinases play a central role in the oncogenesis of colorectal tumors and are attractive druggable targets. Detection of activated kinases within a tumor could open avenues for drug selection and optimization of new kinase inhibitors. By using a phosphokinase arrays with human colorectal tumors we identified activated kinases, including the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR), components of the PI3K/mTOR pathway (AKT and S6), and STAT, among others. A pharmacological screening with kinase inhibitors against these proteins helped us to identify a new kinase inhibitor, termed EC-70124 that showed the highest anti-proliferative activity in cell lines. EC-70124 also inhibited cell migration and biochemical experiments demonstrated its effect targeting the PI3K/mTOR pathway. This drug also arrested cells at G2/M and induced apoptosis. Experiments in combination with standard chemotherapy used in the clinical setting indicated a synergistic effect. EC-70124 also reduced tumor growth in vivo and inhibited pS6 in the implanted tumors. In conclusion, by studying the kinase profile of colorectal tumors, we identified relevant activated pathways, and a new multi-kinase compound with significant antitumor properties. PMID:26418718

  1. CDPKs are dual-specificity protein kinases and tyrosine autophosphorylation attenuates kinase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs or CPKs) are classified as serine/threonine protein kinases but we made the surprising observation that soybean CDPK' and several Arabidopsis isoforms (AtCPK4 and AtCPK34) could also autophosphorylate on tyrosine residues. In studies with His6-GmCDPK', we ide...

  2. Co-inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and Aurora kinases promotes mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Hong, Myung Jin; Chow, Jeremy P H; Man, Wing Yu; Mak, Joyce P Y; Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y C

    2015-04-20

    Mitosis is choreographed by a number of protein kinases including polo-like kinases and Aurora kinases. As these kinases are frequently dysregulated in cancers, small-molecule inhibitors have been developed for targeted anticancer therapies. Given that PLK1 and Aurora kinases possess both unique functions as well as co-regulate multiple mitotic events, whether pharmacological inhibition of these kinases together can enhance mitotic catastrophe remains an outstanding issue to be determined. Using concentrations of inhibitors that did not induce severe mitotic defects on their own, we found that both the metaphase arrest and mitotic slippage induced by inhibitors targeting Aurora A and Aurora B (MK-5108 and Barasertib respectively) were enhanced by a PLK1 inhibitor (BI 2536). We found that PLK1 is overexpressed in cells from nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a highly invasive cancer with poor prognosis, in comparison to normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells were more sensitive to BI 2536 as a single agent and co-inhibition with Aurora kinases than normal cells. These observations underscore the mechanism and potential benefits of targeting PLK1 and Aurora kinases to induce mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. PMID:25871386

  3. KinasePA: Phosphoproteomics data annotation using hypothesis driven kinase perturbation analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengyi; Patrick, Ellis; Humphrey, Sean J; Ghazanfar, Shila; James, David E; Jothi, Raja; Yang, Jean Yee Hwa

    2016-07-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative phosphoproteomics has become a key approach for proteome-wide profiling of phosphorylation in tissues and cells. Traditional experimental design often compares a single treatment with a control, whereas increasingly more experiments are designed to compare multiple treatments with respect to a control. To this end, the development of bioinformatic tools that can integrate multiple treatments and visualise kinases and substrates under combinatorial perturbations is vital for dissecting concordant and/or independent effects of each treatment. Here, we propose a hypothesis driven kinase perturbation analysis (KinasePA) to annotate and visualise kinases and their substrates that are perturbed by various combinatorial effects of treatments in phosphoproteomics experiments. We demonstrate the utility of KinasePA through its application to two large-scale phosphoproteomics datasets and show its effectiveness in dissecting kinases and substrates within signalling pathways driven by unique combinations of cellular stimuli and inhibitors. We implemented and incorporated KinasePA as part of the "directPA" R package available from the comprehensive R archive network (CRAN). Furthermore, KinasePA also has an interactive web interface that can be readily applied to annotate user provided phosphoproteomics data (http://kinasepa.pengyiyang.org). PMID:27145998

  4. The SH2 domain of Abl kinases regulates kinase autophosphorylation by controlling activation loop accessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontanara, Allan Joaquim; Georgeon, Sandrine; Tria, Giancarlo; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Hantschel, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    The activity of protein kinases is regulated by multiple molecular mechanisms, and their disruption is a common driver of oncogenesis. A central and almost universal control element of protein kinase activity is the activation loop that utilizes both conformation and phosphorylation status to determine substrate access. In this study, we use recombinant Abl tyrosine kinases and conformation-specific kinase inhibitors to quantitatively analyse structural changes that occur after Abl activation. Allosteric SH2-kinase domain interactions were previously shown to be essential for the leukemogenesis caused by the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein. We find that these allosteric interactions switch the Abl activation loop from a closed to a fully open conformation. This enables the trans-autophosphorylation of the activation loop and requires prior phosphorylation of the SH2-kinase linker. Disruption of the SH2-kinase interaction abolishes activation loop phosphorylation. Our analysis provides a molecular mechanism for the SH2 domain-dependent activation of Abl that may also regulate other tyrosine kinases.

  5. Co-inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and Aurora kinases promotes mitotic catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjing; Hong, Myung Jin; Chow, Jeremy P.H.; Man, Wing Yu; Mak, Joyce P.Y.; Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y.C.

    2015-01-01

    Mitosis is choreographed by a number of protein kinases including polo-like kinases and Aurora kinases. As these kinases are frequently dysregulated in cancers, small-molecule inhibitors have been developed for targeted anticancer therapies. Given that PLK1 and Aurora kinases possess both unique functions as well as co-regulate multiple mitotic events, whether pharmacological inhibition of these kinases together can enhance mitotic catastrophe remains an outstanding issue to be determined. Using concentrations of inhibitors that did not induce severe mitotic defects on their own, we found that both the metaphase arrest and mitotic slippage induced by inhibitors targeting Aurora A and Aurora B (MK-5108 and Barasertib respectively) were enhanced by a PLK1 inhibitor (BI 2536). We found that PLK1 is overexpressed in cells from nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a highly invasive cancer with poor prognosis, in comparison to normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells were more sensitive to BI 2536 as a single agent and co-inhibition with Aurora kinases than normal cells. These observations underscore the mechanism and potential benefits of targeting PLK1 and Aurora kinases to induce mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. PMID:25871386

  6. KIDFamMap: a database of kinase-inhibitor-disease family maps for kinase inhibitor selectivity and binding mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yi-Yuan; Lin, Chih-Ta; Huang, Jhang-Wei; Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Tseng, Jen-Hu; You, Syuan-Ren; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2013-01-01

    Kinases play central roles in signaling pathways and are promising therapeutic targets for many diseases. Designing selective kinase inhibitors is an emergent and challenging task, because kinases share an evolutionary conserved ATP-binding site. KIDFamMap (http://gemdock.life.nctu.edu.tw/KIDFamMap/) is the first database to explore kinase-inhibitor families (KIFs) and kinase-inhibitor-disease (KID) relationships for kinase inhibitor selectivity and mechanisms. This database includes 1208 KIFs, 962 KIDs, 55 603 kinase-inhibitor interactions (KIIs), 35 788 kinase inhibitors, 399 human protein kinases, 339 diseases and 638 disease allelic variants. Here, a KIF can be defined as follows: (i) the kinases in the KIF with significant sequence similarity, (ii) the inhibitors in the KIF with significant topology similarity and (iii) the KIIs in the KIF with significant interaction similarity. The KIIs within a KIF are often conserved on some consensus KIDFamMap anchors, which represent conserved interactions between the kinase subsites and consensus moieties of their inhibitors. Our experimental results reveal that the members of a KIF often possess similar inhibition profiles. The KIDFamMap anchors can reflect kinase conformations types, kinase functions and kinase inhibitor selectivity. We believe that KIDFamMap provides biological insights into kinase inhibitor selectivity and binding mechanisms. PMID:23193279

  7. KIDFamMap: a database of kinase-inhibitor-disease family maps for kinase inhibitor selectivity and binding mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yi-Yuan; Lin, Chih-Ta; Huang, Jhang-Wei; Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Tseng, Jen-Hu; You, Syuan-Ren; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2013-01-01

    Kinases play central roles in signaling pathways and are promising therapeutic targets for many diseases. Designing selective kinase inhibitors is an emergent and challenging task, because kinases share an evolutionary conserved ATP-binding site. KIDFamMap (http://gemdock.life.nctu.edu.tw/KIDFamMap/) is the first database to explore kinase-inhibitor families (KIFs) and kinase-inhibitor-disease (KID) relationships for kinase inhibitor selectivity and mechanisms. This database includes 1208 KIFs, 962 KIDs, 55 603 kinase-inhibitor interactions (KIIs), 35 788 kinase inhibitors, 399 human protein kinases, 339 diseases and 638 disease allelic variants. Here, a KIF can be defined as follows: (i) the kinases in the KIF with significant sequence similarity, (ii) the inhibitors in the KIF with significant topology similarity and (iii) the KIIs in the KIF with significant interaction similarity. The KIIs within a KIF are often conserved on some consensus KIDFamMap anchors, which represent conserved interactions between the kinase subsites and consensus moieties of their inhibitors. Our experimental results reveal that the members of a KIF often possess similar inhibition profiles. The KIDFamMap anchors can reflect kinase conformations types, kinase functions and kinase inhibitor selectivity. We believe that KIDFamMap provides biological insights into kinase inhibitor selectivity and binding mechanisms. PMID:23193279

  8. Tyrosine kinase BMX phosphorylates phosphotyrosine-primed motif mediating the activation of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sen; Jiang, Xinnong; Gewinner, Christina A; Asara, John M; Simon, Nicholas I; Cai, Changmeng; Cantley, Lewis C; Balk, Steven P

    2013-05-28

    The nonreceptor tyrosine kinase BMX (bone marrow tyrosine kinase gene on chromosome X) is abundant in various cell types and activated downstream of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) and the kinase Src, but its substrates are unknown. Positional scanning peptide library screening revealed a marked preference for a priming phosphorylated tyrosine (pY) in the -1 position, indicating that BMX substrates may include multiple tyrosine kinases that are fully activated by pYpY sites in the kinase domain. BMX phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr⁵⁷⁷ subsequent to its Src-mediated phosphorylation at Tyr⁵⁷⁶. Loss of BMX by RNA interference or by genetic deletion in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) markedly impaired FAK activity. Phosphorylation of the insulin receptor in the kinase domain at Tyr¹¹⁸⁹ and Tyr¹¹⁹⁰, as well as Tyr¹¹⁸⁵, and downstream phosphorylation of the kinase AKT at Thr³⁰⁸ were similarly impaired by BMX deficiency. However, insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT at Ser⁴⁷³ was not impaired in Bmx knockout MEFs or liver tissue from Bmx knockout mice, which also showed increased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, possibly because of decreased abundance of the phosphatase PHLPP (PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase). Thus, by identifying the pYpY motif as a substrate for BMX, our findings suggest that BMX functions as a central regulator among multiple signaling pathways mediated by tyrosine kinases. PMID:23716717

  9. The protein interaction landscape of the human CMGC kinase group.

    PubMed

    Varjosalo, Markku; Keskitalo, Salla; Van Drogen, Audrey; Nurkkala, Helka; Vichalkovski, Anton; Aebersold, Ruedi; Gstaiger, Matthias

    2013-04-25

    Cellular information processing via reversible protein phosphorylation requires tight control of the localization, activity, and substrate specificity of protein kinases, which to a large extent is accomplished by complex formation with other proteins. Despite their critical role in cellular regulation and pathogenesis, protein interaction information is available for only a subset of the 518 human protein kinases. Here we present a global proteomic analysis of complexes of the human CMGC kinase group. In addition to subgroup-specific functional enrichment and modularity, the identified 652 high-confidence kinase-protein interactions provide a specific biochemical context for many poorly studied CMGC kinases. Furthermore, the analysis revealed a kinase-kinase subnetwork and candidate substrates for CMGC kinases. Finally, the presented interaction proteome uncovered a large set of interactions with proteins genetically linked to a range of human diseases, including cancer, suggesting additional routes for analyzing the role of CMGC kinases in controlling human disease pathways. PMID:23602568

  10. Protein kinase activators alter glial cholesterol esterification

    SciTech Connect

    Jeng, I.; Dills, C.; Klemm, N.; Wu, C.

    1986-05-01

    Similar to nonneural tissues, the activity of glial acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase is controlled by a phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mechanism. Manipulation of cyclic AMP content did not alter the cellular cholesterol esterification, suggesting that cyclic AMP is not a bioregulator in this case. Therefore, the authors tested the effect of phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on cellular cholesterol esterification to determine the involvement of protein kinase C. PMA has a potent effect on cellular cholesterol esterification. PMA depresses cholesterol esterification initially, but cells recover from inhibition and the result was higher cholesterol esterification, suggesting dual effects of protein kinase C. Studies of other phorbol analogues and other protein kinase C activators such as merezein indicate the involvement of protein kinase C. Oleoyl-acetyl glycerol duplicates the effect of PMA. This observation is consistent with a diacyl-glycerol-protein kinase-dependent reaction. Calcium ionophore A23187 was ineffective in promoting the effect of PMA. They concluded that a calcium-independent and protein C-dependent pathway regulated glial cholesterol esterification.

  11. Src Kinase Regulation in Progressively Invasive Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weichen; Allbritton, Nancy; Lawrence, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic progression is a multistep process that involves tumor growth and survival, motility and invasion, and subsequent proliferation in an inappropriate environment. The Src protein tyrosine kinase has been implicated in many of the biochemical pathways that drive these behaviors. Although Src itself is only rarely mutated in human tumors, its aberrant activity has been noted in various cancers and suggested to serve as a barometer of metastatic potential. With these features in mind, we examined Src kinase regulation at the structural, enzymatic, and expression levels as a function of progressively invasive prostate cancer cell lines. Surprisingly, both total Src content and kinase activity decrease with increasing cell line aggressiveness, an observation that appears to be inconsistent with the well-documented role of Src in the signaling pathways that drive growth and invasion. However, we do observe a direct correlation between Src kinase specific activity (total Src kinase activity/total Src content) and metastatic aggressiveness, possibly suggesting that in highly aggressive cell lines, key signaling enzymes are globally recruited to drive the cancerous phenotype. In addition, although the expected enhanced phosphorylation of Src at Tyr-416 (activation site) is present in the most aggressive prostate cancer cell lines, unexpectedly high phosphorylation levels at the Tyr-527 inhibitory site are observed as well. The latter, rather than representative of inhibited enzyme, is more indicative of primed Src responsive to local phosphorylated binding partners. PMID:23145001

  12. Regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by protein kinase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Trappanese, Danielle M; Sivilich, Sarah; Ets, Hillevi K; Kako, Farah; Autieri, Michael V; Moreland, Robert S

    2016-06-01

    Vascular smooth muscle contraction is primarily regulated by phosphorylation of myosin light chain. There are also modulatory pathways that control the final level of force development. We tested the hypothesis that protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase modulate vascular smooth muscle activity via effects on MAP kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1). Swine carotid arteries were mounted for isometric force recording and subjected to histamine stimulation in the presence and absence of inhibitors of PKC [bisindolylmaleimide-1 (Bis)], MAP kinase kinase (MEK) (U0126), and MKP-1 (sanguinarine) and flash frozen for measurement of MAP kinase, PKC-potentiated myosin phosphatase inhibitor 17 (CPI-17), and caldesmon phosphorylation levels. CPI-17 was phosphorylated in response to histamine and was inhibited in the presence of Bis. Caldesmon phosphorylation levels increased in response to histamine stimulation and were decreased in response to MEK inhibition but were not affected by the addition of Bis. Inhibition of PKC significantly increased p42 MAP kinase, but not p44 MAP kinase. Inhibition of MEK with U0126 inhibited both p42 and p44 MAP kinase activity. Inhibition of MKP-1 with sanguinarine blocked the Bis-dependent increase of MAP kinase activity. Sanguinarine alone increased MAP kinase activity due to its effects on MKP-1. Sanguinarine increased MKP-1 phosphorylation, which was inhibited by inhibition of MAP kinase. This suggests that MAP kinase has a negative feedback role in inhibiting MKP-1 activity. Therefore, PKC catalyzes MKP-1 phosphorylation, which is reversed by MAP kinase. Thus the fine tuning of vascular contraction is due to the concerted effort of PKC, MAP kinase, and MKP-1. PMID:27053523

  13. Structure and Dynamic Regulation of Abl Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Panjarian, Shoghag; Iacob, Roxana E.; Chen, Shugui; Engen, John R.; Smithgall, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    The c-abl proto-oncogene encodes a unique protein-tyrosine kinase (Abl) distinct from c-Src, c-Fes, and other cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases. In normal cells, Abl plays prominent roles in cellular responses to genotoxic stress as well as in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Abl is also well known in the context of Bcr-Abl, the oncogenic fusion protein characteristic of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Selective inhibitors of Bcr-Abl, of which imatinib is the prototype, have had a tremendous impact on clinical outcomes in chronic myelogenous leukemia and revolutionized the field of targeted cancer therapy. In this minireview, we focus on the structural organization and dynamics of Abl kinases and how these features influence inhibitor sensitivity. PMID:23316053

  14. LKB1, the multitasking tumour suppressor kinase

    PubMed Central

    Marignani, P A

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the lkb1 gene are found in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), with loss of heterozygosity or somatic mutations at the lkb1 locus, suggesting the gene product, the serine/threonine kinase LKB1, may function as a tumour suppressor. Patients with PJS are at a greater risk of developing cancers of epithelial tissue origin. It is widely accepted that the presence of hamartomatous polyps in PJS does not in itself lead to the development of malignancy. The signalling mechanisms that lead to these PJS related malignancies are not well understood. However, it is evident from the recent literature that LKB1 is a multitasking kinase, with unlimited potential in orchestrating cell activity. Thus far, LKB1 has been found to play a role in chromatin remodelling, cell cycle arrest, Wnt signalling, cell polarity, and energy metabolism, all of which may require the tumour suppressor function of this kinase and/or its catalytic activity. PMID:15623475

  15. Structure of the human dimeric ATM kinase.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wilson C Y; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Zhe; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Huen, Michael S Y

    2016-01-01

    DNA-double strand breaks activate the serine/threonine protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) to initiate DNA damage signal transduction. This activation process involves autophosphorylation and dissociation of inert ATM dimers into monomers that are catalytically active. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we determined the structure of dimeric ATM in its resting state. The EM map could accommodate the crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a closely related enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family, allowing for the localization of the N- and the C-terminal regions of ATM. In the dimeric structure, the actives sites are buried, restricting the access of the substrates to these sites. The unanticipated domain organization of ATM provides a basis for understanding its mechanism of inhibition. PMID:27097373

  16. The Role of Mirk Kinase in Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Targeting the tyrosine kinase KIT in gastrointestinal stromal tumors has led to improved treatment. Other kinases might serve as therapeutic targets in the more common forms of sarcoma. The kinase Mirk/dyrk1B is highly expressed in the vast majority of osteosarcomas and rhabdomyosarcomas and mediates their growth, as depletion of Mirk led to tumor cell apoptosis. Mirk is known to increase the expression of a series of antioxidant genes, which scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) within various tumor cells, mediating their survival. As a result, depleting Mirk led to increased levels of damaging ROS. Tumor cells depleted of Mirk were also sensitized to low levels of chemotherapeutic drugs that increase ROS levels. In contrast, Mirk expression is quite low in most normal cells, and Mirk depletion or embryonic knockout of Mirk did not detectably affect cell survival. Thus targeting Mirk for intervention in sarcomas might spare most normal tissues. PMID:21559261

  17. Structure of the human dimeric ATM kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wilson C. Y.; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Zhe; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Huen, Michael S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA-double strand breaks activate the serine/threonine protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) to initiate DNA damage signal transduction. This activation process involves autophosphorylation and dissociation of inert ATM dimers into monomers that are catalytically active. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we determined the structure of dimeric ATM in its resting state. The EM map could accommodate the crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a closely related enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family, allowing for the localization of the N- and the C-terminal regions of ATM. In the dimeric structure, the actives sites are buried, restricting the access of the substrates to these sites. The unanticipated domain organization of ATM provides a basis for understanding its mechanism of inhibition. PMID:27097373

  18. Crystal structure of human nicotinamide riboside kinase.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed A; Xiang, Song; Tong, Liang

    2007-08-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD(+) as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 A resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 A resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel beta sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations. PMID:17698003

  19. Crystal Structure of Human Nicotinamide Riboside Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Khan,J.; Xiang, S.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel {beta} sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations.

  20. Regulation of Axonal Transport by Protein Kinases.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Katherine L; Greensmith, Linda; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2015-10-01

    The intracellular transport of organelles, proteins, lipids, and RNA along the axon is essential for neuronal function and survival. This process, called axonal transport, is mediated by two classes of ATP-dependent motors, kinesins, and cytoplasmic dynein, which carry their cargoes along microtubule tracks. Protein kinases regulate axonal transport through direct phosphorylation of motors, adapter proteins, and cargoes, and indirectly through modification of the microtubule network. The misregulation of axonal transport by protein kinases has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several nervous system disorders. Here, we review the role of protein kinases acting directly on axonal transport and discuss how their deregulation affects neuronal function, paving the way for the exploitation of these enzymes as novel drug targets. PMID:26410600

  1. Pharmacological inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Knockaert, Marie; Greengard, Paul; Meijer, Laurent

    2002-09-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate the cell division cycle, apoptosis, transcription and differentiation in addition to functions in the nervous system. Deregulation of CDKs in various diseases has stimulated an intensive search for selective pharmacological inhibitors of these kinases. More than 50 inhibitors have been identified, among which >20 have been co-crystallized with CDK2. These inhibitors all target the ATP-binding pocket of the catalytic site of the kinase. The actual selectivity of most known CDK inhibitors, and thus the underlying mechanism of their cellular effects, is poorly known. Pharmacological inhibitors of CDKs are currently being evaluated for therapeutic use against cancer, alopecia, neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke), cardiovascular disorders (e.g. atherosclerosis and restenosis), glomerulonephritis, viral infections (e.g. HCMV, HIV and HSV) and parasitic protozoa (Plasmodium sp. and Leishmania sp.). PMID:12237154

  2. Kinase signaling in the spindle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jungseog; Yu, Hongtao

    2009-06-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a cell cycle surveillance system that ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation. In mitosis, it elicits the "wait anaphase" signal to inhibit the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome until all chromosomes achieve bipolar microtubule attachment and align at the metaphase plate. Because a single kinetochore unattached to microtubules activates the checkpoint, the wait anaphase signal is thought to be generated by this kinetochore and is then amplified and distributed throughout the cell to inhibit the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. Several spindle checkpoint kinases participate in the generation and amplification of this signal. Recent studies have begun to reveal the activation mechanisms of these checkpoint kinases. Increasing evidence also indicates that the checkpoint kinases not only help to generate the wait anaphase signal but also actively correct kinetochore-microtubule attachment defects. PMID:19228686

  3. X-Ray Crystal Structure of Bone Marrow Kinase in the X Chromosome: A Tec Family Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Muckelbauer, Jodi; Sack, John S.; Ahmed, Nazia; Burke, James; Chang, ChiehYing Y.; Gao, Mian; Tino, Joseph; Xie, Dianlin; Tebben, Andrew J.

    2012-06-27

    Bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome, a member of the Tec family of tyrosine kinases, plays a role in both monocyte/macrophage trafficking as well as cytokine secretion. Although the structures of Tec family kinases Bruton's tyrosine kinase and IL-2-inducible T-cell kinase are known, the crystal structures of other Tec family kinases have remained elusive. We report the X-ray crystal structures of bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome in complex with dasatinib at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution and PP2 at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. The bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome structures reveal a typical kinase protein fold; with well-ordered protein conformation that includes an open/extended activation loop and a stabilized DFG-motif rendering the kinase in an inactive conformation. Dasatinib and PP2 bind to bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome in the ATP binding pocket and display similar binding modes to that observed in other Tec and Src protein kinases. The bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome structures identify conformational elements of the DFG-motif that could potentially be utilized to design potent and/or selective bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome inhibitors.

  4. Phosphorylation of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein gpI by mammalian casein kinase II and casein kinase I

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, C.; Jackson, W. ); Traugh, J.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein gpI is the predominant viral glycoprotein within the plasma membranes of infected cells. This viral glycoprotein is phosphorylated on its polypeptide backbone during biosynthesis. In this report, the authors investigated the protein kinases which participate in the phosphorylation events. Under in vivo conditions, VZV gpI was phosphorylated on its serine and threonine residues by protein kinases present within lysates of either VZV-infected or uninfected cells. Because this activity was diminished by heparin, a known inhibitor of casein kinase II, isolated gpI was incubated with purified casein kinase II and shown to be phosphorylated in an in vitro assay containing ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. The same glycoprotein was phosphorylated when ({sup 32}P)GTP was substituted for ({sup 32}P)ATP in the protein kinase assay. They also tested whether VZV gpI was phosphorylated by two other ubiquitous mammalian protein kinases--casein kinase I and cyclic AMP-dependent kinase--and found that only casein kinase I modified gpI. When the predicted 623-amino-acid sequence of gpI was examined, two phosphorylation sites known to be optimal for casein kinase II were observed. In summary, this study showed that VZV gpI was phosphorylated by each of two mammalian protein kinases (casein kinase I and casein kinase II) and that potential serine-threonine phosphorylation sites for each of these two kinases were present in the viral glycoprotein.

  5. Phosphorylation of the Kinase Interaction Motif in Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Phosphatase-4 Mediates Cross-talk between Protein Kinase A and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Robin J.; Delavaine, Laurent; Cejudo-Marín, Rocío; Stewart, Graeme; Staples, Christopher J.; Didmon, Mark P.; Trinidad, Antonio Garcia; Alonso, Andrés; Pulido, Rafael; Keyse, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    MAP kinase phosphatase 4 (DUSP9/MKP-4) plays an essential role during placental development and is one of a subfamily of three closely related cytoplasmic dual-specificity MAPK phosphatases, which includes the ERK-specific enzymes DUSP6/MKP-3 and DUSP7/MKP-X. However, unlike DUSP6/MKP-3, DUSP9/MKP-4 also inactivates the p38α MAP kinase both in vitro and in vivo. Here we demonstrate that inactivation of both ERK1/2 and p38α by DUSP9/MKP-4 is mediated by a conserved arginine-rich kinase interaction motif located within the amino-terminal non-catalytic domain of the protein. Furthermore, DUSP9/MKP-4 is unique among these cytoplasmic MKPs in containing a conserved PKA consensus phosphorylation site 55RRXSer-58 immediately adjacent to the kinase interaction motif. DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 by PKA in vitro, and phosphorylation abrogates the binding of DUSP9/MKP-4 to both ERK2 and p38α MAP kinases. In addition, although mutation of Ser-58 to either alanine or glutamic acid does not affect the intrinsic catalytic activity of DUSP9/MKP-4, phospho-mimetic (Ser-58 to Glu) substitution inhibits both the interaction of DUSP9/MKP-4 with ERK2 and p38α in vivo and its ability to dephosphorylate and inactivate these MAP kinases. Finally, the use of a phospho-specific antibody demonstrates that endogenous DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 in response to the PKA agonist forskolin and is also modified in placental tissue. We conclude that DUSP9/MKP-4 is a bona fide target of PKA signaling and that attenuation of DUSP9/MKP-4 function can mediate cross-talk between the PKA pathway and MAPK signaling through both ERK1/2 and p38α in vivo. PMID:21908610

  6. Selectivity of docking sites in MAPK kinases.

    PubMed

    Bardwell, A Jane; Frankson, Erlynn; Bardwell, Lee

    2009-05-01

    Protein kinases often recognize their substrates and regulators through docking interactions that occur outside of the active site; these interactions can help us to understand kinase networks, and to target kinases with drugs. During mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, the ability of MAPK kinases (MKKs, or MEKs) to recognize their cognate MAPKs is facilitated by a short docking motif (the D-site) in the MKK N terminus, which binds to a complementary region on the MAPK. MAPKs then recognize many of their targets using the same strategy, because many MAPK substrates also contain D-sites. The extent to which docking contributes to the specificity of MAPK transactions is incompletely understood. Here we characterize the selectivity of the interaction between MKK-derived D-sites and MAPKs by measuring the ability of D-site peptides to inhibit MAPK-mediated phosphorylation of D-site-containing substrates. We find that all MKK D-sites bind better to their cognate MAPKs than they do to non-cognate MAPKs. For instance, the MKK3 D-site peptide, which is a remarkably potent inhibitor of p38alpha (IC(50) < 10 nm), does not inhibit JNK1 or JNK2. Likewise, MAPKs generally bind as well or better to cognate D-sites than to non-cognate D-sites. For instance, JNK1 and JNK2 do not appreciably bind to any D-sites other than their cognate D-sites from MKK4 and MKK7. In general, cognate, within-pathway interactions are preferred about an order of magnitude over non-cognate interactions. However, the selectivity of MAPKs and their cognate MKK-derived D-sites for each other is limited in some cases; in particular, ERK2 is not very selective. We conclude that MAPK-docking sites in MAPK kinases bind selectively to their cognate MAPKs. PMID:19196711

  7. Cell signaling by receptor-tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lemmon, Mark A.; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Recent structural studies of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) have revealed unexpected diversity in the mechanisms of their activation by growth factor ligands. Strategies for inducing dimerization by ligand binding are surprisingly diverse, as are mechanisms that couple this event to activation of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domains. As our understanding of these details becomes increasingly sophisticated, it provides an important context for therapeutically countering the effects of pathogenic RTK mutations in cancer and other diseases. Much remains to be learned, however, about the complex signaling networks downstream from RTKs and how alterations in these networks are translated into cellular responses. PMID:20602996

  8. Identification and characterization of plant Haspin kinase as a histone H3 threonine kinase

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Haspin kinases are mitotic kinases that are well-conserved from yeast to human. Human Haspin is a histone H3 Thr3 kinase that has important roles in chromosome cohesion during mitosis. Moreover, phosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3 by Haspin in fission yeast, Xenopus, and human is required for accumulation of Aurora B on the centromere, and the subsequent activation of Aurora B kinase activity for accurate chromosome alignment and segregation. Although extensive analyses of Haspin have been carried out in yeast and animals, the function of Haspin in organogenesis remains unclear. Results Here, we identified a Haspin kinase, designated AtHaspin, in Arabidopsis thaliana. The purified AtHaspin phosphorylated histone H3 at both Thr3 and Thr11 in vitro. Live imaging of AtHaspin-tdTomato and GFP-α-tubulin in BY-2 cells showed that AtHaspin-tdTomato localized on chromosomes during prometaphase and metaphase, and around the cell plate during cytokinesis. This localization of AtHaspin overlapped with that of phosphorylated Thr3 and Thr11 of histone H3 in BY-2 cells. AtHaspin-GFP driven by the native promoter was expressed in root meristems, shoot meristems, floral meristems, and throughout the whole embryo at stages of high cell division. Overexpression of a kinase domain mutant of AtHaspin decreased the size of the root meristem, which delayed root growth. Conclusions Our results indicated that the Haspin kinase is a histone H3 threonine kinase in A. thaliana. AtHaspin phosphorylated histone H3 at both Thr3 and Thr11 in vitro. The expression and dominant-negative analysis showed that AtHaspin may have a role in mitotic cell division during plant growth. Further analysis of coordinated mechanisms involving Haspin and Aurora kinases will shed new light on the regulation of chromosome segregation in cell division during plant growth and development. PMID:21527018

  9. Purification and characterization of a casein kinase 2-type protein kinase from pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Almost all the polyamine-stimulated protein kinase activity associated with the chromatin fraction of nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.35 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified over 2000-fold by salt fractionation and anion-exchange and casein-agarose column chromatography, after which it is more than 90% pure. The purified kinase has a specific activity of about 650 nanomoles per minute per milligram protein in the absence of polyamines, with either ATP or GTP as phosphoryl donor. Spermidine can stimulate its activity fourfold, with half-maximal activation at about 2 millimolar. Spermine and putrescine also stimulate activity, although somewhat less effectively. This kinase has a tetrameric alpha 2 beta 2 structure with a native molecular weight of 130,000, and subunit molecular weights of 36,000 for the catalytic subunit (alpha) and 29,000 for the regulatory subunit (beta). In western blot analyses, only the alpha subunit reacts strongly with polyclonal antibodies to a Drosophila casein kinase II. The pea kinase can use casein and phosvitin as artificial substrates, phosphorylating both the serine and threonine residues of casein. It has a pH optimum near 8.0, a Vmax of 1.5 micromoles per minute per milligram protein, and a Km for ATP of approximately 75 micromolar. Its activity can be almost completely inhibited by heparin at 5 micrograms per milliliter, but is relatively insensitive to concentrations of staurosporine, K252a, and chlorpromazine that strongly antagonize Ca(2+) -regulated protein kinases. These results are discussed in relation to recent findings that casein kinase 2-type kinases may phosphorylate trans-acting factors that bind to light-regulated promoters in plants.

  10. Role of Protein Kinase C, PI3-kinase and Tyrosine Kinase in Activation of MAP Kinase by Glucose and Agonists of G-protein Coupled Receptors in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Böcker, Dietmar

    2001-01-01

    MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase (also called Erk 1/2) plays a crucial role in cell proliferation and differentiation. Its impact on secretory events is less well established. The interplay of protein kinase C (PKC), PI3-kinase nd cellular tyrosine kinase with MAP kinase activity using inhibitors and compounds such as glucose, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and agonists of G-protein coupled receptors like gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), oxytocin (OT) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) was investigated in INS-1 cells, an insulin secreting cell line. MAP kinase activity was determined by using a peptide derived from the EGF receptor as a MAP kinase substrate and [ P 32 ]ATP. Glucose as well as GRP, OT and GIP exhibited a time-dependent increase in MAP kinase activity with a maximum at time point 2.5 min. All further experiments were performed using 2.5 min incubations. The flavone PD 098059 is known to bind to the inactive forms of MEK1 (MAPK/ERK-Kinase) thus preventing activation by upstream activators. 20 μM PD 098059 ( IC 50 =51 μM) inhibited MAP kinase stimulated by either glucose, GRP, OT, GIP or PMA. Inhibiton (“downregulation”) of PKC by a long term (22h) pretreatment with 1 μM PMA did not influence MAP kinase activity when augmented by either of the above mentioned compound. To investigate whether PI3-kinase and cellular tyrosine kinase are involved in G-protein mediated effects on MAP kinase, inhibitors were used: 100 nM wortmannin (PI3-kinase inhibitor) reduced the effects of GRP, OT and GIP but not that of PMA; 100 μM genistein (tyrosine kinase inhibitor) inhibited the stimulatory effect of either above mentioned compound on MAP kinase activation. Inhibition of MAP kinase by 20 μM PD 098059 did not influence insulin secretion modulated by either compound (glucose, GRP, OT or GIP). [ H 3 ]Thymidine incorporation, however, was severely inhibited by PD 098059. Thus MAP kinase is important for INS-1 cell proliferation but

  11. Designing novel kinases using evolutionary sequence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mody, Areez; Weiner, Joan; Iyer, Lakshman; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2006-03-01

    Cellular pathways with new functions are thought to arise from the duplication and divergence of proteins in existing pathways. The MAP kinase pathways in eukaryotes provide one example of this. These pathways consist of the MAP kinase proteins which are responsible for evoking the correct response to external stimuli. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae these pathways detect pheromones, osmolar stresses and nutrient levels, leading the cell into dramatic changes of morphology. Despite being homologous to each other, the MAP kinase proteins show specificity of function. We investigate the nature of the amino acid sequences conferring this specificity. To this end, we i) search the sequences of similar proteins in other Eukaryote species, ii) make a study of simple theoretical models exploring the constraints felt by these protein segments and iii) experimentally construct, a large suite of hybrid proteins made of segments taken from the homologous proteins. These are then expressed in Yeast cells to see what function they are able to perform. Particularly we also ask whether it is possible to design a new kinase protein possessing new function and specificity.

  12. Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) suppresses osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Ebina, Kosuke; Shi, Kenrin; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-09-01

    The Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases has been shown to play a key role in inflammation and bone destruction. Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been the most widely studied because of its critical role in B cells. Furthermore, recent evidence has demonstrated that blocking Btk signaling is effective in ameliorating lymphoma progression and experimental arthritis. The role of Btk in osteoblastic differentiation has not been well elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated the role of Btk in osteoblastic differentiation and investigated the effects of a Btk inhibitor on osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells, primary calvarial osteoblasts, and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. Btk expression was detected in all three cell lines. Btk inhibition stimulated mRNA expression of osteoblastic markers (alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and osterix) and promoted mineralization of the extracellular matrix. In addition, Btk knockdown caused increased mRNA expression of osteoblastic markers. Furthermore, Btk inhibition suppressed the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), and protein kinase Cα (PKCα). Our results indicate that Btk may regulate osteoblastic differentiation through the MAPK, NFκB, and PKCα signaling pathways. PMID:25230818

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    PRISIC, SLADJANA; HUSSON, ROBERT N.

    2014-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 serine/threonine protein kinases (STPKs). A similar number of two-component systems are also present, indicating that these two signal transduction mechanisms are both important in the adaptation of this bacterial pathogen to its environment. The M. tuberculosis phosphoproteome includes hundreds of Ser- and Thr-phosphorylated proteins that participate in all aspects of M. tuberculosis biology, supporting a critical role for the STPKs in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. Nine of the STPKs are receptor type kinases, with an extracytoplasmic sensor domain and an intracellular kinase domain, indicating that these kinases transduce external signals. Two other STPKs are cytoplasmic and have regulatory domains that sense changes within the cell. Structural analysis of some of the STPKs has led to advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which these STPKs are activated and regulated. Functional analysis has provided insights into the effects of phosphorylation on the activity of several proteins, but for most phosphoproteins the role of phosphorylation in regulating function is unknown. Major future challenges include characterizing the functional effects of phosphorylation for this large number of phosphoproteins, identifying the cognate STPKs for these phosphoproteins, and determining the signals that the STPKs sense. Ultimately, combining these STPK-regulated processes into larger, integrated regulatory networks will provide deeper insight into M. tuberculosis adaptive mechanisms that contribute to tuberculosis pathogenesis. Finally, the STPKs offer attractive targets for inhibitor development that may lead to new therapies for drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:25429354

  14. Pink1, the first ubiquitin kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xinde; Hunter, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Pink1 and Parkin, identified through studies of hereditary early onset Parkinson's disease, are involved in mitochondria quality control. Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity is activated by Pink1 kinase activity, although the mechanism is still elusive. Three recent reports uncover a surprising mechanism in which Pink1 directly phosphorylates ubiquitin to boost Parkin activity. PMID:24942162

  15. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency is a genetic disorder that affects the body's ability to break down the simple sugar glucose, which is the primary energy source for most cells. Researchers have described two major ...

  16. Phosphotyrosine enrichment identifies focal adhesion kinase and other tyrosine kinases for targeting in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Marley, K; Maier, C S; Helfand, S C

    2012-09-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is an endothelial cell malignancy driven, in part, by activating mutations in receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases. Proteomics, Western blots and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor were used to elucidate activating mechanisms in HSA cell lines. Phosphotyrosine peptides from focal adhesion kinase (FAK) STAT3, Lyn, Fyn and other signal transduction kinases were identified by mass spectrometry. FAK was constitutively activated at tyrosine 397, the autophosphorylation site, and this was reversible with high concentrations of a FAK inhibitor. FAK inhibitor-14 suppressed migration and phosphorylation of FAK tyrosine 397 and tyrosines 576/577 and was cytotoxic to HSA cells suggesting FAK signalling may be an important contributor to canine HSA survival. PMID:22487216

  17. The crystal structure of choline kinase reveals a eukaryotic protein kinase fold

    SciTech Connect

    Peisach, D.; Gee, P.; Kent, K.; Xu, Z.

    2010-03-08

    Choline kinase catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of choline, the first committed step in the CDP-choline pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. The 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of a choline kinase from C. elegans (CKA-2) reveals that the enzyme is a homodimeric protein with each monomer organized into a two-domain fold. The structure is remarkably similar to those of protein kinases and aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, despite no significant similarity in amino acid sequence. Comparisons to the structures of other kinases suggest that ATP binds to CKA-2 in a pocket formed by highly conserved and catalytically important residues. In addition, a choline binding site is proposed to be near the ATP binding pocket and formed by several structurally flexible loops.

  18. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 Is Required for Regulation during Dark-Light Transition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Horim

    2015-07-01

    Plant growth and development are coordinately orchestrated by environmental cues and phytohormones. Light acts as a key environmental factor for fundamental plant growth and physiology through photosensory phytochromes and underlying molecular mechanisms. Although phytochromes are known to possess serine/threonine protein kinase activities, whether they trigger a signal transduction pathway via an intracellular protein kinase network remains unknown. In analyses of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK, also called MKK) mutants, the mkk3 mutant has shown both a hypersensitive response in plant hormone gibberellin (GA) and a less sensitive response in red light signaling. Surprisingly, light-induced MAPK activation in wild-type (WT) seedlings and constitutive MAPK phosphorylation in dark-grown mkk3 mutant seedlings have also been found, respectively. Therefore, this study suggests that MKK3 acts in negative regulation in darkness and in light-induced MAPK activation during dark-light transition. PMID:26082029

  19. A new autoinhibited kinase conformation reveals a salt-bridge switch in kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qiang; Yang, Shaoyuan; Li, Dan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zheng, Jimin; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    In the structure of autoinhibited EphA2 tyrosine kinase reported herein, we have captured the entire activation segment, revealing a previously unknown role of the conserved Arg762 in kinase autoinhibition by interacting with the essential Mg2+-chelating Asp757. While it is well known that this Arg residue is involved in an electrostatic interaction with the phospho-residue of the activation loop to stabilize the active conformation, our structure determination revealed a new role for the Arg, acting as a switch between the autoinhibited and activated conformations. Mutation of Arg762 to Ala in EphA2 sensitized Mg2+ response, resulting in enhanced kinase catalytic activity and Mg2+ cooperativity. Furthermore, mutation of the corresponding Arg/Lys to Ala in PKA and p38MAPK also exhibited similar behavior. This new salt bridge-mediated switch may thus be an important mechanism of activation on a broader scope for kinases which utilize autophosphorylation. PMID:27324091

  20. Crystal Structure of the Protein Kinase Domain of Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Snf1

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph,M.; Amodeo, G.; Bai, Y.; Tong, L.

    2005-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master metabolic regulator, and is an important target for drug development against diabetes, obesity, and other diseases. AMPK is a hetero-trimeric enzyme, with a catalytic ({alpha}) subunit, and two regulatory ({beta} and {gamma}) subunits. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.2 Angstrom resolution of the protein kinase domain (KD) of the catalytic subunit of yeast AMPK (commonly known as SNF1). The Snf1-KD structure shares strong similarity to other protein kinases, with a small N-terminal lobe and a large C-terminal lobe. Two negative surface patches in the structure may be important for the recognition of the substrates of this kinase.

  1. Unraveling Kinase Activation Dynamics Using Kinase-Substrate Relationships from Temporal Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Rima; Yang, Pengyi; Vafaee, Fatemeh; Fazakerley, Daniel; Humphrey, Sean; James, David; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2016-01-01

    In response to stimuli, biological processes are tightly controlled by dynamic cellular signaling mechanisms. Reversible protein phosphorylation occurs on rapid time-scales (milliseconds to seconds), making it an ideal carrier of these signals. Advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have led to the identification of many tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites, yet for the majority of these the kinase is unknown and the underlying network topology of signaling networks therefore remains obscured. Identifying kinase substrate relationships (KSRs) is therefore an important goal in cell signaling research. Existing consensus sequence motif based prediction algorithms do not consider the biological context of KSRs, and are therefore insensitive to many other mechanisms guiding kinase-substrate recognition in cellular contexts. Here, we use temporal information to identify biologically relevant KSRs from Large-scale In Vivo Experiments (KSR-LIVE) in a data-dependent and automated fashion. First, we used available phosphorylation databases to construct a repository of existing experimentally-predicted KSRs. For each kinase in this database, we used time-resolved phosphoproteomics data to examine how its substrates changed in phosphorylation over time. Although substrates for a particular kinase clustered together, they often exhibited a different temporal pattern to the phosphorylation of the kinase. Therefore, although phosphorylation regulates kinase activity, our findings imply that substrate phosphorylation likely serve as a better proxy for kinase activity than kinase phosphorylation. KSR-LIVE can thereby infer which kinases are regulated within a biological context. Moreover, KSR-LIVE can also be used to automatically generate positive training sets for the subsequent prediction of novel KSRs using machine learning approaches. We demonstrate that this approach can distinguish between Akt and Rps6kb1, two kinases that share the same linear consensus motif

  2. Unraveling Kinase Activation Dynamics Using Kinase-Substrate Relationships from Temporal Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Studies.

    PubMed

    Domanova, Westa; Krycer, James; Chaudhuri, Rima; Yang, Pengyi; Vafaee, Fatemeh; Fazakerley, Daniel; Humphrey, Sean; James, David; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2016-01-01

    In response to stimuli, biological processes are tightly controlled by dynamic cellular signaling mechanisms. Reversible protein phosphorylation occurs on rapid time-scales (milliseconds to seconds), making it an ideal carrier of these signals. Advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have led to the identification of many tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites, yet for the majority of these the kinase is unknown and the underlying network topology of signaling networks therefore remains obscured. Identifying kinase substrate relationships (KSRs) is therefore an important goal in cell signaling research. Existing consensus sequence motif based prediction algorithms do not consider the biological context of KSRs, and are therefore insensitive to many other mechanisms guiding kinase-substrate recognition in cellular contexts. Here, we use temporal information to identify biologically relevant KSRs from Large-scale In Vivo Experiments (KSR-LIVE) in a data-dependent and automated fashion. First, we used available phosphorylation databases to construct a repository of existing experimentally-predicted KSRs. For each kinase in this database, we used time-resolved phosphoproteomics data to examine how its substrates changed in phosphorylation over time. Although substrates for a particular kinase clustered together, they often exhibited a different temporal pattern to the phosphorylation of the kinase. Therefore, although phosphorylation regulates kinase activity, our findings imply that substrate phosphorylation likely serve as a better proxy for kinase activity than kinase phosphorylation. KSR-LIVE can thereby infer which kinases are regulated within a biological context. Moreover, KSR-LIVE can also be used to automatically generate positive training sets for the subsequent prediction of novel KSRs using machine learning approaches. We demonstrate that this approach can distinguish between Akt and Rps6kb1, two kinases that share the same linear consensus motif

  3. Mnk kinase pathway: Cellular functions and biological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sonali; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2014-08-26

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) interacting protein kinases 1 and 2 (Mnk1 and Mnk2) play important roles in controlling signals involved in mRNA translation. In addition to the MAPKs (p38 or Erk), multiple studies suggest that the Mnk kinases can be regulated by other known kinases such as Pak2 and/or other unidentified kinases by phosphorylation of residues distinct from the sites phosphorylated by the MAPKs. Several studies have established multiple Mnk protein targets, including PSF, heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1, Sprouty 2 and have lead to the identification of distinct biological functions and substrate specificity for the Mnk kinases. In this review we discuss the pathways regulating the Mnk kinases, their known substrates as well as the functional consequences of engagement of pathways controlled by Mnk kinases. These kinases play an important role in mRNA translation via their regulation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and their functions have important implications in tumor biology as well as the regulation of drug resistance to anti-oncogenic therapies. Other studies have identified a role for the Mnk kinases in cap-independent mRNA translation, suggesting that the Mnk kinases can exert important functional effects independently of the phosphorylation of eIF4E. The role of Mnk kinases in inflammation and inflammation-induced malignancies is also discussed. PMID:25225600

  4. The Roles of Protein Kinases in Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giese, Karl Peter; Mizuno, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, more than 250 protein kinases are expressed, but only a few of these kinases are currently known to enable learning and memory. Based on this information it appears that learning and memory-related kinases either impact on synaptic transmission by altering ion channel properties or ion channel density, or regulate…

  5. Problem-Solving Test: "In Vitro" Protein Kinase A Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins by protein kinases is an important mechanism in the regulation of protein activity. Among hundreds of protein kinases present in human cells, PKA, the first kinase discovered, belongs to the most important and best characterized group of these enzymes. The author presents an experiment that analyzes the "in vitro"…

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades in Vitis vinifera

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important mechanisms to control cellular functions in response to external and endogenous signals. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are universal signaling molecules in eukaryotes that mediate the intracellular transmission of extracellular signals resulting in the induction of appropriate cellular responses. MAPK cascades are composed of four protein kinase modules: MAPKKK kinases (MAPKKKKs), MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs), MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), and MAPKs. In plants, MAPKs are activated in response to abiotic stresses, wounding, and hormones, and during plant pathogen interactions and cell division. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of MAPK cascades genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with MAPK, MAPK kinases, MAPK kinase kinases and MAPK kinase kinase kinase kinase members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we revealed the existence of 14 MAPKs, 5 MAPKKs, 62 MAPKKKs, and 7 MAPKKKKs in Vitis vinifera. We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative MAPKs in different species, and ESTs corresponding to members of MAPK cascades in various tissues. This work represents the first complete inventory of MAPK cascades in V. vinifera and could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these proteins in V. vinifera. PMID:26257761

  7. Identification of Protein Kinase Substrates by the Kinase-Interacting Substrate Screening (KISS) Approach.

    PubMed

    Amano, Mutsuki; Nishioka, Tomoki; Yura, Yoshimitsu; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the substrates of protein kinases to understand their modes of action has been undertaken by various approaches and remains an ongoing challenge. Phosphoproteomic technologies have accelerated the accumulation of data concerning protein phosphorylation and have uncovered vast numbers of phosphorylation sites in vivo. In this unit, a novel in vitro screening approach for protein kinase substrates is presented, based on protein-protein interaction and mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic technology. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27580705

  8. Protein kinase CK2 and protein kinase D are associated with the COP9 signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Uhle, Stefan; Medalia, Ohad; Waldron, Richard; Dumdey, Renate; Henklein, Peter; Bech-Otschir, Dawadschargal; Huang, Xiaohua; Berse, Matthias; Sperling, Joseph; Schade, Rüdiger; Dubiel, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) purified from human erythrocytes possesses kinase activity that phosphoryl ates proteins such as c-Jun and p53 with consequence for their ubiquitin (Ub)-dependent degradation. Here we show that protein kinase CK2 (CK2) and protein kinase D (PKD) co-purify with CSN. Immunoprecipi tation and far-western blots reveal that CK2 and PKD are in fact associated with CSN. As indicated by electron microscopy with gold-labeled ATP, at least 10% of CSN particles are associated with kinases. Kinase activity, most likely due to CK2 and PKD, co-immuno precipitates with CSN from HeLa cells. CK2 binds to ΔCSN3(111–403) and CSN7, whereas PKD interacts with full-length CSN3. CK2 phosphorylates CSN2 and CSN7, and PKD modifies CSN7. Both CK2 and PKD phosphorylate c-Jun as well as p53. CK2 phosphoryl ates Thr155, which targets p53 to degradation by the Ub system. Curcumin, emodin, DRB and resveratrol block CSN-associated kinases and induce degradation of c-Jun in HeLa cells. Curcumin treatment results in elevated amounts of c-Jun–Ub conjugates. We conclude that CK2 and PKD are recruited by CSN in order to regulate Ub conjugate formation. PMID:12628923

  9. Kinases and kinase signaling pathways: potential therapeutic targets in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Pan, Jing; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2012-08-01

    Complex molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) are gradually being elucidated. Accumulating genetic evidence implicates dysfunction of kinase activities and phosphorylation pathways in the pathogenesis of PD. Causative and risk gene products associated with PD include protein kinases (such as PINK1, LRRK2 and GAK) and proteins related phosphorylation signaling pathways (such as SNCA, DJ-1). PINK1, LRRK2 and several PD gene products have been associated with mitogen-activated protein (MAP) and protein kinase B (AKT) kinase signaling pathways. C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and p38, signaling pathways downstream of MAP, are particularly important in PD. JNK and p38 play an integral role in neuronal death. Targeting JNK or p38 signaling may offer an effective therapy for PD. Inhibitors of the ERK signaling pathway, which plays an important role in the development of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID), have been shown to attenuate this condition in animal models. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence gathered over the last decade on the role of PINK1, LRRK2 and GAK and their related phosphorylation signaling pathways (JNK, ERK, p38 and PI3K/AKT) in PD. It is speculated that improvement or modulation of these signaling pathways will reveal potential therapeutic targets for attenuation of the cardinal symptoms and motor complications in patients with PD in the future. PMID:22709943

  10. Comprehensive kinase profile of pacritinib, a nonmyelosuppressive Janus kinase 2 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Jack W; Al-Fayoumi, Suliman; Ma, Haiching; Komrokji, Rami S; Mesa, Ruben; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2016-01-01

    Pacritinib, potent inhibitor of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), JAK2V617F, and fms-like receptor tyrosine kinase 3, is in Phase III development in myelofibrosis. Among type 1 inhibitors, pacritinib shows a lack of myelosuppression at doses that both inhibit JAK2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway and demonstrate clinical efficacy. To elucidate these mechanisms and identify other disease targets, a kinome analysis screened 439 recombinant kinases at 100 nM pacritinib concentration. For kinases with >50% inhibition, pacritinib was titrated from 1 to 100 nM. JAK2, JAK2V617F, FLT3, colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor, and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 achieved half-maximal inhibitory concentrations <50 nM. Pacritinib did not inhibit JAK1 (82% control at 100 nM). Lack of myelosuppression may stem from inhibiting JAK2 without affecting JAK1 and reducing hematopoietic inhibitory cytokines by suppressing interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 or colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor. The pacritinib kinome suggests therapeutic utility in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, solid tumors, and inflammatory conditions. PMID:27574472

  11. Comprehensive kinase profile of pacritinib, a nonmyelosuppressive Janus kinase 2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Singer, Jack W; Al-Fayoumi, Suliman; Ma, Haiching; Komrokji, Rami S; Mesa, Ruben; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2016-01-01

    Pacritinib, potent inhibitor of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), JAK2V617F, and fms-like receptor tyrosine kinase 3, is in Phase III development in myelofibrosis. Among type 1 inhibitors, pacritinib shows a lack of myelosuppression at doses that both inhibit JAK2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway and demonstrate clinical efficacy. To elucidate these mechanisms and identify other disease targets, a kinome analysis screened 439 recombinant kinases at 100 nM pacritinib concentration. For kinases with >50% inhibition, pacritinib was titrated from 1 to 100 nM. JAK2, JAK2V617F, FLT3, colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor, and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 achieved half-maximal inhibitory concentrations <50 nM. Pacritinib did not inhibit JAK1 (82% control at 100 nM). Lack of myelosuppression may stem from inhibiting JAK2 without affecting JAK1 and reducing hematopoietic inhibitory cytokines by suppressing interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 or colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor. The pacritinib kinome suggests therapeutic utility in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, solid tumors, and inflammatory conditions. PMID:27574472

  12. A Novel Mode of Protein Kinase Inhibition Exploiting Hydrophobic Motifs of Autoinhibited Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    S Eathiraj; R Palma; M Hirschi; E Volckova; E Nakuci; J Castro; C Chen; T Chan; D France; M Ashwell

    2011-12-31

    Protein kinase inhibitors with enhanced selectivity can be designed by optimizing binding interactions with less conserved inactive conformations because such inhibitors will be less likely to compete with ATP for binding and therefore may be less impacted by high intracellular concentrations of ATP. Analysis of the ATP-binding cleft in a number of inactive protein kinases, particularly in the autoinhibited conformation, led to the identification of a previously undisclosed non-polar region in this cleft. This ATP-incompatible hydrophobic region is distinct from the previously characterized hydrophobic allosteric back pocket, as well as the main pocket. Generalized hypothetical models of inactive kinases were constructed and, for the work described here, we selected the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase family as a case study. Initial optimization of a FGFR2 inhibitor identified from a library of commercial compounds was guided using structural information from the model. We describe the inhibitory characteristics of this compound in biophysical, biochemical, and cell-based assays, and have characterized the binding mode using x-ray crystallographic studies. The results demonstrate, as expected, that these inhibitors prevent activation of the autoinhibited conformation, retain full inhibitory potency in the presence of physiological concentrations of ATP, and have favorable inhibitory activity in cancer cells. Given the widespread regulation of kinases by autoinhibitory mechanisms, the approach described herein provides a new paradigm for the discovery of inhibitors by targeting inactive conformations of protein kinases.

  13. Asymmetric Tyrosine Kinase Arrangements in Activation or Autophosphorylation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    J Bae; J Schlessinger

    2011-12-31

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play important roles in the control of many cellular processes including cell proliferation, cell adhesion, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. Ligand-induced dimerization of RTKs leads to autophosphorylation and activation of RTKs. Structural studies have shown that while isolated ectodomains of several RTKs form symmetric dimers the isolated cytoplasmic kinase domains of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) form asymmetric dimers during their activation. Binding of one kinase molecule of EGFR to a second kinase molecule asymmetrically leads to stimulation of kinase activity and enhanced autophosphorylation. Furthermore, the structures of the kinase domain of FGFR1 and FGFR2 reveal the formation of asymmetric interfaces in the processes of autophosphorylation at their specific phosphotyrosine (pY) sites. Disruption of asymmetric dimer interface of EGFR leads to reduction in enzymatic activity and drastic reduction of autophosphorylation of FGFRs in ligandstimulated live cells. These studies demonstrate that asymmetric dimer formation is as a common phenomenon critical for activation and autophosphorylation of RTKs.

  14. Activation of S6 kinase in human neutrophils by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals: protein kinase C-dependent and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-independent pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Tudan, C; Jackson, J K; Charlton, L; Pelech, S L; Sahl, B; Burt, H M

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) has been shown previously to be a central enzyme in crystal-induced neutrophil activation. Since activation of the 70 kDa S6 kinase (p70S6K) has been shown to be dependent on PI 3-kinase activation in mammalian cells, and since the former is a key enzyme in the transmission of signals to the cell nucleus, activation of p70(S6K) was investigated in crystal-stimulated neutrophils. Cytosolic fractions from calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD)-crystal-activated neutrophils were separated by Mono Q chromatography and analysed for phosphotransferase activity using a range of substrates and probed by Western analysis using antibodies to p70(S6K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase). CPPD crystals induced a robust, transient activation (peak activity at 2 min) of p70(S6K) that was fully inhibited by pretreatment with rapamycin. This is the first report of the activation of p70(S6K) in neutrophil signal transduction pathways induced by an agonist. This crystal-induced activation of p70(S6K) could also be inhibited by a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (Compound 3), but not by the PI 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. CPPD crystals also activated the ERK1 and ERK2 forms of MAP kinase (wortmannin insensitive), PKC (Compound 3 sensitive) and protein kinase B (wortmannin sensitive) in neutrophils. These data suggest that activation of p70(S6K) may proceed through a PI 3-kinase- and protein kinase B-independent but PKC-dependent pathway in crystal-activated neutrophils. PMID:9531494

  15. Evaluation of Kinase Activity Profiling Using Chemical Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ruprecht, Benjamin; Zecha, Jana; Heinzlmeir, Stephanie; Médard, Guillaume; Lemeer, Simone; Kuster, Bernhard

    2015-12-18

    Protein kinases are important mediators of intracellular signaling and are reversibly activated by phosphorylation. Immobilized kinase inhibitors can be used to enrich these often low-abundance proteins, to identify targets of kinase inhibitors, or to probe their selectivity. It has been suggested that the binding of kinases to affinity beads reflects a kinase's activation status, a concept that is under considerable debate. To assess the merits of the idea, we performed a series of experiments including quantitative phosphoproteomics and purification of kinases by single or mixed affinity matrices from signaling activated or resting cancer cells. The data show that mixed affinity beads largely bind kinases independent of their activation status, and experiments using individual immobilized kinase inhibitors show mixed results in terms of preference for binding the active or inactive conformation. Taken together, activity- or conformation-dependent binding to such affinity resins depends (i) on the kinase, (ii) on the affinity probe, and (iii) on the activation status of the lysate or cell. As a result, great caution should be exercised when inferring kinase activity from such binding data. The results also suggest that assaying kinase activity using binding data is restricted to a limited number of well-chosen cases. PMID:26378887

  16. Identification of four plastid-localized protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Richter, Andreas S; Gartmann, Hans; Fechler, Mona; Rödiger, Anja; Baginsky, Sacha; Grimm, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    In chloroplasts, protein phosphorylation regulates important processes, including metabolism, photosynthesis, gene expression, and signaling. Because the hitherto known plastid protein kinases represent only a fraction of existing kinases, we aimed at the identification of novel plastid-localized protein kinases that potentially phosphorylate enzymes of the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TBS) pathway. We screened publicly available databases for proteins annotated as putative protein kinase family proteins with predicted chloroplast localization. Additionally, we analyzed chloroplast fractions which were separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation by mass spectrometry. We identified four new candidates for protein kinases, which were confirmed to be plastid localized by expression of GFP-fusion proteins in tobacco leaves. A phosphorylation assay with the purified kinases confirmed the protein kinase activity for two of them. PMID:27214872

  17. Human UMP-CMP kinase 2, a novel nucleoside monophosphate kinase localized in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunjian; Johansson, Magnus; Karlsson, Anna

    2008-01-18

    Enzyme deficiency in the salvage pathway of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis in mitochondria can cause mtDNA depletion syndromes. We have identified a human mitochondrial UMP-CMP kinase (UMP-CMPK, cytidylate kinase; EC 2.7.4.14), designated as UMP-CMP kinase 2 (UMP-CMPK2). The C-terminal domain of this 449-amino acid protein contains all consensus motifs of a nucleoside monophosphate kinase. Phylogenetic analysis showed that UMP-CMPK2 belonged to a novel nucleoside monophosphate kinase family, which was closer to thymidylate kinase than to cytosolic UMP-CMP kinase. Subcellular localization with green fluorescent protein fusion proteins illustrated that UMP-CMPK2 was localized in the mitochondria of HeLa cells and that the mitochondrial targeting signal was included in the N-terminal 22 amino acids. The enzyme was able to phosphorylate dUMP, dCMP, CMP, and UMP with ATP as phosphate donor, but the kinetic properties were different compared with the cytosolic UMP-CMPK. Its efficacy to convert dUMP was highest, followed by dCMP, whereas CMP and UMP were the poorest substrates. It also phosphorylated the monophosphate forms of the nucleoside analogs ddC, dFdC, araC, BVDU, and FdUrd, which suggests that UMP-CMPK2 may be involved in mtDNA depletion caused by long term treatment with ddC or other pyrimidine analogs. UMP-CMPK2 mRNA expression was exclusively detected in chronic myelogenous leukemia K-562 and lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 among eight studied cancer cell lines. Particular high expression in leukemia cells, dominant expression in bone marrow, and tight correlation with macrophage activation and inflammatory response suggest that UMP-CMPK2 may have other functions in addition to the supply of substrates for mtDNA synthesis. PMID:17999954

  18. The selectivity of protein kinase inhibitors: a further update

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Jenny; Plater, Lorna; Elliott, Matt; Shpiro, Natalia; Hastie, C. James; Mclauchlan, Hilary; Klevernic, Iva; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Alessi, Dario R.; Cohen, Philip

    2007-01-01

    The specificities of 65 compounds reported to be relatively specific inhibitors of protein kinases have been profiled against a panel of 70–80 protein kinases. On the basis of this information, the effects of compounds that we have studied in cells and other data in the literature, we recommend the use of the following small-molecule inhibitors: SB 203580/SB202190 and BIRB 0796 to be used in parallel to assess the physiological roles of p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) isoforms, PI-103 and wortmannin to be used in parallel to inhibit phosphatidylinositol (phosphoinositide) 3-kinases, PP1 or PP2 to be used in parallel with Src-I1 (Src inhibitor-1) to inhibit Src family members; PD 184352 or PD 0325901 to inhibit MKK1 (MAPK kinase-1) or MKK1 plus MKK5, Akt-I-1/2 to inhibit the activation of PKB (protein kinase B/Akt), rapamycin to inhibit TORC1 [mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin)–raptor (regulatory associated protein of mTOR) complex], CT 99021 to inhibit GSK3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3), BI-D1870 and SL0101 or FMK (fluoromethylketone) to be used in parallel to inhibit RSK (ribosomal S6 kinase), D4476 to inhibit CK1 (casein kinase 1), VX680 to inhibit Aurora kinases, and roscovitine as a pan-CDK (cyclin-dependent kinase) inhibitor. We have also identified harmine as a potent and specific inhibitor of DYRK1A (dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylated and -regulated kinase 1A) in vitro. The results have further emphasized the need for considerable caution in using small-molecule inhibitors of protein kinases to assess the physiological roles of these enzymes. Despite being used widely, many of the compounds that we analysed were too non-specific for useful conclusions to be made, other than to exclude the involvement of particular protein kinases in cellular processes. PMID:17850214

  19. WNK Kinases, Renal Ion Transport and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    San-Cristobal, Pedro; de los Heros, Paola; Ponce-Coria, José; Moreno, Erika; Gamba, Gerardo

    2008-01-01

    Two members of a recently discovered family of protein kinases are the cause of an inherited disease known as pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII). These patients exhibit arterial hypertension together with hyperkalemia and metabolic acidosis. This is a mirror image of Gitelman disease that is due to inactivating mutations of the SLC12A3 gene that encodes the thiazide-sensitive Na+: Cl− cotransporter. The uncovered genes causing PHAII encode for serine/threonine kinases known as WNK1 and WNK4. Physiological and biochemical studies have revealed that WNK1 and WNK4 modulate the activity of several transport pathways of the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron, thus increasing our understanding of how diverse renal ion transport proteins are coordinated to regulate normal blood pressure levels. Observations discussed in the present work place WNK1 and WNK4 as genes involved in the genesis of essential hypertension and as potential targets for the development of antihypertensive drugs. PMID:18547946

  20. Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases: Function, structure, and inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Boura, Evzen Nencka, Radim

    2015-10-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases (PI4Ks) synthesize phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P), a key member of the phosphoinositide family. PI4P defines the membranes of Golgi and trans-Golgi network (TGN) and regulates trafficking to and from the Golgi. Humans have two type II PI4Ks (α and β) and two type III enzymes (α and β). Recently, the crystal structures were solved for both type II and type III kinase revealing atomic details of their function. Importantly, the type III PI4Ks are hijacked by +RNA viruses to create so-called membranous web, an extensively phosphorylated and modified membrane system dedicated to their replication. Therefore, selective and potent inhibitors of PI4Ks have been developed as potential antiviral agents. Here we focus on the structure and function of PI4Ks and their potential in human medicine.

  1. The Ror receptor tyrosine kinase family.

    PubMed

    Forrester, W C

    2002-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) participate in numerous developmental decisions. Ror RTKs are a family of orphan receptors that are related to muscle specific kinase (MuSK) and Trk neurotrophin receptors. MuSK assembles acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction, and Trk receptors function in the developing nervous system (reviewed in [3-5]). Rors have been identified in nematodes, insects and mammals. Recent studies have begun to shed light on Ror function during development. In most species, Rors are expressed in many tissue types during development. Analyses of mutants that are defective in the single nematode Ror demonstrate a role in cell migration and in orienting cell polarity. Mice lacking one of the two Ror gene products display defects in bone and heart formation. Similarly, two different human bone development disorders, dominant brachydactyly B and recessive Robinow syndrome, result from mutations in one of the human Ror genes. PMID:11846036

  2. Osmotic stress signaling via protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hiroaki; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2012-10-01

    Plants face various kinds of environmental stresses, including drought, salinity, and low temperature, which cause osmotic stress. An understanding of the plant signaling pathways that respond to osmotic stress is important for both basic biology and agriculture. In this review, we summarize recent investigations concerning the SNF1-related protein kinase (SnRK) 2 kinase family, which play central roles in osmotic stress responses. SnRK2s are activated by osmotic stress, and a mutant lacking SnRK2s is hypersensitive to osmotic stress. Many questions remain about the signaling pathway upstream and downstream of SnRK2s. Because some SnRK2s also functions in the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway, which has recently been well clarified, study of SnRK2s in ABA signaling can provide clues regarding their roles in osmotic stress signaling. PMID:22828864

  3. SUMOylation regulates the SNF1 protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Lavy, Kobi J.; Johnston, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a major stress sensor of mammalian cells. AMPK’s homolog in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the SNF1 protein kinase, is a central regulator of carbon metabolism that inhibits the Snf3/Rgt2-Rgt1 glucose sensing pathway and activates genes involved in respiration. We present evidence that glucose induces modification of the Snf1 catalytic subunt of SNF1 with the small ubiquitin-like modifier protein SUMO, catalyzed by the SUMO (E3) ligase Mms21. Our results suggest that SUMOylation of Snf1 inhibits its function in two ways: by interaction of SUMO attached to lysine 549 with a SUMO-interacting sequence motif located near the active site of Snf1, and by targeting Snf1 for destruction via the Slx5-Slx8 (SUMO-directed) ubiquitin ligase. These findings reveal another way SNF1 function is regulated in response to carbon source. PMID:24108357

  4. Primary structure of maize chloroplast adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Schiltz, E; Burger, S; Grafmüller, R; Deppert, W R; Haehnel, W; Wagner, E

    1994-06-15

    This paper describes the sequence of adenylate kinase (Mg-ATP+AMP<-->Mg-ADP+ADP) from maize chloroplasts. This light-inducible enzyme is important for efficient CO2 fixation in the C4 cycle, by removing and recycling AMP produced in the reversible pyruvate phosphate dikinase reaction. The complete sequence was determined by analyzing peptides from cleavages with trypsin, AspN protease and CNBr and subcleavage of a major CNBr peptide with chymotrypsin. N-terminal Edman degradation and carboxypeptidase digestion established the terminal residues. Electrospray mass spectrometry confirmed the final sequence of 222 residues (M(r) = 24867) including one cysteine and one tryptophan. The sequence shows this enzyme to be a long-variant-type adenylate kinase, the nearest relatives being adenylate kinases from Enterobacteriaceae. Alignment of the sequence with the adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli reveals 44% identical residues. Since the E. coli structure has been published recently at 0.19-nm resolution with the inhibitor adenosine(5')pentaphospho(5')adenosine (Ap5A) [Müller, C. W. & Schulz, G. E. (1992) J. Mol. Biol. 224, 159-177], catalytically essential residues could be compared and were found to be mostly conserved. Surprisingly, in the nucleotide-binding Gly-rich loop Gly-Xaa-Pro-Gly-Xaa-Gly-Lys the middle Gly is replaced by Ala. This is, however, compensated by an Ile-->Val exchange in the nearest spatial neighborhood. A Thr-->Ala exchange explains the unusual tolerance of the enzyme for pyrimidine nucleotides in the acceptor site. PMID:8026505

  5. Approach to asymptomatic creatine kinase elevation

    PubMed Central

    MOGHADAM-KIA, SIAMAK; ODDIS, CHESTER V.; AGGARWAL, ROHIT

    2016-01-01

    How to manage a patient who has an elevated serum creatine kinase (CK) level but no or insignificant muscle-related signs and symptoms is a clinical conundrum. The authors provide a systematic approach, including repeat testing after a period of rest, defining higher thresholds over which pursuing a diagnosis is worthwhile, and evaluating for a variety of nonneuromuscular causes. They also outline a workup for neuromuscular causes. PMID:26760521

  6. Physiological roles of the pantothenate kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dansie, Lorraine E.; Reeves, Stacy; Miller, Karen; Zano, Stephen P.; Frank, Matthew; Pate, Caroline; Wang, Jina; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    CoA (coenzyme A) is an essential cofactor that is involved in many metabolic processes. CoA is derived from pantothenate in five biosynthetic reactions. The CoA biosynthetic pathway is regulated by PanKs (pantothenate kinases) and four active isoforms are expressed in mammals. The critical physiological functions of the PanKs are revealed by systematic deletion of the Pank genes in mice. PMID:25109998

  7. Association of Common Genetic Variants in Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting-Ting; Qiao, Hong; Tong, Hui-Xin; Zhuang, Tian-Wei; Wang, Tong-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Background: A study has identified several novel susceptibility variants of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP4K4) gene for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) within the German population. Among the variants, five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of MAP4K4 (rs1003376, rs11674694, rs2236935, rs2236936, and rs6543087) showed significant association with T2DM or diabetes-related quantitative traits. We aimed to evaluate whether common SNPs in the MAP4K4 gene were associated with T2DM in the Chinese population. Methods: Five candidate SNPs were genotyped in 996 patients newly diagnosed with T2DM and in 976 control subjects, using the SNPscan™ method. All subjects were recruited from the Second Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University from October 2010 to September 2013. We evaluated the T2DM risk conferred by individual SNPs and haplotypes using logistic analysis, and the association between the five SNPs and metabolic traits in the subgroups. Results: Of the five variants, SNP rs2236935T/C was significantly associated with T2DM in this study population (odds ratio = 1.293; 95% confidence interval: 1.034–1.619, P = 0.025). In addition, among the controls, rs1003376 was significantly associated with an increased body mass index (P = 0.045) and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (P = 0.037). Conclusions: MAP4K4 gene is associated with T2DM in a Chinese Han population, and MAP4K4 gene variants may contribute to the risk toward the development of T2DM. PMID:27174326

  8. Molecular Imaging of the ATM Kinase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Terence M.; Nyati, Shyam; Ross, Brian D.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase critical to the cellular DNA-damage response, including from DNA double-strand breaks. ATM activation results in the initiation of a complex cascade of events including DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoint control, and survival. We sought to create a bioluminescent reporter that dynamically and noninvasively measures ATM kinase activity in living cells and subjects. Methods and Materials: Using the split luciferase technology, we constructed a hybrid cDNA, ATM-reporter (ATMR), coding for a protein that quantitatively reports on changes in ATM kinase activity through changes in bioluminescence. Results: Treatment of ATMR-expressing cells with ATM inhibitors resulted in a dose-dependent increase in bioluminescence activity. In contrast, induction of ATM kinase activity upon irradiation resulted in a decrease in reporter activity that correlated with ATM and Chk2 activation by immunoblotting in a time-dependent fashion. Nuclear targeting improved ATMR sensitivity to both ATM inhibitors and radiation, whereas a mutant ATMR (lacking the target phosphorylation site) displayed a muted response. Treatment with ATM inhibitors and small interfering (si)RNA-targeted knockdown of ATM confirm the specificity of the reporter. Using reporter expressing xenografted tumors demonstrated the ability of ATMR to report in ATM activity in mouse models that correlated in a time-dependent fashion with changes in Chk2 activity. Conclusions: We describe the development and validation of a novel, specific, noninvasive bioluminescent reporter that enables monitoring of ATM activity in real time, in vitro and in vivo. Potential applications of this reporter include the identification and development of novel ATM inhibitors or ATM-interacting partners through high-throughput screens and in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies of ATM inhibitors in preclinical models.

  9. Conservation and early expression of zebrafish tyrosine kinases support the utility of zebrafish as a model for tyrosine kinase biology.

    PubMed

    Challa, Anil Kumar; Chatti, Kiranam

    2013-09-01

    Tyrosine kinases have significant roles in cell growth, apoptosis, development, and disease. To explore the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model for tyrosine kinase signaling and to better understand their roles, we have identified all of the tyrosine kinases encoded in the zebrafish genome and quantified RNA expression of selected tyrosine kinases during early development. Using profile hidden Markov model analysis, we identified 122 zebrafish tyrosine kinase genes and proposed unambiguous gene names where needed. We found them to be organized into 39 nonreceptor and 83 receptor type, and 30 families consistent with human tyrosine kinase family assignments. We found five human tyrosine kinase genes (epha1, bmx, fgr, srm, and insrr) with no identifiable zebrafish ortholog, and one zebrafish gene (yrk) with no identifiable human ortholog. We also found that receptor tyrosine kinase genes were duplicated more often than nonreceptor tyrosine kinase genes in zebrafish. We profiled expression levels of 30 tyrosine kinases representing all families using direct digital detection at different stages during the first 24 hours of development. The profiling experiments clearly indicate regulated expression of tyrosine kinases in the zebrafish, suggesting their role during early embryonic development. In summary, our study has resulted in the first comprehensive description of the zebrafish tyrosine kinome. PMID:23234507

  10. Conservation and Early Expression of Zebrafish Tyrosine Kinases Support the Utility of Zebrafish as a Model for Tyrosine Kinase Biology

    PubMed Central

    Challa, Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Tyrosine kinases have significant roles in cell growth, apoptosis, development, and disease. To explore the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model for tyrosine kinase signaling and to better understand their roles, we have identified all of the tyrosine kinases encoded in the zebrafish genome and quantified RNA expression of selected tyrosine kinases during early development. Using profile hidden Markov model analysis, we identified 122 zebrafish tyrosine kinase genes and proposed unambiguous gene names where needed. We found them to be organized into 39 nonreceptor and 83 receptor type, and 30 families consistent with human tyrosine kinase family assignments. We found five human tyrosine kinase genes (epha1, bmx, fgr, srm, and insrr) with no identifiable zebrafish ortholog, and one zebrafish gene (yrk) with no identifiable human ortholog. We also found that receptor tyrosine kinase genes were duplicated more often than nonreceptor tyrosine kinase genes in zebrafish. We profiled expression levels of 30 tyrosine kinases representing all families using direct digital detection at different stages during the first 24 hours of development. The profiling experiments clearly indicate regulated expression of tyrosine kinases in the zebrafish, suggesting their role during early embryonic development. In summary, our study has resulted in the first comprehensive description of the zebrafish tyrosine kinome. PMID:23234507

  11. Diacylglycerol Kinase Inhibition and Vascular Function.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyehun; Allahdadi, Kyan J; Tostes, Rita C A; Webb, R Clinton

    2009-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs), a family of lipid kinases, convert diacylglycerol (DG) to phosphatidic acid (PA). Acting as a second messenger, DG activates protein kinase C (PKC). PA, a signaling lipid, regulates diverse functions involved in physiological responses. Since DGK modulates two lipid second messengers, DG and PA, regulation of DGK could induce related cellular responses. Currently, there are 10 mammalian isoforms of DGK that are categorized into five groups based on their structural features. These diverse isoforms of DGK are considered to activate distinct cellular functions according to extracellular stimuli. Each DGK isoform is thought to play various roles inside the cell, depending on its subcellular localization (nuclear, ER, Golgi complex or cytoplasm). In vascular smooth muscle, vasoconstrictors such as angiotensin II, endothelin-1 and norepinephrine stimulate contraction by increasing inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)), calcium, DG and PKC activity. Inhibition of DGK could increase DG availability and decrease PA levels, as well as alter intracellular responses, including calcium-mediated and PKC-mediated vascular contraction. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate a role of DGK in vascular function. Selective inhibition of DGK isoforms may represent a novel therapeutic approach in vascular dysfunction. PMID:21547002

  12. Protein kinases as drug targets in cancer.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Mehmet Alper; Kutuk, Ozgur; Basaga, Huveyda

    2006-11-01

    Identification of the key roles of protein kinases in signaling pathways leading to development of cancer has caused pharmacological interest to concentrate extensively on targeted therapies as a more specific and effective way for blockade of cancer progression. This review will mainly focus on inhibitors targeting these key components of cellular signaling by employing a technology-based point of view with respect to ATP- and non-ATP-competitive small molecule inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies of selected protein kinases, particularly, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), BCR-ABL, MEK, p38 MAPK, EGFR PDGFR, VEGFR, HER2 and Raf. Inhibitors of the heat shock protein Hsp90 are also included in a separate section, as this protein plays an essential role for the maturation/proper activation of cancer-related protein kinases. In the following review, the molecular details of the mode of action of these inhibitors as well as the emergence of drug resistance encountered in several cases are discussed in light of the structural, molecular and clinical studies conducted so far. PMID:17100568

  13. Creatine kinase in ischemic and inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Kitzenberg, David; Colgan, Sean P; Glover, Louise E

    2016-12-01

    The creatine/phosphocreatine pathway plays a conserved and central role in energy metabolism. Compartmentalization of specific creatine kinase enzymes permits buffering of local high energy phosphates in a thermodynamically favorable manner, enabling both rapid energy storage and energy transfer within the cell. Augmentation of this metabolic pathway by nutritional creatine supplementation has been shown to elicit beneficial effects in a number of diverse pathologies, particularly those that incur tissue ischemia, hypoxia or oxidative stress. In these settings, creatine and phosphocreatine prevent depletion of intracellular ATP and internal acidification, enhance post-ischemic recovery of protein synthesis and promote free radical scavenging and stabilization of cellular membranes. The creatine kinase energy system is itself further regulated by hypoxic signaling, highlighting the existence of endogenous mechanisms in mammals that can enhance creatine metabolism during oxygen deprivation to promote tissue resolution and homeostasis. Here, we review recent insights into the creatine kinase pathway, and provide rationale for dietary creatine supplementation in human ischemic and inflammatory pathologies. PMID:27527620

  14. Phosphatidylinositol kinase activities in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Alba Marina; Gesumaría, María Celeste; Schoijet, Alejandra C; Alonso, Guillermo D; Flawiá, Mirtha M; Racagni, Graciela E; Machado, Estela E

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) metabolism through phosphatidylinositol kinase (PIKs) activities plays a central role in different signaling pathways. In Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, PIKs have been proposed as target for drug design in order to combat this pathogen. In this work, we studied the classes of PI4K, PIPK and PI3K that could participate in signaling pathways in T. cruzi epimastigote forms. For this reason, we analyzed their enzymatic parameters and detailed responses to avowed kinase inhibitors (adenosine, sodium deoxycholate, wortmannin and LY294002) and activators (Ca(2+), phosphatidic acid, spermine and heparin). Our results suggest the presence and activity of a class III PI4K, a class I PIPK, a class III PI3K previously described (TcVps34) and a class I PI3K. Class I PI3K enzyme, here named TcPI3K, was cloned and expressed in a bacterial system, and their product was tested for kinase activity. The possible participation of TcPI3K in central cellular events of the parasite is also discussed. PMID:26493613

  15. Varicella-Zoster Virus Open Reading Frame 66 Protein Kinase and Its Relationship to Alphaherpesvirus US3 Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Erazo, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) open reading frame (ORF) 66 encodes a basophilic kinase orthologous to the US3 protein kinases found in all alphaherpesviruses. This review summarizes current information on the ORF66 kinase, and outlines apparent differences from other US3 kinases, as well as some of the conserved functions. One critical difference is the VZV ORF66 kinase targeting of the major regulatory VZV IE62 protein to control its nuclear import and assembly into the VZV virion, which is so far unprecedented in the alphaherpesviruses. However, ORF66 targets some cellular targets which are also targeted by US3 kinases of other herpesviruses, including the histone deacetylase-1 and 2 proteins, pathways that lead to changes in actin dynamics, and the targeting of substrates of protein kinase A, including the nuclear matrix protein matrin 3. PMID:20186610

  16. Characterization of irreversible kinase inhibitors by directly detecting covalent bond formation: a tool for dissecting kinase drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Klüter, Sabine; Simard, Jeffrey R; Rode, Haridas B; Grütter, Christian; Pawar, Vijaykumar; Raaijmakers, Hans C A; Barf, Tjeerd A; Rabiller, Matthias; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Rauh, Daniel

    2010-12-10

    Targeting protein kinases in cancer therapy with irreversible small-molecule inhibitors is moving to the forefront of kinase-inhibitor research and is thought to be an effective means of overcoming mutation-associated drug resistance in epidermal growth factor receptor kinase (EGFR). We generated a detection technique that allows direct measurements of covalent bond formation without relying on kinase activity, thereby allowing the straightforward investigation of the influence of steric clashes on covalent inhibitors in different resistant kinase mutants. The obtained results are discussed together with structural biology and biochemical studies of catalytic activity in both wild-type and gatekeeper mutated kinase variants to draw conclusions about the impact of steric hindrance and increased catalytic activity in drug-resistant kinase variants. PMID:21080395

  17. Cl- Channels in CF: Lack of Activation by Protein Kinase C and cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Lu, Luo; Zeitlin, Pamela L.; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Huganir, Richard; Guggino, William B.

    1989-06-01

    Secretory chloride channels can be activated by adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase in normal airway epithelial cells but not in cells from individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). In excised, inside-out patches of apical membrane of normal human airway cells and airway cells from three patients with CF, the chloride channels exhibited a characteristic outwardly rectifying current-voltage relation and depolarization-induced activation. Channels from normal tissues were activated by both cAMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C. However, chloride channels from CF patients could not be activated by either kinase. Thus, gating of normal epithelial chloride channels is regulated by both cAMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C, and regulation by both kinases is defective in CF.

  18. Cellular trafficking of the IL-1RI-associated kinase-1 requires intact kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Boel, Gaby-Fleur . E-mail: boel@mail.dife.de; Jurrmann, Nadine; Brigelius-Flohe, Regina

    2005-06-24

    Upon stimulation of cells with interleukin-1 (IL-1) the IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1) transiently associates to and dissociates from the IL-1RI and thereafter translocates into the nucleus. Here we show that nuclear translocation of IRAK-1 depends on its kinase activity since translocation was not observed in EL-4 cells overexpressing a kinase negative IRAK-1 mutant (EL-4{sup IRAK-1-K239S}). IRAK-1 itself, an endogenous substrate with an apparent molecular weight of 24 kDa (p24), and exogenous substrates like histone and myelin basic protein are phosphorylated by nuclear located IRAK-1. Phosphorylation of p24 cannot be detected in EL-4{sup IRAK-1-K239S} cells. IL-1-dependent recruitment of IRAK-1 to the IL-1RI and subsequent phosphorylation of IRAK-1 is a prerequisite for nuclear translocation of IRAK-1. It is therefore concluded that intracellular localization of IRAK-1 depends on its kinase activity and that IRAK-1 may also function as a kinase in the nucleus as shown by a new putative endogenous substrate.

  19. Pyruvate Kinase M2 Regulates Gene Transcription by Acting as A Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xueliang; Wang, Haizhen; Jenny, J. Yang; Liu, Xiaowei; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2) is a glycolysis enzyme catalyzing conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate with transferring a phosphate from PEP to ADP. We report here that PKM2 localizes to the cell nucleus. The levels of nuclear PKM2 correlate with cell proliferation. PKM2 activates transcription of MEK5 by phosphorylating stat3 at Y705. In vitro phosphorylation assays show that PKM2 is a protein kinase using PEP as phosphate donor. ADP competes with the protein substrate binding, indicating that the substrate may bind to the ADP site of PKM2. Our experiments suggest that PKM2 dimer is an active protein kinase, while the tetramer is an active pyruvate kinase. Expression a PKM2 mutant that exists as a dimer promotes cell proliferation, indicating that protein kinase activity of PKM2 plays a role in promoting cell proliferation. Our study reveals an important link between metabolism alteration and gene expression during tumor transformation and progression. PMID:22306293

  20. FGF and stress regulate CREB and ATF-1 via a pathway involving p38 MAP kinase and MAPKAP kinase-2.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Y; Rouse, J; Zhang, A; Cariati, S; Cohen, P; Comb, M J

    1996-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) activates a protein kinase cascade in SK-N-MC cells that regulates gene expression at a cyclic-AMP response element (CRE) by stimulating the transcriptional activity of CREB. The activation of CREB is prevented by a dominant negative mutant of Ras and triggered via the same site (Ser133) that becomes phosphorylated in response to cyclic AMP and Ca2+. However, the effect of FGF is not mediated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, TPA-sensitive isoforms of protein kinase-C, p70S6K or p90rsk (all of which phosphorylate CREB at Ser133 in vitro). Instead, we identify the FGF-stimulated CREB kinase as MAP kinase-activated protein (MAPKAP) kinase-2, an enzyme that lies immediately downstream of p38 MAP kinase, in a pathway that is also stimulated by cellular stresses. We show that MAPKAP kinase-2 phosphorylates CREB at Ser133 in vitro, that the FGF- or stress-induced activation of MAPKAP kinase-2 and phosphorylation of CREB and ATF-1 are prevented by similar concentrations of the specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB 203580, and that MAPKAP kinase-2 is the only detectable SB 203580-sensitive CREB kinase in SK-N-MC cell extracts. We also show that transfection of RK/p38 MAP kinase in SK-N-MC cells, but not transfection of p44 MAP kinase, activates Gal4-CREB-dependent transcription via Ser133. These findings identify a new growth factor and stress-activated signaling pathway that regulates gene expression at the CRE. Images PMID:8887554

  1. Protein Kinases: Emerging Therapeutic Targets in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Gandhi, Varsha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although protein kinases are primary targets for inhibition in hematological malignancies, until recently their contribution to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was poorly understood. Insights into B cell receptor (BCR) signaling and its role in regulating key cellular functions have shed light on candidate protein kinases that are aberrantly activated in CLL. In this regard, protein kinases are now considered as potential drug targets in CLL. Area covered This review has covered signaling pathways and associated protein kinases in CLL and the kinase inhibitors currently available in preclinical and clinical investigations. Individual protein kinases that are abnormally active in CLL and the functional consequences of their inhibition are discussed. Expert opinion A growing body of evidence suggests that protein kinases are druggable targets for patients with CLL. The emergence of novel and bio-available kinase inhibitors and their promising clinical activity in CLL underscore the oncogenic role of kinases in leukemogenesis. Further investigations directed towards their role as single agents or in combinations may provide insight into understanding the substantial role of kinase mediated signal transduction pathways and their inhibition in B- CLL. PMID:22409342

  2. Mitogen activated protein kinase at the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Faustino, Randolph S; Maddaford, Thane G; Pierce, Grant N

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases control eukaryotic proliferation, and import of kinases into the nucleus through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) can influence gene expression to affect cellular growth, cell viability and homeostatic function. The NPC is a critical regulatory checkpoint for nucleocytoplasmic traffic that regulates gene expression and cell growth, and MAP kinases may be physically associated with the NPC to modulate transport. In the present study, highly enriched NPC fractions were isolated and investigated for associated kinases and/or activity. Endogenous kinase activity was identified within the NPC fraction, which phosphorylated a 30 kD nuclear pore protein. Phosphomodification of this nucleoporin, here termed Nup30, was inhibited by apigenin and PD-98059, two MAP kinase antagonists as well as with SB-202190, a pharmacological blocker of p38. Furthermore, high throughput profiling of enriched NPCs revealed constitutive presence of all members of the MAP kinase family, extracellular regulated kinases (ERK), p38 and Jun N-terminal kinase. The NPC thus contains a spectrum of associated MAP kinases that suggests an intimate role for ERK and p38 in regulation of nuclear pore function. PMID:20497490

  3. Mechanism of inhibition of Raf-1 by protein kinase A.

    PubMed Central

    Häfner, S; Adler, H S; Mischak, H; Janosch, P; Heidecker, G; Wolfman, A; Pippig, S; Lohse, M; Ueffing, M; Kolch, W

    1994-01-01

    The cytoplasmic Raf-1 kinase is essential for mitogenic signalling by growth factors, which couple to tyrosine kinases, and by tumor-promoting phorbol esters such as 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, which activate protein kinase C (PKC). Signalling by the Raf-1 kinase can be blocked by activation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). The molecular mechanism of this inhibition is not precisely known but has been suggested to involve attenuation of Raf-1 binding to Ras. Using purified proteins, we show that in addition to weakening the interaction of Raf-1 with Ras, PKA can inhibit Raf-1 function directly via phosphorylation of the Raf-1 kinase domain. Phosphorylation by PKA interferes with the activation of Raf-1 by either PKC alpha or the tyrosine kinase Lck and even can downregulate the kinase activity of Raf-1 previously activated by PKC alpha or amino-terminal truncation. This type of inhibition can be dissociated from the ability of Raf-1 to associate with Ras, since (i) the isolated Raf-1 kinase domain, which lacks the Ras binding domain, is still susceptible to inhibition by PKA, (ii) phosphorylation of Raf-1 by PKC alpha alleviates the PKA-induced reduction of Ras binding but does not prevent the downregulation of Raf-1 kinase activity by PKA and (iii) cAMP agonists antagonize transformation by v-Raf, which is Ras independent. Images PMID:7935389

  4. Protein kinase A signalling in Schistosoma mansoni cercariae and schistosomules.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Natasha L; Lawton, Scott P; Walker, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A regulates multiple processes in eukaryotes by phosphorylating diverse cellular substrates, including metabolic and signalling enzymes, ion channels and transcription factors. Here we provide insight into protein kinase A signalling in cercariae and 24h in vitro cultured somules of the blood parasite, Schistosoma mansoni, which causes human intestinal schistosomiasis. Functional mapping of activated protein kinase A using anti-phospho protein kinase A antibodies and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed activated protein kinase A in the central and peripheral nervous system, oral-tip sensory papillae, oesophagus and excretory system of intact cercariae. Cultured 24h somules, which biologically represent the skin-resident stage of the parasite, exhibited similar activation patterns in oesophageal and nerve tissues but also displayed striking activation at the tegument and activation in a region resembling the germinal 'stem' cell cluster. The adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, stimulated somule protein kinase A activation and produced a hyperkinesia phenotype. The biogenic amines, serotonin and dopamine known to be present in skin also induced protein kinase A activation in somules, whereas neuropeptide Y or [Leu(31),Pro(34)]-neuropeptide Y attenuated protein kinase A activation. However, neuropeptide Y did not block the forskolin-induced somule hyperkinesia. Bioinformatic investigation of potential protein associations revealed 193 medium confidence and 59 high confidence protein kinase A interacting partners in S. mansoni, many of which possess putative protein kinase A phosphorylation sites. These data provide valuable insight into the intricacies of protein kinase A signalling in S. mansoni and a framework for further physiological investigations into the roles of protein kinase A in schistosomes, particularly in the context of interactions between the parasite and the host. PMID:26777870

  5. Mechanism of dual specificity kinase activity of DYRK1A.

    PubMed

    Walte, Agnes; Rüben, Katharina; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Preisinger, Christian; Bamberg-Lemper, Simone; Hilz, Nikolaus; Bracher, Franz; Becker, Walter

    2013-09-01

    The function of many protein kinases is controlled by the phosphorylation of a critical tyrosine residue in the activation loop. Dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinases (DYRKs) autophosphorylate on this tyrosine residue but phosphorylate substrates on aliphatic amino acids. This study addresses the mechanism of dual specificity kinase activity in DYRK1A and related kinases. Tyrosine autophosphorylation of DYRK1A occurred rapidly during in vitro translation and did not depend on the non-catalytic domains or other proteins. Expression in bacteria as well as in mammalian cells revealed that tyrosine kinase activity of DYRK1A is not restricted to the co-translational autophosphorylation in the activation loop. Moreover, mature DYRK1A was still capable of tyrosine autophosphorylation. Point mutants of DYRK1A and DYRK2 lacking the activation loop tyrosine showed enhanced tyrosine kinase activity. A series of structurally diverse DYRK1A inhibitors was used to pharmacologically distinguish different conformational states of the catalytic domain that are hypothesized to account for the dual specificity kinase activity. All tested compounds inhibited substrate phosphorylation with higher potency than autophosphorylation but none of the tested inhibitors differentially inhibited threonine and tyrosine kinase activity. Finally, the related cyclin-dependent kinase-like kinases (CLKs), which lack the activation loop tyrosine, autophosphorylated on tyrosine both in vitro and in living cells. We propose a model of DYRK autoactivation in which tyrosine autophosphorylation in the activation loop stabilizes a conformation of the catalytic domain with enhanced serine/threonine kinase activity without disabling tyrosine phosphorylation. The mechanism of dual specificity kinase activity probably applies to related serine/threonine kinases that depend on tyrosine autophosphorylation for maturation. PMID:23809146

  6. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  7. Netrin requires focal adhesion kinase and Src family kinases for axon outgrowth and attraction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guofa; Beggs, Hilary; Jürgensen, Claudia; Park, Hwan-Tae; Tang, Hao; Gorski, Jessica; Jones, Kevin R; Reichardt, Louis F; Wu, Jane; Rao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Although netrins are an important family of neuronal guidance proteins, intracellular mechanisms that mediate netrin function are not well understood. Here we show that netrin-1 induces tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins including focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the Src family kinase Fyn. Blockers of Src family kinases inhibited FAK phosphorylation and axon outgrowth and attraction by netrin. Dominant-negative FAK and Fyn mutants inhibited the attractive turning response to netrin. Axon outgrowth and attraction induced by netrin-1 were significantly reduced in neurons lacking the FAK gene. Our results show the biochemical and functional links between netrin, a prototypical neuronal guidance cue, and FAK, a central player in intracellular signaling that is crucial for cell migration. PMID:15494732

  8. Ribosomal S6 Kinase Cooperates with Casein Kinase 2 to Modulate the Drosophila Circadian Molecular Oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Akten, Bikem; Tangredi, Michelle M.; Jauch, Eike; Roberts, Mary A.; Ng, Fanny; Raabe, Thomas; Jackson, F. Rob

    2009-01-01

    There is a universal requirement for post-translational regulatory mechanisms in circadian clock systems. Previous work in Drosophila has identified several kinases, phosphatases and an E3 ligase that are critical for determining the nuclear translocation and/or stability of clock proteins. The present study evaluated the function of p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) in the Drosophila circadian system. In mammals, RSK1 is a light- and clock-regulated kinase known to be activated by the MAPK pathway, but there is no direct evidence that it functions as a component of the circadian system. Here, we show that Drosophila S6KII RNA displays rhythms in abundance, indicative of circadian control. Importantly, an S6KII null mutant exhibits a short-period circadian phenotype that can be rescued by expression of the wild-type gene in clock neurons, indicating a role for S6KII in the molecular oscillator. Peak PER clock protein expression is elevated in the mutant, indicative of enhanced stability, whereas per mRNA level is decreased, consistent with enhanced feedback repression. Gene reporter assays show that decreased S6KII is associated with increased PER repression. Surprisingly, we demonstrate a physical interaction between S6KII and the Casein Kinase 2 regulatory subunit (CK2β), suggesting a functional relationship between the two kinases. In support of such a relationship, there are genetic interactions between S6KII and CK2 mutations, in vivo, which indicate that CK2 activity is required for S6KII action. We propose that the two kinases cooperate within clock neurons to fine-tune circadian period, improving the precision of the clock mechanism. PMID:19144847

  9. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MAP3K1) integrates developmental signals for eyelid closure

    PubMed Central

    Geh, Esmond; Meng, Qinghang; Mongan, Maureen; Wang, Jingcai; Takatori, Atsushi; Zheng, Yi; Puga, Alvaro; Lang, Richard A.; Xia, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Developmental eyelid closure is an evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic event requiring proliferation, differentiation, cytoskeleton reorganization, and migration of epithelial cells at the tip of the developing eyelid. Many signaling events take place during eyelid closure, but how the signals converge to regulate the morphogenetic process remains an open and intriguing question. Here we show that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MAP3K1) highly expressed in the developing eyelid epithelium, forms with c-Jun, a regulatory axis that orchestrates morphogenesis by integrating two different networks of eyelid closure signals. A TGF-α/EGFR-RhoA module initiates one of these networks by inducing c-Jun expression which, in a phosphorylation-independent manner, binds to the Map3k1 promoter and causes an increase in MAP3K1 expression. RhoA knockout in the ocular surface epithelium disturbs this network by decreasing MAP3K1 expression, and causes delayed eyelid closure in Map3k1 hemizygotes. The second network is initiated by the enzymatic activity of MAP3K1, which phosphorylates and activates a JNK-c-Jun module, leading to AP-1 transactivation and induction of its downstream genes, such as Pai-1. MAP3K1 inactivation reduces AP-1 activity and PAI-1 expression both in cells and developing eyelids. MAP3K1 is therefore the nexus of an intracrine regulatory loop connecting the TGF-α/EGFR/RhoA-c-Jun and JNK-c-Jun-AP-1 pathways in developmental eyelid closure. PMID:21969564

  10. The secret life of kinases: functions beyond catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation participates in the regulation of all fundamental biological processes, and protein kinases have been intensively studied. However, while the focus was on catalytic activities, accumulating evidence suggests that non-catalytic properties of protein kinases are essential, and in some cases even sufficient for their functions. These non-catalytic functions include the scaffolding of protein complexes, the competition for protein interactions, allosteric effects on other enzymes, subcellular targeting, and DNA binding. This rich repertoire often is used to coordinate phosphorylation events and enhance the specificity of substrate phosphorylation, but also can adopt functions that do not rely on kinase activity. Here, we discuss such kinase independent functions of protein and lipid kinases focussing on kinases that play a role in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and motility. PMID:22035226

  11. High quality, small molecule-activity datasets for kinase research.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajan; Schürer, Stephan C; Muskal, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Kinases regulate cell growth, movement, and death. Deregulated kinase activity is a frequent cause of disease. The therapeutic potential of kinase inhibitors has led to large amounts of published structure activity relationship (SAR) data. Bioactivity databases such as the Kinase Knowledgebase (KKB), WOMBAT, GOSTAR, and ChEMBL provide researchers with quantitative data characterizing the activity of compounds across many biological assays. The KKB, for example, contains over 1.8M kinase structure-activity data points reported in peer-reviewed journals and patents. In the spirit of fostering methods development and validation worldwide, we have extracted and have made available from the KKB 258K structure activity data points and 76K associated unique chemical structures across eight kinase targets. These data are freely available for download within this data note. PMID:27429748

  12. An essential role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in myogenic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bing-Hua; Zheng, Jenny Z.; Vogt, Peter K.

    1998-01-01

    The oncogene p3k, coding for a constitutively active form of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase; EC 2.7.1.137), strongly enhances myogenic differentiation in cultures of chicken-embryo myoblasts. It increases the size of the myotubes and induces elevated levels of the muscle-specific proteins MyoD, myosin heavy chain, creatine kinase, and desmin. Inhibition of PI 3-kinase activity with LY294002 or with dominant-negative mutants of PI 3-kinase interferes with myogenic differentiation and with the induction of muscle-specific genes. PI 3-kinase is therefore an upstream mediator for the expression of the muscle-specific genes and is both necessary and rate-limiting for the process of myogenesis. PMID:9826674

  13. Kinase active Misshapen regulates Notch signaling in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhinava K; Sachan, Nalani; Mutsuddi, Mousumi; Mukherjee, Ashim

    2015-11-15

    Notch signaling pathway represents a principal cellular communication system that plays a pivotal role during development of metazoans. Drosophila misshapen (msn) encodes a protein kinase, which is related to the budding yeast Ste20p (sterile 20 protein) kinase. In a genetic screen, using candidate gene approach to identify novel kinases involved in Notch signaling, we identified msn as a novel regulator of Notch signaling. Data presented here suggest that overexpression of kinase active form of Msn exhibits phenotypes similar to Notch loss-of-function condition and msn genetically interacts with components of Notch signaling pathway. Kinase active form of Msn associates with Notch receptor and regulate its signaling activity. We further show that kinase active Misshapen leads to accumulation of membrane-tethered form of Notch. Moreover, activated Msn also depletes Armadillo and DE-Cadherin from adherens junctions. Thus, this study provides a yet unknown mode of regulation of Notch signaling by Misshapen. PMID:26431585

  14. High quality, small molecule-activity datasets for kinase research

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajan; Schürer, Stephan C.; Muskal, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Kinases regulate cell growth, movement, and death. Deregulated kinase activity is a frequent cause of disease. The therapeutic potential of kinase inhibitors has led to large amounts of published structure activity relationship (SAR) data. Bioactivity databases such as the Kinase Knowledgebase (KKB), WOMBAT, GOSTAR, and ChEMBL provide researchers with quantitative data characterizing the activity of compounds across many biological assays. The KKB, for example, contains over 1.8M kinase structure-activity data points reported in peer-reviewed journals and patents. In the spirit of fostering methods development and validation worldwide, we have extracted and have made available from the KKB 258K structure activity data points and 76K associated unique chemical structures across eight kinase targets. These data are freely available for download within this data note. PMID:27429748

  15. Bioorthogonal Chemical Activation of Kinases in Living Systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective manipulation of protein kinases under living conditions is highly desirable yet extremely challenging, particularly in a gain-of-function fashion. Here we employ our recently developed bioorthogonal cleavage reaction as a general strategy for intracellular activation of individual kinases. Site-specific incorporation of trans-cyclooctene-caged lysine in place of the conserved catalytic lysine, in conjunction with the cleavage partner dimethyl-tetrazine, allowed efficient lysine decaging with the kinase activity chemically rescued in living systems. PMID:27280167

  16. Plant protein kinase substrates identification using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases regulate signaling pathways by phosphorylating their targets. They play critical roles in plant signaling networks. Although many important protein kinases have been identified in plants, their substrates are largely unknown. We have developed and produced plant protein microarrays with more than 15,000 purified plant proteins. Here, we describe a detailed protocol to use these microarrays to identify plant protein kinase substrates via in vitro phosphorylation assays on these arrays. PMID:25930701

  17. RAF protein-serine/threonine kinases: Structure and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Roskoski, Robert

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} The formation of unique side-to-side RAF dimers is required for full kinase activity. {yields} RAF kinase inhibitors block MEK activation in cells containing oncogenic B-RAF. {yields} RAF kinase inhibitors can lead to the paradoxical increase in RAF kinase activity. -- Abstract: A-RAF, B-RAF, and C-RAF are a family of three protein-serine/threonine kinases that participate in the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signal transduction cascade. This cascade participates in the regulation of a large variety of processes including apoptosis, cell cycle progression, differentiation, proliferation, and transformation to the cancerous state. RAS mutations occur in 15-30% of all human cancers, and B-RAF mutations occur in 30-60% of melanomas, 30-50% of thyroid cancers, and 5-20% of colorectal cancers. Activation of the RAF kinases requires their interaction with RAS-GTP along with dephosphorylation and also phosphorylation by SRC family protein-tyrosine kinases and other protein-serine/threonine kinases. The formation of unique side-to-side RAF dimers is required for full kinase activity. RAF kinase inhibitors are effective in blocking MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation in cells containing the oncogenic B-RAF Val600Glu activating mutation. RAF kinase inhibitors lead to the paradoxical increase in RAF kinase activity in cells containing wild-type B-RAF and wild-type or activated mutant RAS. C-RAF plays a key role in this paradoxical increase in downstream MEK-ERK activation.

  18. Discovery of a Potent And Selective Aurora Kinase Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Oslob, J.D.; Romanowski, M.J.; Allen, D.A.; Baskaran, S.; Bui, M.; Elling, R.A.; Flanagan, W.M.; Fung, A.D.; Hanan, E.J.; Harris, S.; Heumann, S.A.; Hoch, U.; Jacobs, J.W.; Lam, J.; Lawrence, C.E.; McDowell, R.S.; Nannini, M.A.; Shen, W.; Silverman, J.A.; Sopko, M.M.; Tangonan, B.T.

    2009-05-21

    This communication describes the discovery of a novel series of Aurora kinase inhibitors. Key SAR and critical binding elements are discussed. Some of the more advanced analogues potently inhibit cellular proliferation and induce phenotypes consistent with Aurora kinase inhibition. In particular, compound 21 (SNS-314) is a potent and selective Aurora kinase inhibitor that exhibits significant activity in pre-clinical in vivo tumor models.

  19. Protein kinases are potential targets to treat inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Yan, Yutao

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the two main forms of which are ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. In this article, we will review the mechanisms of involvement of protein kinases in the pathogenesis of and intervention against IBD, in terms of their effects on genetics, microbiota, mucous layer and tight junction, and the potential of protein kinases as therapeutic targets against IBD. PMID:25374761

  20. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is required for integrin-stimulated AKT and Raf-1/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation.

    PubMed Central

    King, W G; Mattaliano, M D; Chan, T O; Tsichlis, P N; Brugge, J S

    1997-01-01

    Cell attachment to fibronectin stimulates the integrin-dependent interaction of p85-associated phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase with integrin-dependent focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as well as activation of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. However, it is not known if this PI 3-kinase-FAK interaction increases the synthesis of the 3-phosphorylated phosphoinositides (3-PPIs) or what role, if any, is played by activated PI 3-kinase in integrin signaling. We demonstrate here the integrin-dependent accumulation of the PI 3-kinase products, PI 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P2] and PI(3,4,5)P3, as well as activation of AKT kinase, a serine/threonine kinase that can be stimulated by binding of PI(3,4)P2. The PI 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002 significantly decreased the integrin-induced accumulation of the 3-PPIs and activation of AKT kinase, without having significant effects on the levels of PI(4,5)P2 or tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin. These inhibitors also reduced cell adhesion/spreading onto fibronectin but had no effect on attachment to polylysine. Interestingly, integrin-mediated Erk-2, Mek-1, and Raf-1 activation, but not Ras-GTP loading, was inhibited at least 80% by wortmannin and LY294002. In support of the pharmacologic results, fibronectin activation of Erk-2 and AKT kinases was completely inhibited by overexpression of a dominant interfering p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase. We conclude that integrin-mediated adhesion to fibronectin results in the accumulation of the PI 3-kinase products PI(3,4)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3 as well as the PI 3-kinase-dependent activation of the kinases Raf-1, Mek-1, Erk-2, and AKT and that PI 3-kinase may function upstream of Raf-1 but downstream of Ras in integrin activation of Erk-2 MAP and AKT kinases. PMID:9234699

  1. Pyruvate kinase M2 at a glance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiwei; Lu, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Reprogrammed metabolism is a key feature of cancer cells. The pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) isoform, which is commonly upregulated in many human cancers, has been recently shown to play a crucial role in metabolism reprogramming, gene transcription and cell cycle progression. In this Cell Science at a glance article and accompanying poster, we provide a brief overview of recent advances in understanding the mechanisms underlying the regulation of PKM2 expression, enzymatic activity, metabolic functions and subcellular location. We highlight the instrumental role of the non-metabolic functions of PKM2 in tumorigenesis and evaluate the potential to target PKM2 for cancer treatment. PMID:25770102

  2. Myopathy and parkinsonism in phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Evangelia; Greene, Paul; Krishna, Sindu; Hirano, Michio; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2010-05-01

    A 25-year-old man with exertional myoglobinuria had no evidence of hemolytic anemia, but he had severe parkinsonism that was responsive to levodopa. Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) activity was markedly decreased in muscle, and molecular analysis of the PGK1 gene identified the p.T378P mutation that was recently reported in a patient with isolated myopathy. This case reinforces the concept that PGK deficiency is a clinically heterogeneous disorder and raises the question of a relationship between PGK deficiency and idiopathic juvenile Parkinson disease. PMID:20151463

  3. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    SciTech Connect

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Mikkelsen, Nils Egil; Clausen, Anders Ranegaard; Willer, Mette; Gojkovic, Zoran

    2009-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 A resolution structure of Dm-dNK in complex with gemcitabine shows that the residues Tyr70 and Arg105 play a crucial role in the firm positioning of gemcitabine by extra interactions made by the fluoride atoms. This explains why gemcitabine is a good substrate for Dm-dNK.

  4. Structural and mechanistic insights into Mps1 kinase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Yuting; Gao, Yuefeng; Xu, Quanbin; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Songcheng; Old, William; Resing, Katheryn; Ahn, Natalie; Lei, Ming; Liu, Xuedong

    2010-11-05

    Mps1 is one of the several essential kinases whose activation is required for robust mitotic spindle checkpoint signalling. The activity of Mps1 is tightly regulated and increases dramatically during mitosis or in response to spindle damage. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying Mps1 regulation, we determined the crystal structure of the kinase domain of Mps1. The 2.7-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure shows that the Mps1 kinase domain adopts a unique inactive conformation. Intramolecular interactions between the key Glu residue in the {alpha}C helix of the N-terminal lobe and the backbone amides in the catalytic loop lock the kinase in the inactive conformation. Autophosphorylation appears to be a priming event for kinase activation. We identified Mps1 autophosphorylation sites in the activation and the P+1 loops. Whereas activation loop autophosphorylation enhances kinase activity, autophosphorylation at the P+1 loop (T686) is associated with the active kinase. Mutation of T686 autophosphorylation site impairs both autophosphorylation and transphosphorylation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of T676 may be a priming event for phosphorylation at T686. Finally, we identified two critical lysine residues in the loop between helices {alpha}EF and {alpha}F that are essential for substrate recruitment and maintaining high levels of kinase activity. Our studies reveal critical biochemical mechanisms for Mps1 kinase regulation.

  5. In Vitro Characterization of Derrone as an Aurora Kinase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Nhung Thi My; Phuong, Thuong Thien; Nguyen, Trang Thi Nhu; Tran, Yen Thi Hai; Nguyen, Anh Thi Ngoc; Nguyen, Thanh Lai; Bui, Khanh Thi Van

    2016-06-01

    Among mitotic kinases, Aurora kinases are the most widely studied, since their expression is restricted to mitosis. They play a key role in chromosome segregation and cell polyploidy. Aurora kinases are important therapeutic targets, and several research groups have directed their efforts toward the identification of kinase inhibitors. The aim of this study is to screen and characterize Aurora kinase inhibitors from natural substances extracted from plants that are used in the Vietnamese pharmacopoeia. We have characterized in vitro Derrone, extracted from Erythrina orientalis L. MURR, as a novel Aurora kinase inhibitor. This compound exhibited an ability to inhibit the phosphorylation of histone H3 at ser10 both in kinase assay and at the cellular level. The compound was more effective against Aurora kinase B, with a lower IC50 value as compared to Aurora A. Moreover, it impaired the mitotic spindle checkpoint and led to endoreduplication in cancer cells, a phenomenon caused by an Aurora B inhibitor. Interestingly, using the xCelligence system and real-time cell analysis (RTCA) software, we set up a comparison of cell proliferation profiles between cancer cells treated with Derrone and VX680-a well-known Aurora kinase inhibitor-and we found that these profiles exhibited considerable similarity in cell morphology, growth, and death. Additionally, Derrone significantly inhibited the formation and growth of MCF7 tumor spheroids. PMID:26983907

  6. Cytoskeletal protein kinases: titin and its relations in mechanosensing.

    PubMed

    Gautel, Mathias

    2011-07-01

    Titin, the giant elastic ruler protein of striated muscle sarcomeres, contains a catalytic kinase domain related to a family of intrasterically regulated protein kinases. The most extensively studied member of this branch of the human kinome is the Ca(2+)-calmodulin (CaM)-regulated myosin light-chain kinases (MLCK). However, not all kinases of the MLCK branch are functional MLCKs, and about half lack a CaM binding site in their C-terminal autoinhibitory tail (AI). A unifying feature is their association with the cytoskeleton, mostly via actin and myosin filaments. Titin kinase, similar to its invertebrate analogue twitchin kinase and likely other "MLCKs", is not Ca(2+)-calmodulin-activated. Recently, local protein unfolding of the C-terminal AI has emerged as a common mechanism in the activation of CaM kinases. Single-molecule data suggested that opening of the TK active site could also be achieved by mechanical unfolding of the AI. Mechanical modulation of catalytic activity might thus allow cytoskeletal signalling proteins to act as mechanosensors, creating feedback mechanisms between cytoskeletal tension and tension generation or cellular remodelling. Similar to other MLCK-like kinases like DRAK2 and DAPK1, TK is linked to protein turnover regulation via the autophagy/lysosomal system, suggesting the MLCK-like kinases have common functions beyond contraction regulation. PMID:21416260

  7. Diversity, classification and function of the plant protein kinase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lehti-Shiu, Melissa D.; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases belong to a large superfamily with hundreds to thousands of copies and are components of essentially all cellular functions. The goals of this study are to classify protein kinases from 25 plant species and to assess their evolutionary history in conjunction with consideration of their molecular functions. The protein kinase superfamily has expanded in the flowering plant lineage, in part through recent duplications. As a result, the flowering plant protein kinase repertoire, or kinome, is in general significantly larger than other eukaryotes, ranging in size from 600 to 2500 members. This large variation in kinome size is mainly due to the expansion and contraction of a few families, particularly the receptor-like kinase/Pelle family. A number of protein kinases reside in highly conserved, low copy number families and often play broadly conserved regulatory roles in metabolism and cell division, although functions of plant homologues have often diverged from their metazoan counterparts. Members of expanded plant kinase families often have roles in plant-specific processes and some may have contributed to adaptive evolution. Nonetheless, non-adaptive explanations, such as kinase duplicate subfunctionalization and insufficient time for pseudogenization, may also contribute to the large number of seemingly functional protein kinases in plants. PMID:22889912

  8. Gene looping facilitates TFIIH kinase-mediated termination of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Medler, Scott; Ansari, Athar

    2015-01-01

    TFIIH is a general transcription factor with kinase and helicase activities. The kinase activity resides in the Kin28 subunit of TFIIH. The role of Kin28 kinase in the early steps of transcription is well established. Here we report a novel role of Kin28 in the termination of transcription. We show that RNAPII reads through a termination signal upon kinase inhibition. Furthermore, the recruitment of termination factors towards the 3′ end of a gene was compromised in the kinase mutant, thus confirming the termination defect. A concomitant decrease in crosslinking of termination factors near the 5′ end of genes was also observed in the kinase-defective mutant. Simultaneous presence of termination factors towards both the ends of a gene is indicative of gene looping; while the loss of termination factor occupancy from the distal ends suggest the abolition of a looped gene conformation. Accordingly, CCC analysis revealed that the looped architecture of genes was severely compromised in the Kin28 kinase mutant. In a looping defective sua7-1 mutant, even the enzymatically active Kin28 kinase could not rescue the termination defect. These results strongly suggest a crucial role of Kin28 kinase-dependent gene looping in the termination of transcription in budding yeast. PMID:26286112

  9. 21 CFR 862.1650 - Pyruvate kinase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862... to pyruvate kinase deficiency or of acute leukemias. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1650 - Pyruvate kinase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862... to pyruvate kinase deficiency or of acute leukemias. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1650 - Pyruvate kinase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862... to pyruvate kinase deficiency or of acute leukemias. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1650 - Pyruvate kinase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862... to pyruvate kinase deficiency or of acute leukemias. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  13. Liver specific pyruvate kinase in pheasants Phasianus colchicus.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H; Jacques, L

    1987-01-01

    While in chickens, the existence of a liver form of pyruvate kinase is controversial, the liver form of pyruvate kinase in pheasants, murres and puffins is electrophoretically distinct from that in muscle, brain, kidney, lung and small intestine. Although the forms in lungs, muscle, heart, brain and small intestine could not be reliably separated by electrophoresis, the functional characteristics of the lung and muscle forms of pyruvate kinase in the pheasant are distinct and can be classified as K and M isozymes respectively. Our data suggest that these birds possess at least three distinct isozymes of pyruvate kinase. PMID:3609446

  14. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition: An Approach to Drug Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitzki, Alexander; Gazit, Aviv

    1995-03-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulate cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and signaling processes in the cells of the immune system. Uncontrolled signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases and intracellular tyrosine kinases can lead to inflammatory responses and to diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and psoriasis. Thus, inhibitors that block the activity of tyrosine kinases and the signaling pathways they activate may provide a useful basis for drug development. This article summarizes recent progress in the development of PTK inhibitors and demonstrates their potential use in the treatment of disease.

  15. Nuclear localization of Lyn tyrosine kinase mediated by inhibition of its kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kikuko; Nakayama, Yuji; Togashi, Yuuki; Obata, Yuuki; Kuga, Takahisa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2008-11-01

    Src-family kinases, cytoplasmic enzymes that participate in various signaling events, are found at not only the plasma membrane but also subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, the Golgi apparatus and late endosomes/lysosomes. Lyn, a member of the Src-family kinases, is known to play a role in DNA damage response and cell cycle control in the nucleus. However, it is still unclear how the localization of Lyn to the nucleus is regulated. Here, we investigated the mechanism of the distribution of Lyn between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in epitheloid HeLa cells and hematopoietic THP-1 cells. Lyn was definitely detected in purified nuclei by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analyses. Nuclear accumulation of Lyn was enhanced upon treatment of cells with leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of Crm1-mediated nuclear export. Moreover, Lyn mutants lacking the sites for lipid modification were highly accumulated in the nucleus upon LMB treatment. Intriguingly, inhibition of the kinase activity of Lyn by SU6656, Csk overexpression, or point mutation in the ATP-binding site induced an increase in nuclear Lyn levels. These results suggest that Lyn being imported into and rapidly exported from the nucleus preferentially accumulates in the nucleus by inhibition of the kinase activity and lipid modification.

  16. Some implications of receptor kinase signaling pathway for development of multitargeted kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mitrasinovic, Petar M

    2013-03-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) belong to the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (TKs). Based on the role of EGFR signaling pathway in malignant progression of various types of tumors, a growing interest in the use of EGFR-TK inhibitors as probes for molecular imaging of EGFR-overexpressing tumors via positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is being notable. On one side, such noninvasive and repetitive monitoring of the activity of EGFR at the kinase level is intended to provide a direct measure of EGFR occupancy and inhibition by EGFR-targeting drugs. On the other side, all oncologic imaging tracers are molecularly targeted radiopharmaceuticals, which are strongly dependent on the tumor biochemistry including increased metabolism, hyperproliferation, angiogenesis, hypoxia, apoptosis, and specific tumor biomarkers (tumor specific antigens and tumor-specific receptors). The present article is an attempt to reconcile these two vital standpoints influencing the choice of appropriate radiolabeled agents for PET and SPECT imaging aimed to support the development of a new generation of multi-targeted kinase inhibitors in the time ahead, because the routine accomplishment of drug selectivity for particular protein kinases is a substantial challenge. PMID:23278847

  17. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Interaction Protein Functions as an A-kinase Anchoring Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Hundsrucker, Christian; Skroblin, Philipp; Christian, Frank; Zenn, Hans-Michael; Popara, Viola; Joshi, Mangesh; Eichhorst, Jenny; Wiesner, Burkhard; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Reif, Bernd; Rosenthal, Walter; Klussmann, Enno

    2010-01-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) include a family of scaffolding proteins that target protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling proteins to cellular compartments and thereby confine the activities of the associated proteins to distinct regions within cells. AKAPs bind PKA directly. The interaction is mediated by the dimerization and docking domain of regulatory subunits of PKA and the PKA-binding domain of AKAPs. Analysis of the interactions between the dimerization and docking domain and various PKA-binding domains yielded a generalized motif allowing the identification of AKAPs. Our bioinformatics and peptide array screening approaches based on this signature motif identified GSKIP (glycogen synthase kinase 3β interaction protein) as an AKAP. GSKIP directly interacts with PKA and GSK3β (glycogen synthase kinase 3β). It is widely expressed and facilitates phosphorylation and thus inactivation of GSK3β by PKA. GSKIP contains the evolutionarily conserved domain of unknown function 727. We show here that this domain of GSKIP and its vertebrate orthologues binds both PKA and GSK3β and thereby provides a mechanism for the integration of PKA and GSK3β signaling pathways. PMID:20007971

  18. Protein kinase Cδ regulates vaccinia-related kinase 1 in DNA damage–induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Choon-Ho; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Jeong, Min-Woo; Kim, Sangjune; Kim, Wanil; Song, Yun Seon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2011-01-01

    Vaccinia-related kinase 1 (VRK1) is a novel serine/threonine kinase that plays an important role in cell proliferation. However, little is known about the upstream regulators of VRK1 activity. Here we provide evidence for a role of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) in the regulation of murine VRK1. We show that PKCδ interacts with VRK1, phosphorylates the Ser-355 residue in the putative regulatory region, and negatively regulates its kinase activity in vitro. Intriguingly, PKCδ-induced cell death was facilitated by phosphorylation of VRK1 when cells were exposed to a DNA-damaging agent. In addition, p53 played a critical role in the regulation of DNA damage–induced cell death accompanied by PKCδ-mediated modulation of VRK1. In p53-deficient cells, PKCδ-mediated phosphorylation of VRK1 had no effect on cell viability. However, cells overexpressing p53 exhibited significant reduction of cell viability when cotransfected with both VRK1 and PKCδ. Taken together, these results indicate that PKCδ regulates phosphorylation and down-regulation of VRK1, thereby contributing to cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:21346188

  19. The early evolution of the phosphagen kinases--insights from choanoflagellate and poriferan arginine kinases.

    PubMed

    Conejo, Maria; Bertin, Matt; Pomponi, Shirley A; Ellington, W Ross

    2008-01-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) is a member of a large family of phosphoryl transfer enzymes called phosphagen (guanidino) kinases. AKs are present in certain protozoans, sponges, cnidarians, and both lophotrochozoan and ecdysozoan protostomes. Another phosphagen kinase, creatine kinase (CK), is found in sponges, cnidarians, and both deuterostome and protostome groups but does not appear to be present in protozoans. To probe the early evolution of phosphagen kinases, we have amplified the cDNAs for AKs from three choanoflagellates and from the hexactinellid sponge Aphrocallistes beatrix and the demosponges Suberites fuscus and Microciona prolifera. Phylogenetic analysis using maximum likelihood of these choanoflagellate and sponge AKs with other AK sequences revealed that the AK from the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis clusters with the AK from the glass sponge Aphrocallistes and is part of a larger cluster containing AKs from the demosponges Suberites and Microciona as well as basal and protostome invertebrates. In contrast, AKs from Codonosiga gracilis and Monosiga ovata form a distinct cluster apart from all other AK sequences. tBLASTn searches of the recently released M. brevicollis genome database showed that this species has three unique AK genes-one virtually identical to the M. brevicollis cDNA and the other two showing great similarity to C. gracilis and M. ovata AKs. Three distinct AK genes are likely present in choanoflagellates. Two of these AKs display extensive similarity to both CKs and an AK from sponges. Previous work has shown CK evolved from an AK-like ancestor prior to the divergence of sponges. The present results provide evidence suggesting that the initial gene duplication event(s) leading to the CK lineage may have occurred before the divergence of the choanoflagellate and animal lineages. PMID:18064398

  20. Protein-tyrosine phosphorylation interaction network in Bacillus subtilis reveals new substrates, kinase activators and kinase cross-talk

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Pigeonneau, Nathalie; Ventroux, Magali; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Bidnenko, Vladimir; Mijakovic, Ivan; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Signal transduction in eukaryotes is generally transmitted through phosphorylation cascades that involve a complex interplay of transmembrane receptors, protein kinases, phosphatases and their targets. Our previous work indicated that bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases may exhibit similar properties, since they act on many different substrates. To capture the complexity of this phosphorylation-based network, we performed a comprehensive interactome study focused on the protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. The resulting network identified many potential new substrates of kinases and phosphatases, some of which were experimentally validated. Our study highlighted the role of tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases and phosphatases in DNA metabolism, transcriptional control and cell division. This interaction network reveals significant crosstalk among different classes of kinases. We found that tyrosine kinases can bind to several modulators, transmembrane or cytosolic, consistent with a branching of signaling pathways. Most particularly, we found that the division site regulator MinD can form a complex with the tyrosine kinase PtkA and modulate its activity in vitro. In vivo, it acts as a scaffold protein which anchors the kinase at the cell pole. This network highlighted a role of tyrosine phosphorylation in the spatial regulation of the Z-ring during cytokinesis. PMID:25374563

  1. Structures of human Bruton's tyrosine kinase in active and inactive conformations suggest a mechanism of activation for TEC family kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, Douglas J.; Liu, Yu-Ting; Arduini, Robert M.; Hession, Catherine A.; Miatkowski, Konrad; Wildes, Craig P.; Cullen, Patrick F.; Hong, Victor; Hopkins, Brian T.; Mertsching, Elisabeth; Jenkins, Tracy J.; Romanowski, Michael J.; Baker, Darren P.; Silvian, Laura F.

    2010-11-15

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a member of the TEC family of kinases, plays a crucial role in B-cell maturation and mast cell activation. Although the structures of the unphosphorylated mouse BTK kinase domain and the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated kinase domains of human ITK are known, understanding the kinase selectivity profiles of BTK inhibitors has been hampered by the lack of availability of a high resolution, ligand-bound BTK structure. Here, we report the crystal structures of the human BTK kinase domain bound to either Dasatinib (BMS-354825) at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution or to 4-amino-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolospyrimidin- 7-yl-cyclopentane at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. This data provides information relevant to the development of small molecule inhibitors targeting BTK and the TEC family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Analysis of the structural differences between the TEC and Src families of kinases near the Trp-Glu-Ile motif in the N-terminal region of the kinase domain suggests a mechanism of regulation of the TEC family members.

  2. Rho-associated kinase, a novel serine/threonine kinase, as a putative target for small GTP binding protein Rho.

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, T; Amano, M; Yamamoto, T; Chihara, K; Nakafuku, M; Ito, M; Nakano, T; Okawa, K; Iwamatsu, A; Kaibuchi, K

    1996-01-01

    The small GTP binding protein Rho is implicated in cytoskeletal responses to extracellular signals such as lysophosphatidic acid to form stress fibers and focal contacts. Here we have purified a Rho-interacting protein with a molecular mass of approximately 164 kDa (p164) from bovine brain. This protein bound to GTPgammaS (a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog).RhoA but not to GDP.RhoA or GTPgammaS.RhoA with a mutation in the effector domain (RhoAA37).p164 had a kinase activity which was specifically stimulated by GTPgammaS.RhoA. We obtained the cDNA encoding p164 on the basis of its partial amino acid sequences and named it Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase). Rho-kinase has a catalytic domain in the N-terminal portion, a coiled coil domain in the middle portion and a zinc finger-like motif in the C-terminal portion. The catalytic domain shares 72% sequence homology with that of myotonic dystrophy kinase and the coiled coil domain contains a Rho-interacting interface. When COS7 cells were cotransfected with Rho-kinase and activated RhoA, some Rho-kinase was recruited to membranes. Thus it is likely that Rho-kinase is a putative target serine/threonine kinase for Rho and serves as a mediator of the Rho-dependent signaling pathway. Images PMID:8641286

  3. Virtual Target Screening: Validation Using Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Daniel N.; Pevzner, Yuri; Durand, Ashley A.; Tran, MinhPhuong; Scheerer, Rachel R.; Daniel, Kenyon; Sung, Shen-Shu; Woodcock, H. Lee; Guida, Wayne C.; Brooks, Wesley H.

    2012-01-01

    Computational methods involving virtual screening could potentially be employed to discover new biomolecular targets for an individual molecule of interest (MOI). However, existing scoring functions may not accurately differentiate proteins to which the MOI binds from a larger set of macromolecules in a protein structural database. An MOI will most likely have varying degrees of predicted binding affinities to many protein targets. However, correctly interpreting a docking score as a hit for the MOI docked to any individual protein can be problematic. In our method, which we term “Virtual Target Screening (VTS)”, a set of small drug-like molecules are docked against each structure in the protein library to produce benchmark statistics. This calibration provides a reference for each protein so that hits can be identified for an MOI. VTS can then be used as tool for: drug repositioning (repurposing), specificity and toxicity testing, identifying potential metabolites, probing protein structures for allosteric sites, and testing focused libraries (collection of MOIs with similar chemotypes) for selectivity. To validate our VTS method, twenty kinase inhibitors were docked to a collection of calibrated protein structures. Here we report our results where VTS predicted protein kinases as hits in preference to other proteins in our database. Concurrently, a graphical interface for VTS was developed. PMID:22747098

  4. Mechanism of Focal Adhesion Kinase Mechanosensing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Aponte-Santamaría, Camilo; Sturm, Sebastian; Bullerjahn, Jakob Tómas; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Gräter, Frauke

    2015-11-01

    Mechanosensing at focal adhesions regulates vital cellular processes. Here, we present results from molecular dynamics (MD) and mechano-biochemical network simulations that suggest a direct role of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) as a mechano-sensor. Tensile forces, propagating from the membrane through the PIP2 binding site of the FERM domain and from the cytoskeleton-anchored FAT domain, activate FAK by unlocking its central phosphorylation site (Tyr576/577) from the autoinhibitory FERM domain. Varying loading rates, pulling directions, and membrane PIP2 concentrations corroborate the specific opening of the FERM-kinase domain interface, due to its remarkably lower mechanical stability compared to the individual alpha-helical domains and the PIP2-FERM link. Analyzing downstream signaling networks provides further evidence for an intrinsic mechano-signaling role of FAK in broadcasting force signals through Ras to the nucleus. This distinguishes FAK from hitherto identified focal adhesion mechano-responsive molecules, allowing a new interpretation of cell stretching experiments. PMID:26544178

  5. Targeting Axl and Mer kinases in cancer.

    PubMed

    Verma, Anupam; Warner, Steven L; Vankayalapati, Hariprasad; Bearss, David J; Sharma, Sunil

    2011-10-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) are cell-surface transmembrane receptors that contain regulated kinase activity within their cytoplasmic domain and play an important role in signal transduction in both normal and malignant cells. The mammalian TAM RTK family includes 3 closely related members: Tyro-3, Axl, and Mer. Overexpression or ectopic expression of the TAM receptors has been detected in a wide array of human cancers. Growth arrest-specific gene 6 has been identified as the major ligand for these TAM RTKs, and its binding to the receptors has been shown to promote proliferation and survival of cancer cells in vitro. Abnormal expression and activation of Axl or Mer can provide a survival advantage for certain cancer cells. Inhibition of Axl and Mer may enhance the sensitivity of cancer cells to cytotoxic agents and would potentially be a therapeutic strategy to target cancer cells. This review elucidates the role of Axl and Mer in normal cellular function and their role in oncogenesis. In addition, we review the potential to inhibit these RTKs for the development of therapeutic targets in treatment of cancer. PMID:21933973

  6. Targeting the Pim kinases in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Keane, N A; Reidy, M; Natoni, A; Raab, M S; O'Dwyer, M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy that remains incurable. Novel treatment strategies to improve survival are urgently required. The Pims are a small family of serine/threonine kinases with increased expression across the hematological malignancies. Pim-2 shows highest expression in MM and constitutes a promising therapeutic target. It is upregulated by the bone marrow microenvironment to mediate proliferation and promote MM survival. Pim-2 also has a key role in the bone destruction typically seen in MM. Additional putative roles of the Pim kinases in MM include trafficking of malignant cells, promoting oncogenic signaling in the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment and mediating resistance to therapy. A number of Pim inhibitors are now under development with lead compounds entering the clinic. The ATP-competitive Pim inhibitor LGH447 has recently been reported to have single agent activity in MM. It is anticipated that Pim inhibition will be of clinical benefit in combination with standard treatments and/or with novel drugs targeting other survival pathways in MM. PMID:26186558

  7. Mechanism of Focal Adhesion Kinase Mechanosensing

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Sebastian; Bullerjahn, Jakob Tómas; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Gräter, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensing at focal adhesions regulates vital cellular processes. Here, we present results from molecular dynamics (MD) and mechano-biochemical network simulations that suggest a direct role of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) as a mechano-sensor. Tensile forces, propagating from the membrane through the PIP2 binding site of the FERM domain and from the cytoskeleton-anchored FAT domain, activate FAK by unlocking its central phosphorylation site (Tyr576/577) from the autoinhibitory FERM domain. Varying loading rates, pulling directions, and membrane PIP2 concentrations corroborate the specific opening of the FERM-kinase domain interface, due to its remarkably lower mechanical stability compared to the individual alpha-helical domains and the PIP2-FERM link. Analyzing downstream signaling networks provides further evidence for an intrinsic mechano-signaling role of FAK in broadcasting force signals through Ras to the nucleus. This distinguishes FAK from hitherto identified focal adhesion mechano-responsive molecules, allowing a new interpretation of cell stretching experiments. PMID:26544178

  8. Mechanism of regulation of receptor histidine kinases.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Hedda U; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Hornig, Nora; Hulko, Michael; Martin, Jörg; Schultz, Joachim E; Zeth, Kornelius; Lupas, Andrei N; Coles, Murray

    2012-01-11

    Bacterial transmembrane receptors regulate an intracellular catalytic output in response to extracellular sensory input. To investigate the conformational changes that relay the regulatory signal, we have studied the HAMP domain, a ubiquitous intracellular module connecting input to output domains. HAMP forms a parallel, dimeric, four-helical coiled coil, and rational substitutions in our model domain (Af1503 HAMP) induce a transition in its interhelical packing, characterized by axial rotation of all four helices (the gearbox signaling model). We now illustrate how these conformational changes are propagated to a downstream domain by fusing Af1503 HAMP variants to the DHp domain of EnvZ, a bacterial histidine kinase. Structures of wild-type and mutant constructs are correlated with ligand response in vivo, clearly associating them with distinct signaling states. We propose that altered recognition of the catalytic domain by DHp, rather than a shift in position of the phospho-accepting histidine, forms the basis for regulation of kinase activity. PMID:22244755

  9. Janus kinase inhibitors for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Kunihiro

    2016-06-01

    Treatment of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has advanced substantially over the past decade with the development of biologics targeting inflammatory cytokines. Recent progress in treating RA has been achieved with janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors (Jakinibs), an orally available disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug targeting the intracellular kinase JAK and with similar efficacy to biologics. The first Jakinib approved for RA was tofacitinib, which exerted superiority to methotrexate and non-inferiority to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. In recent years, the Jakinib baricitinib has demonstrated superiority to both methotrexate and a TNF inhibitor, adalimumab. Given these promising findings, Jakinibs are expected to represent the next generation compounds for treating RA, and a number of Jakinibs are currently in clinical trials. Jakinibs can differ substantially in their selectivity against JAKs; tofacitinib and baricitinib target multiple JAKs, whereas the most recently developed Jakinibs target only a single JAK. The influence of Jakinib selectivity on efficacy and side effects is of great interest, requiring further careful observation. PMID:26994322

  10. Coated vesicles contain a phosphatidylinositol kinase.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C R; Fishman, J B; Fine, R E

    1985-09-15

    When coated vesicles (CVs) are incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP, radioactivity is rapidly incorporated into a compound identified by thin layer chromatography as phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate. This activity has been identified in CVs isolated from bovine brain as well as from rat liver and chick embryo skeletal muscle. Phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase is not separated from CVs during agarose electrophoresis, which produces CVs of greater than 95% purity, indicating that the activity present does not derive from contamination. The specific activity of these highly purified CVs was demonstrated to be approximately twice that of synaptic plasma membranes, further ruling out contamination from this source. The PI kinase remains associated with the vesicle upon removal of clathrin and its associated proteins and is solubilized by nonionic detergents, suggesting it is an integral membrane protein. We have been unable to demonstrate the formation of significant amounts of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in any of our CV preparations. In the presence of exogenous PI, activity is stimulated, with maximal phosphorylation occurring at 0.1 mM. The enzyme appears to be maximally stimulated by 200 mM MgCl2 and 1 mM ATP and is most active at pH 7.25. Calculations indicate that, under optimal conditions, approximately 25 molecules of PIP are produced per CV within 60 s, suggesting that these structures may play an important role in cellular PI metabolism. PMID:2863269

  11. Identification of the regulatory autophosphorylation site of autophosphorylation-dependent protein kinase (auto-kinase). Evidence that auto-kinase belongs to a member of the p21-activated kinase family.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, J S; Chen, W J; Ni, M H; Chan, W H; Yang, S D

    1998-01-01

    Autophosphorylation-dependent protein kinase (auto-kinase) was identified from pig brain and liver on the basis of its unique autophosphorylation/activation property [Yang, Fong, Yu and Liu (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 7034-7040; Yang, Chang and Soderling (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 9421-9427]. Its substrate consensus sequence motif was determined as being -R-X-(X)-S*/T*-X3-S/T-. To characterize auto-kinase further, we partly sequenced the kinase purified from pig liver. The N-terminal sequence (VDGGAKTSDKQKKKAXMTDE) and two internal peptide sequences (EKLRTIV and LQNPEK/ILTP/FI) of auto-kinase were obtained. These sequences identify auto-kinase as a C-terminal catalytic fragment of p21-activated protein kinase 2 (PAK2 or gamma-PAK) lacking its N-terminal regulatory region. Auto-kinase can be recognized by an antibody raised against the C-terminal peptide of human PAK2 by immunoblotting. Furthermore the autophosphorylation site sequence of auto-kinase was successfully predicted on the basis of its substrate consensus sequence motif and the known PAK2 sequence, and was further demonstrated to be RST(P)MVGTPYWMAPEVVTR by phosphoamino acid analysis, manual Edman degradation and phosphopeptide mapping via the help of phosphorylation site analysis of a synthetic peptide corresponding to the sequence of PAK2 from residues 396 to 418. During the activation process, auto-kinase autophosphorylates mainly on a single threonine residue Thr402 (according to the sequence numbering of human PAK2). In addition, a phospho-specific antibody against a synthetic phosphopeptide containing this identified sequence was generated and shown to be able to differentially recognize the activated auto-kinase autophosphorylated at Thr402 but not the non-phosphorylated/inactive auto-kinase. Immunoblot analysis with this phospho-specific antibody further revealed that the change in phosphorylation level of Thr402 of auto-kinase was well correlated with the activity change of the kinase during both

  12. Identification and functional analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) genes in canola (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yun; Wang, Chen; Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yuan-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascades, consisting of three types of reversibly phosphorylated kinases (MAPKKK, MAPKK, and MAPK), are involved in important processes including plant immunity and hormone responses. The MAPKKKs comprise the largest family in the MAPK cascades, yet only a few of these genes have been associated with physiological functions, even in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Canola (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oilseed crops in China and worldwide. To explore MAPKKK functions in biotic and abiotic stress responses in canola, 66 MAPKKK genes were identified and 28 of them were cloned. Phylogenetic analysis of these canola MAPKKKs with homologous genes from representative species classified them into three groups (A–C), comprising four MAPKKKs, seven ZIKs, and 17 Raf genes. A further 15 interaction pairs between these MAPKKKs and the downstream BnaMKKs were identified through a yeast two-hybrid assay. The interactions were further validated through bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis. In addition, by quantitative real-time reverse transcription–PCR, it was further observed that some of these BnaMAPKKK genes were regulated by different hormone stimuli, abiotic stresses, or fungal pathogen treatments. Interestingly, two novel BnaMAPKKK genes, BnaMAPKKK18 and BnaMAPKKK19, which could elicit hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death when transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, were successfully identified. Moreover, it was found that BnaMAPKKK19 probably mediated cell death through BnaMKK9. Overall, the present work has laid the foundation for further characterization of this important MAPKKK gene family in canola. PMID:24604738

  13. Identification and functional analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) genes in canola (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Sun, Yun; Wang, Chen; Yang, Bo; Wu, Feifei; Hao, Xueyu; Liang, Wanwan; Niu, Fangfang; Yan, Jingli; Zhang, Hanfeng; Wang, Boya; Deyholos, Michael K; Jiang, Yuan-Qing

    2014-05-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascades, consisting of three types of reversibly phosphorylated kinases (MAPKKK, MAPKK, and MAPK), are involved in important processes including plant immunity and hormone responses. The MAPKKKs comprise the largest family in the MAPK cascades, yet only a few of these genes have been associated with physiological functions, even in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Canola (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oilseed crops in China and worldwide. To explore MAPKKK functions in biotic and abiotic stress responses in canola, 66 MAPKKK genes were identified and 28 of them were cloned. Phylogenetic analysis of these canola MAPKKKs with homologous genes from representative species classified them into three groups (A-C), comprising four MAPKKKs, seven ZIKs, and 17 Raf genes. A further 15 interaction pairs between these MAPKKKs and the downstream BnaMKKs were identified through a yeast two-hybrid assay. The interactions were further validated through bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis. In addition, by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR, it was further observed that some of these BnaMAPKKK genes were regulated by different hormone stimuli, abiotic stresses, or fungal pathogen treatments. Interestingly, two novel BnaMAPKKK genes, BnaMAPKKK18 and BnaMAPKKK19, which could elicit hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death when transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, were successfully identified. Moreover, it was found that BnaMAPKKK19 probably mediated cell death through BnaMKK9. Overall, the present work has laid the foundation for further characterization of this important MAPKKK gene family in canola. PMID:24604738

  14. Kinase-mediated quasi-dimers of EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Bublil, Erez M.; Pines, Gur; Patel, Gargi; Fruhwirth, Gilbert; Ng, Tony; Yarden, Yosef

    2010-01-01

    Ligand-induced dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (ErbB-1/EGFR) involves conformational changes that expose an extracellular dimerization interface. Subsequent alterations within the cytoplasmic kinase domain, which culminate in tyrosine phosphorylation, are less understood. Our study addressed this question by using two strategies: a chimeric receptor approach employed ErbB-3, whose defective kinase domain was replaced by the respective part of EGFR. The implanted full-length kinase, unlike its subdomains, conferred dimerization and catalysis. The data infer that the kinase function of EGFR is restrained by the carboxyl tail; once grafted distally to the ectopic tail of ErbB-3, the kinase domain acquires quasi-dimerization and activation. In an attempt to alternatively refold the cytoplasmic tail, our other approach employed kinase inhibitors. Biophysical measurements and covalent cross-linking analyses showed that inhibitors targeting the active conformation of EGFR, in contrast to a compound recognizing the inactive conformation, induce quasi-dimers in a manner similar to the chimeric ErbB-3 molecule. Collectively, these observations unveil kinase domain-mediated quasi-dimers, which are regulated by an autoinhibitory carboxyl tail. On the basis of these observations, we propose that quasi-dimers precede formation of ligand-induced, fully active dimers, which are stabilized by both extracellular and intracellular receptor-receptor interactions.—Bublil, E. M., Pines, G., Patel, G., Fruhwirth, G., Ng, T., Yosef Yarden. Kinase-mediated quasi-dimers of EGFR. PMID:20682838

  15. Lack of stereospecificity of suid pseudorabies virus thymidine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Maga, G; Verri, A; Bonizzi, L; Ponti, W; Poli, G; Garbesi, A; Niccolai, D; Spadari, S; Focher, F

    1993-01-01

    We have partially purified suid pseudorabies virus (PRV) thymidine kinase from infected thymidine kinase- mouse cells, and cytosolic swine thymidine kinase from lymphatic glands, and we have found that PRV thymidine kinase, unlike the host enzyme, shows no stereospecificity for D- and L-beta-nucleosides. In vitro, unnatural L-enantiomers, except L-deoxycytidine, function as specific inhibitors for the viral enzyme in the order: L-thymidine >> L-deoxyguanosine > L-deoxyuridine > L-deoxyadenosine. Contrary to human and swine thymidine kinases and like herpes simplex virus-1 and -2 thymidine kinases, PRV thymidine kinase phosphorylates both the natural (D-) and the unnatural (L-) thymidine enantiomers to their corresponding monophosphates with comparable efficiency. The kinetic parameters Vmax/Km for D- and L-thymidine are 3.7 and 2.3 respectively. Our results demonstrate that the lack of stereospecificity might be a common feature of the thymidine kinases that are encoded by human and animal herpes viruses. These observations could lead to the development of a novel class of antiviral drugs. PMID:8396911

  16. Lack of stereospecificity of suid pseudorabies virus thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Maga, G; Verri, A; Bonizzi, L; Ponti, W; Poli, G; Garbesi, A; Niccolai, D; Spadari, S; Focher, F

    1993-09-01

    We have partially purified suid pseudorabies virus (PRV) thymidine kinase from infected thymidine kinase- mouse cells, and cytosolic swine thymidine kinase from lymphatic glands, and we have found that PRV thymidine kinase, unlike the host enzyme, shows no stereospecificity for D- and L-beta-nucleosides. In vitro, unnatural L-enantiomers, except L-deoxycytidine, function as specific inhibitors for the viral enzyme in the order: L-thymidine > L-deoxyguanosine > L-deoxyuridine > L-deoxyadenosine. Contrary to human and swine thymidine kinases and like herpes simplex virus-1 and -2 thymidine kinases, PRV thymidine kinase phosphorylates both the natural (D-) and the unnatural (L-) thymidine enantiomers to their corresponding monophosphates with comparable efficiency. The kinetic parameters Vmax/Km for D- and L-thymidine are 3.7 and 2.3 respectively. Our results demonstrate that the lack of stereospecificity might be a common feature of the thymidine kinases that are encoded by human and animal herpes viruses. These observations could lead to the development of a novel class of antiviral drugs. PMID:8396911

  17. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Jessica R; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Markus, Benedikt M; Mandelbaum, Joseph; Ramek, Alexander; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E; Schwartz, Thomas U; Ploegh, Hidde L; Lourido, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics, the effects of 1B7-kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes. PMID:26305940

  18. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Jessica R.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Markus, Benedikt M.; Mandelbaum, Joseph; Ramek, Alexander; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Lourido, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics, the effects of 1B7–kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes. PMID:26305940

  19. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  20. The Potential Role of Aurora Kinase Inhibitors in Haematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Sherif S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Aurora kinases play an important role in the control of the cell cycle and have been implicated in tumourigenesis in a number of cancers. Among the haematological malignancies, overexpression of Aurora kinases has been reported in acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic myeloid leukaemia, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, multiple myeloma, aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. A large number of Aurora kinase inhibitors are currently in different stages of clinical development. In addition to varying in their selectivity for the different Aurora kinases, some also have activity directed at other cellular kinases involved in important molecular pathways in cancer cells. This review summarizes the biology of Aurora kinases and discusses why they may be good therapeutic targets in different haematological cancers. We describe preclinical data that has served as the rationale for investigating Aurora kinase inhibitors in different haematological malignancies, and summarize published results from early phase clinical trials. While the anti-tumour effects of Aurora kinase inhibitors appear promising, we highlight important issues for future clinical research and suggest that the optimal use of these inhibitors is likely to be in combination with cytotoxic agents already in use for the treatment of various haematological cancers. PMID:21980926

  1. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase: the key switch mechanism in insulin signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, P R; Withers, D J; Siddle, K

    1998-01-01

    Insulin plays a key role in regulating a wide range of cellular processes. However, until recently little was known about the signalling pathways that are involved in linking the insulin receptor with downstream responses. It is now apparent that the activation of class 1a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) is necessary and in some cases sufficient to elicit many of insulin's effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. The lipid products of PI 3-kinase act as both membrane anchors and allosteric regulators, serving to localize and activate downstream enzymes and their protein substrates. One of the major ways these lipid products of PI 3-kinase act in insulin signalling is by binding to pleckstrin homology (PH) domains of phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase (PDK) and protein kinase B (PKB) and in the process regulating the phosphorylation of PKB by PDK. Using mechanisms such as this, PI 3-kinase is able to act as a molecular switch to regulate the activity of serine/threonine-specific kinase cascades important in mediating insulin's effects on endpoint responses. PMID:9677303

  2. Activation of AMP-kinase by Policosanol Requires Peroxisomal Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Subhashis; Ghoshal, Sarbani

    2011-01-01

    Policosanol, a well-defined mixture of very long chain primary alcohols that is available as a nutraceutical product, has been reported to lower blood cholesterol levels. The present studies demonstrate that policosanol promotes the phosphorylation of AMP-kinase and HMG-CoA reductase in hepatoma cells and in mouse liver after intragastric administration, providing a possible means by which policosanol might lower blood cholesterol levels. Treatment of hepatoma cells with policosanol produced a 2.5-fold or greater increase in the phosphorylation of AMP-kinase and HMG-CoA reductase, and increased the phosphorylation of Ca++/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKK), an upstream AMP-kinase kinase. Intra-gastric administration of policosanol to mice similarly increased the phosphorylation of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase and AMP-kinase by greater than 2-fold. siRNA-mediated suppression of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase, fatty acyl-CoA synthetase 4, and acyl-CoA acetyltransferase expression in hepatoma cells prevented the phosphorylation of AMP-kinase and HMG-CoA reductase by policosanol, indicating that metabolism of these very long chain alcohols to activated fatty acids is necessary for the suppression of cholesterol synthesis, presumably by increasing cellular AMP levels. Subsequent peroxisomal β-oxidation probably augments this effect. PMID:21359855

  3. Leishmania Infection Engages Non-Receptor Protein Kinases Differentially to Persist in Infected Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Naixin; Kima, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play important roles in the regulation of cellular activities. In cells infected by pathogens, there is an increasing appreciation that dysregulated expression of protein kinases promotes the success of intracellular infections. In Leishmania-infected cells, expression and activation of protein kinases, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinases, kinases in the PI3-kinase signaling pathway, and kinases in the NF-κB-signaling pathway, are modulated in some manner. Several recent reviews have discussed our current understanding of the roles of these kinases in Leishmania infections. Apart from the kinases in the pathways enumerated above, there are other host cell protein kinases that are activated during the Leishmania infection of mammalian cells whose roles also appear to be significant. This review discusses recent observations on the Abl family of protein kinases and the protein kinase regulated by RNA in Leishmania infections. PMID:27148265

  4. In silico design of protein kinase inhibitors: successes and failures.

    PubMed

    Dubinina, Galina G; Chupryna, Oleksandr O; Platonov, Maxim O; Borisko, Petro O; Ostrovska, Galina V; Tolmachov, Andriy O; Shtil, Alexander A

    2007-03-01

    Protein kinases are among the most exploited targets in modern drug discovery due to key roles these enzymes play in human diseases including cancer. The in silico approach, an important part of rational design of protein kinase inhibitors, is founded on vast information about 3D structures of these enzymes. This review summarizes general structural features of the kinase inhibitors and the studies applied toward a large scale chemical database for virtual screening. Analyzed are the ways of validating the modern docking tools and their combinations with different scoring functions. In particular, we discuss the kinase flexibility as a reason for failures of the docking procedure. Finally, evidence is provided for the main patterns of kinase-inhibitor interactions and creation of the hinge-region-directed 2D filters. PMID:17348826

  5. Activation Domain-dependent Degradation of Somatic Wee1 Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Laura; Simanski, Scott; Squire, Christopher; Smith, Anthony; Cartzendafner, Jeff; Cavett, Valerie; Caldwell Busby, Jennifer; Sato, Trey; Ayad, Nagi G.

    2010-01-01

    Cell cycle progression is dependent upon coordinate regulation of kinase and proteolytic pathways. Inhibitors of cell cycle transitions are degraded to allow progression into the subsequent cell cycle phase. For example, the tyrosine kinase and Cdk1 inhibitor Wee1 is degraded during G2 and mitosis to allow mitotic progression. Previous studies suggested that the N terminus of Wee1 directs Wee1 destruction. Using a chemical mutagenesis strategy, we report that multiple regions of Wee1 control its destruction. Most notably, we find that the activation domain of the Wee1 kinase is also required for its degradation. Mutations in this domain inhibit Wee1 degradation in somatic cell extracts and in cells without affecting the overall Wee1 structure or kinase activity. More broadly, these findings suggest that kinase activation domains may be previously unappreciated sites of recognition by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. PMID:20038582

  6. Feedback Regulation of Kinase Signaling Pathways by AREs and GREs

    PubMed Central

    Vlasova-St. Louis, Irina; Bohjanen, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental signals, kinases phosphorylate numerous proteins, including RNA-binding proteins such as the AU-rich element (ARE) binding proteins, and the GU-rich element (GRE) binding proteins. Posttranslational modifications of these proteins lead to a significant changes in the abundance of target mRNAs, and affect gene expression during cellular activation, proliferation, and stress responses. In this review, we summarize the effect of phosphorylation on the function of ARE-binding proteins ZFP36 and ELAVL1 and the GRE-binding protein CELF1. The networks of target mRNAs that these proteins bind and regulate include transcripts encoding kinases and kinase signaling pathways (KSP) components. Thus, kinase signaling pathways are involved in feedback regulation, whereby kinases regulate RNA-binding proteins that subsequently regulate mRNA stability of ARE- or GRE-containing transcripts that encode components of KSP. PMID:26821046

  7. Feedback Regulation of Kinase Signaling Pathways by AREs and GREs.

    PubMed

    Vlasova-St Louis, Irina; Bohjanen, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental signals, kinases phosphorylate numerous proteins, including RNA-binding proteins such as the AU-rich element (ARE) binding proteins, and the GU-rich element (GRE) binding proteins. Posttranslational modifications of these proteins lead to a significant changes in the abundance of target mRNAs, and affect gene expression during cellular activation, proliferation, and stress responses. In this review, we summarize the effect of phosphorylation on the function of ARE-binding proteins ZFP36 and ELAVL1 and the GRE-binding protein CELF1. The networks of target mRNAs that these proteins bind and regulate include transcripts encoding kinases and kinase signaling pathways (KSP) components. Thus, kinase signaling pathways are involved in feedback regulation, whereby kinases regulate RNA-binding proteins that subsequently regulate mRNA stability of ARE- or GRE-containing transcripts that encode components of KSP. PMID:26821046

  8. An X-ray structural study of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase: A eukaryotic serine kinase with a prokaryotic histidine-kinase fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steussy, Calvin Nicklaus, Jr.

    2001-07-01

    Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase is an enzyme that controls the flow of glucose through the eukaryotic cell and contributes to the pathology of diabetes mellitus. Early work on this kinase demonstrated that it has an amino acid sequence much like bacterial histidine kinases, but an activity similar to that of modern serine/threonine kinases. This project utilized the techniques of X-ray crystallography to determine molecular structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isozyme 2. The structure was phased using selenium substituted for sulfur in methionine residues, and data at multiple wavelengths was collected at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratories. PDK 2 was found to fold into a two-domain monomer that forms a dimer through two beta sheets in the C-terminal domain. The N-terminal domain is an alpha-helical bundle while the C-terminal domain is an alpha/beta sandwich. The fold of the C-terminal domain is very similar to that of the prokaryotic histidine kinases, indicating that they share a common ancestor. The catalytic mechanism, however, has evolved to use general base catalysis to activate the serine substrate, rather than the direct nucleophilic attack by the imidazole sidechain used in the prokaryotic kinases. Thus, the structure of the protein echoes its prokaryotic ancestor, while the chemical mechanism has adapted to a serine substrate. The electrostatic surface of PDK2 leads to the suggestion that the lipoyl domain of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, an important associated structure, may bind in the cleft formed between the N- and C-terminal domains. In addition, a network of hydrogen bonds directly connects the nucleotide binding pocket to the dimer interface, suggesting that there may be some interaction between dimer formation and ATP binding or ADP release.

  9. The molecular basis of targeting protein kinases in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we provide an overview of targeted anticancer therapies with small molecule kinase inhibitors. First, we discuss why a single constitutively active kinase emanating from a variety of aberrant genetic alterations is capable of transforming a normal cell, leading it to acquire the hallmarks of a cancer cell. To draw attention to the fact that kinase inhibition in targeted cancer therapeutics differs from conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, we exploit a conceptual framework explaining why suppressed kinase activity will selectively kill only the so-called oncogene 'addicted' cancer cell, while sparing the healthy cell. Second, we introduce the protein kinase superfamily in light of its common active conformation with precisely positioned structural elements, and the diversified auto-inhibitory conformations among the kinase families. Understanding the detailed activation mechanism of individual kinases is essential to relate the observed oncogenic alterations to the elevated constitutively active state, to identify the mechanism of consequent drug resistance, and to guide the development of the next-generation inhibitors. To clarify the vital importance of structural guidelines in studies of oncogenesis, we explain how somatic mutations in EGFR result in kinase constitutive activation. Third, in addition to the common theme of secondary (acquired) mutations that prevent drug binding from blocking a signaling pathway which is hijacked by the aberrant activated kinase, we discuss scenarios of drug resistance and relapse by compensating lesions that bypass the inactivated pathway in a vertical or horizontal fashion. Collectively, these suggest that the future challenge of cancer therapy with small molecule kinase inhibitors will rely on the discovery of distinct combinations of optimized drugs to target individual subtypes of different cancers. PMID:23651790

  10. Peptide biosensors for the electrochemical measurement of protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kerman, Kagan; Song, Haifeng; Duncan, James S; Litchfield, David W; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2008-12-15

    The kinase activities are elucidated using the novel redox-active cosubstrate adenosine 5'-[gamma-ferrocene] triphosphate (Fc-ATP), which enables the kinase-catalyzed transfer of a redox active gamma-phosphate-Fc to a hydroxyamino acid. In this report, a versatile electrochemical biosensor is developed for monitoring the activity and inhibition of a serine/threonine kinase, casein kinase 2 (CK2), and protein tyrosine kinases, Abl1-T315I and HER2, in buffered solutions and in cell lysates. The method is based on the labeling of a specific phosphorylation event with Fc, followed by electrochemical detection. The electrochemical response obtained from the "ferrocenylated" peptides enables monitoring the activity of the kinase and its substrate, as well as the inhibition of small molecule inhibitors on protein phosphorylation. Kinetic information was extracted from the electrochemical measurements for the determination of K(m) and V(m) values, which were in agreement with those previously reported. Kinase reactions were also performed in the presence of well-defined inhibitors of CK2, 4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-2-azabenzimidazole, 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole, and E-3-(2,3,4,5-tetrabromophenyl)acrylic acid as well as the nonspecific kinase inhibitors, staurosporine and N-benzoylstaurosporine. On the basis of the dependency of the Fc signal on inhibitor concentration, K(i) of the inhibitors was estimated, which were also in agreement with the literature values. The performance of the biosensor was optimized including the kinase reaction, incubation with Fc-ATP, and the small molecule inhibitors. Peptide modified electrochemical biosensors are promising candidates for cost-effective in vitro kinase activity and inhibitor screening assays. PMID:18989981

  11. IκB Kinase ε Is an NFATc1 Kinase that Inhibits T Cell Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjie; Feng, Hao; Zhao, Jun; Feldman, Emily R; Chen, Si-Yi; Yuan, Weiming; Huang, Canhua; Akbari, Omid; Tibbetts, Scott A; Feng, Pinghui

    2016-07-12

    Activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is crucial for immune responses. IKKε is an IκB kinase (IKK)-related kinase, and the function of IKKε remains obscure in T cells, despite its abundant expression. We report that IKKε inhibits NFAT activation and T cell responses by promoting NFATc1 phosphorylation. During T cell activation, IKKε was transiently activated to phosphorylate NFATc1. Loss of IKKε elevated T cell antitumor and antiviral immunity and, therefore, reduced tumor development and persistent viral infection. IKKε was activated in CD8(+) T cells of mice bearing melanoma or persistently infected with a model herpesvirus. These results collectively show that IKKε promotes NFATc1 phosphorylation and inhibits T cell responses, identifying IKKε as a crucial negative regulator of T cell activation and a potential target for immunotherapy. PMID:27346349

  12. Small-molecule inhibitors of IκB kinase (IKK) and IKK-related kinases.

    PubMed

    Llona-Minguez, Sabin; Baiget, Jessica; Mackay, Simon P

    2013-07-01

    The transcription factors NF-κB and IFN control important signaling cascades and mediate the expression of a number of important pro-inflammatory cytokines, adhesion molecules, growth factors and anti-apoptotic survival proteins. IκB kinase (IKK) and IKK-related kinases (IKKε and TBK1) are key regulators of these biological pathways and, as such, modulators of these enzymes may be useful in the treatment of inflammatory diseases and cancer. We have reviewed the most recent IKK patent literature (2008-2012), added publications of interest overlooked in previous patent reviews and identified all the players involved in small-molecule inhibitors of the IKKs. This will provide the reader with a decisive summary of the IKK arena, a field that has reached maturity over a decade of research. PMID:24237125

  13. Receptor tyrosine kinase targeting in multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Susan; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    While growing cells as a monolayer is the traditional method for cell culture, the incorporation of multicellular spheroids into experimental design is becoming increasingly popular. This is due to the understanding that cells grown as spheroids tend to replicate the in vivo situation more reliably than monolayer cells. Thus, the use of multicellular spheroids may be more clinically relevant than monolayer cell cultures. Here, we describe methods for multicellular 3D spheroid generation that may be used to provide samples for receptor tyrosine kinase (and other protein) detection. Methods described include the forced-floating poly-HEMA method, the hanging-drop method, and the use of ECM to form multicellular 3D spheroids. PMID:25319898

  14. Phosphoinositide 3-kinases-a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Toker, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K) signal relay pathway represents arguably one of the most intensely studied mechanisms by which extracellular signals elicit cellular responses through the generation of second messengers that are associated with cell growth and transformation. This chapter reviews the many landmark discoveries in the PI 3-K signaling pathway in biology and disease, from the identification of a novel phosphoinositide kinase activity associated with transforming oncogenes in the 1980s, to the identification of oncogenic mutations in the catalytic subunit of PI 3-K in the mid 2000s. Two and a half decades of intense research have provided clear evidence that the PI 3-K pathway controls virtually all aspects of normal cellular physiology, and that deregulation of one or more proteins that regulate or transduce the PI 3-K signal ultimately leads to human pathology. The most recent efforts have focused on the development of specific PI 3-K inhibitors that are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for a range of disease states.This chapter is devoted to a historical review of the landmark findings in the PI 3-K from its relatively humble beginnings in the early to mid 1980s up until the present day. When considering the key findings in the history of PI 3-K, it is essential to recognize the landmark studies by Lowell and Mabel Hokin in the 1950s who were the first to describe that extracellular agonists such as acetylcholine could stimulate the incorporation of radiolabeled phosphate into phospholipids (Hokin and Hokin 1953). Their work initiated an entirely new field of lipid signaling, and subsequent studies in the 1970s by Michell and Lapetina who linked phosphoinositide turnover to membrane-associated receptors that initiate intracellular calcium mobilization (Lapetina and Michell 1973). Later studies revealed that the phospholipase-mediated breakdown of the same minor membrane phospholipids such as PtdIns-4,5-P(2) (phosphatidylinositol-4

  15. Protein kinase C, an elusive therapeutic target?

    PubMed Central

    Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Das, Kanad; Grimes, Kevin V

    2013-01-01

    Preface Protein kinase C (PKC) has been a tantalizing target for drug discovery ever since it was first identified as the receptor for the tumor promoter phorbol ester in 19821. Although initial therapeutic efforts focused on cancer, additional diseases, including diabetic complications, heart failure, myocardial infarction, pain and bipolar disease were targeted as researchers developed a better understanding of the roles that PKC’s eight conventional and novel isozymes play in health and disease. Unfortunately, both academic and pharmaceutical efforts have yet to result in the approval of a single new drug that specifically targets PKC. Why does PKC remain an elusive drug target? This review will provide a short account of some of the efforts, challenges and opportunities in developing PKC modulators to address unmet clinical needs. PMID:23197040

  16. Structural investigation of protein kinase C inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barak, D.; Shibata, M.; Rein, R.

    1991-01-01

    The phospholipid and Ca2+ dependent protein kinase (PKC) plays an essential role in a variety of cellular events. Inhibition of PKC was shown to arrest growth in tumor cell cultures making it a target for possible antitumor therapy. Calphostins are potent inhibitors of PKC with high affinity for the enzyme regulatory site. Structural characteristics of calphostins, which confer the inhibitory activity, are investigated by comparing their optimized structures with the existing models for PKC activation. The resulting model of inhibitory activity assumes interaction with two out of the three electrostatic interaction sites postulated for activators. The model shows two sites of hydrophobic interaction and enables the inhibitory activity of gossypol to be accounted for.

  17. Animal models of antimuscle specific kinase myasthenia

    PubMed Central

    Richman, David P.; Nishi, Kayoko; Ferns, Michael J.; Schnier, Joachim; Pytel, Peter; Maselli, Ricardo A.; Agius, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Antimuscle specific kinase (anti-MuSK) myasthenia (AMM) differs from antiacetylcholine receptor myasthenia gravis in exhibiting more focal muscle involvement (neck, shoulder, facial, and bulbar muscles) with wasting of the involved, primarily axial, muscles. AMM is not associated with thymic hyperplasia and responds poorly to anticholinesterase treatment. Animal models of AMM have been induced in rabbits, mice, and rats by immunization with purified xenogeneic MuSK ectodomain, and by passive transfer of large quantities of purified serum IgG from AMM patients into mice. The models have confirmed the pathogenic role of the MuSK antibodies in AMM and have demonstrated the involvement of both the presynaptic and postsynaptic components of the neuromuscular junction. The observations in this human disease and its animal models demonstrate the role of MuSK not only in the formation of this synapse but also in its maintenance. PMID:23252909

  18. Leukemic cell creatine kinase and its isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Fang, S R; Yao, E G; Wei, S Z; Fan, H; Dong, Z R

    1989-06-01

    Using malachite green single agent coloration and acetate membrane electrophoresis, we studied the cellular creatine kinase (CK) activity and its isoenzymes in 7 normal controls and 26 leukemia patients. The leukemic cellular CK activity was 12.62 +/- 4.86 u/mg protein, 2.2 times higher than the normal value (5.73 +/- 2.66 u/mg protein, p less than 0.05). Only 2 of 5 normal leukocyte samples showed '+' CK isoenzyme MM. 22 leukemia patients had CK isoenzyme. CK-BB appeared mainly in acute granulocytic leukemic, and CK-MM mainly in other types. CK-MB was also found in 6 patients. The recurrence of CK-BB may indicate atavism, and the enhanced anaerobic glycolysis and the accelerated energetic turnover may be on of the metabolic characteristics of leukemic cell. PMID:2512061

  19. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors and the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Steven I

    2009-12-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have emerged as significant targets for novel cancer therapies. For patients with differentiated or medullary carcinomas unresponsive to conventional treatments, multiple novel therapies primarily targeting angiogenesis have entered clinical trials. Partial response rates up to 30% have been reported in single-agent studies, but prolonged disease stabilisation is more commonly seen. The most successful agents target the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Sorafenib and sunitinib have had promising preliminary results reported and are being used selectively for patients who do not qualify for clinical trials. Treatment for patients with metastatic or advanced thyroid carcinoma now emphasises clinical trial opportunities for novel agents with considerable promise. Adverse effects on thyroid function and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been seen with several TKIs, necessitating prospective thyroid function testing for all patients starting therapy. PMID:19942148

  20. Antibodies directed against receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    FAUVEL, Bénédicte; Yasri, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30 therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have already been approved for cancers and inflammatory diseases, and monoclonal antibodies continue to be one of the fastest growing classes of therapeutic molecules. Because aberrant signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is a commonly observed factor in cancer, most of the subclasses of RTKs are being extensively studied as potential targets for treating malignancies. The first two RTKs that have been targeted by antibody therapy, with five currently marketed antibodies, are the growth factor receptors EGFR and HER2. However, due to systemic side effects, refractory patients and the development of drug resistance, these treatments are being challenged by emerging therapeutics. This review examines current monoclonal antibody therapies against RTKs. After an analysis of agents that have already been approved, we present an analysis of antibodies in clinical development that target RTKs. Finally, we highlight promising RTKs that are emerging as new oncological targets for antibody-based therapy. PMID:24859229

  1. Complexity of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signal Processing

    PubMed Central

    Volinsky, Natalia; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge of molecular mechanisms of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling advances with ever-increasing pace. Yet our understanding of how the spatiotemporal dynamics of RTK signaling control specific cellular outcomes has lagged behind. Systems-centered experimental and computational approaches can help reveal how overlapping networks of signal transducers downstream of RTKs orchestrate specific cell-fate decisions. We discuss how RTK network regulatory structures, which involve the immediate posttranslational and delayed transcriptional controls by multiple feed forward and feedback loops together with pathway cross talk, adapt cells to the combinatorial variety of external cues and conditions. This intricate network circuitry endows cells with emerging capabilities for RTK signal processing and decoding. We illustrate how mathematical modeling facilitates our understanding of RTK network behaviors by unraveling specific systems properties, including bistability, oscillations, excitable responses, and generation of intricate landscapes of signaling activities. PMID:23906711

  2. The extended protein kinase C superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, H; Parker, P J

    1998-01-01

    Members of the mammalian protein kinase C (PKC) superfamily play key regulatory roles in a multitude of cellular processes, ranging from control of fundamental cell autonomous activities, such as proliferation, to more organismal functions, such as memory. However, understanding of mammalian PKC signalling systems is complicated by the large number of family members. Significant progress has been made through studies based on comparative analysis, which have defined a number of regulatory elements in PKCs which confer specific location and activation signals to each isotype. Further studies on simple organisms have shown that PKC signalling paradigms are conserved through evolution from yeast to humans, underscoring the importance of this family in cellular signalling and giving novel insights into PKC function in complex mammalian systems. PMID:9601053

  3. A Quantitative Mass Spectrometry-based Approach for Identifying Protein Kinase-Clients and Quantifying Kinase Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana genomes are believed to encode >500 and >1,000 protein kinases, respectively. Despite this abundance, few bona fide kinase-client relationships have been described in detail. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based approaches have been integral to the large-scale mapp...

  4. Transphosphorylation of E. coli proteins during production of recombinant protein kinases provides a robust system to characterize kinase specificity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein kinase specificity is of fundamental importance to pathway regulation and signal transduction. Here, we report a convenient system to monitor the activity and specificity of recombinant protein kinases expressed in E.coli. We apply this to the study of the cytoplasmic domain of the plant rec...

  5. Human protein kinase CK2 genes.

    PubMed

    Wirkner, U; Voss, H; Lichter, P; Pyerin, W

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed the genomic structure of human protein kinase CK2. Of the presumably four genes, the gene encoding the regulatory subunit beta and a processed (pseudo)gene of the catalytic subunit alpha have been characterized completely. In addition, a 18.9 kb-long central part of the gene encoding the catalytic subunit alpha has been characterized. The subunit beta gene spans 4.2 kb and is composed of seven exons. Its promoter region shows several features of a "housekeeping gene" and shares common features with the promoter of the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Conforming to the genomic structure, the beta gene transcripts form a band around 1.1 kb. The central part of the subunit alpha gene contains eight exons comprising bases 102 to 824 of the translated region. Within the introns, 16 Alu repeats were identified, some of which arranged in tandems. The structure of both human CK2 coding genes, alpha and beta, is highly conserved. Several introns are located at corresponding positions in the respective genes of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The processed alpha (pseudo)gene has a complete open reading frame and is 99% homologous to the coding region of the CK2 alpha cDNA. Although the gene has a promoter-like upstream region, no transcript could be identified so far. The genomic clones were used for localization in the human genome. The beta gene was mapped to locus 6p21, the alpha gene to locus 20p13 and the alpha (pseudo)gene to locus 11p15. There is no evidence for additional alpha or beta loci in the human genome. PMID:7735323

  6. Combined Cancer Immunotherapy Against Aurora Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Kaštánková, Iva; Poláková, Ingrid; Dušková, Martina; Šmahel, Michal

    2016-05-01

    Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is a centrosomal protein that is overexpressed in a number of human malignancies and can contribute to tumor progression. As we used this protein as a target of DNA immunization, we increased its immunogenicity by the addition of the PADRE helper epitope and decreased its potential oncogenicity by mutagenesis of the kinase domain. For in vitro analysis of induced immune responses in mice, we identified the Aurka220-228 nonapeptide representing an H-2K epitope. As DNA vaccination against the Aurka self-antigen by a gene gun did not show any antitumor effect, we combined DNA immunization with anti-CD25 treatment that depletes mainly regulatory T cells. Whereas 1 anti-CD25 dose injected before DNA vaccination did not enhance the activation of Aurka-specific splenocytes, 3 doses administered on days of immunizations augmented about 10-fold immunity against Aurka. However, an opposite effect was found for antitumor immunity-only 1 anti-CD25 dose combined with DNA vaccination reduced tumor growth. Moreover, the administration of 3 doses of anti-CD25 antibody alone accelerated tumor growth. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating cells showed that 3 anti-CD25 doses not only efficiently depleted regulatory T cells but also activated helper T cells and CD3CD25 cells. Next, we found that blockade of the PD-1 receptor initiated 1 week after the first immunization was necessary for significant inhibition of tumor growth with therapeutic DNA vaccination against Aurka combined with depletion of CD25 cells. Our results suggest that combined cancer immunotherapy should be carefully evaluated to achieve the optimal antitumor effect. PMID:27070447

  7. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase status in rhabdomyosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akihiko; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Wakai, Susumu; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Tsuta, Koji; Fukayama, Masashi; Makimoto, Atsushi; Furuta, Koh; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2013-06-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare soft tissue sarcoma that typically affects children, adolescents, and young adults. Despite treatment via a multidisciplinary approach, the prognosis of advance-stage rhabdomyosarcomas remains poor, and a new treatment strategy is needed. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is a potential target for specific inhibitors. In this study, we investigated 116 rhabdomyosarcomas using a polymer-based ALK immunostaining method and correlated the results with clinicopathological parameters. In addition, we examined ALK status using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization, PCR, and sequencing. In immunohistochemical analysis, ALK was detected in 2 (6%) of 33 embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas, 42 (69%) of 61 alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas, and 0 (0%) of 22 other subtypes, including pleomorphic, adult-spindle-cell/sclerosing, and epithelioid variants. Compared with ALK-negative alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas, ALK-positive ones are presented with metastatic spread more frequently and showed a greater extent of myogenin reactivity. Overall survival was not associated with ALK expression. FOXO1 rearrangement was significantly associated with ALK immunoreactivity. The median ALK copy number was greater in ALK-positive tumors than in ALK-negative tumors. Most (93%) cases tested showed no selective increase in the ALK gene dosage. ALK selective amplification and low-level selective gain were noted in one and three cases, respectively. Further, a high-polysomy pattern (≥4 ALK copies in ≥40% of cells) was observed in seven cases. A significant increase in the ALK copy number was exclusive to the ALK-immunopositive cohort, but it was uncommon, accounting for only 30% of the 37 ALK-positive rhabdomyosarcomas. ALK gene rearrangement was not observed in either cohort, while an ALK somatic mutation (I1277T) was found in one ALK-negative embryonal case. Although it remains controversial whether ALK expression without gene rearrangement

  8. Conformational Dynamics and Allostery in Pyruvate Kinase.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Katherine A; Zhu, Shaolong; Liuni, Peter; Peng, Fen; Kessans, Sarah A; Wilson, Derek J; Dobson, Renwick C J

    2016-04-22

    Pyruvate kinase catalyzes the final step in glycolysis and is allosterically regulated to control flux through the pathway. Two models are proposed to explain how Escherichia coli pyruvate kinase type 1 is allosterically regulated: the "domain rotation model" suggests that both the domains within the monomer and the monomers within the tetramer reorient with respect to one another; the "rigid body reorientation model" proposes only a reorientation of the monomers within the tetramer causing rigidification of the active site. To test these hypotheses and elucidate the conformational and dynamic changes that drive allostery, we performed time-resolved electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled to hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies followed by mutagenic analysis to test the activation mechanism. Global exchange experiments, supported by thermostability studies, demonstrate that fructose 1,6-bisphosphate binding to the allosteric domain causes a shift toward a globally more dynamic ensemble of conformations. Mapping deuterium exchange to peptides within the enzyme highlight site-specific regions with altered conformational dynamics, many of which increase in conformational flexibility. Based upon these and mutagenic studies, we propose an allosteric mechanism whereby the binding of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate destabilizes an α-helix that bridges the allosteric and active site domains within the monomeric unit. This destabilizes the β-strands within the (β/α)8-barrel domain and the linked active site loops that are responsible for substrate binding. Our data are consistent with the domain rotation model but inconsistent with the rigid body reorientation model given the increased flexibility at the interdomain interface, and we can for the first time explain how fructose 1,6-bisphosphate affects the active site. PMID:26879751

  9. Photoinduced structural changes to protein kinase A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozinek, Sarah C.; Thomas, Robert J.; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2014-03-01

    The importance of porphyrins in organisms is underscored by the ubiquitous biological and biochemical functions that are mediated by these compounds and by their potential biomedical and biotechnological applications. Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) is the precursor to heme and has biomedical applications such as its use as a photosensitizer in phototherapy and photodetection of cancer. Among other applications, our group has demonstrated that low-irradiance exposure to laser irradiation of PPIX, Fe-PPIX, or meso-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrin (TSPP) non-covalently docked to a protein causes conformational changes in the polypeptide. Such approach can have remarkable consequences in the study of protein structure/function relationship and can be used to prompt non-native protein properties. Therefore we have investigated protein kinase A (PKA), a more relevant protein model towards the photo-treatment of cancer. PKA's enzymatic functions are regulated by the presence of cyclic adenosine monophosphate for intracellular signal transduction involved in, among other things, stimulation of transcription, tumorigenesis in Carney complex and migration of breast carcinoma cells. Since phosphorylation is a necessary step in some cancers and inflammatory diseases, inhibiting the protein kinase, and therefore phosphorylation, may serve to treat these diseases. Changes in absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and fluorescence lifetime indicate: 1) both TSPP and PPIX non-covalently bind to PKA where they maintain photoreactivity; 2) absorptive photoproduct formation occurs only when PKA is bound to TSPP and irradiated; and 3) PKA undergoes secondary structural changes after irradiation with either porphyrin bound. These photoinduced changes could affect the protein's enzymatic and signaling capabilities.

  10. Glucose kinases from Streptomyces peucetius var. caesius.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Villafán, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina; Aguilar-Osorio, Guillermo; Gosset, Guillermo; Sanchez, Sergio

    2014-07-01

    Glucose kinases (Glks) are enzymes of the glycolytic pathway involved in glucose phosphorylation. These enzymes can use various phosphoryl donors such as ATP, ADP, and polyphosphate. In several streptomycetes, ATP-glucose kinase (ATP-Glk) has been widely studied and regarded as the main glucose phosphorylating enzyme and is likely a regulatory protein in carbon catabolite repression. In cell extracts from the doxorubicin overproducing strain Streptomyces peucetius var. caesius, grown in glucose, a polyphosphate-dependent Glk (Pp-Glk) was detected by zymogram. Maximum activity was observed during the stationary growth phase (48 h) of cells grown in 100 mM glucose. No activity was detected when 20 mM glutamate was used as the only carbon source, supporting a role for glucose in inducing this enzyme. Contrary to wild-type strains of Streptomyces coelicolor, Streptomyces lividans, and Streptomyces thermocarboxydus K-155, S. peucetius var. caesius produced 1.8 times more Pp-Glk than ATP-Glk. In addition, this microorganism produced five and four times more Pp-Glk and anthracyclines, respectively, than its wild-type S. peucetius parent strain, supporting a role for this enzyme in antibiotic production in the overproducer strain. A cloned 726-bp DNA fragment from S. peucetius var. caesius encoded a putative Pp-Glk, with amino acid identities between 83 and 87 % to orthologous sequences from the above-cited streptomycetes. The cloned fragment showed the polyphosphate-binding sequences GXDIGGXXIK, TXGTGIGSA, and KEX(4)SWXXWA. Sequences for the Zn-binding motif were not detected in this fragment, suggesting that Pp-Glk is not related to the Glk ROK family of proteins. PMID:24687748

  11. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  12. Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase and Kinase Specificity in Regulation of SRC and Breast Tumor Kinase* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Gaofeng; Aleem, Saadat; Yang, Ming; Miller, W. Todd; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant evidence to the contrary, the view that phosphatases are “nonspecific” still pervades the field. Systems biology approaches to defining how signal transduction pathways are integrated at the level of whole organisms also often downplay the contribution of phosphatases, defining them as “erasers” that serve merely to restore the system to its basal state. Here, we present a study that counteracts the idea of “nonspecific phosphatases.” We have characterized two structurally similar and functionally related kinases, BRK and SRC, which are regulated by combinations of activating autophosphorylation and inhibitory C-terminal sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. We demonstrated specificity at the level of the kinases in that SRMS phosphorylated the C terminus of BRK, but not SRC; in contrast, CSK is the kinase responsible for C-terminal phosphorylation of SRC, but not BRK. For the phosphatases, we observed that RNAi-mediated suppression of PTP1B resulted in opposing effects on the activity of BRK and SRC and have defined the mechanisms underlying this specificity. PTP1B inhibited BRK by directly dephosphorylating the Tyr-342 autophosphorylation site. In contrast, PTP1B potentiated SRC activity, but not by dephosphorylating SRC itself directly; instead, PTP1B regulated the interaction between CBP/PAG and CSK. SRC associated with, and phosphorylated, the transmembrane protein CBP/PAG at Tyr-317, resulting in CSK recruitment. We identified PAG as a substrate of PTP1B, and dephosphorylation abolished recruitment of the inhibitory kinase CSK. Overall, these findings illustrate how the combinatorial effects of PTKs and PTPs may be integrated to regulate signaling, with both classes of enzymes displaying exquisite specificity. PMID:25897081

  13. Arginine kinase shows nucleoside diphosphate kinase-like activity toward deoxythymidine diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Hernandez-Flores, Jose M; Lugo-Sanchez, Maria E; Sugich-Miranda, Rocio; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D

    2016-06-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) (ATP: L-arginine phosphotransferase, E.C. 2.7.3.3) catalyzes the reversible transfer of ATP γ-phosphate group to L-arginine to synthetize phospho-arginine as a high-energy storage. Previous studies suggest additional roles for AK in cellular processes. Since AK is found only in invertebrates and it is homologous to creatine kinase from vertebrates, the objective of this work was to demonstrate nucleoside diphosphate kinase-like activity for shrimp AK. For this, AK from marine shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (LvAK) was purified and its activity was assayed for phosphorylation of TDP using ATP as phosphate donor. Moreover, by using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) the phosphate transfer reaction was followed. Also, LvAK tryptophan fluorescence emission changes were detected by dTDP titration, suggesting that the hydrophobic environment of Trp 221, which is located in the top of the active site, is perturbed upon dTDP binding. The kinetic constants for both substrates Arg and dTDP were calculated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Besides, docking calculations suggested that dTDP could bind LvAK in the same cavity where ATP bind, and LvAK basic residues (Arg124, 126 and 309) stabilize the dTDP phosphate groups and the pyrimidine base interact with His284 and Ser122. These results suggest that LvAK bind and phosphorylate dTDP being ATP the phosphate donor, thus describing a novel alternate nucleoside diphosphate kinase-like activity for this enzyme. PMID:27072556

  14. Venus Kinase Receptors: Prospects in Signaling and Biological Functions of These Invertebrate Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dissous, Colette; Morel, Marion; Vanderstraete, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Venus kinase receptors (VKRs) form a family of invertebrate receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) initially discovered in the parasitic platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni. VKRs are single transmembrane receptors that contain an extracellular venus fly trap structure similar to the ligand-binding domain of G protein-coupled receptors of class C, and an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain close to that of insulin receptors. VKRs are found in a large variety of invertebrates from cnidarians to echinoderms and are highly expressed in larval stages and in gonads, suggesting a role of these proteins in embryonic and larval development as well as in reproduction. VKR gene silencing could demonstrate the function of these receptors in oogenesis as well as in spermatogenesis in S. mansoni. VKRs are activated by amino acids and are highly responsive to arginine. As many other RTKs, they form dimers when activated by ligands and induce intracellular pathways involved in protein synthesis and cellular growth, such as MAPK and PI3K/Akt/S6K pathways. VKRs are not present in vertebrates or in some invertebrate species. Questions remain open about the origin of this little-known RTK family in evolution and its role in emergence and specialization of Metazoa. What is the meaning of maintenance or loss of VKR in some phyla or species in terms of development and physiological functions? The presence of VKRs in invertebrates of economical and medical importance, such as pests, vectors of pathogens, and platyhelminth parasites, and the implication of these RTKs in gametogenesis and reproduction processes are valuable reasons to consider VKRs as interesting targets in new programs for eradication/control of pests and infectious diseases, with the main advantage in the case of parasite targeting that VKR counterparts are absent from the vertebrate host kinase panel. PMID:24860549

  15. Venus kinase receptors: prospects in signaling and biological functions of these invertebrate kinases.

    PubMed

    Dissous, Colette; Morel, Marion; Vanderstraete, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Venus kinase receptors (VKRs) form a family of invertebrate receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) initially discovered in the parasitic platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni. VKRs are single transmembrane receptors that contain an extracellular venus fly trap structure similar to the ligand-binding domain of G protein-coupled receptors of class C, and an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain close to that of insulin receptors. VKRs are found in a large variety of invertebrates from cnidarians to echinoderms and are highly expressed in larval stages and in gonads, suggesting a role of these proteins in embryonic and larval development as well as in reproduction. VKR gene silencing could demonstrate the function of these receptors in oogenesis as well as in spermatogenesis in S. mansoni. VKRs are activated by amino acids and are highly responsive to arginine. As many other RTKs, they form dimers when activated by ligands and induce intracellular pathways involved in protein synthesis and cellular growth, such as MAPK and PI3K/Akt/S6K pathways. VKRs are not present in vertebrates or in some invertebrate species. Questions remain open about the origin of this little-known RTK family in evolution and its role in emergence and specialization of Metazoa. What is the meaning of maintenance or loss of VKR in some phyla or species in terms of development and physiological functions? The presence of VKRs in invertebrates of economical and medical importance, such as pests, vectors of pathogens, and platyhelminth parasites, and the implication of these RTKs in gametogenesis and reproduction processes are valuable reasons to consider VKRs as interesting targets in new programs for eradication/control of pests and infectious diseases, with the main advantage in the case of parasite targeting that VKR counterparts are absent from the vertebrate host kinase panel. PMID:24860549

  16. DIRECT MODULATION OF THE PROTEIN KINASE A CATALYTIC SUBUNIT α BY GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR TYROSINE KINASES

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, George B.; Howe, Alan K.; Nickl, Christian K.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Deming, Paula B.

    2011-01-01

    The cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) regulates processes such as cell proliferation and migration following activation of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), yet the signaling mechanisms that link PKA with growth factor receptors remain largely undefined. Here we report that RTKs can directly modulate the function of the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKA-C) through post-translational modification. In vitro kinase assays revealed that both the epidermal growth factor and platelet derived growth factor receptors (EGFR and PDGFR, respectively) tyrosine phosphorylate PKA-C. Mass spectrometry identified tyrosine 330 (Y330) as a receptor-mediated phosphorylation site and mutation of Y330 to phenylalanine (Y330F) all but abolished the RTK-mediated phosphorylation of PKA-C in vitro. Y330 resides within a conserved region at the C-terminal tail of PKA-C that allosterically regulates enzymatic activity. Therefore, the effect of phosphorylation at Y330 on the activity of PKA-C was investigated. The Km for a peptide substrate was markedly decreased when PKA-C subunits were tyrosine phosphorylated by the receptors as compared to un-phosphorylated controls. Importantly, tyrosine-phosphorylated PKA-C subunits were detected in cells stimulated with EGF, PDGF and FGF2 and in fibroblasts undergoing PDGF-mediated chemotaxis. These results demonstrate a direct, functional interaction between RTKs and PKA-C and identify tyrosine phosphorylation as a novel mechansim for regulating PKA activity. PMID:21866565

  17. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β suppresses polyglutamine aggregation by inhibiting Vaccinia-related kinase 2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunju; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kim, Sangjune; Lee, Dohyun; Jeong, Young-Hun; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of polyglutamine repeats in the N-terminal of huntingtin. The amount of aggregate-prone protein is controlled by various mechanisms, including molecular chaperones. Vaccinia-related kinase 2 (VRK2) is known to negatively regulate chaperonin TRiC, and VRK2-facilitated degradation of TRiC increases polyQ protein aggregation, which is involved in HD. We found that VRK2 activity was negatively controlled by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). GSK3β directly bound to VRK2 and inhibited the catalytic activity of VRK2 in a kinase activity-independent manner. Furthermore, GSK3β increased the stability of TRiC and decreased the formation of HttQ103-GFP aggregates by inhibiting VRK2. These results indicate that GSK3β signaling may be a regulatory mechanism of HD progression and suggest targets for further therapeutic trials for HD. PMID:27377031

  18. Aurora Kinases and Potential Medical Applications of Aurora Kinase Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gavriilidis, Paschalis; Giakoustidis, Alexandros; Giakoustidis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinases (AKs) represent a novel group of serine/threonine kinases. They were originally described in 1995 by David Glover in the course of studies of mutant alleles characterized with unusual spindle pole configuration in Drosophila melanogaster. Thus far, three AKs A, B, and C have been discovered in human healthy and neoplastic cells. Each one locates in different subcellular locations and they are all nuclear proteins. AKs are playing an essential role in mitotic events such as monitoring of the mitotic checkpoint, creation of bipolar mitotic spindle and alignment of centrosomes on it, also regulating centrosome separation, bio-orientation of chromosomes and cytokinesis. Any inactivation of them can have catastrophic consequences on mitotic events of spindle formation, alignment of centrosomes and cytokinesis, resulting in apoptosis. Overexpression of AKs has been detected in diverse solid and hematological cancers and has been linked with a dismal prognosis. After discovery and identification of the first aurora kinase inhibitor (AKI) ZM447439 as a potential drug for targeted therapy in cancer treatment, approximately 30 AKIs have been introduced in cancer treatment. PMID:26345296

  19. Tank binding kinase 1 is a centrosome-associated kinase necessary for microtubule dynamics and mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Smitha; Nguyen, Jonathan; Johnson, Joseph; Haura, Eric; Coppola, Domenico; Chellappan, Srikumar

    2015-01-01

    TANK Binding Kinase 1 (TBK1) is a non-canonical IκB kinase that contributes to KRAS-driven lung cancer. Here we report that TBK1 plays essential roles in mammalian cell division. Specifically, levels of active phospho-TBK1 increase during mitosis and localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and midbody, and selective inhibition or silencing of TBK1 triggers defects in spindle assembly and prevents mitotic progression. TBK1 binds to the centrosomal protein CEP170 and to the mitotic apparatus protein NuMA, and both CEP170 and NuMA are TBK1 substrates. Further, TBK1 is necessary for CEP170 centrosomal localization and binding to the microtubule depolymerase Kif2b, and for NuMA binding to dynein. Finally, selective disruption of the TBK1–CEP170 complex augments microtubule stability and triggers defects in mitosis, suggesting that TBK1 functions as a mitotic kinase necessary for microtubule dynamics and mitosis. PMID:26656453

  20. Diacylglycerol kinase regulation of protein kinase D during oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Song Jun; Li Jing; Mourot, Joshua M.; Mark Evers, B.; Chung, Dai H.

    2008-10-17

    We recently demonstrated that protein kinase D (PKD) exerts a protective function during oxidative stress-induced intestinal epithelial cell injury; however, the exact role of DAG kinase (DGK){zeta}, an isoform expressed in intestine, during this process is unknown. We sought to determine the role of DGK during oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury and whether DGK acts as an upstream regulator of PKD. Inhibition of DGK with R59022 compound or DGK{zeta} siRNA transfection decreased H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced RIE-1 cell apoptosis as measured by DNA fragmentation and increased PKD phosphorylation. Overexpression of kinase-dead DGK{zeta} also significantly increased PKD phosphorylation. Additionally, endogenous nuclear DGK{zeta} rapidly translocated to the cytoplasm following H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. Our findings demonstrate that DGK is involved in the regulation of oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury. PKD activation is induced by DGK{zeta}, suggesting DGK is an upstream regulator of oxidative stress-induced activation of the PKD signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells.

  1. Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase: key kinase for stem cell phenotype in glioma and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Ranjit; Hong, Christopher S; Smith, Luke G F; Kornblum, Harley I; Nakano, Ichiro

    2014-06-01

    Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) is a member of the snf1/AMPK family of protein serine/threonine kinases that has recently gained significant attention in the stem cell and cancer biology field. Recent studies suggest that activation of this kinase is tightly associated with extended survival and accelerated proliferation of cancer stem cells (CSC) in various organs. Overexpression of MELK has been noted in various cancers, including colon, breast, ovaries, pancreas, prostate, and brain, making the inhibition of MELK an attractive therapeutic strategy for a variety of cancers. In the experimental cancer models, depletion of MELK by RNA interference or small molecule inhibitors induces apoptotic cell death of CSCs derived from glioblastoma multiforme and breast cancer, both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanism of action of MELK includes, yet may not be restricted to, direct binding and activation of the oncogenic transcription factors c-JUN and FOXM1 in cancer cells but not in the normal counterparts. Following these preclinical studies, the phase I clinical trial for advanced cancers with OTSSP167 started in 2013, as the first-in-class MELK inhibitor. This review summarizes the current molecular understanding of MELK and the recent preclinical studies about MELK as a cancer therapeutic target. PMID:24795222

  2. Protein kinase C mediates platelet secretion and thrombus formation through protein kinase D2

    PubMed Central

    Konopatskaya, Olga; Matthews, Sharon A.; Harper, Matthew T.; Gilio, Karen; Cosemans, Judith M. E. M.; Williams, Christopher M.; Navarro, Maria N.; Carter, Deborah A.; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Leitges, Michael; Cantrell, Doreen; Poole, Alastair W.

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are highly specialized blood cells critically involved in hemostasis and thrombosis. Members of the protein kinase C (PKC) family have established roles in regulating platelet function and thrombosis, but the molecular mechanisms are not clearly understood. In particular, the conventional PKC isoform, PKCα, is a major regulator of platelet granule secretion, but the molecular pathway from PKCα to secretion is not defined. Protein kinase D (PKD) is a family of 3 kinases activated by PKC, which may represent a step in the PKC signaling pathway to secretion. In the present study, we show that PKD2 is the sole PKD member regulated downstream of PKC in platelets, and that the conventional, but not novel, PKC isoforms provide the upstream signal. Platelets from a gene knock-in mouse in which 2 key phosphorylation sites in PKD2 have been mutated (Ser707Ala/Ser711Ala) show a significant reduction in agonist-induced dense granule secretion, but not in α-granule secretion. This deficiency in dense granule release was responsible for a reduced platelet aggregation and a marked reduction in thrombus formation. Our results show that in the molecular pathway to secretion, PKD2 is a key component of the PKC-mediated pathway to platelet activation and thrombus formation through its selective regulation of dense granule secretion. PMID:21527521

  3. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β suppresses polyglutamine aggregation by inhibiting Vaccinia-related kinase 2 activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunju; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kim, Sangjune; Lee, Dohyun; Jeong, Young-Hun; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of polyglutamine repeats in the N-terminal of huntingtin. The amount of aggregate-prone protein is controlled by various mechanisms, including molecular chaperones. Vaccinia-related kinase 2 (VRK2) is known to negatively regulate chaperonin TRiC, and VRK2-facilitated degradation of TRiC increases polyQ protein aggregation, which is involved in HD. We found that VRK2 activity was negatively controlled by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). GSK3β directly bound to VRK2 and inhibited the catalytic activity of VRK2 in a kinase activity-independent manner. Furthermore, GSK3β increased the stability of TRiC and decreased the formation of HttQ103-GFP aggregates by inhibiting VRK2. These results indicate that GSK3β signaling may be a regulatory mechanism of HD progression and suggest targets for further therapeutic trials for HD. PMID:27377031

  4. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase enhancer (PIKE) in the brain: is it simply a phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt enhancer?

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chi Bun; Ye, Keqiang

    2013-01-01

    Since its discovery in 2000, phosphoinositide 3-kinase enhancer (PIKE) has been recognized as a class of GTPase that controls the enzymatic activities of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt in the central nervous system (CNS). However, recent studies suggest that PIKEs are not only enhancers to PI3K/Akt but also modulators to other kinases including insulin receptor tyrosine kinase and focal adhesion kinases. Moreover, they regulate transcription factors such as signal transducer and activator of transcription and nuclear factor κB. Indeed, PIKE proteins participate in multiple cellular processes including control of cell survival, brain development, memory formation, gene transcription, and metabolism. In this review, we have summarized the functions of PIKE proteins in CNS and discussed their potential implications in various neurological disorders. PMID:22499674

  5. Requirement for the Kinase Activity of Human DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit in DNA Strand Break Rejoining

    PubMed Central

    Kurimasa, Akihiro; Kumano, Satoshi; Boubnov, Nikolai V.; Story, Michael D.; Tung, Chang-Shung; Peterson, Scott R.; Chen, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an enormous, 470-kDa protein serine/threonine kinase that has homology with members of the phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase superfamily. This protein contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by assembling broken ends of DNA molecules in combination with the DNA-binding factors Ku70 and Ku80. It may also serve as a molecular scaffold for recruiting DNA repair factors to DNA strand breaks. This study attempts to better define the role of protein kinase activity in the repair of DNA DSBs. We constructed a contiguous 14-kb human DNA-PKcs cDNA and demonstrated that it can complement the DNA DSB repair defects of two mutant cell lines known to be deficient in DNA-PKcs (M059J and V3). We then created deletion and site-directed mutations within the conserved PI 3-kinase domain of the DNA-PKcs gene to test the importance of protein kinase activity for DSB rejoining. These DNA-PKcs mutant constructs are able to express the protein but fail to complement the DNA DSB or V(D)J recombination defects of DNA-PKcs mutant cells. These results indicate that the protein kinase activity of DNA-PKcs is essential for the rejoining of DNA DSBs in mammalian cells. We have also determined a model structure for the DNA-PKcs kinase domain based on comparisons to the crystallographic structure of a cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. This structure gives some insight into which amino acid residues are crucial for the kinase activity in DNA-PKcs. PMID:10207111

  6. A protein kinase screen of Neurospora crassa mutant strains reveals that the SNF1 protein kinase promotes glycogen synthase phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Candido, Thiago De Souza; Gonçalves, Rodrigo Duarte; Felício, Ana Paula; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; De Carvalho, Ana Carolina Gomes Vieira; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2014-12-15

    Glycogen functions as a carbohydrate reserve in a variety of organisms and its metabolism is highly regulated. The activities of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase, the rate-limiting enzymes of the synthesis and degradation processes, respectively, are regulated by allosteric modulation and reversible phosphorylation. To identify the protein kinases affecting glycogen metabolism in Neurospora crassa, we performed a screen of 84 serine/threonine kinase knockout strains. We identified multiple kinases that have already been described as controlling glycogen metabolism in different organisms, such as NcSNF1, NcPHO85, NcGSK3, NcPKA, PSK2 homologue and NcATG1. In addition, many hypothetical kinases have been implicated in the control of glycogen metabolism. Two kinases, NcIME-2 and NcNIMA, already functionally characterized but with no functions related to glycogen metabolism regulation, were also identified. Among the kinases identified, it is important to mention the role of NcSNF1. We showed in the present study that this kinase was implicated in glycogen synthase phosphorylation, as demonstrated by the higher levels of glycogen accumulated during growth, along with a higher glycogen synthase (GSN) ±glucose 6-phosphate activity ratio and a lesser set of phosphorylated GSN isoforms in strain Ncsnf1KO, when compared with the wild-type strain. The results led us to conclude that, in N. crassa, this kinase promotes phosphorylation of glycogen synthase either directly or indirectly, which is the opposite of what is described for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The kinases also play a role in gene expression regulation, in that gdn, the gene encoding the debranching enzyme, was down-regulated by the proteins identified in the screen. Some kinases affected growth and development, suggesting a connection linking glycogen metabolism with cell growth and development. PMID:25253091

  7. Cell cycle regulation of a Xenopus Wee1-like kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, P R; Coleman, T R; Dunphy, W G

    1995-01-01

    Using a polymerase chain reaction-based strategy, we have isolated a gene encoding a Wee1-like kinase from Xenopus eggs. The recombinant Xenopus Wee1 protein efficiently phosphorylates Cdc2 exclusively on Tyr-15 in a cyclin-dependent manner. The addition of exogenous Wee1 protein to Xenopus cell cycle extracts results in a dose-dependent delay of mitotic initiation that is accompanied by enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of Cdc2. The activity of the Wee1 protein is highly regulated during the cell cycle: the interphase, underphosphorylated form of Wee1 (68 kDa) phosphorylates Cdc2 very efficiently, whereas the mitotic, hyperphosphorylated version (75 kDa) is weakly active as a Cdc2-specific tyrosine kinase. The down-modulation of Wee1 at mitosis is directly attributable to phosphorylation, since dephosphorylation with protein phosphatase 2A restores its kinase activity. During interphase, the activity of this Wee1 homolog does not vary in response to the presence of unreplicated DNA. The mitosis-specific phosphorylation of Wee1 is due to at least two distinct kinases: the Cdc2 protein and another activity (kinase X) that may correspond to an MPM-2 epitope kinase. These studies indicate that the down-regulation of Wee1-like kinase activity at mitosis is a multistep process that occurs after other biochemical reactions have signaled the successful completion of S phase. Images PMID:7749193

  8. A novel nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, Srm: cloning and targeted disruption.

    PubMed Central

    Kohmura, N; Yagi, T; Tomooka, Y; Oyanagi, M; Kominami, R; Takeda, N; Chiba, J; Ikawa, Y; Aizawa, S

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated a novel nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, Srm, that maps to the distal end of chromosome 2. It has SH2, SH2', and SH3 domains and a tyrosine residue for autophosphorylation in the kinase domain but lacks an N-terminal glycine for myristylation and a C-terminal tyrosine which, when phosphorylated, suppresses kinase activity. These are structural features of the recently identified Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. The Srm N-terminal unique domain, however, lacks the structural characteristics of the Tec family kinases, and the sequence similarity is highest to Src in the SH region. The expression of two transcripts is rather ubiquitous and changes according to tissue and developmental stage. Mutant mice were generated by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells but displayed no apparent phenotype as in mutant mice expressing Src family kinases. These results suggest that Srm constitutes a new family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases that may be redundant in function. Images PMID:7935409

  9. Unconventional Functions of Mitotic Kinases in Kidney Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hascoet, Pauline; Chesnel, Franck; Le Goff, Cathy; Le Goff, Xavier; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Human tumors exhibit a variety of genetic alterations, including point mutations, translocations, gene amplifications and deletions, as well as aneuploid chromosome numbers. For carcinomas, aneuploidy is associated with poor patient outcome for a large variety of tumor types, including breast, colon, and renal cell carcinoma. The Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a heterogeneous carcinoma consisting of different histologic types. The clear renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most common subtype and represents 85% of the RCC. Central to the biology of the ccRCC is the loss of function of the Von Hippel–Lindau gene, but is also associated with genetic instability that could be caused by abrogation of the cell cycle mitotic spindle checkpoint and may involve the Aurora kinases, which regulate centrosome maturation. Aneuploidy can also result from the loss of cell–cell adhesion and apical–basal cell polarity that also may be regulated by the mitotic kinases (polo-like kinase 1, casein kinase 2, doublecortin-like kinase 1, and Aurora kinases). In this review, we describe the “non-mitotic” unconventional functions of these kinases in renal tumorigenesis. PMID:26579493

  10. Structure of the intact ATM/Tel1 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuejuan; Chu, Huanyu; Lv, Mengjuan; Zhang, Zhihui; Qiu, Shuwan; Liu, Haiyan; Shen, Xuetong; Wang, Weiwu; Cai, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein is an apical kinase that orchestrates the multifaceted DNA-damage response. Normally, ATM kinase is in an inactive, homodimer form and is transformed into monomers upon activation. Besides a conserved kinase domain at the C terminus, ATM contains three other structural modules, referred to as FAT, FATC and N-terminal helical solenoid. Here we report the first cryo-EM structure of ATM kinase, which is an intact homodimeric ATM/Tel1 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that two monomers directly contact head-to-head through the FAT and kinase domains. The tandem N-terminal helical solenoid tightly packs against the FAT and kinase domains. The structure suggests that ATM/Tel1 dimer interface and the consecutive HEAT repeats inhibit the binding of kinase substrates and regulators by steric hindrance. Our study provides a structural framework for understanding the mechanisms of ATM/Tel1 regulation as well as the development of new therapeutic agents. PMID:27229179

  11. Discovery of selective RIO2 kinase small molecule ligand.

    PubMed

    Varin, Thibault; Godfrey, Alexander G; Masquelin, Thierry; Nicolaou, Christos A; Evans, David A; Vieth, Michal

    2015-10-01

    We report the discovery and initial optimization of diphenpyramide and several of its analogs as hRIO2 kinase ligands. One of these analogs is the most selective hRIO2 ligand reported to date. Diphenpyramide is a Cyclooxygenase 1 and 2 inhibitor that was used as an anti-inflammatory agent. The RIO2 kinase affinity of diphenpyramide was discovered by serendipity while profiling of 13 marketed drugs on a large 456 kinase assay panel. The inhibition values also suggested a relative selectivity of diphenpyramide for RIO2 against the other kinases in the panel. Subsequently three available and eight newly synthesized analogs were assayed, one of which showed a 10 fold increased hRIO2 binding affinity. Additionally, this compound shows significantly better selectivity over assayed kinases, when compared to currently known RIO2 inhibitors. As RIO2 is involved in the biosynthesis of the ribosome and cell cycle regulation, our selective ligand may be useful for the delineation of the biological role of this kinase. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases. PMID:25891899

  12. LRRK2 and ubiquitination: implications for kinase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Melrose, Heather L.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations and risk variants in LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2) represent the most common genetic cause of familial and sporadic PD (Parkinson's disease). LRRK2 protein is widely expressed throughout the brain and the periphery. Structurally, LRRK2 contains several functional domains, including a dual enzymatic core consisting of a kinase and GTPase domain. Disease-linked variants are found in both these enzymatic domains as well as in the COR [C-terminal of ROC (Ras of complex proteins)] and WD40 protein–protein binding domain. The kinase domain is widely believed to be linked to toxicity, and thus the thrust of pharmaceutical effort has focused on developing LRRK2 kinase inhibitors. However, recent data have suggested that inhibition of LRRK2 activity results in reduced LRRK2 levels and peripheral side effects, which are similar to those observed in homozygous LRRK2-knockout and LRRK2 kinase-dead rodent models. In a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal, a study led by Nichols reveals that dephosphorylation of LRRK2 cellular phosphorylation sites (Ser910/Ser935/Ser955/Ser973) triggers its ubiquitination and subsequent degradation and thus may account for the loss of function phenotypes observed in peripheral tissues in LRRK2-knockout/kinase-dead or inhibitor-treated rodents and primates. Albeit negative from a kinase inhibitor standpoint, the data open new avenues for LRRK2 biology and therapeutic approaches to counteract LRRK2 toxicity. PMID:26341487

  13. Activation of Cytosolic Pyruvate Kinase by Polyethylene Glycol.

    PubMed Central

    Podesta, F. E.; Plaxton, W. C.

    1993-01-01

    Homogeneous cytosolic pyruvate kinase from endosperm of germinating castor oil (Ricinus communis L. cv Hale) seeds was potently activated by polyethylene glycol. The addition of 5% (w/v) polyethylene glycol to the pyruvate kinase reaction mixture caused a 2.6-fold increase in maximal velocity and 12.5- and 2-fold reductions in Km values for phosphoenolpyruvate and ADP, respectively. Glycerol, ethylene glycol, and bovine serum albumin also enhanced pyruvate kinase activity, albeit to a lesser extent than polyethylene glycol. The addition of 5% (w/v) polyethylene glycol to the elution buffer during high-performance gel filtration chromatography of purified cytosolic pyruvate kinase helped to stabilize the active heterotetrameric native structure of the enzyme. A higher degree of inhibition by MgATP, but lower sensitivity to the inhibitors 3-phosphoglycerate and fructose- 1,6-bisphosphate, was also observed in the presence of 5% (w/v) polyethylene glycol. It is concluded that (a) plant cytosolic pyruvate kinase activity and regulation, like that of other regulatory pyruvate kinases, is modified by extreme dilution in the assay medium, probably as a result of deaggregation of the native tetrameric enzyme, and (b) ATP is probably the major metabolic effector of germinating castor endosperm cytosolic pyruvate kinase in vivo. PMID:12231936

  14. Activation of Cytosolic Pyruvate Kinase by Polyethylene Glycol.

    PubMed

    Podesta, F. E.; Plaxton, W. C.

    1993-09-01

    Homogeneous cytosolic pyruvate kinase from endosperm of germinating castor oil (Ricinus communis L. cv Hale) seeds was potently activated by polyethylene glycol. The addition of 5% (w/v) polyethylene glycol to the pyruvate kinase reaction mixture caused a 2.6-fold increase in maximal velocity and 12.5- and 2-fold reductions in Km values for phosphoenolpyruvate and ADP, respectively. Glycerol, ethylene glycol, and bovine serum albumin also enhanced pyruvate kinase activity, albeit to a lesser extent than polyethylene glycol. The addition of 5% (w/v) polyethylene glycol to the elution buffer during high-performance gel filtration chromatography of purified cytosolic pyruvate kinase helped to stabilize the active heterotetrameric native structure of the enzyme. A higher degree of inhibition by MgATP, but lower sensitivity to the inhibitors 3-phosphoglycerate and fructose- 1,6-bisphosphate, was also observed in the presence of 5% (w/v) polyethylene glycol. It is concluded that (a) plant cytosolic pyruvate kinase activity and regulation, like that of other regulatory pyruvate kinases, is modified by extreme dilution in the assay medium, probably as a result of deaggregation of the native tetrameric enzyme, and (b) ATP is probably the major metabolic effector of germinating castor endosperm cytosolic pyruvate kinase in vivo. PMID:12231936

  15. Structure of the intact ATM/Tel1 kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuejuan; Chu, Huanyu; Lv, Mengjuan; Zhang, Zhihui; Qiu, Shuwan; Liu, Haiyan; Shen, Xuetong; Wang, Weiwu; Cai, Gang

    2016-05-01

    The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein is an apical kinase that orchestrates the multifaceted DNA-damage response. Normally, ATM kinase is in an inactive, homodimer form and is transformed into monomers upon activation. Besides a conserved kinase domain at the C terminus, ATM contains three other structural modules, referred to as FAT, FATC and N-terminal helical solenoid. Here we report the first cryo-EM structure of ATM kinase, which is an intact homodimeric ATM/Tel1 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that two monomers directly contact head-to-head through the FAT and kinase domains. The tandem N-terminal helical solenoid tightly packs against the FAT and kinase domains. The structure suggests that ATM/Tel1 dimer interface and the consecutive HEAT repeats inhibit the binding of kinase substrates and regulators by steric hindrance. Our study provides a structural framework for understanding the mechanisms of ATM/Tel1 regulation as well as the development of new therapeutic agents.

  16. Indolinones as promising scaffold as kinase inhibitors: a review.

    PubMed

    Prakash, C R; Raja, S

    2012-02-01

    Kinases are probably the most important signaling enzymes, which represent about 20% of the druggable genome. Currently, more than 150 kinases are known. So, kinase inhibition therapy has become a very important area of drug research since most of our diseases are related to intra or intercellular signaling by kinases. Indole alkaloids are extensively studied for their biological activities in several pharmaceutical areas, including, for example, antitumor. Among this chemical family, indolinone displays very promising antitumor properties by inhibiting various kinase families. These small molecules have a low molecular weight and most of them bind to protein kinases competing with ATP for the ATP-binding site. This review focuses on the indolinone based drugs approved for the treatment of cancer, drugs under clinical trial and then chemical diversity of various synthetic analogues of indolinone and their metabolites as various kinase inhibitors. This review also focused on structural activity relationship (SAR), mechanisms of action and biological targets through which indolinone and its derivatives display their antitumor activity. PMID:22372601

  17. Structure of the intact ATM/Tel1 kinase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuejuan; Chu, Huanyu; Lv, Mengjuan; Zhang, Zhihui; Qiu, Shuwan; Liu, Haiyan; Shen, Xuetong; Wang, Weiwu; Cai, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein is an apical kinase that orchestrates the multifaceted DNA-damage response. Normally, ATM kinase is in an inactive, homodimer form and is transformed into monomers upon activation. Besides a conserved kinase domain at the C terminus, ATM contains three other structural modules, referred to as FAT, FATC and N-terminal helical solenoid. Here we report the first cryo-EM structure of ATM kinase, which is an intact homodimeric ATM/Tel1 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that two monomers directly contact head-to-head through the FAT and kinase domains. The tandem N-terminal helical solenoid tightly packs against the FAT and kinase domains. The structure suggests that ATM/Tel1 dimer interface and the consecutive HEAT repeats inhibit the binding of kinase substrates and regulators by steric hindrance. Our study provides a structural framework for understanding the mechanisms of ATM/Tel1 regulation as well as the development of new therapeutic agents. PMID:27229179

  18. Variable intron/exon structure in the oligochaete lombricine kinase gene.

    PubMed

    Doumen, Chris

    2012-09-01

    Lombricine kinase is an annelid enzyme that belongs to the phosphagen kinase family of which creatine kinase and arginine kinase are the typical representatives. The enzymes play important roles in the cellular energy metabolism of animals. Biochemical, physiological and molecular information with respect to lombricine kinase is limited compared to other phosphagen kinases. This study presents data on the cDNA sequences of lombricine kinase from two smaller oligochaetes, Enchytraeus sp. and Stylaria sp. The deduced amino acid sequences are analyzed and compared with other selected phosphagen kinases. The intron/exon structure of the lombricine kinase gene was determined for these two species as well as two additional oligochaetes, Lumbriculus variegatus and Tubifex tubifex, and compared with available data for annelid phosphagen kinases. The data indicate the existence of a variable organization of the proposed 8-intron/9-exon gene structure. The results provide further insights in the evolution and position of these enzymes within the phosphagen kinase family. PMID:22705027

  19. Multiplexed tyrosine kinase activity detection in cancer cells using hydrogel immobilized substrate

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Alicia D.; Han, Wenquing; Liu, Bi; Palecek, Sean P.

    2013-01-01

    Kinases play a key role in cellular signaling, and the overactivation or overexpression of these kinases has been linked to a variety of cancers. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors treat the mechanism of these cancers by targeting the specific kinases that are overactive. Some patients, however, do not respond to these inhibitors or develop resistance to these inhibitors during treatment. Additionally, even within cancers of the same tissue type, different kinases may be overactive in different patients. For example, some lung cancers overexpress epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and respond to EGFR inhibitors, while other lung cancers do not overexpress EGFR and receive no benefit from this treatment. Even among patients exhibiting EGFR overexpression, some do not respond to EGFR kinase inhibitors because other kinases, such as Met kinase, are also overactivated. Here we describe a quantitative and specific multiplexed microfluidic assay using a hydrogel immobilized substrate for measuring the kinase activity of Met and Abl kinase from cancer cells. We immobilized kinase specific substrates into macroporous hydrogel micropillars in microchannels. These microchannels were incubated with 6 µl of a kinase reaction solution containing cancer cell lysate and measured kinase activity via fluorescence detection of a phosphotyrosine antibody. We showed that the assay can specifically measure the activity of both Met and Abl kinase within one microchannel with potential to measure the activity of as many as 5 kinases within one microchannel. The assay also detected Met kinase inhibition from lysates of cancer cells grown in the Met kinase inhibitor PHA665752. PMID:23624904

  20. Rho kinase as a target for cerebral vascular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Sellers, James R; McKerracher, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel pharmaceutical treatments for disorders of the cerebral vasculature is a serious unmet medical need. These vascular disorders are typified by a disruption in the delicate Rho signaling equilibrium within the blood vessel wall. In particular, Rho kinase overactivation in the smooth muscle and endothelial layers of the vessel wall results in cytoskeletal modifications that lead to reduced vascular integrity and abnormal vascular growth. Rho kinase is thus a promising target for the treatment of cerebral vascular disorders. Indeed, preclinical studies indicate that Rho kinase inhibition may reduce the formation/growth/rupture of both intracranial aneurysms and cerebral cavernous malformations. PMID:26062400

  1. Novel cinnoline-based inhibitors of LRRK2 kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Albert W; Adler, Marc; Aubele, Danielle L; Bowers, Simeon; Franzini, Maurizio; Goldbach, Erich; Lorentzen, Colin; Neitz, R Jeffrey; Probst, Gary D; Quinn, Kevin P; Santiago, Pam; Sham, Hing L; Tam, Danny; Truong, Anh P; Ye, Xiaocong M; Ren, Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity is a therapeutic approach that may lead to new treatments for PD. Herein we report the discovery of a series of cinnoline-3-carboxamides that are potent against both wild-type and mutant LRRK2 kinase activity in biochemical assays. These compounds are also shown to be potent inhibitors in a cellular assay and to have good to excellent CNS penetration. PMID:23219325

  2. LPS-induced clustering of CD14 triggers generation of PI(4,5)P2.

    PubMed

    Płóciennikowska, Agnieszka; Zdioruk, Mykola I; Traczyk, Gabriela; Świątkowska, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna

    2015-11-15

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces strong pro-inflammatory reactions after sequential binding to CD14 protein and TLR4 receptor. Here, we show that CD14 controls generation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] in response to LPS binding. In J774 cells and HEK293 cells expressing CD14 exposed to 10-100 ng/ml LPS, the level of PI(4,5)P2 rose in a biphasic manner with peaks at 5-10 min and 60 min. After 5-10 min of LPS stimulation, CD14 underwent prominent clustering in the plasma membrane, accompanied by accumulation of PI(4,5)P2 and type-I phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K) isoforms Iα and Iγ (encoded by Pip5k1a and Pip5k1c, respectively) in the CD14 region. Clustering of CD14 with antibodies, without LPS and TLR4 participation, was sufficient to trigger PI(4,5)P2 elevation. The newly generated PI(4,5)P2 accumulated in rafts, which also accommodated CD14 and a large portion of PIP5K Iα and PIP5K Iγ. Silencing of PIP5K Iα and PIP5K Iγ, or application of drugs interfering with PI(4,5)P2 synthesis and availability, abolished the LPS-induced PI(4,5)P2 elevation and inhibited downstream pro-inflammatory reactions. Taken together, these data indicate that LPS induces clustering of CD14, which triggers PI(4,5)P2 generation in rafts that is required for maximal pro-inflammatory signaling of TLR4. PMID:26446256

  3. Activation of protein kinase C induces mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation and pronucleus formation in rat oocytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing; Smith, Gary D; Chen, Da-Yuan; Han, Zhi-Ming; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2002-07-01

    Mammalian oocytes are arrested at metaphase of the second meiotic division (MII) before fertilization. When oocytes are stimulated by spermatozoa, they exit MII stage and complete meiosis. It has been suggested that an immediate increase in intracellular free calcium concentration and inactivation of maturation promoting factor (MPF) are required for oocyte activation. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and their interplay in rat oocyte activation. We found that MAP kinase became dephosphorylated in correlation with pronucleus formation after fertilization. Protein kinase C activators, phorbol 12-myriatate 13-acetate (PMA) and 1,2-dioctanoyl-rac-glycerol (diC8), triggered dephosphorylation of MAP kinase and pronucleus formation in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Dephosphorylation of MAP kinase was also correlated with pronucleus formation when oocytes were treated with PKC activators. Effects of PKC activators were abolished by the PKC inhibitors, calphostin C and staurosporine, as well as a protein phosphatase blocker, okadaic acid (OA). These results suggest that PKC activation may cause rat oocyte pronucleus formation via MAP kinase dephosphorylation, which is probably mediated by OA-sensitive protein phosphatases. We also provide evidence supporting the involvement of such a process in fertilization. PMID:12080000

  4. Quercetin: a pleiotropic kinase inhibitor against cancer.

    PubMed

    Russo, Gian Luigi; Russo, Maria; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Tedesco, Idolo; Bilotto, Stefania; Iannitti, Roberta; Palumbo, Rosanna

    2014-01-01

    Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables can represent an easy strategy to significantly reduce the incidence of cancer. From this observation, derived mostly from epidemiological data, the new field of chemoprevention has emerged in the primary and secondary prevention of cancer. Chemoprevention is defined as the use of natural or synthetic compounds able to stop, reverse, or delay the process of tumorigenesis in its early stages. A large number of phytochemicals are potentially capable of simultaneously inhibiting and modulating several key factors regulating cell proliferation in cancer cells. Quercetin is a flavonoid possessing potential chemopreventive properties. It is a functionally pleiotropic molecule, possessing multiple intracellular targets, affecting different cell signaling processes usually altered in cancer cells, with limited toxicity on normal cells. Simultaneously targeting multiple pathways may help to kill malignant cells and slow down the onset of drug resistance. Among the different substrates triggered by quercetin, we have reviewed the ability of the molecule to inhibit protein kinases involved in deregulated cell growth in cancer cells. PMID:24114481

  5. Therapeutic drug monitoring and tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Herviou, Pauline; Thivat, Emilie; Richard, Damien; Roche, Lucie; Dohou, Joyce; Pouget, Mélanie; Eschalier, Alain; Durando, Xavier; Authier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic activity of drugs can be optimized by establishing an individualized dosage, based on the measurement of the drug concentration in the serum, particularly if the drugs are characterized by an inter-individual variation in pharmacokinetics that results in an under- or overexposure to treatment. In recent years, several tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been developed to block intracellular signaling pathways in tumor cells. These oral drugs are candidates for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) due to their high inter-individual variability for therapeutic and toxic effects. Following a literature search on PubMed, studies on TKIs and their pharmacokinetic characteristics, plasma quantification and inter-individual variability was studied. TDM is commonly used in various medical fields, including cardiology and psychiatry, but is not often applied in oncology. Plasma concentration monitoring has been thoroughly studied for imatinib, in order to evaluate the usefulness of TDM. The measurement of plasma concentration can be performed by various analytical techniques, with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry being the reference method. This method is currently used to monitor the efficacy and tolerability of imatinib treatments. Although TDM is already being used for imatinib, additional studies are required in order to improve this practice with the inclusion of other TKIs. PMID:27446421

  6. Weekly oral alendronate in mevalonate kinase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is caused by mutations in the MVK gene, encoding the second enzyme of mevalonate pathway, which results in subsequent shortage of downstream compounds, and starts in childhood with febrile attacks, skin, joint, and gastrointestinal symptoms, sometimes induced by vaccinations. Methods For a history of early-onset corticosteroid-induced reduction of bone mineral density in a 14-year-old boy with MKD, who also had presented three bone fractures, we administered weekly oral alendronate, a drug widely used in the management of osteoporosis and other high bone turnover diseases, which blocks mevalonate and halts the prenylation process. Results All of the patient’s MKD clinical and laboratory abnormalities were resolved after starting alendronate treatment. Conclusions This observation appears enigmatic, since alendronate should reinforce the metabolic block characterizing MKD, but is crucial because of the ultimate improvement shown by this patient. The anti-inflammatory properties of bisphosphonates are a new question for debate among physicians across various specialties, and requires further biochemical and clinical investigation. PMID:24360083

  7. Protein kinase inhibitors against malignant lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    D’Cruz, Osmond J; Uckun, Fatih M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are intimately involved in multiple signal transduction pathways regulating survival, activation, proliferation and differentiation of lymphoid cells. Deregulation or overexpression of specific oncogenic TKs is implicated in maintaining the malignant phenotype in B-lineage lymphoid malignancies. Several novel targeted TK inhibitors (TKIs) have recently emerged as active in the treatment of relapsed or refractory B-cell lymphomas that inhibit critical signaling pathways, promote apoptotic mechanisms or modulate the tumor microenvironment. Areas covered In this review, the authors summarize the clinical outcomes of newer TKIs in various B-cell lymphomas from published and ongoing clinical studies and abstracts from major cancer and hematology conferences. Expert opinion Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that robust antitumor activity can be obtained with TKIs directed toward specific oncogenic TKs that are genetically deregulated in various subtypes of B-cell lymphomas. Clinical success of targeting TKIs is dependent upon on identifying reliable molecular and clinical markers associated with select cohorts of patients. Further understanding of the signaling pathways should stimulate the identification of novel molecular targets and expand the development of new therapeutic options and individualized therapies. PMID:23496343

  8. [Determination of riboflavin kinase activity in yeast].

    PubMed

    Shavlovsky, G M; Kashchenko, V E

    1975-01-01

    It is established that the main reason of the riboflavin kinase (RFK, EC 2.7.1.26) low specific activity in the cell-free extracts of the yeast Pichia guillermondii Wickerham ATCC 9058 is the presence of alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1), effectively destructing flaven mononucleotide. By chromatography of the cell-free extracts of P. guillermondii on DEAE-Sephadex A-50, CM-Sphadex C-50, CM-cellulose, Sephadexes G-75 and G-100 RFK and alkaline phosphatase may be separated completely. Any of these procedures results in a several times increase of the RFK activity as compared with the initial preparation. One failed to obtain a similar effect by fractionation of the extracts with amminium sulphate and by hydroxylapatite chromatography. A simple method is developed for determining the activity of RFK in the cell-free extracts of yeast on the basis of negative adsorption of this enzyme on DEAE-Sephadex A-50. A selective inhibition of alkaline phosphatase by ions Be2+ and F- yields a less satisfactory result. The data are presented on the PFK activity of certain species of flavinogenic (Pichia guillermondii, Torulopsis camdida) and non-flavinogenic (Pichia ohmeri, Candida utilis, Saccharomyces cervisiae) yeast. PMID:174262

  9. Hybrid histidine kinases in pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Defosse, Tatiana A; Sharma, Anupam; Mondal, Alok K; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Calderone, Richard; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Courdavault, Vincent; Clastre, Marc; Papon, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Histidine kinases (HK) sense and transduce via phosphorylation events many intra- and extracellular signals in bacteria, archaea, slime moulds and plants. HK are also widespread in the fungal kingdom, but their precise roles in the regulation of physiological processes remain largely obscure. Expanding genomic resources have recently given the opportunity to identify uncharacterised HK family members in yeasts and moulds and now allow proposing a complex classification of Basidiomycota, Ascomycota and lower fungi HK. A growing number of genetic approaches have progressively provided new insight into the role of several groups of HK in prominent fungal pathogens. In particular, a series of studies have revealed that members of group III HK, which occur in the highest number of fungal species and contain a unique N-terminus region consisting of multiple HAMP domain repeats, regulate morphogenesis and virulence in various human, plant and insect pathogenic fungi. This research field is further supported by recent shape-function studies providing clear correlation between structural properties and signalling states in group III HK. Since HK are absent in mammals, these represent interesting fungal target for the discovery of new antifungal drugs. PMID:25560420

  10. Protein Kinase C Pharmacology: Refining the Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Wu-Zhang, Alyssa X.; Newton, Alexandra C.

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Protein kinase C (PKC) has been in the limelight since the discovery three decades ago that it acts as a major receptor for the tumor-promoting phorbol esters. Phorbol esters, with their potent ability to activate two of the three classes of PKC isozymes, have remained the best pharmacological tool for directly modulating PKC activity. However, with the discovery of other phorbol ester-responsive proteins, the advent of various small-molecule and peptide modulators, and the need to distinguish isozyme-specific activity, the pharmacology of PKC has become increasingly complex. Not surprisingly, many of the compounds originally touted as direct modulators of PKC have subsequently been shown to hit many other cellular targets and, in some cases, not even directly modulate PKC. The complexities and reversals in PKC pharmacology have led to widespread confusion about the current status of the pharmacological tools available to control PKC activity. Here, we aim to clarify the cacophony in the literature regarding the current state of bona fide and discredited cellular PKC modulators, including activators, small-molecule inhibitors, and peptides, and also address the use of genetically-encoded reporters and of PKC mutants to measure the effects of these drugs on the spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling by specific isozymes. PMID:23662807

  11. Protein kinase A alterations in adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Espiard, S; Ragazzon, B; Bertherat, J

    2014-11-01

    Stimulation of the cAMP pathway by adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) is essential for adrenal cortex maintenance, glucocorticoid and adrenal androgens synthesis, and secretion. Various molecular and cellular alterations of the cAMP pathway have been observed in endocrine tumors. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a central key component of the cAMP pathway. Molecular alterations of PKA subunits have been observed in adrenocortical tumors. PKA molecular defects can be germline in hereditary disorders or somatic in sporadic tumors. Heterozygous germline inactivating mutations of the PKA regulatory subunit RIα gene (PRKAR1A) can be observed in patients with ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome (CS) due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). PRKAR1A is considered as a tumor suppressor gene. Interestingly, these mutations can also be observed as somatic alterations in sporadic cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas. Germline gene duplication of the catalytic subunits Cα (PRKACA) has been observed in patients with PPNAD. Furthermore, exome sequencing revealed recently activating somatic mutations of PRKACA in about 40% of cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas. In vitro and in vivo functional studies help in the progress to understand the mechanisms of adrenocortical tumors development due to PKA regulatory subunits alterations. All these alterations are observed in benign oversecreting tumors and are mimicking in some way cAMP pathway constitutive activation. On the long term, unraveling these alterations will open new strategies of pharmacological treatment targeting the cAMP pathway in adrenal tumors and cortisol-secretion disorders. PMID:25105543

  12. Regulation of Macropinocytosis by Diacylglycerol Kinase ζ

    PubMed Central

    Pomoransky, Julia L.; Parks, Robin J.; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Bell, John C.; Gee, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Macropinosomes arise from the closure of plasma membrane ruffles to bring about the non-selective uptake of nutrients and solutes into cells. The morphological changes underlying ruffle formation and macropinosome biogenesis are driven by actin cytoskeleton rearrangements under the control of the Rho GTPase Rac1. We showed previously that Rac1 is activated by diacylglycerol kinase ζ (DGKζ), which phosphorylates diacylglycerol to yield phosphatidic acid. Here, we show DGKζ is required for optimal macropinocytosis induced by growth factor stimulation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Time-lapse imaging of live cells and quantitative analysis revealed DGKζ was associated with membrane ruffles and nascent macropinosomes. Macropinocytosis was attenuated in DGKζ-null cells, as determined by live imaging and vaccinia virus uptake experiments. Moreover, macropinosomes that did form in DGKζ-null cells were smaller than those found in wild type cells. Rescue of this defect required DGKζ catalytic activity, consistent with it also being required for Rac1 activation. A constitutively membrane bound DGKζ mutant substantially increased the size of macropinosomes and potentiated the effect of a constitutively active Rac1 mutant on macropinocytosis. Collectively, our results suggest DGKζ functions in concert with Rac1 to regulate macropinocytosis. PMID:26701304

  13. Distinct 1-monoacylglycerol and 2-monoacylglycerol kinase activities of diacylglycerol kinase isozymes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuriko; Murakami, Chiaki; Yamaki, Atsumi; Mizuno, Satoru; Sakai, Hiromichi; Sakane, Fumio

    2016-09-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) consists of ten isozymes and is involved in a wide variety of patho-physiological events. However, the enzymological properties of DGKs have not been fully understood. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis on the 1-monoacylglycerol kinase (MGK) and 2-MGK activities of ten DGK isozymes. We revealed that type I (α, β and γ), type II (δ, η and κ) and type III (ε) DGKs have 7.9-19.2% 2-MGK activity compared to their DGK activities, whereas their 1-MGK activities were <3.0%. Both the 1-MGK and 2-MGK activities of the type IV DGKs (ζ and ι) were <1% relative to their DGK activities. Intriguingly, type V DGKθ has approximately 6% 1-MGK activity and <2% 2-MGK activity compared to its DGK activity. Purified DGKθ exhibited the same results, indicating that its 1-MGK activity is intrinsic. Therefore, DGK isozymes are categorized into three types with respect to their 1-MGK and 2-MGK activities: those having (1) 2-MGK activity relatively stronger than their 1-MGK activity (types I-III), (2) only negligible 1-MGK and 2-MGK activities (type IV), and (3) 1-MGK activity stronger than its 2-MGK activity (type V). The 1-MGK activity of DGKθ and the 2-MGK activity of DGKα were stronger than those of the acylglycerol kinase reported as 1-MGK and 2-MGK to date. The presence or absence of 1-MGK and 2-MGK activities may be essential to the patho-physiological functions of each DGK isozyme. PMID:27346717

  14. Toward the rational design of protein kinase casein kinase-2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sarno, Stefania; Moro, Stefano; Meggio, Flavio; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Dal Ben, Diego; Ghisellini, Paola; Battistutta, Roberto; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2002-01-01

    Casein kinase-2 (CK2) probably is the most pleiotropic member of the protein kinase family, with more than 200 substrates known to date. Unlike the great majority of protein kinases, which are tightly regulated enzymes, CK2 is endowed with high constitutive activity, a feature that is suspected to underlie its oncogenic potential and possible implication in viral infections. This makes CK2 an attractive target for anti-neoplastic and antiviral drugs. Here, we present an overview of our present knowledge about CK2 inhibitors, with special reference to the information drawn from two recently solved crystal structures of CK2alpha in complex with emodin and with 4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-2-azabenzimidazole (TBB), this latter being the most specific CK2 inhibitor known to date. A comparison with a series of anthraquinone and xanthenone derivatives highlights the crucial relevance of the hydroxyl group at position 3 for inhibition by emodin, and discloses the possibility of increasing the inhibitory potency by placing an electron withdrawing group at position 5. We also present mutational data corroborating the relevance of two hydrophobic residues unique to CK2, Val66 and Ile174, for the interactions with emodin and TBB, but not with the flavonoid inhibitors quercetin and fisetin. In particular, the CK2alpha mutant V66A displays 27- and 11-fold higher IC(50) values with emodin and TBB, respectively, as compared with the wild-type, while the IC(50) value with quercetin is unchanged. The data presented pave the road toward the rational design of more potent and selective inhibitors of CK2 and the generation of CK2 mutants refractory to inhibition, useful to probe the implication of CK2 in specific cellular functions. PMID:12191608

  15. A Causal Gene for Seed Dormancy on Wheat Chromosome 4A Encodes a MAP Kinase Kinase.

    PubMed

    Torada, Atsushi; Koike, Michiya; Ogawa, Taiichi; Takenouchi, Yu; Tadamura, Kazuki; Wu, Jianzhong; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kawaura, Kanako; Ogihara, Yasunari

    2016-03-21

    Seed germination under the appropriate environmental conditions is important both for plant species survival and for successful agriculture. Seed dormancy, which controls germination time, is one of the adaptation mechanisms and domestication traits [1]. Seed dormancy is generally defined as the absence of germination of a viable seed under conditions that are favorable for germination [2]. The seed dormancy of cultivated plants has generally been reduced during domestication [3]. Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most widely grown crops in the world. Weak dormancy may be an advantage for the productivity due to uniform emergence and a disadvantage for the risks of pre-harvest sprouting (PHS), which decreases grain quality and yield [4]. A number of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling natural variation of seed dormancy have been identified on various chromosomes [5]. A major QTL for seed dormancy has been consistently detected on chromosome 4A [6-13]. The QTL was designated as a major gene, Phs1, which could be precisely mapped within a 2.6 cM region [14]. Here, we identified a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MKK3) gene (designated TaMKK3-A) by a map-based approach as a candidate gene for the seed dormancy locus Phs1 on chromosome 4A in bread wheat. Complementation analysis showed that transformation of a dormant wheat cultivar with the TaMKK3-A allele from a nondormant cultivar clearly reduced seed dormancy. Cultivars differing in dormancy had a single nonsynonymous amino acid substitution in the kinase domain of the predicted MKK3 protein sequence, which may be associated with the length of seed dormancy. PMID:26948878

  16. Protein Kinase Cδ mediates the activation of Protein Kinase D2 in Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Bhavanasi, Dheeraj; Kim, Soochong; Goldfinger, Lawrence E.; Kunapuli, Satya P.

    2011-01-01

    Protein Kinase D (PKD) is a subfamily of serine/threonine specific family of kinases, comprised of PKD1, PKD2 and PKD3 (PKCμ, PKD2 and PKCν in humans). It is known that PKCs activate PKD, but the relative expression of isoforms of PKD or the specific PKC isoform/s responsible for its activation in platelets is not known. This study is aimed at investigating the pathway involved in activation of PKD in platelets. We show that PKD2 is the major isoform of PKD that is expressed in human as well as murine platelets but not PKD1 or PKD3. PKD2 activation induced by AYPGKF was abolished with a Gq inhibitor YM-254890, but was not affected by Y-27632, a RhoA/p160ROCK inhibitor, indicating that PKD2 activation is Gq-, but not G12/13-mediated Rho-kinase dependent. Calcium-mediated signals are also required for activation of PKD2 as dimethyl BAPTA inhibited its phosphorylation. GF109203X, a pan PKC inhibitor abolished PKD2 phosphorylation but Go6976, a classical PKC inhibitor had no effect suggesting that novel PKC isoforms are involved in PKD2 activation. Importantly, Rottlerin, a non-selective PKCδ inhibitor, inhibited AYPGKF-induced PKD2 activation in human platelets. Similarly, AYPGKF- and Convulxin-induced PKD2 phosphorylation was dramatically inhibited in PKCδ-deficient platelets, but not in PKCθ– or PKCε–deficient murine platelets compared to that of wild type platelets. Hence, we conclude that PKD2 is a common signaling target downstream of various agonist receptors in platelets and Gq-mediated signals along with calcium and novel PKC isoforms, in particular, PKCδ activate PKD2 in platelets. PMID:21736870

  17. Extending Thymidine Kinase Activity to the Catalytic Repertoire of Human Deoxycytidine Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Saugata; Sabini, Eliszbetta; Ort, Stephan; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2009-03-04

    Salvage of nucleosides in the cytosol of human cells is carried out by deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and thymidine kinase 1 (TK1). Whereas TK1 is only responsible for thymidine phosphorylation, dCK is capable of converting dC, dA, and dG into their monophosphate forms. Using structural data on dCK, we predicted that select mutations at the active site would, in addition to making the enzyme faster, expand the catalytic repertoire of dCK to include thymidine. Specifically, we hypothesized that steric repulsion between the methyl group of the thymine base and Arg104 is the main factor preventing the phosphorylation of thymidine by wild-type dCK. Here we present kinetic data on several dCK variants where Arg104 has been replaced by select residues, all performed in combination with the mutation of Asp133 to an alanine. We show that several hydrophobic residues at position 104 endow dCK with thymidine kinase activity. Depending on the exact nature of the mutations, the enzyme's substrate preference is modified. The R104M-D133A double mutant is a pyrimidine-specific enzyme due to large K{sub m} values with purines. The crystal structure of the double mutant R104M-D133A in complex with the L-form of thymidine supplies a structural explanation for the ability of this variant to phosphorylate thymidine and thymidine analogs. The replacement of Arg104 by a smaller residue allows L-dT to bind deeper into the active site, making space for the C5-methyl group of the thymine base. The unique catalytic properties of several of the mutants make them good candidates for suicide-gene/protein-therapy applications.

  18. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 Regulates Seed Dormancy in Barley.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shingo; Pourkheirandish, Mohammad; Morishige, Hiromi; Kubo, Yuta; Nakamura, Masako; Ichimura, Kazuya; Seo, Shigemi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Wu, Jianzhong; Ando, Tsuyu; Hensel, Goetz; Sameri, Mohammad; Stein, Nils; Sato, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yano, Masahiro; Komatsuda, Takao

    2016-03-21

    Seed dormancy has fundamental importance in plant survival and crop production; however, the mechanisms regulating dormancy remain unclear [1-3]. Seed dormancy levels generally decrease during domestication to ensure that crops successfully germinate in the field. However, reduction of seed dormancy can cause devastating losses in cereals like wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) due to pre-harvest sprouting, the germination of mature seed (grain) on the mother plant when rain occurs before harvest. Understanding the mechanisms of dormancy can facilitate breeding of crop varieties with the appropriate levels of seed dormancy [4-8]. Barley is a model crop [9, 10] and has two major seed dormancy quantitative trait loci (QTLs), SD1 and SD2, on chromosome 5H [11-19]. We detected a QTL designated Qsd2-AK at SD2 as the single major determinant explaining the difference in seed dormancy between the dormant cultivar "Azumamugi" (Az) and the non-dormant cultivar "Kanto Nakate Gold" (KNG). Using map-based cloning, we identified the causal gene for Qsd2-AK as Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 (MKK3). The dormant Az allele of MKK3 is recessive; the N260T substitution in this allele decreases MKK3 kinase activity and appears to be causal for Qsd2-AK. The N260T substitution occurred in the immediate ancestor allele of the dormant allele, and the established dormant allele became prevalent in barley cultivars grown in East Asia, where the rainy season and harvest season often overlap. Our findings show fine-tuning of seed dormancy during domestication and provide key information for improving pre-harvest sprouting tolerance in barley and wheat. PMID:26948880

  19. Giant protein kinases: domain interactions and structural basis of autoregulation.

    PubMed Central

    Kobe, B; Heierhorst, J; Feil, S C; Parker, M W; Benian, G M; Weiss, K R; Kemp, B E

    1996-01-01

    The myosin-associated giant protein kinases twitchin and titin are composed predominantly of fibronectin- and immunoglobulin-like modules. We report the crystal structures of two autoinhibited twitchin kinase fragments, one from Aplysia and a larger fragment from Caenorhabditis elegans containing an additional C-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain. The structure of the longer fragment shows that the immunoglobulin domain contacts the protein kinase domain on the opposite side from the catalytic cleft, laterally exposing potential myosin binding residues. Together, the structures reveal the cooperative interactions between the autoregulatory region and the residues from the catalytic domain involved in protein substrate binding, ATP binding, catalysis and the activation loop, and explain the differences between the observed autoinhibitory mechanism and the one found in the structure of calmodulin-dependent kinase I. Images PMID:9003756

  20. Targeting protein kinases in central nervous system disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chico, Laura K.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Watterson, D. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases are a growing drug target class in disorders in peripheral tissues, but the development of kinase-targeted therapies for central nervous system (CNS) diseases remains a challenge, largely owing to issues associated specifically with CNS drug discovery. However, several candidate therapeutics that target CNS protein kinases are now in various stages of preclinical and clinical development. We review candidate compounds and discuss selected CNS protein kinases that are emerging as important therapeutic targets. In addition, we analyse trends in small-molecule properties that correlate with key challenges in CNS drug discovery, such as blood–brain barrier penetrance and cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism, and discuss the potential of future approaches that will integrate molecular-fragment expansion with pharmacoinformatics to address these challenges. PMID:19876042

  1. The energy landscape of adenylate kinase during catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, S. Jordan; Agafonov, Roman V.; Cho, Young-Jin; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Pachov, Dimitar V.; Kutter, Steffen; Phung, Lien A.; Murphy, Padraig N.; Thai, Vu; Alber, Tom; Hagan, Michael F.; Kern, Dorothee

    2014-01-01

    Kinases perform phosphoryl-transfer reactions in milliseconds; without enzymes, these reactions would take about 8000 years under physiological conditions. Despite extensive studies, a comprehensive understanding of kinase energy landscapes, including both chemical and conformational steps, is lacking. Here we scrutinize the microscopic steps in the catalytic cycle of adenylate kinase, through a combination of NMR measurements during catalysis, pre-steady-state kinetics, MD simulations, and crystallography of active complexes. We find that the Mg2+ cofactor activates two distinct molecular events, phosphoryl transfer (>105-fold) and lid-opening (103-fold). In contrast, mutation of an essential active-site arginine decelerates phosphoryl transfer 103-fold without substantially affecting lid-opening. Our results highlight the importance of the entire energy landscape in catalysis and suggest that adenylate kinases have evolved to activate key processes simultaneously by precise placement of a single, charged and very abundant cofactor in a pre-organized active site. PMID:25580578

  2. Regulatory crosstalk by protein kinases on CFTR trafficking and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinha, Carlos Miguel; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e. channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  3. Design and synthesis of novel selective anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Michellys, Pierre-Yves; Chen, Bei; Jiang, Tao; Jin, Yunho; Lu, Wenshuo; Marsilje, Thomas H; Pei, Wei; Uno, Tetsuo; Zhu, Xuefeng; Wu, Baogen; Nguyen, Truc Ngoc; Bursulaya, Badry; Lee, Christian; Li, Nanxin; Kim, Sungjoon; Tuntland, Tove; Liu, Bo; Sun, Frank; Steffy, Auzon; Hood, Tami

    2016-02-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the insulin receptor superfamily. Expression of ALK in normal human tissues is only found in a subset of neural cells, however it is involved in the genesis of several cancers through genetic aberrations involving translocation of the kinase domain with multiple fusion partners (e.g., NPM-ALK in anaplastic large cell lymphoma ALCL or EML4-ALK in non-small cell lung cancer) or activating mutations in the full-length receptor resulting in ligand-independent constitutive activation (e.g., neuroblastoma). Here we are reporting the discovery of novel and selective anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors from specific modifications of the 2,4-diaminopyridine core present in TAE684 and LDK378. Synthesis, structure activity relationships (SAR), absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) profile, and in vivo efficacy in a mouse xenograft model of anaplastic large cell lymphoma are described. PMID:26750252

  4. Clinical experience with aurora kinase inhibitors: a review.

    PubMed

    Boss, David S; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M

    2009-08-01

    The aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases comprises three members, designated auroras A, B, and C. Auroras A and B are essential components of the mitotic pathway, ensuring proper chromosome assembly, formation of the mitotic spindle, and cytokinesis. The role of aurora C is less clear. Overexpression of aurora A and B has been observed in several tumor types, and has been linked with a poor prognosis of cancer patients. Several small molecules targeting aurora kinases A and B or both have been evaluated preclinically and in early phase I trials. In this review we aim to summarize the most recent advances in the development of aurora kinase inhibitors, with a focus on the clinical data. PMID:19684075

  5. OTSSP167 Abrogates Mitotic Checkpoint through Inhibiting Multiple Mitotic Kinases.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenbin; Arnst, Christopher; Tipton, Aaron R; Bekier, Michael E; Taylor, William R; Yen, Tim J; Liu, Song-Tao

    2016-01-01

    OTSSP167 was recently characterized as a potent inhibitor for maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) and is currently tested in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors that have not responded to other treatment. Here we report that OTSSP167 abrogates the mitotic checkpoint at concentrations used to inhibit MELK. The abrogation is not recapitulated by RNAi mediated silencing of MELK in cells. Although OTSSP167 indeed inhibits MELK, it exhibits off-target activity against Aurora B kinase in vitro and in cells. Furthermore, OTSSP167 inhibits BUB1 and Haspin kinases, reducing phosphorylation at histones H2AT120 and H3T3 and causing mislocalization of Aurora B and associated chromosomal passenger complex from the centromere/kinetochore. The results suggest that OTSSP167 may have additional mechanisms of action for cancer cell killing and caution the use of OTSSP167 as a MELK specific kinase inhibitor in biochemical and cellular assays. PMID:27082996

  6. OTSSP167 Abrogates Mitotic Checkpoint through Inhibiting Multiple Mitotic Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Tipton, Aaron R.; Bekier, Michael E.; Taylor, William R.; Yen, Tim J.; Liu, Song-Tao

    2016-01-01

    OTSSP167 was recently characterized as a potent inhibitor for maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) and is currently tested in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors that have not responded to other treatment. Here we report that OTSSP167 abrogates the mitotic checkpoint at concentrations used to inhibit MELK. The abrogation is not recapitulated by RNAi mediated silencing of MELK in cells. Although OTSSP167 indeed inhibits MELK, it exhibits off-target activity against Aurora B kinase in vitro and in cells. Furthermore, OTSSP167 inhibits BUB1 and Haspin kinases, reducing phosphorylation at histones H2AT120 and H3T3 and causing mislocalization of Aurora B and associated chromosomal passenger complex from the centromere/kinetochore. The results suggest that OTSSP167 may have additional mechanisms of action for cancer cell killing and caution the use of OTSSP167 as a MELK specific kinase inhibitor in biochemical and cellular assays. PMID:27082996

  7. Regulatory Crosstalk by Protein Kinases on CFTR Trafficking and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Farinha, Carlos M.; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David L.; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e., channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease. PMID:26835446

  8. Resolution of thylakoid polyphenol oxidase and a protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Race, H.L.; Davenport, J.W.; Hind, G.

    1995-12-31

    The predominant protein kinase activity in octylglucoside (OG) extracts of spinach thylakoids has been attributed to a 64-kDa protein, tp64. Recent work calls into question the relation between tp64 and protein kinase activity, which were fractionated apart using fluid phase IEF and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Hind et al. sequenced tp64 from the cDNA and showed it to be a polyphenol oxidase (PPO) homolog. Its transit peptide indicates a location for the mature protein within the thylakoid lumen, where there is presumably no ATP and where it is remote from the presumed kinase substrates: the stromally exposed regions of integral PS-II membrane proteins. Here the authors suggest that the kinase is a 64-kDa protein distinct from tp64.

  9. Predictive Models for Fast and Effective Profiling of Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bora, Alina; Avram, Sorin; Ciucanu, Ionel; Raica, Marius; Avram, Stefana

    2016-05-23

    In this study we developed two-dimensional pharmacophore-based random forest models for the effective profiling of kinase inhibitors. One hundred seven prediction models were developed to address distinct kinases spanning over all kinase groups. Rigorous external validation demonstrates excellent virtual screening and classification potential of the predictors and, more importantly, the capacity to prioritize novel chemical scaffolds in large chemical libraries. The models built upon more diverse and more potent compounds tend to exert the highest predictive power. The analysis of ColBioS-FlavRC (Collection of Bioselective Flavonoids and Related Compounds) highlighted several potentially promiscuous derivatives with undesirable selectivity against kinases. The prediction models can be downloaded from www.chembioinf.ro . PMID:27064988

  10. Regulation of mitochondrial protein import by cytosolic kinases.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Oliver; Harbauer, Angelika B; Rao, Sanjana; Eyrich, Beate; Zahedi, René P; Stojanovski, Diana; Schönfisch, Birgit; Guiard, Bernard; Sickmann, Albert; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2011-01-21

    Mitochondria import a large number of nuclear-encoded proteins via membrane-bound transport machineries; however, little is known about regulation of the preprotein translocases. We report that the main protein entry gate of mitochondria, the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex), is phosphorylated by cytosolic kinases-in particular, casein kinase 2 (CK2) and protein kinase A (PKA). CK2 promotes biogenesis of the TOM complex by phosphorylation of two key components, the receptor Tom22 and the import protein Mim1, which in turn are required for import of further Tom proteins. Inactivation of CK2 decreases the levels of the TOM complex and thus mitochondrial protein import. PKA phosphorylates Tom70 under nonrespiring conditions, thereby inhibiting its receptor activity and the import of mitochondrial metabolite carriers. We conclude that cytosolic kinases exert stimulatory and inhibitory effects on biogenesis and function of the TOM complex and thus regulate protein import into mitochondria. PMID:21215441

  11. Deletion of the phosphoinositide 3-Kinase p110(gamma) gene attenuates murine atherosclerosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammatory cell activation by chemokines requires intracellular signaling through phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) and the PI3-kinase-dependent protein serine/threonine kinase Akt. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory process driven by oxidatively modified (atherogenic) lipoproteins, ch...

  12. EGFR kinase-dependent and kinase-independent roles in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Muroni, Maria R; Sanges, Francesca; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Asunis, Anna; Tanca, Luciana; Onnis, Daniela; Pira, Giovanna; Manca, Alessandra; Dore, Simone; Uras, Maria G; Ena, Sara; De Miglio, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with progression of many epithelial malignancies and represents a significant therapeutic target. Although clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) has been widely investigated for EGFR molecular alterations, genetic evidences of EGFR gene activating mutations and/or gene amplification have been rarely confirmed in the literature. Therefore, until now EGFR-targeted therapies in clinical trials have been demonstrated unsuccessful. New evidence has been given about the interactions between EGFR and the sodium glucose co-transporter-1 (SGLT1) in maintaining the glucose basal intracellular level to favour cancer cell growth and survival; thus a new functional role may be attributed to EGFR, regardless of its kinase activity. To define the role of EGFR in CCRCC an extensive investigation of genetic changes and functional kinase activities was performed in a series of tumors by analyzing the EGFR mutational status and expression profile, together with the protein expression of downstream signaling pathways members. Furthermore, we investigated the co-expression of EGFR and SGLT1 proteins and their relationships with clinic-pathological features in CCRCC. EGFR protein expression was identified in 98.4% of CCRCC. Furthermore, it was described for the first time that SGLT1 is overexpressed in CCRCC (80.9%), and that co-expression with EGFR is appreciable in 79.4% of the tumours. Moreover, the activation of downstream EGFR pathways was found in about 79.4% of SGLT1-positive CCRCCs. The mutational status analysis of EGFR failed to demonstrate mutations on exons 18 to 24 and the presence of EGFR-variantIII (EGFRvIII) in all CCRCCs analyzed. FISH analysis revealed absence of EGFR amplification, and high polysomy of chromosome 7. Finally, the EGFR gene expression profile showed gene overexpression in 38.2% of CCRCCs. Our study contributes to define the complexity of EGFR role in CCRCC, identifying its bivalent kinase

  13. EGFR kinase-dependent and kinase-independent roles in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Muroni, Maria R; Sanges, Francesca; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Asunis, Anna; Tanca, Luciana; Onnis, Daniela; Pira, Giovanna; Manca, Alessandra; Dore, Simone; Uras, Maria G; Ena, Sara; De Miglio, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with progression of many epithelial malignancies and represents a significant therapeutic target. Although clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) has been widely investigated for EGFR molecular alterations, genetic evidences of EGFR gene activating mutations and/or gene amplification have been rarely confirmed in the literature. Therefore, until now EGFR-targeted therapies in clinical trials have been demonstrated unsuccessful. New evidence has been given about the interactions between EGFR and the sodium glucose co-transporter-1 (SGLT1) in maintaining the glucose basal intracellular level to favour cancer cell growth and survival; thus a new functional role may be attributed to EGFR, regardless of its kinase activity. To define the role of EGFR in CCRCC an extensive investigation of genetic changes and functional kinase activities was performed in a series of tumors by analyzing the EGFR mutational status and expression profile, together with the protein expression of downstream signaling pathways members. Furthermore, we investigated the co-expression of EGFR and SGLT1 proteins and their relationships with clinic-pathological features in CCRCC. EGFR protein expression was identified in 98.4% of CCRCC. Furthermore, it was described for the first time that SGLT1 is overexpressed in CCRCC (80.9%), and that co-expression with EGFR is appreciable in 79.4% of the tumours. Moreover, the activation of downstream EGFR pathways was found in about 79.4% of SGLT1-positive CCRCCs. The mutational status analysis of EGFR failed to demonstrate mutations on exons 18 to 24 and the presence of EGFR-variantIII (EGFRvIII) in all CCRCCs analyzed. FISH analysis revealed absence of EGFR amplification, and high polysomy of chromosome 7. Finally, the EGFR gene expression profile showed gene overexpression in 38.2% of CCRCCs. Our study contributes to define the complexity of EGFR role in CCRCC, identifying its bivalent kinase

  14. Dynamics of Protein Kinases: Insights from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yao; Liddle, Jennifer C.; Pardi, Arthur; Ahn, Natalie G.

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Protein kinases are ubiquitous enzymes with critical roles in cellular processes and pathology. As a result, researchers have studied their activity and regulatory mechanisms extensively. Thousands of X-ray structures give snapshots of the architectures of protein kinases in various states of activation and ligand binding. However, the extent of and manner by which protein motions and conformational dynamics underlie the function and regulation of these important enzymes is not well understood. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods provide complementary information about protein conformation and dynamics in solution. However, until recently, the large size of these enzymes prevented researchers from using these methods with kinases. Developments in transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY)-based techniques and more efficient isotope labeling strategies are now allowing researchers to carry out NMR studies on full-length protein kinases. In this Account, we describe recent insights into the role of dynamics in protein kinase regulation and catalysis that have been gained from NMR measurements of chemical shift changes and line broadening, residual dipolar couplings, and relaxation. These findings show strong associations between protein motion and events that control kinase activity. Dynamic and conformational changes occurring at ligand binding sites and other regulatory domains of these proteins propagate to conserved kinase core regions that mediate catalytic function. NMR measurements of slow time scale (microsecond to millisecond) motions also reveal that kinases carry out global exchange processes that synchronize multiple residues and allosteric interconversion between conformational states. Activating covalent modifications or ligand binding to form the Michaelis complex can induce these global processes. Inhibitors can also exploit the exchange properties of kinases by using conformational selection to form dynamically quenched

  15. Structural and biochemical studies of the PDGFRA kinase domain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ling; Yan, Xiao-E; Yin, Yuxin; Yun, Cai-Hong

    2016-09-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) is a Type III receptor tyrosine kinase, and this kinase is a target for treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) as it is frequently mutated in these cancers. Most of the mutations that cause constitutive activation of PDGFRA occur in either the activation loop (A-loop) or in the juxtamembrane (JM) domain, such as the mutations D842V or V561D respectively. Treatment of PDGFRA-mutated GIST with imatinib is successful in some cases, but the D842V mutation is imatinib-resistant. To better understand the mechanism of PDGFRA drug-resistance, we have determined the crystal structure of the PDGFRA kinase domain in the auto-inhibited form, and studied the kinetics of the D842V mutation. Auto-inhibited PDGFRA is stabilized by the JM domain, which inserts into the active site of the kinase. The conserved residue Asp842 makes extensive contacts with several A-loop residues to maintain PDGFRA in the "DFG out" conformation, which stabilizes the kinase in the inactive state and facilitates the binding of imatinib. The D842V mutation would therefore be expected to activate the kinase and hinder the binding of drug through destabilizing the "DFG out" conformation. Furthermore, our kinetic data show that drug resistance in the D842V mutation may also in part result from its increased affinity for ATP. The PDGFRA kinase domain structure we report in this study has potential to facilitate development of new agents which can inhibit this kinase, including both its activating and drug-resistant mutations. PMID:27349873

  16. Revisiting protein kinase-substrate interactions: Toward therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Paulo Sérgio L; Ferraz, Felipe Augusto N; Pena, Darlene A; Pramio, Dimitrius T; Morais, Felipe A; Schechtman, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Despite the efforts of pharmaceutical companies to develop specific kinase modulators, few drugs targeting kinases have been completely successful in the clinic. This is primarily due to the conserved nature of kinases, especially in the catalytic domains. Consequently, many currently available inhibitors lack sufficient selectivity for effective clinical application. Kinases phosphorylate their substrates to modulate their activity. One of the important steps in the catalytic reaction of protein phosphorylation is the correct positioning of the target residue within the catalytic site. This positioning is mediated by several regions in the substrate binding site, which is typically a shallow crevice that has critical subpockets that anchor and orient the substrate. The structural characterization of this protein-protein interaction can aid in the elucidation of the roles of distinct kinases in different cellular processes, the identification of substrates, and the development of specific inhibitors. Because the region of the substrate that is recognized by the kinase can be part of a linear consensus motif or a nonlinear motif, advances in technology beyond simple linear sequence scanning for consensus motifs were needed. Cost-effective bioinformatics tools are already frequently used to predict kinase-substrate interactions for linear consensus motifs, and new tools based on the structural data of these interactions improve the accuracy of these predictions and enable the identification of phosphorylation sites within nonlinear motifs. In this Review, we revisit kinase-substrate interactions and discuss the various approaches that can be used to identify them and analyze their binding structures for targeted drug development. PMID:27016527

  17. [Side effect management of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in urology : Hypertension].

    PubMed

    Sikic, D; Meidenbauer, N; Lieb, V; Keck, B

    2016-07-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors like sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib or axintinib are regarded the standard of care in the systemic therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. However, the many side effects associated with this therapy pose challenges for the treating physician and the patient. This review offers an overview of the classification and the treatment of hypertension, which is one of the major side effects induced by all tyrosine kinase inhibitors, in order to improve treatment efficacy and patient compliance. PMID:27146871

  18. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2004-10-12

    The present invention relates to 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  19. Ghrelin augments murine T-cell proliferation by activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and protein kinase C signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Ho; Patel, Kalpesh; Tae, Hyun Jin; Lustig, Ana; Kim, Jie Wan; Mattson, Mark P; Taub, Dennis D

    2014-12-20

    Thymic atrophy occurs during normal aging, and is accelerated by exposure to chronic stressors that elevate glucocorticoid levels and impair the naïve T cell output. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin was recently shown to attenuate age-associated thymic atrophy. Here, we report that ghrelin enhances the proliferation of murine CD4+ primary T cells and a CD4+ T-cell line. Ghrelin induced activation of the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways, via upstream activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and protein kinase C, to enhance T-cell proliferation. Moreover, ghrelin induced expression of the cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and retinoblastoma phosphorylation. Finally, ghrelin activated the above-mentioned signaling pathways and stimulated thymocyte proliferation in young and older mice in vivo. PMID:25447526

  20. Ghrelin augments murine T-cell proliferation by activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and protein kinase C signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Ho; Patel, Kalpesh; Tae, Hyun Jin; Lustig, Ana; Kim, Jie Wan; Mattson, Mark P.; Taub, Dennis D.

    2014-01-01

    Thymic atrophy occurs during normal aging, and is accelerated by exposure to chronic stressors that elevate glucocorticoid levelsand impair the naïve T cell output. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin was recently shown to attenuate age-associated thymic atrophy. Here, we report that ghrelin enhances the proliferation of murine CD4+ primary T cells and a CD4+ T-cell line. Ghrelin induced activation of the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways, via upstream activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and protein kinase C, to enhance T-cell proliferation. Moreover, ghrelin induced expression of the cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and retinoblastoma phosphorylation. Finally, ghrelin activated the above-mentioned signaling pathways and stimulated thymocyte proliferation in young and older mice in vivo. PMID:25447526

  1. Mini-review: bmx kinase inhibitors for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Jarboe, John S; Dutta, Shilpa; Velu, Sadanandan E; Willey, Christopher D

    2013-09-01

    Kinase inhibitors are among the fastest growing class of anti-cancer therapies. One family of kinases that has recently gained attention as a target for treating malignant disorders is the Tec kinase family. Evidence has been published that one member of this family; the Bmx kinase, may play a role in the pathogenesis of glioblastoma, prostate, breast and lung cancer. Bmx has also shown potential as an anti-vascular therapy in combination with radiation or as a sensitizer to chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, several companies such as Pharmacyclics, Avila Therapeutics, Merck and Co., Metaproteomics, IRM, and Moerae Matrix have developed compounds or peptides that function as Bmx kinase inhibitors. These companies have subsequently been issued patents for these inhibitors. Additionally, it has been shown that current clinical stage EGFR inhibitors can irreversibly inhibit Bmx, suggesting these compounds might be rapidly moved to clinical trials for other malignancies. This review will discuss current patents issued since 2009 that contain data specifically on inhibition of the Bmx kinase, and will also discuss the scientific literature that suggests their potential application as therapeutics in the treatment of the aforementioned malignancies. PMID:23198769

  2. The Roles of NDR Protein Kinases in Hippo Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Hergovich, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo tumour suppressor pathway has emerged as a critical regulator of tissue growth through controlling cellular processes such as cell proliferation, death, differentiation and stemness. Traditionally, the core cassette of the Hippo pathway includes the MST1/2 protein kinases, the LATS1/2 protein kinases, and the MOB1 scaffold signal transducer, which together regulate the transcriptional co-activator functions of the proto-oncoproteins YAP and TAZ through LATS1/2-mediated phosphorylation of YAP/TAZ. Recent research has identified additional kinases, such as NDR1/2 (also known as STK38/STK38L) and MAP4Ks, which should be considered as novel members of the Hippo core cassette. While these efforts helped to expand our understanding of Hippo core signalling, they also began to provide insights into the complexity and redundancy of the Hippo signalling network. Here, we focus on summarising our current knowledge of the regulation and functions of mammalian NDR kinases, discussing parallels between the NDR pathways in Drosophila and mammals. Initially, we provide a general overview of the cellular functions of NDR kinases in cell cycle progression, centrosome biology, apoptosis, autophagy, DNA damage signalling, immunology and neurobiology. Finally, we put particular emphasis on discussing NDR1/2 as YAP kinases downstream of MST1/2 and MOB1 signalling in Hippo signalling. PMID:27213455

  3. Kinases inhibitors in lung cancer: From benchside to bedside.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Harpreet; Silakari, Om

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer still remains one of the major causes of cancer related mortality around the globe. Various different molecular targets have been discovered till date for targeting lung cancer. But not every new molecular target has a successfully designed inhibitor; moreover conventional chemotherapeutics have their own limitations such as toxicity and lack of selectivity. Thus, kinases still remain the most effective molecular target in lung cancer therapy. Also, once-shunned kinase inhibitors have recently acquired renewed interest after the development and approval of irreversible kinase inhibitors (such as afatinib) that form covalent bonds with cysteine (or other nucleophilic residues) in the ATP-binding pocket of the kinases. Irreversible kinase inhibitors have a number of potential advantages over conventional reversible kinase inhibitors including prolonged pharmacodynamics, suitability for rational design, high potency etc. This review reveals the current knowledge of all the chemical scaffolds, approved and/or investigational, utilized as inhibitors in lung cancer. It also explains the rationale of designing these along with possible interactions with their targets, biological data and possible problems associated with these inhibitors. PMID:27393082

  4. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-05-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ.

  5. Update on Aurora Kinase Targeted Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Green, Myke R.; Woolery, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Mammalian cells contain three distinct serine/threonine protein kinases with highly conserved catalytic domains, including aurora A and B kinases that are essential regulators of mitotic entry and progression. Overexpression of aurora A and/or B kinase is associated with high proliferation rates and poor prognosis, making them ideal targets for anti-cancer therapy. Disruption of mitotic machinery is a proven anti-cancer strategy employed by multiple chemotherapeutic agents. Numerous small molecule inhibitors of the aurora kinases have been discovered and tested in vivo and in vitro, with a few currently in phase II testing. Areas covered This review provides the reader with updated results from both preclinical and human studies for each of the aurora kinase inhibitors (AKI) that are currently being investigated. The paper also covers in detail the late breaking and phase I data presented for AKIs thereby allowing the reader to compare and contrast individual and classrelated effects of AKIs. Expert opinion While the successful development and approval of an AKI for anti-cancer therapy remains unresolved, pre-clinical identification of resistant mechanisms would help design better early phase clinical trials where relevant combinations may be evaluated prior to phase II testing. The authors believe that aurora kinases are important anti-cancer targets that operate in collaboration with other oncogenes intimately involved in uncontrolled tumor proliferation and by providing a unique, targeted and complimentary anti-cancer mechanism, expand the available armamentarium against cancer. PMID:21556291

  6. Update on Aurora Kinase Targeted Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Green, Myke R.; Woolery, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Mammalian cells contain three distinct serine/threonine protein kinases with highly conserved catalytic domains, including aurora A and B kinases that are essential regulators of mitotic entry and progression. Overexpression of aurora A and/or B kinase is associated with high proliferation rates and poor prognosis, making them ideal targets for anti-cancer therapy. Disruption of mitotic machinery is a proven anti-cancer strategy employed by multiple chemotherapeutic agents. Numerous small molecule inhibitors of the aurora kinases have been discovered and tested in vivo and in vitro, with a few currently in phase II testing. Areas covered This review provides the reader with updated results from both preclinical and human studies for each of the aurora kinase inhibitors (AKI) that are currently being investigated. The paper also covers in detail the late breaking and phase I data presented for AKIs thereby allowing the reader to compare and contrast individual and class-related effects of AKIs. Expert opinion While the successful development and approval of an AKI for anti-cancer therapy remains unresolved, pre-clinical identification of resistant mechanisms would help design better early phase clinical trials where relevant combinations may be evaluated prior to phase II testing. The authors believe that aurora kinases are important anti-cancer targets that operate in collaboration with other oncogenes intimately involved in uncontrolled tumor proliferation and by providing a unique, targeted and complimentary anti-cancer mechanism, expand the available armamentarium against cancer. PMID:18991785

  7. Pyruvate kinase: function, regulation and role in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Israelsen, William J.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate and ADP to pyruvate and ATP in glycolysis and plays a role in regulating cell metabolism. There are four mammalian pyruvate kinase isoforms with unique tissue expression patterns and regulatory properties. The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) supports anabolic metabolism and is expressed both in cancer and normal tissue. The enzymatic activity of PKM2 is allosterically regulated by both intracellular signaling pathways and metabolites; PKM2 thus integrates signaling and metabolic inputs to modulate glucose metabolism according to the needs of the cell. Recent advances have increased our understanding of metabolic regulation by pyruvate kinase, raised new questions, and suggested the possibility of non-canonical PKM2 functions to regulate gene expression and cell cycle progression via protein-protein interactions and protein kinase activity. Here we review the structure, function, and regulation of pyruvate kinase and discuss how these properties enable regulation of PKM2 for cell proliferation and tumor growth. PMID:26277545

  8. Ethanol increases affinity of protein kinase C for phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, J.H.

    1986-03-01

    Protein kinase C is a calcium-dependent enzyme that requires phospholipid for its activation. It is present in relatively high concentration in the brain and may be involved in neuronal function. The present experiments test whether the membrane disorder induced by ethanol affects the activity of kinase C by changing its interaction with membrane lipid. Fractions rich in kinase C were purified from rat brain cytosol by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Enzyme activity was assayed by measuring the phosphorylation of histone H1. As expected, phosphatidylserine activated the enzyme, and the stimulation was further increased by the addition of calcium and/or diacylglycerol. At low concentration of free calcium (0.5-1..mu..M), ethanol (800 mM0 enhanced kinase C activity if the presence of phospholipid. similar results were observed in the absence of calcium. Double reciprocal plots of the data showed that ethanol increased the affinity of the enzyme for phosphatidylserine without affecting the V/sub max. The stimulation of kinase C activity by ethanol was not observed at high calcium concentrations. These experiments suggest that ethanol may activated protein kinase C at physiological levels of calcium by facilitating its transfer into the hydrophobic membrane environment.

  9. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ. PMID:25944708

  10. Ten things you should know about protein kinases: IUPHAR Review 14

    PubMed Central

    Fabbro, Doriano; Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W; Moebitz, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Many human malignancies are associated with aberrant regulation of protein or lipid kinases due to mutations, chromosomal rearrangements and/or gene amplification. Protein and lipid kinases represent an important target class for treating human disorders. This review focus on ‘the 10 things you should know about protein kinases and their inhibitors', including a short introduction on the history of protein kinases and their inhibitors and ending with a perspective on kinase drug discovery. Although the ‘10 things’ have been, to a certain extent, chosen arbitrarily, they cover in a comprehensive way the past and present efforts in kinase drug discovery and summarize the status quo of the current kinase inhibitors as well as knowledge about kinase structure and binding modes. Besides describing the potentials of protein kinase inhibitors as drugs, this review also focus on their limitations, particularly on how to circumvent emerging resistance against kinase inhibitors in oncological indications. PMID:25630872

  11. Divergent modulation of Rho‐kinase and Ca2+ influx pathways by Src family kinases and focal adhesion kinase in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shaifta, Yasin; Irechukwu, Nneka; Prieto‐Lloret, Jesus; MacKay, Charles E; Marchon, Keisha A; Ward, Jeremy P T

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The importance of tyrosine kinases in airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Src‐family kinases (SrcFK) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in GPCR‐mediated ASM contraction and associated signalling events. Experimental Approach Contraction was recorded in intact or α‐toxin permeabilized rat bronchioles. Phosphorylation of SrcFK, FAK, myosin light‐chain‐20 (MLC20) and myosin phosphatase targeting subunit‐1 (MYPT‐1) was evaluated in cultured human ASM cells (hASMC). [Ca2+]i was evaluated in Fura‐2 loaded hASMC. Responses to carbachol (CCh) and bradykinin (BK) and the contribution of SrcFK and FAK to these responses were determined. Key Results Contractile responses in intact bronchioles were inhibited by antagonists of SrcFK, FAK and Rho‐kinase, while after α‐toxin permeabilization, they were sensitive to inhibition of SrcFK and Rho‐kinase, but not FAK. CCh and BK increased phosphorylation of MYPT‐1 and MLC20 and auto‐phosphorylation of SrcFK and FAK. MYPT‐1 phosphorylation was sensitive to inhibition of Rho‐kinase and SrcFK, but not FAK. Contraction induced by SR Ca2+ depletion and equivalent [Ca2+]i responses in hASMC were sensitive to inhibition of both SrcFK and FAK, while depolarization‐induced contraction was sensitive to FAK inhibition only. SrcFK auto‐phosphorylation was partially FAK‐dependent, while FAK auto‐phosphorylation was SrcFK‐independent. Conclusions and Implications SrcFK mediates Ca2+‐sensitization in ASM, while SrcFK and FAK together and individually influence multiple Ca2+ influx pathways. Tyrosine phosphorylation is therefore a key upstream signalling event in ASM contraction and may be a viable target for modulating ASM tone in respiratory disease. PMID:26294392

  12. The C-terminal tail of protein kinase D2 and protein kinase D3 regulates their intracellular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Papazyan, Romeo; Rozengurt, Enrique; Rey, Osvaldo . E-mail: orey@mednet.ucla.edu

    2006-04-14

    We generated a set of GFP-tagged chimeras between protein kinase D2 (PKD2) and protein kinase D3 (PKD3) to examine in live cells the contribution of their C-terminal region to their intracellular localization. We found that the catalytic domain of PKD2 and PKD3 can localize to the nucleus when expressed without other kinase domains. However, when the C-terminal tail of PKD2 was added to its catalytic domain, the nuclear localization of the resulting protein was inhibited. In contrast, the nuclear localization of the CD of PKD3 was not inhibited by its C-terminal tail. Furthermore, the exchange of the C-terminal tail of PKD2 and PKD3 in the full-length proteins was sufficient to exchange their intracellular localization. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the short C-terminal tail of these kinases plays a critical role in determining their cytoplasmic/nuclear localization.

  13. Transgene Expression of Drosophila melanogaster Nucleoside Kinase Reverses Mitochondrial Thymidine Kinase 2 Deficiency*♦

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Shuba; Zhou, Xiaoshan; Paredes, João A.; Kuiper, Raoul V.; Curbo, Sophie; Karlsson, Anna

    2013-01-01

    A strategy to reverse the symptoms of thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) deficiency in a mouse model was investigated. The nucleoside kinase from Drosophila melanogaster (Dm-dNK) was expressed in TK2-deficient mice that have been shown to present with a severe phenotype caused by mitochondrial DNA depletion. The Dm-dNK+/− transgenic mice were shown to be able to rescue the TK2-deficient mice. The Dm-dNK+/−TK2−/− mice were normal as judged by growth and behavior during the observation time of 6 months. The Dm-dNK-expressing mice showed a substantial increase in thymidine-phosphorylating activity in investigated tissues. The Dm-dNK expression also resulted in highly elevated dTTP pools. The dTTP pool alterations did not cause specific mitochondrial DNA mutations or deletions when 6-month-old mice were analyzed. The mitochondrial DNA was also detected at normal levels. In conclusion, the Dm-dNK+/−TK2−/− mouse model illustrates how dTMP synthesized in the cell nucleus can compensate for loss of intramitochondrial dTMP synthesis in differentiated tissue. The data presented open new possibilities to treat the severe symptoms of TK2 deficiency. PMID:23288848

  14. Calcium calmodulin dependent kinase kinase 2 - a novel therapeutic target for gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Syed, Nazia; Barbhuiya, Mustafa A; Raja, Remya; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini; Pinto, Sneha M; Manda, Srikanth Srinivas; Renuse, Santosh; Manju, HC; Zameer, Mohammed Abdul Lateef; Sharma, Jyoti; Brait, Mariana; Srikumar, Kotteazeth; Roa, Juan Carlos; Vijaya Kumar, M; Kumar, KV Veerendra; Prasad, TS Keshava; Ramaswamy, Girija; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha; Chatterjee, Aditi

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common gastrointestinal malignancies and is associated with poor prognosis. Exploring alterations in the proteomic landscape of gastric cancer is likely to provide potential biomarkers for early detection and molecules for targeted therapeutic intervention. Using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis, we identified 22 proteins that were overexpressed and 17 proteins that were downregulated in gastric tumor tissues as compared to the adjacent normal tissue. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CAMKK2) was found to be 7-fold overexpressed in gastric tumor tissues. Immunohistochemical labeling of tumor tissue microarrays for validation of CAMKK2 overexpression revealed that it was indeed overexpressed in 94% (92 of 98) of gastric cancer cases. Silencing of CAMKK2 using siRNA significantly reduced cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that CAMKK2 signals in gastric cancer through AMPK activation and suggest that CAMKK2 could be a novel therapeutic target in gastric cancer. PMID:25756516

  15. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase regulate overlapping sets of genes in B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fruman, David A.; Ferl, Gregory Z.; An, Sam S.; Donahue, Amber C.; Satterthwaite, Anne B.; Witte, Owen N.

    2002-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) acts downstream of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) in a pathway required for B cell receptor (BCR)-dependent proliferation. We used DNA microarrays to determine what fraction of genes this pathway influences and to investigate whether PI3K and Btk mediate distinct gene regulation events. As complete loss-of-function mutations in PI3K and Btk alter B cell subpopulations and may cause compensatory changes in gene expression, we used B cells with partial loss of function in either PI3K or Btk. Only about 5% of the BCR-dependent gene expression changes were significantly affected by reduced PI3K or Btk. The results indicate that PI3K and Btk share target genes, and that PI3K influences additional genes independently of Btk. These data are consistent with PI3K acting through Btk and other effectors to regulate expression of a critical subset of BCR target genes that determine effective entry into the cell cycle. PMID:11756681

  16. Myosin light chain kinase regulates cell polarization independently of membrane tension or Rho kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Sunny S.; Diz-Muñoz, Alba; Weiner, Orion D.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells polarize to a single front and rear to achieve rapid actin-based motility, but the mechanisms preventing the formation of multiple fronts are unclear. We developed embryonic zebrafish keratocytes as a model system for investigating establishment of a single axis. We observed that, although keratocytes from 2 d postfertilization (dpf) embryos resembled canonical fan-shaped keratocytes, keratocytes from 4 dpf embryos often formed multiple protrusions despite unchanged membrane tension. Using genomic, genetic, and pharmacological approaches, we determined that the multiple-protrusion phenotype was primarily due to increased myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression. MLCK activity influences cell polarity by increasing myosin accumulation in lamellipodia, which locally decreases protrusion lifetime, limiting lamellipodial size and allowing for multiple protrusions to coexist within the context of membrane tension limiting protrusion globally. In contrast, Rho kinase (ROCK) regulates myosin accumulation at the cell rear and does not determine protrusion size. These results suggest a novel MLCK-specific mechanism for controlling cell polarity via regulation of myosin activity in protrusions. PMID:25918227

  17. Focal adhesion kinases and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases regulate protein tyrosine phosphorylation in stallion sperm.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Lauro; Macías-García, Beatriz; Loux, Shavahn C; Varner, Dickson D; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2013-06-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation (PY) is a hallmark of sperm capacitation. In stallion sperm, calcium inhibits PY at pH <7.8, mediated by calmodulin. To explore the mechanism of that inhibition, we incubated stallion sperm in media without added calcium, with calcium, or with calcium plus the calmodulin inhibitor W-7 (Ca/W-7 treatment). Treatment with inhibitors of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, protein kinase A (PRKA), or Src family kinases suppressed the PY induced by the absence of added calcium, but not that induced by the Ca/W-7 treatment, indicating that PY in the absence of added calcium occurred via the canonical PRKA pathway, but that PY in the Ca/W-7 treatment did not. This suggested that when calmodulin was inhibited, calcium stimulated PY via a noncanonical pathway. Incubation with PF-431396, an inhibitor of focal adhesion kinases (FAKs), a family of calcium-induced protein tyrosine kinases, inhibited the PY induced both by the absence of added calcium and by the Ca/W-7 treatment. Western blotting demonstrated that both FAK family members, protein tyrosine kinases 2 and 2B, were phosphorylated in the absence of added calcium and in the Ca/W-7 treatment, but not in the presence of calcium without calmodulin inhibitors. Inhibition of FAK proteins inhibited PY in stallion sperm incubated under capacitating conditions (in the presence of calcium, bovine serum albumin, and bicarbonate at pH >7.8). These results show for the first time a role for calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases in PRKA-dependent sperm PY; a non-PRKA-dependent pathway regulating sperm PY; and the apparent involvement of the FAK family of protein tyrosine kinases downstream in both pathways. PMID:23595906

  18. Structure of Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 in Complex with the Kinase Inhibitor Balanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tesmer, John J.G.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lodowski, David T.; Steinhagen, Henning; Huber, Jochen

    2010-07-19

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. To better understand how nanomolar inhibition and selectivity for GRK2 might be achieved, we have determined crystal structures of human GRK2 in complex with G{beta}{gamma} in the presence and absence of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. The selectivity of balanol among human GRKs is assessed.

  19. Cdc42 Regulation of Kinase Activity and Signaling by the Yeast p21-Activated Kinase Ste20

    PubMed Central

    Lamson, Rachel E.; Winters, Matthew J.; Pryciak, Peter M.

    2002-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinase Ste20 is a member of the p21-activated kinase (PAK) family with several functions, including pheromone-responsive signal transduction. While PAKs are usually activated by small G proteins and Ste20 binds Cdc42, the role of Cdc42-Ste20 binding has been controversial, largely because Ste20 lacking its entire Cdc42-binding (CRIB) domain retains kinase activity and pheromone response. Here we show that, unlike CRIB deletion, point mutations in the Ste20 CRIB domain that disrupt Cdc42 binding also disrupt pheromone signaling. We also found that Ste20 kinase activity is stimulated by GTP-bound Cdc42 in vivo and this effect is blocked by the CRIB point mutations. Moreover, the Ste20 CRIB and kinase domains bind each other, and mutations that disrupt this interaction cause hyperactive kinase activity and bypass the requirement for Cdc42 binding. These observations demonstrate that the Ste20 CRIB domain is autoinhibitory and that this negative effect is antagonized by Cdc42 to promote Ste20 kinase activity and signaling. Parallel results were observed for filamentation pathway signaling, suggesting that the requirement for Cdc42-Ste20 interaction is not qualitatively different between the mating and filamentation pathways. While necessary for pheromone signaling, the role of the Cdc42-Ste20 interaction does not require regulation by pheromone or the pheromone-activated Gβγ complex, because the CRIB point mutations also disrupt signaling by activated forms of the kinase cascade scaffold protein Ste5. In total, our observations indicate that Cdc42 converts Ste20 to an active form, while pathway stimuli regulate the ability of this active Ste20 to trigger signaling through a particular pathway. PMID:11940652

  20. Cooperation of phosphoinositides and BAR domain proteins in endosomal tubulation.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki-Narikawa, Naeko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Shibasaki, Yoshikazu

    2006-11-01

    Phosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) regulate many intracellular events, including vesicular trafficking and actin remodeling, by recruiting proteins to their sites of function. PtdIns(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and related phosphoinositides are mainly synthesized by type I PtdIns-4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5Ks). We found that PIP5K induces endosomal tubules in COS-7 cells. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 6 has been shown to act upstream of PIP5K and regulate endocytic transport and tubulation. ARF GAP with coiled-coil, ankyrin repeat, and pleckstrin homology domains 1 (ACAP1) has guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein (GAP) activity for ARF6. While there were few tubules induced by the expression of ACAP1 alone, numerous endosomal tubules were induced by coexpression of PIP5K and ACAP1. ACAP1 has a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain known to bind phosphoinositide and a Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain that has been reported to detect membrane curvature. Truncated and point mutations in the ACAP1 BAR and PH domains revealed that both BAR and PH domains are required for tubulation. These results suggest that two ARF6 downstream molecules, PIP5K and ACAP1, function together in endosomal tubulation and that phosphoinositide levels may regulate endosomal dynamics. PMID:17010122

  1. Diacylglycerol kinase θ: regulation and stability.

    PubMed

    Tu-Sekine, Becky; Goldschmidt, Hana; Petro, Elizabeth; Raben, Daniel M

    2013-01-01

    Given the well-established roles of diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PtdOH) in a variety of signaling cascades, it is not surprising that there is an increasing interest in understanding their physiological roles and mechanisms that regulate their cellular levels. One class of enzymes capable of coordinately regulating the levels of these two lipids is the diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs). These enzymes catalyze the transfer of the γ-phosphate of ATP to the hydroxyl group of DAG, which generates PtdOH while reducing DAG. As these enzymes reciprocally modulate the relative levels of these two signaling lipids, it is essential to understand the regulation and roles of these enzymes in various tissues. One system where these enzymes play important roles is the nervous system. Of the ten mammalian DGKs, eight of them are readily detected in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS): DGK-α, DGK-β, DGK-γ, DGK-η, DGK-ζ, DGK-ι, DGK-ε, and DGK-θ. Despite the increasing interest in DGKs, little is known about their regulation. We have focused some attention on understanding the enzymology and regulation of one of these DGK isoforms, DGK-θ. We recently showed that DGK-θ is regulated by an accessory protein containing polybasic regions. We now report that this accessory protein is required for the previously reported broadening of the pH profile observed in cell lysates in response to phosphatidylserine (PtdSer). Our data further reveal DGK-θ is regulated by magnesium and zinc, and sensitive to the known DGK inhibitor R599022. These data outline new parameters involved in regulating DGK-θ. PMID:23266086

  2. Protein kinase C sensitizes olfactory adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Frings, S

    1993-02-01

    Effects of neurotransmitters on cAMP-mediated signal transduction in frog olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) were studied using in situ spike recordings and radioimmunoassays. Carbachol, applied to the mucosal side of olfactory epithelium, amplified the electrical response of ORCs to cAMP-generating odorants, but did not affect unstimulated cells. A similar augmentation of odorant response was observed in the presence of phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC). The electrical response to forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase (AC), was also enhanced by PDBu, and it was attenuated by the PKC inhibitor Goe 6983. Forskolin-induced accumulation of cAMP in olfactory tissue was potentiated by carbachol, serotonin, and PDBu to a similar extent. Potentiation was completely suppressed by the PKC inhibitors Goe 6983, staurosporine, and polymyxin B, suggesting that the sensitivity of olfactory AC to stimulation by odorants and forskolin was increased by PKC. Experiments with deciliated olfactory tissue indicated that sensitization of AC was restricted to sensory cilia of ORCs. To study the effects of cell Ca2+ on these mechanisms, the intracellular Ca2+ concentration of olfactory tissue was either increased by ionomycin or decreased by BAPTA/AM. Increasing cell Ca2+ had two effects on cAMP production: (a) the basal cAMP production was enhanced by a mechanism sensitive to inhibitors of calmodulin; and (b) similar to phorbol ester, cell Ca2+ caused sensitization of AC to stimulation by forskolin, an effect sensitive to Goe 6983. Decreasing cell Ca2+ below basal levels rendered AC unresponsive to stimulation by forskolin. These data suggest that a crosstalk mechanism is functional in frog ORCs, linking the sensitivity of AC to the activity of PKC. At increased activity of PKC, olfactory AC becomes more responsive to stimulation by odorants, forskolin, and cell Ca2+. Neurotransmitters appear to use this crosstalk mechanism to regulate olfactory

  3. Myosin, Transgelin, and Myosin Light Chain Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Léguillette, Renaud; Laviolette, Michel; Bergeron, Celine; Zitouni, Nedjma; Kogut, Paul; Solway, Julian; Kachmar, Linda; Hamid, Qutayba; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Airway smooth muscle (SM) of patients with asthma exhibits a greater velocity of shortening (Vmax) than that of normal subjects, and this is thought to contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness. A greater Vmax can result from increased myosin activation. This has been reported in sensitized human airway SM and in models of asthma. A faster Vmax can also result from the expression of specific contractile proteins that promote faster cross-bridge cycling. This possibility has never been addressed in asthma. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that the expression of genes coding for SM contractile proteins is altered in asthmatic airways and contributes to their increased Vmax. Methods: We quantified the expression of several genes that code for SM contractile proteins in mild allergic asthmatic and control human airway endobronchial biopsies. The function of these contractile proteins was tested using the in vitro motility assay. Measurements and Main Results: We observed an increased expression of the fast myosin heavy chain isoform, transgelin, and myosin light chain kinase in patients with asthma. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the expression of these genes at the protein level. To address the functional significance of this overexpression, we purified tracheal myosin from the hyperresponsive Fisher rats, which also overexpress the fast myosin heavy chain isoform as compared with the normoresponsive Lewis rats, and found a faster rate of actin filament propulsion. Conversely, transgelin did not alter the rate of actin filament propulsion. Conclusions: Selective overexpression of airway smooth muscle genes in asthmatic airways leads to increased Vmax, thus contributing to the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in asthma. PMID:19011151

  4. Plant cytosolic pyruvate kinase: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Podestá, F E; Plaxton, W C

    1992-11-20

    The kinetic properties of cytosolic pyruvate kinase (PKc) from germinating castor oil seeds (COS) have been investigated. From experiments in which the free Mg2+ concentration was varied at constant levels of either the complexed or free forms of the substrates it was determined that the true substrates are the free forms of both phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and ADP. This conclusion is corroborated by the quenching of intrinsic PKC tryptophan fluorescence by free PEP and ADP. Mg2+ is bound as the free bivalent cation but is likely released as MgATP. The fluorescence data, substrate interaction kinetics, and pattern of inhibition by products and substrate analogues (adenosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) for ADP and phenyl phosphate for PEP) are compatible with a sequential, compulsory-ordered, Tri-Bi type kinetic reaction mechanism. PEP is the leading substrate, and pyruvate the last product to abandon the enzyme. The dissociation constant and limiting Km for free PEP (8.2 to 22 and 38 microM, respectively) and the limiting Km for free ADP (2.9 microM) are considerably lower than those reported for the non-plant enzyme. The results indicate that COS PKc exists naturally in an activated state, similar to the fructose 1,6-bisphosphate-activated yeast enzyme. This deduction is consistent with a previous study (F.E. Podestá and W.C. Plaxton (1991) Biochem. J. 279, 495-501) that failed to identify any allosteric activators for the COS PKc, but which proposed a regulatory mechanism based upon ATP levels and pH-dependent alterations in the enzyme's response to various metabolite inhibitors. As plant phosphofructokinases display potent inhibition by PEP, the overall rate of glycolytic flux from hexose 6-phosphate to pyruvate in the plant cytosol will ultimately depend upon variations in PEP levels brought about by the regulation of PKc. PMID:1445948

  5. Protein kinase A alterations in endocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, B; Ragazzon, B; Rizk-Rabin, M; Bertherat, J

    2012-09-01

    Various molecular and cellular alterations of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway have been observed in endocrine tumors. Since protein kinase A (PKA) is a central key component of the cAMP pathway, studies of the alterations of PKA subunits in endocrine tumors reveal new aspects of the mechanisms of cAMP pathway alterations in human diseases. So far, most alterations have been observed for the regulatory subunits, mainly PRKAR1A and to a lower extent, PRKAR2B. One of the best examples of such alteration today is the multiple neoplasia syndrome Carney complex (CNC). The most common endocrine gland manifestations of CNC are pituitary GH-secreting adenomas, thyroid tumors, testicular tumors, and ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). Heterozygous germline inactivating mutations of the PKA regulatory subunit RIα gene (PRKAR1A) are observed in about two-third of CNC patients, and also in patients with isolated PPNAD. PRKAR1A is considered as a tumor suppressor gene. Interestingly, these mutations can also be observed as somatic alterations in sporadic endocrine tumors. More than 120 different PRKAR1A mutations have been found today. Most of them lead to an unstable mutant mRNA, which will be degraded by nonsense mediated mRNA decay. In vitro and in vivo functional studies are in progress to understand the mechanisms of endocrine tumor development due to PKA regulatory subunits inactivation. PRKAR1A mutations stimulate in most models PKA activity, mimicking in some way cAMP pathway constitutive activation. Cross-talks with other signaling pathways summarized in this review have been described and might participate in endocrine tumorigenesis. PMID:22752956

  6. Adenosine Kinase: Exploitation for Therapeutic Gain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine kinase (ADK; EC 2.7.1.20) is an evolutionarily conserved phosphotransferase that converts the purine ribonucleoside adenosine into 5′-adenosine-monophosphate. This enzymatic reaction plays a fundamental role in determining the tone of adenosine, which fulfills essential functions as a homeostatic and metabolic regulator in all living systems. Adenosine not only activates specific signaling pathways by activation of four types of adenosine receptors but it is also a primordial metabolite and regulator of biochemical enzyme reactions that couple to bioenergetic and epigenetic functions. By regulating adenosine, ADK can thus be identified as an upstream regulator of complex homeostatic and metabolic networks. Not surprisingly, ADK dysfunction is involved in several pathologies, including diabetes, epilepsy, and cancer. Consequently, ADK emerges as a rational therapeutic target, and adenosine-regulating drugs have been tested extensively. In recent attempts to improve specificity of treatment, localized therapies have been developed to augment adenosine signaling at sites of injury or pathology; those approaches include transplantation of stem cells with deletions of ADK or the use of gene therapy vectors to downregulate ADK expression. More recently, the first human mutations in ADK have been described, and novel findings suggest an unexpected role of ADK in a wider range of pathologies. ADK-regulating strategies thus represent innovative therapeutic opportunities to reconstruct network homeostasis in a multitude of conditions. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the genetics, biochemistry, and pharmacology of ADK and will then focus on pathologies and therapeutic interventions. Challenges to translate ADK-based therapies into clinical use will be discussed critically. PMID:23592612

  7. Phosphorylation and activation of calcineurin by glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.J.; Wang, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    Calcineurin is a phosphoprotein phosphatase that is activated by divalent cations and further stimulated by calmodulin. In this study calcineurin is shown to be a substrate for both glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 (CK-1) and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase). Either kinase can catalyze the incorporation of 1.0-1.4 mol /sup 32/P/mol calcineurin. Analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed that only the ..cap alpha.. subunit is phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of calcineurin by either kinase leads to its activation. Using p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate the authors observed a 2-3 fold activation of calcineurin by either Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ni/sup 2 +/ (in the presence or absence of calmodulin) after phosphorylation of calcineurin by either CK-1 or A-kinase. In the absence of Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ni/sup 2 +/ phosphorylated calcineurin, like the nonphosphorylated enzyme, showed very little activity. Ni/sup 2 +/ was a more potent activator of phosphorylated calcineurin compared to Mn/sup 2 +/. Higher levels of activation (5-8 fold) of calcineurin by calmodulin was observed when phosphorylated calcineurin was pretreated with Ni/sup 2 +/ before measurement of phosphatase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation may be an important mechanism by which calcineurin activity is regulated by Ca/sup 2 +/.

  8. Plant Raf-like kinase integrates abscisic acid and hyperosmotic stress signaling upstream of SNF1-related protein kinase2.

    PubMed

    Saruhashi, Masashi; Kumar Ghosh, Totan; Arai, Kenta; Ishizaki, Yumiko; Hagiwara, Kazuya; Komatsu, Kenji; Shiwa, Yuh; Izumikawa, Keiichi; Yoshikawa, Harunori; Umezawa, Taishi; Sakata, Yoichi; Takezawa, Daisuke

    2015-11-17

    Plant response to drought and hyperosmosis is mediated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA), a sesquiterpene compound widely distributed in various embryophyte groups. Exogenous ABA as well as hyperosmosis activates the sucrose nonfermenting 1 (SNF1)-related protein kinase2 (SnRK2), which plays a central role in cellular responses against drought and dehydration, although the details of the activation mechanism are not understood. Analysis of a mutant of the moss Physcomitrella patens with reduced ABA sensitivity and reduced hyperosmosis tolerance revealed that a protein kinase designated "ARK" (for "ABA and abiotic stress-responsive Raf-like kinase") plays an essential role in the activation of SnRK2. ARK encoded by a single gene in P. patens belongs to the family of group B3 Raf-like MAP kinase kinase kinases (B3-MAPKKKs) mediating ethylene, disease resistance, and salt and sugar responses in angiosperms. Our findings indicate that ARK, as a novel regulatory component integrating ABA and hyperosmosis signals, represents the ancestral B3-MAPKKKs, which multiplied, diversified, and came to have specific functions in angiosperms. PMID:26540727

  9. Pim kinases modulate resistance to FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors in FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Green, Alexa S.; Maciel, Thiago T.; Hospital, Marie-Anne; Yin, Chae; Mazed, Fetta; Townsend, Elizabeth C.; Pilorge, Sylvain; Lambert, Mireille; Paubelle, Etienne; Jacquel, Arnaud; Zylbersztejn, Florence; Decroocq, Justine; Poulain, Laury; Sujobert, Pierre; Jacque, Nathalie; Adam, Kevin; So, Jason C. C.; Kosmider, Olivier; Auberger, Patrick; Hermine, Olivier; Weinstock, David M.; Lacombe, Catherine; Mayeux, Patrick; Vanasse, Gary J.; Leung, Anskar Y.; Moura, Ivan C.; Bouscary, Didier; Tamburini, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) is frequently detected in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and is associated with a dismal long-term prognosis. FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors provide short-term disease control, but relapse invariably occurs within months. Pim protein kinases are oncogenic FLT3-ITD targets expressed in AML cells. We show that increased Pim kinase expression is found in relapse samples from AML patients treated with FLT3 inhibitors. Ectopic Pim-2 expression induces resistance to FLT3 inhibition in both FLT3-ITD–induced myeloproliferative neoplasm and AML models in mice. Strikingly, we found that Pim kinases govern FLT3-ITD signaling and that their pharmacological or genetic inhibition restores cell sensitivity to FLT3 inhibitors. Finally, dual inhibition of FLT3 and Pim kinases eradicates FLT3-ITD+ cells including primary AML cells. Concomitant Pim and FLT3 inhibition represents a promising new avenue for AML therapy. PMID:26601252

  10. rlk/TXK Encodes Two Forms of a Novel Cysteine String Tyrosine Kinase Activated by Src Family Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Jayantha; Chamorro, Mario; Czar, Michael J.; Schaeffer, Edward M.; Lenardo, Michael J.; Varmus, Harold E.; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.

    1999-01-01

    Rlk/Txk is a member of the BTK/Tec family of tyrosine kinases and is primarily expressed in T lymphocytes. Unlike other members of this kinase family, Rlk lacks a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain near the amino terminus and instead contains a distinctive cysteine string motif. We demonstrate here that Rlk protein consists of two isoforms that arise by alternative initiation of translation from the same cDNA. The shorter, internally initiated protein species lacks the cysteine string motif and is located in the nucleus when expressed in the absence of the larger form. In contrast, the larger form is cytoplasmic. We show that the larger form is palmitoylated and that mutation of its cysteine string motif both abolishes palmitoylation and allows the protein to migrate to the nucleus. The cysteine string, therefore, is a critical determinant of both fatty acid modification and protein localization for the larger isoform of Rlk, suggesting that Rlk regulation is distinct from the other Btk family kinases. We further show that Rlk is phosphorylated and changes localization in response to T-cell-receptor (TCR) activation and, like the other Btk family kinases, can be phosphorylated and activated by Src family kinases. However, unlike the other Btk family members, Rlk is activated independently of the activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, consistent with its lack of a PH domain. Thus, Rlk has two distinct isoforms, each of which may have unique properties in signaling downstream from the TCR. PMID:9891083

  11. Kinase Control of Latent HIV-1 Infection: PIM-1 Kinase as a Major Contributor to HIV-1 Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Duverger, Alexandra; Wolschendorf, Frank; Anderson, Joshua C.; Wagner, Frederic; Bosque, Alberto; Shishido, Takao; Jones, Jennifer; Planelles, Vicente; Willey, Christopher; Cron, Randall Q.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the clinical relevance of latent HIV-1 infection as a block to HIV-1 eradication, the molecular biology of HIV-1 latency remains incompletely understood. We recently demonstrated the presence of a gatekeeper kinase function that controls latent HIV-1 infection. Using kinase array analysis, we here expand on this finding and demonstrate that the kinase activity profile of latently HIV-1-infected T cells is altered relative to that of uninfected T cells. A ranking of altered kinases generated from these kinome profile data predicted PIM-1 kinase as a key switch involved in HIV-1 latency control. Using genetic and pharmacologic perturbation strategies, we demonstrate that PIM-1 activity is indeed required for HIV-1 reactivation in T cell lines and primary CD4 T cells. The presented results thus confirm that kinases are key contributors to HIV-1 latency control. In addition, through mutational studies we link the inhibitory effect of PIM-1 inhibitor IV (PIMi IV) on HIV-1 reactivation to an AP-1 motif in the CD28-responsive element of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR). The results expand our conceptual understanding of the dynamic interactions of the host cell and the latent HIV-1 integration event and position kinome profiling as a research tool to reveal novel molecular mechanisms that can eventually be targeted to therapeutically trigger HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:24155393

  12. Kinase control of latent HIV-1 infection: PIM-1 kinase as a major contributor to HIV-1 reactivation.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Alexandra; Wolschendorf, Frank; Anderson, Joshua C; Wagner, Frederic; Bosque, Alberto; Shishido, Takao; Jones, Jennifer; Planelles, Vicente; Willey, Christopher; Cron, Randall Q; Kutsch, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Despite the clinical relevance of latent HIV-1 infection as a block to HIV-1 eradication, the molecular biology of HIV-1 latency remains incompletely understood. We recently demonstrated the presence of a gatekeeper kinase function that controls latent HIV-1 infection. Using kinase array analysis, we here expand on this finding and demonstrate that the kinase activity profile of latently HIV-1-infected T cells is altered relative to that of uninfected T cells. A ranking of altered kinases generated from these kinome profile data predicted PIM-1 kinase as a key switch involved in HIV-1 latency control. Using genetic and pharmacologic perturbation strategies, we demonstrate that PIM-1 activity is indeed required for HIV-1 reactivation in T cell lines and primary CD4 T cells. The presented results thus confirm that kinases are key contributors to HIV-1 latency control. In addition, through mutational studies we link the inhibitory effect of PIM-1 inhibitor IV (PIMi IV) on HIV-1 reactivation to an AP-1 motif in the CD28-responsive element of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR). The results expand our conceptual understanding of the dynamic interactions of the host cell and the latent HIV-1 integration event and position kinome profiling as a research tool to reveal novel molecular mechanisms that can eventually be targeted to therapeutically trigger HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:24155393

  13. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  14. Structural and functional diversity in the activity and regulation of DAPK-related protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Temmerman, Koen; Simon, Bertrand; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2013-11-01

    Within the large group of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CAMKs) of the human kinome, there is a distinct branch of highly related kinases that includes three families: death-associated protein-related kinases, myosin light-chain-related kinases and triple functional domain protein-related kinases. In this review, we refer to these collectively as DMT kinases. There are several functional features that span the three families, such as a broad involvement in apoptotic processes, cytoskeletal association and cellular plasticity. Other CAMKs contain a highly conserved HRD motif, which is a prerequisite for kinase regulation through activation-loop phosphorylation, but in all 16 members of the DMT branch, this is replaced by an HF/LD motif. This DMT kinase signature motif substitutes phosphorylation-dependent active-site interactions with a local hydrophobic core that maintains an active kinase conformation. Only about half of the DMT kinases have an additional autoregulatory domain, C-terminal to the kinase domain that binds calcium/calmodulin in order to regulate kinase activity. Protein substrates have been identified for some of the DMT kinases, but little is known about the mechanism of recognition. Substrate conformation could be an equally important parameter in substrate recognition as specific preferences in sequence position. Taking the data together, this kinase branch encapsulates a treasure trove of features that renders it distinct from many other protein kinases and calls for future research activities in this field. PMID:23745726

  15. Kinase domain inhibition of leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) using a [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-b]pyridazine scaffold.

    PubMed

    Galatsis, Paul; Henderson, Jaclyn L; Kormos, Bethany L; Han, Seungil; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Wager, Travis T; Verhoest, Patrick R; Noell, G Stephen; Chen, Yi; Needle, Elie; Berger, Zdenek; Steyn, Stefanus J; Houle, Christopher; Hirst, Warren D

    2014-09-01

    Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) has been genetically linked to Parkinson's disease (PD). The most common mutant, G2019S, increases kinase activity, thus LRRK2 kinase inhibitors are potentially useful in the treatment of PD. We herein disclose the structure, potential ligand-protein binding interactions, and pharmacological profiling of potent and highly selective kinase inhibitors based on a triazolopyridazine chemical scaffold. PMID:25113930

  16. Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Docking Analysis of the Molecular Chaperone-Kinase Interactions: Towards Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Kinases by Targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lawless, Nathan; Blacklock, Kristin; Berrigan, Elizabeth; Verkhivker, Gennady

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental role of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone system in mediating maturation of protein kinase clients and supporting kinase functional activity is essential for the integrity and viability of signaling pathways involved in cell cycle control and organism development. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, the molecular mechanisms and guiding principles of kinase recruitment to the chaperone system are lacking quantitative characterization. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with protein kinase clients by modern experimental techniques is highly challenging, owing to a transient nature of chaperone-mediated interactions. In this work, we used experimentally-guided protein docking to probe the allosteric nature of the Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) kinase clients. The results of docking simulations suggest that the kinase recognition and recruitment to the chaperone system may be primarily determined by Cdc37 targeting of the N-terminal kinase lobe. The interactions of Hsp90 with the C-terminal kinase lobe may provide additional “molecular brakes” that can lock (or unlock) kinase from the system during client loading (release) stages. The results of this study support a central role of the Cdc37 chaperone in recognition and recruitment of the kinase clients. Structural analysis may have useful implications in developing strategies for allosteric inhibition of protein kinases by targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone machinery. PMID:24287464

  17. NEW POLLEN-SPECIFIC RECEPTOR KINASES IDENTIFIED IN TOMATO, MAIZE AND ARABIDOPSIS: THE TOMATO KINASES SHOW OVERLAPPING BUT DISTINCT LOCALIZATOIN PATTERNS ON POLLEN TUBES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously characterized LePRKl and LePRK2, pollen-specific receptor kinases from tomato (Mushietti et al., 1998). Here we identify a similar receptor kinase from maize, ZmPRKl, that is also specifically expressed late in pollen development, and a third pollen receptor kinase from tomato, LePRK3...

  18. Identification of autophosphorylation sites in eukaryotic elongation factor-2 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Pyr Dit Ruys, Sébastien; Wang, Xuemin; Smith, Ewan M.; Herinckx, Gaëtan; Hussain, Nusrat; Rider, Mark H.; Vertommen, Didier; Proud, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    eEF2K [eEF2 (eukaryotic elongation factor 2) kinase] phosphorylates and inactivates the translation elongation factor eEF2. eEF2K is not a member of the main eukaryotic protein kinase superfamily, but instead belongs to a small group of so-called α-kinases. The activity of eEF2K is normally dependent upon Ca2+ and calmodulin. eEF2K has previously been shown to undergo autophosphorylation, the stoichiometry of which suggested the existence of multiple sites. In the present study we have identified several autophosphorylation sites, including Thr348, Thr353, Ser366 and Ser445, all of which are highly conserved among vertebrate eEF2Ks. We also identified a number of other sites, including Ser78, a known site of phosphorylation, and others, some of which are less well conserved. None of the sites lies in the catalytic domain, but three affect eEF2K activity. Mutation of Ser78, Thr348 and Ser366 to a non-phosphorylatable alanine residue decreased eEF2K activity. Phosphorylation of Thr348 was detected by immunoblotting after transfecting wild-type eEF2K into HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells, but not after transfection with a kinase-inactive construct, confirming that this is indeed a site of autophosphorylation. Thr348 appears to be constitutively autophosphorylated in vitro. Interestingly, other recent data suggest that the corresponding residue in other α-kinases is also autophosphorylated and contributes to the activation of these enzymes [Crawley, Gharaei, Ye, Yang, Raveh, London, Schueler-Furman, Jia and Cote (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 2607–2616]. Ser366 phosphorylation was also detected in intact cells, but was still observed in the kinase-inactive construct, demonstrating that this site is phosphorylated not only autocatalytically but also in trans by other kinases. PMID:22216903

  19. AKAP79 Selectively Enhances Protein Kinase C Regulation of GluR1 at a Ca2+-Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II/Protein Kinase C Site*

    PubMed Central

    Tavalin, Steven J.

    2008-01-01

    Enhancement of AMPA receptor activity in response to synaptic plasticity inducing stimuli may arise, in part, through phosphorylation of the GluR1 AMPA receptor subunit at Ser-831. This site is a substrate for both Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and protein kinase C (PKC). However, neuronal protein levels of CaMKII may exceed those of PKC by an order of magnitude. Thus, it is unclear how PKC could effectively regulate this common target site. The multivalent neuronal scaffold A-kinase-anchoring protein 79 (AKAP79) is known to bind PKC and is linked to GluR1 by synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP97). Here, biochemical studies demonstrate that AKAP79 localizes PKC activity near the receptor, thus accelerating Ser-831 phosphorylation. Complementary electrophysiological studies indicate that AKAP79 selectively shifts the dose-dependence for PKC modulation of GluR1 receptor currents ∼20-fold, such that low concentrations of PKC are as effective as much higher CaMKII concentrations. By boosting PKC activity near a target substrate, AKAP79 provides a mechanism to overcome limitations in kinase abundance thereby ensuring faithful signal propagation and efficient modification of AMPA receptor-mediated responses. PMID:18305116

  20. The FRK1 mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) from Solanum chacoense is involved in embryo sac and pollen development

    PubMed Central

    Lafleur, Edith; Kapfer, Christelle; Joly, Valentin; Liu, Yang; Tebbji, Faiza; Daigle, Caroline; Gray-Mitsumune, Madoka; Cappadocia, Mario; Nantel, André; Matton, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    The fertilization-related kinase 1 (ScFRK1), a nuclear-localized mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) from the wild potato species Solanum chacoense, belongs to a small group of pMEKKs that do not possess an extended N- or C-terminal regulatory domain. Initially selected based on its highly specific expression profile following fertilization, in situ expression analyses revealed that the ScFRK1 gene is also expressed early on during female gametophyte development in the integument and megaspore mother cell and, later, in the synergid and egg cells of the embryo sac. ScFRK1 mRNAs are also detected in pollen mother cells. Transgenic plants with lower or barely detectable levels of ScFRK1 mRNAs lead to the production of small fruits with severely reduced seed set, resulting from a concomitant decline in the number of normal embryo sacs produced. Megagametogenesis and microgametogenesis were affected, as megaspores did not progress beyond the functional megaspore (FG1) stage and the microspore collapsed around the first pollen mitosis. As for other mutants that affect embryo sac development, pollen tube guidance was severely affected in the ScFRK1 transgenic lines. Gametophyte to sporophyte communication was also affected, as observed from a marked change in the transcriptomic profiles of the sporophytic tissues of the ovule. The ScFRK1 MAPKKK is thus involved in a signalling cascade that regulates both male and female gamete development. PMID:25576576

  1. Protein Kinase A Opposes the Phosphorylation-dependent Recruitment of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β to A-kinase Anchoring Protein 220.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Jennifer L; Nygren, Patrick J; Tunquist, Brian J; Langeberg, Lorene K; Seternes, Ole-Morten; Scott, John D

    2015-08-01

    The proximity of an enzyme to its substrate can influence rate and magnitude of catalysis. A-kinase anchoring protein 220 (AKAP220) is a multivalent anchoring protein that can sequester a variety of signal transduction enzymes. These include protein kinase A (PKA) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). Using a combination of molecular and cellular approaches we show that GSK3β phosphorylation of Thr-1132 on AKAP220 initiates recruitment of this kinase into the enzyme scaffold. We also find that AKAP220 anchors GSK3β and its substrate β-catenin in membrane ruffles. Interestingly, GSK3β can be released from the multienzyme complex in response to PKA phosphorylation on serine 9, which suppresses GSK3β activity. The signaling scaffold may enhance this regulatory mechanism, as AKAP220 has the capacity to anchor two PKA holoenzymes. Site 1 on AKAP220 (residues 610-623) preferentially interacts with RII, whereas site 2 (residues 1633-1646) exhibits a dual specificity for RI and RII. In vitro affinity measurements revealed that site 2 on AKAP220 binds RII with ∼10-fold higher affinity than site 1. Occupancy of both R subunit binding sites on AKAP220 could provide a mechanism to amplify local cAMP responses and enable cross-talk between PKA and GSK3β. PMID:26088133

  2. Stimulus-Specific Distinctions in Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Stress-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinases Revealed by a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Biosensor▿

    PubMed Central

    Tomida, Taichiro; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro; O'Grady, Pauline; Saito, Haruo

    2009-01-01

    The stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs), namely, p38 and JNK, are members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family and are important determinants of cell fate when cells are exposed to environmental stresses such as UV and osmostress. SAPKs are activated by SAPK kinases (SAP2Ks), which are in turn activated by various SAP2K kinases (SAP3Ks). Because conventional methods, such as immunoblotting using phospho-specific antibodies, measure the average activity of SAP3Ks in a cell population, the intracellular dynamics of SAP3K activity are largely unknown. Here, we developed a reporter of SAP3K activity toward the MKK6 SAP2K, based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer, that can uncover the dynamic behavior of SAP3K activation in cells. Using this reporter, we demonstrated that SAP3K activation occurs either synchronously or asynchronously among a cell population and in different cellular compartments in single cells, depending on the type of stress applied. In particular, SAP3Ks are activated by epidermal growth factor and osmostress on the plasma membrane, by anisomycin and UV in the cytoplasm, and by etoposide in the nucleus. These observations revealed previously unknown heterogeneity in SAPK responses and supplied answers to the question of the cellular location in which various stresses induce stimulus-specific SAPK responses. PMID:19737916

  3. The FRK1 mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) from Solanum chacoense is involved in embryo sac and pollen development.

    PubMed

    Lafleur, Edith; Kapfer, Christelle; Joly, Valentin; Liu, Yang; Tebbji, Faiza; Daigle, Caroline; Gray-Mitsumune, Madoka; Cappadocia, Mario; Nantel, André; Matton, Daniel P

    2015-04-01

    The fertilization-related kinase 1 (ScFRK1), a nuclear-localized mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) from the wild potato species Solanum chacoense, belongs to a small group of pMEKKs that do not possess an extended N- or C-terminal regulatory domain. Initially selected based on its highly specific expression profile following fertilization, in situ expression analyses revealed that the ScFRK1 gene is also expressed early on during female gametophyte development in the integument and megaspore mother cell and, later, in the synergid and egg cells of the embryo sac. ScFRK1 mRNAs are also detected in pollen mother cells. Transgenic plants with lower or barely detectable levels of ScFRK1 mRNAs lead to the production of small fruits with severely reduced seed set, resulting from a concomitant decline in the number of normal embryo sacs produced. Megagametogenesis and microgametogenesis were affected, as megaspores did not progress beyond the functional megaspore (FG1) stage and the microspore collapsed around the first pollen mitosis. As for other mutants that affect embryo sac development, pollen tube guidance was severely affected in the ScFRK1 transgenic lines. Gametophyte to sporophyte communication was also affected, as observed from a marked change in the transcriptomic profiles of the sporophytic tissues of the ovule. The ScFRK1 MAPKKK is thus involved in a signalling cascade that regulates both male and female gamete development. PMID:25576576

  4. Evidence that a kinase distinct from protein kinase C and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase mediates ligation-dependent serine/threonine phosphorylation of the T-lymphocyte co-stimulatory molecule CD28.

    PubMed Central

    Parry, R V; Olive, D; Westwick, J; Sansom, D M; Ward, S G

    1997-01-01

    The CD28 cytoplasmic tail contains several potential phosphorylation sites for the serine/threonine kinase protein kinase C (PKC) and/or proline-directed serine/threonine kinases, such as extracellular signal-regulated kinases. We demonstrate that ligation of CD28 by B7.1 results in strong serine/threonine phosphorylation of CD28. It is unlikely that ligation-stimulated phosphorylation of CD28 is mediated via activation of PKC, since it was not prevented by pre-treatment of Jurkat cells with inhibitors of PKC, and it was not mimicked by treatment with PKC activators such as PMA. Nevertheless, despite for lack of detectable effects of PMA treatment on CD28 phosphorylation, PMA did partially inhibit the association of CD28 with the putative signalling molecule phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) and the subsequent accumulation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. PI 3-kinase exhibits dual specificity as both a lipid kinase and a protein serine kinase, and site-specific mutagenesis of the Tyr173 residue in the CD28 cytoplasmic tail, which abolishes CD28 coupling to PI 3-kinase [Pages, Ragueneau, Rottapel, Truneh, Nunes, Imbert and Olive (1994) Nature (London) 369, 327-329], also prevents ligation-stimulated phosphorylation of CD28. However, the two PI 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002 had no effect on phosphorylation of CD28 after ligation by B7.1. This study therefore demonstrates that (1) a CD28-activated serine/threonine kinase distinct from both PKC and PI 3-kinase mediates ligation-stimulated CD28 phosphorylation, and (2) the PMA-stimulated down-regulation of the coupling of CD28 to PI 3-kinase is not due to PMA-stimulated phosphorylation of CD28. PMID:9337876

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Kinase Interacting Protein 1, a Pollen Protein That Interacts with the Kinase Domain of PRK1, a Receptor-Like Kinase of Petunia1

    PubMed Central

    Skirpan, Andrea L.; McCubbin, Andrew G.; Ishimizu, Takeshi; Wang, Xi; Hu, Yi; Dowd, Peter E.; Ma, Hong; Kao, Teh-hui

    2001-01-01

    Many receptor-like kinases have been identified in plants and have been shown by genetic or transgenic knockouts to play diverse physiological roles; however, to date, the cytosolic interacting proteins of relatively few of these kinases have been identified. We have previously identified a predominantly pollen-expressed receptor-like kinase of petunia (Petunia inflata), named PRK1, and we have shown by the antisense RNA approach that it is required for microspores to progress from the unicellular to bicellular stage. To investigate the PRK1-mediated signal transduction pathway, PRK1-K cDNA, encoding most of the cytoplasmic domain of PRK1, was used as bait in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid screens of pollen/pollen tube cDNA libraries of petunia. A protein named kinase interacting protein 1 (KIP1) was found to interact very strongly with PRK1-K. This interaction was greatly reduced when lysine-462 of PRK1-K, believed to be essential for kinase activity, was replaced with arginine (the resulting protein is named PRK1-K462R). The amino acid sequence of KIP1 deduced from full-length cDNA contains an EF-hand Ca2+-binding motif and nine predicted coiled-coil regions. The yeast two-hybrid assay and affinity chromatography showed that KIP1 interacts with itself to form a dimer or higher multimer. KIP1 is present in a single copy in the genome, and is expressed predominantly in pollen with a similar temporal pattern to PRK1. In situ hybridization showed that PRK1 and KIP1 transcripts were localized in the cytoplasm of pollen. PRK1-K phosphorylated KIP1-NT (amino acids 1–716), whereas PRK1-K462R only weakly phosphorylated KIP1-NT in vitro. PMID:11500547

  6. Linking phenotype to kinase: identification of a novel benzoxaborole hinge-binding motif for kinase inhibition and development of high-potency rho kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Akama, Tsutomu; Dong, Chen; Virtucio, Charlotte; Sullivan, David; Zhou, Yasheen; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Rock, Fernando; Freund, Yvonne; Liu, Liang; Bu, Wei; Wu, Anne; Fan, Xiao-Qing; Jarnagin, Kurt

    2013-12-01

    Benzoxaboroles are a novel class of drug-like compounds that have been rich sources of novel inhibitors for various enzymes and of new drugs. While examining benzoxaborole activity in phenotypic screens, our attention was attracted by the (aminomethylphenoxy)benzoxaborole family, which potently inhibited Toll-like receptor-stimulated cytokine secretion from leukocytes. After considering their structure-activity relationships and the central role of kinases in leukocyte biology, we performed a kinome-wide screen to investigate the members of the (aminomethylphenoxy)benzoxaborole family. This technique identified Rho-activated kinase (ROCK) as a target. We showed competitive behavior, with respect to ATP, and then determined the ROCK2-drug cocrystal structure. The drug occupies the ATP site in which the oxaborole moiety provides hydrogen bond donors and acceptors to the hinge, and the aminomethyl group interacts with the magnesium/ATP-interacting aspartic acid common to protein kinases. The series exhibits excellent selectivity against most of the kinome, with greater than 15-fold selectivity against the next best member of the AGC protein kinase subfamily. Medicinal chemistry efforts with structure-based design resulted in a compound with a Ki of 170 nM. Cellular studies revealed strong enzyme inhibition rank correlation with suppression of intracellular phosphorylation of a ROCK substrate. The biochemical potencies of these compounds also translated to functional activity, causing smooth muscle relaxation in rat aorta and guinea pig trachea. The series exhibited oral availability and one member reduced rat blood pressure, consistent with ROCK's role in smooth muscle contraction. Thus, the benzoxaborole moiety represents a novel hinge-binding kinase scaffold that may have potential for therapeutic use. PMID:24049062

  7. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 interacts with p21-activated kinase 6 to control neurite complexity in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Civiero, Laura; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Beilina, Alexandra; Rodella, Umberto; Russo, Isabella; Belluzzi, Elisa; Lobbestael, Evy; Reyniers, Lauran; Hondhamuni, Geshanthi; Lewis, Patrick A; Van den Haute, Chris; Baekelandt, Veerle; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Bubacco, Luigi; Piccoli, Giovanni; Cookson, Mark R; Taymans, Jean-Marc; Greggio, Elisa

    2015-12-01

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a causative gene for Parkinson's disease, but the physiological function and the mechanism(s) by which the cellular activity of LRRK2 is regulated are poorly understood. Here, we identified p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) as a novel interactor of the GTPase/ROC domain of LRRK2. p21-activated kinases are serine-threonine kinases that serve as targets for the small GTP binding proteins Cdc42 and Rac1 and have been implicated in different morphogenetic processes through remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton such as synapse formation and neuritogenesis. Using an in vivo neuromorphology assay, we show that PAK6 is a positive regulator of neurite outgrowth and that LRRK2 is required for this function. Analyses of post-mortem brain tissue from idiopathic and LRRK2 G2019S carriers reveal an increase in PAK6 activation state, whereas knock-out LRRK2 mice display reduced PAK6 activation and phosphorylation of PAK6 substrates. Taken together, these results support a critical role of LRRK2 GTPase domain in cytoskeletal dynamics in vivo through the novel interactor PAK6, and provide a valuable platform to unravel the mechanism underlying LRRK2-mediated pathophysiology. We propose p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) as a novel interactor of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), a kinase involved in Parkinson's disease (PD). In health, PAK6 regulates neurite complexity in the brain and LRRK2 is required for its function, (a) whereas PAK6 is aberrantly activated in LRRK2-linked PD brain (b) suggesting that LRRK2 toxicity is mediated by PAK6. PMID:26375402

  8. Purification of catalytic domain of rat spleen p72syk kinase and its phosphorylation and activation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Borowski, P; Heiland, M; Kornetzky, L; Medem, S; Laufs, R

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic domain of p72(syk) kinase (CDp72(syk)) was purified from a 30000 g particulate fraction of rat spleen. The purification procedure employed sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-Sephacel and Superdex-200, and elution from HA-Ultrogel by chloride. The analysis of the final CDp72(syk) preparation by SDS/PAGE revealed a major silver-stained 40 kDa protein. The kinase was identified by covalent modification of its ATP-binding site with [14C]5'-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine and by immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against the 'linker' region of p72(syk). By using poly(Glu4, Tyr1) as a substrate, the specific activity of the enzyme was determined as 18.5 nmol Pi/min per mg. Casein, histones H1 and H2B and myelin basic protein were efficiently phosphorylated by CDp72(syk). The kinase exhibited a limited ability to phosphorylate random polymers containing tyrosine residues. CDp72(syk) autophosphorylation activity was associated with an activation of the kinase towards exogenous substrates. The extent of activation was dependent on the substrates added. CDp72(syk) was phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) on serine and threonine residues. With a newly developed assay method, we demonstrated that the PKC-mediated phosphorylation had a strong activating effect on the tyrosine kinase activity of CDp72(syk). Studies extended to conventional PKC isoforms revealed an isoform-dependent manner (alpha > betaI = betaII > gamma) of CDp72(syk) phosphorylation. The different phosphorylation efficiencies of the PKC isoforms closely correlated with the ability to enhance the tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:9531509

  9. Multi-kinase inhibitor C1 triggers mitotic catastrophe of glioma stem cells mainly through MELK kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Minata, Mutsuko; Gu, Chunyu; Joshi, Kaushal; Nakano-Okuno, Mariko; Hong, Christopher; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Kornblum, Harley I; Molla, Annie; Nakano, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly lethal brain tumor. Due to resistance to current therapies, patient prognosis remains poor and development of novel and effective GBM therapy is crucial. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) have gained attention as a therapeutic target in GBM due to their relative resistance to current therapies and potent tumor-initiating ability. Previously, we identified that the mitotic kinase maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK) is highly expressed in GBM tissues, specifically in GSCs, and its expression is inversely correlated with the post-surgical survival period of GBM patients. In addition, patient-derived GSCs depend on MELK for their survival and growth both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate evidence that the role of MELK in the GSC survival is specifically dependent on its kinase activity. With in silico structure-based analysis for protein-compound interaction, we identified the small molecule Compound 1 (C1) is predicted to bind to the kinase-active site of MELK protein. Elimination of MELK kinase activity was confirmed by in vitro kinase assay in nano-molar concentrations. When patient-derived GSCs were treated with C1, they underwent mitotic arrest and subsequent cellular apoptosis in vitro, a phenotype identical to that observed with shRNA-mediated MELK knockdown. In addition, C1 treatment strongly induced tumor cell apoptosis in slice cultures of GBM surgical specimens and attenuated growth of mouse intracranial tumors derived from GSCs in a dose-dependent manner. Lastly, C1 treatment sensitizes GSCs to radiation treatment. Collectively, these data indicate that targeting MELK kinase activity is a promising approach to attenuate GBM growth by eliminating GSCs in tumors. PMID:24739874

  10. The Src-family tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP1 interferes with the activation of ribosomal protein S6 kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Shah, O Jameel; Kimball, Scot R; Jefferson, Leonard S

    2002-01-01

    Considerable biochemical and pharmacological evidence suggests that the activation of ribosomal protein S6 kinases (S6Ks) by activated receptor tyrosine kinases involves multiple co-ordinated input signals. However, the identities of many of these inputs remain poorly described, and their precise involvement in S6K activation has been the subject of great investigative effort. In the present study, we have shown that 4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP1), a selective inhibitor of the Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases, interferes with the activation of 70 and 85 kDa S6K gene products (p70S6K1 and p85S6K1) by insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1, sodium orthovanadate and activated alleles of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and H-Ras. PP1 also impedes the activation of AKT/protein kinase B and the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 by these various stimuli. Insulin-like growth factor 1 was observed to induce a sustained increase in c-Src autophosphorylation as revealed using anti-phospho-Y416 antisera, but this effect was absent from the cells treated with PP1. To conclude, an activated allele of p70S6K1 is compared with the wild-type allele, resistant to inhibition by PP1 when co-expressed with phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1), suggesting that PP1 affects p70S6K1 via a PDK1-independent pathway. Thus activation of Src may supply a necessary signal for the activation of p70S6K1 and possibly other S6Ks. PMID:12014987

  11. Salicylic acid activates a 48-kD MAP kinase in tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S; Klessig, D F

    1997-01-01

    The involvement of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in the salicylic acid (SA) signal transduction pathway leading to pathogenesis-related gene induction has previously been demonstrated using kinase and phosphatase inhibitors. Here, we show that in tobacco suspension cells, SA induced a rapid and transient activation of a 48-kD kinase that uses myelin basic protein as a substrate. This kinase is called the p48 SIP kinase (for SA-Induced Protein kinase). Biologically active analogs of SA, which induce pathogenesis-related genes and enhanced resistance, also activated this kinase, whereas inactive analogs did not. Phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue(s) in the SIP kinase was associated with its activation. The SIP kinase was purified to homogeneity from SA-treated tobacco suspension culture cells. The purified SIP kinase is strongly phosphorylated on a tyrosine residue(s), and treatment with either protein tyrosine or serine/threonine phosphatases abolished its activity. Using primers corresponding to the sequences of internal tryptic peptides, we cloned the SIP kinase gene. Analysis of the SIP kinase sequence indicates that it belongs to the MAP kinase family and that it is distinct from the other plant MAP kinases previously implicated in stress responses, suggesting that different members of the MAP kinase family are activated by different stresses. PMID:9165755

  12. Evolutionary Adaptations of Plant AGC Kinases: From Light Signaling to Cell Polarity Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Eike H.; Offringa, Remko

    2012-01-01

    Signaling and trafficking over membranes involves a plethora of transmembrane proteins that control the flow of compounds or relay specific signaling events. Next to external cues, internal stimuli can modify the activity or abundance of these proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). One such regulatory mechanism is protein phosphorylation by membrane-associated kinases, several of which are AGC kinases. The AGC kinase family is one of seven kinase families that are conserved in all eukaryotic genomes. In plants evolutionary adaptations introduced specific structural changes within the AGC kinases that most likely allow modulation of kinase activity by external stimuli (e.g., light). Starting from the well-defined structural basis common to all AGC kinases we review the current knowledge on the structure-function relationship in plant AGC kinases. Nine of the 39 Arabidopsis AGC kinases have now been shown to be involved in the regulation of auxin transport. In particular, AGC kinase-mediated phosphorylation of the auxin transporters ABCB1 and ABCB19 has been shown to regulate their activity, while auxin transporters of the PIN family are located to different positions at the PM depending on their phosphorylation status, which is a result of counteracting AGC kinase and PP6 phosphatase activities. We therefore focus on regulation of AGC kinase activity in this context. Identified structural adaptations of the involved AGC kinases may provide new insight into AGC kinase functionality and demonstrate their position as central hubs in the cellular network controlling plant development and growth. PMID:23162562

  13. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Pigeonneau, Nathalie; Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Dobrinic, Paula; Macek, Boris; Franjevic, Damjan; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Francoise; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD, and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells. PMID:25278935

  14. Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

    2011-03-24

    It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellular mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the

  15. A monomeric form of pyruvate kinase in human pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, K; Ghory, P K; Asakura, T; Schwartz, E

    1977-01-01

    A mutant pyruvate kinase (ATP:pyruvate 2-O-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.40) from human erythrocytes which is easily separated into monomers and dimers by gel chromatography is described. Tht mutant enzyme shows almost the same pH optimum and thermostability as normal enzyme, but has a decreased stability on shaking with air, a decreased Km for phosphoenolpyruvate and a loss of allosteric properties. The apparent Km values for phosphoenolpyruvate of tetramers and monomers were the same. The tetrameric enzyme was slightly activated by fructose-1,6-diphosphate but the monomeric form was not. The tetrameric enzyme was found to dissociate spontaneously to dimeric and monomeric forms. PMID:15247

  16. Allosteric Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the AKT Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalafave, D. S.

    This research addresses computational design of small druglike molecules for possible anticancer applications. AKT and SGK are kinases that control important cellular functions. They are highly homologous, having similar activators and targets. Cancers with increased SGK activity may develop resistance to AKT-specific inhibitors. Our goal was to design new molecules that would bind both AKT and SGK, thus preventing the development of drug resistance. Most kinase inhibitors target the kinase ATP-binding site. However, the high similarity in this site among kinases makes it difficult to target specifically. Furthermore, mutations in this site can cause resistance to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. We used existing AKT inhibitors as initial templates to design molecules that could potentially bind the allosteric sites of both AKT and SGK. Molecules with no implicit toxicities and optimal drug-like properties were used for docking studies. Binding energies of the stable complexes that the designed molecules formed with AKT and SGK were calculated. Possible applications of the designed putative inhibitors against cancers with overexpressed AKT/SGK is discussed.

  17. Made to measure – keeping Rho kinase at a distance

    PubMed Central

    Truebestein, Linda; Elsner, Daniel J.; Leonard, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCK) were first identified as effectors of the small GTPase RhoA, hence their nomenclature. Since their discovery, two decades ago, scientists have sought to unravel the structure, regulation, and function of these essential kinases. During that time, a consensus model has formed, in which ROCK activity is regulated via both Rho-dependent and independent mechanisms. However, recent findings have raised significant questions regarding this model. In their recent publication in Nature Communications, Truebestein and colleagues present the structure of a full-length Rho kinase for the first time. In contrast to previous reports, the authors could find no evidence for autoinhibition, RhoA binding, or regulation of kinase activity by phosphorylation. Instead, they propose that ROCK functions as a molecular ruler, in which the central coiled-coil bridges the membrane-binding regulatory domains to the kinase domains at a fixed distance from the plasma membrane. Here, we explore the consequences of the new findings, re-examine old data in the context of this model, and emphasize outstanding questions in the field. PMID:27070834

  18. Host cell kinases and the hepatitis C virus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Colpitts, Che C; Lupberger, Joachim; Doerig, Christian; Baumert, Thomas F

    2015-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection relies on virus-host interactions with human hepatocytes, a context in which host cell kinases play critical roles in every step of the HCV life cycle. During viral entry, cellular kinases, including EGFR, EphA2 and PKA, regulate the localization of host HCV entry factors and induce receptor complex assembly. Following virion internalization, viral genomes replicate on endoplasmic reticulum-derived membranous webs. The formation of membranous webs depends on interactions between the HCV NS5a protein and PI4KIIIα. The phosphorylation status of NS5a, regulated by PI4KIIIα, CKI and other kinases, also acts as a molecular switch to virion assembly, which takes place on lipid droplets. The formation of lipid droplets is enhanced by HCV activation of IKKα. In view of the multiple crucial steps in the viral life cycle that are mediated by host cell kinases, these enzymes also represent complementary targets for antiviral therapy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases. PMID:25896387

  19. The molecular regulation of Janus kinase (JAK) activation.

    PubMed

    Babon, Jeffrey J; Lucet, Isabelle S; Murphy, James M; Nicola, Nicos A; Varghese, Leila N

    2014-08-15

    The JAK (Janus kinase) family members serve essential roles as the intracellular signalling effectors of cytokine receptors. This family, comprising JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2 (tyrosine kinase 2), was first described more than 20 years ago, but the complexities underlying their activation, regulation and pleiotropic signalling functions are still being explored. Here, we review the current knowledge of their physiological functions and the causative role of activating and inactivating JAK mutations in human diseases, including haemopoietic malignancies, immunodeficiency and inflammatory diseases. At the molecular level, recent studies have greatly advanced our knowledge of the structures and organization of the component FERM (4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin)-SH2 (Src homology 2), pseudokinase and kinase domains within the JAKs, the mechanism of JAK activation and, in particular, the role of the pseudokinase domain as a suppressor of the adjacent tyrosine kinase domain's catalytic activity. We also review recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of negative regulation exerted by the SH2 domain-containing proteins, SOCS (suppressors of cytokine signalling) proteins and LNK. These recent studies highlight the diversity of regulatory mechanisms utilized by the JAK family to maintain signalling fidelity, and suggest alternative therapeutic strategies to complement existing ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. PMID:25057888

  20. Creating Order from Chaos: Cellular Regulation by Kinase Anchoring

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John D.; Dessauer, Carmen W.; Tasken, Kjetil

    2012-01-01

    Second messenger responses rely on where and when the enzymes that propagate these signals become active. Spatial and temporal organization of certain signaling enzymes is controlled in part by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). This family of regulatory proteins was originally classified on the basis of their ability to compartmentalize the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (also known as protein kinase A, or PKA). However, it is now recognized that AKAPs position G protein–coupled receptors, adenylyl cyclases, G proteins, and their effector proteins in relation to protein kinases and signal termination enzymes such as phosphodiesterases and protein phosphatases. This arrangement offers a simple and efficient means to limit the scope, duration, and directional flow of information to sites deep within the cell. This review focuses on the pros and cons of reagents that define the biological role of kinase anchoring inside cells and discusses recent advances in our understanding of anchored second messenger signaling in the cardiovascular and immune systems. PMID:23043438

  1. KLIFS: a structural kinase-ligand interaction database

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, Albert J.; Kanev, Georgi K.; van Linden, Oscar P.J.; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J.P.; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in cell signaling and are important drug targets in several therapeutic areas. The KLIFS database contains detailed structural kinase-ligand interaction information derived from all (>2900) structures of catalytic domains of human and mouse protein kinases deposited in the Protein Data Bank in order to provide insights into the structural determinants of kinase-ligand binding and selectivity. The kinase structures have been processed in a consistent manner by systematically analyzing the structural features and molecular interaction fingerprints (IFPs) of a predefined set of 85 binding site residues with bound ligands. KLIFS has been completely rebuilt and extended (>65% more structures) since its first release as a data set, including: novel automated annotation methods for (i) the assessment of ligand-targeted subpockets and the analysis of (ii) DFG and (iii) αC-helix conformations; improved and automated protocols for (iv) the generation of sequence/structure alignments, (v) the curation of ligand atom and bond typing for accurate IFP analysis and (vi) weekly database updates. KLIFS is now accessible via a website (http://klifs.vu-compmedchem.nl) that provides a comprehensive visual presentation of different types of chemical, biological and structural chemogenomics data, and allows the user to easily access, compare, search and download the data. PMID:26496949

  2. pH regulation of an egg cortex tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W P; Veno, P A; Wood, R W; Peaucellier, G; Kinsey, W H

    1991-07-01

    Fertilization of the echinoderm egg is known to result in the phosphorylation, on tyrosine, of a high-molecular-weight cortical protein (HMWCP) localized in the egg cortex. Studies using various parthenogenic agents indicate that this phosphorylation event occurs in response to the alkaline shift in cytoplasmic pHi which normally occurs 1 to 2 min after fertilization. In the present study, the purified egg cell surface complex was used as in vitro system to determine whether a small alkaline shift in pH, such as occurs upon fertilization, could stimulate the activity of the egg cortex-associated tyrosine kinase toward endogenous protein substrates. The results demonstrated that the cell surface complex is highly enriched in a tyrosine kinase activity which accounts for the majority of the protein kinase activity in this preparation. The activity of this tyrosine kinase toward the HMWCP and other cortical proteins was highly dependent on pH over the range pH 6.8 to 7.3. This indicates that the fertilization-associated change in cytoplasmic pH would be sufficient to trigger increased tyrosine phosphorylation of the high-molecular-weight cortical protein in vivo. The regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation by small changes in pH represents a novel control mechanism in which a tyrosine protein kinase may act as a pH-sensitive transducer. PMID:2060713

  3. KLIFS: a structural kinase-ligand interaction database.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, Albert J; Kanev, Georgi K; van Linden, Oscar P J; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in cell signaling and are important drug targets in several therapeutic areas. The KLIFS database contains detailed structural kinase-ligand interaction information derived from all (>2900) structures of catalytic domains of human and mouse protein kinases deposited in the Protein Data Bank in order to provide insights into the structural determinants of kinase-ligand binding and selectivity. The kinase structures have been processed in a consistent manner by systematically analyzing the structural features and molecular interaction fingerprints (IFPs) of a predefined set of 85 binding site residues with bound ligands. KLIFS has been completely rebuilt and extended (>65% more structures) since its first release as a data set, including: novel automated annotation methods for (i) the assessment of ligand-targeted subpockets and the analysis of (ii) DFG and (iii) αC-helix conformations; improved and automated protocols for (iv) the generation of sequence/structure alignments, (v) the curation of ligand atom and bond typing for accurate IFP analysis and (vi) weekly database updates. KLIFS is now accessible via a website (http://klifs.vu-compmedchem.nl) that provides a comprehensive visual presentation of different types of chemical, biological and structural chemogenomics data, and allows the user to easily access, compare, search and download the data. PMID:26496949

  4. Preclinical validation of Aurora kinases-targeting drugs in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tavanti, E; Sero, V; Vella, S; Fanelli, M; Michelacci, F; Landuzzi, L; Magagnoli, G; Versteeg, R; Picci, P; Hattinger, C M; Serra, M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aurora kinases are key regulators of cell cycle and represent new promising therapeutic targets in several human tumours. Methods: Biological relevance of Aurora kinase-A and -B was assessed on osteosarcoma clinical samples and by silencing these genes with specific siRNA in three human osteosarcoma cell lines. In vitro efficacy of two Aurora kinases-targeting drugs (VX-680 and ZM447439) was evaluated on a panel of four drug-sensitive and six drug-resistant human osteosarcoma cell lines. Results: Human osteosarcoma cell lines proved to be highly sensitive to both drugs. A decreased drug sensitivity was observed in doxorubicin-resistant cell lines, most probably related to ABCB1/MDR1 overexpression. Both drugs variably induced hyperploidy and apoptosis in the majority of cell lines. VX-680 also reduced in vitro cell motility and soft-agar cloning efficiency. Drug association experiments showed that VX-680 positively interacts with all conventional drugs used in osteosarcoma chemotherapy, overcoming the cross-resistance observed in the single-drug treatments. Conclusion: Aurora kinase-A and -B represent new candidate therapeutic targets for osteosarcoma. In vitro analysis of the Aurora kinases inhibitors VX-680 and ZM447439 indicated in VX-680 a new promising drug of potential clinical usefulness in association with conventional osteosarcoma chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:24129234

  5. Functions of Aurora kinase C in meiosis and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Quartuccio, Suzanne M.; Schindler, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian genome encodes three Aurora kinase protein family members: A, B, and C. While Aurora kinase A (AURKA) and B (AURKB) are found in cells throughout the body, significant protein levels of Aurora kinase C (AURKC) are limited to cells that undergo meiosis (sperm and oocyte). Despite its discovery nearly 20 years ago, we know little about the function of AURKC compared to that of the other 2 Aurora kinases. This lack of understanding can be attributed to the high sequence homology between AURKB and AURKC preventing the use of standard approaches to understand non-overlapping and meiosis I (MI)-specific functions of the two kinases. Recent evidence has revealed distinct functions of AURKC in meiosis and may aid in our understanding of why chromosome segregation during MI often goes awry in oocytes. Many cancers aberrantly express AURKC, but because we do not fully understand AURKC function in its normal cellular context, it is difficult to predict the biological significance of this expression on the disease. Here, we consolidate and update what is known about AURKC signaling in meiotic cells to better understand why it has oncogenic potential. PMID:26347867

  6. Combinations of Kinase Inhibitors Protecting Myoblasts against Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yunyi; Tierney, Matthew; Ong, Edison; Zhang, Linda; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Sacco, Alessandra; Paternostro, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapies to treat skeletal muscle disease are limited by the poor survival of donor myoblasts, due in part to acute hypoxic stress. After confirming that the microenvironment of transplanted myoblasts is hypoxic, we screened a kinase inhibitor library in vitro and identified five kinase inhibitors that protected myoblasts from cell death or growth arrest in hypoxic conditions. A systematic, combinatorial study of these compounds further improved myoblast viability, showing both synergistic and additive effects. Pathway and target analysis revealed CDK5, CDK2, CDC2, WEE1, and GSK3β as the main target kinases. In particular, CDK5 was the center of the target kinase network. Using our recently developed statistical method based on elastic net regression we computationally validated the key role of CDK5 in cell protection against hypoxia. This method provided a list of potential kinase targets with a quantitative measure of their optimal amount of relative inhibition. A modified version of the method was also able to predict the effect of combinations using single-drug response data. This work is the first step towards a broadly applicable system-level strategy for the pharmacology of hypoxic damage. PMID:26042811

  7. Arginine kinase from Myzostoma cirriferum, a basal member of annelids.

    PubMed

    Yano, Daichi; Mimura, Sayo; Uda, Kouji; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2016-08-01

    We assembled a phosphagen kinase gene from the Expressed Sequence Tags database of Myzostoma cirriferum, a basal member of annelids. The assembled gene sequence was synthesized using an overlap extension polymerase chain reaction method and was expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme (355 residues) exhibited monomeric behavior on a gel filtration column and showed strong activity only for l-arginine. Thus, the enzyme was identified as arginine kinase (AK). The two-substrate kinetic parameters were obtained and compared with other AKs. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of phosphagen kinases indicated that the Myzostoma AK gene lineage differed from that of the polychaete Sabellastarte spectabilis AK, which is a dimer of creatine kinase (CK) origin. It is likely that the Myzostoma AK gene lineage was lost at an early stage of annelid evolution and that Sabellastarte AK evolved secondarily from the CK gene. This work contributes to our understanding of the evolution of phosphagen kinases of annelids with marked diversity. PMID:27095694

  8. Purification and characterization of a thylakoid protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlan, S.J.; Hind, G.

    1986-01-01

    Control of state transitions in the thylakoid by reversible phosphorylation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) is modulated by a kinase. The kinase catalyzing this phosphorylation is associated with the thylakoid membrane, and is regulated by the redox state of the plastoquinone pool. The isolation and partial purification from spinach thylakoids of two protein kinases (CPK1, CPK2) of apparent molecular masses 25 kDa and 38 kDa has been reported. Neither enzyme utilizes isolated LHC-II as a substrate. The partial purification of a third protein kinase (LHCK) which can utilize both lysine-rich histones (IIIs and Vs) and isolated LHC-II as substrate has now been purified to homogeneity and characterized by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as a 64 kDa peptide. From a comparison of the two isolation procedures we have concluded that CPK1 is indeed a protein kinase, but has a lower specific activity than that of LHCK. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, R M; Mesri, E; Esteva, M; Torres, H N; Téllez-Iñón, M T

    1988-01-01

    A cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity from epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was characterized. Cytosolic extracts were chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose columns, giving two peaks of kinase activity, which were eluted at 0.15 M- and 0.32 M-NaCl respectively. The second activity peak was stimulated by nanomolar concentrations of cyclic AMP. In addition, a cyclic AMP-binding protein co-eluted with the second kinase activity peak. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity was further purified by gel filtration, affinity chromatography on histone-agarose and cyclic AMP-agarose, as well as by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. The enzyme ('holoenzyme') could be partially dissociated into two different components: 'catalytic' and 'regulatory'. The 'regulatory' component had specific binding for cyclic AMP, and it inhibited phosphotransferase activity of the homologous 'catalytic component' or of the 'catalytic subunit' from bovine heart. Cyclic AMP reversed these inhibitions. A 'holoenzyme preparation' was phosphorylated in the absence of exogenous phosphate acceptor and analysed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. A 56 kDa band was phosphorylated. The same preparation was analysed by Western blotting, by using polyclonal antibodies to the regulatory subunits of protein kinases type I or II. Both antibodies reacted with the 56 kDa band. Images Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2848508

  10. Identification of quinones as novel PIM1 kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Richard L; Goyal, Navneet; Bratton, Melyssa; Townley, Ian; Pham, Nancy A; Tram, Phan; Stone, Treasure; Geathers, Jasmine; Nguyen, Kathy; Sridhar, Jayalakshmi

    2016-07-01

    PIM1 is a proto-oncogene encoding the serine/threonine PIM1 kinase. PIM1 kinase plays important roles in regulating aspects of cell cycle progression, apoptosis resistance, and has been implicated in the development of such malignancies as prostate cancer and acute myeloid leukemia among others. Knockout of PIM1 kinase in mice has been shown to be non-lethal without any obvious phenotypic changes, making it an attractive therapeutic target. Our investigation of anthraquinones as kinase inhibitors revealed a series of quinone analogs showing high selectivity for inhibition of the PIM kinases. Molecular modeling studies were used to identify key interactions and binding poses of these compounds within the PIM1 binding pocket. Compounds 1, 4, 7 and 9 inhibited the growth of DU-145 prostate cancer cell lines with a potency of 8.21μM, 4.06μM, 3.21μM and 2.02μM. PMID:27173800

  11. Structure of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase from Klebsiella pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Michalska, Karolina; Cuff, Marianne E.; Tesar, Christine; Feldmann, Brian; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2011-08-01

    The crystal structure of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase from the De Ley–Doudoroff pathway of galactose metabolism has been determined at 2.1 Å resolution. In most organisms, efficient d-galactose utilization requires the highly conserved Leloir pathway that converts d-galactose to d-glucose 1-phosphate. However, in some bacterial and fungal species alternative routes of d-galactose assimilation have been identified. In the so-called De Ley–Doudoroff pathway, d-galactose is metabolized into pyruvate and d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate in five consecutive reactions carried out by specific enzymes. The penultimate step in this pathway involves the phosphorylation of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate to 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate 6-phosphate catalyzed by 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase, with ATP serving as a phosphoryl-group donor. Here, a crystal structure of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase from Klebsiella pneumoniae determined at 2.1 Å resolution is reported, the first structure of an enzyme from the De Ley–Doudoroff pathway. Structural comparison indicates that the enzyme belongs to the ASKHA (acetate and sugar kinases/hsc70/actin) family of phosphotransferases. The protein is composed of two α/β domains, each of which contains a core common to all family members. Additional elements introduced between conserved structural motifs define the unique features of 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase and possibly determine the biological function of the protein.

  12. Regulation of ERK Kinase by MEK1 Kinase Inhibition in the Brain*

    PubMed Central

    Tassin, Tara C.; Benavides, David R.; Plattner, Florian; Nishi, Akinori; Bibb, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabotropic (slow) and ionotropic (fast) neurotransmission are integrated by intracellular signal transduction mechanisms involving protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation to achieve experience-dependent alterations in brain circuitry. ERK is an important effector of both slow and fast forms of neurotransmission and has been implicated in normal brain function and CNS diseases. Here we characterize phosphorylation of the ERK-activating protein kinase MEK1 by Cdk5, ERK, and Cdk1 in vitro in intact mouse brain tissue and in the context of an animal behavioral paradigm of stress. Cdk5 only phosphorylates Thr-292, whereas ERK and Cdk1 phosphorylate both Thr-292 and Thr-286 MEK1. These sites interact in a kinase-specific manner and inhibit the ability of MEK1 to activate ERK. Thr-292 and Thr-286 MEK1 are phosphorylated in most mouse brain regions to stoichiometries of ∼5% or less. Phosphorylation of Thr-292 MEK1 is regulated by cAMP-dependent signaling in mouse striatum in a manner consistent with negative feedback inhibition in response to ERK activation. Protein phosphatase 1 and 2A contribute to the maintenance of the basal phosphorylation state of both Thr-292 and Thr-286 MEK1 and that of ERK. Activation of the NMDA class of ionotropic glutamate receptors reduces inhibitory MEK1 phosphorylation, whereas forced swim, a paradigm of acute stress, attenuates Thr-292 MEK1 phosphorylation. Together, the data indicate that these inhibitory MEK1 sites phosphorylated by Cdk5 and ERK1 serve as mechanistic points of convergence for the regulation of ERK signaling by both slow and fast neurotransmission. PMID:25971971

  13. AMP-activated protein kinase kinase: detection with recombinant AMPK alpha1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Stephen R; O'Donnell, John B; Hammet, Andrew; Stapleton, David; Habinowski, Susan A; Means, Anthony R; Kemp, Bruce E; Witters, Lee A

    2002-05-10

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein kinase important for the responses to metabolic stress. It consists of a catalytic alpha subunit and two non-catalytic subunits, beta and gamma, and is regulated both by the allosteric action of AMP and by phosphorylation of the alpha and beta subunits catalyzed by AMPKK(s) and autophosphorylation. The Thr172 site on the alpha subunit has been previously characterized as an activating phosphorylation site. Using bacterially expressed AMPK alpha1 subunit proteins, we have explored the role of Thr172-directed AMPKKs in alpha subunit regulation. Recombinant alpha1 subunit proteins, representing the N-terminus, have been expressed as maltose binding protein (MBP) 6x His fusion proteins and purified to homogeneity by Ni(2+) chromatography. Both wild-type alpha1(1-312) and alpha1(1-312)T172D are inactive when expressed in bacteria, but the former can be fully phosphorylated (1 mol/mol) on Thr172 and activated by a surrogate AMPKK, CaMKKbeta. The corresponding AMPKalpha1(1-392), an alpha construct containing its autoinhibitory sequence, can be similarly phosphorylated, but it remains inactive. In an insulinoma cell line, either low glucose or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR) treatment leads to activation and T172 phosphorylation of endogenous AMPK. Under the same conditions of cell incubation, we have identified an AMPKK activity that both phosphorylates and activates the recombinant alpha1(1-312), but this Thr172-directed AMPKK activity is unaltered by low glucose or AICAR, indicating that it is constitutively active. PMID:12051742

  14. Arabidopsis Receptor of Activated C Kinase1 Phosphorylation by WITH NO LYSINE8 KINASE

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Urano, Daisuke; Czarnecki, Olaf; Wang, Xiaoping; Jones, Alan M.; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2014-12-08

    Receptor of activated C kinase1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that binds to numerous proteins to regulate diverse cellular pathways in mammals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), RACK1 has been shown to regulate plant hormone signaling, stress responses, and multiple processes of growth and development. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. In this paper, we show that an atypical serine (Ser)/threonine (Thr) protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE8 (WNK8), phosphorylates RACK1. WNK8 physically interacted with and phosphorylated RACK1 proteins at two residues: Ser-122 and Thr-162. Genetic epistasis analysis of rack1 wnk8 double mutants indicated that RACK1more » acts downstream of WNK8 in the glucose responsiveness and flowering pathways. The phosphorylation-dead form, RACK1AS122A/T162A, but not the phosphomimetic form, RACK1AS122D/T162E, rescued the rack1a null mutant, implying that phosphorylation at Ser-122 and Thr-162 negatively regulates RACK1A function. The transcript of RACK1AS122D/T162E accumulated at similar levels as those of RACK1S122A/T162A. However, although the steady-state level of the RACK1AS122A/T162A protein was similar to wild-type RACK1A protein, the RACK1AS122D/T162E protein was nearly undetectable, suggesting that phosphorylation affects the stability of RACK1A proteins. In conclusion, these results suggest that RACK1 is phosphorylated by WNK8 and that phosphorylation negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability.« less

  15. Arabidopsis Receptor of Activated C Kinase1 Phosphorylation by WITH NO LYSINE8 KINASE

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Daisuke; Czarnecki, Olaf; Wang, Xiaoping; Jones, Alan M.; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2014-12-08

    Receptor of activated C kinase1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that binds to numerous proteins to regulate diverse cellular pathways in mammals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), RACK1 has been shown to regulate plant hormone signaling, stress responses, and multiple processes of growth and development. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. In this paper, we show that an atypical serine (Ser)/threonine (Thr) protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE8 (WNK8), phosphorylates RACK1. WNK8 physically interacted with and phosphorylated RACK1 proteins at two residues: Ser-122 and Thr-162. Genetic epistasis analysis of rack1 wnk8 double mutants indicated that RACK1 acts downstream of WNK8 in the glucose responsiveness and flowering pathways. The phosphorylation-dead form, RACK1AS122A/T162A, but not the phosphomimetic form, RACK1AS122D/T162E, rescued the rack1a null mutant, implying that phosphorylation at Ser-122 and Thr-162 negatively regulates RACK1A function. The transcript of RACK1AS122D/T162E accumulated at similar levels as those of RACK1S122A/T162A. However, although the steady-state level of the RACK1AS122A/T162A protein was similar to wild-type RACK1A protein, the RACK1AS122D/T162E protein was nearly undetectable, suggesting that phosphorylation affects the stability of RACK1A proteins. In conclusion, these results suggest that RACK1 is phosphorylated by WNK8 and that phosphorylation negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability.

  16. Universal quantitative kinase assay based on diagonal SCX chromatography and stable isotope dimethyl labeling provides high-definition kinase consensus motifs for PKA and human Mps1.

    PubMed

    Hennrich, Marco L; Marino, Fabio; Groenewold, Vincent; Kops, Geert J P L; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R

    2013-05-01

    In order to understand cellular signaling, a clear understanding of kinase-substrate relationships is essential. Some of these relationships are defined by consensus recognition motifs present in substrates making them amendable for phosphorylation by designated kinases. Here, we explore a method that is based on two sequential steps of strong cation exchange chromatography combined with differential stable isotope labeling, to define kinase consensus motifs with high accuracy. We demonstrate the value of our method by evaluating the motifs of two very distinct kinases: cAMP regulated protein kinase A (PKA) and human monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) kinase, also known as TTK. PKA is a well-studied basophilic kinase with a relatively well-defined motif and numerous known substrates in vitro and in vivo. Mps1, a kinase involved in chromosome segregation, has been less well characterized. Its substrate specificity is unclear and here we show that Mps1 is an acidophilic kinase with a striking tendency for phosphorylation of threonines. The final outcomes of our work are high-definition kinase consensus motifs for PKA and Mps1. Our generic method, which makes use of proteolytic cell lysates as a source for peptide-substrate libraries, can be implemented for any kinase present in the kinome. PMID:23510141

  17. Phosphagen kinase of the giant tubeworm Riftia pachyptila. Cloning and expression of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial isoforms of taurocyamine kinase.

    PubMed

    Uda, Kouji; Tanaka, Kumiko; Bailly, Xavier; Zal, Franck; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2005-10-30

    The giant tubeworm Riftia pachyptila lives at deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise and the Galapagos Rift. The large size and high growth rate of R. pachyptila is supported by an endosymbiotic relationship with a chemosynthetic bacterium. Elucidation of the regulation of energy metabolism of the giant tubeworm remains an interesting problem. The purpose of this study is to determine the cDNA sequence of phosphagen kinase, one of the most important enzymes in energy metabolism, and to characterize its function. Two phosphagen kinase cDNA sequences amplified from the cDNA library of R. pachyptila showed high derived amino acid sequence identity (74%) with those of cytoplasmic taurocyamine kinase (TK) and mitochondrial TK from an annelid Arenicola brasiliensis. The cytoplasmic form of the Riftia recombinant enzyme showed stronger activity for the substrates taurocyamine and also considerable activity for lombricine (21% that of taurocyamine). The mitochondrial form, which was structurally similar to mitochondrial creatine kinase, showed stronger activity for taurocyamine, and a broader activity for various guanidine compounds: glycocyamine (35% that of taurocyamine), lombricine (31%) and arginine (3%). Both forms showed no activity for creatine. The difference in substrate specificities between the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial forms might be attributable to the large difference in the amino acid sequence of the GS region and/or several key amino acid residues for establishing guanidine substrate specificity. Based on these results, we conclude that Riftia contains at least two forms of TK as phosphagen kinase. We also report the kinetic parameters, Km and kcat, of Arenicola and Riftia TKs for the first time. The Km values for taurocyamine of Arenicola and Riftia TKs ranged from 0.9 to 4.0 mM and appear to be comparable to those of other annelid-specific enzymes, lombricine kinase and glycocyamine kinase, but are significantly lower than those of

  18. Studying MAP Kinase pathways during early development of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Keren, Aviad; Bengal, Eyal

    2010-01-01

    The following chapter describes several methods involved in the detection of MAPK activities and phosphorylated proteins during early development of Xenopus laevis. The Xenopus embryo provides a powerful platform for biochemical studies. We describe here basic methods of embryo manipulations such as egg fertilization, embryo growth and maintenance, microinjection of capped RNA and antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (AMOs), and isolation of explants. In addition, we describe methods to detect phosphorylated proteins, to analyze kinase activity, and to interfere with signaling pathways. Immunohistochemical staining performed on whole embryos or on tissue sections is an additional method for the detection of phosphorylated proteins in the developing embryo. Approaches to activate or inhibit MAPK activities including the ectopic expression of mutated isoforms of MAPK kinase, or the incubation of embryo explants with pharmacological inhibitors are described. Finally, we describe an in vitro kinase assay specifically designed for the Xenopus embryo. PMID:20811998

  19. Pim-1 kinase as cancer drug target: An update

    PubMed Central

    TURSYNBAY, YERNAR; ZHANG, JINFU; LI, ZHI; TOKAY, TURSONJAN; ZHUMADILOV, ZHAXYBAY; WU, DENGLONG; XIE, YINGQIU

    2016-01-01

    Proviral integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus-1 (Pim-1) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates multiple cellular functions such as cell cycle, cell survival, drug resistance. Aberrant elevation of Pim-1 kinase is associated with numerous types of cancer. Two distinct isoforms of Pim-1 (Pim-1S and Pim-1L) show distinct cellular functions. Pim-1S predominately localizes to the nucleus and Pim-1L localizes to plasma membrane for drug resistance. Recent studies show that mitochondrial Pim-1 maintains mitochondrial integrity. Pim-1 is emerging as a cancer drug target, particularly in prostate cancer. Recently the potent new functions of Pim-1 in immunotherapy, senescence bypass, metastasis and epigenetic dynamics have been found. The aim of the present updated review is to provide brief information regarding networks of Pim-1 kinase and focus on its recent advances as a novel drug target. PMID:26893828

  20. Complete inhibition of creatine kinase in isolated perfused rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Fossel, E.T.; Hoefeler, H.

    1987-01-01

    Transient exposure of an isolated isovolumic perfused rat heart to low concentrations (0.5 mM) of perfusate-born iodoacetamide resulted in complete inhibition of creatine kinase and partial inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the heart. At low levels of developed pressure, hearts maintained mechanical function, ATP, and creatine phosphate levels at control values. However, iodoacetamide-inhibited hearts were unable to maintain control values of end diastolic pressure or peak systolic pressure as work load increased. Global ischemia resulted in loss of all ATP without loss of creatine phosphate, indicating lack of active creatine kinase. These results indicate that isovolumic perfused rat hearts are able to maintain normal function and normal levels of high-energy phosphates without active creatine kinase at low levels of developed pressure. /sup 31/P-NMR of the heart was carried out.

  1. Fragment-based design of kinase inhibitors: a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jon A

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design has become an important strategy for drug design and development over the last decade. It has been used with particular success in the development of kinase inhibitors, which are one of the most widely explored classes of drug targets today. The application of fragment-based methods to discovering and optimizing kinase inhibitors can be a complicated and daunting task; however, a general process has emerged that has been highly fruitful. Here a practical outline of the fragment process used in kinase inhibitor design and development is laid out with specific examples. A guide to the overall process from initial discovery through fragment screening, including the difficulties in detection, to the computational methods available for use in optimization of the discovered fragments is reported. PMID:25709040

  2. A secretory kinase complex regulates extracellular protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jixin; Xiao, Junyu; Tagliabracci, Vincent S; Wen, Jianzhong; Rahdar, Meghdad; Dixon, Jack E

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous extracellular phosphoproteins have been identified, the protein kinases within the secretory pathway have only recently been discovered, and their regulation is virtually unexplored. Fam20C is the physiological Golgi casein kinase, which phosphorylates many secreted proteins and is critical for proper biomineralization. Fam20A, a Fam20C paralog, is essential for enamel formation, but the biochemical function of Fam20A is unknown. Here we show that Fam20A potentiates Fam20C kinase activity and promotes the phosphorylation of enamel matrix proteins in vitro and in cells. Mechanistically, Fam20A is a pseudokinase that forms a functional complex with Fam20C, and this complex enhances extracellular protein phosphorylation within the secretory pathway. Our findings shed light on the molecular mechanism by which Fam20C and Fam20A collaborate to control enamel formation, and provide the first insight into the regulation of secretory pathway phosphorylation. PMID:25789606

  3. G-protein coupled receptor kinases in inflammation and disease

    PubMed Central

    Packiriswamy, Nandakumar; Parameswaran, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are serine/threonine protein kinases originally discovered for their role in G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) phosphorylation. Recent studies have demonstrated a much broader function for this kinase family including phosphorylation of cytosolic substrates involved in cell signaling pathways stimulated by GPCRs as well as non-GPCRs. In addition, GRKs modulate signaling via phosphorylation-independent functions. Because of these various biochemical functions, GRKs have been shown to affect critical physiological and pathophysiological processes and thus are considered as drug targets in diseases such as heart failure. Role of GRKs in inflammation and inflammatory diseases is an evolving area of research and several studies including work from our lab in the recent years have demonstrated critical role of GRKs in the immune system. In this review we discuss the classical and the newly emerging functions of GRKs in the immune system and their role in inflammation and disease processes. PMID:26226012

  4. Getting Syk: Spleen Tyrosine Kinase as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Geahlen, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Syk is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase well known for its ability to couple immune cell receptors to intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cellular responses to extracellular antigens and antigen-immunoglobulin complexes of particular importance to the initiation of inflammatory responses. Thus, Syk is an attractive target for therapeutic kinase inhibitors designed to ameliorate symptoms and consequences of acute and chronic inflammation. Its more recently recognized role as a promoter of cell survival in numerous cancer cell types ranging from leukemia to retinoblastoma has attracted considerable interest as a target for a new generation of anticancer drugs. This review discusses the biological processes in which Syk participates that have made this kinase such a compelling drug target. PMID:24975478

  5. MAPK-Activated Protein Kinases (MKs): Novel Insights and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gaestel, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Downstream of MAPKs, such as classical/atypical ERKs and p38 MAPKs, but not of JNKs, signaling is often mediated by protein kinases which are phosphorylated and activated by MAPKs and, therefore, designated MAPK-activated protein kinases (MAPKAPKs). Recently, novel insights into the specificity of the assembly of MAPK/MAPKAPK hetero-dimeric protein kinase signaling complexes have been gained. In addition, new functional aspects of MKs have been described and established functions have been challenged. This short review will summarize recent developments including the linear motif (LM) in MKs, the ERK-independent activation of RSK, the RSK-independent effects of some RSK-inhibitors and the challenged role of MK5/PRAK in tumor suppression. PMID:26779481

  6. The DeMSTification of mammalian Ste20 kinases.

    PubMed

    Radu, Maria; Chernoff, Jonathan

    2009-05-26

    When first reported in 1995, the mammalian Ste20-like kinases (Mst) 1 and 2 were so named both for their similarity to the yeast kinase Ste20 and for the fact that their function was, to us, a deep mystery. While much remains to be explained about the regulation and role of these kinases, the veil has been at least partly raised on the Msts, revealing unexpected modes of activation and function. Work in model organisms suggests a central growth-suppressive role for Mst orthologs, with intriguing possible links to other established tumor suppressors. This minireview underlines our current understanding of how Mst1 and Mst2 are regulated, and how activation of these proteins influences cell survival and proliferation. PMID:19467213

  7. The Aurora kinase inhibitors in cancer research and therapy.

    PubMed

    Cicenas, Jonas

    2016-09-01

    Compounds that affect enzymatic function of kinases are valuable for the understanding of the complex biochemical processes in cells. Aurora kinases (AURKs) play a key role in the control of the mitosis. These kinases are frequently deregulated in different human cancers: overexpression, amplifications, translocations and deletions were reported in many cancer cell lines as well as patient tissues. These findings steered a rigorous hunt for small-molecule AURK inhibitors not only for research purposes as well as for therapeutic uses. In this review, we describe a number of AURK inhibitors and their use in cancer research and/or therapy. We hope to assist researchers and clinicians in deciding which inhibitor is most appropriate for their specific purpose. The review will also provide a broad overview of the clinical studies performed with some of these inhibitors (if such studies have been performed). PMID:26932147

  8. Regulation of Multicellular Spheroids by MAPK and FYN Kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Casey; Ramos, Daniel M

    2016-08-01

    Understanding of the biology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has not progressed significantly in the past 60 years, with 5-year survival remaining at approximately 50%. The epidemic of Human Papilloma Virus and its associated SCC warrants a renewed emphasis on fully understanding this disease. We previously used the 3-dimensional multicellular spheroid (MCS) model system to evaluate SCC behavior more accurately. In this study, we determined that SCC growth in MCS approximates epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Organization of an MCS requires the full-length β6 integrin subunit and its maintenance requires mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Limiting FYN kinase activation results in the down-regulation of E-cadherin, β-catenin and an increase in expression of N-cadherin and SNAIL. These results indicate that the microenvironment and growth patterns in an MCS are complex and require MAPK and FYN kinase. PMID:27466485

  9. Redundancy in the World of MAP Kinases: All for One

    PubMed Central

    Saba-El-Leil, Marc K.; Frémin, Christophe; Meloche, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinases ERK1 and ERK2 are the effector components of the prototypical ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. This signaling pathway regulates cell proliferation, differentiation and survival, and is essential for embryonic development and cellular homeostasis. ERK1 and ERK2 homologs share similar biochemical properties but whether they exert specific physiological functions or act redundantly has been a matter of controversy. However, recent studies now provide compelling evidence in support of functionally redundant roles of ERK1 and ERK2 in embryonic development and physiology. In this review, we present a critical assessment of the evidence for the functional specificity or redundancy of MAP kinase isoforms. We focus on the ERK1/ERK2 pathway but also discuss the case of JNK and p38 isoforms. PMID:27446918

  10. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Diabetes: A Novel Treatment Paradigm?

    PubMed

    Fountas, Athanasios; Diamantopoulos, Leonidas-Nikolaos; Tsatsoulis, Agathocles

    2015-11-01

    Deregulation of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity is implicated in various proliferative conditions. Multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are increasingly used for the treatment of different malignancies. Recently, several clinical cases of the reversal of both type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, T2DM) during TKI administration have been reported. Experimental in vivo and in vitro studies have elucidated some of the mechanisms behind this effect. For example, inhibition of Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) results in β cell survival and enhanced insulin secretion, while platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition leads to improvement in insulin sensitivity. In addition, inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) reduces the degree of islet cell inflammation (insulitis). Therefore, targeting several PTKs may provide a novel approach for correcting the pathophysiologic disturbances of diabetes. PMID:26492832

  11. Microfluidic IEF technique for sequential phosphorylation analysis of protein kinases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Nakchul; Song, Simon; Choi, Hoseok; Lim, Bu-Taek; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-11-01

    Sequential phosphorylation of protein kinases play the important role in signal transduction, protein regulation, and metabolism in living cells. The analysis of these phosphorylation cascades will provide new insights into their physiological functions in many biological functions. Unfortunately, the existing methods are limited to analyze the cascade activity. Therefore, we suggest a microfluidic isoelectric focusing technique (μIEF) for the analysis of the cascade activity. Using the technique, we show that the sequential phosphorylation of a peptide by two different kinases can be successfully detected on a microfluidic chip. In addition, the inhibition assay for kinase activity and the analysis on a real sample have also been conducted. The results indicate that μIEF is an excellent means for studies on phosphorylation cascade activity.

  12. MELK-a conserved kinase: functions, signaling, cancer, and controversy.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Ranjit; Mohyeldin, Ahmed; Thiel, Jordyn; Kornblum, Harley I; Beullens, Monique; Nakano, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase initially found to be expressed in a wide range of early embryonic cellular stages, and as a result has been implicated in embryogenesis and cell cycle control. Recent evidence has identified a broader spectrum of tissue expression pattern for this kinase than previously appreciated. MELK is expressed in several human cancers and stem cell populations. Unique spatial and temporal patterns of expression within these tissues suggest that MELK plays a prominent role in cell cycle control, cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell migration, cell renewal, embryogenesis, oncogenesis, and cancer treatment resistance and recurrence. These findings have important implications for our understanding of development, disease, and cancer therapeutics. Furthermore understanding MELK signaling may elucidate an added dimension of stem cell control. PMID:25852826

  13. MAPK-Activated Protein Kinases (MKs): Novel Insights and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Gaestel, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Downstream of MAPKs, such as classical/atypical ERKs and p38 MAPKs, but not of JNKs, signaling is often mediated by protein kinases which are phosphorylated and activated by MAPKs and, therefore, designated MAPK-activated protein kinases (MAPKAPKs). Recently, novel insights into the specificity of the assembly of MAPK/MAPKAPK hetero-dimeric protein kinase signaling complexes have been gained. In addition, new functional aspects of MKs have been described and established functions have been challenged. This short review will summarize recent developments including the linear motif (LM) in MKs, the ERK-independent activation of RSK, the RSK-independent effects of some RSK-inhibitors and the challenged role of MK5/PRAK in tumor suppression. PMID:26779481

  14. RhoA/Rho kinase in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiangbing; Xu, Xiao-ming

    2016-01-01

    A spinal cord injury refers to an injury to the spinal cord that is caused by a trauma instead of diseases. Spinal cord injury includes a primary mechanical injury and a much more complex secondary injury process involving inflammation, oxidation, excitotoxicity, and cell death. During the secondary injury, many signal pathways are activated and play important roles in mediating the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury. Among them, the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway plays a particular role in mediating spinal degeneration and regeneration. In this review, we will discuss the role and mechanism of RhoA/Rho kinase-mediated spinal cord pathogenesis, as well as the potential of targeting RhoA/Rho kinase as a strategy for promoting both neuroprotection and axonal regeneration. PMID:26981071

  15. Kinase fusions are frequent in Spitz tumors and spitzoid melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Botton, Thomas; Yeh, Iwei; Lipson, Doron; Otto, Geoff; Brennan, Kristina; Murali, Rajmohan; Garrido, Maria; Miller, Vincent A.; Ross, Jeffrey S; Berger, Michael F.; Sparatta, Alyssa; Palmedo, Gabriele; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Busam, Klaus J.; Kutzner, Heinz; Cronin, Maureen T; Stephens, Philip J; Bastian, Boris C.

    2014-01-01

    Spitzoid neoplasms are a group of melanocytic tumors with distinctive histopathologic features. They include benign tumors (Spitz nevi), malignant tumors (spitzoid melanomas), and tumors with borderline histopathologic features and uncertain clinical outcome (atypical Spitz tumors). Their genetic underpinnings are poorly understood, and alterations in common melanoma-associated oncogenes are typically absent. Here we show that spitzoid neoplasms harbor kinase fusions of ROS1 (17%), NTRK1 (16%), ALK (10%), BRAF (5%), and RET (3%) in a mutually exclusive pattern. The chimeric proteins are constitutively active, stimulate oncogenic signaling pathways, are tumorigenic, and are found in the entire biologic spectrum of spitzoid neoplasms, including 55% of Spitz nevi, 56% of atypical Spitz tumors, and 39% of spitzoid melanomas. Kinase inhibitors suppress the oncogenic signaling of the fusion proteins in vitro. In summary, kinase fusions account for the majority of oncogenic aberrations in spitzoid neoplasms, and may serve as therapeutic targets for metastatic spitzoid melanomas. PMID:24445538

  16. Structural Basis for Autoinhibition of c-Abl Tyrosine Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Bhushan; Hantschel, Oliver; Young, Matthew A.; Scheffzek,Klaus; Veach, Darren; Bornmann, William; Clarkson, Bayard; Superti-Furga,Giulio; Kuriyan, John

    2003-03-21

    c-Abl is normally regulated by an autoinhibitory mechanism, the disruption of which leads to chronic myelogenous leukemia. The details of this mechanism have been elusive because c-Abl lacks aphosphotyrosine residue that triggers the assembly of the autoinhibited form of the closely related Src kinases by internally engaging the SH2 domain. Crystal structures of c-Abl show that the N-terminal myristoyl modification of c-Abl 1b binds to the kinase domain and induces conformational changes that allow the SH2 and SH3 domains to dock onto it. Autoinhibited c-Abl forms an assembly that is strikingly similar to that of inactive Src kinases but with specific differences that explain the differential ability of the drug STI-571/Gleevec/imatinib (STI-571)to inhibit the catalytic activity of Abl, but not that of c-Src.

  17. Focal adhesion kinases in adhesion structures and disease.

    PubMed

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  18. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eleniste, Pierre P.; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  19. Kinase fusions are frequent in Spitz tumours and spitzoid melanomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, Thomas; He, Jie; Yelensky, Roman; Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Botton, Thomas; Yeh, Iwei; Lipson, Doron; Otto, Geoff; Brennan, Kristina; Murali, Rajmohan; Garrido, Maria; Miller, Vincent A.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Berger, Michael F.; Sparatta, Alyssa; Palmedo, Gabriele; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Busam, Klaus J.; Kutzner, Heinz; Cronin, Maureen T.; Stephens, Philip J.; Bastian, Boris C.

    2014-01-01

    Spitzoid neoplasms are a group of melanocytic tumours with distinctive histopathological features. They include benign tumours (Spitz naevi), malignant tumours (spitzoid melanomas) and tumours with borderline histopathological features and uncertain clinical outcome (atypical Spitz tumours). Their genetic underpinnings are poorly understood, and alterations in common melanoma-associated oncogenes are typically absent. Here we show that spitzoid neoplasms harbour kinase fusions of ROS1 (17%), NTRK1 (16%), ALK (10%), BRAF (5%) and RET (3%) in a mutually exclusive pattern. The chimeric proteins are constitutively active, stimulate oncogenic signalling pathways, are tumourigenic and are found in the entire biologic spectrum of spitzoid neoplasms, including 55% of Spitz naevi, 56% of atypical Spitz tumours and 39% of spitzoid melanomas. Kinase inhibitors suppress the oncogenic signalling of the fusion proteins in vitro. In summary, kinase fusions account for the majority of oncogenic aberrations in spitzoid neoplasms and may serve as therapeutic targets for metastatic spitzoid melanomas.

  20. Characterization of all possible single-nucleotide change caused amino acid substitutions in the kinase domain of Bruton tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Väliaho, Jouni; Faisal, Imrul; Ortutay, Csaba; Smith, C I Edvard; Vihinen, Mauno

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge about features distinguishing deleterious and neutral variations is crucial for interpretation of novel variants. Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) contains the highest number of unique disease-causing variations among the human protein kinases, still it is just 10% of all the possible single-nucleotide substitution-caused amino acid variations (SNAVs). In the BTK kinase domain (BTK-KD) can appear altogether 1,495 SNAVs. We investigated them all with bioinformatic and protein structure analysis methods. Most disease-causing variations affect conserved and buried residues disturbing protein stability. Minority of exposed residues is conserved, but strongly tied to pathogenicity. Sixty-seven percent of variations are predicted to be harmful. In 39% of the residues, all the variants are likely harmful, whereas in 10% of sites, all the substitutions are tolerated. Results indicate the importance of the entire kinase domain, involvement in numerous interactions, and intricate functional regulation by conformational change. These results can be extended to other protein kinases and organisms. PMID:25777788

  1. Contractions Activate Hormone-Sensitive Lipase in Rat Muscle by Protein Kinase C and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Donsmark, Morten; Langfort, Jozef; Holm, Cecilia; Ploug, Thorkil; Galbo, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    Intramuscular triacylglycerol is an important energy store and is also related to insulin resistance. The mobilization of fatty acids from this pool is probably regulated by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), which has recently been shown to exist in muscle and to be activated by both adrenaline and contractions. Adrenaline acts via cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). The signalling mediating the effect of contractions is unknown and was explored in this study. Incubated soleus muscles from 70 g male rats were electrically stimulated to perform repeated tetanic contractions for 5 min. The contraction-induced activation of HSL was abolished by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors bisindolylmaleimide I and calphostin C and reduced 50 % by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126, which also completely blocked extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2 phosphorylation. None of the inhibitors reduced adrenaline-induced HSL activation in soleus muscle. Both phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), which activates PKC and, in turn, ERK, and caffeine, which increases intracellular Ca2+ without eliciting contraction, increased HSL activity. Activated ERK increased HSL activity in supernatant from basal but not from electrically stimulated muscle. In conclusion, in muscle, PKC can stimulate HSL through ERK. Contractions and adrenaline enhance muscle HSL activity by different signalling mechanisms. The effect of contractions is mediated by PKC, at least partly via the ERK pathway. PMID:12794177

  2. Nuclear factor kappa B-inducing kinase and Ikappa B kinase-alpha signal skeletal muscle cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Canicio, J; Ruiz-Lozano, P; Carrasco, M; Palacin, M; Chien, K; Zorzano, A; Kaliman, P

    2001-06-01

    Nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB)-inducing kinase (NIK), IkappaB kinase (IKK)-alpha and -beta, and IkappaBalpha are common elements that signal NF-kappaB activation in response to diverse stimuli. In this study, we analyzed the role of this pathway during insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II)-induced myoblast differentiation. L6E9 myoblasts differentiated with IGF-II showed an induction of NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity that correlated in time with the activation of IKKalpha, IKKbeta, and NIK. Moreover, the activation of IKKalpha, IKKbeta, and NIK by IGF-II was dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, a key regulator of myogenesis. Adenoviral transduction with the IkappaBalpha(S32A/S36A) mutant severely impaired both IGF-II-dependent NF-kappaB activation and myoblast differentiation, indicating that phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha at Ser-32 and Ser-36 is an essential myogenic step. Adenoviral transfer of wild-type or kinase-deficient forms of IKKalpha or IKKbeta revealed that IKKalpha is required for IGF-II-dependent myoblast differentiation, whereas IKKbeta is not essential for this process. Finally, overexpression of kinase-proficient wild-type NIK showed that the activation of NIK is sufficient to generate signals that trigger myogenin expression and multinucleated myotube formation in the absence of IGF-II. PMID:11279241

  3. Ab Initio Modeling and Experimental Assessment of Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) Kinase-Pseudokinase Complex Structure

    PubMed Central

    McClendon, Christopher L.; Huang, Lily Jun-shen; Huang, Niu

    2013-01-01

    The Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) plays essential roles in transmitting signals from multiple cytokine receptors, and constitutive activation of JAK2 results in hematopoietic disorders and oncogenesis. JAK2 kinase activity is negatively regulated by its pseudokinase domain (JH2), where the gain-of-function mutation V617F that causes myeloproliferative neoplasms resides. In the absence of a crystal structure of full-length JAK2, how JH2 inhibits the kinase domain (JH1), and how V617F hyperactivates JAK2 remain elusive. We modeled the JAK2 JH1–JH2 complex structure using a novel informatics-guided protein-protein docking strategy. A detailed JAK2 JH2-mediated auto-inhibition mechanism is proposed, where JH2 traps the activation loop of JH1 in an inactive conformation and blocks the movement of kinase αC helix through critical hydrophobic contacts and extensive electrostatic interactions. These stabilizing interactions are less favorable in JAK2-V617F. Notably, several predicted binding interfacial residues in JH2 were confirmed to hyperactivate JAK2 kinase activity in site-directed mutagenesis and BaF3/EpoR cell transformation studies. Although there may exist other JH2-mediated mechanisms to control JH1, our JH1–JH2 structural model represents a verifiable working hypothesis for further experimental studies to elucidate the role of JH2 in regulating JAK2 in both normal and pathological settings. PMID:23592968

  4. The yeast carboxyl-terminal repeat domain kinase CTDK-I is a divergent cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Sterner, D E; Lee, J M; Hardin, S E; Greenleaf, A L

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae CTDK-I is a protein kinase complex that specifically and efficiently hyperphosphorylates the carboxyl-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II and is composed of three subunits of 58, 38, and 32 kDa. The kinase is essential in vivo for normal phosphorylation of the CTD and for normal growth and differentiation. We have now cloned the genes for the two smaller kinase subunits, CTK2 and CTK3, and found that they form a unique, divergent cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase complex with the previously characterized largest subunit protein CTK1, a cyclin-dependent kinase homolog. The CTK2 gene encodes a cyclin-related protein with limited homology to cyclin C, while CTK3 shows no similarity to other known proteins. Copurification of the three gene products with each other and CTDK-I activity by means of conventional chromatography and antibody affinity columns has verified their participation in the complex in vitro. In addition, null mutations of each of the genes and all combinations thereof conferred very similar growth-impaired, cold-sensitive phenotypes, consistent with their involvement in the same function in vivo. These characterizations and the availability of all of the genes encoding CTDK-I and reagents derivable from them will facilitate investigations into CTD phosphorylation and its functional consequences both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:7565723

  5. Plant Raf-like kinase integrates abscisic acid and hyperosmotic stress signaling upstream of SNF1-related protein kinase2

    PubMed Central

    Saruhashi, Masashi; Kumar Ghosh, Totan; Arai, Kenta; Ishizaki, Yumiko; Hagiwara, Kazuya; Komatsu, Kenji; Shiwa, Yuh; Izumikawa, Keiichi; Yoshikawa, Harunori; Umezawa, Taishi; Sakata, Yoichi; Takezawa, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Plant response to drought and hyperosmosis is mediated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA), a sesquiterpene compound widely distributed in various embryophyte groups. Exogenous ABA as well as hyperosmosis activates the sucrose nonfermenting 1 (SNF1)-related protein kinase2 (SnRK2), which plays a central role in cellular responses against drought and dehydration, although the details of the activation mechanism are not understood. Analysis of a mutant of the moss Physcomitrella patens with reduced ABA sensitivity and reduced hyperosmosis tolerance revealed that a protein kinase designated “ARK” (for “ABA and abiotic stress-responsive Raf-like kinase”) plays an essential role in the activation of SnRK2. ARK encoded by a single gene in P. patens belongs to the family of group B3 Raf-like MAP kinase kinase kinases (B3-MAPKKKs) mediating ethylene, disease resistance, and salt and sugar responses in angiosperms. Our findings indicate that ARK, as a novel regulatory component integrating ABA and hyperosmosis signals, represents the ancestral B3-MAPKKKs, which multiplied, diversified, and came to have specific functions in angiosperms. PMID:26540727

  6. Mutational Analysis of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Protein Kinase Together with Kinome-Wide Binding and Stability Studies Suggests Context-Dependent Recognition of Kinases by the Chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Pasculescu, Adrian; Dai, Anna Yue; Williton, Kelly; Taylor, Lorne; Savitski, Mikhail M.; Bantscheff, Marcus; Woodgett, James R.; Pawson, Tony; Colwill, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and cell division cycle 37 (CDC37) chaperones are key regulators of protein kinase folding and maturation. Recent evidence suggests that thermodynamic properties of kinases, rather than primary sequences, are recognized by the chaperones. In concordance, we observed a striking difference in HSP90 binding between wild-type (WT) and kinase-dead (KD) glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) forms. Using model cell lines stably expressing these two GSK3β forms, we observed no interaction between WT GSK3β and HSP90, in stark contrast to KD GSK3β forming a stable complex with HSP90 at a 1:1 ratio. In a survey of 91 ectopically expressed kinases in DLD-1 cells, we compared two parameters to measure HSP90 dependency: static binding and kinase stability following HSP90 inhibition. We observed no correlation between HSP90 binding and reduced stability of a kinase after pharmacological inhibition of HSP90. We expanded our stability study to >50 endogenous kinases across four cell lines and demonstrated that HSP90 dependency is context dependent. These observations suggest that HSP90 binds to its kinase client in a particular conformation that we hypothesize to be associated with the nucleotide-processing cycle. Lastly, we performed proteomics profiling of kinases and phosphopeptides in DLD-1 cells to globally define the impact of HSP90 inhibition on the kinome. PMID:26755559

  7. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase regulates mast cell ion channel activity.

    PubMed

    Lam, Rebecca S; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Matzner, Nicole; Zemtsova, Irina M; Sobiesiak, Malgorzata; Lang, Camelia; Felder, Edward; Dietl, Paul; Huber, Stephan M; Lang, Florian

    2008-01-01

    Stimulation of the mast cell IgE-receptor (FcepsilonRI) by antigen leads to stimulation of Ca(2+) entry with subsequent mast cell degranulation and release of inflammatory mediators. Ca(2+) further activates Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, which in turn provide the electrical driving force for Ca(2+) entry. Since phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3-kinase has previously been shown to be required for mast cell activation and degranulation, we explored, whether mast cell Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels may be sensitive to PI3-kinase activity. Whole-cell patch clamp experiments and Fura-2 fluorescence measurements for determination of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration were performed in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells either treated or untreated with the PI3-kinase inhibitors LY-294002 (10 muM) and wortmannin (100 nM). Antigen-stimulated Ca(2+) entry but not Ca(2+) release from the intracellular stores was dramatically reduced upon PI3-kinase inhibition. Ca(2+) entry was further inhibited by TRPV blocker ruthenium red (10 muM). Ca(2+) entry following readdition after Ca(+)-store depletion with thapsigargin was again decreased by LY-294002, pointing to inhibition of store-operated channels (SOCs). Moreover, inhibition of PI3-kinase abrogated IgE-stimulated, but not ionomycin-induced stimulation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. These observations disclose PI3-kinase-dependent regulation of Ca(2+) entry and Ca(2+)-activated K(+)-channels, which in turn participate in triggering mast cell degranulation. PMID:18769043

  8. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways used by interleukin 1 in tissues in vivo: activation of hepatic c-Jun N-terminal kinases 1 and 2, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 4 and 7.

    PubMed Central

    Finch, A; Davis, W; Carter, W G; Saklatvala, J

    2001-01-01

    The effects of interleukin 1 (IL-1) are mediated by the activation of protein kinase signalling pathways, which have been well characterized in cultured cells. We have investigated the activation of these pathways in rabbit liver and other tissues after the systemic administration of IL-1alpha. In liver there was 30-40-fold activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and 5-fold activation of both JNK kinases, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MKK)4 and MKK7. IL-1alpha also caused 2-3-fold activation of p38 MAPK and degradation of the inhibitor of nuclear factor kappaB ('IkappaB'), although no activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) (p42/44 MAPK) was observed. The use of antibodies against specific JNK isoforms showed that, in liver, short (p46) JNK1 and long (p54) JNK2 are the predominant forms activated, with smaller amounts of long JNK1 and short JNK2. No active JNK3 was detected. A similar pattern of JNK activation was seen in lung, spleen, skeletal muscle and kidney. Significant JNK3 activity was detectable only in the brain, although little activation of the JNK pathway in response to IL-1alpha was observed in this tissue. This distribution of active JNK isoforms probably results from a different expression of JNKs within the tissues, rather than from a selective activation of isoforms. We conclude that IL-1alpha might activate a more restricted set of signalling pathways in tissues in vivo than it does in cultured cells, where ERK and JNK3 activation are often observed. Cultured cells might represent a 'repair' phenotype that undergoes a broader set of responses to the cytokine. PMID:11139391

  9. Comparative Analysis of Mutant Tyrosine Kinase Chemical Rescue†

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Kathryn E.; Seeliger, Markus A.; Wang, Zhihong; Fomina, Dina; Neiswinger, Johnathan; Havranek, James J.; Baker, David; Kuriyan, John; Cole, Philip A.

    2009-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are critical cell signaling enzymes. These enzymes have a highly conserved Arg residue in their catalytic loop which is present two residues or four residues downstream from an absolutely conserved Asp catalytic base. Prior studies on protein tyrosine kinases Csk and Src revealed the potential for chemical rescue of catalytically-deficient mutant kinases (Arg to Ala mutations) by small diamino compounds, particularly imidazole, however the potency and efficiency of rescue was greater for Src. This current study further examines the structural and kinetic basis of rescue for mutant Src as compared to mutant Abl tyrosine kinase. An X-ray crystal structure of R388A Src revealed the surprising finding that a histidine residue of the N-terminus of a symmetry-related kinase inserts into the active site of the adjacent Src and mimics the hydrogen bonding pattern seen in wild-type protein tyrosine kinases. Abl R367A shows potent and efficient rescue more comparable to Src, even though its catalytic loop is more like that of Csk. Various enzyme redesigns of the active sites indicate that the degree and specificity of rescue is somewhat flexible, but the overall properties of the enzymes and rescue agents play an overarching role. The newly discovered rescue agent 2-aminoimidazole is about as efficient as imidazole in rescuing R/A Src and Abl. Rate vs. pH studies with these imidazole analogs suggest that the protonated imidazolium is the preferred form for chemical rescue, consistent with structural models. The efficient rescue seen with mutant Abl points to the potential of this approach to be used effectively to analyze Abl phosphorylation pathways in cells. PMID:19260709

  10. Enzymatic assay for calmodulins based on plant NAD kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, A.C.; Jarrett, H.W.; Cormier, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    NAD kinase with increased sensitivity to calmodulin was purified from pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L., Willet Wonder). Assays for calmodulin based on the activities of NAD kinase, bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, and human erythrocyte Ca/sup 2 -/-ATPase were compared for their sensitivities to calmodulin and for their abilities to discriminate between calmodulins from different sources. The activities of the three enzymes were determined in the presence of various concentrations of calmodulins from human erythrocyte, bovine brain, sea pansy (Renilla reniformis), mung bean seed (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek), mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The concentrations of calmodulin required for 50% activation of the NAD kinase (K/sub 0.5/) ranged from 0.520 ng/ml for Tetrahymena to 2.20 ng/ml for bovine brain. The A/sub 0.5/ s ranged from 19.6 ng/ml for bovine brain calmodulin to 73.5 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin for phosphodiesterase activation. The K/sub 0.5/'s for the activation of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase ranged from 36.3 ng/mol for erythrocyte calmodulin to 61.7 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin. NAD kinase was not stimulated by phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, or palmitoleic acid in the absence or presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitic acid had a slightly stimulatory effect in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ (10% of maximum), but no effect in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitoleic acid inhibited the calmodulin-stimulated activity by 50%. Both the NAD kinase assay and radioimmunoassay were able to detect calmodulin in extracts containing low concentrations of calmodulin. Estimates of calmodulin contents of crude homogenates determined by the NAD kinase assay were consistent with amounts obtained by various purification procedures. 30 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  11. Kinase Impaired BRAF Mutations Confer Lung Cancer Sensitivity to Dasatinib

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Banibrata; Peng, Shaohua; Tang, Ximing; Erickson, Heidi S.; Galindo, Hector; Mazumdar, Tuhina; Stewart, David J.; Wistuba, Ignacio; Johnson, Faye M.

    2013-01-01

    During a clinical trial of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib for advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) one patient responded dramatically and remains cancer-free 4 years later. A comprehensive analysis of his tumor revealed a previously undescribed, kinase inactivating BRAF mutation (Y472CBRAF); no inactivating BRAF mutations were found in the non-responding tumors taken from other patients. Cells transfected with Y472CBRAF exhibited CRAF, MEK, and ERK activation – characteristics identical to signaling changes that occur with previously known kinase inactivating BRAF mutants. Dasatinib selectively induced senescence in NSCLC cells with inactivating BRAF mutations. Transfection of other NSCLC cells with these BRAF mutations also increased these cells’ dasatinib sensitivity, whereas transfection with an activating BRAF mutation led to their increased dasatinib resistance. The sensitivity induced by Y472CBRAF was reversed by the introduction of a BRAF mutation that impairs RAF dimerization. Dasatinib inhibited CRAF modestly, but concurrently induced RAF dimerization resulting in ERK activation in NSCLC cells with kinase inactivating BRAF mutations. The sensitivity of NSCLC with kinase impaired BRAF to dasatinib suggested synthetic lethality of BRAF and a dasatinib target. Inhibiting BRAF in NSCLC cells expressing wild-type BRAF likewise enhanced these cells’ dasatinib sensitivity. Thus, the patient’s BRAF mutation was likely responsible for his tumor’s marked response to dasatinib, suggesting that tumors bearing kinase impaired BRAF mutations may be exquisitely sensitive to dasatinib. Moreover, the potential synthetic lethality of combination therapy including dasatinib and BRAF inhibitors may lead to additional therapeutic options against cancers with wild-type BRAF. PMID:22649091

  12. Cyclophilin represents a novel class of protein kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, M.W.; Gorelick, F.S.; Handschumacher, R.E.

    1987-05-01

    Cyclophilin (CyP, Mr 17,737, pI 9.6), a highly specific cytosolic receptor for cyclosporin A (CsA) has ser/thr protein kinase activity. Incorporation of /sup 32/P into bovine histone H/sub 3/ (BH/sub 3/) was catalyzed by major and minor CyP isozymes at the same rate. Salt effects were biphasic with optimal kinase activity between 50-100 mM Na/sup +/ or K/sup +/. Kinase activity was maximal at 37/sup 0/C, stable for 5 min at 45/sup 0/, labile at 56/sup 0/, optimal between pH 6.8 and 8.0 and had an apparent Km of 20 uM ATP with both isozymes. The specific activity of CyP was 1.0 nmole P/mg protein/min with chicken histone H/sub 1/ (CH/sub 1/), 0.2 nmoles P/mg prot/min with BH/sub 3/ and less than 0.01 nmoles P/mg prot/min with synapsin, casein, phosvitin, and ribosomal protein S6. Cofactors including Mn/sup + +/, Zn/sup + +/, Ca/sup + +/, phosphatidyl serine, diolein and phorbol ester, cAMP, cGMP and Ca/sup + +/ did not affect basal CyP kinase activity. CsA (<200 ng/ml) inhibited phosphorylation of CH/sub 3/ by 50% but did not inhibit phosphorylation of other histones; 2ug CsA/ml was required to cause 50% inhibition of cAMP and Ca/sup + +//CaM dependent kinases. A non-immunosuppressive analog (Me-leu-11-CsA) that does not bind to CyP did not inhibit CH/sub 3/ phosphorylation. Thus, CyP is a novel protein kinase that mediates immunosuppression by CsA.

  13. Cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors as anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Concepción; Gelbert, Lawrence M; Lallena, María José; de Dios, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    Sustained proliferative capacity is a hallmark of cancer. In mammalian cells proliferation is controlled by the cell cycle, where cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate critical checkpoints. CDK4 and CDK6 are considered highly validated anticancer drug targets due to their essential role regulating cell cycle progression at the G1 restriction point. This review provides an overview of recent advances on cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors in general with special emphasis on CDK4 and CDK6 inhibitors and compounds under clinical evaluation. Chemical structures, structure activity relationships, and relevant preclinical properties will be described. PMID:26115571

  14. Autophosphorylation of nucleoside diphosphate kinase on non-histidine residues.

    PubMed

    Bominaar, A A; Tepper, A D; Véron, M

    1994-10-10

    Recently, several reports appeared which described auto-phosphorylation of NDP kinase on residues different from the active-site histidine. Based on these findings conclusions were drawn with respect to a regulation of enzyme activity and to a possible role as a metastasis suppressor. In this paper we show that although non-histidine autophosphorylation occurs on NDP kinases from mammals, lower eukaryotes and bacteria, less than 0.2% of the subunits are phosphorylated. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that the active site histidine is essential for non-histidine autophosphorylation. The low stoichiometry of phosphate incorporation excludes a role of autophosphorylation in regulating overall enzyme activity. PMID:7926021

  15. In vitro evolution of new ribozymes with polynucleotide kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Lorsch, J R; Szostak, J W

    1994-09-01

    We have isolated a large number of polynucleotide kinase ribozymes from a pool of RNA molecules consisting of an ATP-binding domain flanked by regions of random sequence. Different classes of kinases catalyse the transfer of the gamma-thiophosphate of ATP-gamma S to the 5'-hydroxyl or to internal 2'-hydroxyls. An engineered version of one class is able to catalyse the transfer of thiophosphate from ATP-gamma S to the 5'-hydroxyl of an exogenous oligoribonucleotide substrate with multiple turnover, thus acting as a true enzyme. PMID:7521014

  16. VEGF receptor kinase inhibitors: phthalazines, anthranilamides and related structures.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Jacques; Dixon, Julie A

    2005-06-01

    Inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) signalling, using either antibodies or small molecule inhibitors of the VEGFR kinase domain, has become a major area of research in oncology. The phthalazine PTK787/ZK222584, first published in the literature in 1998, is one of the most advanced VEGFR inhibitors in the clinic. This paper provides an update on the patenting activity related to the phthalazine class. In addition, newer kinase inhibitor pharmacophores derived from this class (e.g., anthranilamides) will be reviewed. PMID:20141503

  17. FES kinase participates in KIT-ligand induced chemotaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Voisset, Edwige; Lopez, Sophie; Chaix, Amandine; Vita, Marina; George, Coralie; Dubreuil, Patrice; De Sepulveda, Paulo

    2010-02-26

    FES is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase activated by several membrane receptors, originally identified as a viral oncogene product. We have recently identified FES as a crucial effector of oncogenic KIT mutant receptor. However, FES implication in wild-type KIT receptor function was not addressed. We report here that FES interacts with KIT and is phosphorylated following activation by its ligand SCF. Unlike in the context of oncogenic KIT mutant, FES is not involved in wild-type KIT proliferation signal, or in cell adhesion. Instead, FES is required for SCF-induced chemotaxis. In conclusion, FES kinase is a mediator of wild-type KIT signalling implicated in cell migration.

  18. Creatine kinase MB isoenzyme in dermatomyositis: a noncardiac source

    SciTech Connect

    Larca, L.J.; Coppola, J.T.; Honig, S.

    1981-03-01

    Three patients with polymyositis had elevated serum levels of creatine kinase MB isoenzyme. The presence of this isoenzyme is used extensively to diagnose myocardial infarction, but the isoenzyme is also found in sera of patients with primary muscular and neuromuscular disorders. Researchers studied cardiac function in two of our patients with electrocardiograms, technetium stannous pyrophosphate scanning, and technetium 99m-labeled erythrocyte gated blood pool imaging and in the third patient by postmortem examination. There was no evidence of myocardial involvement to account for the high serum levels of isoenzyme. Creatine kinase MB in the sera of patients with polymyositis does not necessarily indicate myocardial necrosis.

  19. Cell-free expression of functional receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Scharadin, Tiffany M.; Saldana, Matthew; Gellner, Candice; Hoang-Phou, Steven; Takanishi, Christina; Hura, Gregory L.; Tainer, John A; Carraway III, Kermit L.; Henderson, Paul T.; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play critical roles in physiological and pathological processes, and are important anticancer drug targets. In vitro mechanistic and drug discovery studies of full-length RTKs require protein that is both fully functional and free from contaminating proteins. Here we describe a rapid cell-free and detergent-free co-translation method for producing full-length and functional ERBB2 and EGFR receptor tyrosine kinases supported by water-soluble apolipoprotein A-I based nanolipoprotein particles. PMID:26274523

  20. The azaindole framework in the design of kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mérour, Jean-Yves; Buron, Frédéric; Plé, Karen; Bonnet, Pascal; Routier, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    This review article illustrates the growing use of azaindole derivatives as kinase inhibitors and their contribution to drug discovery and innovation. The different protein kinases which have served as targets and the known molecules which have emerged from medicinal chemistry and Fragment-Based Drug Discovery (FBDD) programs are presented. The various synthetic routes used to access these compounds and the chemical pathways leading to their synthesis are also discussed. An analysis of their mode of binding based on X-ray crystallography data gives structural insights for the design of more potent and selective inhibitors. PMID:25460315

  1. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane recruiter the alter ego of CFTR as a multi-kinase anchor

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    This review focuses on a newly discovered interaction between protein kinases involved in cellular energetics, a process that may be disturbed in cystic fibrosis for unknown reasons. I propose a new model where kinase-mediated cellular transmission of energy provides mechanistic insight to a latent role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). I suggest that CFTR acts as a multi-kinase recruiter to the apical epithelial membrane. My group finds that, in the cytosol, two protein kinases involved in cell energy homeostasis, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) and AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), bind one another. Preliminary data suggest that both can also bind CFTR (function unclear). The disrupted role of this CFTR-kinase complex as ‘membrane transmitter to the cell’ is proposed as an alternative paradigm to the conventional ion transport mediated and CFTR/chloride-centric view of cystic fibrosis pathogenesis. Chloride remains important, but instead, chloride-induced control of the phosphohistidine content of one kinase component (NDPK, via a multi-kinase complex that also includes a third kinase, CK2; formerly casein kinase 2). I suggest that this complex provides the necessary near-equilibrium conditions needed for efficient transmission of phosphate energy to proteins controlling cellular energetics. Crucially, a new role for CFTR as a kinase controller is proposed with ionic concentration acting as a signal. The model posits a regulatory control relay for energy sensing involving a cascade of protein kinases bound to CFTR. PMID:17805562

  2. cDNA identification, comparison and phylogenetic aspects of lombricine kinase from two oligochaete species.

    PubMed

    Doumen, Chris

    2010-06-01

    Creatine kinase and arginine kinase are the typical representatives of an eight-member phosphagen kinase family, which play important roles in the cellular energy metabolism of animals. The phylum Annelida underwent a series of evolutionary processes that resulted in rapid divergence and radiation of these enzymes, producing the greatest diversity of the phosphagen kinases within this phylum. Lombricine kinase (EC 2.7.3.5) is one of such enzymes and sequence information is rather limited compared to other phosphagen kinases. This study presents data on the cDNA sequences of lombricine kinase from two oligochaete species, the California blackworm (Lumbriculus variegatus) and the sludge worm (Tubifex tubifex). The deduced amino acid sequences are analyzed and compared with other selected phosphagen kinases, including two additional lombricine kinase sequences extracted from DNA databases and provide further insights in the evolution and position of these enzymes within the phosphagen kinase family. The data confirms the presence of a deleted region within the flexible loop (the GS region) of all six examined lombricine kinases. A phylogenetic analysis of these six lombricine kinases clearly positions the enzymes together in a small subcluster within the larger creatine kinase (EC 2.7.3.2) clade. PMID:20230902

  3. Leishmania amazonensis: PKC-like protein kinase modulates the (Na++K+)ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Amaral, Elmo Eduardo de; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Lara, Lucienne Silva; Pinheiro, Carla Mônica; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2007-08-01

    The present study aimed to identify the presence of protein kinase C-like (PKC-like) in Leishmania amazonensis and to elucidate its possible role in the modulation of the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity. Immunoblotting experiments using antibody against a consensus sequence (Ac 543-549) of rabbit protein kinase C (PKC) revealed the presence of a protein kinase of 80 kDa in L. amazonensis. Measurements of protein kinase activity showed the presence of both (Ca(2+)-dependent) and (Ca(2+)-independent) protein kinase activity in plasma membrane and cytosol. Phorbol ester (PMA) activation of the Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase stimulated the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity, while activation of the Ca(2+)-independent protein kinase was inhibitory. Both effects of protein kinase on the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase of the plasma membrane were lower than that observed in intact cells. PMA induced the translocation of protein kinase from cytosol to plasma membrane, indicating that the maximal effect of protein kinase on the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity depends on the synergistic action of protein kinases from both plasma membrane and cytosol. This is the first demonstration of a protein kinase activated by PMA in L. amazonensis and the first evidence for a possible role in the regulation of the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity in this trypanosomatid. Modulation of the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase by protein kinase in a trypanosomatid opens up new possibilities to understand the regulation of ion homeostasis in this parasite. PMID:17475255

  4. Signals fly when kinases meet Rho-of-plants (ROP) small G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Attila; Lajkó, Dézi Bianka

    2015-08-01

    Rho-type small GTP-binding plant proteins function as two-state molecular switches in cellular signalling. There is accumulating evidence that Rho-of-plants (ROP) signalling is positively controlled by plant receptor kinases, through the ROP guanine nucleotide exchange factor proteins. These signalling modules regulate cell polarity, cell shape, hormone responses, and pathogen defence, among other things. Other ROP-regulatory proteins might also be subjected to protein phosphorylation by cellular kinases (e.g., mitogen-activated protein kinases or calcium-dependent protein kinases), in order to integrate various cellular signalling pathways with ROP GTPase-dependent processes. In contrast to the role of kinases in upstream ROP regulation, much less is known about the potential link between ROP GTPases and downstream kinase signalling. In other eukaryotes, Rho-type G-protein-activated kinases are widespread and have a key role in many cellular processes. Recent data indicate the existence of structurally different ROP-activated kinases in plants, but their ROP-dependent biological functions still need to be validated. In addition to these direct interactions, ROPs may also indirectly control the activity of mitogen-activated protein kinases or calcium-dependent protein kinases. These kinases may therefore function as upstream as well as downstream kinases in ROP-mediated signalling pathways, such as the phosphatidylinositol monophosphate kinases involved in cell polarity establishment. PMID:26089155

  5. Dominant negative selection of vaccinia virus using a thymidine kinase/thymidylate kinase fusion gene and the prodrug azidothymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Holzer, Georg W. . E-mail: falknef@baxter.com

    2005-07-05

    The Escherichia coli thymidine kinase/thymidylate kinase (tk/tmk) fusion gene encodes an enzyme that efficiently converts the prodrug 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT) into its toxic triphosphate derivative, a substance which stops DNA chain elongation. Integration of this marker gene into vaccinia virus that normally is not inhibited by AZT allowed the establishment of a powerful selection procedure for recombinant viruses. In contrast to the conventional vaccinia thymidine kinase (tk) selection that is performed in tk-negative cell lines, AZT selection can be performed in normal (tk-positive) cell lines. The technique is especially useful for the generation of replication-deficient vaccinia viruses and may also be used for gene knock-out studies of essential vaccinia genes.

  6. Protein Kinase Cδ Mediates Neurogenic but Not Mitogenic Activation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Corbit, Kevin C.; Foster, David A.; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    1999-01-01

    In several neuronal cell systems, fibroblast-derived growth factor (FGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) act as neurogenic agents, whereas epidermal growth factor (EGF) acts as a mitogen. The mechanisms responsible for these different cellular fates are unclear. We report here that although FGF, NGF, and EGF all activate mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (extracellular signal-related kinase [ERK]) in rat hippocampal (H19-7) and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, the activation of ERK by the neurogenic agents FGF and NGF is dependent upon protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), whereas ERK activation in response to the mitogenic EGF is independent of PKCδ. Antisense PKCδ oligonucleotides or the PKCδ-specific inhibitor rottlerin inhibited FGF- and NGF-induced, but not EGF-induced, ERK activation. In contrast, EGF-induced ERK activation was inhibited by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin, which had no effect upon FGF-induced ERK activation. Rottlerin also inhibited the activation of MAP kinase kinase (MEK) in response to activated Raf, but had no effect upon c-Raf activity or ERK activation by activated MEK. These results indicate that PKCδ functions either downstream from or in parallel with c-Raf, but upstream of MEK. Inhibition of PKCδ also blocked neurite outgrowth induced by FGF and NGF in PC12 cells and by activated Raf in H19-7 cells, indicating a role for PKCδ in the neurogenic effects of FGF, NGF, and Raf. Interestingly, the PKCδ requirement is apparently cell type specific, since FGF-induced ERK activation was independent of PKCδ in NIH 3T3 murine fibroblasts, in which FGF is a mitogen. These data demonstrate that PKCδ contributes to growth factor specificity and response in neuronal cells and may also promote cell-type-specific differences in growth factor signaling. PMID:10330161

  7. Novel autophosphorylation sites of Src family kinases regulate kinase activity and SH2 domain-binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Weir, Marion E; Mann, Jacqueline E; Corwin, Thomas; Fulton, Zachary W; Hao, Jennifer M; Maniscalco, Jeanine F; Kenney, Marie C; Roman Roque, Kristal M; Chapdelaine, Elizabeth F; Stelzl, Ulrich; Deming, Paula B; Ballif, Bryan A; Hinkle, Karen L

    2016-04-01

    Src family tyrosine kinases (SFKs) are critical players in normal and aberrant biological processes. While phosphorylation importantly regulates SFKs at two known tyrosines, large-scale phosphoproteomics have revealed four additional tyrosines commonly phosphorylated in SFKs. We found these novel tyrosines to be autophosphorylation sites. Mimicking phosphorylation at the C-terminal site to the activation loop decreased Fyn activity. Phosphomimetics and direct phosphorylation at the three SH2 domain sites increased Fyn activity while reducing phosphotyrosine-dependent interactions. While 68% of human SH2 domains exhibit conservation of at least one of these tyrosines, few have been found phosphorylated except when found in cis to a kinase domain. PMID:27001024

  8. Discovery of Clinical Candidate CEP-37440, a Selective Inhibitor of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK).

    PubMed

    Ott, Gregory R; Cheng, Mangeng; Learn, Keith S; Wagner, Jason; Gingrich, Diane E; Lisko, Joseph G; Curry, Matthew; Mesaros, Eugen F; Ghose, Arup K; Quail, Matthew R; Wan, Weihua; Lu, Lihui; Dobrzanski, Pawel; Albom, Mark S; Angeles, Thelma S; Wells-Knecht, Kevin; Huang, Zeqi; Aimone, Lisa D; Bruckheimer, Elizabeth; Anderson, Nathan; Friedman, Jay; Fernandez, Sandra V; Ator, Mark A; Ruggeri, Bruce A; Dorsey, Bruce D

    2016-08-25

    Analogues structurally related to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor 1 were optimized for metabolic stability. The results from this endeavor not only led to improved metabolic stability, pharmacokinetic parameters, and in vitro activity against clinically derived resistance mutations but also led to the incorporation of activity for focal adhesion kinase (FAK). FAK activation, via amplification and/or overexpression, is characteristic of multiple invasive solid tumors and metastasis. The discovery of the clinical stage, dual FAK/ALK inhibitor 27b, including details surrounding SAR, in vitro/in vivo pharmacology, and pharmacokinetics, is reported herein. PMID:27527804

  9. A mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor induced compound skin toxicity with oedema in metastatic malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C L; Mortimer, P S; Larkin, J M; Basu, T N; Gore, M E; Fearfield, L

    2016-04-01

    We report three cases of skin toxicity associated with oral mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma (MM). All three patients developed oedema, and a single patient experienced eyelash trichomegaly. This is the first known report of eyelash trichomegaly secondary to MEK inhibitor use. We also discuss possible mechanisms for MEK inhibitor-associated oedema development. This series supports the role of the dermatologist in the screening and management of patients in the rapidly developing oncology setting, as new targeted agents can give rise to marked skin toxicity. PMID:26411345

  10. Selective anticancer activity of a hexapeptide with sequence homology to a non-kinase domain of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyclin-dependent kinases 2, 4 and 6 (Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6) are closely structurally homologous proteins which are classically understood to control the transition from the G1 to the S-phases of the cell cycle by combining with their appropriate cyclin D or cyclin E partners to form kinase-active holoenzymes. Deregulation of Cdk4 is widespread in human cancer, CDK4 gene knockout is highly protective against chemical and oncogene-mediated epithelial carcinogenesis, despite the continued presence of CDK2 and CDK6; and overexpresssion of Cdk4 promotes skin carcinogenesis. Surprisingly, however, Cdk4 kinase inhibitors have not yet fulfilled their expectation as 'blockbuster' anticancer agents. Resistance to inhibition of Cdk4 kinase in some cases could potentially be due to a non-kinase activity, as recently reported with epidermal growth factor receptor. Results A search for a potential functional site of non-kinase activity present in Cdk4 but not Cdk2 or Cdk6 revealed a previously-unidentified loop on the outside of the C'-terminal non-kinase domain of Cdk4, containing a central amino-acid sequence, Pro-Arg-Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (PRGPRP). An isolated hexapeptide with this sequence and its cyclic amphiphilic congeners are selectively lethal at high doses to a wide range of human cancer cell lines whilst sparing normal diploid keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Treated cancer cells do not exhibit the wide variability of dose response typically seen with other anticancer agents. Cancer cell killing by PRGPRP, in a cyclic amphiphilic cassette, requires cells to be in cycle but does not perturb cell cycle distribution and is accompanied by altered relative Cdk4/Cdk1 expression and selective decrease in ATP levels. Morphological features of apoptosis are absent and cancer cell death does not appear to involve autophagy. Conclusion These findings suggest a potential new paradigm for the development of broad-spectrum cancer specific therapeutics with a companion diagnostic

  11. A peptide biosensor for detecting intracellular Abl kinase activity using MALDI-TOF MS

    PubMed Central

    Placzek, Ekaterina A.; Plebanek, Michael P.; Lipchik, Andrew M.; Kidd, Stephanie R.; Parker, Laurie L.

    2009-01-01

    Many cancers are characterized by changes in protein phosphorylation as a result of kinase dysregulation. Disruption of Abl kinase signaling through the Philadelphia chromosome (causing the Bcr-Abl mutation) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has provided a paradigm for development of kinase inhibitor drugs such as the specific inhibitor imatinib (also known as STI571 or Gleevec). However, since patients are treated indefinitely with this drug to maintain remission, resistance is increasingly becoming an issue. While there are many ways to detect kinase activity, most lack the ability to ‘multiplex’ the analysis (to detect more than one substrate simultaneously). Here we report a novel biosensor for detecting Abl kinase activity and sensitivity to inhibitor in live, intact cells overexpressing a CML model Abl kinase construct. This straightforward methodology could eventually provide a new tool for detecting kinase activity and inhibitor drug response in cancer cells that overexpress oncogenic kinases. PMID:19818327

  12. Inhibitors that stabilize a closed RAF kinase domain conformation induce dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, Hugo; Thevakumaran, Neroshan; Gavory, Gwenaëlle; Li, John; Padeganeh, Abbas; Guiral, Sébastien; Duchaine, Jean; Mao, Daniel Y. L.; Bouvier, Michel; Sicheri, Frank; Therrien, Marc

    2016-01-01

    RAF kinases play a prominent role in cancer. Their mode of activation is complex, but critically requires dimerization of their kinase domains. Unexpectedly, several ATP-competitive RAF inhibitors were recently found to promote dimerization and transactivation of RAF kinases in a RAS-dependent manner and as a result undesirably stimulate RAS/ERK-mediated cell growth. The mechanism by which these inhibitors induce RAF kinase domain dimerization remains unclear. Here we describe BRET-based biosensors for the extended RAF family enabling the detection of RAF dimerization in living cells. Notably, we demonstrate the utility of these tools for profiling kinase inhibitors that selectively modulate RAF dimerization as well as for probing structural determinants of RAF dimerization in vivo. Our findings, which appear generalizable to other kinase families allosterically regulated by kinase domain dimerization, suggest a model whereby ATP-competitive inhibitors mediate RAF dimerization by stabilizing a rigid closed conformation of the kinase domain. PMID:23685672

  13. A FRET biosensor reveals spatiotemporal activation and functions of aurora kinase A in living cells.

    PubMed

    Bertolin, Giulia; Sizaire, Florian; Herbomel, Gaëtan; Reboutier, David; Prigent, Claude; Tramier, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of AURKA is a major hallmark of epithelial cancers. It encodes the multifunctional serine/threonine kinase aurora A, which is activated at metaphase and is required for cell cycle progression; assessing its activation in living cells is mandatory for next-generation drug design. We describe here a Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor detecting the conformational changes of aurora kinase A induced by its autophosphorylation on Thr288. The biosensor functionally replaces the endogenous kinase in cells and allows the activation of the kinase to be followed throughout the cell cycle. Inhibiting the catalytic activity of the kinase prevents the conformational changes of the biosensor. Using this approach, we discover that aurora kinase A activates during G1 to regulate the stability of microtubules in cooperation with TPX2 and CEP192. These results demonstrate that the aurora kinase A biosensor is a powerful tool to identify new regulatory pathways controlling aurora kinase A activation. PMID:27624869

  14. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foda, Zachariah H.; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T.; Shaw, David E.; Seeliger, Markus A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity.

  15. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase

    PubMed Central

    Foda, Zachariah H.; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T.; Shaw, David E.; Seeliger, Markus A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity. PMID:25600932

  16. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase.

    PubMed

    Foda, Zachariah H; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T; Shaw, David E; Seeliger, Markus A

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity. PMID:25600932

  17. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids Promote Wound Healing through Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAP Kinases) Signaling Pathway in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Hee; Yang, Dong Joo; Kulkarni, Atul; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ki Woo

    2015-01-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are secondary metabolites found in diverse marine, freshwater, and terrestrial organisms. Evidence suggests that MAAs have several beneficial effects on skin homeostasis such as protection against UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, MAAs are also involved in the modulation of skin fibroblasts proliferation. However, the regulatory function of MAAs on wound repair in human skin is not yet clearly elucidated. To investigate the roles of MAAs on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes, three MAAs, Shinorine (SH), Mycosporine-glycine (M-Gly), and Porphyra (P334) were purified from Chlamydomonas hedlyei and Porphyra yezoensis. We found that SH, M-Gly, and P334 have significant effects on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes and these effects were mediated by activation of focal adhesion kinases (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). These results suggest that MAAs accelerate wound repair by activating the FAK-MAPK signaling pathways. This study also indicates that MAAs can act as a new wound healing agent and further suggests that MAAs might be a novel biomaterial for wound healing therapies. PMID:26703626

  18. Follicle-stimulating Hormone Activates Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase but Not Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Kinase through a 100-kDa Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase*

    PubMed Central

    Cottom, Joshua; Salvador, Lisa M.; Maizels, Evelyn T.; Reierstad, Scott; Park, Youngkyu; Carr, Daniel W.; Davare, Monika A.; Hell, Johannes W.; Palmer, Stephen S.; Dent, Paul; Kawakatsu, Hisaaki; Ogata, Masato; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary

    2006-01-01

    In this report we sought to elucidate the mechanism by which the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor signals to promote activation of the p42/p44 extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERKs) in granulosa cells. Results show that the ERK kinase MEK and upstream intermediates Raf-1, Ras, Src, and L-type Ca2+ channels are already partially activated in vehicle-treated cells and that FSH does not further activate them. This tonic stimulatory pathway appears to be restrained at the level of ERK by a 100-kDa phosphotyrosine phosphatase that associates with ERK in vehicle-treated cells and promotes dephosphorylation of its regulatory Tyr residue, resulting in ERK inactivation. FSH promotes the phosphorylation of this phosphotyrosine phosphatase and its dissociation from ERK, relieving ERK from inhibition and resulting in its activation by the tonic stimulatory pathway and consequent translocation to the nucleus. Consistent with this premise, FSH-stimulated ERK activation is inhibited by the cell-permeable protein kinase A-specific inhibitor peptide Myr-PKI as well as by inhibitors of MEK, Src, a Ca2+ channel blocker, and chelation of extracellular Ca2+. These results suggest that FSH stimulates ERK activity in immature granulosa cells by relieving an inhibition imposed by a 100-kDa phosphotyrosine phosphatase. PMID:12493768

  19. Brassinosteroid-regulated GSK3/Shaggy-like Kinases Phosphorylate Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Kinases, Which Control Stomata Development in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mamoona; Rozhon, Wilfried; Bigeard, Jean; Pflieger, Delphine; Husar, Sigrid; Pitzschke, Andrea; Teige, Markus; Jonak, Claudia; Hirt, Heribert; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are steroid hormones that coordinate fundamental developmental programs in plants. In this study we show that in addition to the well established roles of BRs in regulating cell elongation and cell division events, BRs also govern cell fate decisions during stomata development in Arabidopsis thaliana. In wild-type A. thaliana, stomatal distribution follows the one-cell spacing rule; that is, adjacent stomata are spaced by at least one intervening pavement cell. This rule is interrupted in BR-deficient and BR signaling-deficient A. thaliana mutants, resulting in clustered stomata. We demonstrate that BIN2 and its homologues, GSK3/Shaggy-like kinases involved in BR signaling, can phosphorylate the MAPK kinases MKK4 and MKK5, which are members of the MAPK module YODA-MKK4/5-MPK3/6 that controls stomata development and patterning. BIN2 phosphorylates a GSK3/Shaggy-like kinase recognition motif in MKK4, which reduces MKK4 activity against its substrate MPK6 in vitro. In vivo we show that MKK4 and MKK5 act downstream of BR signaling because their overexpression rescued stomata patterning defects in BR-deficient plants. A model is proposed in which GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of MKK4 and MKK5 enables for a dynamic integration of endogenous or environmental cues signaled by BRs into cell fate decisions governed by the YODA-MKK4/5-MPK3/6 module. PMID:23341468

  20. (Na+ + K+)-ATPase Is a Target for Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase/Protein Kinase B and Protein Kinase C Pathways Triggered by Albumin*

    PubMed Central

    Peruchetti, Diogo B.; Pinheiro, Ana Acacia S.; Landgraf, Sharon S.; Wengert, Mira; Takiya, Christina M.; Guggino, William B.; Caruso-Neves, Celso

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades, evidence has confirmed the crucial role of albumin in the progression of renal disease. However, the possible role of signaling pathways triggered by physiologic concentrations of albumin in the modulation of proximal tubule (PT) sodium reabsorption has not been considered. In the present work, we have shown that a physiologic concentration of albumin increases the expression of the α1 subunit of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase in LLC-PK1 cells leading to an increase in enzyme activity. This process involves the sequential activation of PI3K/protein kinase B and protein kinase C pathways promoting inhibition of protein kinase A. This integrative network is inhibited when albumin concentration is increased, similar to renal disease, leading to a decrease in the α1 subunit of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase expression. Together, the results indicate that variation in albumin concentration in PT cells has an important effect on PT sodium reabsorption and, consequently, on renal sodium excretion. PMID:22057272