Science.gov

Sample records for piret kll-klais reet

  1. Extracellular microbial polysaccharides. I. Substrate, biomass, and product kinetic equations for batch xanthan gum fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.M.; Ollis, D.F.

    1980-04-01

    Various biomass (X), product (P), and substrate (S) rate equations are investigated in order to synthesize a general xanthan fermentation model from literature data. Analytical forms that provide reasonable descriptions for the X, P, and S behaviors reported by Moraine and Rogovin are shown to be the logistic equation, the Luedeking-Piret equation, and a modified Leudeking-Piret equation, respectively. The autonomous logistic equation allows the serial evaluation of parameters for all three equations, rather than a simultaneous determination required by nonautonomous models. 22 references.

  2. Studies on cultivation kinetics for elastase production by Bacillus sp. EL31410.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi-He; He, Guo-Qing; Schwarz, Paul

    2004-06-01

    It was the first time to study elastase batch cultivation kinetics. This paper discusses the growth kinetics, elastase production, and substrate consumption kinetics model of Bacillus sp. EL31410 in batch cultivation. A simple model was proposed using a logistic equation for growth, the Luedeking-Piret equation for elastase production, and the Luedeking-Piret-like equation for glucose consumption. The model appeared to provide a reasonable description for each parameter during the growth phase. This study could provide some support for studying elastase fermentation kinetics, especially for studying its singular growth phenomenon. However, the model for elastase production is not good for explaining the real process and is still up to research. PMID:15161197

  3. Progress and Perspectives of Plasmon-Enhanced Solar Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Cushing, Scott K; Wu, Nianqiang

    2016-02-18

    Plasmonics allows extraordinary control of light, making it attractive for application in solar energy harvesting. In metal-semiconductor heterojunctions, plasmons can enhance photoconversion in the semiconductor via three mechanisms, including light trapping, hot electron/hole transfer, and plasmon-induced resonance energy transfer (PIRET). To understand the plasmonic enhancement, the metal's geometry, constituent metal, and interface must be viewed in terms of the effects on the plasmon's dephasing and decay route. To simplify design of plasmonic metal-semiconductor heterojunctions for high-efficiency solar energy conversion, the parameters controlling the plasmonic enhancement can be distilled to the dephasing time. The plasmonic geometry can then be further refined to optimize hot carrier transfer, PIRET, or light trapping. PMID:26817500

  4. Plasmon-induced resonance energy transfer for solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangtian; Cushing, Scott K.; Meng, Fanke; Senty, Tess R.; Bristow, Alan D.; Wu, Nianqiang

    2015-09-01

    In Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), energy non-radiatively transfers from a blue-shifted emitter to a red-shifted absorber by dipole-dipole coupling. This study shows that plasmonics enables the opposite transfer direction, transferring the plasmonic energy towards the short-wavelength direction to induce charge separation in a semiconductor. Plasmon-induced resonance energy transfer (PIRET) differs from FRET because of the lack of a Stoke's shift, non-local absorption effects and a strong dependence on the plasmon's dephasing rate and dipole moment. PIRET non-radiatively transfers energy through an insulating spacer layer, which prevents interfacial charge recombination losses and dephasing of the plasmon from hot-electron transfer. The distance dependence of dipole-dipole coupling is mapped out for a range of detuning across the plasmon resonance. PIRET can efficiently harvest visible and near-infrared sunlight with energy below the semiconductor band edge to help overcome the constraints of band-edge energetics for single semiconductors in photoelectrochemical cells, photocatalysts and photovoltaics.

  5. Evaluation of medium components by Plackett-Burman statistical design for lipase production by Candida rugosa and kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Aravindan; Palanisamy, Anbumathi; Thangavelu, Viruthagiri

    2008-03-01

    Lipase production by Candida rugosa was carried out in submerged fermentation. Plackett-Burman statistical experimental design was applied to evaluate the fermentation medium components. The effect of twelve medium components was studied in sixteen experimental trials. Glucose, olive oil, peptone and FeCl3.6H2O were found to have more significance on lipase production by Candida rugosa. Maximum lipase activity of 3.8 u mL(-1) was obtained at 50 h of fermentation period. The fermentation was carried out at optimized temperature of 30 degrees C, initial pH of 6.8 and shaking speed of 120 r/min. Unstructured kinetic models were used to simulate the experimental data. Logistic model, Luedeking-Piret model and modified Luedeking-Piret model were found suitable to efficiently predict the cell mass, lipase production and glucose consumption respectively with high determination coefficient(R2). From the estimated values of the Luedeking-Piret kinetic model parameters, alpha and beta, it was found that the lipase production by Candida rugosa is growth associated. PMID:18589820

  6. Mathematical model of Chlorella minutissima UTEX2341 growth and lipid production under photoheterotrophic fermentation conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, JinShui; Rasa, Ehsan; Tantayotai, Prapakorn; Scow, Kate M.; Yuan, HongLi; Hristova, Krassimira R.

    2012-01-01

    To reduce the cost of algal biomass production, mathematical model was developed for the first time to describe microalgae growth, lipid production and glycerin consumption under photoheterotrophic conditions based on logistic, Luedeking–Piret and Luedeking–Piret-like equations. All experiments were conducted in a 2 L batch reactor without considering CO2 effect on algae’s growth and lipid production. Biomass and lipid production increased with glycerin as carbon source and were well described by the logistic and Luedeking–Piret equations respectively. Model predictions were in satisfactory agreement with measured data and the mode of lipid production was growth-associated. Sensitivity analysis was applied to examine the effects of certain important parameters on model performance. Results showed that S0, the initial concentration of glycerin, was the most significant factor for algae growth and lipid production. This model is applicable for prediction of other single cell algal species but model testing is recommended before scaling up the fermentation of process. PMID:21115343

  7. Direct Observation of Reversible Electronic Energy Transfer Involving an Iridium Center

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A cyclometalated iridium complex is reported where the core complex comprises naphthylpyridine as the main ligand and the ancillary 2,2′-bipyridine ligand is attached to a pyrene unit by a short alkyl bridge. To obtain the complex with satisfactory purity, it was necessary to modify the standard synthesis (direct reaction of the ancillary ligand with the chloro-bridged iridium dimer) to a method harnessing an intermediate tetramethylheptanolate-based complex, which was subjected to acid-promoted removal of the ancillary ligand and subsequent complexation. The photophysical behavior of the bichromophoric complex and a model complex without the pendant pyrene were studied using steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopies. Reversible electronic energy transfer (REET) is demonstrated, uniquely with an emissive cyclometalated iridium center and an adjacent organic chromophore. After excited-state equilibration is established (5 ns) as a result of REET, extremely long luminescence lifetimes of up to 225 μs result, compared to 8.3 μs for the model complex, without diminishing the emission quantum yield. As a result, remarkably high oxygen sensitivity is observed in both solution and polymeric matrices. PMID:24555716

  8. Stochastic growth logistic model with aftereffect for batch fermentation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, Norhayati; Ayoubi, Tawfiqullah; Bahar, Arifah; Rahman, Haliza Abdul; Salleh, Madihah Md

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the stochastic growth logistic model with aftereffect for the cell growth of C. acetobutylicum P262 and Luedeking-Piret equations for solvent production in batch fermentation system is introduced. The parameters values of the mathematical models are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic models numerically. The effciency of mathematical models is measured by comparing the simulated result and the experimental data of the microbial growth and solvent production in batch system. Low values of Root Mean-Square Error (RMSE) of stochastic models with aftereffect indicate good fits.

  9. Stochastic growth logistic model with aftereffect for batch fermentation process

    SciTech Connect

    Rosli, Norhayati; Ayoubi, Tawfiqullah; Bahar, Arifah; Rahman, Haliza Abdul; Salleh, Madihah Md

    2014-06-19

    In this paper, the stochastic growth logistic model with aftereffect for the cell growth of C. acetobutylicum P262 and Luedeking-Piret equations for solvent production in batch fermentation system is introduced. The parameters values of the mathematical models are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic models numerically. The effciency of mathematical models is measured by comparing the simulated result and the experimental data of the microbial growth and solvent production in batch system. Low values of Root Mean-Square Error (RMSE) of stochastic models with aftereffect indicate good fits.

  10. Kinetic models of ribonucleic acid fermentation and continuous culture by Candida tropicalis no.121.

    PubMed

    Li, Bingbing; Chen, Xiaochun; Ren, Huajing; Li, Lei; Xiong, Jian; Bai, Jianxin; Chen, Yong; Wu, Jinglan; Ying, Hanjie

    2012-03-01

    During ribonucleic acid fermentation, the fermentative processes were researched at pH controlled at 4.0 and under natural conditions. Unstructured models in a 50-L airlift fermentor were established for batch RNA production at pH 4.0 using the Verhulst equation for microbial growth, the Luedeking-Piret equation for product formation and a Luedeking-Piret-like equation for substrate uptake. Parameters of the kinetic models were determined using origin 7.5. Based on the models estimated above, another batch fermentation experiment was conducted in a 300-L airlift fermentor, which demonstrated that the models could be useful for RNA production on an industrial scale. Additionally, continuous fermentation based on kinetic models was proposed to make full use of substrates and reduce the cost of waste water treatment. As a result, although the DCW and RNA concentration were 11.5 and 1.68 g L(-1), which were lower than that of batch fermentation, the sugar utilization increased by 14.3%, while the waste water decreased by more than 90%. PMID:21853330

  11. Modelling the Biphasic Growth and Product Formation by Enterococcus faecium CECT 410 in Realkalized Fed-Batch Fermentations in Whey

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Nelson Pérez; Fajardo, Paula; Fuciños, Clara; Amado, Isabel Rodríguez; Alonso, Elisa; Torrado, Ana; Pastrana, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    The influence of initial pH on growth and nutrient (total sugars, nitrogen, and phosphorous) consumption by Enterococcus faecium CECT 410 was studied during batch cultures in whey. With these data, two realkalized fed-batch fermentations were developed using different feeding substrates. The shift from homolactic to mixed acid fermentation, the biphasic kinetics observed for cell growth and nitrogen consumption and the increase in the concentrations of biomass and products (lactic acid, acetic acid, ethanol, and butane-2,3-diol) were the most noteworthy observations of these cultures. Modelling the fed-batch growth of Ent. faecium with the Logistic and bi-Logistic models was not satisfactory. However, biomass production was best mathematically described with the use of a double Monod model, which was expressed in terms of biomass, product accumulation, and nitrogen utilization. Product formation was successfully modelled with a modified form of the Luedeking and Piret model developed in this study. PMID:20689729

  12. Homo-fermentative production of D-lactic acid by Lactobacillus sp. employing casein whey permeate as a raw feed-stock.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Saurav; Srikanth, Katla; Limaye, Anil M; Sivaprakasam, Senthilkumar

    2014-06-01

    Casein whey permeate (CWP), a lactose-enriched dairy waste effluent, is a viable feed stock for the production of value-added products. Two lactic acid bacteria were cultivated in a synthetic casein whey permeate medium with or without pH control. Lactobacillus lactis ATCC 4797 produced D-lactic acid (DLA) at 12.5 g l(-1) in a bioreactor. The values of Leudking-Piret model parameters suggested that lactate was a growth-associated product. Batch fermentation was also performed employing CWP (35 g lactose l(-1)) with casein hydrolysate as a nitrogen supplement in a bioreactor. After 40 h, L. lactis produced 24.3 g lactic acid l(-1) with an optical purity >98 %. Thus CWP may be regarded as a potential feed-stock for DLA production. PMID:24563313

  13. Theoretical maximum efficiency of solar energy conversion in plasmonic metal-semiconductor heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Cushing, Scott K; Bristow, Alan D; Wu, Nianqiang

    2015-11-28

    Plasmonics can enhance solar energy conversion in semiconductors by light trapping, hot electron transfer, and plasmon-induced resonance energy transfer (PIRET). The multifaceted response of the plasmon and multiple interaction pathways with the semiconductor makes optimization challenging, hindering design of efficient plasmonic architectures. Therefore, in this paper we use a density matrix model to capture the interplay between scattering, hot electrons, and dipole-dipole coupling through the plasmon's dephasing, including both the coherent and incoherent dynamics necessary for interactions on the plasmon's timescale. The model is extended to Shockley-Queisser limit calculations for both photovoltaics and solar-to-chemical conversion, revealing the optimal application of each enhancement mechanism based on plasmon energy, semiconductor energy, and plasmon dephasing. The results guide application of plasmonic solar-energy harvesting, showing which enhancement mechanism is most appropriate for a given semiconductor's weakness, and what nanostructures can achieve the maximum enhancement. PMID:26497739

  14. Growth characteristics of freeze-tolerant baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae AFY in aerobic batch culture.

    PubMed

    Ji, Meng; Miao, Yelian; Chen, Jie Yu; You, Yebing; Liu, Feilong; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae AFY is a novel baker's yeast strain with strong freeze-tolerance, and can be used for frozen-dough processing. The present study armed to clarify the growth characteristics of the yeast AFY. Aerobic batch culture experiments of yeast AFY were carried out using media with various initial glucose concentrations, and the culture process was analyzed kinetically. The growth of the yeast AFY exhibited a diauxic pattern with the first growth stage consuming glucose and the second growth stage consuming ethanol. The cell yield decreased with increasing initial glucose concentration in the first growth stage, and also decreased with increasing initial ethanol concentration in the second growth stage. In the initial glucose concentration range of 5.0-40.0 g/L, the simultaneous equations of Monod equation, Luedeking-Piret equation and pseudo-Luedeking-Piret equation could be used to describe the concentrations of cell, ethanol and glucose in either of the two exponential growth phases. At the initial glucose concentrations of 5.0, 10.0 and 40.0 g/L, the first exponential growth phase had a maximal specific cell growth rate of 0.52, 0.98 and 0.99 h(-1), while the second exponential growth phase had a maximal specific cell growth rate of 0.11, 0.06 and 0.07 h(-1), respectively. It was indicated that the efficiency of the yeast production could be improved by reducing the ethanol production in the first growth stage. PMID:27186467

  15. The rabbit pulmonary cytochrome P450 arachidonic acid metabolic pathway: characterization and significance.

    PubMed Central

    Zeldin, D C; Plitman, J D; Kobayashi, J; Miller, R F; Snapper, J R; Falck, J R; Szarek, J L; Philpot, R M; Capdevila, J H

    1995-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 metabolizes arachidonic acid to several unique and biologically active compounds in rabbit liver and kidney. Microsomal fractions prepared from rabbit lung homogenates metabolized arachidonic acid through cytochrome P450 pathways, yielding cis-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and their hydration products, vic-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids, mid-chain cis-trans conjugated dienols, and 19- and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. Inhibition studies using polyclonal antibodies prepared against purified CYP2B4 demonstrated 100% inhibition of arachidonic acid epoxide formation. Purified CYP2B4, reconstituted in the presence of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and cytochrome b5, metabolized arachidonic acid, producing primarily EETs. EETs were detected in lung homogenate using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy, providing evidence for the in vivo pulmonary cytochrome P450 epoxidation of arachidonic acid. Chiral analysis of these lung EETs demonstrated a preference for the 14(R),15(S)-, 11(S),12(R)-, and 8(S),9(R)-EET enantiomers. Both EETs and vic-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids were detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. At micromolar concentrations, methylated 5,6-EET and 8,9-EET significantly relaxed histamine-contracted guinea pig hilar bronchi in vitro. In contrast, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid caused contraction to near maximal tension. We conclude that CYP2B4, an abundant rabbit lung cytochrome P450 enzyme, is the primary constitutive pulmonary arachidonic acid epoxygenase and that these locally produced, biologically active eicosanoids may be involved in maintaining homeostasis within the lung. Images PMID:7738183

  16. Cytochrome P450-dependent eicosapentaenoic acid metabolites are novel BK channel activators.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Birgit; Barbosa-Sicard, Eduardo; Wang, Mong-Heng; Honeck, Horst; Kärgel, Eva; Theuer, Jürgen; Schwartzman, Michal L; Haller, Hermann; Luft, Friedrich C; Gollasch, Maik; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen

    2002-02-01

    P450-dependent arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites regulate arterial tone by modulating calcium-activated (BK) potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Because eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) has been reported to improve vascular function, we tested the hypothesis that P450-dependent epoxygenation of EPA produces alternative vasoactive compounds. We synthesized the 5 regioisomeric epoxyeicosattrienoic acids (EETeTr) and examined them for effects on K(+) currents in rat cerebral artery VSMCs with the patch-clamp technique. 11(R),12(S)-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (50 nmol/L) was used for comparison and stimulated K(+) currents 6-fold at +60 mV. However, 17(R),18(S)-EETeTr elicited a more than 14-fold increase. 17(S),18(R)-EET and the remaining four regioisomers were inactive. The effect of 17(R),18(S)-EETeTr was blocked by tetraethylammonium but not by 4-aminopyridine. VSMCs expressed P450s 4A1 and 4A3. Recombinant P450 4A1 hydroxylated EPA at C-19 and C-20 and epoxygenated the 17,18-double bond, yielding the R, S- and S, R-enantiomers in a ratio of 64:36. We conclude that 17(R),18(S)-EETeTr represents a novel, potent activator of BK potassium channels. Furthermore, this metabolite can be directly produced in VSMCs. We suggest that 17(R),18(S)-EETeTr may function as an important hyperpolarizing factor, particularly with EPA-rich diets. PMID:11882617

  17. Simultaneous production of amylases and proteases by Bacillus subtilis in brewery wastes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Blanco, Alina; Palacios Durive, Osmar; Batista Pérez, Sulema; Díaz Montes, Zoraida; Pérez Guerra, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous production of amylase (AA) and protease (PA) activity by Bacillus subtilis UO-01 in brewery wastes was studied by combining the response surface methodology with the kinetic study of the process. The optimum conditions (T=36.0°C and pH=6.8) for high biomass production (0.92g/L) were similar to the conditions (T=36.8°C and pH=6.6) for high AA synthesis (9.26EU/mL). However, the maximum PA level (9.77EU/mL) was obtained at pH 7.1 and 37.8°C. Under these conditions, a considerably high reduction (between 69.9 and 77.8%) of the initial chemical oxygen demand of the waste was achieved. In verification experiments under the optimized conditions for production of each enzyme, the AA and PA obtained after 15h of incubation were, respectively, 9.35 and 9.87EU/mL. By using the Luedeking and Piret model, both enzymes were classified as growth-associated metabolites. Protease production delay seemed to be related to the consumption of non-protein and protein nitrogen. These results indicate that the brewery waste could be successfully used for a high scale production of amylases and proteases at a low cost. PMID:27266628

  18. Nitrite inhibition of denitrification by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, J.S.; Julio, S.M.; Reis, M.A.M. |

    1995-05-05

    Using a pure culture of Pseudomonas fluorescens as a model system nitrite inhibition of denitrification was studied. A mineral media with acetate and nitrate as sole electron donor and acceptor, respectively, was used. Results obtained in continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR) operated at pH values between 6.6 and 7.8 showed that growth inhibition depended only on the nitrite undissociated fraction concentration (nitrous acid). A mathematical model to describe this dependence is put forward. The maximum nitrous acid concentration compatible with cell growth and denitrification activity was found to be 66 {mu}g N/L. Denitrification activity was partially associated with growth, as described by the Luedeking-Piret equation. However, when the freshly inoculated reactor was operated discontinuously, nitrite accumulation caused growth uncoupling from denitrification activity. The authors suggest that these results can be interpreted considering that (a) nitrous acid acts as a proton uncoupler; and (b) cultures continuously exposed to nitrous acid prevent the uncoupling effect but not the growth inhibition. Examination of the growth dependence on nitrite concentration at pH 7.0 showed that adapted cultures (growth on CSTR) are less sensitive to nitrous acid inhibition than the ones cultivated in batch.

  19. [Construction and application of black-box model for glucoamylase production by Aspergillus niger].

    PubMed

    Li, Lianwei; Lu, Hongzhong; Xia, Jianye; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2015-07-01

    Carbon-limited continuous culture was used to study the relationship between the growth of Aspergillus niger and the production of glucoamylase. The result showed that when the specific growth rate was lower than 0.068 h(-1), the production of glucoamylase was growth-associated, when the specific growth rate was higher than 0.068 h(-1), the production of glucoamylase was not growth-associated. Based on the result of continuous culture, the Monod dynamics model of glucose consumption of A. niger was constructed, Combining Herbert-Pirt equation of glucose and oxygen consumption with Luedeking-Piret equation of enzyme production, the black-box model of Aspergillus niger for enzyme production was established. The exponential fed-batch culture was designed to control the specific growth rate at 0.05 h(-1) by using this model and the highest yield for glucoamylase production by A. niger reached 0.127 g glucoamylase/g glucose. The black-box model constructed in this study successfully described the glucoamylase production by A. niger and the result of the model fitted the measured value well. The black-box model could guide the design and optimization of glucoamylase production by A. niger. PMID:26647584

  20. Modeling for Gellan Gum Production by Sphingomonas paucimobilis ATCC 31461 in a Simplified Medium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Xu, Ping; Yuan, Yong; Liu, Changlong; Zhang, Dezhong; Yang, Zhengting; Yang, Chunyu; Ma, Cuiqing

    2006-01-01

    Gellan gum production was carried out by Sphingomonas paucimobilis ATCC 31461 in a simplified medium with a short incubation time, and a kinetic model for understanding, controlling, and optimizing the fermentation process was proposed. The results revealed that glucose was the best carbon source and that the optimal concentration was 30 g liter−1. As for the fermenting parameters, considerably large amounts of gellan gum were yielded by an 8-h-old culture and a 4% inoculum at 200 rpm on a rotary shaker. Under the optimized conditions, the maximum level of gellan gum (14.75 g liter−1) and the highest conversion efficiency (49.17%) were obtained in a 30-liter fermentor in batch fermentation. Logistic and Luedeking-Piret models were confirmed to provide a good description of gellan gum fermentation, which gave some support for the study of gellan gum fermentation kinetics. Additionally, this study is the first demonstration that gellan gum production is largely growth associated by analysis of kinetics in its batch fermentation process. Based on model prediction, higher gellan gum production (17.71 g liter−1) and higher conversion efficiency (57.12%) were obtained in fed-batch fermentation at the same total glucose concentration (30 g liter−1). PMID:16672479

  1. Modeling for gellan gum production by Sphingomonas paucimobilis ATCC 31461 in a simplified medium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Xu, Ping; Yuan, Yong; Liu, Changlong; Zhang, Dezhong; Yang, Zhengting; Yang, Chunyu; Ma, Cuiqing

    2006-05-01

    Gellan gum production was carried out by Sphingomonas paucimobilis ATCC 31461 in a simplified medium with a short incubation time, and a kinetic model for understanding, controlling, and optimizing the fermentation process was proposed. The results revealed that glucose was the best carbon source and that the optimal concentration was 30 g liter(-1). As for the fermenting parameters, considerably large amounts of gellan gum were yielded by an 8-h-old culture and a 4% inoculum at 200 rpm on a rotary shaker. Under the optimized conditions, the maximum level of gellan gum (14.75 g liter(-1)) and the highest conversion efficiency (49.17%) were obtained in a 30-liter fermentor in batch fermentation. Logistic and Luedeking-Piret models were confirmed to provide a good description of gellan gum fermentation, which gave some support for the study of gellan gum fermentation kinetics. Additionally, this study is the first demonstration that gellan gum production is largely growth associated by analysis of kinetics in its batch fermentation process. Based on model prediction, higher gellan gum production (17.71 g liter(-1)) and higher conversion efficiency (57.12%) were obtained in fed-batch fermentation at the same total glucose concentration (30 g liter(-1)). PMID:16672479

  2. A robust method for the joint estimation of yield coefficients and kinetic parameters in bioprocess models.

    PubMed

    Vastemans, V; Rooman, M; Bogaerts, Ph

    2009-01-01

    Bioprocess model structures that require nonlinear parameter estimation, thus initialization values, are often subject to poor identification performances because of the uncertainty on those initialization values. Under some conditions on the model structure, it is possible to partially circumvent this problem by an appropriate decoupling of the linear part of the model from the nonlinear part of it. This article provides a procedure to be followed when these structural conditions are not satisfied. An original method for decoupling two sets of parameters, namely, kinetic parameters from maximum growth, production, decay rates, and yield coefficients, is presented. It exhibits the advantage of requiring only initialization of the first subset of parameters. In comparison with a classical nonlinear estimation procedure, in which all the parameters are freed, results show enhanced robustness of model identification with regard to parameter initialization errors. This is illustrated by means of three simulation case studies: a fed-batch Human Embryo Kidney cell cultivation process using a macroscopic reaction scheme description, a process of cyclodextrin-glucanotransferase production by Bacillus circulans, and a process of simultaneous starch saccharification and glucose fermentation to lactic acid by Lactobacillus delbrückii, both based on a Luedeking-Piret model structure. Additionally, perspectives of the presented procedure in the context of systematic bioprocess modeling are promising. PMID:19455623

  3. Modeling of the pyruvate production with Escherichia coli in a fed-batch bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zelić, B; Vasić-Racki, D; Wandrey, C; Takors, R

    2004-07-01

    A family of 10 competing, unstructured models has been developed to model cell growth, substrate consumption, and product formation of the pyruvate producing strain Escherichia coli YYC202 ldhA::Kan strain used in fed-batch processes. The strain is completely blocked in its ability to convert pyruvate into acetyl-CoA or acetate (using glucose as the carbon source) resulting in an acetate auxotrophy during growth in glucose minimal medium. Parameter estimation was carried out using data from fed-batch fermentation performed at constant glucose feed rates of q(VG)=10 mL h(-1). Acetate was fed according to the previously developed feeding strategy. While the model identification was realized by least-square fit, the model discrimination was based on the model selection criterion (MSC). The validation of model parameters was performed applying data from two different fed-batch experiments with glucose feed rate q(VG)=20 and 30 mL h(-1), respectively. Consequently, the most suitable model was identified that reflected the pyruvate and biomass curves adequately by considering a pyruvate inhibited growth (Jerusalimsky approach) and pyruvate inhibited product formation (described by modified Luedeking-Piret/Levenspiel term). PMID:15085423

  4. Biohydrogen production and kinetic modeling using sediment microorganisms of Pichavaram mangroves, India.

    PubMed

    Mullai, P; Rene, Eldon R; Sridevi, K

    2013-01-01

    Mangrove sediments host rich assemblages of microorganisms, predominantly mixed bacterial cultures, which can be efficiently used for biohydrogen production through anaerobic dark fermentation. The influence of process parameters such as effect of initial glucose concentration, initial medium pH, and trace metal (Fe(2+)) concentration was investigated in this study. A maximum hydrogen yield of 2.34, 2.3, and 2.6 mol H2 mol(-1) glucose, respectively, was obtained under the following set of optimal conditions: initial substrate concentration-10,000 mg L(-1), initial pH-6.0, and ferrous sulphate concentration-100 mg L(-1), respectively. The addition of trace metal to the medium (100 mg L(-1) FeSO4 ·7H2O) enhanced the biohydrogen yield from 2.3 mol H2 mol(-1) glucose to 2.6 mol H2 mol(-1) glucose. Furthermore, the experimental data was subjected to kinetic analysis and the kinetic constants were estimated with the help of well-known kinetic models available in the literature, namely, Monod model, logistic model and Luedeking-Piret model. The model fitting was found to be in good agreement with the experimental observations, for all the models, with regression coefficient values >0.92. PMID:24319679

  5. Aeration effect on Spirulina platensis growth and γ-Linolenic acid production

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy; Bokka, Chandra Sekhar; Ketineni, Chandrika; Rijal, Binod; Allu, Prasada Rao

    2012-01-01

    The influence of aeration on algal growth and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) production in a bubble column photobioreactor was investigated. Studies were performed in a 20-L reactor at different aeration rates (0.2– 2.5 vvm). Static, continuous, and periodic operation of air resulted in 41.9%, 88.4%, and 108% air saturation of dissolved oxygen, for which the corresponding values of GLA were 2.3, 6.5, and 7.5 mg·g-1 dry cell weight, respectively. An increase in the aeration rate from 0.2 to 2.5 vvm enhanced both the specific growth rate and GLA content under periodic sparging in the bicarbonate medium. With a 6-fold increase in the aeration rate, the GLA content of the alga increased by 69.64% (5.6–9.5 mg· g-1 dry cell weight). In addition, the total fatty acid (TFA) content in dry biomass increased from 2.22% to 4.41%, whereas the algae maintained a constant GLA to TFA ratio within the aeration rate tested. The dependence of GLA production on the aeration rate was explained by interrelating the GLA production rate with the specific growth rate using the Luedeking and Piret mixed growth model. PMID:24031799

  6. Fed-batch Fermentation of Lactic Acid Bacteria to Improve Biomass Production: A Theoretical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beng Lee, Boon; Tham, Heng Jin; Chan, Eng Seng

    Recently, fed-batch fermentation has been introduced in an increasing number of fermentation processes. Previous researches showed that fed-batch fermentation can increase the biomass yield of many strains. Improvement of the biomass yield is interested because biomass from lactic acid bacteria (LAB) fermentation is widely used in food and pharmaceutical industry. The aim of this research is to study the ability and feasibility of fed-batch fermentation to improve biomass production of LAB. Appropriate model has been selected from literature. Monod equation described the substrate limitation of LAB and the product inhibition of LAB follows a non-competitive model. Furthermore, the lactic acid production follows Luedeking and Piret model. Then the models are applied to simulate the fermentation of batch and fed-batch cultures by using MATLAB. From the results of simulation, fed-batch fermentation showed that substrate limitation and substrate inhibition can be avoided. Besides that, the variable volume fed-batch fermentation also showed that product inhibition can be eliminated by diluting the product concentration with added fresh feed. However, it was found that fed-batch fermentation is not economically feasible because large amount of substrate is required to reduce the product inhibition effect. Therefore, fed-batch fermentation plays more importance role if the fermentation strain has high Ks value or low Kp value.

  7. Improved production of live cells of Lactobacillus rhamnosus by continuous cultivation using glucose-yeast extract medium.

    PubMed

    Ling, Liew Siew; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Wan, Ho Yin; Ariff, Arbakariya Bin

    2006-08-01

    In this study, the growth kinetics of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and lactic acid production in continuous culture were assessed at a range of dilution rates (0.05 h(-1) to 0.40 h(-1)) using a 2 L stirred tank fermenter with a working volume of 600 ml. Unstructured models, predicated on the Monod and Luedeking-Piret equations, were employed to simulate the growth of the bacterium, glucose consumption, and lactic acid production at different dilution rates in continuous cultures. The maximum specific growth rate of L. rhamnosus, mu-max, was estimated at 0.40 h(-1), and the Monod cell growth saturation constant, Ks, at approximately 0.25 g/L. Maximum cell viability (1.3 x 10(10) CFU/ml) was achieved in the dilution rate range of D = 0.28 h(-1) to 0.35 h(-1). Both maximum viable cell yield and productivity were achieved at D = 0.35 h(-1). The continuous cultivation of L. rhamnosus at D = 0.35 h(-1) resulted in substantial improvements in cell productivity, of 267% (viable cell count) that achieved via batch cultivation. PMID:16953180

  8. Kinetics of growth and caffeine demethylase production of Pseudomonas sp. in bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N; Santhosh, Devarai

    2010-09-01

    The effect of various initial caffeine concentrations on growth and caffeine demethylase production by Pseudomonas sp. was studied in bioreactor. At initial concentration of 6.5 g l(-1) caffeine, Pseudomonas sp. showed a maximum specific growth rate of 0.2 h(-1), maximum degradation rate of 1.1 g h(-1), and caffeine demethylase activity of 18,762 U g CDW(-1) (CDW: cell dry weight). Caffeine degradation rate was 25 times higher in bioreactor than in shake flask. For the first time, we show highest degradation of 75 g caffeine (initial concentration 20 g l(-1)) in 120 h, suggesting that the tested strain has potential for successful bioprocess for caffeine degradation. Growth kinetics showed substrate inhibition phenomenon. Various substrate inhibition models were fitted to the kinetic data, amongst which the double-exponential (R(2) = 0.94), Luong (R(2) = 0.92), and Yano and Koga 2 (R(2) = 0.94) models were found to be the best. The Luedeking-Piret model showed that caffeine demethylase production kinetics was growth related. This is the first report on production of high levels of caffeine demethylase in batch bioreactor with faster degradation rate and high tolerance to caffeine, hence clearly suggesting that Pseudomonas sp. used in this study is a potential biocatalyst for industrial decaffeination. PMID:20495941

  9. Process optimization and kinetic modelling of cyclic (1→3, 1→6)-β-glucans production from Bradyrhizobium japonicum MTCC120.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anju V; Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N; Doble, Mukesh

    2016-05-20

    Cyclic (1→3, 1→6)-β-glucans are water soluble, biocompatible polymers with potential applications in food and pharmaceutical industries but have not yet been exploited due to their poor yield. In the present study statistical experimental design methodology was employed to improve their production. Initial screening indicated arabinose and peptone as best carbon and nitrogen source respectively, for glucan production. Arabinose and osmolyte concentrations as well as pH significantly contributed to the glucan production. Central composite design indicated a significant interaction between osmolyte concentration and pH on glucan production. The maximum amount of cyclic glucan produced was 6.7g/L in a 2.5L reactor in batch conditions. The logistic equation for cell growth and Luedeking-Piret equation for glucan production could satisfactorily simulate the batch kinetics data. Cyclic β-glucans could efficiently encapsulate a hydrophobic molecule, curcumin and increase its solubility in water, thus indicating that these glucans have potential as drug delivery systems. PMID:27046066

  10. Kinetic studies on batch cultivation of Trichoderma reesei and application to enhance cellulase production by fed-batch fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijuan; Li, Chen; Yang, Zhenhua; Jia, Wendi; Zhang, Dongyuan; Chen, Shulin

    2013-07-20

    Reducing the production cost of cellulase as the key enzyme for cellulose hydrolysis to fermentable sugars remains a major challenge for biofuel production. Because of the complexity of cellulase production, kinetic modeling and mass balance calculation can be used as effective tools for process design and optimization. In this study, kinetic models for cell growth, substrate consumption and cellulase production in batch fermentation were developed, and then applied in fed-batch fermentation to enhance cellulase production. Inhibition effect of substrate was considered and a modified Luedeking-Piret model was developed for cellulase production and substrate consumption according to the growth characteristics of Trichoderma reesei. The model predictions fit well with the experimental data. Simulation results showed that higher initial substrate concentration led to decrease of cellulase production rate. Mass balance and kinetic simulation results were applied to determine the feeding strategy. Cellulase production and its corresponding productivity increased by 82.13% after employing the proper feeding strategy in fed-batch fermentation. This method combining mathematics and chemometrics by kinetic modeling and mass balance can not only improve cellulase fermentation process, but also help to better understand the cellulase fermentation process. The model development can also provide insight to other similar fermentation processes. PMID:23702163

  11. The bioprocessing of stem cells: how to reach the clinic. Interviewed by Emily Culme-Seymour.

    PubMed

    Zandstra, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Peter Zandstra speaks to Emily Culme-Seymour, Assistant Commissioning Editor Peter Zandstra graduated with a Bachelor of Engineering degree from McGill University (QC, Canada) in the Department of Chemical Engineering, and obtained his PhD degree from the University of British Columbia (BC, USA) in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, under the supervision of Jamie Piret and Connie Eaves. He continued his research training as a Post Doctoral Fellow in the field of Bioengineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MA, USA; with Doug Lauffenburger) before being appointed to the University of Toronto (ON, USA) in 1999. He holds an academic appointment as a Professor at the University of Toronto's Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, and he is cross-appointed with the Departments of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, and the Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research. Zandstra is a Canada Research Chair in Stem Cell Bioengineering and is a recipient of a number of awards and fellowships including the Premiers Research Excellence Award (2002), the Edgar William Richard Steacie Memorial Fellowship (2006), the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (2007) and the McLean Award (2009). Zandstra is a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Zandstra currently serves as associate editor for several journals. In addition to his academic appointment, he serves as the Chief Scientific Officer for the Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine in Toronto (ON, Canada). PMID:23826695

  12. Modeling kinetics of aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus in maize-based medium and maize grain.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Daiana; Ramos, Antonio J; Sanchis, Vicente; Marín, Sonia

    2013-03-15

    Predictive mycology has dealt mainly with germination, growth and inactivation of fungi while the issue of mycotoxin production remains relatively unexplored. Very few studies provide biomass dry weight/colony size data along with mycotoxin data for the same sample times, thus the ratio mycotoxin accumulation per fungal biomass dry weight/colony size has rarely been reported. For this reason, the objective of the present study was to model the kinetics of mycotoxin production under the assumption of existing both no-growth-associated and growth-associated production. Aspergillus flavus was chosen as a model mycotoxigenic microorganism, and it was grown in maize agar medium and maize grain at 0.90 and 0.99 aw at 25°C. A significant positive correlation (p<0.05) was observed among the biomass responses (colony radius and biomass dry weight) in agar medium and colony radius in maize at both aw levels assayed. The Luedeking-Piret model was used to model AFB1 production and reasonable percentages of variability were explained. Moreover, AFB1 production was in general slightly better predicted through colony area. As conclusion, aflatoxin production may follow a mixed-growth associated trend, confirming that toxin formation does not present a clear delay in relation to growth under certain conditions. PMID:23422844

  13. Comparative study of growth responses and screening of inter-specific OTA production kinetics by A. carbonarius isolated from grapes.

    PubMed

    Lappa, Iliada K; Kizis, Dimosthenis; Natskoulis, Pantelis I; Panagou, Efstathios Z

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess OchratoxinA (OTA) production of different Aspergillus carbonarius isolates, evaluate their growth profile through different growth measurements, and reveal any underlying correlation between them. Ten different isolates of A. carbonarius isolated from Greek vineyards located in different geographical regions were examined in vitro for their OTA production potential after an incubation period of up to 11 days. All fungal isolates grew on a synthetic grape juice medium (SGM) similar to grape composition at optimum conditions of temperature and water activity (25°C and 0.98 aw). Samples for OTA determination were removed at 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11 days of growth and analyzed by HPLC. Based on OTA measurements the isolates were characterized by diverse OTA production ranging from 50 to 2000 ppb at day 11. The different fungal growth responses (colony diameter, colony area, biomass, biomass dry weight, and colony density) have been measured and correlated with toxin production by means of principal components analysis (PCA), confirming satisfactory correlation and explained over 99% of data variability. Leudeking-Piret model was also used to study OTA production with time, revealing a mixed-growth associated trend and pointing a fail-safe model with slightly better prediction through colony area. This approach contributes to the assessment of correlation between mycotoxin production and different methods of fungal growth determination in relation to time. PMID:26074896

  14. Comparative study of growth responses and screening of inter-specific OTA production kinetics by A. carbonarius isolated from grapes

    PubMed Central

    Lappa, Iliada K.; Kizis, Dimosthenis; Natskoulis, Pantelis I.; Panagou, Efstathios Z.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess OchratoxinA (OTA) production of different Aspergillus carbonarius isolates, evaluate their growth profile through different growth measurements, and reveal any underlying correlation between them. Ten different isolates of A. carbonarius isolated from Greek vineyards located in different geographical regions were examined in vitro for their OTA production potential after an incubation period of up to 11 days. All fungal isolates grew on a synthetic grape juice medium (SGM) similar to grape composition at optimum conditions of temperature and water activity (25°C and 0.98 aw). Samples for OTA determination were removed at 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11 days of growth and analyzed by HPLC. Based on OTA measurements the isolates were characterized by diverse OTA production ranging from 50 to 2000 ppb at day 11. The different fungal growth responses (colony diameter, colony area, biomass, biomass dry weight, and colony density) have been measured and correlated with toxin production by means of principal components analysis (PCA), confirming satisfactory correlation and explained over 99% of data variability. Leudeking-Piret model was also used to study OTA production with time, revealing a mixed-growth associated trend and pointing a fail-safe model with slightly better prediction through colony area. This approach contributes to the assessment of correlation between mycotoxin production and different methods of fungal growth determination in relation to time. PMID:26074896

  15. Modeling and simulation of Streptomyces peucetius var. caesius N47 cultivation and epsilon-rhodomycinone production with kinetic equations and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kiviharju, Kristiina; Salonen, Kalle; Leisola, Matti; Eerikäinen, Tero

    2006-11-10

    This study focuses on comparing different kinetic growth models and the use of neural networks in the batch cultivation of Streptomyces peucetius var. caesius producing epsilon-rhodomycinone. Contois, Monod and Teissier microbial growth models were used as well as the logistic growth modeling approach, which was found best in the simulations of growth and glucose consumption in the batch growth phase. The lag phase was included in the kinetic model with a CO2 trigger and a delay factor. Substrate consumption and product formation were included as Luedeking-Piret and logistic type equations, respectively. Biomass formation was modeled successfully with a 6-8-2 network, and the network was capable of biomass prediction with an R2-value of 0.983. Epsilon-rhodomycinone production was successfully modeled with a recursive 8-3-1 network capable of epsilon-rhodomycinone prediction with an R2-value of 0.903. The predictive power of the neural networks was superior to the kinetic models, which could not be used in predictive modeling of arbitrary batch cultivations. PMID:16797766

  16. Microscopic Meteoritic Material Surrounding Meteorite Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. R.; Hodge, P.

    1993-07-01

    Meteoritic impact-related particles around meteorite craters can have several forms: (1) ablation spherules formed from the melt layer during atmospheric entry; (2) fragments of meteoritic metal formed by the shattering of the meteorite on impact; (3) fragments of metal oxide with meteoritic Fe/Ni ratios; (4) glassy spherules made up of a mixture of target rock and meteoritic material, formed by condensation of impact vapor; and (5) fragments of vesicular material formed from the impact melt. We are investigating the nature of the particles collected from soil surrounding the following craters: Odessa (Texas), Kaalijarvi (Estonia), Boxhole, Dalgaranga, Henbury, Snelling, Veevers, and Wolfe Creek (all Australia). No impact-related particles have been identified in the Veevers or Snelling samples. The Odessa samples include both meteoritic fragments (type 3) and Fe/Ni spherules (type 1). The Henbury samples include particles of type 4 [1] and type 2. The Boxhole samples include particles of types 1 and 4 [2]. The Kaalijarvi particles, being studied cooperatively with Reet Tiimaa of the Institute of Gelogy of the Estonian Academy of Sciences, include particles of type 3 and 5. The type 3 particles from Kaalijarvi are primarily kamacite, with small amounts of taenite. They have oxidized, Ni-free surface layers, probably formed by weathering. The vesicular particles are primarily made of glass that has a bulk composition that indicates that they are about half meteorite and half target rock material. The glass suggests partial recrystallization, with dendritic patterns of slightly different composition. Inclusions of quartz grains also occur and the outer layer in some cases is pure iron oxide. Many of the bubbles have their inner walls laced with patterns of iron condensate, often dendritic and in some cases in the form of stars. References: [1] Hodge P. W. and Wright F. W. (1971) JGR, 76, 3880-3895. [2] Hodge P. W. and Wright F. W. (1973) Meteoritics, 8, 315-320.

  17. Plasmonic Enhancement Mechanisms in Solar Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, Scott K.

    possible: i) increasing light absorption in the semiconductor by light trapping through scattering, ii) transferring hot carriers from metal to semiconductor after light absorption in the metal, and iii) non-radiative excitation of interband transitions in the semiconductor by plasmon-induced resonant energy transfer (PIRET). The effects of the metal on charge transport and carrier recombination were also revealed. Next, it has been shown that the strength and balance of the three enhancement mechanisms is rooted in the plasmon's dephasing time, or how long it takes the collective electron oscillations to stop being collective. The importance of coherent effects in plasmonic enhancement is also shown. Based on these findings, a thermodynamic balance framework has been used to predict the theoretical maximum efficiency of solar energy conversion in plasmonic metal-semiconductor heterojunctions. These calculations have revealed how plasmonics is best used to address the different light absorption problems in semiconductors, and that not taking into account the plasmon's dephasing is the origin of low plasmonic enhancement Finally, to prove these guidelines, each of the three enhancement mechanisms has been translated into optimal device geometries, showing the plasmon's potential for solar energy harvesting. This dissertation identifies the three possible plasmonic enhancement mechanisms for the first time, discovering a new enhancement mechanism (PIRET) in the process. It has also been shown for the first time that the various plasmon-semiconductor interactions could be rooted in the plasmon's dephasing. This has allowed for the first maximum efficiency estimates which have combined all three enhancement mechanisms to be performed, and revealed that changes in the plasmon's dephasing leads to the disparity in reported plasmonic enhancements. These findings are combined to create optimal device design guidelines, which are proven by fabrication of several devices with top

  18. Plasmonic Enhancement Mechanisms in Solar Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, Scott K.

    possible: i) increasing light absorption in the semiconductor by light trapping through scattering, ii) transferring hot carriers from metal to semiconductor after light absorption in the metal, and iii) non-radiative excitation of interband transitions in the semiconductor by plasmon-induced resonant energy transfer (PIRET). The effects of the metal on charge transport and carrier recombination were also revealed. Next, it has been shown that the strength and balance of the three enhancement mechanisms is rooted in the plasmon's dephasing time, or how long it takes the collective electron oscillations to stop being collective. The importance of coherent effects in plasmonic enhancement is also shown. Based on these findings, a thermodynamic balance framework has been used to predict the theoretical maximum efficiency of solar energy conversion in plasmonic metal-semiconductor heterojunctions. These calculations have revealed how plasmonics is best used to address the different light absorption problems in semiconductors, and that not taking into account the plasmon's dephasing is the origin of low plasmonic enhancement Finally, to prove these guidelines, each of the three enhancement mechanisms has been translated into optimal device geometries, showing the plasmon's potential for solar energy harvesting. This dissertation identifies the three possible plasmonic enhancement mechanisms for the first time, discovering a new enhancement mechanism (PIRET) in the process. It has also been shown for the first time that the various plasmon-semiconductor interactions could be rooted in the plasmon's dephasing. This has allowed for the first maximum efficiency estimates which have combined all three enhancement mechanisms to be performed, and revealed that changes in the plasmon's dephasing leads to the disparity in reported plasmonic enhancements. These findings are combined to create optimal device design guidelines, which are proven by fabrication of several devices with top

  19. Kinetic modeling, production and characterization of an acidic lipase produced by Enterococcus durans NCIM5427 from fish waste.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Vrinda; Goveas, Louella Concepta; Halami, Prakash M; Narayan, Bhaskar

    2015-03-01

    Enterococcus durans NCIM5427 (ED-27), capable of producing an intracellular acid stable lipase, was isolated from fish processing waste. Its growth and subsequent lipase production was optimized by Box Behneken design (optimized conditions: 5 % v/v fish waste oil (FWO), 0.10 mg/ml fish waste protein hydrolysates (FWPH) at 48 h of fermentation time). Under optimized conditions, ED-27 showed a 3.0 fold increase (207.6 U/ml to 612.53 U/ml) in lipase production, as compared to un-optimized conditions. Cell growth and lipase production was modeled using Logistic and Luedeking-Piret model, respectively; and lipase production by ED-27 was found to be growth-associated. Lipase produced by ED-27 showed stability at low pH ranges from 2 to 5 with its optimal activity at 30 °C , pH 4.6; showed metal ion dependent activity wherein its catalytic activity was activated by barium, sodium, lithium and potassium (10 mM); reduced by calcium and magnesium (10 mM). However, iron and mercury (5 mM) completely inactivated the enzyme. In addition, modifying agents like SDS, DTT, β-ME (1%v/v) increased activity of lipase of ED-27; while, PMSF, DEPC and ascorbic acid resulted in a marked decrease. ED-27 had maximum cell growth of 9.90309 log CFU/ml under optimized conditions as compared to 13 log CFU/ml in MRS. The lipase produced has potential application in poultry and slaughterhouse waste management. PMID:25745201

  20. A kinetic model for product formation of microbial and mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, A.P.

    1995-05-20

    Growth of microbial and mammalian cells can be classified into substrate-limited and substrate-sufficient growth according to the relative availability of the substrate (carbon and energy source) and other nutrients. It has been observed for a number of microbial and mammalian cells that the consumption rate of substrate and energy (ATP) is generally higher under substrate-sufficient conditions than under substrate limitation. Accordingly, the product formation under substrate excess often exhibits different patterns from those under substrate limitation. In this study, the Luedeking-Piret kinetic model is extended to include a term describing the effect of residual substrate concentration. The applicability of the extended model is demonstrated with three microbial cultures for the production of primary metabolites and three hybridoma cell cultures for the production of ammonia and lactic acid over a wide range of substrate concentration. Anaerobic fermentation of glycerol by Klebsiella pneumoniae is a multiproduct fermentation process. At a neutral pH value, acetic acid, ethanol, and 1,3-propanediol are the main fermentation products. Formation of acetic acid and/or ethanol is necessary for the generation by K. pneumoniae. The aerobic growth of bacillus strain TS1 on methanol has been studied in methanol-limited and methanol-sufficient hemostat cultures. Under methanol-limited conditions there is no extracellular product formed. However, under methanol-sufficient conditions, particularly with nitrogen limitation, metabolites such as acetic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid are excreted into the culture medium above a certain level of residual methanol concentration.

  1. Using simple models to describe the kinetics of growth, glucose consumption, and monoclonal antibody formation in naive and infliximab producer CHO cells.

    PubMed

    López-Meza, Julián; Araíz-Hernández, Diana; Carrillo-Cocom, Leydi Maribel; López-Pacheco, Felipe; Rocha-Pizaña, María Del Refugio; Alvarez, Mario Moisés

    2016-08-01

    Despite their practical and commercial relevance, there are few reports on the kinetics of growth and production of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells-the most frequently used host for the industrial production of therapeutic proteins. We characterize the kinetics of cell growth, substrate consumption, and product formation in naive and monoclonal antibody (mAb) producing recombinant CHO cells. Culture experiments were performed in 125 mL shake flasks on commercial culture medium (CD Opti CHO™ Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA, USA) diluted to different glucose concentrations (1.2-4.8 g/L). The time evolution of cell, glucose, lactic acid concentration and monoclonal antibody concentrations was monitored on a daily basis for mAb-producing cultures and their naive counterparts. The time series were differentiated to calculate the corresponding kinetic rates (rx = d[X]/dt; rs = d[S]/dt; rp = d[mAb]/dt). Results showed that these cell lines could be modeled by Monod-like kinetics if a threshold substrate concentration value of [S]t = 0.58 g/L (for recombinant cells) and [S]t = 0.96 g/L (for naïve cells), below which growth is not observed, was considered. A set of values for μmax, and Ks was determined for naive and recombinant cell cultures cultured at 33 and 37 °C. The yield coefficient (Yx/s) was observed to be a function of substrate concentration, with values in the range of 0.27-1.08 × 10(7) cell/mL and 0.72-2.79 × 10(6) cells/mL for naive and recombinant cultures, respectively. The kinetics of mAb production can be described by a Luedeking-Piret model (d[mAb]/dt = αd[X]/dt + β[X]) with values of α = 7.65 × 10(-7) µg/cell and β = 7.68 × 10(-8) µg/cell/h for cultures conducted in batch-agitated flasks and batch and instrumented bioreactors operated in batch and fed-batch mode. PMID:26091615