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Sample records for pkquest volatile solutes

  1. Volatile hydrocarbons in pharmaceutical solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kroneld, R. )

    1991-07-01

    Volatile pollutants such as hydrocarbons have, during many years, been analysed in small concentrations in air, water, food, pharmaceutical solutions, and human blood and tissues. It has also been shown that such substances have unexpected consequences for cell cultures and scientific experiments. These substances also accumulate in patients receiving haemodialysis and these patients are exposed to quite high concentrations. The knowledge of the toxicity of such compounds has led to the development of maximum limit concentrations with the aim to decrease the exposure of humans. This paper discusses the problems of human exposure in general and especially through pharmaceutical solutions, and the possibilities of eliminating such compounds with the aim of decreasing the exposure as a hygienic challenge.

  2. Turbulence effects on volatilization rates of liquids and solutes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.-F.; Chao, H.-P.; Chiou, C.T.; Manes, M.

    2004-01-01

    Volatilization rates of neat liquids (benzene, toluene, fluorobenzene, bromobenzene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, o-xylene, o-dichlorobenzene, and 1-methylnaphthalene) and of solutes (phenol, m-cresol, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene, and ethylene dibromide) from dilute water solutions have been measured in the laboratory over a wide range of air speeds and water-stirring rates. The overall transfer coefficients (KL) for individual solutes are independent of whether they are in single- or multi-solute solutions. The gas-film transfer coefficients (kG) for solutes in the two-film model, which have hitherto been estimated by extrapolation from reference coefficients, can now be determined directly from the volatilization rates of neatliquids through anew algorithm. The associated liquid-film transfer coefficients (KL) can then be obtained from measured KL and kG values and solute Henry law constants (H). This approach provides a novel means for checking the precision of any kL and kG estimation methods for ultimate prediction of KL. The improved kG estimation enables accurate K L predictions for low-volatility (i.e., low-H) solutes where K L and kGH are essentially equal. In addition, the prediction of KL values for high-volatility (i.e., high-H) solutes, where KL ??? kL, is also improved by using appropriate reference kL values.

  3. Solute transport by a volatile solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Glenn O.; McWhorter, David B.

    1990-05-01

    In relatively dry porous media, water is transported as both liquid and vapor. Exact knowledge of this two-phase transport, and the phase transfer of water associated with it, is required for the prediction of solute transport. Combined liquid and vapor transport is examined starting from basic principles. An analytic solution is presented for the case of isothermal, transient, one-dimensional sorption of water with constant liquid content boundaries. A relation is also obtained for the evaporation and condensation within the flow field. A numerical solution for the solute transport is obtained which takes maximum advantage of the analytical flow solution. Using the properties of Lurgi retorted oil shale, several special cases are examined which show the relative importance of the separate phases in the total transport of water, the effects on the phase transfer, and the solute transport. It is expected that these methods and results can be applied to other problems in multiple phase transport, such as hazardous waste disposal and pesticide transport.

  4. Turbulence effects on volatilization rates of liquids and solutes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiunn-Fwu; Chao, Huan-Ping; Chiou, Cary T; Manes, Milton

    2004-08-15

    Volatilization rates of neat liquids (benzene, toluene, fluorobenzene, bromobenzene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, o-xylene, o-dichlorobenzene, and 1-methylnaphthalene) and of solutes (phenol, m-cresol, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene, and ethylene dibromide) from dilute water solutions have been measured in the laboratory over a wide range of air speeds and water-stirring rates. The overall transfer coefficients (K(L)) for individual solutes are independent of whether they are in single- or multi-solute solutions. The gas-film transfer coefficients (kG) for solutes in the two-film model, which have hitherto been estimated by extrapolation from reference coefficients, can now be determined directly from the volatilization rates of neat liquids through a new algorithm. The associated liquid-film transfer coefficients (kL) can then be obtained from measured K(L) and kG values and solute Henry law constants (H). This approach provides a novel means for checking the precision of any kL and kG estimation methods for ultimate prediction of K(L). The improved kG estimation enables accurate K(L) predictions for low-volatility (i.e., low-H) solutes where K(L) and kGH are essentially equal. In addition, the prediction of K(L) values for high-volatility (i.e., high-H) solutes, where K(L) approximately equal to kL, is also improved by using appropriate reference kL values. PMID:15382860

  5. Numerical solution for option pricing with stochastic volatility model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Andi; Nugrahani, Endar H.; Lesmana, Donny C.

    2016-01-01

    The option pricing equations derived from stochatic volatility models in finance are often cast in the form of nonlinear partial differential equations. To solve the equations, we used the upwind finite difference scheme for the spatial discretisation and a fully implicit time-stepping scheme. The result of this scheme is a matrix system in the form of an M-Matrix and we proof that the approximate solution converges to the viscosity solution to the equation by showing that the scheme is monotone, consistent and stable. Numerical experiments are implemented to show that the behavior and the order of convergence of upwind finite difference method.

  6. Challenges and solutions for biofiltration of hydrophobic volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yan; He, Huijun; Yang, Chunping; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hong; Yu, Guanlong

    2016-11-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted to the environment highly probably result in ecological and health risks. Many biotechnologies for waste gases containing hydrophobic VOCs have been developed in recent years. However, these biological processes usually exhibit poor removal performances for hydrophobic VOCs due to the low bioavailability. This review presents an overview of enhanced removal of hydrophobic VOCs in biofilters. Mechanisms and problems relevant to the biological removal of hydrophobic VOCs are reviewed, and then solutions including the addition of surfactants, application of fungal biocatalysts, biofiltration with pretreatment, innovative bioreactors and utilization of hydrophilic compounds are discussed in detail. Future research needs are also proposed. This review provides new insights into hydrophobic VOC removal by biofiltration. PMID:27374790

  7. HENRY'S LAW CONSTANTS AND MICELLAR PARTITIONING OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SURFACTANT SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Partitioning of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into surfactant micelles affects the apparent vapor-liquid equilibrium of VOCs in surfactant solutions. This partitioning will complicate removal of VOCs from surfactant solutions by standard separation processes. Headspace expe...

  8. Method and apparatus for measuring volatile compounds in an aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Tyler J [Pasco, WA; Cantrell, Kirk J [West Richland, WA

    2002-07-16

    The present invention is an improvement to the method and apparatus for measuring volatile compounds in an aqueous solution. The apparatus is a chamber with sides and two ends, where the first end is closed. The chamber contains a solution volume of the aqueous solution and a gas that is trapped within the first end of the chamber above the solution volume. The gas defines a head space within the chamber above the solution volume. The chamber may also be a cup with the second end. open and facing down and submerged in the aqueous solution so that the gas defines the head space within the cup above the solution volume. The cup can also be entirely submerged in the aqueous solution. The second end of the. chamber may be closed such that the chamber can be used while resting on a flat surface such as a bench. The improvement is a sparger for mixing the gas with the solution volume. The sparger can be a rotating element such as a propeller on a shaft or a cavitating impeller. The sparger can also be a pump and nozzle where the pump is a liquid pump and the nozzle is a liquid spray nozzle open, to the head space for spraying the solution volume into the head space of gas. The pump could also be a gas pump and the nozzle a gas nozzle submerged in the solution volume for spraying the head space gas into the solution volume.

  9. Non-volatile resistive memory devices based on solution-processed ultrathin two-dimensional nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chaoliang; Liu, Zhengdong; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Hua

    2015-05-01

    Ultrathin two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, such as graphene and MoS2, hold great promise for electronics and optoelectronics due to their distinctive physical and electronic properties. Recent progress in high-yield, massive production of ultrathin 2D nanomaterials via various solution-based methods allows them to be easily integrated into electronic devices via solution processing techniques. Non-volatile resistive memory devices based on ultrathin 2D nanomaterials have been emerging as promising alternatives for the next-generation data storage devices due to their high flexibility, three-dimensional-stacking capability, simple structure, transparency, easy fabrication and low cost. In this tutorial review, we will summarize the recent progress in the utilization of solution-processed ultrathin 2D nanomaterials for fabrication of non-volatile resistive memory devices. Moreover, we demonstrate how to achieve excellent device performance by engineering the active layers, electrodes and/or device structure of resistive memory devices. On the basis of current status, the discussion is concluded with some personal insights into the challenges and opportunities in future research directions. PMID:25877687

  10. Different coatings for the HS-SBSE grape volatile analysis in model solution: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Serrano de la Hoz, Kortes; Salinas, Maria Rosario; Ferrandino, Alessandra

    2016-12-01

    Head space stir bar sorptive extraction (HS-SBSE) was used to evaluate the efficacy of two stir bar coatings, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-modified silicone (EG-Silicone) and polyacrylate (PA), in comparison with polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) coating, to assess volatiles in model wine solutions. In addition, two temperatures (0°C and 25°C) of the injection system (CIS) were compared. This was performed to propose an analytical procedure cheaper and faster respect to traditional extractive methods and environmental friendly, avoiding the use of large amounts of solvents and high-energy consumption for cooling. Fifteen grape volatiles with different polarities, known to have an important impact on varietal wine aroma, were tested. The affinity of each tested molecule to the new coatings was assessed. The PDMS coating showed higher relative areas for terpenes (β-citronellol, geraniol, linalool and α-terpineol) and norisoprenoids (β-ionone), especially when the CIS temperature was set at 25°C. C6 compounds such as 1-hexanol, (E)-2-hexenal, (E)-2-hexen-1-ol, (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, and benzaldehyde and eugenol, obtained greater area response using EG-Silicone and PA coatings, regardless the temperatures. The memory effect of each coating type was studied; EG Silicone and PA coatings showed a higher memory effect for a certain compounds, probably due to the lower desorption temperature that EG Silicone and PA coatings can be submitted to, respect to PDMS (220°C the former two, 295°C the latter). PMID:27374599

  11. SEPARATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY PERVAPORATION USING S-B-S BLOCK COPOLYMER MEMBRANES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Composite membranes of a block copolymer of styrene and butadiene (S-B-S) were cast on highly porous, hydrophobic thin films of PTFE, and used for the separation and recovery of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from aqueous solutions by pervaporation. Trichloroethane, trichloroe...

  12. SEPARATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY PERVAPORATION USING S-B-S BLOCK COPOLYMER MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Composite membranes of a block copolymer of styrene and butadiene (S-B-S) were cast on highly porous, hydrophobic thin films of PTFE and used for the separation and recovery of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from aqueous solutions by pervaporation. Trichloroethane, trichloroe...

  13. S1 34841: Simple Analytical Solutions to Pesticide Volatilization From Soil With A Change in Surface Condition.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An analytical solution describing the fate and transport of volatile pesticides applied to soils has been developed. Two application methods can be simulated: point-source applications such as idealized shank or a hot-gas injection method and a more realistic shank-source application method that in...

  14. Measurements of the volatilities of solutes from aqueous solutions and their application to water/steam cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, J.P.; Palmer, D.A.; Simonson, J.M.

    1995-02-01

    Partitioning of NaSO{sub 4} and NaHSO{sub 4} between the liquid and vapor phases was measured at 300, 325 and 350{degrees}C by sampling both phases from a static platinum-lined autoclave. Sample compositions were determined by ion chromatography and acidimetric titrations. The solutions were buffered with either acid or base so that the volatility of individual species was determined. The molal thermodynamic partitioning constants were calculated by taking into account the mean stoichiometric activity coefficient in the liquid phase and the hydrolysis equilibrium constants. The vapor phase species were assumed to be neutral molecules with unit activity coefficients. The strong temperature dependence of the partitioning constant was treated by the isocoulombic method to obtain a linear dependence of the logarithm of the partitioning constant versus reciprocal temperature in Kelvin. A model is described for predicting the composition of the condensate in the water/steam cycle of power plants using drum boilers. Equilibrium between liquid and steam is assumed in the drum during boiling, and in the low pressure turbine on steam condensation. The model is based on the measured partitioning constants of HCl, NH{sub 4}Cl, NaCl, NaOH, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, NaHSO{sub 4}, NaSO{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}, the hydrolysis of HSO{sub 4}{sup -} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} and the ionic product of water. Two test cases are given to demonstrate the sensitivity of the pH of the first condensate to the concentrations of various anions relative to the corresponding sodium concentration in the drum. These calculations also indicate that very high concentrations of solutes can be achieved under certain conditions.

  15. THEORETICAL DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS FOR TRANSPORT OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN DUAL-POROSITY SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicting the behavior of volatile organic compounds in soils or sediments is necessary for managing their use and designing appropriate remedial systems to eliminate potential threats to the environment, particularly the air and groundwater resources. In this effort, based on c...

  16. Separation of volatile organic compounds from aqueous solutions by pervaporation using S-B-S block copolymer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, B.K.; Sikdar, S.K.

    1999-05-15

    Composite membranes of a block copolymer of styrene and butadiene (S-B-S) were cast on highly porous, hydrophobic thin films of PTFE and used for the separation and recovery of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from aqueous solutions by pervaporation. Trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and toluene were the VOCs selected for testing the efficacy of these membranes. An analysis of the pervaporation data showed that the liquid film boundary layer offered the main mass transfer resistance to permeation. The separation factor for the VOCs was as high as 5000 at near-ambient temperatures but decreased substantially at higher temperatures. The water flux was practically independent of the solute concentration. But it increased more rapidly with an increase in temperature as compared to the organic flux, thereby reducing the separation factor. Also, the separation of a multicomponent mixture from the aqueous feed could be predicted well from single-component data.

  17. Dynamic Solution Injection: a new method for preparing pptv-ppbv standard atmospheres of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K. J.; Henderson, W. M.; Huxman, T. E.; Abrell, L.

    2010-11-01

    Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and thermal desorption Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) allow for absolute quantification of a wide range of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with concentrations in the ppbv to pptv range. Although often neglected, routine calibration is necessary for accurate quantification of VOCs by PTR-MS and GC-MS. Several gas calibration methods currently exist, including compressed gas cylinders, permeation tubes, diffusion tubes, and liquid injection. While each method has its advantages and limitations, no single technique has emerged that is capable of dynamically generating known concentrations of complex mixtures of VOCs over a large concentration range (ppbv to pptv) and is technically simple, field portable, and affordable. We present the development of a new VOC calibration technique based on liquid injection with these features termed Dynamic Solution Injection (DSI). This method consists of injecting VOCs (0.1-0.5 mM) dissolved in cyclohexane (PTR-MS) or methanol (GC-MS) into a 1.0 slpm flow of purified dilution gas in an unheated 25 ml glass vial. Upon changes in the injection flow rate (0.5-4.0 μl min-1), new VOC concentrations are reached within seconds to minutes, depending on the compound, with a liquid injection flow rate accuracy and precision of better than 7% and 4% respectively. We demonstrate the utility of the DSI technique by calibrating a PTR-MS to seven different cyclohexane solutions containing a total of 34 different biogenic compounds including volatile isoprenoids, oxygenated VOCs, fatty acid oxidation products, aromatics, and dimethyl sulfide. We conclude that because of its small size, low cost, and simplicity, the Dynamic Solution Injection method will be of great use to both laboratory and field VOC studies.

  18. SORPTION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC SOLVENTS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION ONTO SUBSURFACE SOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption isotherms for tetrachloroethene on low-carbon subsurface core samples were linear to equilibrium solution concentrations of 2 mg L−1. Concentrations above this value produced pronounced curvature in the sorption isotherms. Sorption of tetrachloroethene, benzene, trichlor...

  19. Analytical Solution Describing Pesticide Volatilization from Soil Affected by a Change in Surface Condition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An analytical solution describing the fate and transport of pesticides applied to soils has been developed. Two pesticide application methods can be simulated: point-source applications such as a hot-gas injection method and a shank-source application method that includes a vertical pesticide distr...

  20. Dynamic Solution Injection: a new method for preparing pptv-ppbv standard atmospheres of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K. J.; Henderson, W. M.; Huxman, T. E.; Abrell, L.; Shartsis, T.

    2010-07-01

    Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and thermal desorption Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) allow for absolute quantification of a wide range of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with concentrations in the ppbv to pptv range. Although often neglected, routine calibration is necessary for accurate quantification of VOCs by PTR-MS and GC-MS. Several gas calibration methods currently exist, including compressed gas cylinders, permeation tubes, diffusion tubes, and liquid injection. While each method has its advantages and limitations, no single technique has emerged that is capable of dynamically generating accurate concentrations of complex mixtures of VOCs over a large concentration range (ppbv to pptv), is technically simple and field portable, and affordable. We present the development of a new VOC calibration technique based on liquid injection with these features termed Dynamic Solution Injection (DSI). This method consists of injecting VOCs (0.1-0.5 mM) dissolved in cyclohexane (PTR-MS) or methanol (GC-MS) into a 1.0 slpm flow of purified dilution gas in an unheated 25 mL glass vial. Upon changes in the injection flow rate (0.5-4.0 μL min-1), new VOC concentrations are reached within seconds to minutes, depending on the compound, with a liquid injection flow rate accuracy and precision of better than 7% and 4%, respectively. We demonstrate the utility of the DSI technique by calibrating a PTR-MS to seven different cyclohexane solutions containing a total of 34 different biogenic compounds including volatile isoprenoids, oxygenated VOCs, fatty acid oxidation products, aromatics, and dimethyl sulfide. In order to validate the new DSI method, a GC-MS and PTR-MS calibration intercomparison with VOC standards generated by dynamic dilution of NIST traceable permeation tubes (α-pinene, acetone, and ethanol) and a compressed gas cylinder (acetaldehyde) was made. The results revealed that while calibration of acetone is

  1. Dissolved plume attenuation with DNAPL source remediation, aqueous decay and volatilization — Analytical solution, model calibration and prediction uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jack C.; Park, Eungyu; Tang, Guoping

    2008-11-01

    A vertically-integrated analytical model for dissolved phase transport is described that considers a time-dependent DNAPL source based on the upscaled dissolution kinetics model of Parker and Park with extensions to consider time-dependent source zone biodecay, partial source mass reduction, and remediation-enhanced source dissolution kinetics. The model also considers spatial variability in aqueous plume decay, which is treated as the sum of aqueous biodecay and volatilization due to diffusive transport and barometric pumping through the unsaturated zone. The model is implemented in Excel/VBA coupled with (1) an inverse solution that utilizes prior information on model parameters and their uncertainty to condition the solution, and (2) an error analysis module that computes parameter covariances and total prediction uncertainty due to regression error and parameter uncertainty. A hypothetical case study is presented to evaluate the feasibility of calibrating the model from limited noisy field data. The results indicate that prediction uncertainty increases significantly over time following calibration, primarily due to propagation of parameter uncertainty. However, differences between the predicted performance of source zone partial mass reduction and the known true performance were reasonably small. Furthermore, a clear difference is observed between the predicted performance for the remedial action scenario versus that for a no-action scenario, which is consistent with the true system behavior. The results suggest that the model formulation can be effectively utilized to assess monitored natural attenuation and source remediation options if careful attention is given to model calibration and prediction uncertainty issues.

  2. Dissolved plume attenuation with DNAPL source remediation, aqueous decay and volatilization--analytical solution, model calibration and prediction uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jack C; Park, Eungyu; Tang, Guoping

    2008-11-14

    A vertically-integrated analytical model for dissolved phase transport is described that considers a time-dependent DNAPL source based on the upscaled dissolution kinetics model of Parker and Park with extensions to consider time-dependent source zone biodecay, partial source mass reduction, and remediation-enhanced source dissolution kinetics. The model also considers spatial variability in aqueous plume decay, which is treated as the sum of aqueous biodecay and volatilization due to diffusive transport and barometric pumping through the unsaturated zone. The model is implemented in Excel/VBA coupled with (1) an inverse solution that utilizes prior information on model parameters and their uncertainty to condition the solution, and (2) an error analysis module that computes parameter covariances and total prediction uncertainty due to regression error and parameter uncertainty. A hypothetical case study is presented to evaluate the feasibility of calibrating the model from limited noisy field data. The results indicate that prediction uncertainty increases significantly over time following calibration, primarily due to propagation of parameter uncertainty. However, differences between the predicted performance of source zone partial mass reduction and the known true performance were reasonably small. Furthermore, a clear difference is observed between the predicted performance for the remedial action scenario versus that for a no-action scenario, which is consistent with the true system behavior. The results suggest that the model formulation can be effectively utilized to assess monitored natural attenuation and source remediation options if careful attention is given to model calibration and prediction uncertainty issues. PMID:18502537

  3. The Effect of Bamboo Leaf Extract Solution and Sodium Copper Chlorophyllin Solution on Growth and Volatile Sulfur Compounds Production of Oral Malodor Associated Some Anaerobic Periodontal Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Majbauddin, Abir; Kodani, Isamu; Ryoke, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Background Bamboo leaf extract solution (BLES) and sodium copper chlorophyllin solution (SCCS) are known for their anti-oxidant activities. Oral malodor is often related with periodontal pathogens. The present study was undertaken to investigate the anti-bacterial effect of both BLES and SCCS on anaerobic periodontal bacteria producing oral malodorous volatile sulfur compounds (VSC). Methods Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 (PG), Prevotella intermidai TDC19B (PI), Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC25586 (FN) and Prevotella nigrescence ATCC33563 (PN) were investigated as oral isolated bacteria. VSC production ability of the oral strains was investigated by gas chromatography. With serial dilution of BLES or SCCS, the strains PG, PI, FN or PN were cultured anaerobically with AnaeroPack at 37 ℃ for 3 days. For the determination of anti-bacterial action of BLES or SCCS, the inoculum was cultured with original concentrations of BLES 0.16% (w/v) or SCCS 0.25% (w/v). Results Gas chromatography exhibited that all strains, PG, PI, FN and PN were responsible for producing a high range of H2S and a moderate range of CH3SH. Anti-bacterial effect of BLES or SCCS on the strains was observed. Inhibition of BLES or SCCS on the strains was revealed as concentration dependent. BLES or SCCS inhibited bacterial proliferation at higher concentrations (PG; 0.04% BLES or 0.03% SCCS, PI; 0.002% BLES or 0.03% SCCS, FN; 0.005% BLES or 0.01% SCCS, PN; 0.01% BLES or 0.015% SCCS). No viable bacterial colony observed at original concentration of BLES 0.16% or SCCS 0.25%. Strain growth was eliminated from inhibition at lower concentrations (PG; 0.02% BLES or 0.015% SCCS, PI; 0.001% BLES or 0.015% SCCS, FN; 0.002% BLES or 0.007% SCCS, PN; 0.005% BLES or 0.007% SCCS). Conclusion High concentrations of both BLES (0.16%) and SCCS (0.25%) show superior inhibiting capability on all four oral malodor associated periodontal anaerobes during testing, suggesting that these compounds might have a beneficial effect

  4. Volatile Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Daryl D.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (volatiles) comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles constitute only a small proportion of the total number of metabolites produced by living organisms, however, because of their roles as signaling molecules (semiochemicals) both within and between organisms, accurately measuring and determining the roles of these compounds is crucial to an integrated understanding of living systems. This review summarizes recent developments in volatile research from a metabolomics perspective with a focus on the role of recent technical innovation in developing new areas of volatile research and expanding the range of ecological interactions which may be mediated by volatile organic metabolites. PMID:24957243

  5. Study of β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes with volatile molecules geraniol and α-terpineol enantiomers in solid state and in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceborska, Magdalena; Szwed, Kamila; Asztemborska, Monika; Wszelaka-Rylik, Małgorzata; Kicińska, Ewa; Suwińska, Kinga

    2015-11-01

    Geraniol and α-terpineol are insoluble in water volatile compounds. α-Terpineol is a potentially important agent for medical applications. Formation of molecular complexes with β-cyclodextrin would lead to the increase of water solubility and bioavailability. β-Cyclodextrin forms 2:2 inclusion complexes with both enantiomers of α-terpineol and their precursor geraniol. Solid state complexes are thoroughly characterized by single X-ray crystallography and their stability over vast range of temperatures is proven by TG analysis. Intermolecular host-guest, host-host and guest-guest interactions give good insight into the nature of formed inclusion complexes. Stability constants of the complexes in solution are determined by HPLC.

  6. Influence of the matrix composition on the volatility and sensory perception of 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol in model wine solutions.

    PubMed

    Petrozziello, Maurizio; Asproudi, Andriani; Guaita, Massimo; Borsa, Daniela; Motta, Silvia; Panero, Loretta; Bosso, Antonella

    2014-04-15

    This study was aimed at investigating the influence of ethanol, wine polyphenols and yeast extract on the volatility of 4-ethylphenols in red wines. The use of solid-phase microextraction with short extraction times for the study of the headspace composition, revealed a strong influence of ethanol and polyphenols on reducing the volatility of 4-ethylphenols in a model wine. At the same time, the influence of ethanol and polyphenols on the perception of the "Brett character" (stable, manure, horse sweat and phenolic notes) due to 4-ethylphenols was evaluated by sensory analysis. Polyphenols and ethanol were found to have a significant influence on the olfactory perception of the tainted wines. On the contrary, a direct influence of yeast extract on the volatility of 4-ethylphenols was not observed, although some results suggested that the effectiveness of polyphenols in reducing the volatility of 4-ethylphenols could be limited by the presence of yeast proteins. PMID:24295695

  7. Volatile chemical reagent detector

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Liaohai; McBranch, Duncan; Wang, Rong; Whitten, David

    2004-08-24

    A device for detecting volatile chemical reagents based on fluorescence quenching analysis that is capable of detecting neutral electron acceptor molecules. The device includes a fluorescent material, a contact region, a light source, and an optical detector. The fluorescent material includes at least one polymer-surfactant complex. The polymer-surfactant complex is formed by combining a fluorescent ionic conjugated polymer with an oppositely charged surfactant. The polymer-surfactant complex may be formed in a polar solvent and included in the fluorescent material as a solution. Alternatively, the complex may be included in the fluorescent material as a thin film. The use of a polymer-surfactant complex in the fluorescent material allows the device to detect both neutral and ionic acceptor molecules. The use of a polymer-surfactant complex film allows the device and the fluorescent material to be reusable after exposing the fluorescent material to a vacuum for limited time.

  8. Conference on Planetary Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrametz, K.; Kofler, L.

    1982-01-01

    Initial and present volatile inventories and distributions in the Earth, other planets, meteorites, and comets; observational evidence on the time history of volatile transfer among reservoirs; and volatiles in planetary bodies, their mechanisms of transport, and their relation to thermal, chemical, geological and biological evolution were addressed.

  9. Conference on Planetary Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, R. O. (Compiler); Oconnell, R. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Initial and present volatile inventories and distributions in the Earth, other planets, meteorites, and comets; observational evidence on the time history of volatile transfer among reservoirs; and volatiles in planetary bodies, their mechanisms of transport, and their relation to thermal, chemical, geological and biological evolution are addressed.

  10. Comment on "Steady State Solutions to PBPK Models and their Applications to Risk Assessment I: Route to Route Extrapolation of Volatile Chemicals," by Chiu and White in Risk Analysis, 26(3), 769-780

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, K T

    2006-07-20

    Steady-state analyses of generic PBPK models for volatile organic chemical (VOC) exposure and risk assessment have been undertaken and applied for nearly two decades now. Chiu and White's paper on this subject adds little new to this earlier work. Their dismissive claim that ''Similar analyses have been done for specific chemicals and for inhalation'' is misleading, because some of this earlier work did indeed focus on ''generic'' PBPK models generally applicable to VOC exposure by multiple routes. In particular, the earliest of these previous studies developed steady-state solutions for generic PBPK models including respiratory and 1-compartment oral routes of exposure, and further specified how to add injection and dermal exposure routes. Chiu and White included a 2-compartment oral pathway and a lung compartment in an otherwise identical generic PBPK model, but did not consider other exposure pathways such as dermal uptake. Each of the earlier studies first presented a steady-state solution to a generic, multiroute PBPK model, and only then applied the generic solution to a problem or illustration involving a specific compound--i.e., the same approach used later by Chiu and White. For example, the earlier study included a simple, intuitive expression for low-dose metabolized fraction f*{sub m} of any applied multiroute dose, allowing route-to-route extrapolation regardless of compound in low-dose contexts that typically are of interest in environmental VOC risk assessment. Section 2.2 of Chiu and White's paper (''Generalization to Time-Varying Exposures'') concludes that, under conditions of virtually linear metabolism, PBPK system ''solutions to steady-state exposures are directly applicable to intermittent exposures''--i.e., under such conditions, all steady-state system solutions (or output states) become valid when each dynamic input is replaced by its corresponding time-weighted average value. This conclusion, a well known axiom of linear systems theory

  11. Food price volatility

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, C. L.; Morgan, C. W.

    2010-01-01

    The high food prices experienced over recent years have led to the widespread view that food price volatility has increased. However, volatility has generally been lower over the two most recent decades than previously. Variability over the most recent period has been high but, with the important exception of rice, not out of line with historical experience. There is weak evidence that grains price volatility more generally may be increasing but it is too early to say. PMID:20713400

  12. Long-memory volatility in derivative hedging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Abby

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this work is to take into account the effects of long memory in volatility on derivative hedging. This idea is an extension of the work by Fedotov and Tan [Stochastic long memory process in option pricing, Int. J. Theor. Appl. Finance 8 (2005) 381-392] where they incorporate long-memory stochastic volatility in option pricing and derive pricing bands for option values. The starting point is the stochastic Black-Scholes hedging strategy which involves volatility with a long-range dependence. The stochastic hedging strategy is the sum of its deterministic term that is classical Black-Scholes hedging strategy with a constant volatility and a random deviation term which describes the risk arising from the random volatility. Using the fact that stock price and volatility fluctuate on different time scales, we derive an asymptotic equation for this deviation in terms of the Green's function and the fractional Brownian motion. The solution to this equation allows us to find hedging confidence intervals.

  13. Volatile halocarbons in water

    SciTech Connect

    Kroneld, R.

    1986-11-01

    Volatile halocarbons in drinking water have attracted increasing attention during recent years. These substances are also found in body fluids. All disinfectant chemicals used in water treatment seem to produce by-products. Of particular concern are the following substances from the use of various disinfectants according to US EPA: chlorine, bromine and iodine, and chlorine dioxide. The aim of the present study was to follow the formation and occurrence of volatile halocarbons in different types of water.

  14. Fate of Volatile Organic Compounds in Constructed Wastewater Treatment Wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keefe, S.H.; Barber, L.B.; Runkel, R.L.; Ryan, J.N.

    2004-01-01

    The fate of volatile organic compounds was evaluated in a wastewater-dependent constructed wetland near Phoenix, AZ, using field measurements and solute transport modeling. Numerically based volatilization rates were determined using inverse modeling techniques and hydraulic parameters established by sodium bromide tracer experiments. Theoretical volatilization rates were calculated from the two-film method incorporating physicochemical properties and environmental conditions. Additional analyses were conducted using graphically determined volatilization rates based on field measurements. Transport (with first-order removal) simulations were performed using a range of volatilization rates and were evaluated with respect to field concentrations. The inverse and two-film reactive transport simulations demonstrated excellent agreement with measured concentrations for 1,4-dichlorobenzene, tetrachloroethene, dichloromethane, and trichloromethane and fair agreement for dibromochloromethane, bromo-dichloromethane, and toluene. Wetland removal efficiencies from inlet to outlet ranged from 63% to 87% for target compounds.

  15. Prediction of stream volatilization coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    Equations are developed for predicting the liquid-film and gas-film reference-substance parameters for quantifying volatilization of organic solutes from streams. Molecular weight and molecular-diffusion coefficients of the solute are used as correlating parameters. Equations for predicting molecular-diffusion coefficients of organic solutes in water and air are developed, with molecular weight and molal volume as parameters. Mean absolute errors of prediction for diffusion coefficients in water are 9.97% for the molecular-weight equation, 6.45% for the molal-volume equation. The mean absolute error for the diffusion coefficient in air is 5.79% for the molal-volume equation. Molecular weight is not a satisfactory correlating parameter for diffusion in air because two equations are necessary to describe the values in the data set. The best predictive equation for the liquid-film reference-substance parameter has a mean absolute error of 5.74%, with molal volume as the correlating parameter. The best equation for the gas-film parameter has a mean absolute error of 7.80%, with molecular weight as the correlating parameter.

  16. Volatilization of EPTC: Simulation and measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.M.; Koskinen, W.C.; Dowdy, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    Many of the organic chemicals used in agricultural production are susceptible to loss from the soil surface to the atmosphere by volatilization. Adequate prediction of the impact of these chemicals on the environment thus requires consideration of both downward movement through the soil to groundwater and upward movement in the gas phase to the atmosphere. We developed a method to mechanistically simulate volatilization within the framework of a conventionally formulated solute transport model and used it to simulate the gas-phase losses of EPTC, a commonly used volatile herbicide. The model considers efflux of a trace gas at the sod surface to be a process of unsteady diffusion, interrupted intermittently by dispersive events that can be thought of as eddies at the innermost scale. Model results were compared to measurements of volatilization during the first 7 d following application of EPTC, conducted with a Bowen ratio system in a 17-ha field at Rosemount, MN. The measurements indicated a relatively large initial flux (ca. 150 g ha{sup -1} h{sup -1}) that rapidly decreased to negligible levels within a day following application. The model agreed reasonably well on the first day, if a measured value for Henry`s constant was used rather than a value estimated from the saturation vapor pressure and the solubility. However, on subsequent days the model considerably overestimated volatilization, regardless of the Henry`s constant that was used. It is likely that hysteresis in sorption/desorption, particularly as surface soil dries following herbicide incorporation, may be the primary reason why volatile losses are lower than might be predicted on the basis of equilibrium partitioning theory. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Best linear forecast of volatility in financial time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivoruchenko, M. I.

    2004-09-01

    The autocorrelation function of volatility in financial time series is fitted well by a superposition of several exponents. This case admits an explicit analytical solution of the problem of constructing the best linear forecast of a stationary stochastic process. We describe and apply the proposed analytical method for forecasting volatility. The leverage effect and volatility clustering are taken into account. Parameters of the predictor function are determined numerically for the Dow Jones 30 Industrial Average. Connection of the proposed method to the popular autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity models is discussed.

  18. Option volatility and the acceleration Lagrangian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Cao, Yang

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops a volatility formula for option on an asset from an acceleration Lagrangian model and the formula is calibrated with market data. The Black-Scholes model is a simpler case that has a velocity dependent Lagrangian. The acceleration Lagrangian is defined, and the classical solution of the system in Euclidean time is solved by choosing proper boundary conditions. The conditional probability distribution of final position given the initial position is obtained from the transition amplitude. The volatility is the standard deviation of the conditional probability distribution. Using the conditional probability and the path integral method, the martingale condition is applied, and one of the parameters in the Lagrangian is fixed. The call option price is obtained using the conditional probability and the path integral method.

  19. Volatilization of Mercury By Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Magos, L.; Tuffery, A. A.; Clarkson, T. W.

    1964-01-01

    Volatilization of mercury has been observed from various biological media (tissue homogenates, infusion broth, plasma, urine) containing mercuric chloride. That micro-organisms were responsible was indicated by the finding that the rates of volatilization were highly variable, that a latent period often preceded volatilization, that toluene inhibited the process, and that the capacity to volatilize mercury could be transferred from one biological medium to another. Two species of bacteria when isolated and cultured from these homogenates were able to volatilize mercury. Two other bacteria, one of which was isolated from the local water supply, were also highly active. The volatile mercury was identified as mercury vapour. The importance of these findings in relation to the storage of urine samples prior to mercury analysis is discussed. PMID:14249899

  20. Immune Modulation by Volatile Anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Stollings, Lindsay M; Jia, Li-Jie; Tang, Pei; Dou, Huanyu; Lu, Binfeng; Xu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Volatile general anesthetics continue to be an important part of clinical anesthesia worldwide. The impact of volatile anesthetics on the immune system has been investigated at both mechanistic and clinical levels, but previous studies have returned conflicting findings due to varied protocols, experimental environments, and subject species. While many of these studies have focused on the immunosuppressive effects of volatile anesthetics, compelling evidence also exists for immunoactivation. Depending on the clinical conditions, immunosuppression and activation due to volatile anesthetics can be either detrimental or beneficial. This review provides a balanced perspective on the anesthetic modulation of innate and adaptive immune responses as well as indirect effectors of immunity. Potential mechanisms of immunomodulation by volatile anesthetics are also discussed. A clearer understanding of these issues will pave the way for clinical guidelines that better account for the impact of volatile anesthetics on the immune system, with the ultimate goal of improving perioperative management. PMID:27286478

  1. Classification of Volatile Engine Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Mengdawn

    2013-01-01

    Volatile particles cannot be detected at the engine exhaust by an aerosol detector. They are formed when the exhaust is mixed with ambient air downstream. Lack of a precise definition of volatile engine particles has been an impediment to engine manufacturers and regulatory agencies involved in the development of an effective control strategy. It is beyond doubt that volatile particles from combustion sources contribute to the atmospheric particulate burden, and the effect of that contribution is a critical issue in the ongoing research in the areas of air quality and climate change. A new instrument, called volatile particle separator (VPS), has been developed. It utilizes a proprietary microporous metallic membrane to separate particles from vapors. VPS data were used in the development of a two-parameter function to quantitatively classify, for the first time, the volatilization behavior of engine particles. The value of parameter A describes the volatilization potential of an aerosol. A nonvolatile particle has a larger A-value than a volatile one. The value of parameter k, an effective evaporation energy barrier, is found to be much smaller for small engine particles than that for large engine particles. The VPS instrument provides a means beyond just being a volatile particle remover; it enables a numerical definition to characterize volatile engine particles.

  2. Infinite dilution partial molar properties of aqueous solutions of nonelectrolytes. I. Equations for partial molar volumes at infinite dilution and standard thermodynamic functions of hydration of volatile nonelectrolytes over wide ranges of conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyasunov, Andrey V.; O'Connell, John P.; Wood, Robert H.

    2000-02-01

    A semitheoretical expression for partial molar volumes at infinite dilution of aqueous nonelectrolyte solutes has been developed employing the collection of properties from fluctuation solution theory for use over wide ranges of temperature and pressure. The form of the solution expression was suggested by a comparison of solute/solvent and solvent/solvent direct correlation function integrals (DCFI). The selection of solvent density and compressibility as model variables provides a correct description in the critical region while second virial coefficients have been used to give a rigorous expression in the low density region. The formulation has been integrated to obtain analytic expressions for thermodynamic properties of hydration at supercritical temperatures. The equation is limited to solutes for which B12 (the second cross virial coefficient between water and a solute molecule) is known or can be estimated. Regression of the three remaining parameters gives good correlations of the available experimental data. A strategy for estimating these parameters allows prediction from readily available data.

  3. Aroma volatiles in tangerine hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile compounds are well known to contribute to food flavor. In a breeding program, the knowledge of the identity and quantity of volatile compounds may help selecting fruit with desirable eating quality. Many studies report which compounds are responsible for orange juice flavor and aroma, but...

  4. Fabrication of polyaniline-coated halloysite nanotubes by in situ chemical polymerization as a solid-phase microextraction coating for the analysis of volatile organic compounds in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemi, Mir Mahdi; Arsalani, Naser; Yousefi, Vahid; Arsalani, Mahmood; Piryaei, Marzieh

    2016-03-01

    We have synthesized an organic-inorganic polyaniline-halloysite nanotube composite by an in situ polymerization method. This nanocomposite is immobilized on a stainless-steel wire and can be used as a fiber coating for solid-phase microextraction. It was found that our new solid-phase microextraction fiber is an excellent adsorbent for the extraction of some volatile organic compounds in aqueous samples in combination with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The coating can be prepared easily, is mechanically stable, and exhibits relatively high thermal stability. It is capable of extracting phenolic compounds from water samples. Following thermal desorption, the phenols were quantified by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. The effects of extraction temperature, extraction time, sample ionic strength, stirring rate, pH, desorption temperature and desorption time were studied. Under optimal conditions, the repeatability for one fiber (n = 5), expressed as the relative standard deviation, is between 6.2 and 9.1%. The detection limits range from 0.005 to 4 ng/mL. The method offers the advantage of being simple to use, with a shorter analysis time, lower cost of equipment and higher thermal stability of the fiber in comparison to conventional methods of analysis. PMID:26778724

  5. VOLATILIZATION OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS FROM WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The volatilization of organic environmental contaminants from water bodies to the atmosphere was investigated. The general aim was to elucidate the factors that control the volatilization process and develop predictive methods for calculating volatilization rates for various comp...

  6. Method for calcining nuclear waste solutions containing zirconium and halides

    DOEpatents

    Newby, Billie J.

    1979-01-01

    A reduction in the quantity of gelatinous solids which are formed in aqueous zirconium-fluoride nuclear reprocessing waste solutions by calcium nitrate added to suppress halide volatility during calcination of the solution while further suppressing chloride volatility is achieved by increasing the aluminum to fluoride mole ratio in the waste solution prior to adding the calcium nitrate.

  7. STEADY-STATE SOLUTIONS TO PBPK MODELS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS TO RISK ASSESSMENT I: ROUTE-TO-ROUTE EXTRAPOLATION OF VOLATILE CHEMICALS - AUTHORS' RESPONSE TO LETTER BY DR. KENNETH BOGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dear Editor: We are disappointed that Dr. Bogen felt our paper(1) “adds little new” to previously published work utilizing steady state solutions to PBPK models. Moreover, it was not our intention to be either “dismissive” or “misleading” in our admittedly brief citation of the...

  8. Apparatus automatically measures soluble residue content of volatile solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswalt, F. W.

    1969-01-01

    Solvent Purity Meter /SPM/ automatically measures the soluble residue in volatile solvents used in cleaning or extraction of oils, greases, and other nonvolatile materials. The SPM gives instantaneous and continuous readout of soluble contaminant residues in concentrations as low as one part per million of solution.

  9. Volatile phytochemicals as mosquito semiochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Nyasembe, Vincent O.; Torto, Baldwyn

    2014-01-01

    Plant biochemical processes result in the release of an array of volatile chemical substances into the environment, some of which are known to play important plant fitness enhancing functions, such as attracting pollinators, thermal tolerance of photosynthesis, and defense against herbivores. Cunningly, phytophagous insects have evolved mechanisms to utilize these volatiles to their own advantage, either to colonize a suitable host for feeding, reproduction and oviposition or avoid an unsuitable one. The volatile compounds involved in plant–insect chemical interactions have been widely exploited in the management of agricultural pests. On the other hand, use of plant volatiles in the management of medically important insects is limited, mainly due to paucity of information on their role in disease vector–plant interactions. To date, a total of 29 plant volatile compounds from various chemical classes, including phenols, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones and terpenes, have been identified as mosquito semiochemicals. In this review, we present highlights of mosquito–plant interactions, the available evidence of nectar feeding, with particular emphasis on sources of plant attractants, methods of plant volatile collection and the candidate plant volatile compounds that attract mosquitoes to nectar sources. We also highlight the potential application of these phytochemical attractants in integrated mosquito management. PMID:25383131

  10. Volatiles on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.

    1988-01-01

    The long-term evolution of both the atmosphere and the surface of Mars can be understood by examining the history of volatiles in the Mars atmosphere, their non-atmospheric reservoirs, and the processes of exchange between the two. Clearly, the present state of both the surface and the atmosphere can only be seen, so that any inferences about the evolution of the climate system are just that, inferences. The processes which control the atmosphere and surface on a seasonal basis, however, are the same processes which can act on longer timescales; only the specific solar and atmospheric forcing will differ. Once the ability of each process to affect the seasonal behavior is understood, the long-timescale forcing may be applied to the various processes in order to clearly identify the ability of the processes to act over the entire history of Mars. The areas of surface-atmospheric interaction of Mars are addressed in the ongoing research. The climate system on Mars is controlled by processes involving the exchange between the surface and atmosphere, so it is important to understand the current behavior of those processes. This is especially so in light of the current interest in understanding Mars; the upcoming Mars Observer mission, and the potential for a future sample-return or human-exploration mission will focus emphasis on this area of Mars science.

  11. Volatile hexafluoroacetylacetonate complexes of einsteinium

    SciTech Connect

    Fedoseev, E.V.; Aizenberg, M.I.; Travnikov, S.S.; Davydov, A.V.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1988-07-01

    Volatile hexafluoroacetylacetonate complexes of einsteinium have been synthesized. Their sublimation and thermochromatographic behavior in the presence of free ..beta..-diketone were studied. The reaction of einsteinium di- and tri-chlorides with hexafluoroacetylacetone vapor is discussed.

  12. Evolution of Triton's volatile budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1993-01-01

    Triton's volatile budget provides important links to planetary formation processes in the cold outer solar nebula. However, the budget has been modified by processes subsequent to the accretion of this body. It is of interest to assess whether certain formation environments can be ruled out for Triton on the basis of its current volatile abundances, and also to quantify some of the post-accretional processes by which the abundances have been modified.

  13. Fruit volatile analysis using an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Simona; Lloyd, Nathan W; Ebeler, Susan E; Zakharov, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Numerous and diverse physiological changes occur during fruit ripening, including the development of a specific volatile blend that characterizes fruit aroma. Maturity at harvest is one of the key factors influencing the flavor quality of fruits and vegetables. The validation of robust methods that rapidly assess fruit maturity and aroma quality would allow improved management of advanced breeding programs, production practices and postharvest handling. Over the last three decades, much research has been conducted to develop so-called electronic noses, which are devices able to rapidly detect odors and flavors. Currently there are several commercially available electronic noses able to perform volatile analysis, based on different technologies. The electronic nose used in our work (zNose, EST, Newbury Park, CA, USA), consists of ultra-fast gas chromatography coupled with a surface acoustic wave sensor (UFGC-SAW). This technology has already been tested for its ability to monitor quality of various commodities, including detection of deterioration in apple; ripeness and rot evaluation in mango; aroma profiling of thymus species; C(6) volatile compounds in grape berries; characterization of vegetable oil and detection of adulterants in virgin coconut oil. This system can perform the three major steps of aroma analysis: headspace sampling, separation of volatile compounds, and detection. In about one minute, the output, a chromatogram, is produced and, after a purging cycle, the instrument is ready for further analysis. The results obtained with the zNose can be compared to those of other gas-chromatographic systems by calculation of Kovats Indices (KI). Once the instrument has been tuned with an alkane standard solution, the retention times are automatically converted into KIs. However, slight changes in temperature and flow rate are expected to occur over time, causing retention times to drift. Also, depending on the polarity of the column stationary phase, the

  14. Volatile Emission of Mechanically Damaged Almonds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mature almonds from the Monterey variety were evaluated for their volatile composition after mechanical damage and compared to the volatile composition of the corresponding undamaged almonds. Volatiles were collected on Tenax, desorbed with diethyl ether, and identified via GC-MS analyses. Volatile ...

  15. Recent Advances in Volatiles of Teas.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xin-Qiang; Li, Qing-Sheng; Xiang, Li-Ping; Liang, Yue-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Volatile compounds are important components of tea aroma, a key attribute of sensory quality. The present review examines the formation of aromatic volatiles of various kinds of teas and factors influencing the formation of tea volatiles, including tea cultivar, growing environment and agronomic practices, processing method and storage of tea. The determination of tea volatiles and the relationship of active-aroma volatiles with the sensory qualities of tea are also discussed in the present paper. PMID:26978340

  16. Nitric acid recovery from waste solutions

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, A. S.

    1959-04-14

    The recovery of nitric acid from aqueous nitrate solutions containing fission products as impurities is described. It is desirable to subject such solutions to concentration by evaporation since nitric acid is regenerated thereby. A difficulty, however, is that the highly radioactive fission product ruthenium is volatilized together with the nitric acid. It has been found that by adding nitrous acid, ruthenium volatilization is suppressed and reduced to a negligible degree so that the distillate obtained is practically free of ruthenium.

  17. Identification of a volatile phytotoxin from algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garavelli, J. S.; Fong, F.; Funkhouser, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives were to develop a trap system for isolating fractions of volatile algal phytotoxin and to characterize the major components of the isolated phytotoxin fractions. A bioassay using Phaseolus vulgaris seedlings was developed to aid in investigating the properties of the phytotoxin produced by cultures of Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris and Chlorella vulgaris. Two traps were found, 1.0 M hydrochloric acid and 0 C, which removed the phytotoxin from the algal effluent and which could be treated to release that phytotoxin as judged with the bioassay procedure. It was also determined that pretraps of 1.0 M sodium hydroxide and 1.0 M potassium biocarbonate could be used without lowering the phytotoxin effect. Ammonia was identified in trap solutions by ninhydrin reaction, indophenol reaction and derivatization with dansyl chloride and phenylisothiocyanate. Ammonia at the gaseous concentrations detected was found to have the same effects in the bioassay system as the volatile phytotoxin. It is possible that other basic, nitrogen containing compounds which augment the effects of ammonia were present at lower concentrations in the algal effluent.

  18. Observability of market daily volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroni, Filippo; Serva, Maurizio

    2016-02-01

    We study the price dynamics of 65 stocks from the Dow Jones Composite Average from 1973 to 2014. We show that it is possible to define a Daily Market Volatility σ(t) which is directly observable from data. This quantity is usually indirectly defined by r(t) = σ(t) ω(t) where the r(t) are the daily returns of the market index and the ω(t) are i.i.d. random variables with vanishing average and unitary variance. The relation r(t) = σ(t) ω(t) alone is unable to give an operative definition of the index volatility, which remains unobservable. On the contrary, we show that using the whole information available in the market, the index volatility can be operatively defined and detected.

  19. Volatile Hydrocarbon Pheromones from Beetles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter reviews literature about hydrocarbons from beetles that serve as long-range pheromones. The most thoroughly studied beetles that use volatile hydrocarbon pheromones belong to the family Nitidulidae in the genera Carpophilus and Colopterus. Published pheromone research deals with behav...

  20. Extreme times for volatility processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoliver, Jaume; Perelló, Josep

    2007-04-01

    Extreme times techniques, generally applied to nonequilibrium statistical mechanical processes, are also useful for a better understanding of financial markets. We present a detailed study on the mean first-passage time for the volatility of return time series. The empirical results extracted from daily data of major indices seem to follow the same law regardless of the kind of index thus suggesting an universal pattern. The empirical mean first-passage time to a certain level L is fairly different from that of the Wiener process showing a dissimilar behavior depending on whether L is higher or lower than the average volatility. All of this indicates a more complex dynamics in which a reverting force drives volatility toward its mean value. We thus present the mean first-passage time expressions of the most common stochastic volatility models whose approach is comparable to the random diffusion description. We discuss asymptotic approximations of these models and confront them to empirical results with a good agreement with the exponential Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model.

  1. Fluctuation behaviors of financial return volatility duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hongli; Wang, Jun; Lu, Yunfan

    2016-04-01

    It is of significantly crucial to understand the return volatility of financial markets because it helps to quantify the investment risk, optimize the portfolio, and provide a key input of option pricing models. The characteristics of isolated high volatility events above certain threshold in price fluctuations and the distributions of return intervals between these events arouse great interest in financial research. In the present work, we introduce a new concept of daily return volatility duration, which is defined as the shortest passage time when the future volatility intensity is above or below the current volatility intensity (without predefining a threshold). The statistical properties of the daily return volatility durations for seven representative stock indices from the world financial markets are investigated. Some useful and interesting empirical results of these volatility duration series about the probability distributions, memory effects and multifractal properties are obtained. These results also show that the proposed stock volatility series analysis is a meaningful and beneficial trial.

  2. Possible Sources of Polar Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    2011-12-01

    Extensive analyses of returned Apollo samples demonstrated that the Moon is extremely volatile poor. While this conclusion remains true, various measurements since the late 90's implicated the presence of water: e.g., enhanced reflection of circularly polarized radar signals and suppression of epithermal neutrons near the poles. More recently, traces of H2O have been discovered inside volcanic glass, along with more significant amounts residing in hydrous minerals (apatite) returned from both highland and mare landing sites. Three recent lunar missions (DIXI, M3, Cassini) identified hydrous phases on/near the lunar surface, whereas the LCROSS probe detected significant quantities of volatiles (OH, H2O and other volatiles) excavated by the Centaur impact. These new mission results and sample studies, however, now allow testing different hypotheses for the generation, trapping, and replenishment of these volatiles. Solar-proton implantation must contribute to the hydrous phases in the lunar regolith in order to account for the observed time-varying abundances and occurrence near the lunar equator. This also cannot be the entire story. The relatively low speed LCROSS-Centaur impact (2.5km/s) could not vaporize such hydrous minerals, yet emissions lines of OH (from the thermal disassociation of H2O), along with other compounds (CO2, NH2) were detected within the first second, before ejecta could reach sunlight. Telescopic observations by Potter and Morgan (1985) discovered a tenuous lunar atmosphere of Na, but the LCROSS UV/Vis spectrometer did not detect the Na-D line until after the ejecta reached sunlight (along with a line pair attributed to Ag). With time, other volatile species emerged (OH, CO). The LAMP instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter had a different viewpoint from the side (rather than from above) and detected many other atomic species release by the LCROSS-Centaur impact. Consequently, it appears that there is a stratigraphy for trapped species

  3. Pyrolysis and volatilization of cocaine

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.R.; Lue, L.P.; Boni, J.P. )

    1989-05-01

    The increasing popularity of inhaling cocaine vapor prompted the present study, to determine cocaine's fate during this process. The free base of (3H)cocaine (1 microCi/50 mg) was added to a glass pipe, which was then heated in a furnace to simulate freebasing. Negative pressure was used to draw the vapor through a series of glass wool, ethanol, acidic, and basic traps. Air flow rate and temperature were found to have profound effects on the volatilization and pyrolysis of cocaine. At a temperature of 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min, 37% of the radioactivity remained in the pipe, 39% was found in the glass wool trap, and less than 1% in the remainder of the volatilization apparatus after a 10-min volatilization. Reducing the air flow rate to 100 mL/min reduced the amount of radioactivity collected in the glass wool trap to less than 10% of the starting material and increased the amount that remained in the pipe to 58%. GC/MS analysis of the contents of the glass wool trap after volatilization at 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min revealed that 60% of the cocaine remained intact, while approximately 6 and 2% of the starting material was recovered as benzoic acid and methylecgonidine, respectively. As the temperature was increased to 650 degrees C, benzoic acid and methylecgonidine accounted for 83 and 89% of the starting material, respectively, whereas only 2% of the cocaine remained intact. Quantitation of cocaine in the vapor during the course of volatilization revealed high concentrations during the first two min and low concentrations for the remaining time.

  4. A Push-Pull Test to Measure Volatilization Fluxes of Organic Pollutants without Flux Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. C.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    Volatilization of organic contaminants is a potentially significant removal mechanism from wetlands, but field measurements are scarce and the physiochemical controls on volatilization from wetland soils remain poorly understood. It has been established that volatilization rates of certain pollutants are enhanced by vegetation and are strongly correlated with evapotranspiration (ET). These observations rely on flux chambers measurements, which are characterized by significant uncertainty due the chamber's effects on the meteorological variables around the plant and consequent impact on the biophysical processes governing ET and plant uptake of soil contaminants. Here we present data from a mesocosm study using a modified single-well push-pull test to measure in-situ volatilization rates from inundated soils vegetated with the wetland macrophytes Scirpus acutus and Typha latifolia, as well as from unplanted soil. This new method uses a test solution containing the volatile tracers sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), helium (He), and dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12) to estimate first-order volatilization rates and examine the relationship between physiochemical properties and volatilization rates. The test also yields an estimate for the volume of subsurface gas bubbles, which is used to derive a retardation factor for the effect of interphase partitioning on the estimation of kinetic parameters. We evaluate models to partition observed fluxes into different pathways for plant-mediated volatilization: transpirational uptake and consequent volatilization, and gas-phase diffusion through porous root aerenchyma. Those models are then used to scale tracer-derived volatilization fluxes to priority organic pollutants including benzene, trichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride. We also discuss the implementation of this method at field scales to estimate volatilization as a component of phytoremediation applications.

  5. Recovery of several volatile organic compounds from simulated water samples: Effect of transport and storage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, L.C.; Schroder, L.J.; Brooks, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    Solutions containing volatile organic compounds were prepared in organic-free water and 2% methanol and submitted to two U.S. Geological Survey laboratories. Data from the determination of volatile compounds in these samples were compared to analytical data for the same volatile compounds that had been kept in solutions 100 times more concentrated until immediately before analysis; there was no statistically significant difference in the analytical recoveries. Addition of 2% methanol to the storage containers hindered the recovery of bromomethane and vinyl chloride. Methanol addition did not enhance sample stability. Further, there was no statistically significant difference in results from the two laboratories, and the recovery efficiency was more than 80% in more than half of the determinations made. In a subsequent study, six of eight volatile compounds showed no significant loss of recovery after 34 days.

  6. Characterizing Bacterial Volatiles using Secondary Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (SESI-MS)

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Heather D.; Zhu, Jiangjiang; Hill, Jane E.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (SESI-MS) is a method developed for the rapid detection of volatile compounds, without the need for sample pretreatment. The method was first described by Fenn and colleagues1 and has been applied to the detection of illicit drugs2 and explosives3-4, the characterization of skin volatiles5, and the analysis of breath6-7. SESI ionization occurs by proton transfer reactions between the electrospray solution and the volatile analyte, and is therefore suitable for the analysis of hetero-organic molecules, just as in traditional electrospray ionization (ESI). However, unlike standard ESI, the proton transfer process of SESI occurs in the vapor phase rather than in solution (Fig. 1), and therefore SESI is best suited for detecting organic volatiles and aerosols. We are expanding the use of SESI-MS to the detection of bacterial volatiles as a method for bacterial identification and characterization8. We have demonstrated that SESI-MS volatile fingerprinting, combined with a statistical analysis method, can be used to differentiate bacterial genera, species, and mixed cultures in a variety of growth media.8 Here we provide the steps for obtaining bacterial volatile fingerprints using SESI-MS, including the instrumental parameters that should be optimized to ensure robust bacterial identification and characterization. PMID:21694687

  7. Analysis of Volatile Markers for Virgin Olive Oil Aroma Defects by SPME-GC/FID: Possible Sources of Incorrect Data.

    PubMed

    Oliver-Pozo, Celia; Aparicio-Ruiz, Ramón; Romero, Inmaculada; García-González, Diego L

    2015-12-01

    The need to explain virgin olive oil (VOO) aroma descriptors by means of volatiles has raised interest in applying analytical techniques for trapping and quantitating volatiles. Static headspace sampling with solid phase microextraction (SPME) as trapping material is one of the most applied solutions for analyzing volatiles. The use of an internal standard and the determination of the response factors of the main volatiles seem to guarantee the correct determination of volatile concentrations in VOOs by SPME-GC/FID. This paper, however, shows that the competition phenomena between volatiles in their adsorption to the SPME fiber, inherent in static headspace sampling, may affect the quantitation. These phenomena are more noticeable in the particular case of highly odorant matrices, such as rancid and vinegary VOOs with high intensity of defect. The competition phenomena can modify the measurement sensitivity, which can be observed in volatile quantitation as well as in the recording of internal standard areas in different matrices. This paper analyzes the bias of the peak areas and concentrations of those volatiles that are markers for each sensory defect of VOOs (rancid, vinegary, musty, and fusty) when the intensity and complexity of aroma are increased. Of the 17 volatile markers studied in this work, 10 presented some anomalies in the quantitation in highly odorant matrices due the competition phenomena. However, quantitation was not affected in the concentration ranges at which each volatile marker is typically found in the defective oils they were characteristic of, validating their use as markers. PMID:26568468

  8. The volatile composition of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, H. A.

    1988-01-01

    Comets may be our best probes of the physical and chemical conditions in the outer regions of the solar nebula during that crucial period when the planets formed. The volatile composition of cometary nuclei can be used to decide whether comets are the product of a condensation sequence similar to that invoked to explain the compositions of the planets and asteroids, or if comets are simply agglomerations of interstellar grains which have been insignificantly modified by the events that shaped the other bodies in the solar system. Although cometary nuclei are not generally accessible to observation, observations of cometary comae can illuminate at least some of the mysteries of the nuclei provided one has a detailed knowledge of the excitation conditions in the coma and also has access to basic atomic and molecular data on the many species present in comets. Examined here is the status of our knowledge of the volatile composition of cometary nuclei and how these data are obtained.

  9. Chirospecific analysis of plant volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachev, A. V.

    2007-10-01

    Characteristic features of the analysis of plant volatiles by enantioselective gas (gas-liquid) chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry are discussed. The most recent advances in the design of enantioselective stationary phases are surveyed. Examples of the preparation of the most efficient phases based on modified cyclodextrins are given. Current knowledge on the successful analytical resolution of different types of plant volatiles (aliphatic and aromatic compounds and mono-, sesqui- and diterpene derivatives) into optical antipodes is systematically described. Chiral stationary phases used for these purposes, temperature conditions and enantiomer separation factors are summarised. Examples of the enantiomeric resolution of fragrance compounds and components of plant extracts, wines and essential oils are given.

  10. Arbitrage and Volatility in Chinese Stock's Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shu Quan; Ito, Takao; Zhang, Jianbo

    From the point of view of no-arbitrage pricing, what matters is how much volatility the stock has, for volatility measures the amount of profit that can be made from shorting stocks and purchasing options. With the short-sales constraints or in the absence of options, however, high volatility is likely to mean arbitrage from stock market. As emerging stock markets for China, investors are increasingly concerned about volatilities of Chinese two stock markets. We estimate volatility's models for Chinese stock markets' indexes using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method and GARCH. We find that estimated values of volatility parameters are very high for all data frequencies. It suggests that stock returns are extremely volatile even at long term intervals in Chinese markets. Furthermore, this result could be considered that there seems to be arbitrage opportunities in Chinese stock markets.

  11. Volatiles in Inter-Specific Bacterial Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tyc, Olaf; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well-described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium, and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal, and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide) were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here, we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities. PMID:26733959

  12. Volatiles in Inter-Specific Bacterial Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tyc, Olaf; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well-described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium, and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal, and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide) were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here, we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities. PMID:26733959

  13. Pathways and relative contributions to arsenic volatilization from rice plants and paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan; Huang, Hai; Sun, Guo-Xin; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that higher plants are unable to methylate arsenic (As), but it is not known whether methylated As species taken up by plants can be volatilized. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants were grown axenically or in a nonsterile soil using a two-chamber system. Arsenic transformation and volatilization were investigated. In the axenic system, uptake of As species into rice roots was in the order of arsenate (As(V)) > monomethylarsonic acid (MMAs(V)) > dimethylarsinic acid (DMAs(V)) > trimethylarsine oxide (TMAs(V)O), but the order of the root-to-shoot transport index (Ti) was reverse. Also, volatilization of trimethylarsine (TMAs) from rice plants was detected when plants were treated with TMAs(V)O but not with As(V), DMAs(V), or MMAs(V). In the soil culture, As was volatilized mainly from the soil. Small amounts of TMAs were also volatilized from the rice plants, which took up DMAs(V), MMAs(V), and TMAs(V)O from the soil solution. The addition of dried distillers grain (DDG) to the soil enhanced As mobilization into the soil solution, As methylation and volatilization from the soil, as well as uptake of different As species and As volatilization from the rice plants. Results show that rice is able to volatilize TMAs after the uptake of TMAs(V)O but not able to convert inorganic As, MMAs(V) or DMAs(V) into TMAs and that the extent of As volatilization from rice plants was much smaller than that from the flooded soil. PMID:22724924

  14. Dilution and volatilization of groundwater contaminant discharges in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisopou, Angeliki; Bjerg, Poul L.; Sonne, Anne T.; Balbarini, Nicola; Rosenberg, Louise; Binning, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical solution to describe dilution and volatilization of a continuous groundwater contaminant plume into streams is developed for risk assessment. The location of groundwater plume discharge into the stream (discharge through the side versus bottom of the stream) and different distributions of the contaminant plume concentration (Gaussian, homogeneous or heterogeneous distribution) are considered. The model considering the plume discharged through the bank of the river, with a uniform concentration distribution was the most appropriate for risk assessment due to its simplicity and limited data requirements. The dilution and volatilization model is able to predict the entire concentration field, and thus the mixing zone, maximum concentration and fully mixed concentration in the stream. It can also be used to identify groundwater discharge zones from in-stream concentration measurement. The solution was successfully applied to published field data obtained in a large and a small Danish stream and provided valuable information on the risk posed by the groundwater contaminant plumes. The results provided by the dilution and volatilization model are very different to those obtained with existing point source models, with a distributed source leading to a larger mixing length and different concentration field. The dilution model can also provide recommendations for sampling locations and the size of impact zones in streams. This is of interest for regulators, for example when developing guidelines for the implementation of the European Water Framework Directive.

  15. Stochastic volatility models and Kelvin waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, Alex; Sepp, Artur

    2008-08-01

    We use stochastic volatility models to describe the evolution of an asset price, its instantaneous volatility and its realized volatility. In particular, we concentrate on the Stein and Stein model (SSM) (1991) for the stochastic asset volatility and the Heston model (HM) (1993) for the stochastic asset variance. By construction, the volatility is not sign definite in SSM and is non-negative in HM. It is well known that both models produce closed-form expressions for the prices of vanilla option via the Lewis-Lipton formula. However, the numerical pricing of exotic options by means of the finite difference and Monte Carlo methods is much more complex for HM than for SSM. Until now, this complexity was considered to be an acceptable price to pay for ensuring that the asset volatility is non-negative. We argue that having negative stochastic volatility is a psychological rather than financial or mathematical problem, and advocate using SSM rather than HM in most applications. We extend SSM by adding volatility jumps and obtain a closed-form expression for the density of the asset price and its realized volatility. We also show that the current method of choice for solving pricing problems with stochastic volatility (via the affine ansatz for the Fourier-transformed density function) can be traced back to the Kelvin method designed in the 19th century for studying wave motion problems arising in fluid dynamics.

  16. Origin of Volatiles in Earth: Indigenous Versus Exogenous Sources Based on Highly Siderophile, Volatile Siderophile, and Light Volatile Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K. M.; Marin, N.; Nickodem, K.

    2015-01-01

    Origin of Earth's volatiles has traditionally been ascribed to late accretion of material after major differentiation events - chondrites, comets, ice or other exogenous sources. A competing theory is that the Earth accreted its volatiles as it was built, thus water and other building blocks were present early and during differentiation and core formation (indigenous). Here we discuss geochemical evidence from three groups of elements that suggests Earth's volatiles were acquired during accretion and did not require additional sources after differentiation.

  17. Scalping of light volatile sulfur compounds by wine closures.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria A; Jourdes, Michaël; Darriet, Philippe; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis

    2012-11-01

    Closures have an important influence on wine quality during aging in a bottle. Closures have a direct impact on oxygen exposure and on volatiles scavenging in wine. Model wine solution soaking assays of several types of closures (i.e., natural and technical cork stoppers, synthetic closures, screw caps) with two important wine volatile sulfur compounds led to a considerable reduction in their levels. After 25 days, cork closures and synthetic closures, to a lesser extent, have significantly scavenged hydrogen sulfide and dimethyl sulfide. These compounds have a determinant impact on wine aging bouquet, being largely responsible for "reduced off-flavors". Hydrogen sulfide levels are often not well correlated with the exposure of wine to oxygen or with the permeability of the closure. Its preferential sorption by some types of closures may explain that behavior. Scalping phenomenon should be taken into account when studying wine post-bottling development. PMID:23072649

  18. SEPARATION OF RUTHENIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Beederman, M.; Vogler, S.; Hyman, H.H.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of rathenium from a rathenium containing aqueous solution is described. The separation is accomplished by adding sodium nitrite, silver nitrate and ozone to the ruthenium containing aqueous solution to form ruthenium tetroxide and ihen volatilizing off the ruthenium tetroxide.

  19. Volatile communication in plant-aphid interactions.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Martin; Jander, Georg

    2010-08-01

    Volatile communication plays an important role in mediating the interactions between plants, aphids, and other organisms in the environment. In response to aphid infestation, many plants initiate indirect defenses through the release of volatiles that attract ladybugs, parasitoid wasps, and other aphid-consuming predators. Aphid-induced volatile release in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana requires the jasmonate signaling pathway. Volatile release is also induced by infection with aphid-transmitted viruses. Consistent with mathematical models of optimal transmission, viruses that are acquired rapidly by aphids induce volatile release to attract migratory aphids, but discourage long-term aphid feeding. Although the ecology of these interactions is well-studied, further research is needed to identify the molecular basis of aphid-induced and virus-induced changes in plant volatile release. PMID:20627668

  20. Floral volatiles: from biosynthesis to function.

    PubMed

    Muhlemann, Joëlle K; Klempien, Antje; Dudareva, Natalia

    2014-08-01

    Floral volatiles have attracted humans' attention since antiquity and have since then permeated many aspects of our lives. Indeed, they are heavily used in perfumes, cosmetics, flavourings and medicinal applications. However, their primary function is to mediate ecological interactions between flowers and a diverse array of visitors, including pollinators, florivores and pathogens. As such, they ultimately ensure the plants' reproductive and evolutionary success. To date, over 1700 floral volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been identified. Interestingly, they are derived from only a few biochemical networks, which include the terpenoid, phenylpropanoid/benzenoid and fatty acid biosynthetic pathways. These pathways are intricately regulated by endogenous and external factors to enable spatially and temporally controlled emission of floral volatiles, thereby fine-tuning the ecological interactions facilitated by floral volatiles. In this review, we will focus on describing the biosynthetic pathways leading to floral VOCs, the regulation of floral volatile emission, as well as biological functions of emitted volatiles. PMID:24588567

  1. Volatile accretion history of the Earth.

    PubMed

    Wood, B J; Halliday, A N; Rehkämper, M

    2010-10-28

    It has long been thought that the Earth had a protracted and complex history of volatile accretion and loss. Albarède paints a different picture, proposing that the Earth first formed as a dry planet which, like the Moon, was devoid of volatile constituents. He suggests that the Earth's complement of volatile elements was only established later, by the addition of a small veneer of volatile-rich material at ∼100 Myr (here and elsewhere, ages are relative to the origin of the Solar System). Here we argue that the Earth's mass balance of moderately volatile elements is inconsistent with Albarède's hypothesis but is well explained by the standard model of accretion from partially volatile-depleted material, accompanied by core formation. PMID:20981045

  2. Volatile halogenated hydrocarbons in foods

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Makoto; Toyoda, Masatake; Saito, Yukio

    1995-02-01

    Volatile halogenated organic compounds were determined in foods. Statistical treatment of the data for 13 sampled from 20 families living in suburban Tokyo (Saitama prefecture) indicated that the foods were contaminated by water pollution and/or substances introduced by the process of food production. Butter and margarine were contaminated by chlorinated ethylene, ethane, and related compounds released by dry cleaning and other operations. Soybean sprouts and tofu (soybean curd) contained chloroform and related trihalomethanes absorbed during the production process. 27 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M.; Sorini-Wong, Susan S.; Wong, Gregory K.

    2011-03-01

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  4. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M.; Sorini-Wong, Susan S.

    2009-02-10

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  5. Volatiles Which Increase Magma Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.

    2015-12-01

    The standard model of an erupting volcano is one in which the viscosity of a decompressing magma increases as the volatiles leave the melt structure to form bubbles. It has now been observed that the addition of the "volatiles" P, Cl and F result in an increase in silicate melt viscosity. This observation would mean that the viscosity of selected degassing magmas would decrease rather than increase. Here we look at P, Cl and F as three volatiles which increase viscosity through different structural mechanisms. In all three cases the volatiles increase the viscosity of peralkaline composition melts, but appear to always decrease the viscosity of peraluminous melts. Phosphorus causes the melt to unmix into a Na-P rich phase and a Na-poor silicate phase. Thus as the network modifying Na (or Ca) are removed to the phosphorus-rich melt, the matrix melt viscosity increases. With increasing amounts of added phosphorus (at network modifying Na ~ P) the addition of further phosphorus causes a decrease in viscosity. The addition of chlorine to Fe-free aluminosilicate melts results in an increase in viscosity. NMR data on these glass indicates that the chlorine sits in salt-like structures surrounded by Na and/or Ca. Such structures would remove network-modifying atoms from the melt structure and thus result in an increase in viscosity. The NMR spectra of fluorine-bearing glasses shows that F takes up at least 5 different structural positions in peralkaline composition melts. Three of these positions should result in a decrease in viscosity due to the removal of bridging oxygens. Two of the structural positons of F, however, should result in an increase in viscosity as they require the removal of network-modifying atoms from the melt structure (with one of the structures being that observed for Cl). This would imply that increasing amounts of F might result in an increase in viscosity. This proposed increase in viscosity with increasing F has now been experimentally confirmed.

  6. Evaporation of iodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution

    DOEpatents

    Partridge, J.A.; Bosuego, G.P.

    1980-07-14

    Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

  7. Method for volatility measurements on polydisperse aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Otmar; Hagen, Donald E.; Whitefield, Philip D.; Hopkins, Alfred R.; Eimer, Ben

    2000-08-01

    We describe a method for measuring the amount of volatile material in the aerosol phase using a thermal discriminator. This method, which requires the measurement of the particle size distributions of the heated (through discriminator) and non-heated (bypassing discriminator) sample aerosol, includes the effects due to both particle loss and partially volatile aerosols. Tests with polydisperse internally mixed, i.e. partially volatile, aerosol (not shown here) indicate a high degree of accuracy of this method even for ultrafine particles.

  8. Conference on Deep Earth and Planetary Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The following topics are covered in the presented papers: (1) rare gases systematics and mantle structure; (2) volatiles in the earth; (3) impact degassing of water and noble gases from silicates; (4) D/H ratios and H2O contents of mantle-derived amphibole megacrysts; (5) thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates; (6) modeling of the effect of water on mantle rheology; (7) noble gas isotopes and halogens in volatile-rich inclusions in diamonds; (8) origin and loss of the volatiles of the terrestrial planets; (9) structure and the stability of hydrous minerals at high pressure; (10) recycling of volatiles at subduction zones and various other topics.

  9. Regolith Volatile Recovery at Simulated Lunar Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Paulsen, Gale; Zacny, Kris; Schmidt, Sherry; Boucher, Dale

    2016-01-01

    Lunar Polar Volatiles: Permanently shadowed craters at the lunar poles contain water, 5 wt according to LCROSS. Interest in water for ISRU applications. Desire to ground truth water using surface prospecting e.g. Resource Prospector and RESOLVE. How to access subsurface water resources and accurately measure quantity. Excavation operations and exposure to lunar environment may affect the results. Volatile capture tests: A series a ground based dirty thermal vacuum tests are being conducted to better understand the subsurface sampling operations. Sample removal and transfer. Volatiles loss during sampling operations. Concept of operations, Instrumentation. This presentation is a progress report on volatiles capture results from these tests with lunar polar drill prototype hardware.

  10. [Solidification of volatile oil with graphene oxide].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong-Mei; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Sun, E; Xu, Yi-Hao

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the properties of solidifying volatile oil with graphene oxide, clove oil and zedoary turmeric oil were solidified by graphene oxide. The amount of graphene oxide was optimized with the eugenol yield and curcumol yield as criteria. Curing powder was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of graphene oxide on dissolution in vitro and thermal stability of active components were studied. The optimum solidification ratio of graphene oxide to volatile oil was 1:1. Dissolution rate of active components had rare influence while their thermal stability improved after volatile oil was solidified. Solidifying herbal volatile oil with graphene oxide deserves further study. PMID:25975033

  11. Release of volatiles from possible Martian analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotra, R. K.; Gibson, E. K.; Urbancic, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Viking data suggest the presence of volatile-rich materials in the Martian regolith. The thermal stabilities of mineral phases and their volatile release profiles were studied in detail in our laboratory. Thermal analysis, combined with mass spectrometry, was applied to the study of the behavior of carbonates, sulfates, hydrates, and clays. The results indicate that these techniques are useful in the preliminary mineralogical characterizations of volatile-rich minerals. However, our results also indicate that great care must be taken in the incorporation into planetary probes of such methods as hearing rates, pressure, composition of atmospheres, grain size, etc., because these factors effect volatile release.

  12. Configuration of Pluto's Volatile Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundy, William M.; Binzel, R. P.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Earle, A. M.; Ennico, K.; Jennings, D. E.; Howett, C. J. A.; Linscott, I. R.; Lunsford, A. W.; Olkin, C. B.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. Wm; Protopapa, S.; Reuter, D. C.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, S. A.; Tsang, C. C. C.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.; Berry, K.; Buie, M. W.; Stansberry, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    We report on near-infrared remote sensing by New Horizons' Ralph instrument (Reuter et al. 2008, Space Sci. Rev. 140, 129-154) of Pluto's N2, CO, and CH4 ices. These especially volatile ices are mobile even at Pluto's cryogenic surface temperatures. Sunlight reflected from these ices becomes imprinted with their characteristic spectral absorption bands. The detailed appearance of these absorption features depends on many aspects of local composition, thermodynamic state, and texture. Multiple-scattering radiative transfer models are used to retrieve quantitative information about these properties and to map how they vary across Pluto's surface. Using parameter maps derived from New Horizons observations, we investigate the striking regional differences in the abundances and scattering properties of Pluto's volatile ices. Comparing these spatial patterns with the underlying geology provides valuable constraints on processes actively modifying the planet's surface, over a variety of spatial scales ranging from global latitudinal patterns to more regional and local processes within and around the feature informally known as Sputnik Planum. This work was supported by the NASA New Horizons Project.

  13. On-Plant Volatile Analysis Utilizing Solid-Phase Microextraction and a New Volatile Collection Technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile emission of plants is typically measured by removal of the plant-part, transportation to a laboratory, and subsequent volatile analyses via a number of accepted methodologies. Studies performed by our laboratory have shown the volatile emission of removed plant parts are essentially identic...

  14. Diffusion in multi-component polymeric systems: Diffusion of non-volatile species in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M.; Kind, M.; Cairncross, R.; Schabel, W.

    2009-01-01

    Polymeric films for high-tech products like LCD-panels, transdermal patches or medical test strips typically consist of a polymer and one or more non-volatile additives. If during the production process a multi-component solution is coated and subsequently dried, the diffusion of solvents and non-volatile species in the polymeric systems plays an important role. Recent experiments revealed that the drying conditions can have a significant influence on the formation of inhomogeneous distribution of the non-volatile components in the final foil and therefore affects desired product properties. The distribution of the non-volatile components in the final film has an important impact on the physical and chemical properties, including mechanical and optical properties, wetting behavior or drug release rates i.e. the product quality of the polymeric system. To be able to describe the diffusion of non-volatile species in a multi-component polymeric system during drying correctly, reliable information about the influence of the solvent concentration on the mobility of the additive are essential. To obtain information about the mobility of the additive in the polymeric solution new experiments were performed and observed by means of Inverse-Micro-Raman-Spectroscopy (IMRS). By fitting simulated concentration profiles to the experimental data, the temperature and concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of the non-volatile additive in the polymer solution was determined. The investigations are part of a bilateral funding of NFG in the US and DFG in Germany. Diffusion of volatile species in multicomponent polymeric systems are investigated by the group of Richard Cairncross.

  15. CESIUM RECOVERY FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, R.A.

    1961-06-20

    Cesium may be precipitated from an aqueous solution whose acidity ranges between a pH of 1.5 and a molarity of 5 on cobaltous, zinc, cadmium, nickel, or ferrous cobalticyanide. This precipitation brings about a separation from most fission products. Ruthenium which coprecipitates to a great degree can be removed by dissolving in sulfuric acid and boiling the solution in the presence of periodic acid for volatilization; other coprecipitated fission products can then be precipitated from the sulfuric acid solution with a ferric hydroxide carrier.

  16. Ambient orchard volatiles from California almonds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The volatile emissions of various plant parts of almonds have been studied via various techniques in the past. These analyses have typically been performed on single cultivars and hence may not be representative of the volatiles found in an entire almond orchard. Recent reports suggest some almond v...

  17. Fixture For Sampling Volatile Materials In Containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Donald; Pratz, Earl Howard

    1995-01-01

    Fixture based on T-connector enables mass-spectrometric analysis of volatile contents of cylindrical containers without exposing contents to ambient conditions. Used to sample volatile contents of pressurized containers, contents of such enclosed processing systems as gas-phase reactors, gases in automotive emission systems, and gas in hostile environments.

  18. VOLATILIZED LUBRICANT EMISSIONS FROM STEEL ROLLING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the volatilization of lubricants used in steel rolling. Data from nine steel mills were used to: define the volatilized portion of lubricants used in rolling; and prepare total oil, grease, and hydraulic material balances for actual and typi...

  19. Current status of fluoride volatility method development

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, J.; Marecek, M.; Skarohlid, J.

    2013-07-01

    The Fluoride Volatility Method is based on a separation process, which comes out from the specific property of uranium, neptunium and plutonium to form volatile hexafluorides whereas most of fission products (mainly lanthanides) and higher transplutonium elements (americium, curium) present in irradiated fuel form nonvolatile tri-fluorides. Fluoride Volatility Method itself is based on direct fluorination of the spent fuel, but before the fluorination step, the removal of cladding material and subsequent transformation of the fuel into a powdered form with a suitable grain size have to be done. The fluorination is made with fluorine gas in a flame fluorination reactor, where the volatile fluorides (mostly UF{sub 6}) are separated from the non-volatile ones (trivalent minor actinides and majority of fission products). The subsequent operations necessary for partitioning of volatile fluorides are the condensation and evaporation of volatile fluorides, the thermal decomposition of PuF{sub 6} and the finally distillation and sorption used for the purification of uranium product. The Fluoride Volatility Method is considered to be a promising advanced pyrochemical reprocessing technology, which can mainly be used for the reprocessing of oxide spent fuels coming from future GEN IV fast reactors.

  20. Belief biases and volatility of assets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei-Sun, Wen-Zou, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Based on an overlapping generation model, this paper introduces the noise traders with belief biases and rational traders. With an equilibrium analysis, this paper examines the volatility of risky asset. The results show that the belief biases, the probability of economy state, and the domain capability are all the factors that have effects on the volatility of the market.

  1. Analyzing volatile compounds in dairy products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile compounds give the first indication of the flavor in a dairy product. Volatiles are isolated from the sample matrix and then analyzed by chromatography, sensory methods, or an electronic nose. Isolation may be performed by solvent extraction or headspace analysis, and gas chromatography i...

  2. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Gregory D.; Moore, Glenn A.; Stone, Mark L.; Reagen, William K.

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

  3. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

    1995-08-29

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

  4. Volatility of HCl and the thermodynamics of brines during brine dryout

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, J.M.; Palmer, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    Laboratory measurements of liquid-vapor partitioning (volatility) of chlorides from brines to steam can be used to indicate the potential for corrosion problems in geothermal systems. Measurements of volatilities of solutes in chloride brines have established a possible mechanism for the production of high-chloride steam from slightly acidic high temperature brines. Questions concerning the fate of NaCl in the steam production process have been addressed through extensive measurements of its volatility from brines ranging in concentration from dilute solutions to halite saturation. Recent measurements of chloride partitioning to steam over brines in contact with Geysers rock samples are consistent with our concept of the process for production of high-chloride steam.

  5. Lunar Volatiles: An Earth-Moon Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.

    2011-01-01

    It has generally been accepted that the Moon is depleted in volatile elements. However, the recent discovery of measurable water in lunar glasses and apatites suggests that volatiles are not as depleted as was once thought. And, in fact, some authors have claimed that water contents of the lunar and terrestrial mantles are similar. Moderately volatile alkali elements may have a bearing on this issue. In general, bulk Moon alkalis are depleted relative to the bulk silicate Earth. Although the bulk lunar chemical composition is difficult to reconstruct, good correlations of alkali elements with refractory lithophile incompatible trace elements make this conclusion robust. These observations have been taken to mean that the Moon overall is depleted in volatiles relative to the Earth. Since water is more volatile than any of the alkali elements, presumably this conclusion is true for water, or even more so.

  6. Volatile Organic Compounds in Uremia

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Luzia; Slodzinski, Rafael; Jankowski, Joachim; Zidek, Walter; Westhoff, Timm H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although “uremic fetor” has long been felt to be diagnostic of renal failure, the compounds exhaled in uremia remain largely unknown so far. The present work investigates whether breath analysis by ion mobility spectrometry can be used for the identification of volatile organic compounds retained in uremia. Methods Breath analysis was performed in 28 adults with an eGFR ≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m2, 26 adults with chronic renal failure corresponding to an eGFR of 10–59 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and 28 adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before and after a hemodialysis session. Breath analysis was performed by ion mobility spectrometryafter gas-chromatographic preseparation. Identification of the compounds of interest was performed by thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results Breath analyses revealed significant differences in the spectra of patients with and without renal failure. Thirteen compounds were chosen for further evaluation. Some compounds including hydroxyacetone, 3-hydroxy-2-butanone and ammonia accumulated with decreasing renal function and were eliminated by dialysis. The concentrations of these compounds allowed a significant differentiation between healthy, chronic renal failure with an eGFR of 10–59 ml/min, and ESRD (p<0.05 each). Other compounds including 4-heptanal, 4-heptanone, and 2-heptanone preferentially or exclusively occurred in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Conclusion Impairment of renal function induces a characteristic fingerprint of volatile compounds in the breath. The technique of ion mobility spectrometry can be used for the identification of lipophilic uremic retention molecules. PMID:23049998

  7. SELECTION GUIDE FOR VOLATILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide presents a methodology for evaluating applicability of volatilization technologies for removing volatile organics from water. The volatilization technologies assessed in the study include: surface sprayers, surface aerators, bubble columns, cooling towers, steam strippe...

  8. The effect of a mouthrinse containing chlorine dioxide in the clinical reduction of volatile sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Soares, Leo Guimaraes; Guaitolini, Roberto Luiz; Weyne, Sergio de Carvalho; Falabella, Marcio Eduardo Vieira; Tinoco, Eduardo Muniz Barretto; da Silva, Denise Gomes

    2013-07-01

    This study sought to evaluate the clinical effect of a mouthrinse containing 0.3% chlorine dioxide (ClO2) in reducing oral volatile sulfur compounds (VSC). Halitosis was induced by L-cysteine in 11 volunteers, and 4 solutions were compared: a test solution containing 0.3% ClO2, 0.07% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), and 0.05% sodium fluoride; a placebo; a solution containing 0.05% CPC; and a control solution of 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX). VSC levels were assessed using a Halimeter, and 6 measurements were made from baseline to 3 hours postrinse. The VSC reduction rate of the test mouthrinse was superior to the placebo and the CPC solution. There was no difference between the test solution and the CHX solution in VSC reduction rates immediately postrinse, or at 2 and 3 hours postrinse; both solutions were statistically superior to the placebo and the CPC solution. PMID:23823344

  9. Partition of volatile compounds in pea globulin-maltodextrin aqueous two-phase system.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Dat; Lafarge, Céline; Murat, Chloé; Mession, Jean-Luc; Cayot, Nathalie; Saurel, Rémi

    2014-12-01

    This study is based on the assumption that the off-flavour of pea proteins might be decreased using the retention of volatile compounds by a mixture with another biopolymer. The partition of volatile compounds in an aqueous system containing pea protein and maltodextrins was followed under thermodynamic incompatibility conditions. Firstly, the phase diagram of the system was established. Then, the partition of aroma compounds between the phase rich in protein and the phase rich in maltodextrin was measured by SPME-GC-MS. There was a transfer of volatile compounds during phase separation. Variations of pH were also used to vary the retention of volatile compounds by proteins. The concentration of volatile compounds in protein solution at pH 2.4 was higher than at pH 7.2. It was possible to increase the transfer of volatile compounds from the phase rich in protein to the phase rich in maltodextrin using the effect of pH on protein denaturation. PMID:24996351

  10. APPARATUS AND PROCEDURE FOR SAMPLING SOIL PROFILES FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A conventional soil-solution sampler was modified to prevent loss of volatiles, which tend to escape from the liquid sample during sample collection. The sampler is connected to a purging chamber, which is in turn connected to a trap packed with Tenax resin. The sample is collect...

  11. Variational formulation for Black-Scholes equations in stochastic volatility models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulov, Tihomir B.; Valkov, Radoslav L.

    2012-11-01

    In this note we prove existence and uniqueness of weak solutions to a boundary value problem arising from stochastic volatility models in financial mathematics. Our settings are variational in weighted Sobolev spaces. Nevertheless, as it will become apparent our variational formulation agrees well with the stochastic part of the problem.

  12. Bacterial volatiles promote growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Choong-Min; Farag, Mohamed A.; Hu, Chia-Hui; Reddy, Munagala S.; Wei, Han-Xun; Paré, Paul W.; Kloepper, Joseph W.

    2003-01-01

    Several chemical changes in soil are associated with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Some bacterial strains directly regulate plant physiology by mimicking synthesis of plant hormones, whereas others increase mineral and nitrogen availability in the soil as a way to augment growth. Identification of bacterial chemical messengers that trigger growth promotion has been limited in part by the understanding of how plants respond to external stimuli. With an increasing appreciation of how volatile organic compounds signal plants and serve in plant defense, investigations into the role of volatile components in plant–bacterial systems now can follow. Here, we present chemical and plant-growth data showing that some PGPR release a blend of volatile components that promote growth of Arabidopsis thaliana. In particular, the volatile components 2,3-butanediol and acetoin were released exclusively from two bacterial strains that trigger the greatest level of growth promotion. Furthermore, pharmacological applications of 2,3-butanediol enhanced plant growth whereas bacterial mutants blocked in 2,3-butanediol and acetoin synthesis were devoid in this growth-promotion capacity. The demonstration that PGPR strains release different volatile blends and that plant growth is stimulated by differences in these volatile blends establishes an additional function for volatile organic compounds as signaling molecules mediating plant–microbe interactions. PMID:12684534

  13. Assessing the fate of biodegradable volatile organic contaminants in unsaturated soil filter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thullner, Martin; de Biase, Cecilia; Hanzel, Joanna; Reger, Daniel; Wick, Lukas; Oswald, Sascha; van Afferden, Manfred; Schmidt, Axel; Reiche, Nils; Jechalke, Sven

    2010-05-01

    The assessment of contaminant biodegradation in the subsurface is challenged by various abiotic processes leading to a reduction of contaminant concentration without a destructive mass removal of the contaminant. In unsaturated porous media, this interplay of processes is further complicated by volatilization. Many organic contaminants are sufficiently volatile to allow for significant fluxes from the water phase into the soil air, which can eventually lead to an emission of contaminants into the atmosphere. Knowledge of the magnitude of these emissions is thus required to evaluate the efficiency of bioremediation in such porous media and to estimate potential risks due to these emissions. In the present study, vertical flow constructed wetlands were investigated at the pilot scale as part of the SAFIRA II project. The investigated wetland system is intermittently irrigated by contaminated groundwater containing the volatile compounds benzene and MTBE. Measured concentration at the in- and outflow of the system demonstrate a high mass removal rate, but the highly transient flow and transport processes in the system challenge the quantification of biodegradation and volatilization and their contribution to the observed mass removal. By a combination of conservative solute tracer tests, stable isotope fractionation and measurements of natural radon concentration is the treated groundwater is was possible to determine the contribution of biodegradation and volatilization to total mass removal. The results suggest that for the investigated volatile compounds biodegradation is the dominating mass removal process with volatilization contributing only to minor or negligible amounts. These results can be confirmed by reactive transport simulations and were further supported by laboratory studies showing that also gas phase gradients of volatile compounds can be affected by biodegradation suggesting the unsaturated zone to act as a biofilter for contaminants in the soil air.

  14. Reduction of volatile acidity of acidic wines by immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Vilela, A; Schuller, D; Mendes-Faia, A; Côrte-Real, M

    2013-06-01

    Excessive volatile acidity in wines is a major problem and is still prevalent because available solutions are nevertheless unsatisfactory, namely, blending the filter-sterilized acidic wine with other wines of lower volatile acidity or using reverse osmosis. We have previously explored the use of an empirical biological deacidification procedure to lower the acetic acid content of wines. This winemaker's enological practice, which consists in refermentation associated with acetic acid consumption by yeasts, is performed by mixing the acidic wine with freshly crushed grapes, musts, or marc from a finished wine fermentation. We have shown that the commercial strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae S26 is able to decrease the volatile acidity of acidic wines with a volatile acidity higher than 1.44 g L(-1) acetic acid, with no detrimental impact on wine aroma. In this study, we aimed to optimize the immobilization of S26 cells in alginate beads for the bioreduction of volatile acidity of acidic wines. We found that S26 cells immobilized in double-layer alginate-chitosan beads could reduce the volatile acidity of an acidic wine (1.1 g L(-1) acetic acid, 12.5 % (v/v) ethanol, pH 3.12) by 28 and 62 % within 72 and 168 h, respectively, associated with a slight decrease in ethanol concentration (0.7 %). Similar volatile acidity removal efficiencies were obtained in medium with high glucose concentration (20 % w/v), indicating that this process may also be useful in the deacidification of grape musts. We, therefore, show that immobilized S. cerevisiae S26 cells in double-layer beads are an efficient alternative to improve the quality of wines with excessive volatile acidity. PMID:23361840

  15. Flower volatiles, crop varieties and bee responses.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Björn K; Burmeister, Carina; Westphal, Catrin; Tscharntke, Teja; von Fragstein, Maximilian; von Fragstein, Maximillian

    2013-01-01

    Pollination contributes to an estimated one third of global food production, through both the improvement of the yield and the quality of crops. Volatile compounds emitted by crop flowers mediate plant-pollinator interactions, but differences between crop varieties are still little explored. We investigated whether the visitation of crop flowers is determined by variety-specific flower volatiles using strawberry varieties (Fragaria x ananassa Duchesne) and how this affects the pollination services of the wild bee Osmia bicornis L. Flower volatile compounds of three strawberry varieties were measured via headspace collection. Gas chromatography showed that the three strawberry varieties produced the same volatile compounds but with quantitative differences of the total amount of volatiles and between distinct compounds. Electroantennographic recordings showed that inexperienced females of Osmia bicornis had higher antennal responses to all volatile compounds than to controls of air and paraffin oil, however responses differed between compounds. The variety Sonata was found to emit a total higher level of volatiles and also higher levels of most of the compounds that evoked antennal responses compared with the other varieties Honeoye and Darselect. Sonata also received more flower visits from Osmia bicornis females under field conditions, compared with Honeoye. Our results suggest that differences in the emission of flower volatile compounds among strawberry varieties mediate their attractiveness to females of Osmia bicornis. Since quality and quantity of marketable fruits depend on optimal pollination, a better understanding of the role of flower volatiles in crop production is required and should be considered more closely in crop-variety breeding. PMID:23977347

  16. Volatile Analyzer for Lunar Polar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibons, Everett K.; Pillinger, Colin T.; McKay, David S.; Waugh, Lester J.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major questions remaining for the future exploration of the Moon by humans concerns the presence of volatiles on our nearest neighbor in space. Observational studies, and investigations involving returned lunar samples and using robotic spacecraft infer the existence of volatile compounds particularly water [1]. It seems very likely that a volatile component will be concentrated at the poles in circumstances where low-temperatures exist to provide cryogenic traps. However, the full inventory of species, their concentration and their origin and sources are unknown. Of particular importance is whether abundances are sufficient to act as a resource of consumables for future lunar expeditions especially if a long-term base involving humans is to be established. To address some of these issues requires a lander designed specifically for operation at a high-lunar latitude. A vital part of the payload needs to be a volatile analyzer such as the Gas Analysis Package specifically designed for identification quantification of volatile substances and collecting information which will allow the origin of these volatiles to be identified [1]. The equipment included, particularly the gas analyzer, must be capable of operation in the extreme environmental conditions to be encountered. No accurate information yet exists regarding volatile concentration even for sites closer to the lunar equator (because of contamination). In this respect it will be important to understand (and thus limit) contamination of the lunar surface by extraneous material contributed from a variety of sources. The only data for the concentrations of volatiles at the poles comes from orbiting spacecraft and whilst the levels at high latitudes may be greater than at the equator, the volatile analyzer package under consideration will be designed to operate at the highest specifications possible and in a way that does not compromise the data.

  17. Magmatic volatiles in explosive rhyolitic eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichelberger, J.C.; Westrich, H.R.

    1981-07-01

    Obsidian clasts in rhyolitic tephra deposits preserve preeruption magmatic volatile contents, providing a direct means for determining the volatile content of explosively erupted magmas. Small to moderate volume Plinian eruptions (10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -1/ km/sup 3/) appear to be driven by 0.5--1.0 wt.% volatiles, consisting dominantly of H/sub 2/O with minor CO/sub 2/. Analysis of obsidian from eruptive sequences consisting of tephra and flows indicates that this hydrous magma abruptly overlies magma with only 0.1--0.2 wt.% H/sub 2/O.

  18. Securing non-volatile memory regions

    SciTech Connect

    Faraboschi, Paolo; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy; Muralimanohar, Naveen

    2013-08-20

    Methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture to secure non-volatile memory regions are disclosed. An example method disclosed herein comprises associating a first key pair and a second key pair different than the first key pair with a process, using the first key pair to secure a first region of a non-volatile memory for the process, and using the second key pair to secure a second region of the non-volatile memory for the same process, the second region being different than the first region.

  19. Malaria Parasites Produce Volatile Mosquito Attractants

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Megan; Su, Chih-Ying; Schaber, Chad; Crowley, Jan R.; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Carlson, John R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains a nonphotosynthetic plastid organelle that possesses plant-like metabolic pathways. Plants use the plastidial isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway to produce volatile odorants, known as terpenes. In this work, we describe the volatile chemical profile of cultured malaria parasites. Among the identified compounds are several plant-like terpenes and terpene derivatives, including known mosquito attractants. We establish the molecular identity of the odorant receptors of the malaria mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae, which responds to these compounds. The malaria parasite produces volatile signals that are recognized by mosquitoes and may thereby mediate host attraction and facilitate transmission. PMID:25805727

  20. Concentrations of Volatiles in the Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jeff; Taylor, Larry; Duke, Mike

    2007-01-01

    To set lower and upper limits on the overall amounts and types of volatiles released during heating of polar regolith, we examined the data for equatorial lunar regolith and for the compositions of comets. The purpose, specifically, was to answer these questions: 1. Upper/Lower limits and 'best guess' for total amount of volatiles (by weight %) released from lunar regolith up to 150C 2. Upper/Lower limit and 'best guess' for composition of the volatiles released from the lunar regolith by weight %

  1. Modelling of volatility in monetary transmission mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Dobešová, Anna; Klepáč, Václav; Kolman, Pavel; Bednářová, Petra

    2015-03-10

    The aim of this paper is to compare different approaches to modeling of volatility in monetary transmission mechanism. For this purpose we built time-varying parameter VAR (TVP-VAR) model with stochastic volatility and VAR-DCC-GARCH model with conditional variance. The data from three European countries are included in the analysis: the Czech Republic, Germany and Slovakia. Results show that VAR-DCC-GARCH system captures higher volatility of observed variables but main trends and detected breaks are generally identical in both approaches.

  2. Geochemical surveillance of magmatic volatiles at Popocatepetl volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, F.; Janik, C.J.; Delgado, H.; Werner, C.; Counce, D.; Stimac, J.A.; Siebe, C.; Love, S.P.; Williams, S.N.; Fischer, T.; Johnson, L.

    1998-01-01

    Surveillance of Popocatepetl volcanic plume geochemistry and SO2 flux began in early 1994 after fumarolic and seismic activity increased significantly during 1993. Volatile traps placed around the summit were collected at near-monthly intervals until the volcano erupted on December 21, 1994. Additional trap samples were obtained in early 1996 before the volcano erupted again, emplacing a small dacite dome in the summit crater. Abundances of volatile constituents (ppm/day of Cl, Stotal, F, CO2, Hg, and As) vaaried, but most constituents were relatively high in earl\\y and late 1994. However, ratios of these constituents to Cl were highest in mid-1994. ??34S-Stotal in trap solutions ranged from 1.5??? to 6.4???; lowest values generally occurred during late 1994. ??13C-CO2 of trap solutions were greatly contaminated with atmospheric CO2 and affected by absorption kinetics. When trap data are combined with SO2 flux measurements made through November 1996, Popocatepetl released about 3.9 Mt SO2, 16 Mt CO2, 0.75 Mt HCl, 0.075 Mt HF, 260 t As, 2.6 t Hg, and roughly 200 Mt H2O. Near-vent gas concentrations in the volcanic plume measured by correlation spectrometer (COSPEC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) commonly exceed human recommended exposure limits and may constitute a potential health hazard. Volatile geochemistry combined with petrologic observations and melt-inclusion studies show that mafic magma injection into a preexisting silicic chamber has accompanied renewed volcanism at Popocatepetl. Minor assimilation of Cretaceous wall rocks probably occurred in mid-1994.

  3. Aerosol volatility in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häkkinen, S. A. K.; ńijälä, M.; Lehtipalo, K.; Junninen, H.; Virkkula, A.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Riipinen, I.

    2012-04-01

    Climate and health effects of atmospheric aerosols are determined by their properties such as their chemical composition. Aerosol chemical composition can be studied indirectly by measuring volatility of aerosol particles. The volatility of submicron aerosol particles (20-500 nm) was studied in a boreal forest site at SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) station (Vesala et al., 1998) in Hyytiälä, Finland, during 01/2008-05/2010. The instrument used for the measurements was VDMPS (Volatility Differential Mobility Particle Sizer), which consists of two separate instruments: DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer, Aalto et al., 2001) and TD (Thermodenuder, Wehner et al., 2002). Aerosol evaporation was examined by heating the aerosol and comparing the total aerosol mass before and after heating. In the VDMPS system ambient aerosol sample was heated up to temperatures ranging from 80 °C to 280 °C. The higher the heating temperature was the more aerosol material was evaporated. There was a non-volatile residual present in aerosol particles when heated up to 280 °C. This residual explained (20±8)% of the total aerosol mass. Aerosol non-volatile mass fraction was highest during winter and smallest during summer months. The role of black carbon in the observed non-volatile residual was determined. Black carbon explained 40 to 90% of the non-volatile mass. Especially during colder seasons noticeable amount of non-volatile material, something else than black carbon, was observed. According to Kalberer et al. (2004) some atmospheric organic species can form polymers that have high evaporation temperatures. Also low-volatile organic salts may contribute to the non-volatile aerosol (Smith et al., 2010). Aerosol mass composition measured directly with AMS (Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, Jayne et al., 2000) was analyzed in order to examine the properties of the non-volatile material (other than black carbon). The AMS measurements were performed

  4. Biofiltration of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Malhautier, Luc; Khammar, Nadia; Bayle, Sandrine; Fanlo, Jean-Louis

    2005-07-01

    The removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated airstreams has become a major air pollution concern. Improvement of the biofiltration process commonly used for the removal of odorous compounds has led to a better control of key parameters, enabling the application of biofiltration to be extended also to the removal of VOCs. Moreover, biofiltration, which is based on the ability of micro-organisms to degrade a large variety of compounds, proves to be economical and environmentally viable. In a biofilter, the waste gas is forced to rise through a layer of packed porous material. Thus, pollutants contained in the gaseous effluent are oxidised or converted into biomass by the action of microorganisms previously fixed on the packing material. The biofiltration process is then based on two principal phenomena: (1) transfer of contaminants from the air to the water phase or support medium, (2) bioconversion of pollutants to biomass, metabolic end-products, or carbon dioxide and water. The diversity of biofiltration mechanisms and their interaction with the microflora mean that the biofilter is defined as a complex and structured ecosystem. As a result, in addition to operating conditions, research into the microbial ecology of biofilters is required in order better to optimise the management of such biological treatment systems. PMID:15803311

  5. Detection of volatile organic compounds using porphyrin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, A D F; Brittle, S; Richardson, T H; Hutchinson, J; Hunter, C A

    2010-09-16

    Seven different porphyrin compounds have been investigated as colorimetric gas sensors for a wide range of volatile organic compounds. The porphyrins examined were the free base and Mg, Sn, Zn, Au, Co, and Mn derivatives of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[3,4-bis(2-ethylhexyloxy)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine. Chloroform solutions of these materials were prepared and changes in their absorption spectra induced by exposure to various organic compounds measured. The porphyrins that showed strong responses in solution were selected, and Langmuir-Blodgett films were prepared and exposed to the corresponding analytes. This was done to determine whether they are useful materials for solid state thin film colorimetric vapor sensors. Porphyrins that readily coordinate extra ligands are shown to be suitable materials for colorimetric volatile organic compound detectors. However, porphyrins that already have bound axial ligands when synthesized only show a sensor response to those analytes that can substitute these axial ligands. The Co porphyrin displays a considerably larger response than the other porphyrins investigated which is attributed to a switch between Co(II) and Co(III) resulting in a large spectral change. PMID:20735119

  6. Screening model for volatile pollutants in dual porosity soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hantush, Mohamed M.; Govindaraju, Rao. S.; Mariño, Miguel A.; Zhang, Zhonglong

    2002-03-01

    This paper develops mass fraction models for transport and fate of agricultural pollutants in structured two-region soils. Mass fraction index models, based on a semi-infinite domain solution, are derived that describe leaching at depth, vapor losses through soil surface, absorption, and degradation in the dynamic- and stagnant-water soil regions. The models predict that leaching is the result of the combined effect of the upward vapor-phase transport relative to downward advection, residence time relative to half-life, dispersion, and lateral diffusive mass transfer. Simulations show that leached fraction of volatile compounds does not always decrease monotonically with increased residence time relative to the pollutant half-life, as a result of complex interactions among the different physical and biochemical processes. The results show that leaching, volatilization, and degradation losses can be affected significantly by lateral diffusive mass transfer into immobile-water regions and advection relative to dispersion (i.e. Peclet number) in the mobile-water regions. It is shown that solute diffusion into the immobile phase and subsequent biochemical decay reduces leaching and vapor losses through soil surface. Potential use of the modified leaching index for the screening of selected pesticides is illustrated for different soil textures and infiltration rates. The analysis may be useful to the management of pesticides and the design of landfills.

  7. Headspace solid-phase microextraction for the determination of volatile and semi-volatile pollutants in water and air.

    PubMed

    Llompart, M; Li, K; Fingas, M

    1998-10-16

    In this work we report the use of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) to extract and concentrate water-soluble volatile as well as semi-volatile pollutants. Both methods of exposing the SPME fibre were utilised: immersion in the aqueous solution (SPME) and in the headspace over the solution (HSSPME). The proposed HSSPME procedure was compared to conventional static headspace (HS) analysis for artificially spiked water as well as real water samples, which had been, equilibrated with various oil and petroleum products. Both techniques gave similar results but HSSPME was much more sensitive and exhibited better precision. Detection limits were found to be in the sub-ng/ml level, with precision better than 5% R.S.D. in most cases. To evaluate the suitability of SPME for relatively high contamination level analysis, the proposed HSSPME method was applied to the screening of run-off water samples that had heavy oil suspended in them from a tire fire incident. HSSPME results were compared with liquid--liquid extraction. Library searches were conducted on the resulting GC-MS total ion chromatograms to determine the types of compounds found in such samples. Both techniques found similar composition in the water samples with the exception of alkylnaphthalenes that were detected only by HSSPME. A brief study was carried out to assess using SPME for air monitoring. By sampling and concentrating the volatile organic compounds in the coating of the SPME fibre without any other equipment, this new technique is useful as an alternative to active air monitoring by means of sampling pumps and sorbent tubes. PMID:9818428

  8. Volatile Growth Inhibitors Produced by Aromatic Shrubs.

    PubMed

    Muller, C H; Muller, W H; Haines, B L

    1964-01-31

    Root growth of Cucumis and Avena seedlings is inhibited by volatile materials produced by leaves of Salvia leucophylla, S. apiana, and Artemisia californica. The toxic substance may be deposited when dew condenses on affected seedlings in the field. PMID:17833745

  9. Microwave spectra of some volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave (MRR) spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequency, peak absorption intensity, and integrated intensity are included for 26 volatile organic compounds, all but one of which contain oxygen.

  10. Volatile Solvent Use among Western Australian Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Annemaree; Houghton, Stephen; Odgers, Peta

    1998-01-01

    Semistructured interviews were conducted with 40 adolescents who reported inhaling volatile solvents. All were aware of the short-term health risks involved in use, and most reported experiencing ill effects. Offers suggestions for intervention. (Author/GCP)

  11. TOXIC ORGANIC VOLATILIZATION FROM LAND TREATMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methodology was evaluated for estimating volatilization of toxic organic chemicals from unsaturated soils. Projections were compared with laboratory data for simulated rapid infiltration wastewater treatment systems receiving primary municipal wastewater spiked with a suite of 18...

  12. Reactive flash volatilization of fluid fuels

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Lanny D.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.; Dreyer, Bradon J.; Salge, James R.

    2013-01-08

    The invention provides methods for the production of synthesis gas. More particularly, various embodiments of the invention relate to systems and methods for volatilizing fluid fuel to produce synthesis gas by using a metal catalyst on a solid support matrix.

  13. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AS EXPOSURE BIOMARKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined...

  14. Release of volatile mercury from vascular plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S. M.; Puerner, N. J.; Speitel, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    Volatile, organic solvent soluble mercury has been found in leaves and seeds of several angiosperms. Leaves of garlic vine, avocado, and haole-koa release mercury in volatile form rapidly at room temperature. In garlic vine, the most active release is temperature dependent, but does not parallel the vapor-pressure temperature relationship for mercury. Mercury can be trapped in nitric-perchloric acid digestion fluid, or n-hexane, but is lost from the hexane unless the acid mixture is present. Seeds of haole-koa also contain extractable mercury but volatility declines in the series n-hexane (90%), methanol (50%), water (10%). This suggests that reduced volatility may accompany solvolysis in the more polar media.

  15. Stabilized hemiacetal complexes as precursors for the controlled release of bioactive volatile alcohols.

    PubMed

    Buchs, Barbara; Fieber, Wolfgang; Drahoňovský, Dušan; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Herrmann, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Hemiacetals of pyridine-2-carbaldehyde derivatives and volatile alcohols can be stabilized in organic solution in the presence of protons or different metal cations. Despite the inherent instability of hemiacetals in H(2) O, stabilizing them with zinc(II) triflate and adding them to a cationic surfactant formulation resulted in the slow release of the alcohol from cotton surfaces being treated with the hemiacetal complex. Stabilized hemiacetals might thus be suitable delivery systems of bioactive volatiles by rapid hydrolysis in H(2) O-based media. PMID:22492488

  16. Partial derivative approach for option pricing in a simple stochastic volatility model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, M.

    2004-11-01

    We study a market model in which the volatility of the stock may jump at a random time from a fixed value to another fixed value. This model has already been introduced in the literature. We present a new approach to the problem, based on partial differential equations, which gives a different perspective to the issue. Within our framework we can easily consider several forms for the market price of volatility risk, and interpret their financial meaning. We thus recover solutions previously mentioned in the literature as well as obtaining new ones.

  17. Stable Local Volatility Calibration Using Kernel Splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Thomas F.; Li, Yuying; Wang, Cheng

    2010-09-01

    We propose an optimization formulation using L1 norm to ensure accuracy and stability in calibrating a local volatility function for option pricing. Using a regularization parameter, the proposed objective function balances the calibration accuracy with the model complexity. Motivated by the support vector machine learning, the unknown local volatility function is represented by a kernel function generating splines and the model complexity is controlled by minimizing the 1-norm of the kernel coefficient vector. In the context of the support vector regression for function estimation based on a finite set of observations, this corresponds to minimizing the number of support vectors for predictability. We illustrate the ability of the proposed approach to reconstruct the local volatility function in a synthetic market. In addition, based on S&P 500 market index option data, we demonstrate that the calibrated local volatility surface is simple and resembles the observed implied volatility surface in shape. Stability is illustrated by calibrating local volatility functions using market option data from different dates.

  18. Lunar apatite with terrestrial volatile abundances.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Jeremy W; Liu, Yang; Rossman, George R; Guan, Yunbin; Eiler, John M; Stolper, Edward M; Taylor, Lawrence A

    2010-07-22

    The Moon is thought to be depleted relative to the Earth in volatile elements such as H, Cl and the alkalis. Nevertheless, evidence for lunar explosive volcanism has been used to infer that some lunar magmas exsolved a CO-rich and CO(2)-rich vapour phase before or during eruption. Although there is also evidence for other volatile species on glass spherules, until recently there had been no unambiguous reports of indigenous H in lunar rocks. Here we report quantitative ion microprobe measurements of late-stage apatite from lunar basalt 14053 that document concentrations of H, Cl and S that are indistinguishable from apatites in common terrestrial igneous rocks. These volatile contents could reflect post-magmatic metamorphic volatile addition or growth from a late-stage, interstitial, sulphide-saturated melt that contained approximately 1,600 parts per million H(2)O and approximately 3,500 parts per million Cl. Both metamorphic and igneous models of apatite formation suggest a volatile inventory for at least some lunar materials that is similar to comparable terrestrial materials. One possible implication is that portions of the lunar mantle or crust are more volatile-rich than previously thought. PMID:20651686

  19. Volatile Emissions from Compressed Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Dini, Francesca; Capuano, Rosamaria; Strand, Tillan; Ek, Anna-Christina; Lindgren, Margareta; Paolesse, Roberto; Di Natale, Corrado; Lundström, Ingemar

    2013-01-01

    Since almost every fifth patient treated in hospital care develops pressure ulcers, early identification of risk is important. A non-invasive method for the elucidation of endogenous biomarkers related to pressure ulcers could be an excellent tool for this purpose. We therefore found it of interest to determine if there is a difference in the emissions of volatiles from compressed and uncompressed tissue. The ultimate goal is to find a non-invasive method to obtain an early warning for the risk of developing pressure ulcers for bed-ridden persons. Chemical analysis of the emissions, collected in compresses, was made with gas-chromatography – mass spectrometry and with a chemical sensor array, the so called electronic nose. It was found that the emissions from healthy and hospitalized persons differed significantly irrespective of the site. Within each group there was a clear difference between the compressed and uncompressed site. Peaks that could be certainly deemed as markers of the compression were, however, not identified. Nonetheless, different compounds connected to the application of local mechanical pressure were found. The results obtained with GC-MS reveal the complexity of VOC composition, thus an array of non-selective chemical sensors seems to be a suitable choice for the analysis of skin emission from compressed tissues; it may represent a practical instrument for bed side diagnostics. Results show that the adopted electronic noses are likely sensitive to the total amount of the emission rather than to its composition. The development of a gas sensor-based device requires then the design of sensor receptors adequate to detect the VOCs bouquet typical of pressure. This preliminary experiment evidences the necessity of studies where each given person is followed for a long time in a ward in order to detect the insurgence of specific VOCs pattern changes signalling the occurrence of ulcers. PMID:23874929

  20. Lunar volatiles: balancing science and resource development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, Dana

    In the context of human exploration of the moon, the volatiles postulated to exist at the lunar poles have value as resources as well as scientific significance. Once sustained human operations commence on the moon, society will move from a paradigm in which examination of planetary materials has been unconstrained to one where use of those materials will support habitability and further exploration. A framework for the scientific investigation of lunar volatiles that allows for eventual economic exploitation can guide both activities and resolve the conflicts that will inevitably develop if the postulated lunar volatiles prove to be both extant and accessible. Scientific constraints on the framework include characterization at both poles of the isotopes, elements, and molecules in the volatiles, their relative and absolute abundances, and their horizontal and vertical distribution. A subset of this data is necessary in order to assess, develop, and initiate resource exploitation. In addition, the scientific record of volatiles in the cold traps can be contaminated by the cold-trapping of migrating volatiles released from operations elsewhere on the moon even if the indigenous, cold-trapped volatiles are not utilized. Possible decision points defining the transition from science-dominated to exploitation-dominated use include technology limits in the 70K environment, evolving science priorities (funding), and the resolution of major science issues. Inputs to policy development include any North vs. South Pole differences in volatile characteristics and the suitability of the volatiles to enable further scientific exploration of the moon. In the absence of national sovereignty on the moon, enforcement of any framework is an open question, particularly if science and commercial interests are in competition. The framework, processes, and precedent set by how we as a society choose to handle the scientific bounty and resource promise of lunar volatiles may eventually

  1. Lewis-Acid/Base Effects on Gallium Volatility in Molten Chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.F.

    2001-02-26

    It has been proposed that GaCl{sub 3} can be removed by direct volatilization from a Pu-Ga alloy that is dissolved in a molten chloride salt. Although pure GaCl{sub 3} is quite volatile (boiling point, 201 C), the behavior of GaCl{sub 3} dissolved in chloride salts is different due to solution effects and is critically dependent on the composition of the solvent salt (i.e., its Lewis-acid/base character). In this report, the behavior of gallium in prototypical Lewis-acid and Lewis-base salts is compared. It was found that gallium volatility is suppressed in basic melts and enhanced in acidic melts. The implications of these results on the potential for simple gallium removal in molten salt systems are significant.

  2. Velamo do campo: its volatile constituents, secretory elements, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    El Babili, Fatiha; Roques, Christine; Haddioui, Laila; Bellvert, Floriant; Bertrand, Cédric; Chatelain, Christian

    2012-07-01

    The volatile components from Croton campestris root bark were localized by an anatomical study and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the first time. The roots of this plant showed secretory cells. These volatile constituents, isolated from the dichloromethane extract by hydrodistillation, were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found 69 components. They were characterized, and the major constituents of crude oil root barks were spathulenol (23.3%) and borneol (18.7%). Growth inhibitory activity of the active compounds in solution was evaluated by measuring minimal inhibitory concentrations using a broth micromethod. The minimal inhibitory concentration of root bark volatile constituents was 1.56 μg/mL for Staphylococcus aureus, 3.125 μg/mL for Candida albicans, and 6.25 μg/mL for Aspergillusniger. PMID:22612296

  3. Volatilization modeling of two herbicides from soil in a wind tunnel experiment under varying humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Martina; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2012-11-20

    Volatilization of pesticides from the bare soil surface is drastically reduced when the soil is under dry conditions (i.e., water content lower than the permanent wilting point). This effect is caused by the hydrated mineral surfaces that become available as additional sorption sites under dry conditions. However, established volatilization models do not explicitly consider the hydrated mineral surfaces as an independent sorption compartment and cannot correctly cover the moisture effect on volatilization. Here we integrated the existing mechanistic understanding of sorption of organic compounds to mineral surfaces and its dependence on the hydration status into a simple volatilization model. The resulting model was tested with reported experimental data for two herbicides from a wind tunnel experiment under various well-defined humidity conditions. The required equilibrium sorption coefficients of triallate and trifluralin to the mineral surfaces, K(min/air), at 60% relative humidity were fitted to experimental data and extrapolated to other humidity conditions. The model captures the general trend of the volatilization in different humidity scenarios. The results reveal that it is essential to have high quality input data for K(min/air), the available specific surface area (SSA), the penetration depth of the applied pesticide solution, and the humidity conditions in the soil. The model approach presented here in combination with an improved description of the humidity conditions under dry conditions can be integrated into existing volatilization models that already work well for humid conditions but still lack the mechanistically based description of the volatilization process under dry conditions. PMID:23130847

  4. Modelling pesticide volatilization after soil application using the mechanistic model Volt'Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedos, Carole; Génermont, Sophie; Le Cadre, Edith; Garcia, Lucas; Barriuso, Enrique; Cellier, Pierre

    Volatilization of pesticides participates in atmospheric contamination and affects environmental ecosystems including human welfare. Modelling at relevant time and spatial scales is needed to better understand the complex processes involved in pesticide volatilization. Volt'Air-Pesticides has been developed following a two-step procedure to study pesticide volatilization at the field scale and at a quarter time step. Firstly, Volt'Air-NH 3 was adapted by extending the initial transfer of solutes to pesticides and by adding specific calculations for physico-chemical equilibriums as well as for the degradation of pesticides in soil. Secondly, the model was evaluated in terms of 3 pesticides applied on bare soil (atrazine, alachlor, and trifluralin) which display a wide range of volatilization rates. A sensitivity analysis confirmed the relevance of tuning to K h. Then, using Volt'Air-Pesticides, environmental conditions and emission fluxes of the pesticides were compared to fluxes measured under 2 environmental conditions. The model fairly well described water temporal dynamics, soil surface temperature, and energy budget. Overall, Volt'Air-Pesticides estimates of the order of magnitude of the volatilization flux of all three compounds were in good agreement with the field measurements. The model also satisfactorily simulated the decrease in the volatilization rate of the three pesticides during night-time as well as the decrease in the soil surface residue of trifluralin before and after incorporation. However, the timing of the maximum flux rate during the day was not correctly described, thought to be linked to an increased adsorption under dry soil conditions. Thanks to Volt'Air's capacity to deal with pedo-climatic conditions, several existing parameterizations describing adsorption as a function of soil water content could be tested. However, this point requires further investigation. Practically speaking, Volt'Air-Pesticides can be a useful tool to make

  5. Volatiles released by endophytic Pseudomonas fluorescens promoting the growth and volatile oil accumulation in Atractylodes lancea.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia-Yu; Li, Xia; Zheng, Jiao-Yan; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2016-04-01

    Atractylodes lancea is a well-known, but endangered, Chinese medicinal plant whose volatile oils are its main active components. As the volatile oil content in cultivated A. lancea is much lower than that in the wild herb, the application of microbes or related elicitors to promote growth and volatile oil accumulation in the cultivated herb is an important area of research. This study demonstrates that the endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens ALEB7B isolated from the geo-authentic A. lancea can release several nitrogenous volatiles, such as formamide and N,N-dimethyl-formamide, which significantly promote the growth of non-infected A. lancea. Moreover, the main bacterial volatile benzaldehyde significantly promotes volatile oil accumulation in non-infected A. lancea via activating plant defense responses. Notably, the bacterial nitrogenous volatiles cannot be detected in the A. lancea - Pseudomonas fluorescens symbiont while the benzaldehyde can be detected, indicating the nitrogenous volatiles or their precursors may have been consumed by the host plant. This study firstly demonstrates that the interaction between plant and endophytic bacterium is not limited to the commonly known physical contact, extending the ecological functions of endophyte in the phytosphere and deepening the understandings about the symbiotic interaction. PMID:26874622

  6. Volatile interaction between undamaged plants affects tritrophic interactions through changed plant volatile emission.

    PubMed

    Vucetic, Andja; Dahlin, Iris; Petrovic-Obradovic, Olivera; Glinwood, Robert; Webster, Ben; Ninkovic, Velemir

    2014-01-01

    Volatile interactions between unattacked plants can lead to changes in their volatile emissions. Exposure of potato plants to onion plant volatiles results in increased emission of 2 terpenoids, (E)-nerolidol and TMTT. We investigated whether this is detectable by the ladybird Coccinella septempunctata. The odor of onion-exposed potato was significantly more attractive to ladybirds than that of unexposed potato. Further, a synthetic blend mimicking the volatile profile of onion-exposed potato was more attractive than a blend mimicking that of unexposed potato. When presented individually, TMTT was attractive to ladybirds whereas (E)-nerolidol was repellent. Volatile exchange between unattacked plants and consequent increased attractiveness for ladybirds may be a mechanism that contributes to the increased abundance of natural enemies in complex plant habitats. PMID:25763628

  7. Improvement of a headspace solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the analysis of wheat bread volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Raffo, Antonio; Carcea, Marina; Castagna, Claudia; Magrì, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    An improved method based on headspace solid phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC-MS) was proposed for the semi-quantitative determination of wheat bread volatile compounds isolated from both whole slice and crust samples. A DVB/CAR/PDMS fibre was used to extract volatiles from the headspace of a bread powdered sample dispersed in a sodium chloride (20%) aqueous solution and kept for 60min at 50°C under controlled stirring. Thirty-nine out of all the extracted volatiles were fully identified, whereas for 95 other volatiles a tentative identification was proposed, to give a complete as possible profile of wheat bread volatile compounds. The use of an array of ten structurally and physicochemically similar internal standards allowed to markedly improve method precision with respect to previous HS-SPME/GC-MS methods for bread volatiles. Good linearity of the method was verified for a selection of volatiles from several chemical groups by calibration with matrix-matched extraction solutions. This simple, rapid, precise and sensitive method could represent a valuable tool to obtain semi-quantitative information when investigating the influence of technological factors on volatiles formation in wheat bread and other bakery products. PMID:26118802

  8. Evaluation of Volatilization by Organic Chemicals Residing Below the Soil Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jury, William A.; Russo, David; Streile, Gary; El Abd, Hesham

    1990-01-01

    Although volatile organic compounds located in buried waste repositories or distributed through the unsaturated soil zone have the potential to migrate to the atmosphere by vapor diffusion, little attention has been paid in the past to estimating the importance of volatilization losses. In this paper a screening model is introduced which evaluates the relative volatilization losses of a number of organic compounds under standard soil conditions. The model is an analytic solution to the problem wherein the organic chemical is located at time zero at uniform concentration in a finite layer of soil covered by a layer of soil devoid of chemical. The compound is assumed to move by vapor or liquid diffusion and by mass flow under the influence of steady upward or zero water flow while undergoing first-order degradation and linear equilibrium adsorption. Loss to the atmosphere is governed by vapor diffusion through a stagnant air boundary layer. Calculations are performed on 35 organic compounds in two model soils with properties characteristic of sandy and clayey soil. The model identifies those compounds with high potential for loss during 1 year after incorporation under 100 cm of soil cover and also is used to calculate the minimum soil cover thickness required to reduce volatilization losses to insignificant levels during the lifetime of the compound in the soil. From the latter calculation it was determined that certain compounds may volatilize from deep subsurface locations or even groundwater unless the soil surface is sealed to prevent gas migration.

  9. Optimal directional volatile transport in retronasal olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Rui; Michalski, Mark H.; Brown, Elliott; Doan, Ngoc; Zinter, Joseph; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of humans to distinguish the delicate differences in food flavors depends mostly on retronasal smell, in which food volatiles entrained into the airway at the back of the oral cavity are transported by exhaled air through the nasal cavity to stimulate the olfactory receptor neurons. Little is known whether food volatiles are preferentially carried by retronasal flow toward the nasal cavity rather than by orthonasal flow into the lung. To study the differences between retronasal and orthonasal flow, we obtained computed tomography (CT) images of the orthonasal airway from a healthy human subject, printed an experimental model using a 3D printer, and analyzed the flow field inside the airway. The results show that, during inhalation, the anatomical structure of the oropharynx creates an air curtain outside a virtual cavity connecting the oropharynx and the back of the mouth, which prevents food volatiles from being transported into the main stream toward the lung. In contrast, during exhalation, the flow preferentially sweeps through this virtual cavity and effectively enhances the entrainment of food volatiles into the main retronasal flow. This asymmetrical transport efficiency is also found to have a nonmonotonic Reynolds number dependence: The asymmetry peaks at a range of an intermediate Reynolds number close to 800, because the air curtain effect during inhalation becomes strongest in this range. This study provides the first experimental evidence, to our knowledge, for adaptations of the geometry of the human oropharynx for efficient transport of food volatiles toward the olfactory receptors in the nasal cavity. PMID:26553982

  10. Volatile aldehydes in libraries and archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenech, Ann; Strlič, Matija; Kralj Cigić, Irena; Levart, Alenka; Gibson, Lorraine T.; de Bruin, Gerrit; Ntanos, Konstantinos; Kolar, Jana; Cassar, May

    2010-06-01

    Volatile aldehydes are produced during degradation of paper-based materials. This may result in their accumulation in archival and library repositories. However, no systematic study has been performed so far. In the frame of this study, passive sampling was carried out at ten locations in four libraries and archives. Despite the very variable sampling locations, no major differences were found, although air-filtered repositories were found to have lower concentrations while a non-ventilated newspaper repository exhibited the highest concentrations of volatile aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, furfural and hexanal). Five employees in one institution were also provided with personal passive samplers to investigate employees' exposure to volatile aldehydes. All values were lower than the presently valid exposure limits. The concentration of volatile aldehydes, acetic acid, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in general was also compared with that of outdoor-generated pollutants. It was evident that inside the repository and particularly inside archival boxes, the concentration of VOCs and acetic acid was much higher than the concentration of outdoor-generated pollutants, which are otherwise more routinely studied in connection with heritage materials. This indicates that further work on the pro-degradative effect of VOCs on heritage materials is necessary and that monitoring of VOCs in heritage institutions should become more widespread.

  11. Optimal directional volatile transport in retronasal olfaction.

    PubMed

    Ni, Rui; Michalski, Mark H; Brown, Elliott; Doan, Ngoc; Zinter, Joseph; Ouellette, Nicholas T; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2015-11-24

    The ability of humans to distinguish the delicate differences in food flavors depends mostly on retronasal smell, in which food volatiles entrained into the airway at the back of the oral cavity are transported by exhaled air through the nasal cavity to stimulate the olfactory receptor neurons. Little is known whether food volatiles are preferentially carried by retronasal flow toward the nasal cavity rather than by orthonasal flow into the lung. To study the differences between retronasal and orthonasal flow, we obtained computed tomography (CT) images of the orthonasal airway from a healthy human subject, printed an experimental model using a 3D printer, and analyzed the flow field inside the airway. The results show that, during inhalation, the anatomical structure of the oropharynx creates an air curtain outside a virtual cavity connecting the oropharynx and the back of the mouth, which prevents food volatiles from being transported into the main stream toward the lung. In contrast, during exhalation, the flow preferentially sweeps through this virtual cavity and effectively enhances the entrainment of food volatiles into the main retronasal flow. This asymmetrical transport efficiency is also found to have a nonmonotonic Reynolds number dependence: The asymmetry peaks at a range of an intermediate Reynolds number close to 800, because the air curtain effect during inhalation becomes strongest in this range. This study provides the first experimental evidence, to our knowledge, for adaptations of the geometry of the human oropharynx for efficient transport of food volatiles toward the olfactory receptors in the nasal cavity. PMID:26553982

  12. Supercritical fluid extraction in plant essential and volatile oil analysis.

    PubMed

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh

    2007-09-01

    The use of supercritical fluids, especially carbon dioxide, in the extraction of plant volatile components has increased during two last decades due to the expected advantages of the supercritical extraction process. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is a rapid, selective and convenient method for sample preparation prior to the analysis of compounds in the volatile product of plant matrices. Also, SFE is a simple, inexpensive, fast, effective and virtually solvent-free sample pretreatment technique. This review provides a detailed and updated discussion of the developments, modes and applications of SFE in the isolation of essential oils from plant matrices. SFE is usually performed with pure or modified carbon dioxide, which facilitates off-line collection of extracts and on-line coupling with other analytical methods such as gas, liquid and supercritical fluid chromatography. In this review, we showed that a number of factors influence extraction yields, these being solubility of the solute in the fluid, diffusion through the matrix and collection process. Finally, SFE has been compared with conventional extraction methods in terms of selectivity, rapidity, cleanliness and possibility of manipulating the composition of the extract. PMID:17624357

  13. Volatile fractionation and tektite source material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, L. S.

    1989-09-01

    The arguments used by Love and Woronow (1988) to assess the role played in the origin of bediasites by extensive volatile fractionation are critically examined. Using the ratios of 'refractory' oxides, CaO, Al2O3, and MgO, to the 'volatile' oxides, Na2O and K2O, these authors concluded that vapor fractionation did not play a significant role. In this paper, experimental evidence is presented that shows that the assumption of volatility for the alkali elements (as least with respect to silica) to be not valid under the conditions under which tektites formed. It is shown that the results of vapor fractionation in experiments on glasses of tektite composition are approximately parallel the trends seen in bediasite analysis.

  14. Redistribution of volatiles during lunar metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cirlin, E. H.; Housley, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal release profiles of Pb, Zn, and Cd in sample 66095 (highly shocked breccia with melt rock matrix) showed that these volatiles were mostly present on the surface of the grains. Zn in rusty grains from 66095 was also mostly surface Zn, probably from sphalerite in grain boundaries and cracks. Simulation experiments of volatile transfer showed that Fe, FeCl2, iron phosphide, and troilite (FeS) can be produced and transported during subsolidus reactions. These results suggest that volatiles, rust, schreibersite, and possible siderophiles which are observed in lunar highland samples might have been redistributed during disequilibrium thermal metamorphism in hot ejecta blankets, and were not necessarily introduced by volcanic activity or meteoritic addition.

  15. Catalyst for Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, George M. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Schyryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); DAmbrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for oxidizing volatile organic compounds to carbon dioxide and water with the minimal addition of energy. A mixture of the volatile organic compound and an oxidizing agent (e.g. ambient air containing the volatile organic compound) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

  16. Volatile components and continental material of planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florenskiy, K. P.; Nikolayeva, O. V.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the continental material of the terrestrial planets varies in composition from planet to planet according to the abundances and composition of true volatiles (H20, CO2, etc.) in the outer shells of the planets. The formation of these shells occurs very early in a planet's evolution when the role of endogenous processes is indistinct and continental materials are subject to melting and vaporizing in the absence of an atmosphere. As a result, the chemical properties of continental materials are related not only to fractionation processes but also to meltability and volatility. For planets retaining a certain quantity of true volatile components, the chemical transformation of continental material is characterized by a close interaction between impact melting vaporization and endogeneous geological processes.

  17. Volatile compounds in shergottite and nakhlite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.; Aggrey, Kwesi E.; Muenow, David W.

    1990-01-01

    Since discovery of apparent carbonate carbon in Nakhla, significant evidence has accumulated for occurrence of volatile compounds in shergotties and nakhlites. Results are presented from a study of volatile compounds in three shergottites, one nakhlite, and three eucrite control samples. Shergotties ALHA77005, EETA79001, and Shergotty, and the nakhlite Nakhla, all contain oxidized sulfur (sulfate) of preterrestrial origin; sulfur oxidation is most complete in EETA79001/Lith-C. Significant bulk carbonate was confirmed in Nakhla and trace carbonate was substantiated for EETA79001, all of which appears to be preterrestrial in origin. Chlorine covaries with oxidized sulfur, whereas carbonate and sulfate are inversely related. These volatile compounds were probably formed in a highly oxidizing, aqueous environment sometime in the late stage histories of the rocks that are now represented as meteorites. They are consistent with the hypothesis that shergottite and nakhlite meteorites originated on Mars and that Mars has supported aqueous geochemistry during its history.

  18. Volatiles of Chrysanthemum zawadskii var. latilobum K

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Gun-Hee

    2012-01-01

    The volatile aroma constituents of Chrysanthemum zawadskii var. latilobum K. were separated by hydro distillation extraction (HDE) method using a Clevenger-type apparatus, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The yield of C. zawadskii var. latilobum K. flower essential oil (FEO) was 0.12% (w/w) and the color was light green. Fifty-five volatile chemical components, which make up 88.38% of the total aroma composition, were tentatively characterized. C. zawadskii var. latilobum K. FEOs contained 27 hydrocarbons, 12 alcohols, 7 ketones, 4 esters, 1 aldehyde, 1 amine, and 3 miscellaneous components. The major functional groups were terpene alcohol and ketone. Borneol (12.96), (±)-7-epi-amiteol (12.60), and camphor (10.54%) were the predominant volatiles. These compounds can be used in food and pharmaceutical industries due to their active bio-functional properties. PMID:24471090

  19. Volatile fractionation and tektite source material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Louis S.

    1989-01-01

    The arguments used by Love and Woronow (1988) to assess the role played in the origin of bediasites by extensive volatile fractionation are critically examined. Using the ratios of 'refractory' oxides, CaO, Al2O3, and MgO, to the 'volatile' oxides, Na2O and K2O, these authors concluded that vapor fractionation did not play a significant role. In this paper, experimental evidence is presented that shows that the assumption of volatility for the alkali elements (as least with respect to silica) to be not valid under the conditions under which tektites formed. It is shown that the results of vapor fractionation in experiments on glasses of tektite composition are approximately parallel the trends seen in bediasite analysis.

  20. Volatile species retention during metallic fuel casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Randall S.; Porter, Douglas L.

    2013-10-01

    Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, and although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Based on these results it is very probable that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

  1. Volatile Species Retention During Metallic Fuel Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Proter

    2013-10-01

    Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Bases on these results it is very probably that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

  2. Volatiles of Chrysanthemum zawadskii var. latilobum K.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Gun-Hee

    2012-09-01

    The volatile aroma constituents of Chrysanthemum zawadskii var. latilobum K. were separated by hydro distillation extraction (HDE) method using a Clevenger-type apparatus, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The yield of C. zawadskii var. latilobum K. flower essential oil (FEO) was 0.12% (w/w) and the color was light green. Fifty-five volatile chemical components, which make up 88.38% of the total aroma composition, were tentatively characterized. C. zawadskii var. latilobum K. FEOs contained 27 hydrocarbons, 12 alcohols, 7 ketones, 4 esters, 1 aldehyde, 1 amine, and 3 miscellaneous components. The major functional groups were terpene alcohol and ketone. Borneol (12.96), (±)-7-epi-amiteol (12.60), and camphor (10.54%) were the predominant volatiles. These compounds can be used in food and pharmaceutical industries due to their active bio-functional properties. PMID:24471090

  3. The volatility of stock market prices.

    PubMed

    Shiller, R J

    1987-01-01

    If the volatility of stock market prices is to be understood in terms of the efficient markets hypothesis, then there should be evidence that true investment value changes through time sufficiently to justify the price changes. Three indicators of change in true investment value of the aggregate stock market in the United States from 1871 to 1986 are considered: changes in dividends, in real interest rates, and in a direct measure of intertemporal marginal rates of substitution. Although there are some ambiguities in interpreting the evidence, dividend changes appear to contribute very little toward justifying the observed historical volatility of stock prices. The other indicators contribute some, but still most of the volatility of stock market prices appears unexplained. PMID:17769311

  4. Arsenic speciation and volatilization from flooded paddy soils amended with different organic matters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai; Jia, Yan; Sun, Guo-Xin; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2012-02-21

    Arsenic (As) methylation and volatilization in soil can be increased after organic matter (OM) amendment, though the factors influencing this are poorly understood. Herein we investigate how amended OM influences As speciation as well as how it alters microbial processes in soil and soil solution during As volatilization. Microcosm experiments were conducted on predried and fresh As contaminated paddy soils to investigate microbial mediated As speciation and volatilization under different OM amendment conditions. These experiments indicated that the microbes attached to OM did not significantly influence As volatilization. The arsine flux from the treatment amended with 10% clover (clover-amended treatment, CT) and dried distillers grain (DDG) (DDG-amended treatment, DT2) were significantly higher than the control. Trimethylarsine (TMAs) was the dominant species in arsine derived from CT, whereas the primary arsine species from DT2 was TMAs and arsine (AsH(3)), followed by monomethylarsine (MeAsH(2)). The predominant As species in the soil solutions of CT and DT2 were dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA) and As(V), respectively. OM addition increased the activities of arsenite-oxidizing bacteria (harboring aroA-like genes), though they did not increase or even decrease the abundance of arsenite oxidizers. In contrast, the abundance of arsenate reducers (carrying the arsC gene) was increased by OM amendment; however, significant enhancement of activity of arsenate reducers was observed only in CT. Our results demonstrate that OM addition significantly increased As methylation and volatilization from the investigated paddy soil. The physiologically active bacteria capable of oxidization, reduction, and methylation of As coexisted and mediated the As speciation in soil and soil solution. PMID:22295880

  5. Changes in dark chocolate volatiles during storage.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, Lia M; Cadwallader, Keith R; Engeseth, Nicki J

    2012-05-01

    Chocolate storage is critical to the quality of the final product. Inadequate storage, especially with temperature fluctuations, may lead to a change in crystal structure, which may eventually cause fat bloom. Bloom is the main cause of quality loss in the chocolate industry. The impact of various storage conditions on the flavor quality of dark chocolate was determined. Dark chocolate was stored in different conditions leading to either fat or sugar bloom and analyzed at 0, 4, and 8 weeks of storage. Changes in chocolate flavor were determined by volatile analysis and descriptive sensory evaluation. Results were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA), cluster analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and linear partial least-squares regression analysis (PLS). Volatile concentration and loss were significantly affected by storage conditions. Chocolates stored at high temperature were the most visually and texturally compromised, but volatile concentrations were affected the least, whereas samples stored at ambient, frozen, and high relative humidity conditions had significant volatile loss during storage. It was determined that high-temperature storage caused a change in crystal state due to the polymorphic shift to form VI, leading to an increase in sample hardness. Decreased solid fat content (SFC) during high-temperature storage increased instrumentally determined volatile retention, although no difference was detected in chocolate flavor during sensory analysis, possibly due to instrumental and sensory sampling techniques. When all instrumental and sensory data had been taken into account, the storage condition that had the least impact on texture, surface roughness, grain size, lipid polymorphism, fat bloom formation, volatile concentrations, and sensory attributes was storage at constant temperature and 75% relative humidity. PMID:22482444

  6. Non-volatile memory for checkpoint storage

    SciTech Connect

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Cipolla, Thomas M.; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan; Heidelberger, Philip; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Ohmacht, Martin; Takken, Todd E.

    2014-07-22

    A system, method and computer program product for supporting system initiated checkpoints in high performance parallel computing systems and storing of checkpoint data to a non-volatile memory storage device. The system and method generates selective control signals to perform checkpointing of system related data in presence of messaging activity associated with a user application running at the node. The checkpointing is initiated by the system such that checkpoint data of a plurality of network nodes may be obtained even in the presence of user applications running on highly parallel computers that include ongoing user messaging activity. In one embodiment, the non-volatile memory is a pluggable flash memory card.

  7. A note on Black Scholes implied volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chargoy-Corona, Jesús; Ibarra-Valdez, Carlos

    2006-10-01

    An approximate formula for the Black-Scholes implied volatility is given by means of an asymptotic representation of the Black-Scholes formula. This representation is based on a variable change that reduces the number of meaningful variables from five to three. It is stated clearly which is the family of functions we are going to work, specially the inverse of the normal accumulative function. Estimates for the error in the resulting approximate formulas for both the option value and the volatility are obtained as well.

  8. PROCESS FOR TREATING VOLATILE METAL FLUORIDES

    DOEpatents

    Rudge, A.J.; Lowe, A.J.

    1957-10-01

    This patent relates to the purification of uranium hexafluoride, made by reacting the metal or its tetrafluoride with fluorine, from the frequently contained traces of hydrofluoric acid. According to the present process, UF/sub 6/ containing as an impurity a small amount of hydrofluoric acid, is treated to remove such impurity by contact with an anhydrous alkali metal fluoride such as sodium fluoride. In this way a non-volatile complex containing hydrofluoric acid and the alkali metal fluoride is formed, and the volatile UF /sub 6/ may then be removed by distillation.

  9. Volatile compound formation during argan kernel roasting.

    PubMed

    El Monfalouti, Hanae; Charrouf, Zoubida; Giordano, Manuela; Guillaume, Dominique; Kartah, Badreddine; Harhar, Hicham; Gharby, Saïd; Denhez, Clément; Zeppa, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Virgin edible argan oil is prepared by cold-pressing argan kernels previously roasted at 110 degrees C for up to 25 minutes. The concentration of 40 volatile compounds in virgin edible argan oil was determined as a function of argan kernel roasting time. Most of the volatile compounds begin to be formed after 15 to 25 minutes of roasting. This suggests that a strictly controlled roasting time should allow the modulation of argan oil taste and thus satisfy different types of consumers. This could be of major importance considering the present booming use of edible argan oil. PMID:23472454

  10. Pricing foreign equity option with stochastic volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qi; Xu, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we propose a general foreign equity option pricing framework that unifies the vast foreign equity option pricing literature and incorporates the stochastic volatility into foreign equity option pricing. Under our framework, the time-changed Lévy processes are used to model the underlying assets price of foreign equity option and the closed form pricing formula is obtained through the use of characteristic function methodology. Numerical tests indicate that stochastic volatility has a dramatic effect on the foreign equity option prices.

  11. Radon as a Tracer for Lunar Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesen, Larry Jay

    1992-01-01

    Radon and its decay product polonium can be used as tracers to search for lunar volatiles. One effective technique to look for them would be by using alpha-particle spectrometers from lunar orbit. Alpha spectrometers were flown in the Apollo Service Modules during the Apollo 15 and 16 missions, and did observe Rn-222 and its decay product Po-210 on the lunar surface from orbit. This demonstrates that radon and polonium can be observed from orbit; what must next be shown is that such observations can reveal something about the locations of volatiles on the Moon.

  12. Volatile element isotope systematics of volcanic geothermal fluids, Krafla Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansson, A.; Gunnarsson Robin, J.; Keller, N. S.; Ono, S.; Barnes, J.

    2015-12-01

    Among the major goals of geothermal geochemistry is to identify the source of the geothermal fluids and the processes influencing their chemical composition. Such can be difficult given that geothermal systems are characterized by many phases (vapor, liquid and solid) and components. Here we report data on volatile element stable isotope systematics (H2O, CO2, Cl, H2S and SO4) in volcanic geothermal fluids at Krafla, NE Iceland. Fluid temperatures ranged from 192 to 437°C. The sources and reactions of these volatile elements is commonly based on identifying the variable end-member components in the system and their respective mixing ratios, or alternatively, comparing temperature dependence of isotope fractionation of given reactions with the measured isotope systematics. Isotopes of a given element fractionates upon reactions with key reactions in geothermal systems being aqueous speciation, vapor-water partitioning and water-rock interactions, these depending on solution composition, temperature and pressure. In order to study the effects of various reactions and processes affecting isotope systematics of geothermal fluids and to reconstruct reservoir isotope systematics, isotope geochemical models were developed by combining aqueous speciation, gas-water partitioning and water-rock modelling together with isotope fractionation and isotope mass action equations. Based on these models and data collected at Krafla it is concluded that the key factors controlling, reactive volatile element isotope systematics (S and C) are two, the isotope composition of the source material and isotope fractionation associated with aqueous and vapor speciation and how these changes as a function of processes occurring in the system including boiling and fluid-rock interaction, whereas the non-reactive element isotope systematics (Cl) is controlled their various end-member components in the system and their respective mixing ratios. Based on these data and models, the reservoir C, S

  13. Determination of the solubility of low volatility liquid organic compounds in water using volatile-tracer assisted headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Barnes, Donald G

    2016-02-26

    This study reports a new headspace gas chromatographic method (HS-GC) for the determination of water solubility of low volatility liquid organic compounds (LVLOs). The HS-GC analysis was performed on a set of aqueous solutions containing a range of concentrations of toluene-spiked (as a tracer) LVLOs, from under-saturation to over-saturation. A plot of the toluene tracer GC signal vs. the concentration of the LVLO results in two lines of different slopes that intersect at the concentration corresponding to the compound's solubility in water. The results showed that the HS-GC method has good precision (RSD <6.3%) and good accuracy, in which the relative deference between the data measured by the HS-GC method and the reference method were within 6.0%. The HS-GC method is simple and particularly suitable for measuring the solubility of LVLOs at elevated temperatures. This approach should be of special interest to those concerned about the impact of the presence of low-volatility organic liquids in waters of environmental and biological systems. PMID:26850316

  14. Analysis of volatile organic compounds. [trace amounts of organic volatiles in gas samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlatkis, A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus and method are described for reproducibly analyzing trace amounts of a large number of organic volatiles existing in a gas sample. Direct injection of the trapped volatiles into a cryogenic percolum provides a sharply defined plug. Applications of the method include: (1) analyzing the headspace gas of body fluids and comparing a profile of the organic volatiles with standard profiles for the detection and monitoring of disease; (2) analyzing the headspace gas of foods and beverages and comparing the profile with standard profiles to monitor and control flavor and aroma; and (3) analyses for determining the organic pollutants in air or water samples.

  15. Volatile Organic Compound Optical Fiber Sensors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Elosua, Cesar; Matias, Ignacio R.; Bariain, Candido; Arregui, Francisco J.

    2006-01-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) detection is a topic of growing interest with applications in diverse fields, ranging from environmental uses to the food or chemical industries. Optical fiber VOC sensors offering new and interesting properties which overcame some of the inconveniences found on traditional gas sensors appeared over two decades ago. Thanks to its minimum invasive nature and the advantages that optical fiber offers such as light weight, passive nature, low attenuation and the possibility of multiplexing, among others, these sensors are a real alternative to electronic ones in electrically noisy environments where electronic sensors cannot operate correctly. In the present work, a classification of these devices has been made according to the sensing mechanism and taking also into account the sensing materials or the different methods of fabrication. In addition, some solutions already implemented for the detection of VOCs using optical fiber sensors will be described with detail.

  16. FLUORIDE VOLATILITY PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Katz, J.J.; Hyman, H.H.; Sheft, I.

    1958-04-15

    The separation and recovery of uraniunn from contaminants introduced by neutron irradiation by a halogenation and volatilization method are described. The irradiated uranium is dissolved in bromine trifluoride in the liquid phase. The uranium is converted to the BrF/sub 3/ soluble urmium hexafluoride compound whereas the fluorides of certain contaminating elements are insoluble in liquid BrF/sub 3/, and the reaction rate of the BrF/sub 3/ with certain other solid uranium contamirnnts is sufficiently slower than the reaction rate with uranium that substantial portions of these contaminating elements will remain as solids. These solids are then separated from the solution by a distillation, filtration, or centrifugation step. The uranium hexafluoride is then separated from the balance of the impurities and solvent by one or more distillations.

  17. Enhanced phytoremediation of volatile environmental pollutants with transgenic trees.

    PubMed

    Doty, Sharon L; James, C Andrew; Moore, Allison L; Vajzovic, Azra; Singleton, Glenda L; Ma, Caiping; Khan, Zareen; Xin, Gang; Kang, Jun Won; Park, Jin Young; Meilan, Richard; Strauss, Steven H; Wilkerson, Jasmine; Farin, Federico; Strand, Stuart E

    2007-10-23

    Small, volatile hydrocarbons, including trichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, carbon tetrachloride, benzene, and chloroform, are common environmental pollutants that pose serious health effects. We have developed transgenic poplar (Populus tremula x Populus alba) plants with greatly increased rates of metabolism and removal of these pollutants through the overexpression of cytochrome P450 2E1, a key enzyme in the metabolism of a variety of halogenated compounds. The transgenic poplar plants exhibited increased removal rates of these pollutants from hydroponic solution. When the plants were exposed to gaseous trichloroethylene, chloroform, and benzene, they also demonstrated superior removal of the pollutants from the air. In view of their large size and extensive root systems, these transgenic poplars may provide the means to effectively remediate sites contaminated with a variety of pollutants at much faster rates and at lower costs than can be achieved with current conventional techniques. PMID:17940038

  18. Instabilities in large economies: aggregate volatility without idiosyncratic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonart, Julius; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe; Landier, Augustin; Thesmar, David

    2014-10-01

    We study a dynamical model of interconnected firms which allows for certain market imperfections and frictions, restricted here to be myopic price forecasts and slow adjustment of production. Whereas the standard rational equilibrium is still formally a stationary solution of the dynamics, we show that this equilibrium becomes linearly unstable in a whole region of parameter space. When agents attempt to reach the optimal production target too quickly, coordination breaks down and the dynamics becomes chaotic. In the unstable, ‘turbulent’ phase, the aggregate volatility of the total output remains substantial even when the amplitude of idiosyncratic shocks goes to zero or when the size of the economy becomes large. In other words, crises become endogenous. This suggests an interesting resolution of the ‘small shocks, large business cycles’ puzzle.

  19. Mercuric iodate precipitation from radioiodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution

    DOEpatents

    Partridge, Jerry A.; Bosuego, Gail P.

    1982-01-01

    Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

  20. The influence of volatile solvents on transport across model membranes and human skin.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gabriela; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2012-10-01

    Simple topical formulations which include volatile components, such as gels or sprays, are appealing from a cosmetic perspective. However, complex formulation effects may result from the use of volatile excipients in topical formulations, particularly when applied at clinically relevant doses (typically less than a few mg cm(-2)). The present investigation aims to study the role of the volatile solvent ethanol (EtOH), in combination with Transcutol P(®) (TC), dimethyl isosorbide (DMI) and isopropyl myristate (IPM), on the efficacy of dermal delivery of a model compound (i.e. methyl paraben). The methodology consisted of in vitro diffusion experiments conducted using silicone membranes and human epidermis. Finite dose studies were performed with two types of formulations: saturated solutions of methyl paraben in each vehicle alone and incorporating the volatile solvent in a 50:50 (v/v) proportion. The kinetics of EtOH evaporation from the formulations were also investigated by monitoring the weight loss of the formulation over time. The results showed that the presence of EtOH had little effect on the skin flux of methyl paraben compared with the corresponding saturated solutions. Formulations incorporating the volatile solvent were clearly more efficient, in line with the data obtained with silicone membranes. Furthermore, the permeation of methyl paraben from the saturated EtOH solution in both silicone and skin showed an initial period of relatively fast permeation, after which there was a marked decrease in the permeation rate. This reflected significant ethanol depletion from the formulation (chiefly by evaporation), causing most of the dose of methyl paraben applied to crystallise as a deposited film at the skin surface (observed experimentally and confirmed by mass balance studies), thus decreasing its availability to permeate. Studies of the kinetics of ethanol evaporation from the formulations confirm these findings, demonstrating a very short residence

  1. Headspace Volatiles of Scutellaria Baicalensis Georgi Flowers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile constituents of Baikal skullcap (Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi) flowers were isolated by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and analyzed by GC and GC/MS. A total of 64 constituents was identified (constituting 57.1 – 89.9% of the total area), 13 of which were tentatively identified. beta...

  2. Volatile terpenoids from aeciospores of Cronartium fusiforme.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laseter, J. L.; Weete, J. D.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    Identification of the terpenoids present in the volatile fraction from aeciospores of the gall rust fungus Cronartium fusiforme. The major monoterpenoid hydrocarbons found to be present with only traces of camphene include alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, delta(3)-carene, myrcene, linonene, beta-phellandrene, and delta-terpinene. A number of monoterpenoid alcohols, acyclic sesquiterpenes, and aromatic compounds were also present.

  3. Linux Incident Response Volatile Data Analysis Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Cyber incident response is an emphasized subject area in cybersecurity in information technology with increased need for the protection of data. Due to ongoing threats, cybersecurity imposes many challenges and requires new investigative response techniques. In this study a Linux Incident Response Framework is designed for collecting volatile data…

  4. Volatile organic compound emissions from silage systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a precursor to smog, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere is an environmental concern in some regions. The major source from farms is silage, with emissions coming from the silo face, mixing wagon, and feed bunk. The major compounds emitted are alcohols with other impor...

  5. biogenic aerosol precursors: volatile amines from agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Uwe; Sintermann, Jörg; Spirig, Christoph; Ammann, Christof; Neftel, Albrecht

    2010-05-01

    Information on the occurrence of volatile biogenic amines in the atmosphere is marginal. This group of N-bearing organic compounds are assumed to be a small, though significant component of the atmospheric N-cycle, but are not accounted for in global assessments due to the scarceness of available data. There is increasing evidence for an important role of biogenic amines in the formation of new particulate matter, as well as for aerosol secondary growth. Volatile amines are ubiquitously formed by biodegradation of organic matter, and agriculture is assumed to dominantly contribute to their atmospheric burden. Here we show that the mixing ratios of volatile amines within livestock buildings scale about 2 orders of magnitude lower than NH3, confirming the few literature data available (e.g., Schade and Crutzen, J. Atm. Chem. 22, 319-346, 1995). Flux measurements after manure application in the field, mixing ratios in the headspace of manure storage pools, and concentrations in distilled manure all indicate major depletion of amines relative to NH3 during manure processing. We conclude that the agricultural source distribution of NH3 and amines is not similar. While for NH3 the spreading of manure in the field dominates agricultural emissions, the direct release from livestock buildings dominates the budget of volatile biogenic amines.

  6. The Negative Effects of Volatile Sulphur Compounds.

    PubMed

    Milella, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Oral malodor has been studied extensively in humans but not necessarily to the same degree in our veterinary patients where malodor constitutes a significant problem. Breath malodor may originate from the mouth, or from an extra oral source, originating from other organ systems such as gastrointestinal, respiratory, or even systemic disease. Oral malodor is a result of microbial metabolism of exogenous and endogenous proteinaceous substrates leading to the production of compounds such as indole, skatole, tyramine, cadaverine, puterescine, mercaptans, and sulphides. Volatile sulphur compounds have been shown to be the main cause of oral malodor. Although most clients perceive oral malodor to be primarily a cosmetic problem, there is an increasing volume of evidence in human dental literature demonstrating that volatile sulphur compounds produced by bacteria, even at low concentrations, are toxic to tissues and play a role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. This article reviews the current available literature in human dentistry looking at these negative effects. No veterinary studies have been conducted looking at the negative effects of volatile sulphur compounds specifically, but as this article highlights, we should be aware of the potential negative effects of volatile sulphur compounds and consider this an area of future research. PMID:26415386

  7. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOCS) CHAPTER 31.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The term "volatile organic compounds' (VOCs) was originally coined to refer, as a class, to carbon-containing chemicals that participate in photochemical reactions in the ambient (outdoor) are. The regulatory definition of VOCs used by the U.S. EPA is: Any compound of carbon, ex...

  8. Methyl bromide volatility measurements from treated fields

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, M.S.; Woodrow, J.E.; Seiber, J.N. |

    1995-12-31

    Methyl bromide is used as an agricultural soil fumigant and concern is growing over the role it may play in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Methyl bromide is applied using various techniques and little is known about how much of the applied fumigant volatilizes into the atmosphere after application. The post-application volatilization losses of methyl bromide from two fields using different application practices were measured using an aerodynamic-gradient technique. One field was covered with a high-barrier plastic film tarp during application and the other was left uncovered, but the furrows made by the injection shanks were bedded over. The cumulative volatilization losses from the tarped field were 22% of the nominal application within the first 5 days of the experiment and about 32% of the nominal application within 9 days including the one day after the tarp was removed on day 8. The nontarped field lost 89%of the nominal application by volatilization in 5 days. The error associated, with each flux measurement, as well as variations in daily flux losses with differing sampling period lengths show the degree of variability inherent in this type of study.

  9. Modeling volatility using state space models.

    PubMed

    Timmer, J; Weigend, A S

    1997-08-01

    In time series problems, noise can be divided into two categories: dynamic noise which drives the process, and observational noise which is added in the measurement process, but does not influence future values of the system. In this framework, we show that empirical volatilities (the squared relative returns of prices) exhibit a significant amount of observational noise. To model and predict their time evolution adequately, we estimate state space models that explicitly include observational noise. We obtain relaxation times for shocks in the logarithm of volatility ranging from three weeks (for foreign exchange) to three to five months (for stock indices). In most cases, a two-dimensional hidden state is required to yield residuals that are consistent with white noise. We compare these results with ordinary autoregressive models (without a hidden state) and find that autoregressive models underestimate the relaxation times by about two orders of magnitude since they do not distinguish between observational and dynamic noise. This new interpretation of the dynamics of volatility in terms of relaxators in a state space model carries over to stochastic volatility models and to GARCH models, and is useful for several problems in finance, including risk management and the pricing of derivative securities. Data sets used: Olsen & Associates high frequency DEM/USD foreign exchange rates (8 years). Nikkei 225 index (40 years). Dow Jones Industrial Average (25 years). PMID:9730016

  10. VOLATILE ORGANIC SAMPLING TRAIN - SOOT INTERFERENCE REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency uses Method 0030, the Volatile Organic Sampling Train (VOST), as a tool in determining the destruction and removal efficiencies of industrial boilers co-firing hazardous waste. ecently, concerns have been expressed over possible measuremen...

  11. Gas chromatography of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlatkis, A.

    1973-01-01

    System has been used for problems such as analysis of volatile metabolities in human blood and urine, analysis of air pollutants, and in tobacco smoke chemistry. Since adsorbent is reusable after porper reconditioning, method is both convenient and economical. System could be used for large scale on-site sampling programs in which sample is shipped to central location for analysis.

  12. ALIPHATIC HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS PRODUCE VOLATILE 'SALMONELLA' MUTAGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Production of volatile mutagenic metabolites from 5 halogenated promutagens was examined by a simple modification of the conventional Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay. This method incorporates the taping together of 2 agar plates face to face during the initial portion of ...

  13. Workshop on Evolution of Martian Volatiles. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, B. (Editor); Treiman, A. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    Different aspects of martian science are discussed. Topics covered include: early Mars volatile inventory, evolution through time, geological influences, present atmospheric properties, soils, exobiology, polar volatiles, and seasonal and diurnal cycles

  14. TREATMENT OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile chlorinated and non-chlorinated compounds occur in both untreated and treated drinking water. Because volatilization is restricted, ground waters rather than surface waters are more likely to have high concentrations of these compounds. This document reviews properties, ...

  15. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: SUBSURFACE VOLATILIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the findings of a Demonstration Test of Brown & Root Environmental's Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System (SVVS) process. nder the SITE program, the technology was evaluated to determine its effectiveness in reducing volatile organic contaminati...

  16. SUBSURFACE VOLATILIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS): INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the findings of a Demonstration Test of Brown & Root Environmental's Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System (SVVS) process. nder the SITE program, the technology was evaluated to determine its effectiveness in reducing volatile organic contaminati...

  17. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: SUBSURFACE VOLATILIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System is an integrated technology used for attacking all phases of volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination in soil and groundwater. The SVVS technology promotes insitu remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated with or-ga...

  18. Relationships between volatile and non-volatile metabolites and attributes of processed potato flavour.

    PubMed

    Morris, Wayne L; Shepherd, Tom; Verrall, Susan R; McNicol, James W; Taylor, Mark A

    2010-10-01

    Although the flavour of processed potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) is important to consumers, the blend of volatile and non-volatile metabolites that impact on flavour attributes is not well-defined. Additionally, it is important to understand how potato flavour changes during storage. In this study, quantitative descriptive analysis of potato samples by a trained taste panel was undertaken, comparing tubers from S. tuberosum group Phureja with those from S. tuberosum group Tuberosum, both at harvest and following storage. The cooked tuber volatile profile was analysed by solid phase micro extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis in sub-samples of the tubers that were assessed by taste panels. A range of non-volatile metabolites including the major umami compounds, glycoalkaloids and sugars was also measured in tuber sub-samples. Correlation and principal component analyses revealed differences between the potato cultivars and storage conditions and demonstrated associations of metabolites with the different sensory attributes. PMID:20678781

  19. Proboscis extension reflex platform for volatiles and semi-volatiles detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wingo, Robert M.; McCabe, Kirsten J.; Haarmann, Timothy K.

    2010-11-30

    The present invention provides an apparatus for the detection of volatile and semi-volatile chemicals using the olfactory abilities of honey bees that are trained to respond to the presence of a specific chemical in a sample of gas with the proboscis extension reflex (PER). In particular, the geometry and arrangement of the parts of the apparatus are such that the amount of surface area in contact with the sample of gas prior to its introduction to the bees is minimized to improve the detection of particular volatile and semi-volatile that have a tendency to "stick" to contacting surfaces, especially certain chemicals associated with explosives and narcotics. According to another aspect of the present invention, a pre-concentrating means is incorporated with the device to effectively increase the concentration of "sticky" chemicals presented to the insects.

  20. Does implied volatility of currency futures option imply volatility of exchange rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Alan T.

    2007-02-01

    By investigating currency futures options, this paper provides an alternative economic implication for the result reported by Stein [Overreactions in the options market, Journal of Finance 44 (1989) 1011-1023] that long-maturity options tend to overreact to changes in the implied volatility of short-maturity options. When a GARCH process is assumed for exchange rates, a continuous-time relationship is developed. We provide evidence that implied volatilities may not be the simple average of future expected volatilities. By comparing the term-structure relationship of implied volatilities with the process of the underlying exchange rates, we find that long-maturity options are more consistent with the exchange rates process. In sum, short-maturity options overreact to the dynamics of underlying assets rather than long-maturity options overreacting to short-maturity options.

  1. Volatile hydrocarbons inhibit methanogenic crude oil degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Angela; Grant, Russell J.; Aitken, Carolyn M.; Jones, D. Martin; Head, Ian M.; Gray, Neil D.

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic degradation of crude oil in subsurface sediments occurs slowly, but without the need for exogenous electron acceptors, is sustained for long periods and has enormous economic and environmental consequences. Here we show that volatile hydrocarbons are inhibitory to methanogenic oil biodegradation by comparing degradation of an artificially weathered crude oil with volatile hydrocarbons removed, with the same oil that was not weathered. Volatile hydrocarbons (nC5–nC10, methylcyclohexane, benzene, toluene, and xylenes) were quantified in the headspace of microcosms. Aliphatic (n-alkanes nC12–nC34) and aromatic hydrocarbons (4-methylbiphenyl, 3-methylbiphenyl, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene) were quantified in the total hydrocarbon fraction extracted from the microcosms. 16S rRNA genes from key microorganisms known to play an important role in methanogenic alkane degradation (Smithella and Methanomicrobiales) were quantified by quantitative PCR. Methane production from degradation of weathered oil in microcosms was rapid (1.1 ± 0.1 μmol CH4/g sediment/day) with stoichiometric yields consistent with degradation of heavier n-alkanes (nC12–nC34). For non-weathered oil, degradation rates in microcosms were significantly lower (0.4 ± 0.3 μmol CH4/g sediment/day). This indicated that volatile hydrocarbons present in the non-weathered oil inhibit, but do not completely halt, methanogenic alkane biodegradation. These findings are significant with respect to rates of biodegradation of crude oils with abundant volatile hydrocarbons in anoxic, sulphate-depleted subsurface environments, such as contaminated marine sediments which have been entrained below the sulfate-reduction zone, as well as crude oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs and contaminated aquifers. PMID:24765087

  2. Realized volatility and absolute return volatility: a comparison indicating market risk.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zeyu; Qiao, Zhi; Takaishi, Tetsuya; Stanley, H Eugene; Li, Baowen

    2014-01-01

    Measuring volatility in financial markets is a primary challenge in the theory and practice of risk management and is essential when developing investment strategies. Although the vast literature on the topic describes many different models, two nonparametric measurements have emerged and received wide use over the past decade: realized volatility and absolute return volatility. The former is strongly favored in the financial sector and the latter by econophysicists. We examine the memory and clustering features of these two methods and find that both enable strong predictions. We compare the two in detail and find that although realized volatility has a better short-term effect that allows predictions of near-future market behavior, absolute return volatility is easier to calculate and, as a risk indicator, has approximately the same sensitivity as realized volatility. Our detailed empirical analysis yields valuable guidelines for both researchers and market participants because it provides a significantly clearer comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the two methods. PMID:25054439

  3. Theoretical predictions of volatile bearing phases and volatile resources in some carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguly, Jibamitra; Saxena, Surendra K.

    1989-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are usually believed to be the primary constituents of near-Earth asteroids and Phobos and Diemos, and are potential resources of fuels which may be exploited for future planetary missions. The nature and abundances are calculated of the major volatile bearing and other phases, including the vapor phase that should form in C1 and C2 type carbonaceous chondrites as functions of pressure and temperature. The results suggest that talc, antigorite plus or minus magnesite are the major volatile bearing phases and are stable below 400 C at 1 bar in these chondritic compositions. Simulated heating of a kilogram of C2 chondrite at fixed bulk composition between 400 and 800 C at 1 bar yields about 135 gm of volatile, which is made primarily of H2O, H2, CH4, CO2 and CO. The relative abundances of these volatile species change as functions of temperature, and on a molar basis, H2 becomes the most dominant species above 500 C. In contrast, Cl chondrites yield about 306 gm of volatile under the same condition, which consist almost completely of 60 wt percent H2O and 40 wt percent CO2. Preliminary kinetic considerations suggest that equilibrium dehydration of hydrous phyllosilicates should be attainable within a few hours at 600 C. These results provide the framework for further analyses of the volatile and economic resource potentials of carbonaceous chondrites.

  4. Another Look at the Volatility of Stock Prices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Investors are interested in the volatility of a stock for various reasons. One investor may desire to purchase a low volatility stock for peace of mind. Another may be interested in a high volatility stock in order to have the opportunity to buy low and sell high as the price of the stock oscillates. This author had the fortunate timing of reading…

  5. Distribution of aroma volatiles in a population of tangerine hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While orange juice volatile composition has been well studied, little is known about volatiles in tangerines. This study was undertaken to determine the most common compounds present in 45 tangerine hybrids, and to find relationships among these hybrids based on volatile content. Fruits were harve...

  6. 40 CFR 53.66 - Test procedure: Volatility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test procedure: Volatility test. 53.66... Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 § 53.66 Test procedure: Volatility test. (a) Overview. This test is designed to ensure that the candidate method's losses due to volatility when sampling...

  7. System of extraction of volatiles from soil using microwave processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin C. (Inventor); Kaukler, William F. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A device for the extraction and collection of volatiles from soil or planetary regolith. The device utilizes core drilled holes to gain access to underlying volatiles below the surface. Microwave energy beamed into the holes penetrates through the soil or regolith to heat it, and thereby produces vapor by sublimation. The device confines and transports volatiles to a cold trap for collection.

  8. The impact of market volatility on the cell therapy industry.

    PubMed

    Brindley, David A; Reeve, Brock C; Sahlman, William A; Bonfiglio, Greg A; Davie, Natasha L; Culme-Seymour, Emily J; Mason, Chris

    2011-11-01

    Stock market volatility in the cell therapy industry has greatly hindered the investment necessary to fund translational therapies. Here, we review the volatility of leading companies and suggest that a distinct industry is maturing to a point at which the volatility should subside, providing a more attractive environment for future growth. PMID:22056137

  9. Gas chromatography column as an ambient-temperature volatile trap

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Open tube volatile traps have largely been shunned in favor of solid-adsorbent-containing traps. Anecdotally, there is a bias against open tube volatile traps due to the belief that they are only effective when chilled as volatiles are expected to pass through unchilled tubes’ lumens or chromatograp...

  10. 40 CFR 53.66 - Test procedure: Volatility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test procedure: Volatility test. 53.66... Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM 2.5 § 53.66 Test procedure: Volatility test. (a) Overview. This test is designed to ensure that the candidate method's losses due to volatility when sampling...

  11. 40 CFR 53.66 - Test procedure: Volatility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test procedure: Volatility test. 53.66... Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 § 53.66 Test procedure: Volatility test. (a) Overview. This test is designed to ensure that the candidate method's losses due to volatility when sampling...

  12. 40 CFR 53.66 - Test procedure: Volatility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test procedure: Volatility test. 53.66... Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 § 53.66 Test procedure: Volatility test. (a) Overview. This test is designed to ensure that the candidate method's losses due to volatility when sampling...

  13. Volatile compounds in milled/unmilled Queso Fresco during storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The profile of volatile compounds that contribute to the flavor of Queso Fresco (QF), a popular high-moisture Hispanic-style cheese, is not well defined. The effects of curd milling on the volatile compounds in QF were determined for cheeses aged at 4 deg C for up to 8 wks. Volatiles from preheate...

  14. Measurements of particulate semi-volatile material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yanbo

    2000-10-01

    A new innovative sampling system, PC-BOSS, was developed by the combination of particle concentrator and BOSS denuder techniques in response to the new EPA PM2.5 standard and to meet top research priorities for particulate matter that were identified by the National Research Council. The PC-BOSS (P_article C_oncentrator- B_righam Young University O_rganic S_ampling S_ystem) can accurately determine not only PM2.5 stable mass and species such as sulfate, but also particulate semi- volatile material. Several field comparison studies of the PC-BOSS with the EPA PM2.5 reference method and state-of-the-art fine particle measurement methods confirm the capability of the PC-BOSS to accurately determine particulate semi-volatile material, especially organic compounds. This is the first routine sampling system for the determination of both particulate semi-volatile inorganic and organic material. Two other denuder system samplers for the determination of PM2.5 total mass including semi-volatile material were also developed for PM2.5 research and exposure monitoring. Results of studies around the United States indicate that the EPA PM2.5 FRM (Federal Reference Method) under- measured PM2.5 mass by 20-30% compared to PC-BOSS results due to the loss of particulate nitrate and semi-volatile organic compounds during sampling. Organic material is mostly responsible for this under- measurement by the FRM. Using our new sampling system in epidemiological and exposure studies will be essential to providing answers to some top research priorities for particulate matter and promote a better PM2.5 standard for the protection of human health because some fractions of particulate semi-volatile organic compounds are toxic and are possibly responsible for health effects associated with exposure to particulate matter. The atmospheric chemistry of organic aerosols in the troposphere and stratosphere is still largely unknown because of the lack of detailed organic aerosol information. The

  15. Proteomic and metabolomic analyses provide insight into production of volatile and non-volatile flavor components in mandarin hybrid fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although many of the volatile constituents of flavor and aroma in citrus have been identified, the molecular mechanism and regulation of volatile production is not well understood. Our aim was to understand mechanisms of flavor volatile production and regulation in mandarin fruit. To this end fruits...

  16. Volatilities of ruthenium, iodine, and technetium on calcining fission product nitrate wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Rimshaw, S.J.; Case, F.N.

    1980-01-01

    Various high-level nitrate wastes were subjected to formic acid denitration. Formic acid reacts with the nitrate anion to yield noncondensable, inert gases according to the following equation: 4 HCOOH + 2 HNO/sub 3/ ..-->.. N/sub 2/O + 4 CO/sub 2/ + 5 H/sub 2/O. These gases can be scrubbed free of /sup 106/Ru, /sup 131/I, and /sup 99/Tc radioactivities prior to elimination from the plant by passage through HEPA filters. The formation of deleterious NO/sub x/ is avoided. Moreover, formic acid reduces ruthenium to a lower valence state with a sharp reduction in RuO/sub 4/ volatility during subsequent calcination of the pretreated waste. It is shown that a minimum of 3% of RuO/sub 4/ in an off-gas stream reacts with Davison silica gel (Grade 40) to give a fine RuO/sub 2/ aerosol having a particle size of 0.5 ..mu... This RuO/sub 2/ aerosol passes through water or weak acid scrub solutions but is trapped by a caustic scrub solution. Iodine volatilizes almost completely on calcining an acidic waste, and the iodine volatility increases with increasing calcination temperature. On calcining an alkaline sodium nitrate waste the iodine volatility is about an order of magnitude lower, with a relatively low iodine volatility of 0.39% at a calcination temperature of 250/sup 0/C and a moderate volatility of 9.5% at 600/sup 0/C. Volatilities of /sup 99/Tc were generally <1% on calcining acidic or basic wastes at temperatures of 250 to 600/sup 0/C. Data are presented to indicate that /sup 99/Tc concentrates in the alkaline sodium nitrate supernatant waste, with approx. 10 mg /sup 99/Tc being associated with each curie of /sup 137/Cs present in the waste. It is shown that lutidine (2,4 dimethyl-pyridine) extracts Tc(VII) quantitatively from alkaline supernatant wastes. The distribution coefficient (K/sub D/) for Tc(VII) going into the organic phase in the above system is 102 for a simulated West Valley waste and 191 for a simulated Savannah River Plant (SRP) waste.

  17. Fizzy Extraction of Volatile and Semivolatile Compounds into the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Hao; Urban, Pawel L

    2016-09-01

    Extraction of volatile and semivolatile compounds from liquid matrixes with high yields, and transferring the extracts to detectors in real time, is challenging. Common extraction procedures involve heating the samples to release the analytes to the gas phase and, in some cases, trapping the gas-phase analytes into sorbents or containers. Here, we propose a new method for fast extraction of volatile and semivolatile compounds from liquid matrixes. This method involves dissolution of a carrier gas in the liquid sample by applying a moderate overpressure (∼150 kPa) and stirring the sample. An abrupt decompression of the extraction chamber leads to effervescence. In this step, many bubbles are instantly formed in the sample matrix. The dissolved carrier gas as well as dissolved volatiles are liberated into the headspace of the extraction chamber within a short period of time (few seconds). The gaseous effluent of the extraction chamber is immediately transferred to the online detector; in this case, an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The fast release of the gas-phase extract gives rise to a high signal recorded by the detector; several times higher than the signal recorded during direct infusion of headspace vapors without fizzy extraction. This feature provides the means to detect and quantify analytes present in solutions in a short period of time. Here we show that fizzy extraction is suitable for analysis of volatile/semivolatile compounds present in various samples, including those containing complex matrixes. PMID:27504910

  18. On decoupling of volatility smile and term structure in inverse option pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Herbert; Hein, Torsten; Hofmann, Bernd

    2006-08-01

    Correct pricing of options and other financial derivatives is of great importance to financial markets and one of the key subjects of mathematical finance. Usually, parameters specifying the underlying stochastic model are not directly observable, but have to be determined indirectly from observable quantities. The identification of local volatility surfaces from market data of European vanilla options is one very important example of this type. As with many other parameter identification problems, the reconstruction of local volatility surfaces is ill-posed, and reasonable results can only be achieved via regularization methods. Moreover, due to the sparsity of data, the local volatility is not uniquely determined, but depends strongly on the kind of regularization norm used and a good a priori guess for the parameter. By assuming a multiplicative structure for the local volatility, which is motivated by the specific data situation, the inverse problem can be decomposed into two separate sub-problems. This removes part of the non-uniqueness and allows us to establish convergence and convergence rates under weak assumptions. Additionally, a numerical solution of the two sub-problems is much cheaper than that of the overall identification problem. The theoretical results are illustrated by numerical tests.

  19. Endogenous Lunar Volatiles: Insights into the Abundances of Volatiles in the Moon from Lunar Apatite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCubbin, Francis

    2016-01-01

    At the time of publication of New Views of the Moon, it was thought that the Moon was bone dry with less than about 1 ppb H2O. However in 2007, initial reports at the 38th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference speculated that H-species were present in both apatites and pyroclastic volcanic lunar glasses. These early reports were later confirmed through peer-review, which motivated many subsequent studies on magmatic volatiles in and on the Moon within the last decade. Some of these studies have cast into question the post-Apollo view of lunar formation, the distribution and sources of volatiles in the Earth-Moon system, and the thermal and magmatic evolution of the Moon. The mineral apatite has been one of the pillars of this new field of study, and it will be the primary focus of this abstract. Although apatite has been used both to understand the abundances of volatiles in lunar systems as well as the isotopic compositions of those volatiles, the focus here will be on the abundances of F, Cl, and H2O. This work demonstrates the utility of apatite in advancing our understanding of lunar volatiles, hence apatite should be among the topics covered in the endogenous lunar volatile chapter in NVM II. Truncated ternary plot of apatite X-site occupancy (mol%) from highlands apatite and mare basalt apatite plotted on the relative volatile abundance diagram from. The solid black lines delineate fields of relative abundances of F, Cl, and H2O (on a weight basis) in the melt from which the apatite crystallized. The diagram was constructed using available apatite/melt partitioning data for fluorine, chlorine, and hydroxyl.

  20. Volatile fingerprints of cancer specific genetic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Nir; Barash, Orna; Tisch, Ulrike; Ionescu, Radu; Broza, Yoav Y.; Ilouze, Maya; Mattei, Jane; Bunn, Paul A.; Hirsch, Fred R.; Haick, Hossam

    2014-01-01

    We report on a new concept for profiling genetic mutations of (lung) cancer cells, based on the detection of patterns of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from cell membranes, using an array of nanomaterial-based sensors. In this in-vitro pilot study we have derived a volatile fingerprint assay for representative genetic mutations in cancer cells that are known to be associated with targeted cancer therapy. Five VOCs were associated with the studied oncogenes, using complementary chemical analysis, and were discussed in terms of possible metabolic pathways. The reported approach could lead to the development of novel methods for guiding treatments, so that patients could benefit from safer, more timely and effective interventions that improve survival and quality of life while avoiding unnecessary invasive procedures. Studying clinical samples (tissue/blood/breath) will be required as next step in order to determine whether this cell-line study can be translated into a clinically useful tool. PMID:23428987

  1. Volatiles on earth and Mars - A comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreibus, G.; Wanke, H.

    1987-08-01

    The halogen content of the SNC meteorites is determined, and these new results (along with published data) are used to estimate the halogen content of Mars (thought to be the source of these objects). The data are presented in extensive tables and graphs, characterized in detail, and shown to be consistent with the two-component planetary-accretion model of Ringwood (1977 and 1979) and Waenke (1981). It is inferred that hydrogen (produced by the reaction of water with metallic iron) and other volatiles (including the gaseous halogens) had already escaped from the early Martian and earth atmospheres before the present atmospheres began to form (by degassing of the interiors), and that volatiles added to the atmospheres later were retained to a much higher degree.

  2. Identification of volatile constituents of Tambourissa leptophylla.

    PubMed

    Gallori, S; Bilia, A R; Mulinacci, N; Bicchi, C; Rubiolo, P; Vincieri, F F

    2001-04-01

    The volatile fraction of Tambourissa leptophylla fruit skin was extracted by petrol ether, purified by adsorption chromatography (LPC) and analysed by gas chromatographic-spectroscopic methods. 27 non-oxygenated terpene hydrocarbons and 10 oxygenated derivatives were identified. The most abundant components were: limonene (24.0%), cis-alpha-bergamotene (23.2%), delta-3-carene (8.2%), alpha-curcumene (6.0%), trans-alpha-bergamotene (5.1%), alpha-copaene (4.1%), alpha-pinene (4.0%), p-cymene (4.0%) and bicyclogermacrene (3.3%). The crude volatile fraction was tested in vitro against Cladosporium cucumerinum in direct bioautography on TLC plates on the basis of the antifungal use of fruit skin. Activity of petrol ether extract against this micro-organism was demonstrated. PMID:11345708

  3. Cosmogenic nuclides: Observable effects of Martian volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Drake, D. M.; Feldman, W. C.

    1988-01-01

    Cosmic-ray produced (cosmogenic) nuclides in returned Martian samples could be used to study the amounts and distributions of volatiles in the recent past on Mars. In planning for the gamma-ray spectrometer experiment that is scheduled to fly on the Mars Observer, many calculations were done on the nuclear reactions that should occur in the Martian surface, studying especially the production and transport of neutrons. It is found that three aspects of Mars can very significantly affect the production of cosmogenic products in Mars: the Martian atmosphere and the presence of H2O in or CO2 on the surface of Mars. These volatile components can greatly affect the energy and spatial distributions of neutrons, expecially those with thermal or near thermal energies, in the surface of Mars. In turn, these neutrons produce many cosmogenic nuclides that can be observed in samples returned from Mars.

  4. Exploring heterogeneous market hypothesis using realized volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Wen Cheong; Isa, Zaidi; Mohd Nor, Abu Hassan Shaari

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates the heterogeneous market hypothesis using high frequency data. The cascaded heterogeneous trading activities with different time durations are modelled by the heterogeneous autoregressive framework. The empirical study indicated the presence of long memory behaviour and predictability elements in the financial time series which supported heterogeneous market hypothesis. Besides the common sum-of-square intraday realized volatility, we also advocated two power variation realized volatilities in forecast evaluation and risk measurement in order to overcome the possible abrupt jumps during the credit crisis. Finally, the empirical results are used in determining the market risk using the value-at-risk approach. The findings of this study have implications for informationally market efficiency analysis, portfolio strategies and risk managements.

  5. Volatility: A hidden Markov process in financial time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisler, Zoltán; Perelló, Josep; Masoliver, Jaume

    2007-11-01

    Volatility characterizes the amplitude of price return fluctuations. It is a central magnitude in finance closely related to the risk of holding a certain asset. Despite its popularity on trading floors, volatility is unobservable and only the price is known. Diffusion theory has many common points with the research on volatility, the key of the analogy being that volatility is a time-dependent diffusion coefficient of the random walk for the price return. We present a formal procedure to extract volatility from price data by assuming that it is described by a hidden Markov process which together with the price forms a two-dimensional diffusion process. We derive a maximum-likelihood estimate of the volatility path valid for a wide class of two-dimensional diffusion processes. The choice of the exponential Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (expOU) stochastic volatility model performs remarkably well in inferring the hidden state of volatility. The formalism is applied to the Dow Jones index. The main results are that (i) the distribution of estimated volatility is lognormal, which is consistent with the expOU model, (ii) the estimated volatility is related to trading volume by a power law of the form σ∝V0.55 , and (iii) future returns are proportional to the current volatility, which suggests some degree of predictability for the size of future returns.

  6. Volatility: a hidden Markov process in financial time series.

    PubMed

    Eisler, Zoltán; Perelló, Josep; Masoliver, Jaume

    2007-11-01

    Volatility characterizes the amplitude of price return fluctuations. It is a central magnitude in finance closely related to the risk of holding a certain asset. Despite its popularity on trading floors, volatility is unobservable and only the price is known. Diffusion theory has many common points with the research on volatility, the key of the analogy being that volatility is a time-dependent diffusion coefficient of the random walk for the price return. We present a formal procedure to extract volatility from price data by assuming that it is described by a hidden Markov process which together with the price forms a two-dimensional diffusion process. We derive a maximum-likelihood estimate of the volatility path valid for a wide class of two-dimensional diffusion processes. The choice of the exponential Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (expOU) stochastic volatility model performs remarkably well in inferring the hidden state of volatility. The formalism is applied to the Dow Jones index. The main results are that (i) the distribution of estimated volatility is lognormal, which is consistent with the expOU model, (ii) the estimated volatility is related to trading volume by a power law of the form sigma proportional, variant V0.55, and (iii) future returns are proportional to the current volatility, which suggests some degree of predictability for the size of future returns. PMID:18233716

  7. Space exploration and the history of solar-system volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, F. P.

    1976-01-01

    The thermochemical history of volatile substances in all solar-system planets, satellites, and planetoids is discussed extensively. The volatiles are viewed as an interface between the abiotic and biotic worlds and as a key to the history of bodies of the solar system. A flowsheet of processes and states is exhibited. Differences in bulk volatiles distribution between the planetary bodies and between the interior, surface, and atmosphere of each body are considered, as well as sinks for volatiles in degassing. The volatiles-rich Jovian and Saturnian satellites, the effect of large-planet magnetosphere sweeps on nearby satellites, volatiles of asteroids and comets, and the crucial importance of seismic, gravity, and libration data are treated. A research program encompassing analysis of the elemental and isotopic composition of rare gas in atmospheres, assay of volatiles-containing phases in regoliths, and examination of present or past atmospheric escape/accretion processes is recommended.

  8. Electromarking solution

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jonathan S.; Harper, William L.; Peck, Charles G.

    1976-06-22

    This invention is directed to an aqueous halogen-free electromarking solution which possesses the capacity for marking a broad spectrum of metals and alloys selected from different classes. The aqueous solution comprises basically the nitrate salt of an amphoteric metal, a chelating agent, and a corrosion-inhibiting agent.

  9. Preformed volatile nitrosamines in some Nigerian foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Atawodi, S E; Maduagwu, E N; Preussmann, R; Spiegelhalder, B

    1993-11-01

    Some common Nigerian foodstuffs were assessed for their content of preformed volatile nitrosamine by chemiluminescence detection following gas chromatographic separation. Nitrosodimethylamine levels of between 0.4 and 4.6 ppb were detected in 75% of the samples analysed. The highest value was found in Brassica oleraceae, while Vernonia amygdalina contained the lowest detectable level. These data suggest that Nigerians may be exposed to chronic but very low levels of carcinogenic nitrosamines in their foods. PMID:8258415

  10. Volatile Metabolites of Pathogens: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Lieuwe D. J.; Sterk, Peter J.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2013-01-01

    Ideally, invading bacteria are detected as early as possible in critically ill patients: the strain of morbific pathogens is identified rapidly, and antimicrobial sensitivity is known well before the start of new antimicrobial therapy. Bacteria have a distinct metabolism, part of which results in the production of bacteria-specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which might be used for diagnostic purposes. Volatile metabolites can be investigated directly in exhaled air, allowing for noninvasive monitoring. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of VOCs produced by the six most abundant and pathogenic bacteria in sepsis, including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli. Such VOCs could be used as biological markers in the diagnostic approach of critically ill patients. A systematic review of existing literature revealed 31 articles. All six bacteria of interest produce isopentanol, formaldehyde, methyl mercaptan, and trimethylamine. Since humans do not produce these VOCs, they could serve as biological markers for presence of these pathogens. The following volatile biomarkers were found for identification of specific strains: isovaleric acid and 2-methyl-butanal for Staphylococcus aureus; 1-undecene, 2,4-dimethyl-1-heptane, 2-butanone, 4-methyl-quinazoline, hydrogen cyanide, and methyl thiocyanide for Pseudomonas aeruginosa; and methanol, pentanol, ethyl acetate, and indole for Escherichia coli. Notably, several factors that may effect VOC production were not controlled for, including used culture media, bacterial growth phase, and genomic variation within bacterial strains. In conclusion, VOCs produced by bacteria may serve as biological markers for their presence. Goal-targeted studies should be performed to identify potential sets of volatile biological markers and evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of these markers in critically ill patients. PMID

  11. Selenium Uptake and Volatilization by Marine Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luxem, Katja E.; Vriens, Bas; Wagner, Bettina; Behra, Renata; Winkel, Lenny H. E.

    2015-04-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace nutrient for humans. An estimated one half to one billion people worldwide suffer from Se deficiency, which is due to low concentrations and bioavailability of Se in soils where crops are grown. It has been hypothesized that more than half of the atmospheric Se deposition to soils is derived from the marine system, where microorganisms methylate and volatilize Se. Based on model results from the late 1980s, the atmospheric flux of these biogenic volatile Se compounds is around 9 Gt/year, with two thirds coming from the marine biosphere. Algae, fungi, and bacteria are known to methylate Se. Although algal Se uptake, metabolism, and methylation influence the speciation and bioavailability of Se in the oceans, these processes have not been quantified under environmentally relevant conditions and are likely to differ among organisms. Therefore, we are investigating the uptake and methylation of the two main inorganic Se species (selenate and selenite) by three globally relevant microalgae: Phaeocystis globosa, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi, and the diatom Thalassiosira oceanica. Selenium uptake and methylation were quantified in a batch experiment, where parallel gas-tight microcosms in a climate chamber were coupled to a gas-trapping system. For E. huxleyi, selenite uptake was strongly dependent on aqueous phosphate concentrations, which agrees with prior evidence that selenite uptake by phosphate transporters is a significant Se source for marine algae. Selenate uptake was much lower than selenite uptake. The most important volatile Se compounds produced were dimethyl selenide, dimethyl diselenide, and dimethyl selenyl sulfide. Production rates of volatile Se species were larger with increasing intracellular Se concentration and in the decline phase of the alga. Similar experiments are being carried out with P. globosa and T. oceanica. Our results indicate that marine algae are important for the global cycling of Se

  12. Volatile processes in Triton's atmosphere and surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1992-01-01

    A basic model for latitudinal transport of nitrogen is reviewed focusing on its limitations and some complications associated with surface and atmospheric physics. Data obtained by 1989 Voyager encounter with the Neptune system revealed the complexity in the pure nitrogen transport which is caused by the nonuniform albedo of the frosts. It is concluded that Triton is similar to Mars in terms of the complexity of volatile transport and to understand Triton's surface-atmosphere system, Mars may be a very good analog.

  13. Volatile components in forest stands of Karelia

    SciTech Connect

    Fuksman, I.L.

    1995-09-01

    Study of the qualitative and quantitative composition of volatile organic compounds in forests stands of Karelia is made. A decrease in temperature and an increase in the relative air humidity adversely affect their emission. To study the relationship between the processes of the synthesis of essential oils in woody plants and the release of their components into the environment, a qualitative and quantitative determination of essential oils in pine branches was carried out. 13 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Plant volatile analogues strengthen attractiveness to insect.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yufeng; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Pickett, John A; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) is one of the major pests in agriculture. Management of A. lucorum was largely achieved by using pesticides. However, the increasing population of A. lucorum since growing Bt cotton widely and the increased awareness of ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety makes their population-control very challenging. Therefore this study was conducted to explore a novel ecological approach, synthetic plant volatile analogues, to manage the pest. Here, plant volatile analogues were first designed and synthesized by combining the bioactive components of β-ionone and benzaldehyde. The stabilities of β-ionone, benzaldehyde and analogue 3 g were tested. The electroantennogram (EAG) responses of A. lucorum adult antennae to the analogues were recorded. And the behavior assay and filed experiment were also conducted. In this study, thirteen analogues were acquired. The analogue 3 g was demonstrated to be more stable than β-ionone and benzaldehyde in the environment. Many of the analogues elicited EAG responses, and the EAG response values to 3 g remained unchanged during seven-day period. 3 g was also demonstrated to be attractive to A. lucorum adults in the laboratory behavior experiment and in the field. Its attractiveness persisted longer than β-ionone and benzaldehyde. This indicated that 3 g can strengthen attractiveness to insect and has potential as an attractant. Our results suggest that synthetic plant volatile analogues can strengthen attractiveness to insect. This is the first published study about synthetic plant volatile analogues that have the potential to be used in pest control. Our results will support a new ecological approach to pest control and it will be helpful to ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety. PMID:24911460

  15. Plant Volatile Analogues Strengthen Attractiveness to Insect

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yufeng; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Pickett, John A.; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) is one of the major pests in agriculture. Management of A. lucorum was largely achieved by using pesticides. However, the increasing population of A. lucorum since growing Bt cotton widely and the increased awareness of ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety makes their population-control very challenging. Therefore this study was conducted to explore a novel ecological approach, synthetic plant volatile analogues, to manage the pest. Here, plant volatile analogues were first designed and synthesized by combining the bioactive components of β-ionone and benzaldehyde. The stabilities of β-ionone, benzaldehyde and analogue 3 g were tested. The electroantennogram (EAG) responses of A. lucorum adult antennae to the analogues were recorded. And the behavior assay and filed experiment were also conducted. In this study, thirteen analogues were acquired. The analogue 3 g was demonstrated to be more stable than β-ionone and benzaldehyde in the environment. Many of the analogues elicited EAG responses, and the EAG response values to 3 g remained unchanged during seven-day period. 3 g was also demonstrated to be attractive to A. lucorum adults in the laboratory behavior experiment and in the field. Its attractiveness persisted longer than β-ionone and benzaldehyde. This indicated that 3 g can strengthen attractiveness to insect and has potential as an attractant. Our results suggest that synthetic plant volatile analogues can strengthen attractiveness to insect. This is the first published study about synthetic plant volatile analogues that have the potential to be used in pest control. Our results will support a new ecological approach to pest control and it will be helpful to ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety. PMID:24911460

  16. Volatile fractionation and tektite source material

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, L.S. )

    1989-09-01

    In discounting the possibility that vapor fractionation played a part in the origin of bediasites, it has been assumed that Na and K are lost to the vapor phase. Experimental work shows, however, that, under oxidizing conditions, neither Na nor K exhibit particularly volatile behavior. Indeed, the compositional variations exhibited by bediasites are very similar to those obtained during experimental high-temperature vapor fractionation of a high-silica melt.

  17. Mars polar volatiles: Topographic and geologic setting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, B.; Soderblom, L.; Herkenhoff, K.

    1984-01-01

    Progress on a project to elucidate the geological and topographic setting of the Martian polar volatiles is reported. The following accomplishments are enumerated: (1) all of the Mariner 9 imaging data sets available through JPL were acquired and copied; (2) Mariner 9 imagery was investigated in terms of the accuracy of the imaging footprints, dark current, and residual image; (3) the transfer functions of both vidicons were investigated; and (4) the magnitude of the atmospheric scattering was examined.

  18. Subduction and volatile recycling in Earth's mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, S. D.; Ita, J. J.; Staudigel, H.

    1994-01-01

    The subduction of water and other volatiles into the mantle from oceanic sediments and altered oceanic crust is the major source of volatile recycling in the mantle. Until now, the geotherms that have been used to estimate the amount of volatiles that are recycled at subduction zones have been produced using the hypothesis that the slab is rigid and undergoes no internal deformation. On the other hand, most fluid dynamical mantle flow calculations assume that the slab has no greater strength than the surrounding mantle. Both of these views are inconsistent with laboratory work on the deformation of mantle minerals at high pressures. We consider the effects of the strength of the slab using two-dimensional calculations of a slab-like thermal downwelling with an endothermic phase change. Because the rheology and composition of subducting slabs are uncertain, we consider a range of Clapeyron slopes which bound current laboratory estimates of the spinel to perovskite plus magnesiowustite phase transition and simple temperature-dependent rheologies based on an Arrhenius law diffusion mechanism. In uniform viscosity convection models, subducted material piles up above the phase change until the pile becomes gravitationally unstable and sinks into the lower mantle (the avalanche). Strong slabs moderate the 'catastrophic' effects of the instabilities seen in many constant-viscosity convection calculations; however, even in the strongest slabs we consider, there is some retardation of the slab descent due to the presence of the phase change.

  19. Volatile and sensory profiling of cocktail bitters.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Arielle J; Heymann, Hildegarde; Ebeler, Susan E

    2015-07-15

    Aromatic cocktail bitters are derived from the alcoholic extraction of a variety of plant materials and are used as additives in mixed drinks to enhance aroma and flavor. In this study sixteen commercial bitters were analyzed using volatile (GC-MS) and sensory profiling and multivariate statistics including Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Squares Regression (PLS). The samples differed significantly in their citrus, celery, and spice characteristics. 148 volatile compounds were tentatively identified and the composition varied significantly with the type of bitters sample evaluated. PLS analysis showed that the volatile data correlated well overall to the sensory data, explaining 60% of the overall variability in the dataset. Primary aldehydes and phenylpropanoids were most closely related to green and spice-related sensory descriptors. However, the sensory impact of terpenoid compounds was difficult to predict in many cases. This may be due to the wide range of aroma qualities associated with terpenes as well as to concentration, synergistic or masking effects. PMID:25722175

  20. Detection of signature volatiles for cariogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Hertel, M; Preissner, R; Gillissen, B; Schmidt-Westhausen, A M; Paris, S; Preissner, S

    2016-02-01

    The development of a breath test by the identification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by cariogenic bacteria is a promising approach for caries risk assessment and early caries detection. The aim of the present study was to investigate the volatile profiles of three major cariogenic bacteria and to assess whether the obtained signatures were species-specific. Therefore, the headspaces above cultures of Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus salivarius and Propionibacterium acidifaciens were analysed after 24 and 48 h of cultivation using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. A volatile database was queried for the obtained VOC profiles. Sixty-four compounds were detected within the analysed culture headspaces and were absent (36) or at least only present in minor amounts (28) in the control headspace. For S. mutans 18, for L. salivarius three and for P. acidifaciens five compounds were found to be unique signature VOCs. Database matching revealed that the identified signatures of all bacteria were unique. Furthermore, 13 of the 64 detected substances have not been previously reported to be emitted by bacteria or fungi. Specific VOC signatures were found in all the investigated bacteria cultures. The obtained results encourage further research to investigate the transferability to in vivo conditions towards the development of a breath test. PMID:26610336

  1. Formation and Volatile Content of Terrestrial Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, S.

    2014-04-01

    Earth contains only 0.1% water by mass. Yet Earth formed in a part of the protoplanetary disk that was probably completely dry. Water and other volatiles were delivered from colder regions to the growing terrestrial planets. Recent thinking suggests that Jupiter's large-scale migration played a prominent role in delivering water to Earth (the "Grand Tack" model). A large fraction of Sun-like stars host planets somewhat larger than Earth (so-called "super-Earths"). Planets as small as Earth have been discovered in the habitable zones of their host stars. To estimate the volatile contents of these planets we first need to understand how they formed. Current thinking suggests that they either accreted in-situ or, more likely, migrated inward from farther out. The planets' volatile contents should vary substantially in the different models. When systems contain gas giants, they have a strong effect on water delivery. Most of the observed systems with giant exoplanets probably only harbor small, dry terrestrial planets on eccentric and inclined orbits.

  2. Guaianolides and volatile compounds in chamomile tea.

    PubMed

    Tschiggerl, Christine; Bucar, Franz

    2012-06-01

    Chamomile (German Chamomile, Matricaria recutita L., Asteraceae) is one of the most popular medicinal plants in use as an herbal tea for food purposes and in folk medicine. Qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses of the volatile fraction of chamomile herbal tea were performed. Volatile constituents of the infusion were isolated by two different methods, namely hydrodistillation and solid phase extraction (SPE), and analysed by GC-MS. The relative proportions of particular chemical classes, present in the essential oil and volatile fractions of the infusion showed remarkable differences. The proportion of mono- and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons in the infusion, as compared to the essential oil, was significantly lower. Strikingly, the dichloromethane extract of the infusion contained a lower amount of bisabolol oxides and chamazulene, but higher amounts of spiroethers, sesquiterpene lactones and coumarins, as compared to the hydrodistillates of the herbal drug and the infusion. In addition to the previously known guaianolides matricarin and achillin, acetoxyachillin and leucodin (= desacetoxymatricarin), corresponding C-11 stereoisomers with various biological activities typically occurring in Achillea species, were identified in the dichloromethane extract of chamomile tea for the first time. PMID:22410959

  3. Financial market volatility and contagion effect: A copula-multifractal volatility approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wang; Wei, Yu; Lang, Qiaoqi; Lin, Yu; Liu, Maojuan

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a new approach based on the multifractal volatility method (MFV) to study the contagion effect between the U.S. and Chinese stock markets. From recent studies, which reveal that multifractal characteristics exist in both developed and emerging financial markets, according to the econophysics literature we could draw conclusions as follows: Firstly, we estimate volatility using the multifractal volatility method, and find out that the MFV method performs best among other volatility models, such as GARCH-type and realized volatility models. Secondly, we analyze the tail dependence structure between the U.S. and Chinese stock market. The estimated static copula results for the entire period show that the SJC copula performs best, indicating asymmetric characteristics of the tail dependence structure. The estimated dynamic copula results show that the time-varying t copula achieves the best performance, which means the symmetry dynamic t copula is also a good choice, for it is easy to estimate and is able to depict both the upper and lower tail dependence structure. Finally, with the results of the previous two steps, we analyze the contagion effect between the U.S. and Chinese stock markets during the subprime mortgage crisis. The empirical results show that the subprime mortgage crisis started in the U.S. and that its stock market has had an obvious contagion effect on the Chinese stock market. Our empirical results should/might be useful for investors allocating their portfolios.

  4. Impact of high hydrostatic pressure on non-volatile and volatile compounds of squid muscles.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jin; Zhang, Yifeng; Jin, Yafang; Deng, Yun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2016-03-01

    The effects of high hydrostatic pressure processing (HHP at 200, 400 or 600MPa) on non-volatile and volatile compounds of squid muscles during 10-day storage at 4°C were investigated. HHP increased the concentrations of Cl(-) and volatile compounds, reduced the level of PO4(3-), but did not affect the contents of 5'-uridine monophosphate (UMP), 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP), 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP), Na(+) and Ca(2+) in squids on Day 0. At 600MPa, squids had the highest levels of 5'-adenosine monophosphate, Cl(-) and lactic acid, but the lowest contents of CMP and volatile compounds on Day 10. Essential free amino acids and succinic acids were lower on Day 0 than on Day 10. HHP at 200MPa caused higher equivalent umami concentration (EUC) on Day 0, and the EUC decreased with increasing pressure on Day 10. Generally, HHP at 200MPa was beneficial for improving EUC and volatile compounds of squids. PMID:26471521

  5. Capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of volatile and semi-volatile compounds of Salvia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Radulescu, Valeria; Chiliment, Silvia; Oprea, Eliza

    2004-02-20

    The essential oil and infusion of Salvia officinalis leaves have been widely applied in traditional medicine since ancient times and nowadays subjected to extensive research of their antibacterial, antiviral and cytotoxic properties. This paper shows chemical composition data of S. officinalis leaves essential oil isolated by steam distillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus. Also, the paper presents the chemical content of volatile and semi-volatile compounds of S. officinalis leaves infusion. The volatile and semi-volatile compounds of S. officinalis leaves infusion were isolated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid-liquid extraction with hexane and dichloromethane. SPE was carried out on 500 mg octadecylsilane (C18) cartridges and elution with dichloromethane. Liquid-liquid extraction was performed with hexane and dichloromethane. The essential oil in dichloromethane and infusion extracts in hexane and dichloromethane were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The quantitative results obtained by solid-phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction showed that SPE on C18 performed the highest recovery of the volatile compounds from infusion sample. PMID:14971492

  6. Aldol Condensation of Volatile Carbonyl Compounds in Acidic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noziere, B.; Esteve, W.

    2003-12-01

    Reactions of volatile organic compounds in acidic aerosols have been shown recently to be potentially important for organic aerosol formation and growth. Aldol condensation, the acid-catalyzed polymerization of carbonyl compounds, is a likely candidate to enhance the flux of organic matter from the gas phase to the condensed phase in the atmosphere. Until now these reactions have only been characterized for conditions relevant to synthesis (high acidities and liquid phase systems) and remote from atmospheric ones. In this work, the uptake of gas-phase acetone and 2,4\\-pentanedione by sulfuric acid solutions has been measured at room temperature using a Rotated Wetted Wall Reactor coupled to a Mass Spectrometer. The aldol condensation rate constants for 2,4\\-pentanedione measured so far for sulfuric acid solutions between 96 and 70 % wt. display a variation with acidity in agreement with what predicted in the organic chemical literature. The values of these constants, however, are much lower than expected for this compound, and comparable to the ones of acetone. Experiments are underway to complete this study to lower acidities and understand the discrepancies with the predicted reactivity.

  7. Loss of volatile hydrocarbons from an LNAPL oil source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, M.J.; Eganhouse, R.P.; Bekins, B.A.; Delin, G.N.

    2011-01-01

    The light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) oil pool in an aquifer that resulted from a pipeline spill near Bemidji, Minnesota, was analyzed for volatile hydrocarbons (VHCs) to determine if the composition of the oil remains constant over time. Oil samples were obtained from wells at five locations in the oil pool in an anaerobic part of the glacial outwash aquifer. Samples covering a 21-year period were analyzed for 25 VHCs. Compared to the composition of oil from the pipeline source, VHCs identified in oil from wells sampled in 2008 were 13 to 64% depleted. The magnitude of loss for the VHCs analyzed was toluene ≫ o-xylene, benzene, C6 and C10–12n-alkanes > C7–C9n-alkanes > m-xylene, cyclohexane, and 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene > 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and ethylbenzene. Other VHCs including p-xylene, 1,3,5- and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzenes, the tetramethylbenzenes, methyl- and ethyl-cyclohexane, and naphthalene were not depleted during the time of the study. Water–oil and air–water batch equilibration simulations indicate that volatilization and biodegradation is most important for the C6–C9n-alkanes and cyclohexanes; dissolution and biodegradation is important for most of the other hydrocarbons. Depletion of the hydrocarbons in the oil pool is controlled by: the lack of oxygen and nutrients, differing rates of recharge, and the spatial distribution of oil in the aquifer. The mass loss of these VHCs in the 5 wells is between 1.6 and 7.4% in 29 years or an average annual loss of 0.06–0.26%/year. The present study shows that the composition of LNAPL changes over time and that these changes are spatially variable. This highlights the importance of characterizing the temporal and spatial variabilities of the source term in solute-transport models.

  8. Path integral approach to closed-form option pricing formulas with applications to stochastic volatility and interest rate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, D.; Wouters, M.; Tempere, J.; Foulon, S.

    2008-07-01

    We present a path integral method to derive closed-form solutions for option prices in a stochastic volatility model. The method is explained in detail for the pricing of a plain vanilla option. The flexibility of our approach is demonstrated by extending the realm of closed-form option price formulas to the case where both the volatility and interest rates are stochastic. This flexibility is promising for the treatment of exotic options. Our analytical formulas are tested with numerical Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Solution based CVD of main group materials.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caroline E; Carmalt, Claire J

    2016-02-21

    This critical review focuses on the solution based chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of main group materials with particular emphasis on their current and potential applications. Deposition of thin films of main group materials, such as metal oxides, sulfides and arsenides, have been researched owing to the array of applications which utilise them including solar cells, transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) and window coatings. Solution based CVD processes, such as aerosol-assisted (AA)CVD have been developed due to their scalability and to overcome the requirement of suitably volatile precursors as the technique relies on the solubility rather than volatility of precursors which vastly extends the range of potentially applicable compounds. An introduction into the applications and precursor requirements of main group materials will be presented first followed by a detailed discussion of their deposition reviewed according to this application. The challenges and prospects for further enabling research in terms of emerging main group materials will be discussed. PMID:26446057

  10. Detecting Volatiles Deep in the Lunar Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, A.; Heggy, E.; Ciarletti, V.; Colaprete, A.; Moghaddam, M.; Siegler, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    There is increasing theoretical and empirical evidence, from the Apollo era and after, of volatiles deep in the lunar interior, in the crust and deeper, both hydrogen-rich and otherwise. This comes in the form of fire fountain samples from Apollo 15 and Apollo 17, of hydrated minerals excavated by impacts which reach the base of the lunar crust e.g., crater Bullialdus, of hydration of apatite and other minerals, as well as predictions of a water-concentrated layer along with the KREEP material at the base of the lunar crust. We discuss how the presence of these volatiles might be directly explored. In particular water vapor molecules percolating to the surface through lunar regolith might be expected to stick and freeze into the regolith, at depths of several meters depending on the regolith temperature profile, porosity and particle size distribution, quantities that are not well known beyond two meters depth. To explore these depths in the regolith we use and propose several modes of penetrating radar. We will present results using the SELENE/Kaguya's Lunar Sounding RADAR (LSR) to probe the bulk volatile dielectric and loss structure properties of the regolith in various locations, both within permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) and without, and within neutron suppression regions (NSRs) as traced by epithermal neutrons and without. We also propose installation of ground penetrating RADAR (GPR) on a roving lunar platform that should be able to probe between 0.2 and 1.6 GHz, which will provide a probe of the entire depth of the lunar regolith as well as a high-resolution (about 4 cm FWHM) probe of the upper meter or two of the lunar soil, where other probes of volatiles such as epithermal neutron absorption or drilling might be employed. We discuss predictions for what kinds of volatile density profiles might be distinguished in this way, and whether these will be detected from orbit as NSRs, whether these must be restricted to PSRs, and how these might appear in

  11. Use of microwave-assisted evaporation for the complete recovery of volatile species of inorganic trace analytes

    PubMed

    Link; Kingston

    2000-07-01

    Solutions must often be evaporated prior to analysis either to preconcentrate the analyte or to eliminate an incompatible matrix component. Elimination of the halogen-based acids HCI and HF using traditional evaporation methods poses recovery problems because of volatilization of the target analyte as the chloride or fluoride species. A new sample preparation chemistry for trace analysis, where losses of analyte due to volatilization during the evaporation process are minimized, is explored using the unique heating mechanisms of the microwave-assisted evaporation process. The heating mechanisms of hot plate evaporation and microwave-assisted evaporation are compared, and temperatures throughout the evaporation process using each method are predicted and experimentally verified. Because the solution actually cools during microwave-assisted evaporation, volatilization due to overheating at dryness is minimized. Elemental standard solutions and SRM soil and tissue digestates were evaporated using a hot plate method and a newly developed reduced-pressure microwave-assisted evaporation apparatus. Redissolution and analysis of the residue by ICPMS showed that complete recovery was achieved using microwave-assisted evaporation while losses of several classically volatile analytes occurred using hot plate evaporation. PMID:10905326

  12. Regolith Volatile Characterization (RVC) in RESOLVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, Janine; Lueck, Dale; Gibson, Tracy; Levine, Lanfang

    2010-01-01

    Resource investigation in the lunar poles is of importance to the potential impact of in-situ resource utilization (ISRU). The RESOLVE project developed a payload to investigate the permanently shadowed areas of the lunar poles and demonstrate ISRU technology. As a part of the RESOLVE project, the regolith volatile characterization (RVC) subsystem was designed to examine the release of volatiles from sample cores. The test sample was heated in the reactor to release the volatiles where they were analyzed with gas chromatography. Subsequently, the volatile sample was introduced into the lunar water resource demonstration (LWRD) subsystem where the released hydrogen and water were selectively captured. The objective of the Regolith Volatile Characterization (RVC) subsystem was to heat the crushed core sample and determine the desorption of volatile species of interest. The RVC subsystem encompasses the reactor and the system for volatile analysis. The system was designed to analyze H2, He, CO, CO2, N2, 02, CH4, H2S and H2O. The GC chosen for this work is a Siemens MicroSAM process GC with 3 columns and 8 TCD detectors. Neon was chosen as the carrier gas to enhance the analysis of hydrogen and helium.The limit of detection for the gases is approx.1000ppm for H2, CO. CO2 , N2, O2 and H2 S. The limit of detection for CH4 is approx.4000ppm and the water limit of detection is -10000 ppm with a sample analysis time of 2-3 minutes. These values (with the exception of water and H2S) were determined by dilution of a six gas mixture from Scott Gas (5% CO2, CO, O2, N2, 4% CH4 and H2) using mass flow controllers (MFC5). Water was calibrated at low levels using an in house relative humidity (RH) generator. H 2S and high concentrations of H2 were calibrated by diluting a pure stream of gas with MFCs. Higher concentrations of N2 and 02 were calibrated using Air again diluting with MFCs. There were three modification goals for the GC in EBU2 that would allow this process GC to be

  13. Sicilian lemon oil: Composition of volatile and oxygen heterocyclic fractions and enantiomeric distribution of volatile components.

    PubMed

    Dugo, Paola; Ragonese, Carla; Russo, Marina; Sciarrone, Danilo; Santi, Luca; Cotroneo, Antonella; Mondello, Luigi

    2010-11-01

    A total of 92 samples of Sicilian lemon oils (Citrus limon (L.) Burm. f.) produced from September 2008 to June 2009, industrially cold-pressed by different extraction techniques (Brown Oil Extractor and Food Machinery Corporation), were analyzed by GC-flame ionization detector (FID) and GC/MS-LRI to investigate the volatile fraction; by RP-HPLC/PDA to determine the non-volatile components and by enantio-GC-FID to determine the enantiomeric ratios of 12 volatile components. This study provides a detailed investigation on the composition of Sicilian lemon essential oils industrially produced during a productive season, with the aim to recognize quality parameters for the characterization of this product. The results obtained are discussed to evaluate seasonal variation, influence of the extraction techniques, and are compared with those obtained for samples produced during different seasons. PMID:20931614

  14. Multilevel non-volatile data storage utilizing common current hysteresis of networked single walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ihn; Wang, Wei; Hwang, Sun Kak; Cho, Sung Hwan; Kim, Kang Lib; Jeong, Beomjin; Huh, June; Park, Cheolmin

    2016-05-21

    The characteristic source-drain current hysteresis frequently observed in field-effect transistors with networked single walled carbon-nanotube (NSWNT) channels is problematic for the reliable switching and sensing performance of devices. But the two distinct current states of the hysteresis curve at a zero gate voltage can be useful for memory applications. In this work, we demonstrate a novel non-volatile transistor memory with solution-processed NSWNTs which are suitable for multilevel data programming and reading. A polymer passivation layer with a small amount of water employed on the top of the NSWNT channel serves as an efficient gate voltage dependent charge trapping and de-trapping site. A systematic investigation evidences that the water mixed in a polymer passivation solution is critical for reliable non-volatile memory operation. The optimized device is air-stable and temperature-resistive up to 80 °C and exhibits excellent non-volatile memory performance with an on/off current ratio greater than 10(4), a switching time less than 100 ms, data retention longer than 4000 s, and write/read endurance over 100 cycles. Furthermore, the gate voltage dependent charge injection mediated by water in the passivation layer allowed for multilevel operation of our memory in which 4 distinct current states were programmed repetitively and preserved over a long time period. PMID:27129104

  15. Final report on CCQM-K47: Volatile organic compounds in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Urquiza, Melina; Maldonado Torres, Mauricio; Mitani, Yoshito; Schantz, Michele M.; Duewer, David L.; May, Wille E.; Parris, Reenie M.; Wise, Stephen A.; Kaminski, Katja; Philipp, Rosemarie; Win, Tin; Rosso, Adriana; Kim, Dal Ho; Ishikawa, Keiichiro; Krylov, A. I.; Kustikov, Y. A.; Baldan, Annarita

    2013-01-01

    At the October 2005 CCQM Organic Analysis Working Group Meeting (IRMM, Belgium), the decision was made to proceed with a Key Comparison study (CCQM-K47) addressing the calibration function for the determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) used for water quality monitoring. This was coordinated by CENAM and NIST. Benzene, o-xylene, m-xylene and p-xylene were chosen as representative VOCs. The solvent of choice was methanol. Key Comparison CCQM-K47 demonstrated the capabilities of participating NMIs to identify and measure the four target VOCs in a calibration solution using GC-based methods. The measurement challenges in CCQM-K47, such as avoiding volatility loss, achieving adequate chromatographic resolution and isolating potential interferences, are typical of those required for value-assigning volatile reference materials. Participants achieving comparable measurements for all four VOCs in this Key Comparison should be capable of providing reference materials and measurements for VOCs in solutions when present at concentration levels greater than 10 µg/g. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  16. Microbial Small Talk: Volatiles in Fungal–Bacterial Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ruth; Etalo, Desalegn W.; de Jager, Victor; Gerards, Saskia; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play an important role in the interactions between fungi and bacteria, two major groups of soil inhabiting microorganisms. Yet, most of the research has been focused on effects of bacterial volatiles on suppression of plant pathogenic fungi whereas little is known about the responses of bacteria to fungal volatiles. In the current study we performed a metabolomics analysis of volatiles emitted by several fungal and oomycetal soil strains under different nutrient conditions and growth stages. The metabolomics analysis of the tested fungal and oomycetal strains revealed different volatile profiles dependent on the age of the strains and nutrient conditions. Furthermore, we screened the phenotypic responses of soil bacterial strains to volatiles emitted by fungi. Two bacteria, Collimonas pratensis Ter291 and Serratia plymuthica PRI-2C, showed significant changes in their motility, in particular to volatiles emitted by Fusarium culmorum. This fungus produced a unique volatile blend, including several terpenes. Four of these terpenes were selected for further tests to investigate if they influence bacterial motility. Indeed, these terpenes induced or reduced swimming and swarming motility of S. plymuthica PRI-2C and swarming motility of C. pratensis Ter291, partly in a concentration-dependent manner. Overall the results of this work revealed that bacteria are able to sense and respond to fungal volatiles giving further evidence to the suggested importance of volatiles as signaling molecules in fungal–bacterial interactions. PMID:26779150

  17. Herbivore-induced Blueberry Volatiles and Intra-plant Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar R.

    2011-01-01

    Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) are commonly emitted from plants after herbivore attack1,2. These HIPVs are mainly regulated by the defensive plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) and its volatile derivative methyl jasmonate (MeJA)3,4,5. Over the past 3 decades researchers have documented that HIPVs can repel or attract herbivores, attract the natural enemies of herbivores, and in some cases they can induce or prime plant defenses prior to herbivore attack. In a recent paper6, I reported that feeding by gypsy moth caterpillars, exogenous MeJA application, and mechanical damage induce the emissions of volatiles from blueberry plants, albeit differently. In addition, blueberry branches respond to HIPVs emitted from neighboring branches of the same plant by increasing the levels of JA and resistance to herbivores (i.e., direct plant defenses), and by priming volatile emissions (i.e., indirect plant defenses). Similar findings have been reported recently for sagebrush7, poplar8, and lima beans9.. Here, I describe a push-pull method for collecting blueberry volatiles induced by herbivore (gypsy moth) feeding, exogenous MeJA application, and mechanical damage. The volatile collection unit consists of a 4 L volatile collection chamber, a 2-piece guillotine, an air delivery system that purifies incoming air, and a vacuum system connected to a trap filled with Super-Q adsorbent to collect volatiles5,6,10. Volatiles collected in Super-Q traps are eluted with dichloromethane and then separated and quantified using Gas Chromatography (GC). This volatile collection method was used n my study6 to investigate the volatile response of undamaged branches to exposure to volatiles from herbivore-damaged branches within blueberry plants. These methods are described here. Briefly, undamaged blueberry branches are exposed to HIPVs from neighboring branches within the same plant. Using the same techniques described above, volatiles emitted from branches after exposure to HIPVs are

  18. Measurement of the temperature dependent partitioning of semi-volatile organics onto aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzell, J. J.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.; Brook, J. R.; Makar, P.; Staebler, R. M.; Evans, G. J.; Jeong, C.; Lu, G.; Gordon, M.; Mihele, C.

    2011-12-01

    The volatility of the organic aerosol (OA) fraction has received a great deal of attention of late in light of new volatility-based modelling approaches and the inability of current models to fully account for secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this regard, evaporation of primary organic aerosol (POA) species and their subsequent oxidation may contribute significantly to SOA downwind of sources. To assess the importance of the temperature dependence of these primary organic aerosol species a temperature controlled inlet capable of heating and cooling was coupled to a High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and was deployed in Southern Ontario as part of the Fast Evolution of Vehicle Emissions near Roadways (FEVER) 2010 field campaign. The instrument and inlet system were mounted on a mobile platform to measure upwind and downwind of the roadway. Changes in"volatility" were observed when the mobile lab moved from an upwind to a downwind location, clearly demonstrating the impact of the roadway. Measured OA mass changes observed ranged from 0.5 to ~1 %/°C over a range of 15 degrees below to 25 degrees above ambient, depending on the location of the mobile lab and meteorological conditions at the time. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was applied to the complete data set (ambient and temperature controlled data) and yielded a 3 factor solution with factors consistent with hydro carbon like organic aerosol (HOA), aged organic aerosol (OOA-1) and a fresher organic aerosol (OOA-2). Mass changes as a function of temperature were observed for all three factors and were found to be similar over the temperature range studied. The potential use of this data for deriving parameters such as average molecular mass of semi-volatile (SVOC) and intermediate volatility organic (IVOC) gases taken up onto organic aerosol using the parameterization of gas-particle partitioning of Pankow (1994) will be discussed.

  19. Characterisation of volatiles in dried white varieties figs (Ficus carica L.).

    PubMed

    Mujić, Ibrahim; Bavcon Kralj, Mojca; Jokić, Stela; Jug, Tjaša; Subarić, Drago; Vidović, Senka; Zivković, Jelena; Jarni, Kristjan

    2014-09-01

    The aromatic profile of volatiles in dried figs varieties Bružetka Bijela and Zimnica were characterised by headspace solid-phase (HS-SPME) procedure with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis (GC-MS). The volatile compounds were distributed by distinct chemical classes, including alcohols, aldehydes, esters, terpenic compounds, and other compounds. The figs were dried in a pilot plant cabinet dryer. Prior to drying process, figs were pre-treated by sulphur dioxide, immersed in solution of citric acid and ascorbic acid, respectively. Several mathematical thin-layer drying models, available in the literature, were fitted to experimental data of figs, implementing non-linear regression analysis techniques. The results showed that pre-treatments of figs decrease significantly the drying time. The best thin-layer drying model in terms of fitting performance was Wang and Singh model. The major volatile compound in dried figs was benzaldehyde. After benzaldehyde, the most abundant aldehyde in dried figs was hexanal. The comparison among dried figs showed the highest abundance of aldehydes, in general, in non-treated (control) dried figs compared to pre-treated samples. Furthermore, ascorbic acid was the most efficient in preserving esters and alcohols in case of Bružetka Bijela, whereas in case of Zimnica, sulphur dioxide was in advance compared to ascorbic acid. Ethyl acetate was the most abundant ester found in dried figs. Among other compounds, 2-butanone,3-hydroxy was the most abundant identified volatiles. Linalool, as the only identified terpen, was in case of both dried fig varieties, preserved by immersion into ascorbic acid. The immersion into citric acid has not been so successful in volatiles conservation. PMID:25190838

  20. Relationship between volatile profile and sensory development of an oat-based biscuit.

    PubMed

    Cognat, Claudine; Shepherd, Tom; Verrall, Susan R; Stewart, Derek

    2014-10-01

    The shelf-life of plain oatcakes and oatcakes containing a natural antioxidant (rosemary extract) was studied for 28 weeks. The biscuits were evaluated using several chemical analyses to determine oxidation (headspace analysis, free fatty acids profile, peroxide value and anisidine value), in addition to sensory testing. A selection of volatiles, including hexanal, were found to be positively correlated to three sensory parameters (aroma, flavour and aftertaste). These volatiles, responsible for the perception of off-flavour in oat biscuits, were predominantly secondary lipid breakdown products, primarily from the unsaturated fatty acids C18:1 and C18:2. The peroxide value was also found to be a useful tool to assess oxidation in oatcakes. The impact of the antioxidant was insufficient at the concentration tested to be used as a solution to prevent the development of off-flavour; however the antioxidant did appear to slow down the rancidity process. PMID:24799211

  1. GADOLINIUM SOLUBILITY AND VOLATILITY DURING DWPF PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Reboul, S

    2008-01-30

    Understanding of gadolinium behavior, as it relates to potential neutron poisoning applications at the DWPF, has increased over the past several years as process specific data have been generated. Of primary importance are phenomena related to gadolinium solubility and volatility, which introduce the potential for gadolinium to be separated from fissile materials during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) and Melter operations. Existing data indicate that gadolinium solubilities under moderately low pH conditions can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on the quantities of other constituents that are present. With respect to sludge batching processes, the gadolinium solubility appears to be highly affected by iron. In cases where the mass ratio of Fe:Gd is 300 or more, the gadolinium solubility has been observed to be low, one milligram per liter or less. In contrast, when the ratio of Fe:Gd is 20 or less, the gadolinium solubility has been found to be relatively high, several thousands of milligrams per liter. For gadolinium to serve as an effective neutron poison in CPC operations, the solubility needs to be limited to approximately 100 mg/L. Unfortunately, the Fe:Gd ratio that corresponds to this solubility limit has not been identified. Existing data suggest gadolinium and plutonium are not volatile during melter operations. However, the data are subject to inherent uncertainties preventing definitive conclusions on this matter. In order to determine if gadolinium offers a practical means of poisoning waste in DWPF operations, generation of additional data is recommended. This includes: Gd solubility testing under conditions where the Fe:Gd ratio varies from 50 to 150; and Gd and Pu volatility studies tailored to quantifying high temperature partitioning. Additional tests focusing on crystal aging of Gd/Pu precipitates should be pursued if receipt of gadolinium-poisoned waste into the Tank Farm becomes routine.

  2. Volatile loss from accreting icy protoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    A large self-gravitating body does not easily lose significant mass because the escape velocity is much larger than the sound speed of atmosphere-forming species under ambient thermal conditions. The most significant exceptions to this are giant impacts or impact jetting by fast-moving projectiles. A very small object (e.g. a comet) also does not easily lose significant volatile mass upon formation because the energy release associated with its accretion is so small. (It can however lose a great deal of mass if it is subsequently moved closer to the Sun.) I argue that there is an intermediate mass range (corresponding to bodies with radii of approximately 300-800 km) for which the ambient steady-state mass loss is a maximum. By ambient, I mean those conditions pertaining to the formation region of the body. By steady state, I mean to exclude infrequent traumas (giant impacts). The existence of a preferred intermediate mass arises through the competition of growing gravitational containment and growing energy release by accretion; it corresponds typically to GM/(Rc(sub s)(exp 2)) approximately equals 2 to 4, where M is the protoplanet mass of radius R, and c(sub s) is the sound speed. Several factors determine the amount of volatile loss is this vulnerable zone during accretion but in general the loss is a substantial fraction of the volatiles, sometimes approaching 100 percent. The principal implication is that bodies larger than a few hundred kilometers in radius will not have a 'primitive' (i.e. cometary) composition. This is relevant for understanding Triton, Pluto, Charon, and perhaps Chiron.

  3. Rift initiation with volatiles and magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinger, Cynthia; Muirhead, James; Roecker, Steve; Tiberi, Christel; Muzuka, Alfred; Ferdinand, Rrichard; Mulibo, Gabrile; Kianji, Gladys

    2015-04-01

    Rift initiation in cratonic lithosphere remains an outstanding problem in continental tectonics, but strain and magmatism patterns in youthful sectors of the East African rift provide new insights. Few teleseisms occur in the Eastern rift arm of the East African rift system, except the southernmost sector in northern Tanzania where extension occurs in Archaean lithosphere. The change in seismic energy release occurs over a narrow along-axis zone, and between sectors with and without volcanoes in the central rift valley. Are these differences in strain behavior indicative of along-strike variations in a) rheology; b) strain transfer from border faults to magma intrusion zones; c) dike vs fault slip; and/or d) shallow vs deep magma chambers? We present time-space relations of seismicity recorded on a 38-station array spanning the Kenya-Tanzania border, focal mechanisms for the largest events during those time periods, and compare these to longer-term strain patterns. Lower crustal seismicity occurs along the rift length, including sectors on and off craton, and those with and without central rift valley volcanoes, and we see no clear along-strike variation in seismogenic layer thickness. One explanation for widespread lower crustal seismicity is high gas pressures and volatile migration from active metasomatism of upper mantle and magma degassing, consistent with very high volatile flux along fault zones, and widespread metasomatism of xenoliths. Volatile release and migration may be critical to strength reduction of initially cold, strong cratonic lithosphere. Seismicity patterns indicate strain (and fluid?) transfer from the Manyara border fault to Gelai shield volcano (faulting, diking) via Oldoinyo Lengai volcano. Our focal mechanisms and Global CMTs from an intense fault-dike episode (2007) show a local, temporally stable, rotation from ~E-W extension to NE-SE extension in this linkage zone, consistent with longer term patterns recorded in vent and eruptive

  4. Remote observations of parent volatiles in comets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, M.

    Cometary nuclei are orts of the early solar system; they contain key information from the time when planets were forming, and even earlier -- some contain material from the natal interstellar cloud. During the first 500 million years of Earth's existence, comets likely delivered vast quantities of pre-biotic organic material along with water for its oceans. The most easily modified forms of matter --the ices, low- temperature -refractory organics, and refractory minerals -- hold special significance for understanding these processes. The unequivocal detection of parent volatile species was first a chieved in 1985 (H2 O and HCN). This capability has exploded since then, until now more than two dozen parent volatile species can be characterized directly from Earth-based observatories . Hyakutake and Hale-Bopp were the first bright comets to be studied with powerful new astronomical facilities. A wealth of new information on cometary organic composition was obtained, including the discovery of symmetric hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, acetylene) by infrared spectroscopy and the detection of six new parent volatiles at radio wavelengths. Since then, larger telescopes and even more powerful instruments have become available, permitting in-depth investigation of much fainter comets. Especially, the advent of a powerful cross-dispersed cryogenic infrared echelle spectrometer (NIRSPEC, at the 10-m Keck-2 telescope) has revolutionized our ability to measure cometary c mposition. Ten parent volatileo species can be characterized in about two hours, eliminating many sources of systematic error. Six Oort cloud comets have been studied with it since 1999. The compositions of nine Oort -cloud comets (including comet Halley and the deceased comet C/1999 S4 LINEAR) will be compared and discussed in the context of chemical diversity in the giant-planets' nebular region. Implications for future research will be mentioned. Mumma, M. J. et al. (2001), Ap. J. 546, 1183-1193. Mumma, M. J

  5. Assessing Requirements Volatility and Risk Using Bayesian Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    There are many factors that affect the level of requirements volatility a system experiences over its lifecycle and the risk that volatility imparts. Improper requirements generation, undocumented user expectations, conflicting design decisions, and anticipated / unanticipated world states are representative of these volatility factors. Combined, these volatility factors can increase programmatic risk and adversely affect successful system development. This paper proposes that a Bayesian Network can be used to support reasonable judgments concerning the most likely sources and types of requirements volatility a developing system will experience prior to starting development and by doing so it is possible to predict the level of requirements volatility the system will experience over its lifecycle. This assessment offers valuable insight to the system's developers, particularly by providing a starting point for risk mitigation planning and execution.

  6. Plume composition and volatile flux from Nyamulagira volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Sergio; Bobrowski, Nicole; Giuffrida, Giovanni Bruno; Scaglione, Sarah; Liotta, Marcello; Brusca, Lorenzo; D'Alessandro, Walter; Arellano, Santiago; Yalire, Matiew; Galle, Bo; Tedesco, Dario

    2015-04-01

    applied inside the crater as well as downwind the volcano and active alkaline traps (Raschig-Tube and Drechsel bottle) were exposed. The alkaline solution traps acidic species (CO2, SO2, H2S, HCl, HF, HBr, HI) due to the acid-base reactions. Moreover, filter packs technique have also been used to collect both the volatile phase of the plume (sulphur and halogen species) and the particulate phase (major and trace metals) emitted from the volcano. These new results will add to our lacking knowledge of volcanic degassing in VVP, and will increase constraints on the abundances and origins of volatiles from the mantle source which feeds volcanism in the western branch of the EARS.

  7. Pluto's volatile distribution from speckle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Leslie; Howell, Steve; Young, Eliot; Buie, Marc; Grundy, Will

    2013-08-01

    Howell et al. (2012) separated Pluto and Charon with the speckle imager, DSSI, and measured their diameters. We propose to build on this work, to map the volatiles on Pluto, by taking more exposures, observing in four filters designed to measure Pluto's albedo, color, and CH_4 distribution, and observing multiple faces on Pluto. This will help us study Pluto's migrating frosts as Pluto leaves the sun, and as its summer pole becomes more directly illuminated. We compare results back to HST maps in 1994 and 2002/2003 and forward to New Horizons maps in 2015 and future ground-based maps in 2015 or beyond.

  8. Thermodynamics of Volatile Silicon Hydroxides Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan H.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2001-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics are promising candidate structural materials for heat engines. The long-term stability of these materials to environmental degradation is dependent on the formation and retention of a protective SiO2 layer. It is well known that SiO2 forms stable volatile hydroxides in the presence of water vapor at elevated temperatures. Combustion conditions, which characteristically are at high velocities, contain significant water vapor pressures, and high temperatures tend to promote continuous formation of these hydroxides with resulting material degradation. For the degradation of silicon-based ceramics to be predicted, accurate thermodynamic data on the formation of silicon hydroxides are needed.

  9. Condensation Of Volatile Contaminant In An Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Patricia A.; Jenkins, Teresa K.; Maag, Carl R.; Taylor, Daniel M.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes investigation of deposition of contaminant of cooled optical detectors in Wide-Field/Planetary Camera (WF/PC), an instrument in Hubble Space Telescope. To understand phenomenon, initially thought to be deposition of water from graphite/epoxy optical-bench material in instrument, researchers mounted several diagnostic instruments on access plate to monitor interior of WF/PC housing and optical bench. Temperature-controlled quartz-crystal microbalance (TQCM) measures adsorbed and desorbed volatile condensible material on surfaces in WF/PC.

  10. Magmatic volatiles and the weathering of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. C.

    1993-01-01

    The sources for volatiles on Mars have been the subject of many hypotheses for exogenous influences including late accretion of volatile-enriched material, impact devolatilization to create massive early atmospheres, and even major bombardment by comets. However, the inventory of chemically active volatiles observable at the contemporary surface of Mars is consistent with domination by endogenous, subsequent planetary processes, viz., persistent magmatic outgassing. Volcanism on Mars has been widespread in both space and time. Notwithstanding important specific differences between the mantles of Earth and Mars, the geochemical similarities are such that the suite of gases emitted from Martian volcanic activity should include H2O, CO2, S-containing gases (e.g. H2S and/or SO2), and Cl-containing gases (e.g., Cl2 and/or HCl). H2O and CO2 exist in the atmosphere of Mars. Both are also present as surface condensates. However, spectroscopic observations of the Martian atmosphere clearly show that the S- and Cl-containing gases are severely depleted, with upper limits of less than or equal to 10(exp -7) the abundance of CO2. Likewise, there is no evidence of polar condensates of compounds of these elements as there is for CO2 and H2O. Within the soil, on the other hand, there has been direct measurement of incorporated H2O and abundant compounds containing S and Cl. Barring some as yet implausible geochemical sequestering process, the S/Cl ratio of about 6:1 in Martian soils implies a limit of 5% on the contribution of matter of solarlike composition (e.g., carbonaceous chondrite or cometary material) to these volatiles. Hence, exogenous sources are minor or not yet observed. From analysis of elemental trends in Martian soils, it has been recently shown that a simple two-component model can satisfy the Viking in situ measurements. Component A includes Si and most or all the Al, Ca, Ti, and Fe. Component B, taken as 16 +/- 3% by weight of the total, contains S and most or

  11. Volatility of patulin in apple juice.

    PubMed

    Kryger, R A

    2001-08-01

    Patulin is a mycotoxin produced by certain fungi, such as those found commonly on apples. The patulin content of apple juice is a regulatory concern because patulin is a suspected carcinogen and mutagen. A simple model of the apple juice concentration process was carried out to examine the possible contamination of patulin in apple aroma, a distillate produced commercially in the concentration of apple juice. The results show no evidence for patulin volatility, and document a reduction in patulin content by at least a factor of 250 in the apple distillate obtained from apple juice. Furthermore, a survey of several commercial apple aroma samples found no evidence of patulin content. PMID:11513722

  12. Production of volatile organohalogens by phytoplankton cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarczyk, R.; Moore, R.M. )

    1994-02-15

    The authors report on laboratory experiments which have demonstrated that types of unialgal cultures of marine phytoplankton can produce a range of halocarbons, including CHBr[sub 3], CHBr[sub 2]Cl, CH[sub 2]Br[sub 2]. In the laboratory environment the production rate is shown to be dependent upon the species of phytoplankton, and the development stage. Such volatile halocarbons, coming from natural sources in the seas, are thought to be important sources of reactive halogens in the troposphere, and perhaps even in the stratosphere, if the compounds are stable enough.

  13. Theoretical predictions of volatile bearing phases and volatile resources in some carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguly, Jibamitra; Saxena, Surendra K.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented from theoretical calculations to predict the modal abundances and compositions of the major mineral phases and the vapor phase that could develop in the bulk compositions of carbonaceous chondrites. The abundances and compositions are obtained as functions of temperature and pressure. The calculations are used to evaluate the volatile and mineralogical resource potential of C1 and C2 carbonaceous chondrites.

  14. A fragrant neighborhood: volatile mediated bacterial interactions in soil

    PubMed Central

    Schulz-Bohm, Kristin; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play essential roles in communication and competition between soil microorganisms. Here we assessed volatile-mediated interactions of a synthetic microbial community in a model system that mimics the natural conditions in the heterogeneous soil environment along the rhizosphere. Phylogenetic different soil bacterial isolates (Burkholderia sp., Dyella sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Paenibacillus sp.) were inoculated as mixtures or monoculture in organic-poor, sandy soil containing artificial root exudates (ARE) and the volatile profile and growth were analyzed. Additionally, a two-compartment system was used to test if volatiles produced by inter-specific interactions in the rhizosphere can stimulate the activity of starving bacteria in the surrounding, nutrient-depleted soil. The obtained results revealed that both microbial interactions and shifts in microbial community composition had a strong effect on the volatile emission. Interestingly, the presence of a slow-growing, low abundant Paenibacillus strain significantly affected the volatile production by the other abundant members of the bacterial community as well as the growth of the interacting strains. Furthermore, volatiles released by mixtures of root-exudates consuming bacteria stimulated the activity and growth of starved bacteria. Besides growth stimulation, also an inhibition in growth was observed for starving bacteria exposed to microbial volatiles. The current work suggests that volatiles produced during microbial interactions in the rhizosphere have a significant long distance effect on microorganisms in the surrounding, nutrient-depleted soil. PMID:26579111

  15. Scale-adjusted volatility and the Dow Jones index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Craig; Hudson, Christopher

    2007-05-01

    This paper extends research by Batten and Ellis [Econ. Lett. 72 (2001) 291] to propose a simple model of scale-adjusted volatility which measures the extent to which the Gaussian scaling law mis-estimates long-horizon volatility. Applied to the Dow Jones industrial average, the results of our model show a dramatic improvement over the Gaussian scaling law in predicting long-horizon volatility. Our model provides a general framework for estimating scaled volatility that may be also applied to other fields of study where the Hurst exponent is commonly used.

  16. A fragrant neighborhood: volatile mediated bacterial interactions in soil.

    PubMed

    Schulz-Bohm, Kristin; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play essential roles in communication and competition between soil microorganisms. Here we assessed volatile-mediated interactions of a synthetic microbial community in a model system that mimics the natural conditions in the heterogeneous soil environment along the rhizosphere. Phylogenetic different soil bacterial isolates (Burkholderia sp., Dyella sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Paenibacillus sp.) were inoculated as mixtures or monoculture in organic-poor, sandy soil containing artificial root exudates (ARE) and the volatile profile and growth were analyzed. Additionally, a two-compartment system was used to test if volatiles produced by inter-specific interactions in the rhizosphere can stimulate the activity of starving bacteria in the surrounding, nutrient-depleted soil. The obtained results revealed that both microbial interactions and shifts in microbial community composition had a strong effect on the volatile emission. Interestingly, the presence of a slow-growing, low abundant Paenibacillus strain significantly affected the volatile production by the other abundant members of the bacterial community as well as the growth of the interacting strains. Furthermore, volatiles released by mixtures of root-exudates consuming bacteria stimulated the activity and growth of starved bacteria. Besides growth stimulation, also an inhibition in growth was observed for starving bacteria exposed to microbial volatiles. The current work suggests that volatiles produced during microbial interactions in the rhizosphere have a significant long distance effect on microorganisms in the surrounding, nutrient-depleted soil. PMID:26579111

  17. Volatilization of metal powders in plasma sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardelle, A.; Vardelle, M.; Zhang, H.; Themelis, N. J.; Gross, K.

    2002-06-01

    Ideally, plasma spraying of metal powders must take place within a narrow processing “window” where the particles become fully molten before they hit the substrate, but are not overheated to the point that substantial volatilization occurs. Metal evaporation in flight results in a decrease in the deposition efficiency. In addiiton, the emission of vapors leads to the formation of metal and oxide fumes that are undesirable from the viewpoints of both resource conservation and environmental control. This study examines the vaporization and fume formation in the plasma spraying of iron powders of different size ranges. The experimental part involves the determination of the population (number density) of metal atoms at different cross sections along the trajectory of the plasma jet, and the collection of the submicronic particles resulting from vapor condensation. The experimental results are compared with the projections of a mathematical model that computes the gas/particle velocity and temperature fields within the jet envelope, projects the rate of heat/mass transfer at the surface of individual particles, and determines the rate of volatilization that results in the formation of metal and metal oxide fumes.

  18. Asymmetric conditional volatility in international stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Nuno B.; Menezes, Rui; Mendes, Diana A.

    2007-08-01

    Recent studies show that a negative shock in stock prices will generate more volatility than a positive shock of similar magnitude. The aim of this paper is to appraise the hypothesis under which the conditional mean and the conditional variance of stock returns are asymmetric functions of past information. We compare the results for the Portuguese Stock Market Index PSI 20 with six other Stock Market Indices, namely the SP 500, FTSE 100, DAX 30, CAC 40, ASE 20, and IBEX 35. In order to assess asymmetric volatility we use autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity specifications known as TARCH and EGARCH. We also test for asymmetry after controlling for the effect of macroeconomic factors on stock market returns using TAR and M-TAR specifications within a VAR framework. Our results show that the conditional variance is an asymmetric function of past innovations raising proportionately more during market declines, a phenomenon known as the leverage effect. However, when we control for the effect of changes in macroeconomic variables, we find no significant evidence of asymmetric behaviour of the stock market returns. There are some signs that the Portuguese Stock Market tends to show somewhat less market efficiency than other markets since the effect of the shocks appear to take a longer time to dissipate.

  19. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

    2002-06-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated exploratory work towards the development of new field screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of carbon-halogen bonds. Commercially available heated diode and corona discharge leak detectors were procured and evaluated for halogenated VOC response. The units were modified to provide a digital readout of signal related to VOC concentration. Sensor response was evaluated with carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE), which represent halogenated VOCs with and without double bonds. The response characteristics were determined for the VOCs directly in headspace in Tedlar bag containers. Quantitation limits in air were estimated. Potential interferences from volatile hydrocarbons, such as toluene and heptane, were evaluated. The effect of humidity was studied also. The performance of the new devices was evaluated in the laboratory by spiking soil samples and monitoring headspace for halogenated VOCs. A draft concept of the steps for a new analytical method was outlined. The results of the first year effort show that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work towards the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

  20. Volatility and Uncertainty in Environmental Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniloff, Peter Taylor

    Environmental policy is increasingly implemented via market mechanisms. While this is in many ways a great success for the economics profession, a number of questions remain. In this dissertation, I empirically explore the question of what will happen as environmental outcomes are coupled to potentially volatile market phenomena, whether policies can insulate environmental outcomes and market shocks, and policymakers should act to mitigate such volatility. I use a variety of empirical methods including reduced form and structural econometrics as well as theoretical models to consider a variety of policy, market, and institutional contexts. The effectiveness of market interventions depends on the context and on the policy mechanism. In particular, energy markets are characterized by low demand elasticities and kinked supply curves which are very flat below a capacity constraint (elastic) and very steep above it (inelastic). This means that a quantity-based policy that acts on demand, such as releasing additional pollution emission allowances from a reserved fund would be an effective way to constrain price shocks in a cap-and-trade system. However, a quantity-based policy that lowers the need for inframarginal supply, such as using ethanol as an oil product substitute to mitigate oil shocks, would be ineffective. Similarly, the benefits of such interventions depends on the macroeconomic impacts of price shocks from the sector. Relatedly, I show that a liability rule designed to reduce risk from low-probability, high-consequence oil spills have very low compliance costs.

  1. Forecasting Volatility in Indian Stock Market using Artificial Neural Network with Multiple Inputs and Outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DattaChaudhuri, Tamal; Ghosh, Indranil

    2015-06-01

    Volatility in stock markets has been extensively studied in the applied finance literature. In this paper, Artificial Neural Network models based on various back propagation algorithms have been constructed to predict volatility in the Indian stock market through volatility of NIFTY returns and volatility of gold returns. This model considers India VIX, CBOE VIX, volatility of crude oil returns (CRUDESDR), volatility of DJIA returns (DJIASDR), volatility of DAX returns (DAXSDR), volatility of Hang Seng returns (HANGSDR) and volatility of Nikkei returns (NIKKEISDR) as predictor variables. Three sets of experiments have been performed over three time periods to judge the effectiveness of the approach.

  2. Polymer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, Gerhard Erich; Miller, Kevin Michael

    2011-07-26

    There is provided a method of making a polymer solution comprising polymerizing one or more monomer in a solvent, wherein said monomer comprises one or more ethylenically unsaturated monomer that is a multi-functional Michael donor, and wherein said solvent comprises 40% or more by weight, based on the weight of said solvent, one or more multi-functional Michael donor.

  3. Sound Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    Poor classroom acoustics are impairing students' hearing and their ability to learn. However, technology has come up with a solution: tools that focus voices in a way that minimizes intrusive ambient noise and gets to the intended receiver--not merely amplifying the sound, but also clarifying and directing it. One provider of classroom audio…

  4. PRECIPITATION OF ZIRCONIUM, NIOBIUM, AND RUTHENIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, A.S.

    1958-08-12

    An improvement on the"head end process" for decontaminating dissolver solutions of their Zr, Ni. and Ru values. The process consists in adding a water soluble symmetrical dialkyl ketone. e.g. acetone, before the formation of the manganese dioxide precipitate. The effect is that upon digestion, the ruthenium oxide does not volatilize, but is carried on the manganese dioxide precipitate.

  5. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of volatile organics -- Carbon tetrachloride

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, R.E.; Veligdan, J.T.

    1994-09-01

    Volatile organic chemicals are a class of pollutants which are regulated at very low levels by the EPA. Consequently a need exists as a part of site remediation efforts within DOE to develop technologies which will allow for the in situ monitoring of these chemicals. Resonance Raman spectroscopy is a potential technique to accomplish this if the resonance enhancement is sufficiently high. Carbon tetrachloride was selected as a test case. Measurements under resonance conditions at 248 nm showed an enhancement factor of 2 {times} 10{sup 4}. Using this value an estimate of the sensitivity for both in situ and remote monitoring of CCl{sup 4} was made. It was concluded that resonance Raman could be used to detect these chemicals at levels of regulatory interest. Future effort directed towards the development of a suitable probe as well as a field-portable system would be desirable. Such effort could be directed towards the solution of a particular monitoring problem within a DOE waste remediation project. Once developed, however, it should be easily generalized to the analysis of other VOC`s in other environments.

  6. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile constituents from latrines.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jianming; Aoll, Jackline; Niclass, Yvan; Velazco, Maria Inés; Wünsche, Laurent; Pika, Jana; Starkenmann, Christian

    2013-07-16

    More than 2.5 billion people defecate in the open. The increased commitment of private and public organizations to improving this situation is driving the research and development of new technologies for toilets and latrines. Although key technical aspects are considered by researchers when designing new technologies for developing countries, the basic aspect of offending malodors from human waste is often neglected. With the objective of contributing to technical solutions that are acceptable to global consumers, we investigated the chemical composition of latrine malodors sampled in Africa and India. Field latrines in four countries were evaluated olfactively and the odors qualitatively and quantitatively characterized with three analytical techniques. Sulfur compounds including H2S, methyl mercaptan, and dimethyl-mono-(di;tri) sulfide are important in sewage-like odors of pit latrines under anaerobic conditions. Under aerobic conditions, in Nairobi for example, paracresol and indole reached concentrations of 89 and 65 μg/g, respectively, which, along with short chain fatty acids such as butyric acid (13 mg/g) explained the strong rancid, manure and farm yard odor. This work represents the first qualitative and quantitative study of volatile compounds sampled from seven pit latrines in a variety of geographic, technical, and economic contexts in addition to three single stools from India and a pit latrine model system. PMID:23829328

  7. Architectural Techniques For Managing Non-volatile Caches

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Sparsh

    2013-01-01

    As chip power dissipation becomes a critical challenge in scaling processor performance, computer architects are forced to fundamentally rethink the design of modern processors and hence, the chip-design industry is now at a major inflection point in its hardware roadmap. The high leakage power and low density of SRAM poses serious obstacles in its use for designing large on-chip caches and for this reason, researchers are exploring non-volatile memory (NVM) devices, such as spin torque transfer RAM, phase change RAM and resistive RAM. However, since NVMs are not strictly superior to SRAM, effective architectural techniques are required for making them a universal memory solution. This book discusses techniques for designing processor caches using NVM devices. It presents algorithms and architectures for improving their energy efficiency, performance and lifetime. It also provides both qualitative and quantitative evaluation to help the reader gain insights and motivate them to explore further. This book will be highly useful for beginners as well as veterans in computer architecture, chip designers, product managers and technical marketing professionals.

  8. High Arctic Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollert, Michelle; Buchard, Sebrina; Faubert, Patrick; Michelsen, Anders; Rinnan, Riikka

    2013-04-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted from terrestrial vegetation participate in oxidative reactions, affecting the tropospheric ozone concentration and the lifetimes of greenhouse gasses such as methane. Also, they affect the formation of secondary organic aerosols. BVOCs thus provide a strong link between the terrestrial biosphere, the atmosphere and the climate. Global models of BVOC emissions have assumed minimal emissions from the high latitudes due to low temperatures, short growing seasons and sparse vegetation cover. However, measurements from this region of the world are lacking and emissions from the High Arctic have not been published yet. The aim of this study was to obtain the first estimates for BVOC emissions from the High Arctic. Hereby, we wish to add new knowledge to the understanding of global BVOC emissions. Measurements were conducted in NE Greenland (74°30' N, 20°30' W) in four vegetation communities in the study area. These four vegetation communities were dominated by Cassiope tetragona, Salix arctica, Vaccinium uliginosum and Kobresia myosuroides/Dryas octopetela/Salix arctica, respectively. Emissions were measured by enclosure technique and collection of volatiles into adsorbent cartridges in August 2009. The volatiles were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following thermal desorption. Isoprene showed highest emissions in S. arctica-dominated heath, where it was the dominant single BVOC. However, isoprene emission decreased below detection limit in the end of August when the temperature was at or below 10°C. According to a principal component analysis, monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions were especially associated with C. tetragona-dominated heath. Especially S. arctica and C. tetragona dominated heaths showed distinct patterns of emitted BVOCs. Emissions of BVOC from the studied high arctic heaths were clearly lower than the emissions observed previously in subarctic heaths with more dense vegetation

  9. Electroantennographic bioassay as a screening tool for host plant volatiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant volatiles play an important role in plant-insect interactions. Herbivorous insects use plant volatiles, known as kairomones, to locate their host plant. When a host plant is an important agronomic or economic commodity feeding damage by these insects can inflict serious economic losses to grow...

  10. SEED DETERIORATION INCREASES IN THE PRESENCE OF VOLATILES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seeds of culinary importance emit low molecular weight carbonyl compounds that can be detected as volatiles in the surrounding air. Volatile carbonyl molecules are byproducts of cascading peroxidative reactions and can be highly reactive against proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Carum carvi L. pro...

  11. A Cost Effective Method to Measure Ammonia Volatilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimating the magnitude of ammonia (NH3) volatilization losses under different conditions is important for proper fertilizer management. Currently used field techniques to trap volatilized NH3 from soils amended with various N sources and the techniques used for the quantitative determination of NH...

  12. MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING FOR SEMI-VOLATILES (ATRAZINE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, air quality model within EPA's Models-3 system, can be adapted to simulate the fate of semi-volatile compounds that are emitted into the atmosphere. "Semi-volatile" refers to compounds that partition their mass between two ph...

  13. Fungal production of volatiles during growth on fiberglass.

    PubMed Central

    Ezeonu, I M; Price, D L; Simmons, R B; Crow, S A; Ahearn, D G

    1994-01-01

    Acoustic and thermal fiberglass insulation materials used in heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems were colonized with fungi in laboratory chambers. The mixed fungal population, principally Aspergillus versicolor, Acremonium obclavatum, and Cladosporium herbarum, produced odoriferous volatiles, including 2-ethyl hexanol, cyclohexane, and benzene. These volatiles may be related to poor indoor air quality and the sick building syndrome. PMID:7993098

  14. Biodiversity of volatile organic compounds from five French ferns.

    PubMed

    Fons, Françoise; Froissard, Didier; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Buatois, Bruno; Rapior, Sylvie

    2010-10-01

    Five French ferns belonging to different families were investigated for volatile organic compounds (VOC) by GC-MS using organic solvent extraction. Fifty-five VOC biosynthesized from the shikimic, lipidic and terpenic pathways including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and carotenoid-type compounds were identified. The main volatile compound of Adiantum capillus-veneris L. (Pteridaceae) was (E)-2-decenal with a plastic or "stink bug" odor. The volatile profiles of Athyrium filix-femina (L.) Roth (Woodsiaceae) and Blechnum spicant (L.) Roth (Blechnaceae) showed similarities, with small amounts of isoprenoids and the same main volatile compounds, i.e., 2-phenylethanal (odor of lilac and hyacinth) and 1-octen-3-ol (mushroom-like odor). The main volatile compound of Dryopteris filix-mas (L.) Schott (Dryopteridaceae) was (E)-nerolidol with a woody or fresh bark note. Polyketides, as acylfilicinic acids, were mainly identified in this fern. Oreopteris limbosperma (Bellardi ex. All.) J. Holub (Thelypteridaceae), well-known for its lemon smell, contained the highest biodiversity of VOC. Eighty percent of the volatiles was issued from the terpenic pathway. The main volatiles were (E)-nerolidol, alpha-terpineol, beta-caryophyllene and other minor monoterpenes (for example, linalool, pinenes, limonene, and gamma-terpinen-7-al). It was also the fern with the highest number of carotenoid-type derivatives, which were identified in large amounts. Our results were of great interest underlying new industrial valorisation for ferns based on their broad spectrum of volatiles. PMID:21121267

  15. Volatile-mediated interactions between phylogenetically different soil bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Garbeva, Paolina; Hordijk, Cornelis; Gerards, Saskia; de Boer, Wietse

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that organic volatiles play an important role in interactions between micro-organisms in the porous soil matrix. Here we report that volatile compounds emitted by different soil bacteria can affect the growth, antibiotic production and gene expression of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0–1. We applied a novel cultivation approach that mimics the natural nutritional heterogeneity in soil in which P. fluorescens grown on nutrient-limited agar was exposed to volatiles produced by 4 phylogenetically different bacterial isolates (Collimonas pratensis, Serratia plymuthica, Paenibacillus sp., and Pedobacter sp.) growing in sand containing artificial root exudates. Contrary to our expectation, the produced volatiles stimulated rather than inhibited the growth of P. fluorescens. A genome-wide, microarray-based analysis revealed that volatiles of all four bacterial strains affected gene expression of P. fluorescens, but with a different pattern of gene expression for each strain. Based on the annotation of the differently expressed genes, bacterial volatiles appear to induce a chemotactic motility response in P. fluorescens, but also an oxidative stress response. A more detailed study revealed that volatiles produced by C. pratensis triggered, antimicrobial secondary metabolite production in P. fluorescens. Our results indicate that bacterial volatiles can have an important role in communication, trophic - and antagonistic interactions within the soil bacterial community. PMID:24966854

  16. Thirteen year summary of field-scale herbicide volatilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Once lost to the atmosphere, herbicide transport can result in unintended re-deposition to inhabited areas, streams, rivers, and lakes. To better understand factors governing herbicide volatilization and to determine its impact relative to other loss pathways, field-scale turbulent volatilization fl...

  17. 40 CFR 60.742 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.742 Section 60.742 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Polymeric Coating of Supporting Substrates Facilities § 60.742 Standards for volatile organic compounds....

  18. 40 CFR 60.712 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.712 Section 60.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities § 60.712 Standards for volatile organic compounds. Each owner or...

  19. 40 CFR 60.622 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.622 Section 60.622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) Each affected...

  20. 40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or...

  1. 40 CFR 60.432 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.432 Section 60.432 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Graphic Arts Industry: Publication Rotogravure Printing § 60.432 Standard for volatile organic...

  2. 40 CFR 60.602 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.602 Section 60.602 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities § 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On and after...

  3. 40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date...

  4. 40 CFR 60.432 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.432 Section 60.432 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Graphic Arts Industry: Publication Rotogravure Printing § 60.432 Standard for volatile organic...

  5. 40 CFR 60.622 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.622 Section 60.622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) Each affected...

  6. 40 CFR 60.392 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.392 Section 60.392 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Automobile and Light Duty Truck Surface Coating Operations § 60.392 Standards for volatile organic...

  7. 40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.582 Section 60.582 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  8. 40 CFR 60.712 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.712 Section 60.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities § 60.712 Standards for volatile organic compounds. Each owner or...

  9. 40 CFR 60.602 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.602 Section 60.602 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities § 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On and after...

  10. 40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.582 Section 60.582 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  11. 40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date...

  12. 40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.582 Section 60.582 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  13. 40 CFR 60.722 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.722 Section 60.722 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... volatile organic compounds. (a) Each owner or operator of any affected facility which is subject to...

  14. 40 CFR 60.722 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.722 Section 60.722 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... volatile organic compounds. (a) Each owner or operator of any affected facility which is subject to...

  15. 40 CFR 60.722 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.722 Section 60.722 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... volatile organic compounds. (a) Each owner or operator of any affected facility which is subject to...

  16. 40 CFR 60.602 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.602 Section 60.602 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities § 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On and after...

  17. 40 CFR 60.432 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.432 Section 60.432 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Graphic Arts Industry: Publication Rotogravure Printing § 60.432 Standard for volatile organic...

  18. 40 CFR 60.392 - Standards for volatile organic compounds

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds 60.392 Section 60.392 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Automobile and Light Duty Truck Surface Coating Operations § 60.392 Standards for volatile organic...

  19. 40 CFR 60.712 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.712 Section 60.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities § 60.712 Standards for volatile organic compounds. Each owner or...

  20. 40 CFR 60.742 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.742 Section 60.742 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Polymeric Coating of Supporting Substrates Facilities § 60.742 Standards for volatile organic compounds....

  1. 40 CFR 60.492 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.492 Section 60.492 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry § 60.492 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On or after...

  2. 40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or...

  3. 40 CFR 60.492 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.492 Section 60.492 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry § 60.492 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On or after...

  4. 40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date...

  5. 40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date...

  6. 40 CFR 60.722 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.722 Section 60.722 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... volatile organic compounds. (a) Each owner or operator of any affected facility which is subject to...

  7. 40 CFR 60.492 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.492 Section 60.492 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry § 60.492 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On or after...

  8. 40 CFR 60.392 - Standards for volatile organic compounds

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds 60.392 Section 60.392 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Automobile and Light Duty Truck Surface Coating Operations § 60.392 Standards for volatile organic...

  9. 40 CFR 60.742 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.742 Section 60.742 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Polymeric Coating of Supporting Substrates Facilities § 60.742 Standards for volatile organic compounds....

  10. 40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.582 Section 60.582 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  11. 40 CFR 60.432 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.432 Section 60.432 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Graphic Arts Industry: Publication Rotogravure Printing § 60.432 Standard for volatile organic...

  12. 40 CFR 60.602 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.602 Section 60.602 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities § 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On and after...

  13. 40 CFR 60.622 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.622 Section 60.622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) Each affected...

  14. 40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or...

  15. 40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or...

  16. 40 CFR 60.622 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.622 Section 60.622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) Each affected...

  17. 40 CFR 60.712 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.712 Section 60.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities § 60.712 Standards for volatile organic compounds. Each owner or...

  18. 40 CFR 60.492 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.492 Section 60.492 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry § 60.492 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On or after...

  19. 40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date...

  20. 40 CFR 60.742 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.742 Section 60.742 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Polymeric Coating of Supporting Substrates Facilities § 60.742 Standards for volatile organic compounds....

  1. 40 CFR 60.602 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.602 Section 60.602 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities § 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On and after...

  2. 40 CFR 60.742 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.742 Section 60.742 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Polymeric Coating of Supporting Substrates Facilities § 60.742 Standards for volatile organic compounds....

  3. 40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or...

  4. 40 CFR 60.392 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.392 Section 60.392 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Automobile and Light Duty Truck Surface Coating Operations § 60.392 Standards for volatile organic...

  5. 40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.582 Section 60.582 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  6. 40 CFR 60.622 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.622 Section 60.622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) Each affected...

  7. 40 CFR 60.722 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.722 Section 60.722 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... volatile organic compounds. (a) Each owner or operator of any affected facility which is subject to...

  8. 40 CFR 60.492 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.492 Section 60.492 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry § 60.492 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On or after...

  9. 40 CFR 60.392 - Standards for volatile organic compounds

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds 60.392 Section 60.392 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Automobile and Light Duty Truck Surface Coating Operations § 60.392 Standards for volatile organic...

  10. 40 CFR 60.712 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.712 Section 60.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities § 60.712 Standards for volatile organic compounds. Each owner or...

  11. 40 CFR 60.432 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.432 Section 60.432 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Graphic Arts Industry: Publication Rotogravure Printing § 60.432 Standard for volatile organic...

  12. Shannon Entropy of Ammonia Volatilization from Fertilized Agricultural Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The economic loss of ammonia (NH3) volatilization from chemical N fertilizers applied to farmlands worldwide is 11.6 billion US dollars per year. The economic impact of negative environmental effects resulted from NH3 volatilization, i.e., formation of potent greenhouse gas (N2O) and PM2.5, is diffi...

  13. 21 CFR 573.914 - Salts of volatile fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.914 Salts of volatile fatty acids. (a) Identity. The food additive is a... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Salts of volatile fatty acids. 573.914 Section...

  14. 21 CFR 573.914 - Salts of volatile fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.914 Salts of volatile fatty acids. (a) Identity. The food additive is a... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salts of volatile fatty acids. 573.914 Section...

  15. Endogenous signals regulating herbivore-associated volatile emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Induced volatiles are a well-characterized response of maize plants to herbivory and contribute to defense through recruitment of natural enemies. Despite the importance of these volatiles, many questions remain regarding plant regulation of this response. While elicitor-induced production of jasm...

  16. EMISSION OF VOLATILE COMPOUNDS BY SEEDS UNDER DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small mammals locate buried wet seeds more efficiently than buried dry seeds. This may be attributable to emission of volatile compounds by the seeds. To test this hypothesis I measured emission of volatile compounds from seeds of three plant species (Pinus contorta, Purshia tr...

  17. Soil moisture and metolachlor volatilization observations over three years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatilization of pesticides from agricultural land is of a concern because of potentially detrimental environmental and ecological impacts. A 3-year study was conducted to focus on the impact of surface soil water on metolachlor volatilization from a single field with different surface soil water r...

  18. ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF VOLATILE CONSTITUENTS OF TAHEEBO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatiles were isolated from the dried inner bark of Tabebuia impetiginosa using steam distillation under reduced pressure followed by continuous liquid-liquid extraction. The extract was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The major volatile const...

  19. Silicon isotopes in angrites and volatile loss in planetesimals.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Emily A; Moynier, Frédéric; Savage, Paul S; Badro, James; Barrat, Jean-Alix

    2014-12-01

    Inner solar system bodies, including the Earth, Moon, and asteroids, are depleted in volatile elements relative to chondrites. Hypotheses for this volatile element depletion include incomplete condensation from the solar nebula and volatile loss during energetic impacts. These processes are expected to each produce characteristic stable isotope signatures. However, processes of planetary differentiation may also modify the isotopic composition of geochemical reservoirs. Angrites are rare meteorites that crystallized only a few million years after calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions and exhibit extreme depletions in volatile elements relative to chondrites, making them ideal samples with which to study volatile element depletion in the early solar system. Here we present high-precision Si isotope data that show angrites are enriched in the heavy isotopes of Si relative to chondritic meteorites by 50-100 ppm/amu. Silicon is sufficiently volatile such that it may be isotopically fractionated during incomplete condensation or evaporative mass loss, but theoretical calculations and experimental results also predict isotope fractionation under specific conditions of metal-silicate differentiation. We show that the Si isotope composition of angrites cannot be explained by any plausible core formation scenario, but rather reflects isotope fractionation during impact-induced evaporation. Our results indicate planetesimals initially formed from volatile-rich material and were subsequently depleted in volatile elements during accretion. PMID:25404309

  20. Volatile Constituents of the Aerial Parts of Salvia apiana Jepson

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile constituents of the aerial parts of fresh white sage (Salvia apiana) were isolated by extraction with diethyl ether followed by high vacuum distillation with a solvent assisted flavor evaporation (SAFE) apparatus. The isolated volatiles were analyzed by GC and GC/MS. A total of 84 constit...

  1. Silicon isotopes in angrites and volatile loss in planetesimals

    PubMed Central

    Moynier, Frédéric; Savage, Paul S.; Badro, James; Barrat, Jean-Alix

    2014-01-01

    Inner solar system bodies, including the Earth, Moon, and asteroids, are depleted in volatile elements relative to chondrites. Hypotheses for this volatile element depletion include incomplete condensation from the solar nebula and volatile loss during energetic impacts. These processes are expected to each produce characteristic stable isotope signatures. However, processes of planetary differentiation may also modify the isotopic composition of geochemical reservoirs. Angrites are rare meteorites that crystallized only a few million years after calcium–aluminum-rich inclusions and exhibit extreme depletions in volatile elements relative to chondrites, making them ideal samples with which to study volatile element depletion in the early solar system. Here we present high-precision Si isotope data that show angrites are enriched in the heavy isotopes of Si relative to chondritic meteorites by 50–100 ppm/amu. Silicon is sufficiently volatile such that it may be isotopically fractionated during incomplete condensation or evaporative mass loss, but theoretical calculations and experimental results also predict isotope fractionation under specific conditions of metal–silicate differentiation. We show that the Si isotope composition of angrites cannot be explained by any plausible core formation scenario, but rather reflects isotope fractionation during impact-induced evaporation. Our results indicate planetesimals initially formed from volatile-rich material and were subsequently depleted in volatile elements during accretion. PMID:25404309

  2. 21 CFR 573.914 - Salts of volatile fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Salts of volatile fatty acids. 573.914 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.914 Salts of volatile fatty acids. (a) Identity. The food additive is a blend containing the ammonium or calcium salt of isobutyric acid and the ammonium or calcium salts of...

  3. 21 CFR 573.914 - Salts of volatile fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Salts of volatile fatty acids. 573.914 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.914 Salts of volatile fatty acids. (a) Identity. The food additive is a blend containing the ammonium or calcium salt of isobutyric acid and the ammonium or calcium salts of...

  4. Compatible solutes

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Recently we reported a role for compatible solute uptake in mediating bile tolerance and increased gastrointestinal persistence in the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes.1 Herein, we review the evolution in our understanding of how these low molecular weight molecules contribute to growth and survival of the pathogen both inside and outside the body, and how this stress survival mechanism may ultimately be used to target and kill the pathogen. PMID:21326913

  5. Effects of ionic strength on the production of short chain volatile hydrocarbons by Dunaliella salina (Teodoresco).

    PubMed

    Muñoz, J; Mudge, S M; Sandoval, A

    2004-02-01

    The effect of ionic strength on the production of short chain volatile hydrocarbons was studied in cultures of Dunaliella salina. Axenic cultures of D. salina were grown at three different ionic strengths 0.5, 2 and 3 M of NaCl in Johnson (J/1) culture medium [Journal of Bacteriology 95 (1968) 1461] under the following laboratory growth conditions: a 12:12 h photoperiod, 300 micromolm(-2)s(-1) of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) provided by a fluorescent lamp of 40 W combined with a 100 W incandescent lamp at 20 +/- 1 degrees C at pH 7.5. C1 to C5 hydrocarbons were detected using a head space technique and GC-FID. Cell numbers and growth rate was greatest at 2 M NaCl 4.3 x 10(6) cellml(-1) after a 15 days period of culture. Maximum hydrocarbon production was measured in the concentration of 0.5 NaCl with lower production rates in the more concentrated solutions. The principal hydrocarbon was pentane at 0.5 M but was ethane in 2 and 3 M solutions. Production rates for individual compounds ranged between 0.13 and 22 x 10(-15) microgCcell(-1)h(-1). It is suggested that the ability to produce and release volatile organic compounds of D. salina is related to osmotic conditions established by the ionic strength of growth solution. PMID:14664856

  6. Highly sensitive electromembrane extraction for the determination of volatile organic compound metabolites in dried urine spot.

    PubMed

    Suh, Joon Hyuk; Eom, Han Young; Kim, Unyong; Kim, Junghyun; Cho, Hyun-Deok; Kang, Wonjae; Kim, Da Som; Han, Sang Beom

    2015-10-16

    Electromembrane extraction coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed for determination of ten volatile organic compound metabolites in dried urine spot samples. The dried urine spot approach is a convenient and economical sampling method, wherein urine is spotted onto a filter paper and dried. This method requires only a small amount of sample, but the analysis sometimes suffers from low sensitivity, which can lead to analytical problems in the detection of minor components in samples. The newly developed dried urine spot analysis using electromembrane extraction exhibited improved sensitivity and extraction, and enrichment of the sample was rapidly achieved in one step by applying an electric field. Aliquots of urine were spotted onto Bond Elut DMS cards and dried at room temperature. After drying, the punched out dried urine spot was eluted with water. Volatile organic compound metabolites were extracted from the sample through a supported liquid membrane into an alkaline acceptor solution inside the lumen of a hollow fiber with the help of an electric potential. The optimum extraction conditions were determined by using design of experiments (fractional factorial design and response surface methodology). Satisfactory sensitivity was achieved and the limits of quantification (LOQ) obtained were lower than the regulatory threshold limits. The method was validated by assessing the linearity, precision, accuracy, recovery, reproducibility, stability, and matrix effects. The results were acceptable, and the developed method was successfully applied to biological exposure monitoring of volatile organic compound metabolites in fifty human urine samples. PMID:26385086

  7. A two-component volatile atmosphere for Pluto. I. The bulk hydrodynamic escape regime

    SciTech Connect

    Trafton, L. )

    1990-08-01

    The seasonal effects on Pluto's atmosphere of a simplified system of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2} saturated over a solid solution are investigated, and the results are compared with previous CH{sub 4} models. It is found that bulk escape occurs for CH{sub 4} mole fractions less than 0.7 of Pluto's volatile reservoir. Greater CH{sub 4} abundance leads to diffusive separation during the escape of both species and an atmospheric mixing ratio of about Xc(0). If Xc(0) is in the range 0.02-0.10, Pluto's atmosphere remains largely intact at aphelion rather than virtually freezing out as it does for Xc(0) greater than 0.3 or less than 0.001, or form an atmosphere with only a single volatile gas. An upper limit for the CH{sub 4} mixing ratio is about 0.07 if N{sub 2} is the second gas. On the other hand, CH{sub 4} is the dominant surface constituent of the volatile deposit if Xc(0) is greater than 0.0001. 29 refs.

  8. Volatility clustering in agent based market models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardina, Irene; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe

    2003-06-01

    We define and study a market model, where agents have different strategies among which they can choose, according to their relative profitability, with the possibility of not participating to the market. The price is updated according to the excess demand, and the wealth of the agents is properly accounted for. Only two parameters play a significant role: one describes the impact of trading on the price, and the other describes the propensity of agents to be trend following or contrarian. We observe three different regimes, depending on the value of these two parameters: an oscillating phase with bubbles and crashes, an intermittent phase and a stable ‘rational’ market phase. The statistics of price changes in the intermittent phase resembles that of real price changes, with small linear correlations, fat tails and long-range volatility clustering. We discuss how the time dependence of these two parameters spontaneously drives the system in the intermittent region.

  9. Laboratory investigations of volatile trapping in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This research program consists of laboratory studies of the formation of ice at low temperatures to simulate the formation of comets in the outer solar nebula. The ice is condensed in the presence of various mixtures of gases at a given temperature, and then warmed to see at what temperatures the gases are released and how much gas was actually trapped. Our results to date indicate that the trapping of argon, krypton, and xenon in ice formed at approximately 50 K fractionates these gase in a way that fits the relative abundances found in the atmospheres of Mars and Earth. This is markedly different from the situation in chondritic meteorites, where the abundance of xenon is about equal to that of krypton. It appears that comets represent a better source for planetary volatiles than do the meteorites.

  10. Alkaline dechlorination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    The vast majority of contaminated sites in the United States and abroad are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE), trichloroethane (TCA), and chloroform. These VOCs are mobile and persistent in the subsurface and present serious health risks at trace concentrations. The goal of this project was to develop a new chemical treatment system that can rapidly and effectively degrade chlorinated VOCs. The system is based on our preliminary findings that strong alkalis such as sodium hydroxide (NaOH) can absorb and degrade TCE. The main objectives of this study were to determine the reaction rates between chlorinated VOCs, particularly TCE, and strong alkalis, to elucidate the reaction mechanisms and by-products, to optimize the chemical reactions under various experimental conditions, and to develop a laboratory bench- scale alkaline destruction column that can be used to destroy vapor- phase TCE.

  11. Volatile loss following very large impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Large impacts on growing planets can be fundamentally different in outcome than small impacts because they can lead to a planet-enveloping cloud of siliate vapor with a radiative cooling time long compared to dynamic time scales. Under these circumstances, there can be preferrential volatile loss by hydrodynamic outflow immediately above the silicate cloud deck. This loss is in ddition to the prompt, nonpreferential loss immediately following the impact event. During this time, evaporative loss (Jeans loss) can be 0.00001 of the planetary mass, provided the impact has substantial angular momentum and a magma disk forms. The loss is preferentially fromt he extremities of the disk and can be easily s100 bar-equivalents of CO2 or H2O. This implies devolatilization of Moon-forming material in an impact origin and may have important implications for the CO2 reservoirs of Venus, Earth, and Mars.

  12. Non-volatile magnetic random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Improvements are made in a non-volatile magnetic random access memory. Such a memory is comprised of an array of unit cells, each having a Hall-effect sensor and a thin-film magnetic element made of material having an in-plane, uniaxial anisotropy and in-plane, bipolar remanent magnetization states. The Hall-effect sensor is made more sensitive by using a 1 m thick molecular beam epitaxy grown InAs layer on a silicon substrate by employing a GaAs/AlGaAs/InAlAs superlattice buffering layer. One improvement avoids current shunting problems of matrix architecture. Another improvement reduces the required magnetizing current for the micromagnets. Another improvement relates to the use of GaAs technology wherein high electron-mobility GaAs MESFETs provide faster switching times. Still another improvement relates to a method for configuring the invention as a three-dimensional random access memory.

  13. Changing volatility of U.S. annual tornado reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tippett, Michael K.

    2014-10-01

    United States (U.S.) tornado activity results in substantial loss of life and property damage each year. A simple measure of the U.S. tornado climatology is the average number of tornadoes per year. However, even this statistic is elusive because of nonstationary behavior due in large part to changes in reporting practices. Differencing of the annual report data results in a quantity without mean trends and whose standard deviation we denote as volatility, since it is an indication of the likely year-to-year variation in the number of tornadoes reported. While volatility changes detected prior to 2000 can be associated with known reporting practice changes, an increase in volatility in the 2000s across intensity levels cannot. A volatility increase is also seen in a tornado environment index which measures the favorability of atmospheric conditions to tornado activity, providing evidence that the recent increase in tornado report volatility is related to the physical environment.

  14. [Study on absorbing volatile oil with mesoporous carbon].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong-mei; Jia, Xiao-bin; Zhang, Zhen-hai; Sun, E; Yang Nan

    2014-11-01

    Clove oil and turmeric oil were absorbed by mesoporous carbon. The absorption ratio of mesoporous carbon to volatile oil was optimized with the eugenol yield and curcumol yield as criteria Curing powder was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorietry (DSC). The effects of mesoporous carbon on dissolution in vitro and thermal stability of active components were studied. They reached high adsorption rate when the absorption ratio of mesoporous carbon to volatile oil was 1:1. When volatile oil was absorbed, dissolution rate of active components had a little improvement and their thermal stability improved after volatile oil was absorbed by the loss rate decreasing more than 50%. Absorbing herbal volatile oil with mesoporous carbon deserves further studying. PMID:25850263

  15. Influence of semi-volatile species on particle hygroscopic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, P.; Sellegri, K.; Monier, M.; Laj, P.

    2009-01-01

    The hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles are often related to their content of soluble material, on the basis of the Kohler theory. Recent studies, however, seem to indicate that the role of aerosol particle semi-volatile fraction properties has been underestimated. In this study, we use a novel method based on a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (TDMA) system combining particle volatilization and humidification conditioning (VH-TDMA) to test the effect of the gentle volatilization of a small fraction of the atmospheric particles on the particle hygroscopic growth in several environments (urban to remote). Results show that the particle hygroscopic properties can either be enhanced or decreased after thermal conditioning of the particle at moderate temperatures (50 to 110°C). The hygroscopic growth factor changes induced by volatilization indicate that some volatile compounds, although present at low concentrations, drastically influence the hygroscopic growth of particles in the way that can not be predicted by the Kohler theory at equilibrium.

  16. Evaluation of γ-radiation on green tea odor volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanaro, G. B.; Duarte, R. C.; Araújo, M. M.; Purgatto, E.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the gamma radiation effects on green tea odor volatiles in green tea at doses of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 kGy. The volatile organic compounds were extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC/MS. The green tea had a large influence on radiation effects, increasing the identified volatiles in relation to control samples. The dose of 10 kGy was responsible to form the majority of new odor compounds following by 5 and 20 kGy. However, the dose of 5 kGy was the dose that degraded the majority of volatiles in non-irradiated samples, following by 20 kGy. The dose of 15 kGy showed has no effect on odor volatiles. The gamma radiation, at dose up to 20 kGy, showed statistically no difference between irradiated and non irradiated green tea on odors compounds.

  17. Microwave Extraction of Volatiles for Mars Science and ISRU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin C.; Kaulker, William F.

    2012-01-01

    The greatest advantage of microwave heating for volatiles extraction is that excavation can be greatly reduced. Surface support operations would be simple consisting of rovers with drilling capability for insertion of microwaves down bore holes to heat at desired depths. The rovers would also provide support to scientific instruments for volatiles analysis and for volatiles collection and storage. The process has the potential for a much lower mass and a less complex system than other in-situ processes. Microwave energy penetrates the surface heating within with subsequent sublimation of water or decomposition of volatile containing minerals. On Mars the volatiles should migrate to the surface to be captured with a cold trap. The water extraction and transport process coupled with atmospheric CO2 collection could readily lead to a propellant production process, H2O + CO2 yields CH4 + O2.

  18. 75 FR 60013 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control of Volatile...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... Volatile Organic Compounds Emissions From Industrial Solvent Cleaning Operations AGENCY: Environmental... consists of an addition to Maryland's Volatile Organic Compounds from Specific Processes Regulation... available control techniques (RACT) requirements for sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) covered...

  19. A fast numerical approach to option pricing with stochastic interest rate, stochastic volatility and double jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sumei; Wang, Lihe

    2013-07-01

    This study proposes a pricing model through allowing for stochastic interest rate and stochastic volatility in the double exponential jump-diffusion setting. The characteristic function of the proposed model is then derived. Fast numerical solutions for European call and put options pricing based on characteristic function and fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique are developed. Simulations show that our numerical technique is accurate, fast and easy to implement, the proposed model is suitable for modeling long-time real-market changes. The model and the proposed option pricing method are useful for empirical analysis of asset returns and risk management in firms.

  20. Pervaporation investigation of recovery of volatile compounds from brown crab boiling juice.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Rodrigo; Sanz, M Teresa; Beltrán, Sagrario

    2014-10-01

    Pervaporation has been used to obtain aroma concentrates from brown crab boiling juice. The boiling juice and the obtained permeate have been analysed by Headspace Solid Phase Dynamic Extraction Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. The effect of feed temperature on the pervaporation performance of the membrane has been analysed. The permeate aroma profile, at 25 ℃ and 40 ℃, was different from that of the boiling juice. Enrichment factors for some of the volatile compounds were much lower than those obtained in model aqueous dilute solutions. Pervaporation performance can be significantly improved by modifying the permeant circuit to include two condensation stages. PMID:23897977

  1. Volatile release from an emulsion: headspace and in-mouth studies.

    PubMed

    Doyen, K; Carey, M; Linforth, R S; Marin, M; Taylor, A J

    2001-02-01

    The headspace concentrations of three esters above solutions containing emulsified lipids were more resistant to dilution by a stream of gas than those above water alone. The effect was greatest for ethyl octanoate, and least for ethyl butyrate, with ethyl hexanoate showing intermediate behavior. This correlated with their solubility in the lipid fraction of the emulsion. Headspace analysis (comparing the emulsion with water) underestimated the release of the esters during consumption. The ratios observed between water and emulsion systems were different for the maximum breath concentration compared with headspace analysis. The emulsion appears to have acted as a reservoir for volatile release, counteracting the effects of sample dilution by saliva. PMID:11262033

  2. On-probe atmospheric pressure thermal desorption-ESI-MS for the analysis of volatile analytes or volatile pryolysis products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An on-probe pyrolyzer has been constructed and interfaced with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) for the rapid analysis of non-volatile pyrolysis products. The detection and analysis of non-volatile pyrolysis products of peptides, proteins and the synthetic polymer pol...

  3. PROTOCOL FOR THE COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE POHCS (PRINCIPAL ORGANIC HAZARDOUS CONSTITUENTS) USING VOST (VOLATILE ORGANIC SAMPLING TRAIN)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is a state-of-the-art operating protocol for sampling and analysis of volatile organic constituents of flue gas from hazardous waste incinerators or other similar combustor systems using the Volatile Organic Sampling Train (VOST). It is intended to be used for guidan...

  4. Volatile solubities in magmas - Transport of volatiles from mantles to planet surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, J. R.; Jakobsson, S.

    1986-01-01

    The solubility of CO2, CO, CH4, H2, and H2O in melts of NaAlSi3O8 composition was measured at the mantle conditions of pressure (10-20 Kb) and temperature (1200 C). The melt volatiles were found to have dramatically lower H2/H2O and higher CO/CO2 ratios than the fluid, due to large variations in relative solubilities of volatile species in the melt. Partial melting of source regions of either high or low oxygen fugacity (fO2) will result in magmas with intermediate fO2. This means that volcanic gases can be either more, or less reducing than their source regions and that a volcanic gas composition cannot be used to directly estimate either the fO2 or the volatile composition of the source region. The results suggest that volcanic gases will usually lie in the 'neutral' range, with the fO2 values near those of the quartz-fayalite-magnetite buffer. These gases are predominately H2O with minor CO2, CO, CH4, and H2. These conclusions should apply to earth, Mars, and Venus mantles, in which the magmas produced by partial melting have moderate silica contents, but will probably not apply to very low silica magmas, such as kimberlites, because of the very high solubility of CO2 in those magmas.

  5. Verification and Validation of the RAGE Hydrocode in Preparation for Investigation of Impacts into a Volatile-rich Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesko, C. S.; Asphaug, E.; Gisler, G. R.; Gittings, M. L.

    2005-01-01

    Before a hydrocode is used to investigate a question of scientific interest, it should be tested against analogous laboratory experiments and problems with analytical solutions. The Radiation Adaptive Grid Eulerian (RAGE) hydrocode[1], developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)[2,3] has been subjected to many tests during its development.[4,5] We extend and review this work, emphasizing tests relevant to impact cratering into volatile-rich targets.

  6. Multiple headspace solid-phase microextraction for quantifying volatile free fatty acids in cheeses.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Arturo A; Pino, Verónica; Ayala, Juan H; Afonso, Ana M

    2014-11-01

    Multiple headspace solid-phase microextraction (MHS-SPME) has been utilized for the quantitative determination of 9 volatile free fatty acids (FFAs) in cheeses, in combination with gas-chromatography and flame-ionization detection (GC-FID). Variables affecting HS-SPME and MHS-SPME were optimized to attain adequate sensitivity while allowing correct application of the MHS method. Thus, the MHS-SPME method was successfully performed when using 0.3g of cheese and 1 mL of NaCl (sat. solution), which is subjected to four consecutive extractions using the carboxen-polydimethylsyloxane (CAR-PDMS) as the commercial SPME coating, 40 min of HS extraction time at 45°C, and 6 min of desorption time in the GC injector at 290°C. The MHS-SPME permitted the calculation of β values, which range from 0.72±0.01-0.95±0.02, depending on the cheese studied. Later, this β parameter is used to perform quantitation for the 9 volatile FFAs after just a single HS-SPME extraction, using an external solvent calibration curve. The validity of the utilization of an external solvent calibration was tested with aqueous standards of volatile FFAs, getting average recoveries higher than 81.2%. Quantitation by MHS-SPME was free of matrix interferences despite measuring a complex cheese sample. The optimized method was validated, presenting inter-day reproducibility values (as RSD in %) lower than 13%, and limits of detection down to 7 µg kg(-1). The method was also compared with a conventional extraction method such as solid-phase extraction for the studied cheeses elaborated with goat milk, generating comparable results. To our knowledge, this is the first time that MHS-SPME has been applied to volatiles in cheeses. PMID:25127582

  7. FULL-SCALE VIBRATING PERVAPORATION MEMBRANE UNIT: VOC REMOVAL FROM WATER AND SURFACTANT SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A commercial-scale vibrating membrane system with 10 square meters of membrane area was evaluated for the separation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from aqueous solutions by pervaporation. Experiments with surrogate solutions of up to five VOCs in the presence and absence o...

  8. FULL-SCALE VIBRATING PERVAPORATION MEMBRANE UNIT: VOC REMOVAL FROM WATER AND SURFACTANT SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A commercial-scale vibrating membrane system was evaluated for the separation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from aqueous solutions by pervaporation. Experiments with surrogate solutions of up to five VOCs in the presence and absence of a surfactant were performed to compar...

  9. Determination of inorganic pollutants in soil after volatilization using microwave-induced combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picoloto, Rochele S.; Wiltsche, Helmar; Knapp, Günter; Mello, Paola A.; Barin, Juliano S.; Flores, Erico M. M.

    2013-08-01

    Microwave-induced combustion (MIC) was applied for analyte volatilization from soil and subsequent determination of As, Cd and Pb by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), and Hg by cold vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CVG-ICP-MS). Soil samples (up to 300 mg) were mixed with microcrystalline cellulose, pressed as pellets and combusted in closed quartz vessels pressurized with 20 bar O2. Analytes were volatilized from soil during combustion and quantitatively absorbed in a suitable solution: nitric acid (1, 2, 4 or 6 mol L- 1) or a solution of nitric (2 mol L- 1) and hydrochloric (1, 2 or 4 mol L- 1) acids. Accuracy was evaluated using certified reference materials of soil (NIST 2709, San Joaquin Soil) and sediment (SUD-1, Sudbury sediment for trace elements). Agreement with certified values was better than 95% (t-test, 95% confidence level) for all analytes when 6 mL of a solution of 2 mol L- 1 HNO3 and 2 mol L- 1 HCl was used with a reflux step of 5 min. The limit of detection was 0.010, 0.002, 0.009 and 0.012 μg g- 1 for As, Cd, Hg and Pb, respectively using ICP-MS determination. A clear advantage of the proposed method over classical approaches is that only diluted solution is used. Moreover, a complete separation of the analytes from matrix is achieved minimizing potential interferences in ICP-MS or ICP-OES determination. Up to eight samples can be digested in a single run of only 25 min, resulting in a solution suitable for the determination of all analytes by both techniques.

  10. Estimating turf pesticide volatilization from simple evapotranspiration models.

    PubMed

    Walden, Rebecca R; Haith, Douglas A

    2003-01-01

    A previously developed model by Haith et al. (2002) related pesticide volatilization from turf to evapotranspiration (ET) by scaling factors determined from vapor pressures and heats of vaporization. Although the model provided volatilization estimates that compared well with field measurements, it relied on the Penman ET equation, requiring hourly temperature, wind speed, and solar radiation data, none of which are routinely available at field sites. The current study determined that the volatilization model works equally well with a simpler ET equation requiring only daily temperatures. Three daily temperature-based ET models were evaluated as vehicles for estimating pesticide volatilization from turf: Hamon, Hargreaves-Samani, and a modified Priestley-Taylor. When compared with field volatilization measurements for eight pesticides, volatilization estimates produced from the Hargreaves-Samani model most closely approximated both the field observations and the previous estimates based on the more data-intensive Penman model. Mean estimated volatilization exceeded mean observations by 15% and the coefficient of variation (R2) between estimates and observations was 0.65. The comparable values based on Penman ET were 17% and 0.63, respectively. PMID:12809316

  11. Stock price dynamics and option valuations under volatility feedback effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanniainen, Juho; Piché, Robert

    2013-02-01

    According to the volatility feedback effect, an unexpected increase in squared volatility leads to an immediate decline in the price-dividend ratio. In this paper, we consider the properties of stock price dynamics and option valuations under the volatility feedback effect by modeling the joint dynamics of stock price, dividends, and volatility in continuous time. Most importantly, our model predicts the negative effect of an increase in squared return volatility on the value of deep-in-the-money call options and, furthermore, attempts to explain the volatility puzzle. We theoretically demonstrate a mechanism by which the market price of diffusion return risk, or an equity risk-premium, affects option prices and empirically illustrate how to identify that mechanism using forward-looking information on option contracts. Our theoretical and empirical results support the relevance of the volatility feedback effect. Overall, the results indicate that the prevailing practice of ignoring the time-varying dividend yield in option pricing can lead to oversimplification of the stock market dynamics.

  12. Multifractal analysis of implied volatility in index options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, GabJin

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the statistical and the non-linear properties of the log-variations in implied volatility for the CAC40, DAX and S& P500 daily index options. The price of an index option is generally represented by its implied volatility surface, including its smile and skew properties. We utilize a Lévy process model as the underlying asset to deepen our understanding of the intrinsic property of the implied volatility in the index options and estimate the implied volatility surface. We find that the options pricing models with the exponential Lévy model can reproduce the smile or sneer features of the implied volatility that are observed in real options markets. We study the variation in the implied volatility for at-the-money index call and put options, and we find that the distribution function follows a power-law distribution with an exponent of 3.5 ≤ γ ≤ 4.5. Especially, the variation in the implied volatility exhibits multifractal spectral characteristics, and the global financial crisis has influenced the complexity of the option markets.

  13. Volatile Selenium Flux in the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, X.; Johnson, W. P.

    2006-12-01

    Volatilization of selenium has been proven to be the major source of selenium vapor from oceans and estuaries and it may be the major mechanism of permanent selenium removal from the Great Salt Lake (other than brine shrimp harvest). However, the volatilization flux of selenium from the Great Salt Lake has not been previously measured due to challenges of analysis in this hyper-saline environment. This work presents results from recent field studies examining the spatial distribution of volatile selenium (geographical and with depth) in the South Arm (main body) of the Great Salt Lake. The analyses involved collection of volatile selenium in a cryo-focusing trap system via sparging with helium. The cryo-trapped volatile selenium was digested with nitric acid and analyzed by ICP-MS. The results show concentrations of volatile selenium that are much greater than values reported for marine estuaries and oceans. Volatile selenium flux to the atmosphere was determined using mass transport equations corrected to simulate the highly saline environment of the South Arm of the Great Salt Lake.

  14. Feasibility and Definition of a Lunar Polar Volatiles Prospecting Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldmann, Jennifer; Elphic, Richard; Colaprete, Anthony; Fong, Terry; Pedersen, Liam; Beyer, Ross; Cockrell, James

    2012-01-01

    The recent Lunar Crater Observing and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission has provided evidence for significant amounts of cold trapped volatiles in Cabeus crater near the Moon's south pole. Moreover, LRO/Diviner measurements of extremely cold lunar polar surface temperatures imply that volatiles can be stable outside or areas of strict permanent shadows. These discoveries suggest that orbital neutron spectrometer data point to extensive deposits at both lunar poles. The physical state, composition and distribution of these volatiles are key scientific issues that relate to source and emplacement mechanisms. These issues are also important for enabling lunar in situ resource utilization (ISRU). An assessment of the feasibility of cold-trapped volatile ISRU requires a priori information regarding the location, form, quantity, and potential for extraction of available resources. A robotic mission to a mostly shadowed but briefly .unlit location with suitable environmental conditions (e.g. short periods of oblique sunlight and subsurface cryogenic temperatures which permit volatile trapping) can help answer these scientific and exploration questions. Key parameters must be defined in order to identify suitable landing sites, plan surface operations, and achieve mission success. To address this need, we have conducted an initial study for a lunar polar volatile prospecting mission, assuming the use of a solar-powered robotic lander and rover. Here we present the mission concept, goals and objectives, and landing site selection analysis for a short-duration, landed, solar-powered mission to a potential hydrogen volatile-rich site.

  15. Fungal volatiles as indicators of food and feeds spoilage.

    PubMed

    Schnürer, J; Olsson, J; Börjesson, T

    1999-01-01

    Fungal growth leads to spoilage of food and animal feeds and to formation of mycotoxins and potentially allergenic spores. Fungi produce volatile compounds, during both primary and secondary metabolism, which can be used for detection and identification. Fungal volatiles from mainly Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium have been characterized with gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and sensory analysis. Common volatiles are 2-methyl-1-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanone, 3-methylfuran, ethyl acetate, and the malodorous 2-methyl-isoborneol and geosmin. Volatile sesquiterpenes can be used for taxonomic classification and species identification in Penicillium, as well as to indicate mycotoxin formation in Fusarium and Aspergillus. Developments in sensor technology have led to the construction of "electronic noses" (volatile compound mappers). Exposure of different nonspecific sensors to volatile compounds produces characteristic electrical signals. These are collected by a computer and processed by multivariate statistical methods or in an artificial neural network (ANN). Such systems can grade cereal grain with regard to presence of molds as efficiently as sensory panels evaluating grain odor. Volatile compound mapping can also be used to predict levels of ergosterol and fungal colony-forming units in grain. Further developments should make it possible to detect individual fungal species as well as the degree of mycotoxin contamination of food and animal feeds. PMID:10441446

  16. Long Memory in STOCK Market Volatility: the International Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chunxia; Hu, Sen; Xia, Bingying; Wang, Rui

    2012-08-01

    It is still a hot topic to catch the auto-dependence behavior of volatility. Here, based on the measurement of average volatility, under different observation window size, we investigated the dependence of successive volatility of several main stock indices and their simulated GARCH(1, 1) model, there were obvious linear auto-dependence in the logarithm of volatility under a small observation window size and nonlinear auto-dependence under a big observation. After calculating the correlation and mutual information of the logarithm of volatility for Dow Jones Industrial Average during different periods, we find that some influential events can change the correlation structure and the volatilities of different periods have distinct influence on that of the remote future. Besides, GARCH model could produce similar behavior of dependence as real data and long memory property. But our analyses show that the auto-dependence of volatility in GARCH is different from that in real data, and the long memory is undervalued by GARCH.

  17. Metamorphic Perspectives of Subduction Zone Volatiles Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, G. E.

    2008-12-01

    Field study of HP/UHP metamorphic rocks provides "ground-truthing" for experimental and theoretical petrologic studies estimating extents of deep volatiles subduction, and provides information regarding devolatilization and deep subduction-zone fluid flow that can be used to reconcile estimates of subduction inputs and arc volcanic outputs for volatiles such as H2O, N, and C. Considerable attention has been paid to H2O subduction in various bulk compositions, and, based on calculated phase assemblages, it is thought that a large fraction of the initially structurally bound H2O is subducted to, and beyond, subarc regions in most modern subduction zones (Hacker, 2008, G-cubed). Field studies of HP/UHP mafic and sedimentary rocks demonstrate the impressive retention of volatiles (and fluid-mobile elements) to depths approaching those beneath arcs. At the slab-mantle interface, high-variance lithologies containing hydrous phases such as mica, amphibole, talc, and chlorite could further stabilize H2O to great depth. Trench hydration in sub-crustal parts of oceanic lithosphere could profoundly increase subduction inputs of particularly H2O, and massive flux of H2O-rich fluids from these regions into the slab-mantle interface could lead to extensive metasomatism. Consideration of sedimentary N concentrations and δ15N at ODP Site 1039 (Li and Bebout, 2005, JGR), together with estimates of the N concentration of subducting altered oceanic crust (AOC), indicates that ~42% of the N subducting beneath Nicaragua is returned in the corresponding volcanic arc (Elkins et al., 2006, GCA). Study of N in HP/UHP sedimentary and basaltic rocks indicates that much of the N initially subducted in these lithologies would be retained to depths approaching 100 km and thus available for addition to arcs. The more altered upper part of subducting oceanic crust most likely to contribute to arcs has sediment-like δ15NAir (0 to +10 per mil; Li et al., 2007, GCA), and study of HP/UHP eclogites

  18. Instabilities of volatile films and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murisic, Nebojsa

    2008-12-01

    We report on instabilities during spreading of volatile liquids, with emphasis on the novel instability observed when isopropyl alcohol (IPA) is deposited on a monocrystalline silicon (Si) wafer. This instability is characterized by emission of drops ahead of the expanding front, with each drop followed by smaller, satellite droplets, forming the structures which we nickname "octopi" due to their appearance. A less volatile liquid, or a substrate of larger heat conductivity, suppress this instability. In addition, we examine the spreading of drops of water (DIW)-IPA mixtures on both Si wafers and plain glass slides, and describe the variety of contact line instabilities which appear. We find that the decrease of IPA concentration in mixtures leads to transition from "octopi" to mushroom-like instabilities. Through manipulation of our experimental set up, we also find that the mechanism responsible for these instabilities appears to be mostly insensitive to both the external application of convection to the gas phase, and the doping of the gas phase with vapor in order to create the saturated environment. In order to better understand the "octopi" instability, we develop a theoretical model for evaporation of a pure liquid drop on a thermally conductive solid substrate. This model includes all relevant physical effects, including evaporation, thermal conductivity in both liquid and solid, (thermocapillary) Marangoni effect, vapor recoil, disjoining pressure, and gravity. The crucial ingredient in this problem is the evaporation model, since it influences both the motion of the drop contact line, and the temperature profiles along the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interfaces. We consider two evaporation models: the equilibrium "lens" model and the non-equilibrium one-sided (NEOS) model. Along with the assumption of equilibrium at the liquid-gas interface, the "lens" model also assumes that evaporation proceeds in a (vapor) diffusion-limited regime, therefore bringing

  19. Productivity and quality of volatile oil extracted from Mentha spicata and M. arvensis var. piperascens grown by a hydroponic system using the deep flow technique.

    PubMed

    Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Sitthithaworn, Worapan; Vannavanich, Danai; Keattikunpairoj, Sunisa; Chittasupho, Chuda

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the differences between spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) and Japanese mint (M. arvensis L. var. piperascens Malinv.) cultivated in either soil or nutrient solution using the deep flow technique (DFT). The differences were measured in terms of harvest period (full bloom period) and quantity and chemical components of volatile oils. The spearmint and Japanese mint were cultivated in four different nutrient formulas: plant standard nutrient, plant standard nutrient with an amino acid mixture, plant standard nutrient with a sulphur compound, and a combination of plant standard nutrient with an amino acid mixture and a sulphur compound. We observed that cultivation of spearmint and Japanese mint in nutrient solution using DFT is an effective method to provide high production of volatile oil, since it results in an earlier harvest period and higher quantity of volatile oil. We determined that for spearmint an amino acid mixture is an appropriate nutrient supplement to enhance production of volatile oil with optimum carvone content. Finally, we observed high menthol content in Japanese mint grown in all four nutrient formulas; however, supplementation with a combination of sulphur fertilisation and amino acid mixture yields the highest quantity of volatile oil. PMID:19763744

  20. Production of bioactive volatiles by different Burkholderia ambifaria strains.

    PubMed

    Groenhagen, Ulrike; Baumgartner, Rita; Bailly, Aurélien; Gardiner, Amber; Eberl, Leo; Schulz, Stefan; Weisskopf, Laure

    2013-07-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that volatile compounds emitted by bacteria can influence the growth of other organisms. In this study, the volatiles produced by three different strains of Burkholderia ambifaria were analysed and their effects on the growth of plants and fungi, as well as on the antibiotic resistance of target bacteria, were assessed. Burkholderia ambifaria emitted highly bioactive volatiles independently of the strain origin (clinical environment, rhizosphere of pea, roots of maize). These volatile blends induced significant biomass increase in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana as well as growth inhibition of two phytopathogenic fungi (Rhizoctonia solani and Alternaria alternata). In Escherichia coli exposed to the volatiles of B. ambifaria, resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics gentamicin and kanamycin was found to be increased. The volatile blends of the three strains were similar, and dimethyl disulfide was the most abundant compound. Sulfur compounds, ketones, and aromatic compounds were major groups in all three volatile profiles. When applied as pure substance, dimethyl disulfide led to increased plant biomass, as did acetophenone and 3-hexanone. Significant fungal growth reduction was observed with high concentrations of dimethyl di- and trisulfide, 4-octanone, S-methyl methanethiosulphonate, 1-phenylpropan-1-one, and 2-undecanone, while dimethyl trisulfide, 1-methylthio-3-pentanone, and o-aminoacetophenone increased resistance of E. coli to aminoglycosides. Comparison of the volatile profile produced by an engineered mutant impaired in quorum-sensing (QS) signalling with the corresponding wild-type led to the conclusion that QS is not involved in the regulation of volatile production in B. ambifaria LMG strain 19182. PMID:23832658

  1. Multilevel non-volatile data storage utilizing common current hysteresis of networked single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ihn; Wang, Wei; Hwang, Sun Kak; Cho, Sung Hwan; Kim, Kang Lib; Jeong, Beomjin; Huh, June; Park, Cheolmin

    2016-05-01

    The characteristic source-drain current hysteresis frequently observed in field-effect transistors with networked single walled carbon-nanotube (NSWNT) channels is problematic for the reliable switching and sensing performance of devices. But the two distinct current states of the hysteresis curve at a zero gate voltage can be useful for memory applications. In this work, we demonstrate a novel non-volatile transistor memory with solution-processed NSWNTs which are suitable for multilevel data programming and reading. A polymer passivation layer with a small amount of water employed on the top of the NSWNT channel serves as an efficient gate voltage dependent charge trapping and de-trapping site. A systematic investigation evidences that the water mixed in a polymer passivation solution is critical for reliable non-volatile memory operation. The optimized device is air-stable and temperature-resistive up to 80 °C and exhibits excellent non-volatile memory performance with an on/off current ratio greater than 104, a switching time less than 100 ms, data retention longer than 4000 s, and write/read endurance over 100 cycles. Furthermore, the gate voltage dependent charge injection mediated by water in the passivation layer allowed for multilevel operation of our memory in which 4 distinct current states were programmed repetitively and preserved over a long time period.The characteristic source-drain current hysteresis frequently observed in field-effect transistors with networked single walled carbon-nanotube (NSWNT) channels is problematic for the reliable switching and sensing performance of devices. But the two distinct current states of the hysteresis curve at a zero gate voltage can be useful for memory applications. In this work, we demonstrate a novel non-volatile transistor memory with solution-processed NSWNTs which are suitable for multilevel data programming and reading. A polymer passivation layer with a small amount of water employed on the top of the

  2. Acidic volatiles and the Mars Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banin, A.; Han, F. X.; Kan, I.; Cicelsky, A.

    1997-06-01

    Large portions of Mars' surface are covered with deposits of fine, homogeneous, weathered dusty-soil material. Nanophase iron oxides, silicate mineraloids, and salts prevail in the soil. The mode of formation of this somewhat peculiar type of soil is still far from being clear. One scenario suggests that weathering took place during early epochs when Mars may have been ``warm and wet.'' The properties of the soil are not easily reconciled with this scenario. We propose another possible scenario that attributes, in part, the peculiar nature of the Martian dust and soil to a relatively ``young'' weathering product formed during the last few hundreds of millions of years in a process that involves acidic volatiles. We tested this hypothesis in an experimental study of the first step of acidolytic weathering of a partly palagonitized volcanic tephra of hawaiitic lava origin, using sulfuric, hydrochloric and nitric acids and their mixtures. The tephra effectively ``neutralize'' the added acidity. The protonic acidity added to the tephra attacks the primary minerals, releasing Fe, Al, and Mg, which control the pH, acting as Lewis-acid species of varying acid strengths. The full amount of acidity added to the tephra is stored in it, but only a very small fraction is preserved as the original protonic acidity. The majority of the added sulfate and chloride were present as salts and easily solubilized minerals. Well-crystallized sulfate salt minerals of aluminum and calcium were detected by powder X ray diffractometry, whereas secondary magnesium and iron minerals were not detected, due probably to lack of crystallinity. The presence of gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) and alunogen (Al2(SO4)3.17H2O) is probably responsible for the observed increased hygroscopicity of the acidified tephra and their tendency to form hardened crusts. We suggest that if this mechanism is of importance on Mars, then the chemically weathered component of the Martian soil consists of a salt-rich mineral

  3. Volatile Exsolution Experiments: Sampling Exsolved Magmatic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tattitch, B.; Blundy, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    In magmatic arcs the conditions of volatile exsolution exert a direct control on the composition of exsolved magmatic volatiles phases (MVPs), as well as on their parental magmas. The ability to accurately assess the exchange of major and trace elements between MVPs and magmas is key to understanding the evolution of arc magmas. The trace element signatures measured in arc volcanoes, fumaroles, and hydrothermal ore deposits are greatly influenced by the role of MVPs. In order to investigate the interplay and evolution of melts and MVPs we need experimental methods to simulate MVP exsolution that impose minimal external constraints on their equilibration. Previous experiments have focused on evaluating the exchange of elements between aqueous fluids and silicate melts under equilibrium conditions[1,2]. However, the large mass proportion of fluid to melt in these experiment designs is unrealistic. As a result, the idealized compositions of the aqueous fluids may exert a strong control on melt compositions for which they are out of equilibrium, especially at low melt fractions. In contrast, other experiments have focused on the melt during crystallization but must calculate MVP compositions by mass balance[3]. In order to investigate MVPs and magmas during this critical period of MVP exsolution, we present a new two-stage fluid-melt experimental design. Stage one experiments generate super-liquidus hydrous melts using Laguna del Maule rhyolites and dactites, as analogues for ascending arc magmas. Stage two experiments allow aliquots of stage one melt/glass to crystallize and exsolve MVPs. The design then uses pressure cycling to promote infiltration of in-situ fractured quartz[4] and traps the MVPs as synthetic fluid inclusions. We present results from trial stage 2 experiments, which produced synthetic fluid inclusions consistent with literature values of fluid-melt Cl partitioning[5] and of sufficient size for LA-ICPMS analysis. Trace element partitioning for Li, Na

  4. Terrestrial Planets: Volatiles Loss & Speed of Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    There is a close relation between orbiting frequencies of terrestrial planets and intensities of their outgassing [1]. ``Sweeping'' out volatiles of their bodies is provoked and facilitated by body shaking (wave oscillations) caused by movement of celestial bodies in elliptical orbits. Non-round orbits cause inertia-gravity warpings in all spheres of the bodies producing their tectonic granulation. The higher orbiting frequency -- the smaller tectonic granula -- more thorough interior degassing. Sizes of tectonic granulas inversely proportional to orbiting frequencies are: Mars π R/2, Earth π R/4, Venus π R/6, Mercury π R/16. The atmospheric masses increase from Mars through Earth to Venus as ˜ 0. 01 : 1 : 90 (radiogenic/primordial Ar is 3000 : 300 : 1, marking degassing intensity). Mercury in this sequence should have been even more outgassed (˜ 500 times comparative to Venus, having in mind different planetary masses [2]). But now it possesses only very weak atmosphere of noble gases, Na, K -- remnants of past significant outgassing now witnessed by a great amount of small deep structurally controlled pits (craters), lobate scarps caused by strong contraction and slow rotation. The slow rotation is due to loss of angular momentum to the atmosphere now wiped out by the solar wind. The same partitioning of angular momentum occurs at Venus: slowly rotating solid body is wrapped in rapidly rotating massive atmosphere (the solid surface exposes many features of contraction due to subsidence -- vast areas of wrinkle ridges). On the contrary to slow Mercury and Venus, Earth and Mars keep their moderate rotation corresponding to their moderate and mild degassing [3]. Still further from Sun weakly outgassed gas giants rotate very rapidly. Sun itself with slowly rotating photosphere and corresponding supergranula size π R/60 is a strongly outgassed object (some think that Sun lost upto 10% of its original mass). In line with the established regularity between

  5. Solution Leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Tiejun; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jian; He, Zhen

    2014-06-01

    Recovery of alumina from magnetic separation tailings of red mud has been investigated by Na2CO3 solution leaching. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that most of the alumina is present as 12CaO·7Al2O3 and CaO·Al2O3 in the magnetic separation tailings. The shrinking core model was employed to describe the leaching kinetics. The results show that the calculated activation energy of 8.31 kJ/mol is characteristic for an internal diffusion-controlled process. The kinetic equation can be used to describe the leaching process. The effects of Na2CO3 concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, and particle size on recovery of Al2O3 were examined.

  6. Analysis of insect-induced volatiles from rice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nan; Zhuang, Xiaofeng; Shrivastava, Gitika; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Plants emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from various organs. To understand the biological and ecological roles of plant VOCs as well as their biosynthesis, it is important to determine the quality and quantity of individual plant VOCs. Here we describe three techniques, including solid-phase microextraction, closed-loop stripping system, and an open dynamic system, for sampling volatiles emitted from insect-damaged rice plants. In addition, the protocol for using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to elucidate the chemical identities of rice volatiles is described. PMID:23135853

  7. Analysis of volatile organic compounds from illicit cocaine samples

    SciTech Connect

    Robins, W.H.; Wright, B.W.

    1994-07-01

    Detection of illicit cocaine hydrochloride shipments can be improved if there is a greater understanding of the identity and quantity of volatile compounds present. This study provides preliminary data concerning the volatile organic compounds detected in a limited Set of cocaine hydrochloride samples. In all cases, cocaine was one of the major volatile compounds detected. Other tropeines were detected in almost all samples. Low concentrations of compounds that may be residues of processing solvents were observed in some samples. The equilibrium emissivity of. cocaine from cocaine hydrochloride was investigated and a value of 83 parts-per-trillion was determined.

  8. A study of volatile contaminants in recovered water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, H. C.; Marek, R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The recovery and reuse of water during long term space flight is discussed. Particular attention was given to obtaining basic information on the volatile impurities in urine samples and in water recovered from urine by distillation. Data also cover laboratory distillation tests to determine the nature and extent of volatile constituents in the distillate and an evaluation of possible problems in distillation due to iodine used for control of microbial contamination. Efforts made to develop design criteria for distillation equipment to minimize the problems of volatile contaminants various methods which might be used for purification subsequent to recovery are included.

  9. Survey of volatile oxylipins and their biosynthetic precursors in bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Croisier, Emmanuel; Rempt, Martin; Pohnert, Georg

    2010-04-01

    Oxylipins are metabolites which are derived from the oxidative fragmentation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. These metabolites play central roles in plant hormonal regulation and defense. Here we survey the production of volatile oxylipins in bryophytes and report the production of a high structural variety of C5, C6, C8 and C9 volatiles of mosses. In liverworts and hornworts oxylipin production was not as pronounced as in the 23 screened mosses. A biosynthetic investigation revealed that both, C18 and C20 fatty acids serve as precursors for the volatile oxylipins that are mainly produced after mechanical wounding of the green tissue of mosses. PMID:20079505

  10. Towards the development of flexible non-volatile memories.

    PubMed

    Han, Su-Ting; Zhou, Ye; Roy, V A L

    2013-10-11

    Flexible non-volatile memories have attracted tremendous attentions for data storage for future electronics application. From device perspective, the advantages of flexible memory devices include thin, lightweight, printable, foldable and stretchable. The flash memories, resistive random access memories (RRAM) and ferroelectric random access memory/ferroelectric field-effect transistor memories (FeRAM/FeFET) are considered as promising candidates for next generation non-volatile memory device. Here, we review the general background knowledge on device structure, working principle, materials, challenges and recent progress with the emphasis on the flexibility of above three categories of non-volatile memories. PMID:24038631

  11. VOLATILE CHLORIDE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF METAL VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Hanley, W.R.

    1959-01-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium, iron, and aluminum from centain shale type ores which contain uranium in minute quantities. The ore is heated wiih a chlorinating agent. such as chlorine, to form a volatilized stream of metal chlorides. The chloride stream is then passed through granular alumina which preferentially absorbs the volatile uranium chloride and from which the uranium may later be recovered. The remaining volatilized chlorides, chiefly those of iron and aluminum, are further treated to recover chlorine gas for recycle, and to recover ferric oxide and aluminum oxide as valuable by-products.

  12. Nitrogen Trifluoride-Based Fluoride- Volatility Separations Process: Initial Studies

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2011-09-28

    This document describes the results of our investigations on the potential use of nitrogen trifluoride as the fluorinating and oxidizing agent in fluoride volatility-based used nuclear fuel reprocessing. The conceptual process uses differences in reaction temperatures between nitrogen trifluoride and fuel constituents that produce volatile fluorides to achieve separations and recover valuable constituents. We provide results from our thermodynamic evaluations, thermo-analytical experiments, kinetic models, and provide a preliminary process flowsheet. The evaluations found that nitrogen trifluoride can effectively produce volatile fluorides at different temperatures dependent on the fuel constituent.

  13. Empirical Analysis of Stochastic Volatility Model by Hybrid Monte Carlo Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaishi, Tetsuya

    2013-04-01

    The stochastic volatility model is one of volatility models which infer latent volatility of asset returns. The Bayesian inference of the stochastic volatility (SV) model is performed by the hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) algorithm which is superior to other Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods in sampling volatility variables. We perform the HMC simulations of the SV model for two liquid stock returns traded on the Tokyo Stock Exchange and measure the volatilities of those stock returns. Then we calculate the accuracy of the volatility measurement using the realized volatility as a proxy of the true volatility and compare the SV model with the GARCH model which is one of other volatility models. Using the accuracy calculated with the realized volatility we find that empirically the SV model performs better than the GARCH model.

  14. One-bottle adhesives: in vitro analysis of solvent volatilization and sealing ability.

    PubMed

    Lima, Fábio Garcia; Moraes, Rafael Ratto de; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Del Pino, Francisco Augusto Burkert; Powers, John

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the solvent volatilization rate and evaluate the sealing ability of different one-bottle adhesives that were in constant clinical use--an ethanol/water-based adhesive (Single Bond, 3M/ESPE-SB) and an acetone-based adhesive (Prime & Bond 2.1, Dentsply/Caulk-PB). Nine bottles of each agent were collected from the clinics of a dental school, and new ones were used as controls. The weight of all bottles and of empty bottles was determined using an analytical balance. A drop of each solution was dispensed onto the balance, taking its initial weight (IW) and, after 10 min, its final weight (FW). The IW/FW ratio was used to determine the solvents volatilization rate. The bottles with the highest evaporation levels (SB Control and PB Control) and with the lowest evaporation levels (SB Test and PB Test) of each agent were applied in Class V restorations with margins in dentin. Specimens were thermocycled and immersed in a 0.5% basic fuchsin solution. Dye penetration was evaluated under magnification and the data were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test. Solvent volatilization was faster for the acetone-based adhesive. IW/FW ratios ranged from 1.239 to 1.515 for SB, and from 3.488 to 6.476 for PB. The PB-Control and SB-Control groups exhibited similar microleakage patterns. The highest dye penetration scores were found for the PB-Test group (p < 0.05). Results indicate that the sealing ability can be affected by the repeated opening of acetone-based adhesive bottles. PMID:16491256

  15. Core-Mantle Partitioning of Volatile Elements and the Origin of Volatile Elements in Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L.; Nickodem, K.

    2014-01-01

    Depletions of siderophile elements in mantles have placed constraints on the conditions on core segregation and differentiation in bodies such as Earth, Earth's Moon, Mars, and asteroid 4 Vesta. Among the siderophile elements there are a sub-set that are also volatile (volatile siderophile elements or VSE; Ga, Ge, In, As, Sb, Sn, Bi, Zn, Cu, Cd), and thus can help to constrain the origin of volatile elements in these bodies, and in particular the Earth and Moon. One of the fundamental observations of the geochemistry of the Moon is the overall depletion of volatile elements relative to the Earth, but a satisfactory explanation has remained elusive. Hypotheses for Earth include addition during accretion and core formation and mobilized into the metallic core, multiple stage origin, or addition after the core formed. Any explanation for volatile elements in the Earth's mantle must also be linked to an explanation of these elements in the lunar mantle. New metal-silicate partitioning data will be applied to the origin of volatile elements in both the Earth and Moon, and will evaluate theories for exogenous versus endogenous origin of volatile elements.

  16. Monitoring plant bioremediation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using open path Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R.M.; Visser, V.P.; Davis, L.C.; Erickson, L.E.; Muralidharan, N.; Hammaker, R.M.; Fateley, W.G.

    1994-12-31

    This study addresses a viable and natural solution to the elimination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are pollutants, through the bioremediation process. Plants and associated rhizosphere bacteria have the ability to bioremediate both volatile and non-volatile organic compounds. For volatile compounds, intersystem transfer by transpiration may be a matter for concern when plants interact with such materials. The authors have monitored, using FT-IR, the potential transfer from subsurface water in the presence of toluene-adapted alfalfa plants. These experiments show that the plants and/or their associated micro-organisms effectively degrade toluene so that potential intersystem transfer of VOCs by transpiration may be quite manageable with adapted plants. Presently, the authors are monitoring 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA), chloroform (CHCl{sub 3}), and, trichloroethylene (TCE) from the subsurface water and the gas phase above the plants. TCA does not show an indication of degradation, whereas TCE does. Methane is produced in the groundwater but not transferred to the atmosphere, indicating the presence of a consortium of methanogens and methanotrophs in this soil. The TCE presumably is the substrate for methane production based on chloride ion accumulation. The majority of the TCE must be degraded aerobically to yield CO{sub 2} in the vadose zone. The FT-IR spectrometer can quickly determine and analyze contaminants in the gas phase, groundwater and plant tissue.

  17. Checksumming strategies for data in volatile memories

    SciTech Connect

    Arafat, Md H.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2014-09-09

    The increase in the number of processors needed to build exascale systems implies that the mean time between failure will further decrease, making it increasingly important to develop scalable techniques for fault tolerance. In this paper we develop an efficient checksum-based approach to fault tolerance for data in volatile memory systems, i.e., an approach without the need to save any data on stable persistent storage. The developed scheme is applicable in multiple scenarios, including: 1) online recovery of large read-only data structures from the memory of failed nodes, with very low storage overhead 2) online recovery from soft errors in blocked data, and 3) online recovery of read/write data via in-memory check-pointing. The approach uses a logical multi-dimension view of the data to be protected. Changing the dimensionality of the data view enables a trade-off between multiple factors, including the storage overheads, the checksum generation time, the failure recovery time, and the number of faults that can be tolerated. Experimental results demonstrating effectiveness are presented on a Cray XE6 system.

  18. Volatile organic compound remedial action project

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) reviews a proposed project that is planned to reduce the levels of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants present in the Mound domestic water supply. The potable and industrial process water supply for Mound is presently obtained from a shallow aquifer via on-site production wells. The present levels of VOCs in the water supply drawn from the on-site wells are below the maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) permissible for drinking water under Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA; 40 CFR 141); however, Mound has determined that remedial measures should be taken to further reduce the VOC levels. The proposed project action is the reduction of the VOC levels in the water supply using packed tower aeration (PTA). This document is intended to satisfy the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 and associated Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 CFR parts 1500 through 1508) as implemented through U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5440.1D and supporting DOE NEPA Guidelines (52 FR 47662), as amended (54 FR 12474; 55 FR 37174), and as modified by the Secretary of Energy Notice (SEN) 15-90 and associated guidance. As required, this EA provides sufficient information on the probable environmental impacts of the proposed action and alternatives to support a DOE decision either to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  19. Formation of organic nanoparticles from volatile microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Margulis-Goshen, Katrin; Netivi, Hadas Donio; Major, Dan T; Gradzielski, Michael; Raviv, Uri; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2010-02-15

    A method for preparation of nanoparticles of poorly water-soluble organic materials is presented. By this method, an oil-in-water microemulsion containing a volatile solvent with dissolved model material, propylparaben, undergoes solvent evaporation and conversion into nanoparticles by spray drying. The resulting powder can be easily dispersed in water to give a clear, stable dispersion of nanoparticles with a high loading of propylparaben. By filtration of this dispersion it was found that more than 95wt.% of the dispersed propylparaben is in particles of less than 450nm. X-ray diffraction revealed that propylparaben is present as nanocrystals of 40-70nm. After dispersion of the powder in water, formation of large crystals rapidly occurs. Addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) prevented crystal growth during dispersion of the powder in water. The inhibition of propylparaben crystal growth by PVP was studied by molecular dynamic simulations that addressed the binding of PVP to the propylparaben crystal. A comparison was made between PVP and polyvinylalcohol, which did not display crystal inhibition properties. PMID:19919861

  20. Directionality volatility in electroencephalogram time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansor, Mahayaudin M.; Green, David A.; Metcalfe, Andrew V.

    2016-06-01

    We compare time series of electroencephalograms (EEGs) from healthy volunteers with EEGs from subjects diagnosed with epilepsy. The EEG time series from the healthy group are recorded during awake state with their eyes open and eyes closed, and the records from subjects with epilepsy are taken from three different recording regions of pre-surgical diagnosis: hippocampal, epileptogenic and seizure zone. The comparisons for these 5 categories are in terms of deviations from linear time series models with constant variance Gaussian white noise error inputs. One feature investigated is directionality, and how this can be modelled by either non-linear threshold autoregressive models or non-Gaussian errors. A second feature is volatility, which is modelled by Generalized AutoRegressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (GARCH) processes. Other features include the proportion of variability accounted for by time series models, and the skewness and the kurtosis of the residuals. The results suggest these comparisons may have diagnostic potential for epilepsy and provide early warning of seizures.

  1. Shedding light on Aspergillus niger volatile exometabolome

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Carina Pedrosa; Gonçalves Silva, Diogo; Rudnitskaya, Alisa; Almeida, Adelaide; Rocha, Sílvia M.

    2016-01-01

    An in-depth exploration of the headspace content of Aspergillus niger cultures was performed upon different growth conditions, using a methodology based on advanced multidimensional gas chromatography. This volatile fraction comprises 428 putatively identified compounds distributed over several chemical families, being the major ones hydrocarbons, alcohols, esters, ketones and aldehydes. These metabolites may be related with different metabolic pathways, such as amino acid metabolism, biosynthesis and metabolism of fatty acids, degradation of aromatic compounds, mono and sesquiterpenoid synthesis and carotenoid cleavage. The A. niger molecular biomarkers pattern was established, comprising the 44 metabolites present in all studied conditions. This pattern was successfully used to distinguish A. niger from other fungi (Candida albicans and Penicillium chrysogenum) with 3 days of growth by using Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA). In addition, PLS-DA-Variable Importance in Projection was applied to highlight the metabolites playing major roles in fungi distinction; decreasing the initial dataset to only 16 metabolites. The data pre-processing time was substantially reduced, and an improvement of quality-of-fit value was achieved. This study goes a step further on A. niger metabolome construction and A. niger future detection may be proposed based on this molecular biomarkers pattern. PMID:27264696

  2. Thermal volatilization properties of atmospheric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Haboub, Abdelmoula; Hallett, John; Lowenthal, Douglas

    2007-11-01

    Thermal volatilization is explored as a means of inferring the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosol particles with diameters smaller than 10 nm (nanoparticles). Such particles contain too little mass for quantitative chemical determination by traditional analytical methods. Aerosols were subjected to increasing temperature in an oven and particle loss was measured as a function of temperature with the TSI model 3025 ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC), which is capable of counting particles with diameters as small as 3 nm. Particle nucleation was observed down stream of the oven when it was heated above about 400 degrees C. To reduce this artifact, the sample air down stream of the oven was cooled to condense the hot gases and/or the freshly nucleated particles before they reached the UCPC. Controlled experiments were done with pure ammonium sulfate (NH4)2SO4 particles. The experimental design was optimized based on the known concentration of pure (NH4)2SO4 particles vaporized in the oven and the diffusion of this material to the walls of the sampling tube before the particle counter. PMID:17458514

  3. Volatile hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates: Chapter 12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates are among the most commonly occurring and widely distributed contaminants in the environment. This chapter presents a summary of the sources, transport, fate, and remediation of volatile fuel hydrocarbons and fuel additives in the environment. Much research has focused on the transport and transformation processes of petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes and methyl tert‐butyl ether, in groundwater following release from underground storage tanks. Natural attenuation from biodegradation limits the movement of these contaminants and has received considerable attention as an environmental restoration option. This chapter summarizes approaches to environmental restoration, including those that rely on natural attenuation, and also engineered or enhanced remediation. Researchers are increasingly combining several microbial and molecular-based methods to give a complete picture of biodegradation potential and occurrence at contaminated field sites. New insights into the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel additives have been gained by recent advances in analytical tools and approaches, including stable isotope fractionation, analysis of metabolic intermediates, and direct microbial evidence. However, development of long-term detailed monitoring programs is required to further develop conceptual models of natural attenuation and increase our understanding of the behavior of contaminant mixtures in the subsurface.

  4. Shedding light on Aspergillus niger volatile exometabolome.

    PubMed

    Costa, Carina Pedrosa; Gonçalves Silva, Diogo; Rudnitskaya, Alisa; Almeida, Adelaide; Rocha, Sílvia M

    2016-01-01

    An in-depth exploration of the headspace content of Aspergillus niger cultures was performed upon different growth conditions, using a methodology based on advanced multidimensional gas chromatography. This volatile fraction comprises 428 putatively identified compounds distributed over several chemical families, being the major ones hydrocarbons, alcohols, esters, ketones and aldehydes. These metabolites may be related with different metabolic pathways, such as amino acid metabolism, biosynthesis and metabolism of fatty acids, degradation of aromatic compounds, mono and sesquiterpenoid synthesis and carotenoid cleavage. The A. niger molecular biomarkers pattern was established, comprising the 44 metabolites present in all studied conditions. This pattern was successfully used to distinguish A. niger from other fungi (Candida albicans and Penicillium chrysogenum) with 3 days of growth by using Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA). In addition, PLS-DA-Variable Importance in Projection was applied to highlight the metabolites playing major roles in fungi distinction; decreasing the initial dataset to only 16 metabolites. The data pre-processing time was substantially reduced, and an improvement of quality-of-fit value was achieved. This study goes a step further on A. niger metabolome construction and A. niger future detection may be proposed based on this molecular biomarkers pattern. PMID:27264696

  5. Multiwavelength Observations of Volatiles in Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.; Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Chuang, Yo-Ling; DiSanti, Michael A.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Remijan, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there have been complimentary observations from multiple facilities to try to unravel the chemical complexity of comets. Incorporating results from various techniques, including: single-dish millimeter wavelength observations, interferometers, and/or IR spectroscopy, one can gain further insight into the abundances, production rates, distributions, and formation mechanisms of molecules in these objects [I]. Such studies have provided great detail towards molecules with a-typical chemistries, such as H2CO [2]. We report spectral observations of C/2006 M4 (SWAN), C/2007 N3 (Lulin), and C/2009 RI (McNaught) with the Arizona Radio Observatory's SMT and 12-m telescopes, as well as the NRAO Greenbank telescope and IRTFCSHELL. Multiple parent volatiles (HCN, CH3OH, CO, CH4, C2H6, and H2O) plus two photodissociation products (CS and OH) have been detected in these objects. We will present a comparison of molecular abundances in these comets to those observed in others, supporting a long-term effort of building a comet taxonomy based on composition. Previous work has revealed a range of abundances of parent species (from "organics-poor" to "organics-rich") with respect to water among comets [3,4,5], however the statistics are stiII poorly constrained and interpretations of the observed compositional diversity are uncertain.

  6. Stochastic volatility models at ρ=±1 as second class constrained Hamiltonian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras G., Mauricio

    2014-07-01

    The stochastic volatility models used in the financial world are characterized, in the continuous-time case, by a set of two coupled stochastic differential equations for the underlying asset price S and volatility σ. In addition, the correlations of the two Brownian movements that drive the stochastic dynamics are measured by the correlation parameter ρ (-1≤ρ≤1). This stochastic system is equivalent to the Fokker-Planck equation for the transition probability density of the random variables S and σ. Solutions for the transition probability density of the Heston stochastic volatility model (Heston, 1993) were explored in Dragulescu and Yakovenko (2002), where the fundamental quantities such as the transition density itself, depend on ρ in such a manner that these are divergent for the extreme limit ρ=±1. The same divergent behavior appears in Hagan et al. (2002), where the probability density of the SABR model was analyzed. In an option pricing context, the propagator of the bi-dimensional Black-Scholes equation was obtained in Lemmens et al. (2008) in terms of the path integrals, and in this case, the propagator diverges again for the extreme values ρ=±1. This paper shows that these similar divergent behaviors are due to a universal property of the stochastic volatility models in the continuum: all of them are second class constrained systems for the most extreme correlated limit ρ=±1. In this way, the stochastic dynamics of the ρ=±1 cases are different of the -1<ρ<1 case, and it cannot be obtained as a continuous limit from the ρ≠±1 regimen. This conclusion is achieved by considering the Fokker-Planck equation or the bi-dimensional Black-Scholes equation as a Euclidean quantum Schrödinger equation. Then, the analysis of the underlying classical mechanics of the quantum model, implies that stochastic volatility models at ρ=±1 correspond to a constrained system. To study the dynamics in an appropriate form, Dirac's method for constrained

  7. Monitoring of volatile and non-volatile urban air genotoxins using bacteria, human cells and plants.

    PubMed

    Ceretti, E; Zani, C; Zerbini, I; Viola, G; Moretti, M; Villarini, M; Dominici, L; Monarca, S; Feretti, D

    2015-02-01

    Urban air contains many mutagenic pollutants. This research aimed to investigate the presence of mutagens in the air by short-term mutagenicity tests using bacteria, human cells and plants. Inflorescences of Tradescantia were exposed to air in situ for 6h, once a month from January to May, to monitor volatile compounds and micronuclei frequency was computed. On the same days PM10 was collected continuously for 24h. Half of each filter was extracted with organic solvents and studied by means of the Ames test, using Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains, and the comet assay on human leukocytes. A quarter of each filter was extracted with distilled water in which Tradescantia was exposed. PM10 concentration was particularly high in the winter season (> 50 μg/m(3)). In situ exposure of inflorescences to urban air induced a significant increase in micronuclei frequency at all the sites considered, but only in January (p < 0.01). Aqueous extracts collected in January and February induced genotoxic effects in Tradescantia exposed in the laboratory (p < 0.01). Ames test showed that organic extracts of winter urban air were able to induce genetic mutations in S. typhimurium TA98 strain (± S9), but not in TA100 strain, with a revertants/plate number nine times higher than the negative control. Comet assay showed that winter extracts were more toxic and genotoxic than spring extracts. All the mutagenicity tests performed confirmed that urban air in North Italy in winter contains both volatile and non-volatile genotoxic substances able to induce genetic damage in bacteria, human cells and plants. PMID:25084136

  8. Intrinsic fiber optic absorption sensors for the detection of volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Klunder, G.L.; Russo, R.E.

    1994-12-31

    Extensive contamination of ground water from organic solvents has placed a large emphasis on the development of instruments for remote in-situ sensing. Fiber optic chemical sensors (FOCSs) have made a great deal of progress in this area. The authors have investigated two intrinsic FOCSs for the detection of volatile organic compounds. One is based on evanescent wave absorption and the other is a direct absorption core-based sensor. Both sensors make use of silicone polymers as selective membranes to extract the volatile analyte from the aqueous solution for analysis in the NIR. The rate limiting step for analyte diffusion into the membrane has been determined to be diffusion through the Nernstian boundary. With each sensor, the times required to reach an equilibrium response are on the order of 30 minutes for 20 ppm aqueous solution of trichloroethylene. Headspace measurements are much faster and reach equilibrium in 3-5 minutes. A comparison of the two sensors, detection limits, diffusion rates and effects of temperature will be discussed.

  9. Multiple microbial activities for volatile organic compounds reduction by biofiltration.

    PubMed

    Civilini, Marcello

    2006-07-01

    In the northeast of Italy, high volatile organic carbon (VOC) emissions originate from small-medium companies producing furniture. In these conditions it is difficult to propose a single, efficient, and economic system to reduce pollution. Among the various choices, the biofiltration method could be a good solution, because microbial populations possess multiple VOC degradation potentials used to oxidize these compounds to CO2. Starting from the air emissions of a typical industrial wood-painting plant, a series of experiments studied in vitro microbial degradation of each individual VOC. Isolated strains were then added to a laboratory-scale biofiltration apparatus filled with an organic matrix, and the different VOC behavior demonstrated the potential of single and/or synergic microbial removal actions. When a single substrate was fed, the removal efficiency of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculated reactor was 1.1, 1.17, and 0.33 g m(-3) hr(-1), respectively, for xylene, toluene, and ethoxy propyl acetate. A VOC mixture composed of butyl acetate, ethyl acetate, diacetin alcohol, ethoxy propanol acetate, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, toluene, and xylene was then fed into a 2-m(3) reactor treating 100 m3 hr(-1) of contaminated air. The reactor was filled with the same mixture of organic matrix, enriched with all of the isolated strains together. During reactor study, different VOC loading rates were used, and the behavior was evaluated continuously. After a short acclimation period, the removal efficiency was > 65% at VOC load of 150-200 g m(-3) hr(-1). Quantification of removal efficiencies and VOC speciation confirmed the relationship among removal efficiencies, compound biodegradability, and the dynamic transport of each mixture component within the organic matrix. Samples of the fixed bed were withdrawn at different intervals and the heterogeneous microbial community evaluated for both total and differential compound counts. PMID:16878585

  10. Determination of volatile fatty acids in landfill leachates by ion-exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Yasuhara, Akio; Kodama, Shuji; Matsunaga, Akinobu; Suzuki, Shigeru; Mohri, Shino; Yamada, Masato

    2004-03-01

    An ion-exclusion chromatographic method with on-line desalinization for the determination of volatile fatty acids in landfill leachates is described. Highly sensitive conductivity detection of the organic acids was achieved by using dilute p-hydroxybenzoic acid solution as an eluent. Interference with mineral acids was reduced by treatment with barium chloride solution prior to desalinization. A silver-loaded cation-exchange guard column for the desalinization was installed in series with the analytical column to avoid the contamination of organic acids. This method features detection limits of 0.01 mg L(-1) formic acid, 0.02 mg L(-1) acetic acid, 0.05 mg L(-1) propionic acid, and 0.1 mg L(-1) butyric acid, respectively, with an injection of 20 microL sample. Application of the on-line desalinization LC method is illustrated for leachate samples from a Japanese sanitary landfill. PMID:15334921

  11. Removal and recovery of inhibitory volatile fatty acids from mixed acid fermentations by conventional electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rhys Jon; Massanet-Nicolau, Jaime; Guwy, Alan; Premier, Giuliano C; Dinsdale, Richard M; Reilly, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen production during dark fermentation is inhibited by the co-production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) such as acetic and n-butyric acid. In this study, the effectiveness of conventional electrodialysis (CED) in reducing VFA concentrations in model solutions and hydrogen fermentation broths is evaluated. This is the first time CED has been reported to remove VFAs from hydrogen fermentation broths. During 60 min of operation CED removed up to 99% of VFAs from model solutions, sucrose-fed and grass-fed hydrogen fermentation broths, containing up to 1200 mg l(-1) each of acetic acid, propionic acid, i-butyric acid, n-butyric acid, i-valeric acid, and n-valeric acid. CED's ability to remove VFAs from hydrogen fermentation broths suggests that this technology is capable of improving hydrogen yields from dark fermentation. PMID:25898090

  12. Coupling of Volatile Transport and Internal Heatflow on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.; Kirk, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    Recently Brown et al. (Science 250, 1991) showed that Trition's internal heat source could amount to 5-20% of the absorbed insolation on Trition, thus significantly affecting volatile transport and stmospheric pressure.

  13. Water Vapor-Mediated Volatilization of High-Temperature Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschter, Peter J.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2013-07-01

    Volatilization in water vapor-containing atmospheres is an important and often unexpected mechanism of degradation of high-temperature materials during processing and in service. Thermodynamic properties data sets for key (oxy)hydroxide vapor product species that are responsible for material transport and damage are often uncertain or unavailable. Estimation, quantum chemistry calculation, and measurement methods for thermodynamic properties of these species are reviewed, and data judged to be reliable are tabulated and referenced. Applications of water vapor-mediated volatilization include component and coating recession in turbine engines, oxidation/volatilization of ferritic steels in steam boilers, chromium poisoning in solid-oxide fuel cells, vanadium transport in hot corrosion and degradation of hydrocracking catalysts, Na loss from Na β"-Al2O3 tubes, and environmental release of radioactive isotopes in a nuclear reactor accident or waste incineration. The significance of water vapor-mediated volatilization in these applications is described.

  14. GLOBAL INVENTORY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the development of a global inventory of anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. t includes VOC estimates for seven classes of VOCs: paraffins, olefins, aromatics (benzene, toluene, xylene), formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and ...

  15. Volatile compounds of dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Oomah, B Dave; Liang, Lisa S Y; Balasubramanian, Parthiba

    2007-12-01

    Volatile compounds of uncooked dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars representing three market classes (black, dark red kidney and pinto) grown in 2005 were isolated with headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), and analyzed with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 62 volatiles consisting of aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, alkanes, alcohols and ketones represented on average 62, 38, 21, 12, and 9 x 10(6) total area counts, respectively. Bean cultivars differed in abundance and profile of volatiles. The combination of 18 compounds comprising a common profile explained 79% of the variance among cultivars based on principal component analysis (PCA). The SPME technique proved to be a rapid and effective method for routine evaluation of dry bean volatile profile. PMID:17926127

  16. COMPACT, CONTINUOUS MONITORING FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved methods for onsite measurement of multiple volatile organic compounds are needed for process control, monitoring, and remediation. This Phase I SBIR project sets forth an optical measurement method that meets these needs. The proposed approach provides an instantaneous m...

  17. Impact of Surface Soil Moisture of Pesticide Volatilization Fluxes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatilization of pesticides can detrimentally affect the environment by contaminating soil and surface waters many kilometers from where the pesticides were applied and intended. To improve quantifying the effect of soil moisture and meteorological interactions on pesticides volatization, metolach...

  18. Biomass torrefaction: modeling of volatile and solid product evolution kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bates, Richard B; Ghoniem, Ahmed F

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this work is the development of a kinetics model for the evolution of the volatile and solid product composition during torrefaction conditions between 200 and 300°C. Coupled to an existing two step solid mass loss kinetics mechanism, this model describes the volatile release kinetics in terms of a set of identifiable chemical components, permitting the solid product composition to be estimated by mass conservation. Results show that most of the volatiles released during the first stage include highly oxygenated species such as water, acetic acid, and carbon dioxide, while volatiles released during the second step are composed primarily of lactic acid, methanol, and acetic acid. This kinetics model will be used in the development of a model to describe reaction energy balance and heat release dynamics. PMID:23026268

  19. Rover Traverse Planning to Support a Lunar Polar Volatiles Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldmann, J.L.; Colaprete, A.C.; Elphic, R. C.; Bussey, B.; McGovern, A.; Beyer, R.; Lees, D.; Deans, M. C.; Otten, N.; Jones, H.; Wettergreen, D.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of lunar polar volatile depositsare of interest for scientific purposes to understandthe nature and evolution of the volatiles, and alsofor exploration reasons as a possible in situ resource toenable long term exploration and settlement of theMoon. Both theoretical and observational studies havesuggested that significant quantities of volatiles exist inthe polar regions, although the lateral and horizontaldistribution remains unknown at the km scale and finerresolution. A lunar polar rover mission is required tofurther characterize the distribution, quantity, andcharacter of lunar polar volatile deposits at thesehigher spatial resolutions. Here we present two casestudies for NASA’s Resource Prospector (RP) missionconcept for a lunar polar rover and utilize this missionarchitecture and associated constraints to evaluatewhether a suitable landing site exists to support an RPflight mission.

  20. ODOR AND IRRITATION EFFECTS OF A VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND MIXTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to volatile organic compounds elicits a variety ofsymptoms, many of which are thought to be mediated by the olfactoryand trigeminal systems. his report describes evidence indicatingthat perceived odor intensity diminishes during prolonged exposure,whearas irritatin...

  1. An inverse finance problem for estimation of the volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neisy, A.; Salmani, K.

    2013-01-01

    Black-Scholes model, as a base model for pricing in derivatives markets has some deficiencies, such as ignoring market jumps, and considering market volatility as a constant factor. In this article, we introduce a pricing model for European-Options under jump-diffusion underlying asset. Then, using some appropriate numerical methods we try to solve this model with integral term, and terms including derivative. Finally, considering volatility as an unknown parameter, we try to estimate it by using our proposed model. For the purpose of estimating volatility, in this article, we utilize inverse problem, in which inverse problem model is first defined, and then volatility is estimated using minimization function with Tikhonov regularization.

  2. GLOBAL INVENTORY OF VOLATILE COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a global inventory anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that includes a separate inventory for each of seven pollutant groups--paraffins, olefins, aromatics, formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds....

  3. IMPROVEMENT IN AIR TOXICS METHODS FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Innovative and customized monitoring methods for air toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are being developed for applications in exposure and trends monitoring. This task addresses the following applications of specific interest:

    o Contributions to EPA Regional Monit...

  4. GLOBAL INVENTORY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FORM ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a global inventory anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that includes a separate inventory for each of seven pollutant groups--paraffins, olefins, aromatics, formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds....

  5. Life's Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Simon Conway

    2003-09-01

    Life's Solution builds a persuasive case for the predictability of evolutionary outcomes. The case rests on a remarkable compilation of examples of convergent evolution, in which two or more lineages have independently evolved similar structures and functions. The examples range from the aerodynamics of hovering moths and hummingbirds to the use of silk by spiders and some insects to capture prey. Going against the grain of Darwinian orthodoxy, this book is a must read for anyone grappling with the meaning of evolution and our place in the Universe. Simon Conway Morris is the Ad Hominen Professor in the Earth Science Department at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St. John's College and the Royal Society. His research focuses on the study of constraints on evolution, and the historical processes that lead to the emergence of complexity, especially with respect to the construction of the major animal body parts in the Cambrian explosion. Previous books include The Crucible of Creation (Getty Center for Education in the Arts, 1999) and co-author of Solnhofen (Cambridge, 1990). Hb ISBN (2003) 0-521-82704-3

  6. Life's Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Simon Conway

    2004-11-01

    Life's Solution builds a persuasive case for the predictability of evolutionary outcomes. The case rests on a remarkable compilation of examples of convergent evolution, in which two or more lineages have independently evolved similar structures and functions. The examples range from the aerodynamics of hovering moths and hummingbirds to the use of silk by spiders and some insects to capture prey. Going against the grain of Darwinian orthodoxy, this book is a must read for anyone grappling with the meaning of evolution and our place in the Universe. Simon Conway Morris is the Ad Hominen Professor in the Earth Science Department at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St. John's College and the Royal Society. His research focuses on the study of constraints on evolution, and the historical processes that lead to the emergence of complexity, especially with respect to the construction of the major animal body parts in the Cambrian explosion. Previous books include The Crucible of Creation (Getty Center for Education in the Arts, 1999) and co-author of Solnhofen (Cambridge, 1990). Hb ISBN (2003) 0-521-82704-3

  7. Ammonia volatilization from crop residues and frozen green manure crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruijter, F. J.; Huijsmans, J. F. M.; Rutgers, B.

    2010-09-01

    Agricultural systems can lose substantial amounts of nitrogen (N). To protect the environment, the European Union (EU) has adopted several directives that set goals to limit N losses. National Emission Ceilings (NEC) are prescribed in the NEC directive for nitrogen oxides and ammonia. Crop residues may contribute to ammonia volatilization, but sufficient information on their contribution to the national ammonia volatilization is lacking. Experiments were carried out with the aim to assess the ammonia volatilization of crop residues left on the soil surface or incorporated into the soil under the conditions met in practice in the Netherlands during late autumn and winter. Ammonia emission from residues of broccoli, leek, sugar beet, cut grass, fodder radish (fresh and frozen) and yellow mustard (frozen) was studied during two winter seasons using volatilization chambers. Residues were either placed on top of soil or mixed with soil. Mixing residues with soil gave insignificant ammonia volatilization, whereas volatilization was 5-16 percent of the N content of residues when placed on top of soil. Ammonia volatilization started after at least 4 days. Total ammonia volatilization was related to C/N-ratio and N concentration of the plant material. After 37 days, cumulative ammonia volatilization was negligible from plant material with N concentration below 2 percent, and was 10 percent of the N content of plant material with 4 percent N. These observations can be explained by decomposition of plant material by micro-organisms. After an initial built up of the microbial population, NH 4+ that is not needed for their own growth is released and can easily emit as NH 3 at the soil surface. The results of the experiments were used to estimate the contribution of crop residues to ammonia volatilization in the Netherlands. Crop residues of arable crops and residues of pasture topping may contribute more than 3 million kg NH 3-N to the national ammonia volatilization of the

  8. Alloy solution hardening with solute pairs

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, John W.

    1976-08-24

    Solution hardened alloys are formed by using at least two solutes which form associated solute pairs in the solvent metal lattice. Copper containing equal atomic percentages of aluminum and palladium is an example.

  9. Volatile fluoride process for separating plutonium from other materials

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F. H.; Newton, A. S.

    1959-04-14

    The separation of plutonium from uranium and/or fission products by formation of the higher fluorides off uranium and/or plutonium is described. Neutronirradiated uranium metal is first converted to the hydride. This hydrided product is then treated with fluorine at about 315 deg C to form and volatilize UF/sub 6/ leaving plutonium behind. Thc plutonium may then be separated by reacting the residue with fluorine at about 5004DEC and collecting the volatile plutonium fluoride thus formed.

  10. VOLATILE FLUORIDE PROCESS FOR SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM OTHER MATERIALS

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Newton, A.S.

    1959-04-14

    The separation of plutonium from uranium and/or tission products by formation of the higher fluorides of uranium and/or plutonium is discussed. Neutronirradiated uranium metal is first convcrted to the hydride. This hydrided product is then treatced with fluorine at about 315 deg C to form and volatilize UF/sup 6/ leaving plutonium behind. The plutonium may then be separated by reacting the residue with fluorine at about 500 deg C and collecting the volatile plutonium fluoride thus formed.

  11. Volatile content and distribution in the Azorean mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, K.; Parman, S. W.; Saal, A. E.; Kelley, K. A.; Shimizu, N.; Nunes, J. C.; Rose-Koga, E. F.

    2012-12-01

    In order to assess pre-eruptive volatile contents of magmas in the central Azores, we have measured major element, trace element, and volatile contents of olivine hosted melt inclusions. Seventy tephra samples were collected from Sao Jorge, Pico and Faial islands. Three samples yielded naturally glassy melt inclusions, while five samples produced crystallized melt inclusions that were rehomogenized with either a one atmosphere furnace or a heating stage. The melt inclusions were analyzed for major elements, volatiles, and trace elements by electron microprobe, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and laser ablation ICP-MS, respectively. Olivine host crystals for the melt inclusions are Fo77-88. Melt inclusions compositionally are alkali basalts with Mg #50-68, 40-51wt% SiO2, and 0.82-1.63wt% K2O (corrected for post-entrapment olivine crystallization), which is consistent with existing whole-rock data. They are trace element enriched with 19.3-49.9ppm La and 3.22-4.33 La/Sm. Volatile contents are 270-2509ppm CO2, 0.06-1.52wt% H2O, 120-1465ppm F, 30-2298ppm S, and 28-727ppm Cl. Volatile to trace element ratios are 8.4-46.5 CO2/Nb, 7-220 H2O/Ce, 2.1-42.4 F/Nd, 4-381 S/Dy, and 0.002-0.084 Cl/K. Correlation between Cl and F precludes seawater contamination as a source for the high volatile content. These data suggest that the HIMU component of the Azorean mantle plume is volatile rich, which is consistent with previously published volatile data from other HIMU sources, such as the Austral Islands plume (Lassiter et. al., 2002).

  12. On volatile element trends in gas-rich meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bart, G.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Ten volatile elements (and non-volatile Co) in co-existing light and dark portions of 5 gas-rich chondrites were studied. Patterns of distinct but non-uniform enrichment by dark admixing material are revealed. The dark admixing material is enriched in Cs; Bi and Tl covary in it. It is compositionally unique from known types of primitive materials and is apparently not derived by secondary processes from such materials.

  13. The fractional volatility model: An agent-based interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilela Mendes, R.

    2008-06-01

    Based on the criteria of mathematical simplicity and consistency with empirical market data, a model with volatility driven by fractional noise has been constructed which provides a fairly accurate mathematical parametrization of the data. Here, some features of the model are reviewed and extended to account for leverage effects. Using agent-based models, one tries to find which agent strategies and (or) properties of the financial institutions might be responsible for the features of the fractional volatility model.

  14. Martian geomorphology and its relation to subsurface volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, Stephen M. (Editor); Rossbacher, Lisa A. (Editor); Zimbelman, James R. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Martian volatile inventory, planetary climatic and atmospheric evolution, and the interpretation of various remote sensing data were discussed. A number of morphologies that were cited as potential indicators of subsurface volatiles were reviewed. Rampart craters and terrain softening were the focus of more in-depth discussion because of the popular attention they have received and the fact that their areal distributions are by far the most extensive of all the proposed indicators.

  15. Pepper weevil attraction to volatiles from host and nonhost plants.

    PubMed

    Addesso, Karla M; McAuslane, Heather J

    2009-02-01

    The location of wild and cultivated host plants by pepper weevil (Anthonomus eugenii Cano) may be aided by visual cues, the male-produced aggregation pheromone, herbivore-induced, or constitutive host plant volatiles. The attractiveness of constitutive plant volatiles to pioneer weevils is important in understanding, and perhaps controlling, dispersal of this insect between wild and cultivated hosts. Ten-day-old male and 2- and 10-day-old female weevils were tested in short-range Y-tube assays. Ten-day-old male and female weevils were attracted to the volatiles released by whole plants of three known oviposition hosts, 'Jalapeno' pepper, American black nightshade, and eggplant, as well as tomato, a congener, which supports feeding but not oviposition. Two-day-old females were attracted to all plants tested, including lima bean, an unrelated, nonhost plant. Fruit volatiles from all three hosts and flower volatiles from nightshade and eggplant were also attractive. In choice tests, weevils showed different preferences for the oviposition hosts, depending on age and sex. Upwind response of 10-day-old male and female weevils to host plant volatiles was also tested in long-range wind tunnel assays. Weevils responded to pepper, nightshade, and eggplant volatiles by moving upwind. There was no difference in the observed upwind response of the weevils to the three host plants under no-choice conditions. Reproductively mature pepper weevils can detect, orient to, and discriminate between the volatile plumes of host plants in the absence of visual cues, conspecific feeding damage, or the presence of their aggregation pheromone. PMID:19791617

  16. Improved Programming Efficiency through Additional Boron Implantation at the Active Area Edge in 90 nm Localized Charge-Trapping Non-volatile Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yue; Yan, Feng; Chen, Dun-Jun; Shi, Yi; Wang, Yong-Gang; Li, Zhi-Guo; Yang, Fan; Wang, Jos-Hua; Lin, Peter; Chang, Jian-Guang

    2010-06-01

    As the scaling-down of non-volatile memory (NVM) cells continues, the impact of shallow trench isolation (STI) on NVM cells becomes more severe. It has been observed in the 90 nm localized charge-trapping non-volatile memory (NROM™) that the programming efficiency of edge cells adjacent to STI is remarkably lower than that of other cells when channel hot electron injection is applied. Boron segregation is found to be mainly responsible for the low programming efficiency of edge cells. Meanwhile, an additional boron implantation of 10° tilt at the active area edge as a new solution to solve this problem is developed.

  17. 29 CFR 1910.1002 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1910.1002... Hazardous Substances § 1910.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. As used in § 1910.1000 (Table Z-1), coal tar pitch volatiles include the fused polycyclic hydrocarbons which volatilize from...

  18. 29 CFR 1910.1002 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1910.1002... Hazardous Substances § 1910.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. As used in § 1910.1000 (Table Z-1), coal tar pitch volatiles include the fused polycyclic hydrocarbons which volatilize from...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.1002 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1910.1002... Hazardous Substances § 1910.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. As used in § 1910.1000 (Table Z-1), coal tar pitch volatiles include the fused polycyclic hydrocarbons which volatilize from...

  20. 29 CFR 1910.1002 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1910.1002... Hazardous Substances § 1910.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. As used in § 1910.1000 (Table Z-1), coal tar pitch volatiles include the fused polycyclic hydrocarbons which volatilize from...

  1. Determination of volatiles produced during radiation processing in Laurus cinnamomum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salum, D. C.; Araújo, M. M.; Fanaro, G. B.; Purgatto, E.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.

    2009-07-01

    In order to protect food from pathogenic microorganisms as well as increase its shelf-life, while keeping sensorial properties (e.g., odor and taste), which are important properties required by spice buyers, it is necessary to analyze volatile formation from irradiation of medicinal and food herbs. Possible changes in the odor of these herbs are evaluated by characterizing different radiation doses and effects on sensorial properties, in order to allow better application of the irradiation technology. The aim of the present study was to analyze volatile formation on cinnamon ( Laurus cinnamomum) samples after gamma irradiation. These samples were irradiated into plastic packages using a 60Co facility. Radiation doses applied were 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 kGy. For the analysis of the samples, solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was applied, while for the analysis of volatile compounds, CG/MS. Spice irradiation showed the highest decrease in volatile compounds. For L. cinnamomum, the irradiation decreased volatile compounds by nearly 56% and 89.5%, respectively, comparing to volatile from a sample which had not been previously irradiated.

  2. Volatilization of extensively dechlorinated polychlorinated biphenyls from historically contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Bushart, S.P.; Bush, B.; Barnard, E.L.; Bott, A. |

    1998-10-01

    A study was conducted as a preliminary characterization of the ability of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated sediments to volatilize PCBs into the air upon drying under conditions meant to be environmentally relevant. Sediments collected from the St. Lawrence River contained high levels of PCBs. The PCB contamination consisted of high levels of mainly ortho-substituted mono- and dichlorobiphenyls, suggesting that the original contamination had been transformed by microbial reductive dechlorination. These sediments lost 0.07 to 1.7% of their total PCB content to the air during a 24-h drying cycle. Sediments with varying amounts of overlying water lost significantly less PCB to the air within the first few cycles than native sediments with no overlying water. Losses due to PCB volatilization were well correlated to sediment PCB concentration and water loss but not to drying temperatures (4--43 C) within 24-h drying cycles. The PCB congeners representing >90% of those volatilized within the first 24 h of drying were those produced in the sediment samples as a result of microbial reductive dechlorination of the original PCB contamination. The presence of these congeners in volatilized air samples was positively confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with Fourier transform infrared detection (FTIR). These results strongly suggest that significant amounts of mono-, di-, and trichlorobiphenyls may be volatilized from PCB-contaminated sediments at ambient environmental conditions and that this PCB volatilization may be enhanced by microbial reductive dechlorination.

  3. Bioactivity of volatile organic compounds produced by Pseudomonas tolaasii

    PubMed Central

    Lo Cantore, Pietro; Giorgio, Annalisa; Iacobellis, Nicola S.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas tolaasii is the main bacterial pathogen of several mushroom species. In this paper we report that strains of P. tolaasii produce volatile substances inducing in vitro mycelia growth inhibition of Pleurotus ostreatus and P. eryngii, and Agaricus bisporus and P. ostreatus basidiome tissue blocks brown discoloration. P. tolaasii strains produced the volatile ammonia but not hydrogen cyanide. Among the volatiles detected by GC–MS, methanethiol, dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), and 1-undecene were identified. The latter, when assayed individually as pure compounds, led to similar effects noticed when P. tolaasii volatiles natural blend was used on mushrooms mycelia and basidiome tissue blocks. Furthermore, the natural volatile mixture resulted toxic toward lettuce and broccoli seedling growth. In contrast, pure volatiles showed different activity according to their nature and/or doses applied. Indeed, methanethiol resulted toxic at all the doses used, while DMDS toxicity was assessed till a quantity of 1.25 μg, below which it caused, together with 1-undecene (≥10 μg), broccoli growth increase. PMID:26500627

  4. Mars and earth - Origin and abundance of volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, E.; Owen, T.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the factors which are responsible for the tenuous nature of the Martian atmosphere in comparison to the terrestrial atmosphere, taking into account new data obtained in connection with the Viking missions. It is found that Mars was poor in volatiles from the start and fell further behind earth by less complete outgassing, by extensive retrapping, and by the partial loss of lighter gases. Attention is given to noble gases on earth and Mars, the condensation of noble gases and other volatiles, the sources of earth's volatiles, the bulk composition of earth, the release of volatiles from earth, clues to the volatile endowment of Mars, an abundance table for Mars, a comparison of terrestrial and Martian conditions, isotopic data on noble gases, xenon-129 on Mars and earth, possibilities concerning the loss of an early Martian atmosphere, the evolution of the atmosphere of Mars, conditions in the case of planet Venus, and the reasons for the poorness of small planets in volatiles.

  5. Resource Prospector: A lunar volatiles prospecting and ISRU demonstration mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaprete, A.; Elphic, R. C.; Andrews, D. R.; Trimble, J.; Sanders, J.; Quinn, J.

    2014-12-01

    A variety of recent observations have indicated several possible reservoirs of water and other volatiles. These volatiles, and in particular water, have the potential to be a valuable or enabling resource for future exploration. NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) is supporting the development of Resource Prospector (RP) to explore the distribution and concentration of lunar volatiles prospecting and to demonstrate In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). The mission includes the RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction) payload, a NASA developed rover, and a lander will most likely be a contributed element by an international partner or the Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown (CATALYST) initiative. The RESOLVE payload is designed to: (1) locate near-subsurface volatiles, (2) excavate and analyze samples of the volatile-bearing regolith, and (3) demonstrate the form, extractability and usefulness of the materials. RP is being designed with thought given to its extensibility to resource prospecting and ISRU on other airless bodies and Mars. This presentation will describe the Resource Prospector mission, the payload and measurements, and concept of operations.

  6. Gall volatiles defend aphids against a browsing mammal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plants have evolved an astonishing array of survival strategies. To defend against insects, for example, damaged plants emit volatile organic compounds that attract the herbivore’s natural enemies. So far, plant volatile responses have been studied extensively in conjunction with leaf chewing and sap sucking insects, yet little is known about the relationship between plant volatiles and gall-inducers, the most sophisticated herbivores. Here we describe a new role for volatiles as gall-insects were found to benefit from this plant defence. Results Chemical analyses of galls triggered by the gregarious aphid Slavum wertheimae on wild pistachio trees showed that these structures contained and emitted considerably higher quantities of plant terpenes than neighbouring leaves and fruits. Behavioural assays using goats as a generalist herbivore confirmed that the accumulated terpenes acted as olfactory signals and feeding deterrents, thus enabling the gall-inducers to escape from inadvertent predation by mammals. Conclusions Increased emission of plant volatiles in response to insect activity is commonly looked upon as a “cry for help” by the plant to attract the insect’s natural enemies. In contrast, we show that such volatiles can serve as a first line of insect defences that extends the ‘extended phenotype’ represented by galls, beyond physical boundaries. Our data support the Enemy hypothesis insofar that high levels of gall secondary metabolites confer protection against natural enemies. PMID:24020365

  7. Analysis of laser extracted volatiles in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanford, George E.

    1987-01-01

    It is scientifically important to understand the composition of volatile compounds from interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) because they may be related to the primordial inventory of planetary materials which were necessary to provide environments conducive to the formation of life. The use of a laser microprobe to measure volatiles in IDPs was evaluated. Because primitive meteorites are thought to be closely related to IDPs, carbonaceous chondrites were used for the evaluation. Three sets of experiments were performed to determine the volatiles released from potential substrate materials, to analyze the volatiles released from matrices of bulk samples of carbonaceous chondrites, and to analyze volatiles released from approx. 100 to 200 micron meteorite particles to simulate IDPs. Aluminum appeared to be the best choice of substrate material. Mass ratios between carbonaceous chondrite matrices of Allende and Murchison show fair reproducibility with somewhat high uncertainties. Particles from the Orgueil, Murchison, and Allende meteorites produced measurable quantities of volatiles that appear to have mass spectra comparable to the bulk matrices.

  8. Multiple sites of action of volatile anesthetics in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, P G; Sedensky, M; Meneely, P M

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism and site(s) of action of volatile anesthetics are unknown. In all organisms studied, volatile anesthetics adhere to the Meyer-Overton relationship--that is, a ln-ln plot of the oil-gas partition coefficients versus the potencies yields a straight line with a slope of -1. This relationship has led to two conclusions about the site of action of volatile anesthetics. (i) It has properties similar to the lipid used to determine the oil-gas partition coefficients. (ii) All volatile anesthetics cause anesthesia by affecting a single site. In Caenorhabditis elegans, we have identified two mutants with altered sensitivities to only some volatile anesthetics. These two mutants, unc-79 and unc-80, confer large increases in sensitivity to very lipid soluble agents but have little or no increases to other agents. In addition, a class of extragenic suppressor mutations exists that suppresses some altered sensitivities but specifically does not suppress the altered sensitivity to diethyl ether. There is much debate concerning the molecular nature of the site(s) of anesthetic action. One point of discussion is whether the site(s) consists of a purely lipid binding site or if protein is involved. The simplest explanation of our observations is that volatile anesthetics cause immobility in C. elegans by specifically interacting with multiple sites. This model is in turn more consistent with involvement of protein at the site(s) of action. PMID:2326259

  9. [Retention of selenium volatility using lime in coal combustion].

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Ren, D; Zhong, Q; Xu, F; Zhang, Y; Yin, J

    2001-05-01

    For understanding the volatility of selenium, the effect of the contents of exchangeable cations of coal on it, and the retention of selenium using CaO in coal combustion, the sequential chemistry extraction, the fixed bed and circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) were undertaken. The results showed that the volatility of selenium was more than 97% in coal combustion at 815 degrees C, and the volatility of selenium was affected by the content of exchangeable cations of coal in low-middle temperature. It was identified that lime can restrain the volatility of selenium. In fixed bed combustion of coal, the retention rates of selenium volatility were between 11.6% and 50.7% using lime. In circulating fluidized bed combustion of coal, partitioning of selenium changed very much in ash of different size fraction between without lime and with lime. Comparing with combustion without lime, the content of selenium in ash from chimney was less than fourth times and that in leaching water from chimney decreased by two orders of magnitude using lime. Retention of selenium volatility using lime is so effective in coal combustion, especially in CFB combustion of coal. PMID:11507891

  10. Metabolic engineering of volatile isoprenoids in plants and microbes.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Claudia E; Bongers, Mareike; Liu, Qing; Delatte, Thierry; Bouwmeester, Harro

    2014-08-01

    The chemical properties and diversity of volatile isoprenoids lends them to a broad variety of biological roles. It also lends them to a host of biotechnological applications, both by taking advantage of their natural functions and by using them as industrial chemicals/chemical feedstocks. Natural functions include roles as insect attractants and repellents, abiotic stress protectants in pathogen defense, etc. Industrial applications include use as pharmaceuticals, flavours, fragrances, fuels, fuel additives, etc. Here we will examine the ways in which researchers have so far found to exploit volatile isoprenoids using biotechnology. Production and/or modification of volatiles using metabolic engineering in both plants and microorganisms are reviewed, including engineering through both mevalonate and methylerythritol diphosphate pathways. Recent advances are illustrated using several case studies (herbivores and bodyguards, isoprene, and monoterpene production in microbes). Systems and synthetic biology tools with particular utility for metabolic engineering are also reviewed. Finally, we discuss the practical realities of various applications in modern biotechnology, explore possible future applications, and examine the challenges of moving these technologies forward so that they can deliver tangible benefits. While this review focuses on volatile isoprenoids, many of the engineering approaches described here are also applicable to non-isoprenoid volatiles and to non-volatile isoprenoids. PMID:24588680

  11. Potential of derived lunar volatiles for life support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Wittenberg, L. J.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Kulcinski, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The lunar regolith contains small quantities of solar wind implanted volatile compounds that have vital, basic uses for maintaining life support systems of lunar or space settlements. Recent proposals to utilize the helium-3 isotope (He-3) derived from the lunar regolith as a fuel for fusion reactors would result in the availability of large quantities of other lunar volatile compounds. The quantities obtained would provide the annual life support replacement requirements of 1150 to 23,000 inhabitants per ton of He-3 recovered, depending on the volatile compound. Utilization of the lunar volatile compounds for life support depends on the costs, in terms of materials and energy, associated with their extraction from the lunar regolith as compared to the delivery costs of these compounds from Earth resources. Considering today's conservative estimated transportation costs ($10,000 dollars per kilogram) and regolith mining costs ($5 dollars per ton), the life support replacement requirements could be more economically supplied by recovering the lunar volatile compounds than transporting these materials from Earth resources, even before He-3 will be utilized as a fusion fuel. In addition, availability of lunar volatile compounds could have a significant cost impact on maintaining the life support systems of the space station and a Mars base.

  12. Essays on oil price volatility and irreversible investment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, Daniel J.

    In chapter 1, we provide an extensive and systematic evaluation of the relative forecasting performance of several models for the volatility of daily spot crude oil prices. Empirical research over the past decades has uncovered significant gains in forecasting performance of Markov Switching GARCH models over GARCH models for the volatility of financial assets and crude oil futures. We find that, for spot oil price returns, non-switching models perform better in the short run, whereas switching models tend to do better at longer horizons. In chapter 2, I investigate the impact of volatility on firms' irreversible investment decisions using real options theory. Cost incurred in oil drilling is considered sunk cost, thus irreversible. I collect detailed data on onshore, development oil well drilling on the North Slope of Alaska from 2003 to 2014. Volatility is modeled by constructing GARCH, EGARCH, and GJR-GARCH forecasts based on monthly real oil prices, and realized volatility from 5-minute intraday returns of oil futures prices. Using a duration model, I show that oil price volatility generally has a negative relationship with the hazard rate of drilling an oil well both when aggregating all the fields, and in individual fields.

  13. Bioactivity of volatile organic compounds produced by Pseudomonas tolaasii.

    PubMed

    Lo Cantore, Pietro; Giorgio, Annalisa; Iacobellis, Nicola S

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas tolaasii is the main bacterial pathogen of several mushroom species. In this paper we report that strains of P. tolaasii produce volatile substances inducing in vitro mycelia growth inhibition of Pleurotus ostreatus and P. eryngii, and Agaricus bisporus and P. ostreatus basidiome tissue blocks brown discoloration. P. tolaasii strains produced the volatile ammonia but not hydrogen cyanide. Among the volatiles detected by GC-MS, methanethiol, dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), and 1-undecene were identified. The latter, when assayed individually as pure compounds, led to similar effects noticed when P. tolaasii volatiles natural blend was used on mushrooms mycelia and basidiome tissue blocks. Furthermore, the natural volatile mixture resulted toxic toward lettuce and broccoli seedling growth. In contrast, pure volatiles showed different activity according to their nature and/or doses applied. Indeed, methanethiol resulted toxic at all the doses used, while DMDS toxicity was assessed till a quantity of 1.25 μg, below which it caused, together with 1-undecene (≥10 μg), broccoli growth increase. PMID:26500627

  14. Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćapraz, Ö.; Deniz, A.; Öztürk, A.; Incecik, S.; Toros, H.; Coşkun, M.

    2012-04-01

    Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in Istanbul Ö. Çapraz1, A. Deniz1,3, A. Ozturk2, S. Incecik1, H. Toros1 and, M. Coskun1 (1) Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Department of Meteorology, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey. (2) Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical, Chemical Engineering, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey. (3) Marmara Clean Air Center, Ministry of Environment and Urbanization, Nişantaşı, 34365, İstanbul, Turkey. One of the major problems of megacities is air pollution. Therefore, investigations of air quality are increasing and supported by many institutions in recent years. Air pollution in Istanbul contains many components that originate from a wide range of industrial, heating, motor vehicle, and natural emissions sources. VOC, originating mainly from automobile exhaust, secondhand smoke and building materials, are one of these compounds containing some thousands of chemicals. In spite of the risks to human health, relatively little is known about the levels of VOC in Istanbul. In this study, ambient air quality measurements of 32 VOCs including hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons and carbonyls were conducted in Kağıthane (Golden Horn) region in Istanbul during the winter season of 2011 in order to develop the necessary scientific framework for the subsequent developments. Kağıthane creek valley is the source part of the Golden Horn and one of the most polluted locations in Istanbul due to its topographical form and pollutant sources in the region. In this valley, horizontal and vertical atmospheric motions are very weak. The target compounds most commonly found were benzene, toluene, xylene and ethyl benzene. Concentrations of total hydrocarbons ranged between 1.0 and 10.0 parts per billion, by volume (ppbv). Ambient air levels of halogenated hydrocarbons appeared to exhibit unique spatial variations and no single factor seemed to explain trends for this group of

  15. Volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds of respiratory health relevance in French dwellings.

    PubMed

    Dallongeville, A; Costet, N; Zmirou-Navier, D; Le Bot, B; Chevrier, C; Deguen, S; Annesi-Maesano, I; Blanchard, O

    2016-06-01

    Over the last decades, the prevalence of childhood respiratory conditions has dramatically increased worldwide. Considering the time spent in enclosed spaces, indoor air pollutants are of major interest to explain part of this increase. This study aimed to measure the concentrations of pollutants known or suspected to affect respiratory health that are present in dwellings in order to assess children's exposure. Measurements were taken in 150 homes with at least one child, in Brittany (western France), to assess the concentrations of 18 volatile organic compounds (among which four aldehydes and four trihalomethanes) and nine semi-volatile organic compounds (seven phthalates and two synthetic musks). In addition to descriptive statistics, a principal component analysis (PCA) was used to investigate grouping of contaminants. Formaldehyde was highly present and above 30 μg/m(3) in 40% of the homes. Diethyl phthalate, diisobutyl phthalate, and dimethylphthalate were quantified in all dwellings, as well as Galaxolide and Tonalide. For each chemical family, the groups appearing in the PCA could be interpreted in term of sources. The high prevalence and the levels of these compounds, with known or suspected respiratory toxicity, should question regulatory agencies to trigger prevention and mitigation actions. PMID:26010323

  16. Volatility modeling of rainfall time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Fadhilah; Kane, Ibrahim Lawal

    2013-07-01

    Networks of rain gauges can provide a better insight into the spatial and temporal variability of rainfall, but they tend to be too widely spaced for accurate estimates. A way to estimate the spatial variability of rainfall between gauge points is to interpolate between them. This paper evaluates the spatial autocorrelation of rainfall data in some locations in Peninsular Malaysia using geostatistical technique. The results give an insight on the spatial variability of rainfall in the area, as such, two rain gauges were selected for an in-depth study of the temporal dependence of the rainfall data-generating process. It could be shown that rainfall data are affected by nonlinear characteristics of the variance often referred to as variance clustering or volatility, where large changes tend to follow large changes and small changes tend to follow small changes. The autocorrelation structure of the residuals and the squared residuals derived from autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models were inspected, the residuals are uncorrelated but the squared residuals show autocorrelation, and the Ljung-Box test confirmed the results. A test based on the Lagrange multiplier principle was applied to the squared residuals from the ARIMA models. The results of this auxiliary test show a clear evidence to reject the null hypothesis of no autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (ARCH) effect. Hence, it indicates that generalized ARCH (GARCH) modeling is necessary. An ARIMA error model is proposed to capture the mean behavior and a GARCH model for modeling heteroskedasticity (variance behavior) of the residuals from the ARIMA model. Therefore, the composite ARIMA-GARCH model captures the dynamics of daily rainfall in the study area. On the other hand, seasonal ARIMA model became a suitable model for the monthly average rainfall series of the same locations treated.

  17. Breath measurements as volatile organic compound biomarkers.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L; Buckley, T; Pellizzari, E; Gordon, S

    1996-01-01

    A brief review of the uses of breath analysis in studies of environmental exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is provided. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's large-scale Total Exposure Assessment Methodology Studies have measured concentrations of 32 target VOCs in the exhaled breath of about 800 residents of various U.S. cities. Since the previous 12-hr integrated personal air exposures to the same chemicals were also measured, the relation between exposure and body burden is illuminated. Another major use of the breath measurements has been to detect unmeasured pathways of exposure; the major impact of active smoking on exposure to benzene and styrene was detected in this way. Following the earlier field studies, a series of chamber studies have provided estimates of several important physiological parameters. Among these are the fraction, f, of the inhaled chemical that is exhaled under steady-state conditions and the residence times. tau i in several body compartments, which may be associated with the blood (or liver), organs, muscle, and fat. Most of the targeted VOCs appear to have similar residence times of a few minutes, 30 min, several hours, and several days in the respective tissue groups. Knowledge of these parameters can be helpful in estimating body burden from exposure or vice versa and in planning environmental studies, particularly in setting times to monitor breath in studies of the variation with time of body burden. Improvements in breath methods have made it possible to study short-term peak exposure situations such as filling a gas tank or taking a shower in contaminated water. PMID:8933027

  18. Volatile N-nitrosamines in dried foods.

    PubMed

    Sen, N P; Seaman, S

    1981-09-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine the levels of volatile N-nitrosamines in several dried food commodities such as malt, instant skim milk powder, infant formula containing milk powder, instant coffee, soup and soup bases, and baby cereals. The method involves vacuum distillation of the sample from 3N KOH or 1% sulfamic acid, followed by extraction of the aqueous distillate with dichloromethane. The dichloromethane extract is then washed with an acidic buffer (to remove amines), dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, concentrated in a Kuderna-Danish concentrator, and analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography, using a thermal energy analyzer. Detection limit is 0.1-0.5 ppb. Of the samples analyzed thus far, all malts (22 samples) and instant skim milk powders (11 samples ) were positive for N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA); average levels were 7.4 ppb (1.3-67.0 ppb) and 0.4 ppb (0.3-0.7 ppb), respectively. Traces of NDMA and/or N-nitrosopyrrolidine were also detected in 3 of 20 dried soups and 5 of 10 instant coffees analyzed. Traces of NDMA and/or N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP) were detected in 3 of 8 powdered instant formulas. All for baby cereal samples were negative. The identity of NDMA in 14 samples of malt and that of NDMA and NPIP in a infant formula was confirmed by gas liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry; identity of N-nitrosamines in 3 instant coffees and 1 infant formula was independently verified by high pressure liquid chromatographic analysis. PMID:7287621

  19. Removal of volatile organic pollutants from rapid streams. [Volatilization rates were obtained for methylene chloride and dichlorobenzene

    SciTech Connect

    Cadena, F.; Eiceman, G.A.; Vandiver, V.J.

    1984-05-01

    The most important self-purification mechanism for removal of volatile compounds from rapid streams is gas transfer to the atmosphere. Various approaches to volatilization phenomena are included in a simple integrated model that considers the effect of temperature on volatilization kinetics. Thermodynamic properties related to volatilization are presented for 20 toxic priority pollutants. Only water temperature and a calculated reaeration coefficient are required for use of the model in natural streams and rivers. The proposed model was tested in a large-scale stream simulator and excellent agreement between theoretical and experimental results was obtained for two toxic compounds. As an example, the model was applied to the Rio Grande and results indicated that over 90% of the purgeable priority pollutants were removed in less than 36 hours (60 km) from the point of discharge. 20 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  20. An investigation of implied volatility during financial crisis: Evidence from Australian index options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Mimi Hafizah; Harun, Hanani Farhah

    2014-10-01

    Volatility implied by an option pricing model is seen as the market participants' assessment of volatility. Past studies documented that implied volatility based on an option pricing model is found to outperform the historical volatility in forecasting future realised volatility. Thus, this study examines the implied volatility smiles and term structures in the Australian S&P/ASX 200 index options from the year 2001 to 2010, which covers the global financial crisis in the mid-2007 until the end of 2008. The results show that the implied volatility rises significantly during the crisis period, which is three time the rate before crisis.

  1. Core-Mantle Partitioning of Volatile Siderophile Elements and the Origin of Volatile Elements in the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickodem, K.; Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.; Lee, C.

    2012-01-01

    There are currently several hypotheses on the origin of volatile siderophile elements in the Earth. One hypothesis is that they were added during Earth s accretion and core formation and mobilized into the metallic core [1], others claim multiple stage origin [2], while some hypothesize that volatiles were added after the core already formed [3]. Several volatile siderophile elements are depleted in Earth s mantle relative to the chondrites, something which continues to puzzle many scientists. This depletion is likely due to a combination of volatility and core formation. The Earth s core is composed of Fe and some lighter constituents, although the abundances of these lighter elements are unknown [4]. Si is one of these potential light elements [5] although few studies have analyzed the effect of Si on metal-silicate partitioning, in particular the volatile elements. As, In, Ge, and Sb are trace volatile siderophile elements which are depleted in the mantle but have yet to be extensively studied. The metal-silicate partition coefficients of these elements will be measured to determine the effect of Si. Partition coefficients depend on temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and metal and silicate composition and can constrain the concentrations of volatile, siderophile elements found in the mantle. Reported here are the results from 13 experiments examining the partitioning of As, In, Ge, and Sb between metallic and silicate liquid. These experiments will examine the effect of temperature, and metal-composition (i.e., Si content) on these elements in or-der to gain a greater understanding of the core-mantle separation which occurred during the Earth s early stages. The data can then be applied to the origin of volatile elements in the Earth.

  2. Caramelization of maltose solution in presence of alanine.

    PubMed

    Fadel, H H M; Farouk, A

    2002-01-01

    Two solutions of maltose in water were used to prepare caramels. Alanine as a catalyst was added to one of these solutions. The caramelization was conducted at 130 degrees C for total time period 90 minutes. Convenient samples were taken of each caramel solution every 30 min and subjected to sensory analysis and isolation of volatile components. The odour and colour sensory tests were evaluated according to the international standard methods (ISO). The results showed that, the presence of alanine gave rise to a high significant (P < 0.01) decrease in acid attributes and remarkable increase in the sweet and caramel attributes, which are the most important caramel notes. On the other hand the increase in heating time in presence of alanine as a catalyst resulted in a high significant (P < 0.01) increase in the browning rate of caramel solution. The new technique Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME) was used for trapping the volatile components in the headspace of each caramel samples followed by thermal desorption and GC and GC - MS analysis. The 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (HMF), the main characteristic caramel product, showed its highest value in sample containing alanine after heating for 60 minutes. The best sensory results of the sample contains alanine were confirmed by the presence of high concentrations of the most potent odorants of caramel besides to the formation of some volatile compounds have caramel like flavours such as 2-acetyl pyrrole, 2-furanones and 1-(2-furanyl)1,2-propandione. PMID:12395187

  3. The volatile compound BinBase mass spectral database

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Volatile compounds comprise diverse chemical groups with wide-ranging sources and functions. These compounds originate from major pathways of secondary metabolism in many organisms and play essential roles in chemical ecology in both plant and animal kingdoms. In past decades, sampling methods and instrumentation for the analysis of complex volatile mixtures have improved; however, design and implementation of database tools to process and store the complex datasets have lagged behind. Description The volatile compound BinBase (vocBinBase) is an automated peak annotation and database system developed for the analysis of GC-TOF-MS data derived from complex volatile mixtures. The vocBinBase DB is an extension of the previously reported metabolite BinBase software developed to track and identify derivatized metabolites. The BinBase algorithm uses deconvoluted spectra and peak metadata (retention index, unique ion, spectral similarity, peak signal-to-noise ratio, and peak purity) from the Leco ChromaTOF software, and annotates peaks using a multi-tiered filtering system with stringent thresholds. The vocBinBase algorithm assigns the identity of compounds existing in the database. Volatile compound assignments are supported by the Adams mass spectral-retention index library, which contains over 2,000 plant-derived volatile compounds. Novel molecules that are not found within vocBinBase are automatically added using strict mass spectral and experimental criteria. Users obtain fully annotated data sheets with quantitative information for all volatile compounds for studies that may consist of thousands of chromatograms. The vocBinBase database may also be queried across different studies, comprising currently 1,537 unique mass spectra generated from 1.7 million deconvoluted mass spectra of 3,435 samples (18 species). Mass spectra with retention indices and volatile profiles are available as free download under the CC-BY agreement (http

  4. Electroantennographic bioassay as a screening tool for host plant volatiles.

    PubMed

    Beck, John J; Light, Douglas M; Gee, Wai S

    2012-01-01

    Plant volatiles play an important role in plant-insect interactions. Herbivorous insects use plant volatiles, known as kairomones, to locate their host plant. When a host plant is an important agronomic commodity feeding damage by insect pests can inflict serious economic losses to growers. Accordingly, kairomones can be used as attractants to lure or confuse these insects and, thus, offer an environmentally friendly alternative to pesticides for insect control. Unfortunately, plants can emit a vast number volatiles with varying compositions and ratios of emissions dependent upon the phenology of the commodity or the time of day. This makes identification of biologically active components or blends of volatile components an arduous process. To help identify the bioactive components of host plant volatile emissions we employ the laboratory-based screening bioassay electroantennography (EAG). EAG is an effective tool to evaluate and record electrophysiologically the olfactory responses of an insect via their antennal receptors. The EAG screening process can help reduce the number of volatiles tested to identify promising bioactive components. However, EAG bioassays only provide information about activation of receptors. It does not provide information about the type of insect behavior the compound elicits; which could be as an attractant, repellent or other type of behavioral response. Volatiles eliciting a significant response by EAG, relative to an appropriate positive control, are typically taken on to further testing of behavioral responses of the insect pest. The experimental design presented will detail the methodology employed to screen almond-based host plant volatiles by measurement of the electrophysiological antennal responses of an adult insect pest navel orangeworm (Amyelois transitella) to single components and simple blends of components via EAG bioassay. The method utilizes two excised antennae placed across a "fork" electrode holder. The protocol

  5. Volatility of Organic Aerosol: Evaporation of Ammonium Sulfate/Succinic Acid Aqueous Solution Droplets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Condensation and evaporation modify the properties and effects of atmospheric aerosol particles. We studied the evaporation of aqueous succinic acid and succinic acid/ammonium sulfate droplets to obtain insights on the effect of ammonium sulfate on the gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric organic acids. Droplet evaporation in a laminar flow tube was measured in a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer setup. A wide range of droplet compositions was investigated, and for some of the experiments the composition was tracked using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. The measured evaporation was compared to model predictions where the ammonium sulfate was assumed not to directly affect succinic acid evaporation. The model captured the evaporation rates for droplets with large organic content but overestimated the droplet size change when the molar concentration of succinic acid was similar to or lower than that of ammonium sulfate, suggesting that ammonium sulfate enhances the partitioning of dicarboxylic acids to aqueous particles more than currently expected from simple mixture thermodynamics. If extrapolated to the real atmosphere, these results imply enhanced partitioning of secondary organic compounds to particulate phase in environments dominated by inorganic aerosol. PMID:24107221

  6. Process Modeling of Ammonia Volatilization from Ammonium Solution and Manure Surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia emissions occur from manure surfaces on the barn floor, during storage, and following field application. Based upon theoretical principles and associated published information on ammonia emission, relationships were refined for modeling the dissociation constant (Ka), Henry’s law constant (K...

  7. Solution-processed Al-chelated gelatin for highly transparent non-volatile memory applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yu-Chi; Wang, Yeong-Her

    2015-03-23

    Using the biomaterial of Al-chelated gelatin (ACG) prepared by sol-gel method in the ITO/ACG/ITO structure, a highly transparent resistive random access memory (RRAM) was obtained. The transmittance of the fabricated device is approximately 83% at 550 nm while that of Al/gelatin/ITO is opaque. As to the ITO/gelatin/ITO RRAM, no resistive switching behavior can be seen. The ITO/ACG/ITO RRAM shows high ON/OFF current ratio (>10{sup 5}), low operation voltage, good uniformity, and retention characteristics at room temperature and 85 °C. The mechanism of the ACG-based memory devices is presented. The enhancement of these electrical properties can be attributed to the chelate effect of Al ions with gelatin. Results show that transparent ACG-based memory devices possess the potential for next-generation resistive memories and bio-electronic applications.

  8. Extraction of ethanol from aqueous solution. 2. A solvent more volatile than ethanol: Dichloromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, F.; Gomis, V.; Botella, R.F.

    1988-04-01

    Liquid-liquid equilibrium data for the ternary system water-ethanol-dichloromethane have been determined experimentally at 25/sup 0/C and correlated simultaneously with vapor-liquid equilibrium data by using the UNIQUAC model. A suitable extraction process for separating ethanol and water using dichloromethane as the solvent has been chosen, and the design calculations have been carried out to determine the energetic requirements. The properties that another solvent should offer to decrease these energetic requirements have been studied.

  9. Process modeling of ammonia volatilization from ammonium solution and manure surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia emissions from animal feeding operations have become an important concern because of their potential effects on animal and human health and the environment. Emissions occur from manure surfaces on the barn floor, during storage, and following field application. To better quantify ammonia emi...

  10. Temperature- and fO2-Dependence of the Volatility and Condensation Behavior of Volatile Elements: Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertel, W.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    The volatility of elements is an important aspect in the Earths past, present and future: its present impact is reflected in elemental transport in the daily outgassing of volcanic vents. Its importance for understanding the earth also reaches back to the earliest periods of our solar system: nebular gases and matter underwent elemental fractionation processes based on the differences in the evaporation and condensation behaviour of matter within the solar nebula, which finally resulted in the formation of condensed matter from interplanetary dust particles up to the planets of the solar system. Precise knowledge of parameters controlling volatility as well as condensation of elements is, however, still lacking. The volatile or refractory behaviour of an element or component likely depends on the temperature and oxygen fugacity (fO2) conditions prevailing. To address this issue, a systematic study of the volatility of 18 volatile elements in respect to fO2 and temperature was launched applying a modified mechanically assisted equilibration technique (MAE): 60 g of a haplobasaltic starting composition (An-Di) was doped with up to 5000 ppm of volatile elements (Li, K, Na, Ti, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Cs, Tl) and heated to run temperature. For the fO2 dependence 2 experiments at logfO2 = -11.3 (~ IW -0.5) and - 0.7 (pure air) at a constant temperature of 1300 °C were performed, while T dependence was investigated at 1300 and 1500 °C at constant fO2 (pure air). The original MAE technique was modified by two Al2O3 plates extending from the hot spot region up to the upper, cooler regions in the muffle tube furnace, which was T calibrated prior to any experiment. In this way the plates function as condensation traps. Experiments lasted for up two weeks while experimental conditions were kept constant and monitored continuously. Up to 46 samples were taken from the melt by time-series sampling to measure the loss of volatile elements from the melt

  11. Volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds in suburban Paris: variability, origin and importance for SOA formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait-Helal, W.; Borbon, A.; Sauvage, S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Colomb, A.; Gros, V.; Freutel, F.; Crippa, M.; Afif, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Beekmann, M.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand-Jolibois, R.; Fronval, I.; Grand, N.; Leonardis, T.; Lopez, M.; Michoud, V.; Miet, K.; Perrier, S.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Schneider, J.; Siour, G.; Zapf, P.; Locoge, N.

    2014-10-01

    Measurements of gaseous and particulate organic carbon were performed during the MEGAPOLI experiments, in July 2009 and January-February 2010, at the SIRTA observatory in suburban Paris. Measurements comprise primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs), of both anthropogenic and biogenic origins, including C12-C16 n-alkanes of intermediate volatility (IVOCs), suspected to be efficient precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The time series of gaseous carbon are generally consistent with times series of particulate organic carbon at regional scale, and are clearly affected by meteorology and air mass origin. Concentration levels of anthropogenic VOCs in urban and suburban Paris were surprisingly low (2-963 ppt) compared to other megacities worldwide and to rural continental sites. Urban enhancement ratios of anthropogenic VOC pairs agree well between the urban and suburban Paris sites, showing the regional extent of anthropogenic sources of similar composition. Contrary to other primary anthropogenic VOCs (aromatics and alkanes), IVOCs showed lower concentrations in winter (< 5 ppt) compared to summer (13-27 ppt), which cannot be explained by the gas-particle partitioning theory. Higher concentrations of most oxygenated VOCs in winter (18-5984 ppt) suggest their dominant primary anthropogenic origin. The respective role of primary anthropogenic gaseous compounds in regional SOA formation was investigated by estimating the SOA mass concentration expected from the anthropogenic VOCs and IVOCs (I / VOCs) measured at SIRTA. From an integrated approach based on emission ratios and SOA yields, 38 % of the SOA measured at SIRTA is explained by the measured concentrations of I / VOCs, with a 2% contribution by C12-C16 n-alkane IVOCs. From the results of an alternative time-resolved approach, the average IVOC contribution to SOA formation is estimated to be 7%, which is half of the average contribution of the traditional aromatic compounds (15%). Both

  12. Slow Release of Plant Volatiles Using Sol-Gel Dispensers.

    PubMed

    Bian, L; Sun, X L; Cai, X M; Chen, Z M

    2014-12-01

    The black citrus aphid, also known as the tea aphid, (Toxoptera aurantii Boyer) attacks economically important crops, including tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze). In the current study, silica sol-gel formulations were screened to find one that could carry and release C. sinensis plant volatiles to lure black citrus aphids in a greenhouse. The common plant volatile trans-2-hexen-1-al was used as a model molecule to screen for suitable sol-gel formulations. A zNose (Electronic Sensor Technology, Newbury Park, CA) transportable gas chromatograph was used to continuously monitor the volatile emissions. A sol-gel formulation containing tetramethyl orthosilicate and methyltrimethoxysilane in an 8:2 (vol:vol) ratio was selected to develop a slow-release dispenser. The half-life of trans-2-hexen-1-al in the sol-gel dispenser increased slightly with the volume of this compound in the dispenser. Ten different volatiles were tested in the sol-gel dispenser. Alcohols of 6-10 carbons had the longest half-lives (3.01-3.77 d), while esters of 6-12 carbons had the shortest (1.53-2.28 d). Release of these volatiles from the dispensers could not be detected by the zNose after 16 d (cis-3-hexenyl acetate) to 26 d (3,7-dimethylocta-1,6-dien-3-ol). In greenhouse experiments, trans-2-hexen-1-al and cis-3-hexen-1-ol released from the sol-gel dispensers attracted aphids for ≍17 d, and release of these volatiles could not be detected by the zNose after ≍24 d. The sol-gel dispensers performed adequately for the slow release of plant volatiles to trap aphids in the greenhouse. PMID:26470065

  13. Sulfur, halogens and helium in vesicles and glass of MORB; global fluxes of volatiles from ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagoshima, T.; Sano, Y.; Takahata, N.; Hattori, K. H.; Marty, B.

    2013-12-01

    We determined the compositions of vesicles and glasses of MORB to estimate fluxes of S and halogens from ridges to the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Samples were collected at 3 sites of the East Pacific Rise, 3 sites between 15-40 N of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and 2 sites near 25 S on the Central Indian Ridge. Volatiles were extracted from vesicles by crushing samples in dilute NaOH solution at liq. nitrogen temp. Helium isotope compositions were measured with a VG-5400 MS; S, F and Cl contents with ICS-2100 ion chromatography; and the contents of Br, I and metals with Agilent 7700x ICP-MS. For glass, the concentrations of S, F, Cl and Br were determined with a NanoSIMS. Vesicles contain similar concentrations of 3He (6.3E-16-5.1E-15 mol/g of sample) and F/Cl molar ratios (0.03-0.15) at all sites. Cl/S ratios are higher at shallower sites, suggesting the start of S degassing at deep levels, > 3000 m. Averages of vesicle data are (4.4×1.3)E7 for S/3He, (1.4×0.7)E6 for F/3He, (2.8×1.3)E7 for Cl/3He, and <2.7E5 for Br/3He and I/3He. The values are much smaller than those for glass probably because of the retention of volatiles in melt at great depths, suggesting that vesicles' contribution of volatiles is minor except for He. Bulk (vesicles+glass) shows S/3He (3.1E9-1.2E10), F/3He (1.6E9-6.5E9), Cl/3He (7.5E8-3.0E9) and Br/3He (5.1E5-2.1E6). Using the global flux of 3He, 527 mol/yr, fluxes of volatiles are calculated to be 2.3E10-6.6E12 mol/yr for S, 7.1E8-3.4E12 mol/yr for F, 1.5E10-1.6E12 mol/yr for Cl and <1.1E9 mol/yr for Br. The values are comparable with those from arc volcanoes reported by Wallace (2005) and Fisher (2008). The combined contributions from MORB and arcs give the total annual fluxes of volatiles to the atmosphere and hydrosphere. Comparison of the annual fluxes and their amounts in the atmosphere and hydrosphere reservoir yield the residence times of volatiles; 4.9E7-1.0E9 yr for S, 2.2E7-5.8E9 yr for F, 1.3E9-1.4E10 yr for Cl, and 1.0E9-8.0E9 yr

  14. Volatile organic compound sources for Southern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patokoski, Johanna; Ruuskanen, Taina M.; Kajos, Maija K.; Taipale, Risto; Rantala, Pekka; Aalto, Juho; Ryyppö, Timo; Hakola, Hannele; Rinne, Janne

    2014-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have several sources, both biogenic and anthropogenic. Emissions of biogenic VOCs in a global scale are estimated to be an order of magnitude higher than anthropogenic ones. However, in densely populated areas and during winter time the anthropogenic VOC emissions dominate over the biogenic ones. The aim of this study was to clarify potential local sources and source areas of VOCs in different seasons. Diurnal behaviour in winter and spring were also compared at two different sites in Finland: SMEAR II and III (Station for Measuring Ecosystem - Atmosphere Relations). SMEAR II is a rural site located in Hyytiälä in Southern Finland 220 km North-West from Helsinki whereas SMEAR III is background urban site located 5 km from the downtown of Helsinki. The volume mixing ratios of VOCs were measured with a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, Ionicon Analytik GmbH, Austria) during years 2006-2011. Other trace gases such as CO, NOXand SO2 were also measured in both sites and used for source analysis. Source areas for long term VOC measurements were investigated with trajectory analysis and sources for local and regional concentrations were determined by Unmix multivariate receptor model. Forest fires affect air quality and the biggest smoke plumes can be seen in satellite images and even hinder visibility in the plume areas. They provide temporally and spatially well-defined sources that can be used to verify source area estimates. During the measurement periods two different forest fire episodes with several hotspots, happened in Russia. Forest fires which showed up in these measurements were in 2006 near the border of Finland in Vyborg area and 2010 in Moscow area. Forest fire episodes were clearly observed in trajectory analysis for benzene, toluene and methanol and also CO and NOX. In addition to event sources continuous source areas were determined. Anthropogenic local sources seemed to be dominant during winter in

  15. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

    2003-07-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing work toward the development of new screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of halogens. In prior work, the devices were tested for response to carbon tetrachloride, heptane, toluene, and water vapors. In the current work, sensor response was evaluated with sixteen halogenated VOCs relative to carbon tetrachloride. The results show that the response of the various chlorinated VOCs is within an order of magnitude of the response to carbon tetrachloride for each of the sensors. Thus, for field screening a single response factor can be used. Both types of leak detectors are being further modified to provide an on-board LCD signal readout, which is related to VOC concentration. The units will be fully portable and will operate with 115-V line or battery power. Signal background, noise level, and response data on the Bacharach heated diode detector and the TIF corona discharge detector show that when the response curves are plotted against the log of concentration, the plot is linear to the upper limit for the particular unit, with some curvature at lower levels. When response is plotted directly against concentration, the response is linear at the low end and is curved at the high end. The dynamic ranges for carbon tetrachloride of the two devices from the lower detection limit (S/N=2) to signal saturation are 4-850 vapor parts per million (vppm) for the corona discharge unit and 0.01-70 vppm for the heated diode unit. Additional circuit modifications are being made to lower the detection limit and increase the dynamic response range of the corona discharge unit. The results indicate that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work toward

  16. The impact of methionine source on poultry fecal matter odor volatiles.

    PubMed

    Chavez, C; Coufal, C D; Lacey, R E; Carey, J B

    2004-03-01

    To determine the impact of Met source on volatile compounds of broiler excreta, 2 trials were conducted using straight-run broiler chicks that were randomly distributed in battery cages with 3 replicate pens of 16 birds each. The treatment groups were 1) dry Met hydroxy analogue (52% Met activity), 2) sodium methioninate aqueous solution (45.9% Met activity), 3) liquid Met hydroxy analogue (88% Met activity), 4) DL-Met, (98% Met activity), and 5) no supplemental Met. All starter diets were formulated to contain 3,135 kcal of ME/kg, 23% crude protein, and 0.8% total Met activity and otherwise met NRC nutrient requirements. Diets were fed ad libitum from d 1 to termination of the study (5 to 6 wk). Feed consumption and feed conversion were measured daily, and all birds were weighed weekly. There were no significant differences in BW, feed consumption, or feed conversion among the treatments in either trial. All excreta were collected in litter pans daily lined with aluminum foil. Litter pans for each pen were individually transferred to a separate room for weekly odor volatile analysis. An electronic nose was used to capture 3 to 4 air samples from various locations for each pan of broiler excreta resulting in a total of 10 air samples from each treatment group. All data taken from the electronic nose were evaluated using analysis of variance. Results indicated that there were significant differences in volatiles in the broiler excreta for all treatment groups. These data indicate that different Met sources may result in the production of different odor-related compounds in broiler excreta. PMID:15049487

  17. Volatiles and trace elements in melt inclusions from Siberian Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, S.; Edmonds, M.; Maclennan, J.; Svensen, H.

    2014-12-01

    The eruption of the Siberian Traps Large Igneous Province (LIP) was synchronous with the largest known mass extinction, at the Permo-Triassic boundary. Understanding the volatile budget of the eruptions and hence their potential effects on climate is of critical importance. The volcanism spanned an enormous territory (5 million km2) over 0.8 Ma and the magmas feeding the eruptions were heterogeneous in their chemistry in space and time. In terms of volatiles in pre-eruptive magmas, there are multiple possible sources: the mantle (including metasomatized lithosphere) and crustal rocks and sediments. Discriminating between these sources requires not only microanalysis of volatiles in melt inclusions, but also analysis of trace elements. Crucially, the magmas sampled for this study did not intersect and assimilate evaporite deposits or brines prior to emplacement as sills or eruption as lavas, in contrast to previous studies, which might allow mantle-derived volatile heterogeneity to be preserved in the melts. We present a new dataset of clinopyroxene-hosted melt inclusion geochemistry. Crystalline inclusions in clinopyroxene with Mg# from 69.2 to 82.6 were homogenized at temperatures of 1190°C and fO2 of FMQ-1 in a high temperature gas mixing furnace. We show that, for this particular suite of lavas, considerable variability exists in trace and volatile element ratios (e.g. La/Yb, Nb/Y, Ba/La, F/Nd, Cl/K) that may be explained entirely by mantle heterogeneity. The most depleted melts (e.g. low La/Yb) have the highest range and values of S/Dy, Cl/K and F/Nd ratios; and the most "enriched" melts (highest La/Yb) exhibit low volatile/trace element ratios. These trends are consistent with mixing between end member sources: low degrees of melting of a volatile-poor source and high degrees of melting of a volatile-rich component with a depleted trace element signature (which might be consistent with minimally devolatilised recycled oceanic crust). There is no clear

  18. EDITORIAL: Non-volatile memory based on nanostructures Non-volatile memory based on nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Sergei; Yang, J. Joshua; Demming, Anna

    2011-06-01

    Non-volatile memory refers to the crucial ability of computers to store information once the power source has been removed. Traditionally this has been achieved through flash, magnetic computer storage and optical discs, and in the case of very early computers paper tape and punched cards. While computers have advanced considerably from paper and punched card memory devices, there are still limits to current non-volatile memory devices that restrict them to use as secondary storage from which data must be loaded and carefully saved when power is shut off. Denser, faster, low-energy non-volatile memory is highly desired and nanostructures are the critical enabler. This special issue on non-volatile memory based on nanostructures describes some of the new physics and technology that may revolutionise future computers. Phase change random access memory, which exploits the reversible phase change between crystalline and amorphous states, also holds potential for future memory devices. The chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is a promising material in this field because it combines a high activation energy for crystallization and a relatively low crystallization temperature, as well as a low melting temperature and low conductivity, which accommodates localized heating. Doping is often used to lower the current required to activate the phase change or 'reset' GST but this often aggravates other problems. Now researchers in Korea report in-depth studies of SiO2-doped GST and identify ways of optimising the material's properties for phase-change random access memory [1]. Resistance switching is an area that has attracted a particularly high level of interest for non-volatile memory technology, and a great deal of research has focused on the potential of TiO2 as a model system in this respect. Researchers at HP labs in the US have made notable progress in this field, and among the work reported in this special issue they describe means to control the switch resistance and show

  19. Wells for In Situ Extraction of Volatiles from Regolith (WIEVR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2013-01-01

    A document discusses WIEVRs, a means to extract water ice more efficiently than previous approaches. This water may exist in subsurface deposits on the Moon, in many NEOs (Near- Earth Objects), and on Mars. The WIEVR approach utilizes heat from the Sun to vaporize subsurface ice; the water (or other volatile) vapor is transported to a surface collection vessel where it is condensed (and collected). The method does not involve mining and extracting regolith before removing the frozen volatiles, so it uses less energy and is less costly than approaches that require mining of regolith. The only drilling required for establishing the WIEVR collection/recovery system is a well-bore drill hole. In its simplest form, the WIEVRs will function without pumps, compressors, or other gas-moving equipment, relying instead on diffusive transport and thermally induced convection of the vaporized volatiles for transport to the collection location(s). These volatile extraction wells could represent a significant advance in extraction efficiency for recovery of frozen volatiles in subsurface deposits on the Moon, Mars, or other extraterrestrial bodies.

  20. Propolis volatile compounds: chemical diversity and biological activity: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a sticky material collected by bees from plants, and used in the hive as building material and defensive substance. It has been popular as a remedy in Europe since ancient times. Nowadays, propolis use in over-the-counter preparations, “bio”-cosmetics and functional foods, etc., increases. Volatile compounds are found in low concentrations in propolis, but their aroma and significant biological activity make them important for propolis characterisation. Propolis is a plant-derived product: its chemical composition depends on the local flora at the site of collection, thus it offers a significant chemical diversity. The role of propolis volatiles in identification of its plant origin is discussed. The available data about chemical composition of propolis volatiles from different geographic regions are reviewed, demonstrating significant chemical variability. The contribution of volatiles and their constituents to the biological activities of propolis is considered. Future perspectives in research on propolis volatiles are outlined, especially in studying activities other than antimicrobial. PMID:24812573