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Sample records for pks b1545-321 bow

  1. Bows, Strings, and Bowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guettler, Knut

    It is to the credit of François Tourte (Paris, ca. 1747-1835) that modern bows give a more direct impact on the string than their predecessors. This feature is of utmost importance when applying off-string, bouncing techniques such as spiccato and ricochet, but even for a stroke such as martelé, where quick reduction of bow force is required during the attack. With Tourte's concave-cambered bow, the bow force increases rapidly when the bow stick is falling or pressed against the string. With the old concave or straight bows, more movement, and thus time, was required for establishing comparable bow force.

  2. Bowed Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossing, Thomas D.; Hanson, Roger J.

    In the next eight chapters, we consider some aspects of the science of bowed string instruments, old and new. In this chapter, we present a brief discussion of bowed strings, a subject that will be developed much more thoroughly in Chap. 16. Chapters 13-15 discuss the violin, the cello, and the double bass. Chapter 17 discusses viols and other historic string instruments, and Chap. 18 discusses the Hutchins-Schelleng violin octet.

  3. Violin bow vibrations.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin E

    2012-05-01

    The modal frequencies and bending mode shapes of a freely supported tapered violin bow are investigated by finite element analysis and direct measurement, with and without tensioned bow hair. Such computations are used with analytic models to model the admittance presented to the stretched bow hairs at the ends of the bow and to the string at the point of contact with the bow. Finite element computations are also used to demonstrate the influence of the lowest stick mode vibrations on the low frequency bouncing modes, when the hand-held bow is pressed against the string. The possible influence of the dynamic stick modes on the sound of the bowed instrument is briefly discussed. PMID:22559386

  4. DETAIL OF BOW FROM STARBOARD SIDE SHOWING ICEBREAKING BOW DESIGN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF BOW FROM STARBOARD SIDE SHOWING ICEBREAKING BOW DESIGN AND BOW THRUSTER. - U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tenders, 180' Class, U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, 2100 Second Street Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. Maximum bow force revisited.

    PubMed

    Mores, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Schelleng [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 53, 26-41 (1973)], Askenfelt [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 86, 503-516 (1989)], Schumacher [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 1985-1998 (1994)], and Schoonderwaldt, Guettler, and Askenfelt [Acta Acust. Acust. 94, 604-622 (2008)] formulated-in different ways-how the maximum bow force relates to bow velocity, bow-bridge distance, string impedance, and friction coefficients. Issues of uncertainty are how to account for friction or for the rotational admittance of the strings. Related measurements at the respective transitions between regimes of Helmholtz motion and non-Helmholtz motion employ a variety of bowing machines and stringed instruments. The related findings include all necessary parameters except the friction coefficients, leaving the underlying models unconfirmed. Here, a bowing pendulum has been constructed which allows precise measurement of relevant bowing parameters, including the friction coefficients. Two cellos are measured across all strings for three different bow-bridge distances. The empirical data suggest that-taking the diverse elements of existing models as options-Schelleng's model combined with Schumacher's velocity term yields the best fit. Furthermore, the pendulum employs a bow driving mechanism with adaptive impedance which discloses that mentioned regimes are stable and transitions between them sometimes require a hysteresis on related parameters. PMID:27586745

  6. 43. Bow thruster room. Bow thruster engine not used for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Bow thruster room. Bow thruster engine not used for powering hydraulics to boom as in some other tenders in same class. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter BRAMBLE, Waterfront at Lincoln Avenue, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  7. Testing bow shock models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrefay, Thamer; Meziane, Karim; Hamza, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Space plasmas studies of bow shock dynamics, given the fundamental transport role and impact natural transition boundaries, have continued to attract much interest. With the overwhelming availability of data collected by various space science missions, several empirical models have been put forward to account for the location of the Earth's bow shock. Various solar wind and IMF measured parameters are used to constrain the proposed models published in the literature. For each of these empirical models, the bow shock nose velocity, at the standoff distance, is computed; each of these velocities is then compared with the observed shock speed as determined from a multipoint measurement provided by the Cluster quartet. The present study reveals to what extent the model parameters used are significant and determinant, and suggests that some empirical models are more accurate than others are.

  8. Neptune inbound bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam; Lepping, Ronald P.

    1995-01-01

    Voyager 2 crossed the inbound or upstream Neptunian bow shock at 1430 spacecraft event time on August 24 in 1989 (Belcher et al., 1989). The plasma and magnetic field measurements allow us to study the solar wind interaction with the outermost gas giant. To fully utilize all of the spacecraft observations, an improved nonlinear least squares, 'Rankine-Hugoniot' magnetohydrodynamic shock-fitting technique has been developed (Szabo, 1994). This technique is applied to the Neptunian data set. We find that the upstream bow shock normal points nearly exactly toward the Sun consistent with any reasonable large-scale model of the bow shock for a near subsolar crossing. The shock was moving outward with a speed of 14 +/- 12 km/s. The shock can be characterized as a low beta, high Mach number, strong quasi-perpendicular shock. Finally, the shock microstructure features are resolved and found to scale well with theoretical expectations.

  9. Bow Shocks at Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Andrew J.

    2009-11-01

    Comets provide a wonderful laboratory to study the interaction of a fast flowing plasma, the solar wind, with neutral gas from the comet. On ionization, the more massive newly-born cometary ions are assimilated into the solar wind flow, eventually causing its deceleration via this `mass loading'. One of the effects of this is the cometary bow shock. The exploration of comet Halley by an armada of spacecraft in 1986, as well as the in-situ exploration of comets Giacobini-Zinner (1985), Grigg-Skjellerup (1992) and Borrelly (2001), has revealed important results on the behavior of these weak shocks and showed that mass loading plays a key role. In 2014, the Rosetta mission will provide the first observations of the formation of the cometary bow shock as a comet, Churyumov-Gerasimenko, nears the Sun. Rosetta will also provide the first measurements of the collision-dominated near-nucleus region. Here, we briefly review what we know about cometary bow shocks, and we examine the prospects for Rosetta.

  10. Multi-wavelength Investigation of the Variability of the Blazars PKS 1510-089, PKS 1514-241, PKS 1622-297, and PKS 2155-304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, J. P.; Miller, H. R.

    2003-12-01

    The 4 southern sky blazars, PKS 1510-089, PKS 1514-241, PKS 1622-297, and PKS 2155-304, were monitored for approximately 6 months in 6 wavebands (B, V, R, J, H, K) every three days. These data were obtained via the SMARTS consortium on the 1.3m telescope at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory. We present this data as a function of time and waveband. These variations place severe limits on the size of the emitting region, and provide constraints for the physical processes responsible for these variations. JPM is a SMARTS Fellow and JPM and HRM are grateful for support of a grant from the Research Corporation and the PEGA-RPE program at Georgia State University.

  11. Martian bow shock - PHOBOS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Lichtenegger, H.; Yeroshenko, Ye.; Sauer, K.; Luhmann, J. G.; Ong, M.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-05-01

    Data obtained with the Magma magnetometer on the subsolar passes of the Phobos spacecraft during its 3 elliptic orbits reveals a turbulent bow shock with a strong foot consistent with the reflection of solar wind protons. The bow shock lies at a subsolar distance of 1.47 + or - .03 R(M). The circular orbit phase of the mission reveals a bow shock with a highly varying location. The median terminator crossing lies at 2.72 Mars radii. The location of the bow shock in the terminator plane is sensitive to neither the EUV flux nor to planetary longitude.

  12. AOTV bow shock location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desautel, D.

    1985-01-01

    Hypersonic bow-shock location and geometry are of central importance to the aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs), but they are difficult to predict for a given vehicle configuration. This paper reports experimental measurements of shock standoff distance for the 70 deg cone AOTV configuration in shock-tunnel-test flows at Mach numbers of 3.8 to 7.9 and for angles of attack from 0 deg to 20 deg. The controlling parameter for hypersonic bow-shock standoff distance (for a given forebody shape) is the mean normal-shock density ratio. Values for this parameter in the tests reported are in the same range as those of the drag-brake AOTV perigee regime. Results for standoff distance are compared with those previously reported in the literature for this AOTV configuration. It is concluded that the AOTV shock standoff distance for the conical configuration, based on frustrum (base) radius, is equivalent to that of a sphere with a radius about 35 percent greater than that of the cone; the distance is, therefore, much less than reported in previous studies. Some reasons for the discrepancies between the present and previous are advanced. The smaller standoff distance determined here implies there will be less radiative heat transfer than was previously expected.

  13. Circular Polarization in PKS 1519-273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, W.; Macquart, J. P.; Johnston, H.; Jauncey, D.

    2005-12-01

    The intra-day variable BL Lac PKS 1519-273 exhibits variations at centimeter wavelengths in total intensity, linear polarization, and circular polarization. Their variability is caused by scintillation due to the interstellar medium. PKS 1519-273 displays 4% circular polarization at 4.8 GHz and the variability has persisted as long as the source has been observed. We present observations of this source over several years, showing that the circularly polarized emission is highly variable on micro-arcsecond scales. We determine properties of the structure of the emission by examining the light curves and associated scintillation theory.

  14. Some aspects of vocal fold bowing.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, S; Hirano, M; Chijiwa, K

    1994-05-01

    Bowing of the vocal fold frequently occurs in patients with vocal fold paralysis (VFP), those with sulcus vocalis, and those who have had laser surgery. Additionally, there are vocal folds that present bowing with no noticeable organic lesion. For the purpose of investigating the causes and mechanisms of vocal fold bowing, consecutive fiberscopic videorecordings of 127 patients with VFP, 33 with sulcus vocalis, 33 with laser surgery, and 33 with dysphonia having no clinically noticeable organic lesion were reviewed. Sixty-nine percent of the paralyzed vocal folds had bowing, and the occurrence of bowing was significantly related to the activity of the thyroarytenoid muscle as measured by electromyography. The cricothyroid activity had no significant relationship to vocal fold bowing. All vocal folds with sulcus presented with bowing. Thirty-five percent of the vocal folds that had had laser surgery had bowing. The extent of tissue removal was closely related to the occurrence of bowing. Twelve cases with no organic lesion had vocal fold bowing. Of these 12 patients, 8 were male and 9 were older than 60 years. Some aging process in the mucosa was presumed to be the cause of the bowing in this age group of patients without clinically noticeable organic lesions. Causes of vocal fold bowing in the younger group of patients without organic lesions were not determined in this study. PMID:8179251

  15. The player and the bowed string: coordination of bowing parameters in violin and viola performance.

    PubMed

    Schoonderwaldt, E

    2009-11-01

    An experiment was conducted with four violin and viola players, measuring their bowing performance using an optical motion capture system and sensors on the bow. The measurements allowed for a detailed analysis of the use and coordination of the main bowing parameters bow velocity, bow force, and bow-bridge distance. An analysis of bowing strategies in detache playing of notes of three durations (0.2, 2, and 4 s) at three dynamic levels (pp, mf, and f) on all four strings is presented, focusing on the "steady" part of the notes. The results revealed clear trends in the coordinated variations of the bowing parameters depending on the constraints of the task, reflecting a common behavior as well as individual strategies. Furthermore, there were clear indications that the players adapted the bowing parameters to the physical properties of the string and the instrument, respecting the limits of the playable control parameter space. PMID:19894847

  16. Engineering of the spinosyn PKS: directing starter unit incorporation.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Lesley S; Lill, Rachel E; Wilkinson, Barrie; Sheridan, Rose M; Vousden, William A; Kaja, Andrew L; Crouse, Gary D; Gifford, James; Graupner, Paul R; Karr, Laura; Lewer, Paul; Sparks, Thomas C; Leadlay, Peter F; Waldron, Clive; Martin, Christine J

    2006-12-01

    The spinosyns are a family of potent and highly selective insect control agents that display a favorable environmental profile. As some regions of the spinosyn molecule are recalcitrant to chemical modification, a targeted genetic approach was carried out to generate new analogues. The polyketide synthase (PKS) loading modules from the avermectin PKS of Streptomyces avermitilis and the erythromcyin PKS of Saccharopolyspora erythraea were each used to replace the spinosyn PKS loading module. Both of the resulting strains containing hybrid PKS pathways produced the anticipated spinosyn analogues. Supplementation of the culture media with a range of exogenous carboxylic acids led to the successful incorporation of these novel elements to yield further novel spinosyn molecules, some of which demonstrated potent and new insecticidal activities. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that semisynthesis of such novel metabolites can then be used to generate active analogues, demonstrating the effectiveness of utilizing these complementary methods to search the chemical space around this template. PMID:17190446

  17. Articulated coordination of the right arm underlies control of bow parameters and quick bow reversals in skilled cello bowing

    PubMed Central

    Verrel, Julius; Woollacott, Marjorie; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2014-01-01

    Stringed instrument bowing is a complex coordinative motor skill acquired though years of intense practice. We apply a novel “freezing” analysis to investigate how movement at different joints contributes to bow transport (movement amplitude), stabilization of bow parameters (angle, velocity) during bow movements, and quick reversals of bow direction (acceleration amplitude). Participants were ten advanced or professional cellists (19–32 years, at least 10 years of practice) and ten age-matched novice players. Arm and bow movements were recorded using 3D motion capture. To assess how performance depends on articulated use of the right arm, actual data were compared to surrogate data, generated by artificially removing movement at (“freezing”) individual joints in measured arm movements. This analysis showed that both elbow and shoulder significantly contribute to bow transport in experts, while only the shoulder contributed to bow transport in novices. Moreover, experts showed more strongly increased variability of bow parameters and reduced acceleration amplitudes at bow reversals for surrogate compared to actual movement data. This indicates that movement across joints was organized to reduce bow variability and achieve quick bow reversals. Corresponding effects were less pronounced or absent in the novices, in particular for the wrist and elbow. Our results demonstrate the importance of articulated use of the right arm and clarify the contribution of different joints in experts’ bowing performance. Moreover, they support theories of motor control and learning that propose exploitation of biomechanical degrees of freedom, in particular of distal joints, as a critical component in skilled motor performance. PMID:25191284

  18. Orion Nebula and Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have found a bow shock around a very young star in the nearby Orion nebula, an intense star-forming region of gas and dust.

    A picture, from the Hubble Heritage team, is available at http://heritage.stsci.edu or http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/05 or http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . It was taken in February 1995 as part of the Hubble Orion Nebula mosaic by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    Named for the crescent-shaped wave a ship makes as it moves through water, a bow shock can form in space when two gas streams collide. In this case, the young star, LL Ori, emits a vigorous wind, a stream of charged particles moving rapidly outward from the star. Our own Sun has a less energetic version of this wind that is responsible for auroral displays on the Earth.

    The material spewed from LL Ori collides with slow-moving gas evaporating away from the center of the Orion nebula, located to the lower right of the image. The surface where the two winds collide is seen as the crescent-shaped bow shock.

    Unlike a water wave from a ship, this interstellar bow shock is three-dimensional. The filamentary emission has a distinct boundary on the side facing away from LL Ori, but is diffuse on the side closest to the star, a trait common to many bow shocks.

    A second, fainter bow shock can be seen around a star near the upper right-hand corner of the image. Astronomers have identified numerous shock fronts in this complex star-forming region and are using this data to understand the complex phenomena associated with star birth.

    The Orion nebula is a close neighbor in our Milky Way galaxy, at only 1,500 light-years from Earth. The filters used in this color composite represent oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen emissions.

  19. NIR Flare of PKS2032+107

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, L.; Miramon, J.; Recillas, E.; Porras, A.; Chabushyan, V.; Carraminana, A.; Mayya, D.

    2013-11-01

    We have observed a recent NIR flare of the intermediate redshift quasar PKS2032+107. This radio source is cross identified with the gamma ray source 2FGLJ2035.4+1058 and the optical source BZQJ2035+1056. From observations carried out on November 12th, 2013 (JD 2456608.603380), we determined the following photometric values H = 13.452 +/- 0.03, J = 14.628 +/- 0.03 and Ks = 12.777 +/- 0.05. Our previous NIR photometry of the object (JD2456595.644780) yielded the value: H = 15.012 =/- 0.05.

  20. Effects of bowing on perception of attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Osugi, Takayuki; Kawahara, Jun I

    2015-07-01

    Bowing is a greeting behavior. The present study examined the modulation effect of bowing on perception of attractiveness. In each trial, a portrait digitized from university yearbooks was presented on a computer screen. The portrait was mildly tilted toward participants to simulate a greeting bow (25-degree angle). Participants evaluated the subjective attractiveness of the face using a visual analog scale (0-100). The mean attractiveness judgment of the bowing portrait was significantly higher relative to that of the bending-backward or standing-still control conditions (Experiment 1). Additional control experiments revealed that alternative accounts relying on apparent spatial proximity and physical characteristics could not solely explain the effect of bowing (Experiment 2) and indicated that the effect was specific to objects perceived as faces (Experiment 3). Furthermore, observers' in-return bowing behavior did not reduce the bowing effect (Experiment 4), and bowing motion increased the ratings of subjective politeness and submissiveness (Experiment 5). Finally, tilting the 3D faces elicited the same effect from observers as did tilting the still photos (Experiment 6). These results suggest that a tilting motion of portraits (or images of face-like objects) mimicking bowing enhances perceived attractiveness, at least as measured in a culture familiar with greeting by bowing. PMID:25813741

  1. Astrospheres and Stellar Bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Marle, Allard Jan

    2016-07-01

    As stars evolve, they deliver feedback to the surrounding medium in the form of stellar wind and radiation. These shape the surrounding matter, forming what is called an astrosphere, a sphere of influence in which the star dominates the morphology and composition of the surrounding medium. Astrospheres are fascinating objects. Because they are formed through the interaction between the stellar feedback and the interstellar gas, they can tell us a great deal about both. Furthermore, because they are shaped over time they provide us with a window into the past. This is of particular interest for the study of stellar evolution, because the astrosphere reflects changes in the properties of the stellar wind, which relate directly to the properties of the star. A special sub-class of astrospheres, the stellar bow shocks, occur when the progenitor star moves through the surrounding medium at supersonic speed. Because the properties of the bow shock relate directly to both the stellar wind and the interstellar medium, the shape and size of the bow shock can be used to determine these properties. Using state-of-the-art numerical codes, it is possible to simulate the interaction between the stellar wind and radiation and the interstellar medium. These results can then be compared to observations. They can also be used to predict the type of observations that are best suited to study these objects. In this fashion computational and observational astronomy can support each other in their efforts to gain a better understanding of stars and their environment.

  2. Interstellar Scattering and the Einstein Ring PKS 1830-211

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. L.; Preston, R. A.; Murphy, D. W.; Meier, D. L.; Jauncey, D. L.; Reynolds, J. E.; Tziomis, A. K.

    1995-01-01

    High frequency (22 GHz) data have been used two resolve two compact components of the strong gravitational lens PKS 1830-211. The two bright components are at opposite sides of a one arcsecond diameter Einstein ring.

  3. The violin bow: taper, camber and flexibility.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin

    2011-12-01

    An analytic, small-deflection, simplified model of the modern violin bow is introduced to describe the bending profiles and related strengths of an initially straight, uniform cross-section, stick as a function of bow hair tension. A number of illustrative bending profiles (cambers) of the bow are considered, which demonstrate the strong dependence of the flexibility of the bow on longitudinal forces across the ends of the bent stick. Such forces are shown to be comparable in strength to critical buckling loads causing excessive sideways buckling unless the stick is very straight. Non-linear, large deformation, finite element computations extend the analysis to bow hair tensions comparable with and above the critical buckling strength of the straight stick. The geometric model assumes an expression for the taper of Tourte bows introduced by Vuillaume, which is re-examined and generalized to describe violin, viola and cello bows. A comparison is made with recently published measurements of the taper and bending profiles of a particularly fine bow by Kittel. PMID:22225065

  4. Entropy Generation Across Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, George K.; McCarthy, Michael; Fu, Suiyan; Lee E. s; Cao, Jinbin; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Canu, Patrick; Dandouras, Iannis S.; Reme, Henri; Fazakerley, Andrew; Lin, Naiguo; Wilber, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Earth's bow shock is a transition layer that causes an irreversible change in the state of plasma that is stationary in time. Theories predict entropy increases across the bow shock but entropy has never been directly measured. Cluster and Double Star plasma experiments measure 3D plasma distributions upstream and downstream of the bow shock that allow calculation of Boltzmann's entropy function H and his famous H-theorem, dH/dt O. We present the first direct measurements of entropy density changes across Earth's bow shock. We will show that this entropy generation may be part of the processes that produce the non-thermal plasma distributions is consistent with a kinetic entropy flux model derived from the collisionless Boltzmann equation, giving strong support that solar wind's total entropy across the bow shock remains unchanged. As far as we know, our results are not explained by any existing shock models and should be of interests to theorists.

  5. The supernumerary bows of the rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Peter; Ricard, Jean; Barckicke, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Everyone appreciate the mysterious beauty of a Rainbow picture. The primary bow shows red on the outer part and violet on the inner side. It is caused by light being refracted when entering a droplet of water, then reflected inside on the back of the droplet and refracted again when leaving it. The secondaty bow is seen outside the primary arc, and has the order of its colours reversed, with red on the inner side of the arc. The supernumerary bows are alternating faint bows on the inner side of the primary rainbow (and also outside the secondary rainbow). In this presentation, we will describe the present knowledge and the future perspectives A fully funded PhD Scholarship on this topic is open at the University of Granada. Picture = Contrast-enhanced photograph of a primary bow picture (prepared by Andrew Dunn).

  6. Modeling nonthermal emission from stellar bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, V.; López-Santiago, J.; Miceli, M.; Bonito, R.; de Castro, E.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Runaway O- and early B-type stars passing through the interstellar medium at supersonic velocities and characterized by strong stellar winds may produce bow shocks that can serve as particle acceleration sites. Previous theoretical models predict the production of high-energy photons by nonthermal radiative processes, but their efficiency is still debated. Aims: We aim to test and explain the possibility of emission from the bow shocks formed by runaway stars traveling through the interstellar medium by using previous theoretical models. Methods: We applied our model to AE Aurigae, the first reported star with an X-ray detected bow shock, to BD+43 3654, in which the observations failed in detecting high-energy emission, and to the transition phase of a supergiant star in the late stages of its life. Results: From our analysis, we confirm that the X-ray emission from the bow shock produced by AE Aurigae can be explained by inverse Compton processes involving the infrared photons of the heated dust. We also predict low high-energy flux emission from the bow shock produced by BD+43 3654, and the possibility of high-energy emission from the bow shock formed by a supergiant star during the transition phase from blue to red supergiant. Conclusions: Bow shocks formed by different types of runaway stars are revealed as a new possible source of high-energy photons in our neighborhood.

  7. Viols and Other Historic Bowed String Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Murray; Campbell, Patsy

    While plucked strings have been used for musical purposes since at least the third millennium BCE, the idea of sounding a string by bowing it is a much more recent development. Bowed string instruments seem to have originated in Asia toward the end of the first millennium CE, and were in widespread use in Western Europe by the end of the eleventh century. For the next three centuries many different types of bowed instrument, with a bewildering variety of names, were in common use throughout Europe.

  8. 46 CFR 42.20-70 - Minimum bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minimum bow height. 42.20-70 Section 42.20-70 Shipping... Freeboards § 42.20-70 Minimum bow height. (a) The bow height defined as the vertical distance at the forward....68. (b) Where the bow height required in paragraph (a) of this section is obtained by sheer,...

  9. 46 CFR 42.20-70 - Minimum bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum bow height. 42.20-70 Section 42.20-70 Shipping... Freeboards § 42.20-70 Minimum bow height. (a) The bow height defined as the vertical distance at the forward....68. (b) Where the bow height required in paragraph (a) of this section is obtained by sheer,...

  10. 46 CFR 42.20-70 - Minimum bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum bow height. 42.20-70 Section 42.20-70 Shipping... Freeboards § 42.20-70 Minimum bow height. (a) The bow height defined as the vertical distance at the forward....68. (b) Where the bow height required in paragraph (a) of this section is obtained by sheer,...

  11. 46 CFR 42.20-70 - Minimum bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minimum bow height. 42.20-70 Section 42.20-70 Shipping... Freeboards § 42.20-70 Minimum bow height. (a) The bow height defined as the vertical distance at the forward....68. (b) Where the bow height required in paragraph (a) of this section is obtained by sheer,...

  12. 46 CFR 42.20-70 - Minimum bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minimum bow height. 42.20-70 Section 42.20-70 Shipping... Freeboards § 42.20-70 Minimum bow height. (a) The bow height defined as the vertical distance at the forward....68. (b) Where the bow height required in paragraph (a) of this section is obtained by sheer,...

  13. Global Hybrid Simulations of the Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, N.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Russell, C. T.

    2005-08-01

    This paper summarizes recent results from global hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) simulations of bow shocks or waves associated with solar wind interaction with magnetic dipoles of various strength. By virtue of resolving ion temporal and spatial scales, global hybrid simulations account for collissionless dissipational processes at and upstream of the shock and their effects on the macrostructure of the bow shock, ion foreshock and the magnetosheath. The results demonstrate that as the level of magnetization increases and the dipole becomes a more effective obstacle, the quasi-perpendicular part of the bow shock forms first and that formation of quasi-parallel part of the bow shock is tied to the generation of oblique magnetosonic waves which steepen to form shocklets in the upstream region.

  14. Bow-shaped toroidal field coils

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanos, P.

    1981-05-01

    Design features of Bow-Shaped Toroidal Field Coils are described and compared with circular and D shaped coils. The results indicate that bow coils can produce higher field strengths, store more energy and be made demountable. The design offers the potential for the production of ultrahigh toroidal fields. Included are representative coil shapes and their engineering properties, a suggested structural design and an analysis of a specific case.

  15. Channel Bow in Boiling Water Reactors - Hot Cell Examination Results and Correlation to Measured Bow

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.T.; Lin, Y.P.; Dubecky, M.A.; Mader, E.V.

    2007-07-01

    An increase in frequency of fuel channel-control blade interference has been observed in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) in recent years. Many of the channels leading to interference were found to bow towards the control blade in a manner that was inconsistent with the expected bow due to other effects. The pattern of bow appeared to indicate a new channel bow mechanism that differed from the predominant bow mechanism caused by differential growth due to fast-fluence gradients. In order to investigate this new type of channel bow, coupons from several channels with varying degrees of bow were returned to the GE Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) for Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE). This paper describes the characteristics of channel corrosion and hydrogen pickup observed, and relates the observations to the channel exposure level, control history, and measured channel bow. The channels selected for PIE had exposures in the range of 36-48 GWd/MTU and covered a wide range of measured bow. The coupons were obtained at 4 elevations from opposing channel sides adjacent and away from the control blade. The PIE performed on these coupons included visual examination, metallography, and hydrogen concentration measurements. A new mechanism of control-blade shadow corrosion-induced channel bow was found to correlate with differences in the extent of corrosion and corresponding differences in the hydrogen concentration between opposite sides of the channels. The increased corrosion on the control blade sides was found to be dependent on the level of control early in the life of the channel. The contributions of other potential factors leading to increased channel bow and channel-control blade interference are also discussed in this paper. (authors)

  16. Dielectric bow-tie nanocavity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qijing; Shu, Fang-Jie; Zou, Chang-Ling

    2013-12-15

    We propose a novel dielectric bow-tie (DBT) nanocavity consisting of two opposing tip-to-tip triangle semiconductor nanowires, whose end faces are coated by silver nanofilms. Based on the advantages of the dielectric slot and tip structures, and the high reflectivity of the silver mirror, light can be confined in this nanocavity with low loss. We demonstrate that at 4.5 K (300 K) around the resonance wavelength of 1550 nm, the mode excited in this nanocavity has a deep subwavelength mode volume of 2.8×10(-4) μm³ and a high quality factor of 4.9×10(4) (401.3), corresponding to an ultrahigh Purcell factor of 1.6×10(7) (1.36×10(5)). This DBT nanocavity may find applications for integrated nanophotonic circuits, such as high-efficiency single photon sources, thresholdless nanolasers, and strong coupling in cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. PMID:24322245

  17. Insect-Specific Polyketide Synthases (PKSs), Potential PKS-Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Hybrids, and Novel PKS Clades in Tropical Fungi▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Amnuaykanjanasin, Alongkorn; Phonghanpot, Suranat; Sengpanich, Nattapong; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Tanticharoen, Morakot

    2009-01-01

    Polyketides draw much attention because of their potential use in pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. This study identifies an abundant pool of polyketide synthase (PKS) genes from local isolates of tropical fungi found in Thailand in three different ecological niches: insect pathogens, marine inhabitants, and lichen mutualists. We detected 149 PKS genes from 48 fungi using PCR with PKS-specific degenerate primers. We identified and classified 283 additional PKS genes from 13 fungal genomes. Phylogenetic analysis of all these PKS sequences the comprising ketosynthase (KS) conserved region and the KS-acyltransferase interdomain region yielded results very similar to those for phylogenies of the KS domain and suggested a number of remarkable points. (i) Twelve PKS genes amplified from 12 different insect-pathogenic fungi form a tight cluster, although along with two PKS genes extracted from genomes of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus, in reducing clade III. Some of these insect-specific fungal PKSs are nearly identical. (ii) We identified 38 new PKS-nonribosomal peptide synthetase hybrid genes in reducing clade II. (iii) Four distinct clades were discovered with more than 75% bootstrap support. We propose to designate the novel clade D1 with 100% bootstrap support “reducing clade V.” The newly cloned PKS genes from these tropical fungi should provide useful and diverse genetic resources for future research on the characterization of polyketide compounds synthesized by these enzymes. PMID:19346345

  18. PKS 1830-211: A Possible Compound Gravitational Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, J. E. J.; Reynolds, J. E.; Jauncey, D. L.; Backus, P. R.; McCullock, P. M.; Sinclair, M. W.; Wilson, W. E.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Gough, R. G.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Phillips, C. J.; Preston, R. A.; Jones, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of the properties of gravitational lenses have the power to tell us what sort of universe we live in. The brightest known radio Einstein ring/gravitational lens PKS 1830-211, whilst obscured by our Galaxy at optical wavelengths, has recently provided a lensing galaxy redshift of 0.89 through the detection of molecular absorption in the millimetre waveband.

  19. The return of the bow shock

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, K.; Fichtner, H. E-mail: hf@tp4.rub.de

    2014-02-10

    Recently, whether a bow shock ahead of the heliospheric stagnation region exists or not has been a topic of discussion. This was triggered by measurements indicating that the Alfvén speed and the speed of fast magnetosonic waves are higher than the flow speed of the local interstellar medium (LISM) relative to the heliosphere and resulted in the conclusion that either a bow wave or a slow magnetosonic shock might exist. We demonstrate here that including the He{sup +} component of the LISM yields both an Alfvén and fast magnetosonic wave speed lower than the LISM flow speed. Consequently, the scenario of a bow shock in front of the heliosphere, as modeled in numerous simulations of the interaction of the solar wind with the LISM, remains valid.

  20. 1. View looking south on Montana Street. The Silver Bow ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View looking south on Montana Street. The Silver Bow County Courthouse (1910-1912) is on the left. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  1. 46 CFR 154.1870 - Bow and stern loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bow and stern loading. 154.1870 Section 154.1870 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1870 Bow and stern loading. (a) When the bow or stern loading...

  2. Extraction of bowing parameters from violin performance combining motion capture and sensors.

    PubMed

    Schoonderwaldt, E; Demoucron, M

    2009-11-01

    A method is described for measurement of a complete set of bowing parameters in violin performance. Optical motion capture was combined with sensors for accurate measurement of the main bowing parameters (bow position, bow velocity, bow acceleration, bow-bridge distance, and bow force) as well as secondary control parameters (skewness, inclination, and tilt of the bow). In addition, other performance features (moments of on/off in bow-string contact, string played, and bowing direction) were extracted. Detailed descriptions of the calculations of the bowing parameters, features, and calibrations are given. The described system is capable of measuring all bowing parameters without disturbing the player, allowing for detailed studies of musically relevant aspects of bow control and coordination of bowing parameters in bowed-string instrument performance. PMID:19894846

  3. Intriguing Microvariability Observations of PKS 0736+017

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, S. D.; Reyes, F.; Clark, D.; Gomez, C.; Jenks, A.; Torres, Y.

    2002-05-01

    The optically violent variable quasar PKS 0736+017 was monitored for microvariability in early 2002. Observations were made with the 0.9m SARA telescope atop Kitt Peak in Arizona and with the 0.76m telescope at Rosemary Hill Observatory in Bronson, Florida. In January, it underwent a substantial flaring event, brightening by 1.3 R magnitudes in 2 hours and exhibiting unusual oscillatory fluctuations once it reached its bright state. Later, its V-R color was also monitored and it was found to exhibit atypical color variations, reddening as it got brighter. The curious behavior displayed by PKS 0736+017 will be compared to that of other sources.

  4. AGILE detection of a flare from PKS 1510-089

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Tavani, M.; Fioretti, V.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Vercellone, S.; Piano, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Costa, E.; Lapshov, I.; Rapisarda, M.; Argan, A.; Pucella, G.; Sabatini, S.; Trois, A.; Vittorini, V.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.

    2014-08-01

    AGILE is now detecting transient gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a source positionally consistent with PKS 1510-089. Integrating from 2014-07-31 00:43 UT to 2014-08-02 02:15 UT, a preliminary maximum likelihood analysis yields a detection above 100 MeV positioned at Galactic coordinates (l,b) = (350.96, 40.12) +/- 0.9 (stat.) +/- 0.1 (syst.).

  5. A BOW SHOCK NEAR A YOUNG STAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope continues to reveal various stunning and intricate treasures that reside within the nearby, intense star-forming region known as the Great Nebula in Orion. One such jewel is the bow shock around the very young star, LL Ori, featured in this Hubble Heritage image. Named for the crescent-shaped wave made by a ship as it moves through water, a bow shock can be created in space when two streams of gas collide. LL Ori emits a vigorous solar wind, a stream of charged particles moving rapidly outward from the star. Our own Sun has a less energetic version of this wind that is responsible for auroral displays on the Earth. The material in the fast wind from LL Ori collides with slow-moving gas evaporating away from the center of the Orion Nebula, which is located to the lower right in this Heritage image. The surface where the two winds collide is the crescent-shaped bow shock seen in the image. Unlike a water wave made by a ship, this interstellar bow shock is a three-dimensional structure. The filamentary emission has a very distinct boundary on the side facing away from LL Ori, but is diffuse on the side closest to the star, a characteristic common to many bow shocks. A second, fainter bow shock can be seen around a star near the upper right-hand corner of the Heritage image. Astronomers have identified numerous shock fronts in this complex star-forming region and are using this data to understand the many complex phenomena associated with the birth of stars. This image was taken in February 1995 as part of the Hubble Orion Nebula mosaic. A close visitor in our Milky Way galaxy, the nebula is only 1,500 light-years from Earth. The filters used in this color composite represent oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen emissions. Image Credit: NASA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Acknowledgment: C. R. O'Dell (Vanderbilt University)

  6. The Polyketide Pks1 Contributes to Biofilm Formation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jennifer M.; Layre, Emilie; Sweet, Lindsay; Sherrid, Ashley; Moody, D. Branch; Ojha, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by biofilms are abundant and highly persistent, displaying phenotypic resistance to high concentrations of antimicrobials and modulating host immune systems. Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, shares these qualities with biofilm infections. To identify genetic determinants of biofilm formation in M. tuberculosis, we performed a small-scale transposon screen using an in vitro pellicle biofilm assay. We identified five M. tuberculosis mutants that were reproducibly attenuated for biofilm production relative to that of the parent strain H37Rv. One of the most attenuated mutants is interrupted in pks1, a polyketide synthase gene. When fused with pks15, as in some M. tuberculosis isolates, pks1 contributes to synthesis of the immunomodulatory phenolic glycolipids (PGLs). However, in strains such as H37Rv with split pks15 and pks1 loci, PGL is not produced and pks1 has no previously defined role. We showed that pks1 complementation restores biofilm production independently of the known role of pks1 in PGL synthesis. We also assessed the relationship among biofilm formation, the pks15/1 genotype, and M. tuberculosis phylogeography. A global survey of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates revealed surprising sequence variability in the pks15/1 locus and substantial variation in biofilm phenotypes. Our studies identify novel M. tuberculosis genes that contribute to biofilm production, including pks1. In addition, we find that the ability to make pellicle biofilms is common among M. tuberculosis isolates from throughout the world, suggesting that this trait is relevant to TB propagation or persistence. PMID:22123254

  7. Bow shock formation in a complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Saitou, Y; Nakamura, Y; Kamimura, T; Ishihara, O

    2012-02-10

    A bow shock is observed in a two-dimensional supersonic flow of charged microparticles in a complex plasma. A thin conducting needle is used to make a potential barrier as an obstacle for the particle flow in the complex plasma. The flow is generated and the flow velocity is controlled by changing a tilt angle of the device under the gravitational force. A void, microparticle-free region, is formed around the potential barrier surrounding the obstacle. The flow is bent around the leading edge of the void and forms an arcuate structure when the flow is supersonic. The structure is characterized by the bow shock as confirmed by a polytropic hydrodynamic theory as well as numerical simulation. PMID:22401079

  8. Bow shock and magnetosheath waves at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Behannon, K. W.

    1975-01-01

    Mariner 10 measurements at the Mercury bow shock provide examples where the magnetic field is approximately parallel or perpendicular to the bow shock normal. Upstream of a broad irregular parallel shock, left hand circularly polarized waves are observed which cut off very sharply at approximately 4 Hz. Upstream of a perpendicular shock, right hand circularly polarized waves are observed which persist up to the Nyquist frequency of 12 Ha. Determination of the wave propagation vector as a function of frequency helps conclusively identify the waves as whistler mode waves propagating from the shock. The magnetosheath downstream of the parallel shock is disturbed more than that downstream of the perpendicular shock particularly below 1 Hz. In the latter case regular left hand polarized waves observed slightly above the proton gyrofrequency are identified as ion cyclotron waves with wavelength approximately 300 km which are Doppler shifted up to their observed frequency.

  9. Radiological assessment of the femoral bowing in Japanese population

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaal, Ahmed Hamed Kassem; Yamamoto, Norio; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Morsy, Ahmad Fawaz; Miwa, Shinji; Kajino, Yoshitomo; Rubio, Donnel A.; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Differences in the magnitude of bowing between races are well-known characteristics of the femur. Asian races have an increased magnitude of femoral bowing but most of the orthopedic implants designed for the femur do not match this exaggerated bowing. We calculated the sagittal and coronal femoral bowing in the Japanese population at different levels of the femur and addressed its surgical significance. Material and methods: We calculated the sagittal and coronal bowing of 132 Japanese femora using CT scan of the femur. A mathematical calculation of the radius of curvature at proximal, middle, and distal regions of the femur was used to determine the degree of femoral bowing. Results: Mean sagittal bowing of the femur was 581, 188, and 161 mm for the proximal, middle, and distal thirds of the femur and mean lateral bowing was 528, 5092, and 876 mm, respectively. Mean sagittal and coronal bowing for the whole femur was 175 and 2640 mm, respectively. No correlation was found between age, gender, length of femur, and the degree of bowing. Conclusion: Our study reveals that femoral bowing in the Japanese population is 175 mm in the sagittal plane and 2640 mm in the coronal plane; these values are greater than the femoral bowing in other ethnic groups studied in the literature. This may result in varying degrees of mismatch between the western-manufactured femoral intramedullary implants and the Japanese femur. We recommend that orthopedic surgeons to accurately perform preoperative evaluation of the femoral bowing to avoid potential malalignment, rotation, and abnormal stresses between the femur and implant. PMID:27163091

  10. The earth's foreshock, bow shock, and magnetosheath

    SciTech Connect

    Onsager, T.G.; Thomsen, M.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies directly pertaining to the earth's foreshock, bow shock, and magnetosheath are reviewed, and some comparisons are made with data on other planets. Topics considered in detail include the electron foreshock, the ion foreshock, the quasi-parallel shock, the quasi-perpendicular shock, and the magnetosheath. Information discussed spans a broad range of disciplines, from large-scale macroscopic plasma phenomena to small-scale microphysical interactions. 184 refs.

  11. A survey for Hα pulsar bow shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Brownsberger, Sasha; Romani, Roger W. E-mail: sashab@stanford.edu

    2014-04-01

    We report on a survey for Hα bow shock emission around nearby γ-detected energetic pulsars. This survey adds three Balmer-dominated neutron star bow shocks to the six previously confirmed examples. In addition to the shock around Fermi pulsar PSR J1741–2054, we now report Hα structures around two additional γ-ray pulsars, PSR J2030+4415 and PSR J1509–5850. These are the first known examples of Hα nebulae with pre-ionization halos. With new measurements, we show that a simple analytic model can account for the angular size and flux of the bow shocks' apices. The latter, in particular, provides a new pulsar probe and indicates large moments of inertia and smaller distances than previously assumed in several cases. In particular, we show that the re-measured PSR J0437–4715 shock flux implies I = (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 45}/(f {sub HI}sin i) g cm{sup 2}. We also derive a distance d ≈ 0.72 kpc for the γ-ray only pulsar PSR J2030+4415 and revised distances for PSRs J1959+2048 (1.4 kpc) and J2555+6535 (∼1 kpc), smaller than the conventional DM-estimated values. Finally, we report upper limits for 94 additional LAT pulsars. An estimate of the survey sensitivity indicates that for a warm neutral medium filling factor φ{sub WNM} ∼ 0.3 there should be a total of approximately nine Hα bow shocks in our LAT-targeted survey; given that seven such objects are now known, a much larger φ{sub WNM} seems problematic.

  12. 46 CFR 45.69 - Correction for bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Correction for bow height. 45.69 Section 45.69 Shipping... § 45.69 Correction for bow height. (a) The minimum summer freeboard of all manned vessels must be.../1640) inches—actual bow height (2) For vessels having a length greater than 550 feet, (341.6—0.227...

  13. 46 CFR 45.69 - Correction for bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Correction for bow height. 45.69 Section 45.69 Shipping... § 45.69 Correction for bow height. (a) The minimum summer freeboard of all manned vessels must be.../1640) inches—actual bow height (2) For vessels having a length greater than 550 feet, (341.6—0.227...

  14. 46 CFR 45.69 - Correction for bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Correction for bow height. 45.69 Section 45.69 Shipping... § 45.69 Correction for bow height. (a) The minimum summer freeboard of all manned vessels must be.../1640) inches—actual bow height (2) For vessels having a length greater than 550 feet, (341.6—0.227...

  15. 46 CFR 45.69 - Correction for bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Correction for bow height. 45.69 Section 45.69 Shipping... § 45.69 Correction for bow height. (a) The minimum summer freeboard of all manned vessels must be.../1640) inches—actual bow height (2) For vessels having a length greater than 550 feet, (341.6—0.227...

  16. 46 CFR 45.69 - Correction for bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Correction for bow height. 45.69 Section 45.69 Shipping... § 45.69 Correction for bow height. (a) The minimum summer freeboard of all manned vessels must be.../1640) inches—actual bow height (2) For vessels having a length greater than 550 feet, (341.6—0.227...

  17. NIR photometry of the flaring Quasar PKS050-225

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, L.; Recillas, E.; Escobedo, G.; Carraminana, D. Y. Mayya. A.

    2012-11-01

    Following the report of a Gamma Ray flare in this object by M. Dutka et al. (Atel # 4574), we observed a recent NIR brightening of the high redshift, PKS0250-225 also known as CGRaBSJ0252-2219 z=1.419), cross identified with the gamma ray source 2FGLJ0252.7-2218. On November 24th 2012 (JD 2456255.7662), we determined the following photometric values H = 15.592+/- 0.05, J = 16.570 +/- 0.04 and Ks = 14.653 +/- 0.06.

  18. Coordination in Fast Repetitive Violin-Bowing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Schoonderwaldt, Erwin; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of coordination behavior in complex violin-bowing patterns involving simultaneous bow changes (reversal of bowing direction) and string crossings (changing from one string to another). Twenty-two violinists (8 advanced amateurs, 8 students with violin as major subject, and 6 elite professionals) participated in the experiment. We investigated the influence of a variety of performance conditions (specific bowing patterns, dynamic level, tempo, and transposition) and level of expertise on coordination behavior (a.o., relative phase and amplitude) and stability. It was found that the general coordination behavior was highly consistent, characterized by a systematic phase lead of bow inclination over bow velocity of about 15° (i.e., string crossings were consistently timed earlier than bow changes). Within similar conditions, a high individual consistency was found, whereas the inter-individual agreement was considerably less. Furthermore, systematic influences of performance conditions on coordination behavior and stability were found, which could be partly explained in terms of particular performance constraints. Concerning level of expertise, only subtle differences were found, the student and professional groups (higher level of expertise) showing a slightly higher stability than the amateur group (lower level of expertise). The general coordination behavior as observed in the current study showed a high agreement with perceptual preferences reported in an earlier study to similar bowing patterns, implying that complex bowing trajectories for an important part emerge from auditory-motor interaction. PMID:25207542

  19. Coordination in fast repetitive violin-bowing patterns.

    PubMed

    Schoonderwaldt, Erwin; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of coordination behavior in complex violin-bowing patterns involving simultaneous bow changes (reversal of bowing direction) and string crossings (changing from one string to another). Twenty-two violinists (8 advanced amateurs, 8 students with violin as major subject, and 6 elite professionals) participated in the experiment. We investigated the influence of a variety of performance conditions (specific bowing patterns, dynamic level, tempo, and transposition) and level of expertise on coordination behavior (a.o., relative phase and amplitude) and stability. It was found that the general coordination behavior was highly consistent, characterized by a systematic phase lead of bow inclination over bow velocity of about 15° (i.e., string crossings were consistently timed earlier than bow changes). Within similar conditions, a high individual consistency was found, whereas the inter-individual agreement was considerably less. Furthermore, systematic influences of performance conditions on coordination behavior and stability were found, which could be partly explained in terms of particular performance constraints. Concerning level of expertise, only subtle differences were found, the student and professional groups (higher level of expertise) showing a slightly higher stability than the amateur group (lower level of expertise). The general coordination behavior as observed in the current study showed a high agreement with perceptual preferences reported in an earlier study to similar bowing patterns, implying that complex bowing trajectories for an important part emerge from auditory-motor interaction. PMID:25207542

  20. Antituberculosis thiophenes define a requirement for Pks13 in mycolic acid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Regina; Kumar, Pradeep; Parashar, Vijay; Vilchèze, Catherine; Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Freundlich, Joel S.; Barnes, S. Whitney; Walker, John R.; Szymonifka, Michael J.; Marchiano, Emily; Shenai, Shubhada; Colangeli, Roberto; Jacobs, William R.; Neiditch, Matthew B.; Kremer, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    We report a new class of thiophene (TP) compounds that kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) by the novel mechanism of Pks13 inhibition. An F79S mutation near the catalytic Ser-55 site in Pks13 conferred TP-resistance in Mtb. Over-expression of wild-type pks13 resulted in TP-resistance and over-expression of the F79S pks13 mutant conferred high-level resistance. In vitro, TP inhibited fatty acyl-AMP loading onto Pks13. TP inhibited mycolic acid biosynthesis in wild-type Mtb, but to a much lesser extent in TP-resistant Mtb. TP treatment was bactericidal and equivalent to the first-line drug isoniazid, but it was less likely to permit emergent resistance. Combined isoniazid and TP treatment exhibited sterilizing activity. Computational-docking identified a possible TP-binding groove within the Pks13 ACP domain. This study confirms that Mtb Pks13 is required for mycolic acid biosynthesis, validates it as a druggable target and demonstrates the therapeutic potential of simultaneously inhibiting multiple targets in the same biosynthetic pathway. PMID:23770708

  1. Evolution of bow-tie architectures in biology.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Tamar; Mayo, Avraham E; Tlusty, Tsvi; Alon, Uri

    2015-03-01

    Bow-tie or hourglass structure is a common architectural feature found in many biological systems. A bow-tie in a multi-layered structure occurs when intermediate layers have much fewer components than the input and output layers. Examples include metabolism where a handful of building blocks mediate between multiple input nutrients and multiple output biomass components, and signaling networks where information from numerous receptor types passes through a small set of signaling pathways to regulate multiple output genes. Little is known, however, about how bow-tie architectures evolve. Here, we address the evolution of bow-tie architectures using simulations of multi-layered systems evolving to fulfill a given input-output goal. We find that bow-ties spontaneously evolve when the information in the evolutionary goal can be compressed. Mathematically speaking, bow-ties evolve when the rank of the input-output matrix describing the evolutionary goal is deficient. The maximal compression possible (the rank of the goal) determines the size of the narrowest part of the network-that is the bow-tie. A further requirement is that a process is active to reduce the number of links in the network, such as product-rule mutations, otherwise a non-bow-tie solution is found in the evolutionary simulations. This offers a mechanism to understand a common architectural principle of biological systems, and a way to quantitate the effective rank of the goals under which they evolved. PMID:25798588

  2. Auditory perception of note transitions in simulated complex bowing patterns.

    PubMed

    Schoonderwaldt, Erwin; Demoucron, Matthias; Altenmüller, Eckart; Leman, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Recent motion-capture measurements of violin bowing revealed an interesting coordination behavior in fast repetitive bowing patterns involving bow changes and string crossings; bow changes were consistently lagging behind string crossings, and the relative timing appeared to be an integral part of the bow-movement patterns. The aim of the current study was to investigate if there might be a perceptual explanation for the observed coordination behavior. For this purpose a virtual violin was used, controlled by simulated bowing gestures. A simplified coordination model is presented, which was implemented to allow real-time control of complex bowing patterns. This synthesis approach was employed in a perceptual experiment in which the participants were asked to optimize the sound by adjusting a slider controlling the main coordination parameters. It was found that the resulting coordination patterns were similar to those observed in performance, implying that complex bowing trajectories for an important part emerge from auditory-motor interaction. Further analysis of the responses shed light on temporal and spatial constraints of the simulated gestures associated with the note transitions. The results raise interesting questions with regard to auditory-motor interaction in complex instrumental control gestures. PMID:23742380

  3. 46 CFR 154.355 - Bow and stern loading piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bow and stern loading piping. 154.355 Section 154.355 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Ship Arrangements § 154.355 Bow and...

  4. 75 FR 52304 - MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... Forest Service MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Saratoga, Wyoming. The... is for an update on projects proposed for funding, and selection of some projects. DATES: The...

  5. 75 FR 39201 - MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Forest Service MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Steamboat Springs, Colorado... Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of...

  6. Evolution of Bow-Tie Architectures in Biology

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Tamar; Mayo, Avraham E.; Tlusty, Tsvi; Alon, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Bow-tie or hourglass structure is a common architectural feature found in many biological systems. A bow-tie in a multi-layered structure occurs when intermediate layers have much fewer components than the input and output layers. Examples include metabolism where a handful of building blocks mediate between multiple input nutrients and multiple output biomass components, and signaling networks where information from numerous receptor types passes through a small set of signaling pathways to regulate multiple output genes. Little is known, however, about how bow-tie architectures evolve. Here, we address the evolution of bow-tie architectures using simulations of multi-layered systems evolving to fulfill a given input-output goal. We find that bow-ties spontaneously evolve when the information in the evolutionary goal can be compressed. Mathematically speaking, bow-ties evolve when the rank of the input-output matrix describing the evolutionary goal is deficient. The maximal compression possible (the rank of the goal) determines the size of the narrowest part of the network—that is the bow-tie. A further requirement is that a process is active to reduce the number of links in the network, such as product-rule mutations, otherwise a non-bow-tie solution is found in the evolutionary simulations. This offers a mechanism to understand a common architectural principle of biological systems, and a way to quantitate the effective rank of the goals under which they evolved. PMID:25798588

  7. The parsec-scale jet of PKS 1749+096

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, R.-S.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Iguchi, S.; Lee, S.-S.; Zensus, J. A.

    2012-08-01

    Context.PKS 1749+096 is a BL Lac object showing weak extended jet emission to the northeast of the compact VLBI core on parsec scales. Aims: We aim at better understanding the jet kinematics and variability of this source and finding clues that may applicable to other BL Lac objects. Methods: The jet was studied with multi-epoch multi-frequency high-resolution VLBI observations. Results: The jet is characterized by a one-sided curved morphology at all epochs and all frequencies. The VLBI core, located at the southern end of the jet, was identified based on its spectral properties. The equipartition magnetic field of the core was investigated, through which we derived a Doppler factor of 5, largely consistent with that derived from kinematics (component C5). The study of the detailed jet kinematics at 22 and 15 GHz, spanning a period of more than 10 years, indicates the possible existence of a bimodal distribution of the jet apparent speed. Ballistic and non-ballistic components are found to coexist in the jet. Superluminal motions in the range of 5-21 c were measured in 11 distinct components. We estimated the physical jet parameters with the minimum Lorentz factor of 10.2 and Doppler factors in the range of 10.2-20.4 (component C5). The coincidence in time of the component's ejection and flares supports the idea that, at least in PKS 1749+096, ejection of new jet components is connected with major outbursts in flux density. For the best-traced component (C5) we found that the flux density decays rapidly as it travels downstream the jet, accompanied by a steepening of its spectra, which argues in favor of a contribution of inverse Compton cooling. These properties make PKS 1749+096 a suitable target for an intensive monitoring to decipher the variability phenomenon of BL Lac objects. Figure A.1 and Tables A.1, A.2 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Micro-arcsecond structure in blazar PKS 1257-326

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, Jeffrey; Bignall, Hayley; Ellingsen, Simon; Fuhrmann, Lars; Godfrey, Leith; Shabala, Stanislav; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Savolainen, Tuomas

    2013-04-01

    Using the wide bandwidth provided by the CABB system, we can investigate the structure and evolution of an ultracompact radio jet and its interaction with the surrounding medium of the AGN with micro-arcsecond scale resolution. Our proposed technique uses auto- and cross-correlation analysis of light curves showing interstellar scintillation to determine the frequency dependent jet structure. We propose to continue monitoring the intra-hour variable quasar PKS 1257-326 over the next semester as the direction of the scintillation velocity changes, thus obtaining ‘slices’ through the ISS pattern in multiple different directions (analogous to Earth Rotation Synthesis). We also propose to observe simultaneously at higher frequencies (switching between bands every 15-20 minutes) to investigate the properties of scintillation above 10 GHz, which are not well studied. We will measure the frequency dependence of the ‘core shift’ and angular size of the source between 4.5 and 20 GHz.

  9. Micro-arcsecond structure in blazar PKS 1257-326

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, Jeffrey; Bignall, Hayley; Ellingsen, Simon; Fuhrmann, Lars; Godfrey, Leith; Shabala, Stanislav; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Savolainen, Tuomas

    2013-10-01

    Using the wide bandwidth provided by the CABB system, we wish to continue investigating structure and evolution of an ultracompact radio jet and its interaction with the surrounding medium of the AGN with micro-arcsecond scale resolution. In addition we wish to observe at higher and lower frequencies to investigate the behaviour of high frequency scintillation and the transition from weak to strong scattering regimes. Our proposed technique uses auto- and cross-correlation analysis of light curves showing interstellar scintillation to determine the frequency dependent jet structure. The monitoring of the intra-hour variable quasar PKS 1257-326 allows us to obtain ‘slices’ through the ISS pattern in multiple different directions (analogous to Earth Rotation Synthesis). We will measure the frequency dependence of the ‘core shift’ and angular size of the source between 1 and 20 GHz.

  10. Time delay in the Einstein ring PKS 1830-211

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Ommen, T. D.; Jones, D. L.; Preston, R. A.; Jauncey, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    We present radio observations of the gravitational lens PKS 1830-211 at 8.4 and 15 GHz acquired using the Very Large Array. The observations were made over a 13 month period. Significant flux density changes over this period provide strong constraints on the time delay between the two lensed images and suffest a value of 44 +/- 9 days. This offers new direct evidence that this source is indeed a gravitational lens. The lens distance is dependent upon the model chosen, but reasonable limits on the mass of the lensing galaxy suggest that it is unlikely to be at a redshift less than a few tenths, and may well be significantly more distant.

  11. The variability analysis of PKS 2155-304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.; Lin, R. G.

    2000-03-01

    In this paper, the post-1977 photometric observations of PKS 2155-304 are compiled and used to discuss the variation periodicity. Largest amplitude variations (Delta U = 1m.5; Delta B = 1m.65; Delta V = 1m.85 ; Delta R = 1m.25; Delta I = 1m.14 ) and color indices ((B-V) = 0.30+/- 0.06; (U-B) = -0.72+/- 0.08; (B-R) = 0.62+/- 0.07; (V-R) = 0.32+/- 0.04) are found. The Jurkevich's method and DCF (Discrete Correlation Function) method indicate possible periods of 4.16-years and 7.0-years in the V light curve.

  12. Simultaneous Multiwavelength Observations of PKS 2155-304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, M. A.; Miller, H. R.; Marshall, K.; Ryle, W. T.; Aller, H.; Aller, M.; Wagner, S.

    2005-12-01

    The TeV blazar PKS 2155-304 was the subject of an intensive two week optical and infrared observing campaign in August 2004 at the CTIO 0.9m telescope. During this time, simultaneous X-ray data from RXTE was also obtained. Over the course of these observations, two large flares occurred at these wavelengths. In the weeks following the CTIO campaign, more flux increases were observed at X-ray, optical, and radio wavelengths. We present an analysis of the relative sizes, shapes, and time delays of the various flares in order to constrain various models for blazar physics (e.g. shock in jet, accelerating or decelerating jet) assuming a synchrotron self-Compton model for the production of X-ray and higher energy emission. MAO, HRM, KM, and WTR are supported in part by the Program for Extragalactic Astronomy's Research Program Enhancement funds from GSU.

  13. Variability in blazars: clues from PKS 2155-304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Ramesh; Piran, Tsvi

    2012-02-01

    Rapid variability on a time-scale much faster than the light-crossing time of the central supermassive black hole has been seen in TeV emission from the blazar PKS 2155-304. The most plausible explanation for this puzzling observation is that the radiating fluid in the relativistic jet is divided into a large number of subregions which move in random directions with relative Lorentz factors ?. The random motions introduce new relativistic effects, over and above those due to the overall mean bulk Lorentz factor Γb of the jet. We consider two versions of this 'jets in a jet' model. In the first, the 'subjets' model, stationary regions in the mean jet frame emit relativistic subjets that produce the observed radiation. The variability time-scale is determined by the size of the subregions in the mean jet frame. This model, which is loosely based on magnetic reconnection, has great difficulty explaining the observations in PKS 2155-304. In the alternate 'turbulence' model, various subregions move relativistically in random directions and the variability time-scale is determined by the size of these regions in their own comoving frames. This model fits the data much more comfortably. Details such as what generates the turbulent motion, how particles are heated, and what the radiation process is, remain to be worked out. We consider collisions between TeV photons and soft photons and find that, in both the subjets and turbulence models, the mean bulk Lorentz factor Γb of the jet needs to be >25 to avoid the pair catastrophe.

  14. A New Estimate of Hubble's Constant From The Gravitational Lens PKS 1830-211

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D.; Meier, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Einstein ring gravitational lens PKS 1830-211 consistents of two bright, milliarcsecond-scale radio components separated by 1 arcsec and connected by a fainter ring of radio emission (Rao and Subrahmanyan 1988; Jauncey et al. 1991).

  15. Renewed Gamma-Ray Emission from the blazar PKS 1510-089 Detected by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munar-Adrover, P.; Pittori, C.; Bulgarelli, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Verrecchia, F.; Piano, G.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Tavani, M.; Vercellone, S.; Minervini, G.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-09-01

    AGILE is currently detecting enhanced gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a source which position is consistent with the blazar PKS 1510-089. (the last activity of this source was reported in ATel #9350).

  16. How we broke the BOWS watermark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craver, Scott; Atakli, Idris; Yu, Jun

    2007-02-01

    From December 2005 to March of 2006, the Break Our Watermarking System (BOWS) contest challenged researchers to break an image watermark of unknown design. The attacked images had to possess a minimum quality level of 30 dB PSNR, and the winners would be those of highest average quality over three images. Our research team won this challenge, employing the strategy of reverse-engineering the watermark before any attempts to attack it in earnest. We determined the frequency transform, sub-band, and an exploitable quirk in the detector that made it sensitive to noise spikes. Of interest is our overall methodology of reverse-engineering through severe false alarms, and we introduce a new concept, "superrobustness," which despite its positive name is a security flaw.

  17. Decay of the cometary bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, M. K.; Dryer, M.

    1985-12-01

    Cooling processes will weaken the bow shock that is expected to form when the solar wind plasma encounters a gassy comet. As the supersonic wind penetrates the comet's outer coma, accreting freshly ionized cometary atoms and molecules, it needs a shock to adjust to the inner subsonic conditions. The cometary ions, implanted in the plasma stream, are accelerated by the associated fields and take up much of the decrease in streaming energy. The subsonic flow in comets is distinguished by strong cooling, effected primarily through ion-molecule reactions between the energetic implanted ions and the neutral gas coma. It is argued here that such cooling can cause complete decay of the shock's flanks, as probed by the International Cometary Explorer spacecraft at comet Giacobini-Zinner.

  18. Radiographic characteristics of lower-extremity bowing in children.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Jugesh I; Grissom, Leslie E; Harcke, H Theodore

    2003-01-01

    Lower-extremity bowing is common in infants and children and can result from a variety of conditions. At radiography, developmental bowing shows varus angulation centered at the knee, "metaphyseal beaking," thickening of the medial tibial cortices, and tilted ankle joints. Tibia vara (Blount disease) demonstrates genu varum and depression of the proximal tibia medially. Congenital bowing manifests as posteromedial bowing with cortical thickening along the concavity of the curvature and, in some cases, diaphyseal broadening. In rickets, radiographic changes occur primarily at sites of rapid growth and are predominantly metaphyseal, with widening of the zone of provisional calcification. Achondroplasia is characterized by shortening and thickening of the long bones with metaphyseal flaring and cupping. In neurofibromatosis, there may be anterolateral bowing of the tibia, and there is often focal narrowing and intramedullary sclerosis or cystic change at the apex of the angulation. The tibia is typically involved at the junction of the middle and distal thirds. Osteogenesis imperfecta demonstrates bowing from softening due to osteoporosis and multiple fractures and typically involves the entire skeleton. In camptomelic dysplasia, lower-extremity bowing is associated with a short trunk, short limbs, and deficiencies in pelvic bone development. Recognition of these pathologic conditions is important for differentiating those that will resolve spontaneously from those that require surgery or other treatment. PMID:12853662

  19. Optimization of bow shape for a non ballast water ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van He, Ngo; Ikeda, Yoshiho

    2013-09-01

    In this research, a commercial CFD code "Fluent" was applied to optimization of bulbous bow shape for a non ballast water ships (NBS). The ship was developed at the Laboratory of the authors in Osaka Prefecture University, Japan. At first, accuracy of the CFD code was validated by comparing the CFD results with experimental results at towing tank of Osaka Prefecture University. In the optimizing process, the resistances acting on ships in calm water and in regular head waves were defined as the object function. Following features of bulbous bow shapes were considered as design parameters: volume of bulbous bow, height of its volume center, angle of bow bottom, and length of bulbous bow. When referring to the computed results given by the CFD like resistance, pressure and wave pattern made by ships in calm water and in waves, an optimal bow shape for ships was discovered by comparing the results in the series of bow shapes. In the computation on waves, the ship is in fully captured condition because shorter waves, λ/ L pp <0.6, are assumed.

  20. Suprathermal Electrons at Saturn's Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, A.; Sulaiman, A. H.; Sergis, N.; Stawarz, L.; Fujimoto, M.; Coates, A. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-07-01

    The leading explanation for the origin of galactic cosmic rays is particle acceleration at the shocks surrounding young supernova remnants (SNRs), although crucial aspects of the acceleration process are unclear. The similar collisionless plasma shocks frequently encountered by spacecraft in the solar wind are generally far weaker (lower Mach number) than these SNR shocks. However, the Cassini spacecraft has shown that the shock standing in the solar wind sunward of Saturn (Saturn's bow shock) can occasionally reach this high-Mach number astrophysical regime. In this regime Cassini has provided the first in situ evidence for electron acceleration under quasi-parallel upstream magnetic conditions. Here we present the full picture of suprathermal electrons at Saturn's bow shock revealed by Cassini. The downstream thermal electron distribution is resolved in all data taken by the low-energy electron detector (CAPS-ELS, <28 keV) during shock crossings, but the higher energy channels were at (or close to) background. The high-energy electron detector (MIMI-LEMMS, >18 keV) measured a suprathermal electron signature at 31 of 508 crossings, where typically only the lowest energy channels (<100 keV) were above background. We show that these results are consistent with the theory in which the “injection” of thermal electrons into an acceleration process involves interaction with whistler waves at the shock front, and becomes possible for all upstream magnetic field orientations at high Mach numbers like those of the strong shocks around young SNRs. A future dedicated study will analyze the rare crossings with evidence for relativistic electrons (up to ˜1 MeV).

  1. PksS from Bacillus subtilis is a cytochrome P450 involved in bacillaene metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Reddick, Jason J. . E-mail: jjreddic@uncg.edu; Antolak, Stephanie A.; Raner, Gregory M.

    2007-06-22

    As part of the pksX gene cluster of Bacillus subtilis strain 168, pksS has been preliminarily annotated as a cytochrome P450 homolog that hydroxylates the polyketide product of this cluster, which was recently shown to be involved in the biosynthesis of bacillaene and dihydrobacillaene. Here we report that there is a frame-shift error in the reported sequence for pksS, and that we have successfully cloned, overexpressed, and purified the protein encoded by the corrected sequence. By utilizing electronic absorption spectrophotometry, we have observed that the ferrous CO complex of PksS absorbs maximally near 450 nm, which confirms the annotation that this protein is a cytochrome P450. We have also established a cell-free system derived from crude cytosolic B. subtilis protein extracts which provides reductase activity essential to sustaining the putative catalytic cycle of PksS. Using LC-MS analysis we have collected data which suggests that the substrate for PksS is dihydrobacillaene.

  2. Suprathermal ions observed upstream of the Venus bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, K. R.; Mccomas, D. J.; Russell, C. T.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    Suprathermal ions with arrival directions quite distinct from those of the solar wind have been detected upstream of the Venus bow shock. The possibility that these events could be caused by instrumental or spacecraft effects or that they could be either solar wind disturbances, planetary pickup ions, or suprethermal ions upstream of the Venus bow shock is examined. It is concluded that they are consistent with upstream suprathermal ions associated with the bow shock that are observed downstream from the points of intersection of their extrapolated trajectories with the shock.

  3. Structural changes in cuticles on violin bow hair caused by wear.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    A bow with horse tail hair is used to play the violin. New and worn-out bow hairs were observed by atomic force microscopy. The cuticles of the new bow hair were already damaged by bleach and delipidation, however the worn-out bow hairs were much more damaged and broken off by force, which relates to wearing out. PMID:20139598

  4. Laser vibrometry measurements of vibration and sound fields of a bowed violin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gren, Per; Tatar, Kourosh; Granström, Jan; Molin, N.-E.; Jansson, Erik V.

    2006-04-01

    Laser vibrometry measurements on a bowed violin are performed. A rotating disc apparatus, acting as a violin bow, is developed. It produces a continuous, long, repeatable, multi-frequency sound from the instrument that imitates the real bow-string interaction for a 'very long bow'. What mainly differs is that the back and forward motion of the real bow is replaced by the rotating motion with constant velocity of the disc and constant bowing force (bowing pressure). This procedure is repeatable. It is long lasting and allows laser vibrometry techniques to be used, which measure forced vibrations by bowing at all excited frequencies simultaneously. A chain of interacting parts of the played violin is studied: the string, the bridge and the plates as well as the emitted sound field. A description of the mechanics and the sound production of the bowed violin is given, i.e. the production chain from the bowed string to the produced tone.

  5. 15. Detail, northeast facade, operator's bow window and tower, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail, northeast facade, operator's bow window and tower, showing knee braces carried on stone ancons used to support eaves, view to northwest, 90mm lens. - Southern Pacific Depot, 559 El Camino Real, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  6. 17. DECK ABOVE CO'S STATEROOM, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW AT DECK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DECK ABOVE CO'S STATEROOM, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW AT DECK ABOVE PILOT HOUSE. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  7. 18. DECK ABOVE PILOT HOUSE, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW, SHOWING DETAIL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DECK ABOVE PILOT HOUSE, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW, SHOWING DETAIL, OF MAST. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  8. A comparative review of bow shocks and magnetopauses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    Bow shock and magnetopauses formation is discussed. Plasma and magnetic field environments of all the planets from Mercury to Saturn were measured. It was found that all the planets have bow shocks and almost all have a magnetopause. Venus is the only planet with no measurable intrinsic magnetic field and the solar wind interacts directly with Venus' ionosphere. The bow shock characteristics depend on the changing solar wind conditions. The shape of a magnetopause or any obstacle to flow depends on the three dimensional pressure profile that it presents to the solar wind. Jupiter is unusual because of the considerable amount of plasma which is contained in its magnetosphere. Magnetopause boundaries in ecliptic plane projection are modelled by segments of ellipses, matched to straight lines for the magnetotool boundaries or parabolas. Specific properties of known planetary bow shocks and magnetopauses are reviewed.

  9. Analysis of the Giacobini-Zinner bow wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Bame, S. J.; Thomsen, M. F.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Richardson, I. G.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Coplan, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    The cometary bow wave of P/Giacobini-Zinner has been analyzed using the complete set of ICE field and particle observations to determine if it is a shock. Changes in the magnetic field and plasma flow velocities from upstream to downstream have been analyzed to determine the direction of the normal and the propagation velocity of the bow wave. The velocity has then been compared with the fast magnetosonic wave speed upstream to derive the Mach number and establish whether it is supersonic, i.e., a shock, or subsonic, i.e., a large amplitude wave. The various measurements have also been compared with values derived from a Rankine-Hugoniot analysis. The results indicate that, inbound, the bow wave is a shock with M = 1.5. Outbound, a subsonic Mach number is obtained, however, arguments are presented that the bow wave is also likely to be a shock at this location.

  10. 15. PORT SIDE OF FLYBRIDGE WING, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. PORT SIDE OF FLYBRIDGE WING, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW AT SHIP'S CONTROLS AND IN BACKGROUND IS COMPASS. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  11. Geology and sediment accumulation rates at Carrie Bow Cay, Belize

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Hudson, J. Harold; Halley, Robert B.; Lidz, Barbara H.; Robbin, Daniel M.; Macintyre, Ian G.

    1982-01-01

    Two other rotary cores were drilled landward of the reef crest. One was drilled on the reef flat to a depth of 8.8 m, and the other was drilled on the southwest tip of Carrie Bow Cay to a depth of 17.7 m. Both cores encountered essentially uncemented carbonate reef sands with some coral rubble. Of the four rotary cores, only the Carrie Bow Cay core encountered Pleistocene bedrock. Radiocarbon dating of a large head of Siderastrea siderea, growing on bedrock from the Carrie Bow Cay core at a depth of 15.04 m below sea level, gave an age of 6960±110 years. The leached calcitic coralline bedrock, at a depth of 15.7 m below sea level in the Carrie Bow Cay core, contained root marks, and iron staining indicative of subaerial exposure.

  12. 6. VIEW OF BOW OF VESSEL FROM STARBOARD SIDE, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF BOW OF VESSEL FROM STARBOARD SIDE, SHOWING DOCKING CREW PREPARING TO REMOVE FOREFOOT FROM VESSEL'S STEM IN ORDER TO DRAW VESSEL OFF LIFT DOCK - Bugeye "Louise Travers", Intersection of Routes 2 & 4, Solomons, Calvert County, MD

  13. 19. DETAIL VIEW OF SKIFF BOW WITH OAK STEM AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. DETAIL VIEW OF SKIFF BOW WITH OAK STEM AND FRAMES PLANKED IN CEDAR USING COPPER CLINCH NAILS. TRANSOM OF SECOND SKIFF CAN BE SEEN BACKGROUND. - Lowell's Boat Shop, 459 Main Street, Amesbury, Essex County, MA

  14. 3. VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING BOW END OF VESSEL 37, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING BOW END OF VESSEL 37, STERN OF VESSEL 38 WITH COLLAPSING LIVING QUARTERS TO RIGHT Susan Kardas, photographer, November 1984 - Shooters Island, Ships Graveyard, Vessel No. 37, Newark Bay, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  15. DETAIL VIEW, WINDOW BOW IN EAST WALL. (NOTE THE OPENING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW, WINDOW BOW IN EAST WALL. (NOTE THE OPENING FOR THE CRYPTOPORTICUS TO THE BOW’S RIGHT. THIS EXTERIOR FEATURE EXTENDS BENEATH THE NORTH TERRACE - The Woodlands, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. Mercury's bow shock and foreshock waves observed by Messenger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, X.; Le, G.; Boardsen, S.; Chi, P.; Slavin, J. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2013-09-01

    The region upstream from a planetary bow shock is a natural plasma laboratory containing a variety of wave particle phenomena. The study of foreshocks other than the Earth's is important for extending our understanding of collisionless shocks and foreshock physics since the bow shock strength varies with heliocentric distance from the Sun, and the sizes of the bow shocks are different at different planets. Mercury's bow shock is unique in our solar system as it is produced by moderate Mach number and low plasma beta solar wind blowing over a small magnetized body with a predominately radial interplanetary magnetic field. We use Messenger high resolution (20 samples per second) magnetic field data to study Mercury's bow shock structure, and the characteristics of ultra low frequency waves observed at the foreshock. Bow shock profiles depend on the upstream Mach number, on shock geometry with respect to the upstream magnetic field, and on the plasma beta. Mercury's bow shock is weaker than Earth's with a Mach number MA ˜ 3, and is 10 times smaller. Thus, a more laminar shock is expected and a less complex foreshock may develop. A preliminary study has shown the existence of at least three types of waves: 1) whistler waves at frequencies near 2 Hz; 2) waves with frequencies ~ 0.1 Hz; 3) fluctuations with broad spectral peaks centered at ~ 0.6 Hz. Whistler waves propagate at angles up to 30 degrees, and lower frequency waves are more parallel propagating. We investigate wave properties such as polarization, ellipticity and compressibility. We also discuss wave origin and evolution. While whistler waves may be generated at the bow shock, the origin of lower frequency waves can be attributed to local generation by kinetic ion-ion instabilities. Due to the small scale size of Mercury's foreshock it is possible that waves suffer less steepening than at Earth.

  17. 76. The Silver Bow County Courthouse, 19101912, at West Granite ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. The Silver Bow County Courthouse, 1910-1912, at West Granite and Montana Streets, was designed by Link and Haire. The building has a dressed sandstone foundation, brick walls, and sandstone trim, parapet and columns. It was used as a barracks for the State militia when the city was placed under martial law following the dynamiting of the Old Miners' Union Hall in September, 1914. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  18. Thermo-plastic analysis of a bowed sodium pump shaft

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, E.O.

    1989-03-01

    A hollow sodium pump shaft was found to have a residual bow sufficient to cause unacceptable vibrations. Investigations suggested that the bow was caused by a sodium overfill event while the pump was shut down and the shaft was not turning. A rising sodium level with natural convection effects could result in local heating of the shaft. Even though the shaft may be essentially free, a local one-sided thermal loading may cause thermal stresses and plastic stains sufficient to give a residual bow when the thermal load is removed. A series of elastic-plastic analyses were carried out to assess the likelihood of the proposed mechanism's causing the residual bow. A special purpose computer program modelled the shaft as a Bernoulli beam. Isotropic hardening was evaluated by successive approximation. For each case studied, a loading sequence was followed by an assumed elastic unloading step, and the thermal loading zone was assumed small compared to the shaft length. These simplifying assumptions allowed parameterization of several variables--yield stress, thermal loading magnitude, extent of the heated zone around the shaft circumference, temperature distribution around the circumference, and shaft unrestrained/restrained conditions. Although the magnitude of the residual bow is not centered with the solution using mean parameters of this study, it is possible that a one-sided combination of parameter values did exist and that such a condition caused the bow under the proposed mechanism. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Evaluation of Gravity Wave Effects on Bow Echo Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams-Selin, R.; Johnson, R. H.

    2012-12-01

    A numerical simulation of the 13 March 2003 bow echo over Oklahoma is used to evaluate bow echo development and its relationship with gravity wave generation. The research is also directed at an explanation of recent observations of surface pressure surges ahead of convective lines prior to the bowing process. Multiple fast-moving n = 1 gravity waves are generated in association with fluctuations in the first vertical mode of heating in the convective line, and each wave modifies the pre-system environment. The surface impacts of four such waves are observed in Oklahoma Mesonet data during this case. A slower gravity wave is also produced in the simulation, which is responsible for the pre-bowing pressure surge in the model. This gravity wave is generated by an increase in low-level microphysical cooling associated with strengthened rear-to-front flow and low-level downdrafts shortly before bowing. The low-level upward vertical motion associated with this wave, in conjunction with higher-frequency gravity waves generated by the multicellularity of the convective line, increases the immediate pre-system CAPE by approximately 250 J kg-1. Statistical methods are used to evaluate the significance of each vertical mode within the microphysical heating profile at the time of the pressure surge. The contribution of each microphysical process to the overall profile, particularly that of cooling by melting and evaporation, is also examined in an attempt to connect the processes generating the slower gravity wave with those producing bow echo development.

  20. 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Models of Betelgeuse's Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, S.; Mackey, J.; Langer, N.

    2013-05-01

    Betelgeuse, the bright red supergiant (RSG) in Orion, is a runaway star. Its supersonic motion through the interstellar medium has resulted in the formation of a bow shock, a cometary structure pointing in the direction of motion. We present the first 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the formation and evolution of Betelgeuse's bow shock. We show that the bow shock morphology depends substantially on the growth timescale for Rayleigh-Taylor versus Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. We discuss our models in light of the recent Herschel, GALEX and VLA observations. If the mass in the bow shock shell is low (~few × 10-3 M⊙), as seems to be implied by the AKARI and Herschel observations, then Betelgeuse's bow shock is very young and is unlikely to have reached a steady state. The circular, smooth bow shock shell is consistent with this conclusion. We further discuss the implications of our results, in particular, the possibility that Betelgeuse may have only recently entered the RSG phase.

  1. Coordination of bowing and fingering in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Baader, Andreas P; Kazennikov, Oleg; Wiesendanger, Mario

    2005-05-01

    Playing string instruments implies motor skills including asymmetrical interlimb coordination. How special is musical skill as compared to other bimanually coordinated, non-musical skillful performances? We succeeded for the first time to measure quantitatively bimanual coordination in violinists playing repeatedly a simple tone sequence. A motion analysis system was used to record finger and bow trajectories for assessing the temporal structure of finger-press, finger-lift (left hand), and bow stroke reversals (right arm). The main results were: (1) fingering consisted of serial and parallel (anticipatory) mechanisms; (2) synchronization between finger and bow actions varied from -12 ms to 60 ms, but these 'errors' were not perceived. The results suggest that (1) bow-finger synchronization varied by about 50 ms from perfect simultaneity, but without impairing auditory perception; (2) the temporal structure depends on a number of combinatorial mechanisms of bowing and fingering. These basic mechanisms were observed in all players, including all amateurs. The successful biomechanical measures of fingering and bowing open a vast practical field of assessing motor skills. Thus, objective assessment of larger groups of string players with varying musical proficiency, or of professional string players developing movement disorders, may be helpful in music education. PMID:15820650

  2. Linker Flexibility Facilitates Module Exchange in Fungal Hybrid PKS-NRPS Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Maria Lund; Isbrandt, Thomas; Petersen, Lene Maj; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2016-01-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) each give rise to a vast array of complex bioactive molecules with further complexity added by the existence of natural PKS-NRPS fusions. Rational genetic engineering for the production of natural product derivatives is desirable for the purpose of incorporating new functionalities into pre-existing molecules, or for optimization of known bioactivities. We sought to expand the range of natural product diversity by combining modules of PKS-NRPS hybrids from different hosts, hereby producing novel synthetic natural products. We succeeded in the construction of a functional cross-species chimeric PKS-NRPS expressed in Aspergillus nidulans. Module swapping of the two PKS-NRPS natural hybrids CcsA from Aspergillus clavatus involved in the biosynthesis of cytochalasin E and related Syn2 from rice plant pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae lead to production of novel hybrid products, demonstrating that the rational re-design of these fungal natural product enzymes is feasible. We also report the structure of four novel pseudo pre-cytochalasin intermediates, niduclavin and niduporthin along with the chimeric compounds niduchimaeralin A and B, all indicating that PKS-NRPS activity alone is insufficient for proper assembly of the cytochalasin core structure. Future success in the field of biocombinatorial synthesis of hybrid polyketide-nonribosomal peptides relies on the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of inter-modular polyketide chain transfer. Therefore, we expressed several PKS-NRPS linker-modified variants. Intriguingly, the linker anatomy is less complex than expected, as these variants displayed great tolerance with regards to content and length, showing a hitherto unreported flexibility in PKS-NRPS hybrids, with great potential for synthetic biology-driven biocombinatorial chemistry. PMID:27551732

  3. Linker Flexibility Facilitates Module Exchange in Fungal Hybrid PKS-NRPS Engineering.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Maria Lund; Isbrandt, Thomas; Petersen, Lene Maj; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2016-01-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) each give rise to a vast array of complex bioactive molecules with further complexity added by the existence of natural PKS-NRPS fusions. Rational genetic engineering for the production of natural product derivatives is desirable for the purpose of incorporating new functionalities into pre-existing molecules, or for optimization of known bioactivities. We sought to expand the range of natural product diversity by combining modules of PKS-NRPS hybrids from different hosts, hereby producing novel synthetic natural products. We succeeded in the construction of a functional cross-species chimeric PKS-NRPS expressed in Aspergillus nidulans. Module swapping of the two PKS-NRPS natural hybrids CcsA from Aspergillus clavatus involved in the biosynthesis of cytochalasin E and related Syn2 from rice plant pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae lead to production of novel hybrid products, demonstrating that the rational re-design of these fungal natural product enzymes is feasible. We also report the structure of four novel pseudo pre-cytochalasin intermediates, niduclavin and niduporthin along with the chimeric compounds niduchimaeralin A and B, all indicating that PKS-NRPS activity alone is insufficient for proper assembly of the cytochalasin core structure. Future success in the field of biocombinatorial synthesis of hybrid polyketide-nonribosomal peptides relies on the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of inter-modular polyketide chain transfer. Therefore, we expressed several PKS-NRPS linker-modified variants. Intriguingly, the linker anatomy is less complex than expected, as these variants displayed great tolerance with regards to content and length, showing a hitherto unreported flexibility in PKS-NRPS hybrids, with great potential for synthetic biology-driven biocombinatorial chemistry. PMID:27551732

  4. The cluster-scale environment of PKS 2155-304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, E. P.; Fumagalli, M.; Decarli, R.; Fanidakis, N.

    2016-01-01

    PKS 2155-304 is one of the brightest extragalactic source in the X-ray and EUV bands, and is a prototype for the BL Lac class of objects. In this paper, we investigate the large-scale environment of this source using new multi-object as well as long-slit spectroscopy, together with archival spectra and optical images. We find clear evidence of a modest overdensity of galaxies at z = 0.116 10 ± 0.000 06, consistent with previous determinations of the BL Lac redshift. The galaxy group has a radial velocity dispersion of 250^{+80}_{-40} km s-1 and a virial radius of 0.22 Mpc, yielding a role-of-thumb estimate of the virial mass of Mvir ˜ 1.5 × 1013 M⊙, i.e. one order of magnitude less than that observed in similar objects. This result hints towards a relatively wide diversity in the environmental properties of BL Lac objects.

  5. Coordinated Multiwavelength Observations of PKS 0528+134 in Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Markus; Palma, N.

    2011-01-01

    We report results of an intensive multiwavelength campaign on the prominent high-redshift (z = 2.06) gamma-ray bright blazar PKS 0528+134 in September - October 2009. The campaign was centered on four 30 ksec pointings with XMM-Newton, supplemented with ground-based optical (MDM, Perkins) and radio (UMRAO, Medicina, Metsaehovi, Noto, SMA) observations as well as long-term X-ray monitoring with RXTE and gamma-ray monitoring by Fermi. We find significant variability on 1 day time scales in the optical regime, accompanied by a weak redder-when-brighter trend. X-ray variability is found on longer ( 1 week) time scales, while the Fermi light curve shows no evidence for variability, neither in flux nor spectral index. We constructed four simultaneous spectral energy distributions, which can all be fit satisfactorily with a one-zone leptonic jet model. This work was supported by NASA through XMM-Newton Guest Observer Grant NNX09AV45G.

  6. Micro-arcsecond stucture in blazar PKS 1257-326

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, Jeffrey; Bignall, Hayley; Ellingsen, Simon; Fuhrmann, Lars; Godfrey, Leith; Shabala, Stanislav; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Savolainen, Tuomas

    2012-10-01

    We propose to monitor the intra-hour variable scintillating blazar PKS 1257-326, using the wide bandwidth provided by the CABB system, to investigate the structure and evolution of an ultracompact radio jet, with micro-arcsecond scale resolution. This probes within ~100 Schwarzschild radii of the 10^9 solar mass black hole in this quasar at redshift z=1.256. An earlier study of the frequency-dependent structure has shown evidence of properties that are inconsistent with standard models of a conical jet. Additionally, earlier (pre-CABB) observations showed evidence of changes in source opacity on microarcsecond scales, correlated with total flux density and spectral index variations. Regular observations with the CABB system will allow detailed investigation of the jet physics, and the construction of a model of the microarcsecond-scale frequency-dependent structure that can be compared against larger milli-arcsecond scale structure and intrinsic flux density changes. The novel technique we propose achieves resolution more than an order of magnitude better than VLBI, with only a 6km array. Rapid scintillators have been known to ‘switch off’, making observing as soon as possible imperative.

  7. Modeling Linear and Cyclic PKS Intermediates through Atom Replacement

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanistic details of many polyketide synthases (PKSs) remain elusive due to the instability of transient intermediates that are not accessible via conventional methods. Here we report an atom replacement strategy that enables the rapid preparation of polyketone surrogates by selective atom replacement, thereby providing key substrate mimetics for detailed mechanistic evaluations. Polyketone mimetics are positioned on the actinorhodin acyl carrier protein (actACP) to probe the underpinnings of substrate association upon nascent chain elongation and processivity. Protein NMR is used to visualize substrate interaction with the actACP, where a tetraketide substrate is shown not to bind within the protein, while heptaketide and octaketide substrates show strong association between helix II and IV. To examine the later cyclization stages, we extended this strategy to prepare stabilized cyclic intermediates and evaluate their binding by the actACP. Elongated monocyclic mimics show much longer residence time within actACP than shortened analogs. Taken together, these observations suggest ACP-substrate association occurs both before and after ketoreductase action upon the fully elongated polyketone, indicating a key role played by the ACP within PKS timing and processivity. These atom replacement mimetics offer new tools to study protein and substrate interactions and are applicable to a wide variety of PKSs. PMID:25406716

  8. The Polyketide Synthase Gene pks4 of Trichoderma reesei Provides Pigmentation and Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova, Lea; Knox, Benjamin P.; Kubicek, Christian P.; Baker, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Species of the fungal genus Trichoderma (Hypocreales, Ascomycota) are well-known for their production of various secondary metabolites. Nonribosomal peptides and polyketides represent a major portion of these products. In a recent phylogenomic investigation of Trichoderma polyketide synthase (PKS)-encoding genes, the pks4 from T. reesei was shown to be an orthologue of pigment-forming PKSs involved in synthesis of aurofusarin and bikaverin in Fusarium spp. In this study, we show that deletion of this gene in T. reesei results in loss of green conidial pigmentation and in pigmentation alteration of teleomorph structures. It also has an impact on conidial cell wall stability and the antagonistic abilities of T. reesei against other fungi, including formation of inhibitory metabolites. In addition, deletion of pks4 significantly influences the expression of other PKS-encoding genes of T. reesei. To our knowledge, this is the first indication that a low-molecular-weight pigment-forming PKS is involved in defense, mechanical stability, and stress resistance in fungi. PMID:24036343

  9. Involvement of both PKS and NRPS in antibacterial activity in Lysobacter enzymogenes OH11

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Du, Liangcheng; Liu, Fengquan; Xu, Feifei; Hu, Baishi; Venturi, Vittorio; Qian, Guoliang

    2014-01-01

    Polyketides and nonribosomal peptides represent two large families of natural products (NPs) with diverse structures and important functions. They are synthesized by polyketide synthase (PKS) and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), respectively. Lysobacter enzymogenes is emerging as a novel biocontrol agent against pathogens of crop plants and a new source of bioactive NPs, such as antibacterial antibiotic WAP-8294A2 and antifungal antibiotic HSAF. Genome survey of strain OH11, a Chinese L. enzymogenes isolate, detected four novel PKS, NRPS or hybrid gene clusters, designed as cluster A to D. We further individually mutated five genes (PKS or NRPS) located in these four gene clusters, and showed that a PKS gene in cluster A and an NRPS gene in cluster D were involved in the antibacterial activity via a WAP-8294A2 dependent way. The data also showed that none of the five genes was associated with antifungal activity and the regulation of HSAF biosynthesis. Our results reveal the unusual regulatory role of these PKS and NRPS genes that were discovered from genome mining in L. enzymogenes. PMID:24801439

  10. Post-PKS Tailoring Steps of the Spiramycin Macrolactone Ring in Streptomyces ambofaciens

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hoang-Chuong; Darbon, Emmanuelle; Thai, Robert; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Spiramycins are clinically important 16-member macrolide antibiotics produced by Streptomyces ambofaciens. Biosynthetic studies have established that the earliest lactonic intermediate in spiramycin biosynthesis, the macrolactone platenolide I, is synthesized by a type I modular polyketide synthase (PKS). Platenolide I then undergoes a series of post-PKS tailoring reactions yielding the final products, spiramycins I, II, and III. We recently characterized the post-PKS glycosylation steps of spiramycin biosynthesis in S. ambofaciens. We showed that three glycosyltransferases, Srm5, Srm29, and Srm38, catalyze the successive attachment of the three carbohydrates mycaminose, forosamine, and mycarose, respectively, with the help of two auxiliary proteins, Srm6 and Srm28. However, the enzymes responsible for the other tailoring steps, namely, the C-19 methyl group oxidation, the C-9 keto group reduction, and the C-3 hydroxyl group acylation, as well as the timing of the post-PKS tailoring reactions, remained to be established. In this study, we show that Srm13, a cytochrome P450, catalyzes the oxidation of the C-19 methyl group into a formyl group and that Srm26 catalyzes the reduction of the C-9 keto group, and we propose a timeline for spiramycin-biosynthetic post-PKS tailoring reactions. PMID:23716060

  11. Biosynthesis of the mycotoxin tenuazonic acid by a fungal NRPS-PKS hybrid enzyme.

    PubMed

    Yun, Choong-Soo; Motoyama, Takayuki; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Tenuazonic acid (TeA) is a well-known mycotoxin produced by various plant pathogenic fungi. However, its biosynthetic gene has been unknown to date. Here we identify the TeA biosynthetic gene from Magnaporthe oryzae by finding two TeA-inducing conditions of a low-producing strain. We demonstrate that TeA is synthesized from isoleucine and acetoacetyl-coenzyme A by TeA synthetase 1 (TAS1). TAS1 is a unique non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase (NRPS-PKS) hybrid enzyme that begins with an NRPS module. In contrast to other NRPS/PKS hybrid enzymes, the PKS portion of TAS1 has only a ketosynthase (KS) domain and this domain is indispensable for TAS1 activity. Phylogenetic analysis classifies this KS domain as an independent clade close to type I PKS KS domain. We demonstrate that the TAS1 KS domain conducts the final cyclization step for TeA release. These results indicate that TAS1 is a unique type of NRPS-PKS hybrid enzyme. PMID:26503170

  12. Biosynthesis of the mycotoxin tenuazonic acid by a fungal NRPS–PKS hybrid enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Choong-Soo; Motoyama, Takayuki; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Tenuazonic acid (TeA) is a well-known mycotoxin produced by various plant pathogenic fungi. However, its biosynthetic gene has been unknown to date. Here we identify the TeA biosynthetic gene from Magnaporthe oryzae by finding two TeA-inducing conditions of a low-producing strain. We demonstrate that TeA is synthesized from isoleucine and acetoacetyl-coenzyme A by TeA synthetase 1 (TAS1). TAS1 is a unique non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase (NRPS–PKS) hybrid enzyme that begins with an NRPS module. In contrast to other NRPS/PKS hybrid enzymes, the PKS portion of TAS1 has only a ketosynthase (KS) domain and this domain is indispensable for TAS1 activity. Phylogenetic analysis classifies this KS domain as an independent clade close to type I PKS KS domain. We demonstrate that the TAS1 KS domain conducts the final cyclization step for TeA release. These results indicate that TAS1 is a unique type of NRPS–PKS hybrid enzyme. PMID:26503170

  13. IRC -10414: a bow-shock-producing red supergiant star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Menten, K. M.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Langer, N.; Mackey, J.; Kraus, A.; Meyer, D. M.-A.; Kamiński, T.

    2014-01-01

    Most runaway OB stars, like the majority of massive stars residing in their parent clusters, go through the red supergiant (RSG) phase during their lifetimes. Nonetheless, although many dozens of massive runaways were found to be associated with bow shocks, only two RSG bow-shock-producing stars, Betelgeuse and μ Cep, are known to date. In this paper, we report the discovery of an arc-like nebula around the late M-type star IRC -10414 using the SuperCOSMOS H-alpha Survey. Our spectroscopic follow-up of IRC -10414 with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) showed that it is a M7 supergiant, which supports previous claims on the RSG nature of this star based on observations of its maser emission. This was reinforced by our new radio- and (sub)millimetre-wavelength molecular line observations made with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment 12-m telescope and the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope, respectively. The SALT spectrum of the nebula indicates that its emission is the result of shock excitation. This finding along with the arc-like shape of the nebula and an estimate of the space velocity of IRC -10414 (≈70 ± 20 km s-1) imply the bow shock interpretation for the nebula. Thus, IRC -10414 represents the third case of a bow-shock-producing RSG and the first one with a bow shock visible at optical wavelengths. We discuss the smooth appearance of the bow shocks around IRC -10414 and Betelgeuse and propose that one of the necessary conditions for stability of bow shocks generated by RSGs is the ionization of the stellar wind. Possible ionization sources of the wind of IRC -10414 are proposed and discussed.

  14. Gravity wave and microphysical effects on bow echo development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selin, Rebecca Denise Adams

    Numerical simulations of the 13 March 2003 bow echo over Oklahoma are used to evaluate bow echo development and its relationship with gravity wave generation and microphysical heating profile variations. The first part of the research is directed at an explanation of recent observations of surface pressure surges ahead of convective lines prior to the bowing process. Multiple fast-moving n = 1 gravity waves are generated in association with fluctuations in the first vertical mode of heating in the convective line. The surface impacts of four such waves are observed in Oklahoma mesonet data during this case. A slower gravity wave is also produced in the simulation, which is responsible for the pre-bowing pressure surge in the model. This gravity wave is generated by an increase in low-level microphysical cooling associated with an increase in rear-to-front flow and low-level downdrafts shortly before bowing. The wave moves ahead of the convective line and is manifested at the surface by a positive pressure surge ahead of the convective line. The low-level upward vertical motion associated with this wave, in conjunction with higher-frequency gravity waves generated by the multicellularity of the convective line, increases the immediate pre-system CAPE by approximately 250 J/kg-1. Two-dimensional heating profiles from this idealized, full-physics bow echo simulation are placed as a constant heat source in another simulation without moisture, to evaluate what type of gravity waves are produced by a heating profile from a given instance in time. A one-dimensional vertical mean heating profile is calculated from each two-dimensional profile, and a statistical method is used to evaluate the significance of each vertical mode. A number of gravity waves are produced in the dry simulation despite their vertical mode lacking statistical significance in the one-dimensional profile, suggesting that horizontal variations in the heating profile are important to consider

  15. Gamma-Ray and Optical Oscillations in PKS 0537-441

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrinelli, A.; Covino, S.; Treves, A.

    2016-03-01

    We have considered the Fermi γ-ray light curve of the blazar PKS 0537-441 during a high state extending from 2008 August 10 to 2011 August 27. The periodogram exhibits a peak at T ˜ 280 days, with a significance of ˜99.7%. A peak of similar relevance at \\frac{1}{2}T is found in the optical light curves. Considering the entire duration of the Fermi light curve 2008-2015, no significant peak is revealed, while the optical one remains meaningful. Comparing with recent observations of PKS 2155-304 and PG 1553+113 it seems that month-year oscillations can characterize some blazars. Month-scale oscillations can also show up only during phases of enhanced or bursting emission, such as in the case of PKS 0537-441.

  16. Numerical simulations of Mach stem formation via intersecting bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, E. C.; Frank, A.; Hartigan, P.; Yirak, K.

    2015-12-01

    Hubble Space Telescope observations show bright knots of Hα emission within outflowing young stellar jets. Velocity variations in the flow create secondary bow shocks that may intersect and lead to enhanced emission. When the bow shocks intersect at or above a certain critical angle, a planar shock called a Mach stem is formed. These shocks could produce brighter Hα emission since the incoming flow to the Mach stem is parallel to the shock normal. In this paper we report first results of a study using 2-D numerical simulations designed to explore Mach stem formation at the intersection of bow shocks formed by hypersonic "bullets" or "clumps". Our 2-D simulations show how the bow shock shapes and intersection angles change as the adiabatic index γ changes. We show that the formation or lack of a Mach stem in our simulations is consistent with the steady-state Mach stem formation theory. Our ultimate goal, which is part of an ongoing research effort, is to characterize the physical and observational consequences of bow shock intersections including the formation of Mach stems.

  17. Swift follow-up of the gamma-ray flaring blazar PKS 0727-11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ammando, F.; Sokolovsky, K. V.

    2010-10-01

    Following the gamma-ray flare of the high redshift flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 0727-11 (also known as PKS J0730-1141 and 1FGL J0730.3-1141, Abdo et al. 2010, ApJS, 188, 405; z = 1.59, Zensus et al. 2002) detected by Fermi LAT on September 21, 2010 (ATel #2860), we performed two Swift target of opportunity observations on September 26 and 29. Swift/XRT data were taken in Photon Counting mode for a total exposure of about 9.0 ksec.

  18. PBS process optimization for bow-wake phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Y.; Lee, Y. I.; Kim, W. S.

    1996-07-01

    We have performed a design experiments to optimize our PBS Process related to bow_wake problem with critical Poly,Metal layers. In pattern dependent geometry as like dog_bone pattern or along feature edge of large clear window (swelling), it happened bow_wake(call:dog bone) phenomena of feature distorted in PBS resist processing. We have investigated the effects of independent factors as like resist thickness, high dose, developer concentration, process factors(bias, exhaust, humidity, flow), post overlapping step optimization, media dispense method through binary or uniary(flat fan spray) nozzle(Developer system A, B, C,). Finally, We have concluded that the bow_wake problems were related to the developer media dispense way by chemical dispense method (uniary, binary), media supply differences(pump, air pressured) and process optimization.

  19. Bow and stern waves triggered by the Moon's shadow boat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. Y.; Sun, Y. Y.; Kakinami, Y.; Chen, C. H.; Lin, C. H.; Tsai, H. F.

    2011-09-01

    It has been predicted that the Moon's shadow, the cooling region, sweeping over the Earth's atmosphere with a supersonic speed could trigger bow waves since 1970. The longest total solar eclipse within next hundred years occurring on 22 July 2009 sweeps over the Eastern Asia region during the noontime period. An analysis of the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is applied to study ionospheric TEC (total electron content) derived from ground-based GPS receivers in Taiwan and Japan. We not only find the feature of the predicted bow wave but also the stern wave on the equator side of the eclipse path, as well as the stern wake right behind the Moon's shadow boat. The bow and stern waves are formed by acoustic gravity waves of periods about 3 and/or 5 minutes traveling equatorward with a phase speed of about 100 m/s in the ionosphere.

  20. Omohyoid muscle transposition for the treatment of bowed vocal fold.

    PubMed

    Kojima, H; Hirano, S; Shoji, K; Omori, K; Honjo, I

    1996-07-01

    Imperfect glottal closure is usually the most important factor causing dysphonia in patients with bowing of the vocal folds. We have performed laryngeal framework surgery, which allows the medialization of the vocal folds from the outside without creating any scar tissue on them. Over the past 6 years, however, we encountered three cases with marked bowing of the vocal folds that could not be cured by laryngeal framework surgery alone. We used an open laryngeal procedure in these cases, even though such procedures had been considered contraindicated in the treatment of hoarseness. After performing a laryngofissure, we made a small pocket beneath the vocal fold mucosa at the anterior commissure. The superiorly based omohyoid muscle flap was then transposed into the mucosal pocket and sutured to the vocal process. This procedure should be considered an option in treating highly bowed vocal folds. PMID:8678430

  1. Foreshock ions observed behind the Martian bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, R. A.; Yamauchi, M.; Winningham, J. D.; Lundin, R.; Sharber, J. R.; Nilsson, H.; Coates, A. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Mars Express Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms experiment contains ion and electron instruments for conducting plasma measurements. On January 23, 2012, during in-bound travel of Mars Express in the southern hemisphere of Mars from its dawn side toward periapsis at dusk, the plasma instruments measured foreshock-like ion beams extending from outside the bow shock and into the magnetosphere, continuing to a distance of about a proton gyroradius from the bow shock. These ion beams were mostly protons, were observed to have energies greater than solar wind protons, and were not gyrating, in agreement with reflections of the solar wind proton beam. Furthermore, in the foreshock region the ion energy gradually decreased toward the magnetosheath, in agreement with an acceleration by outward-directed electric field in the bowshock. The observations also suggest that this electric field exists even inside the magnetosheath within the distance of a proton gyroradius from the bow shock.

  2. EVAPORATION OF ICY PLANETESIMALS DUE TO BOW SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Miura, Hitoshi; Nagasawa, Makiko; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2013-02-20

    We present the novel concept of evaporation of planetesimals as a result of bow shocks associated with planetesimals orbiting with supersonic velocities relative to the gas in a protoplanetary disk. We evaluate the evaporation rates of the planetesimals based on a simple model describing planetesimal heating and evaporation by the bow shock. We find that icy planetesimals with radius {approx}>100 km evaporate efficiently even outside the snow line in the stage of planetary oligarchic growth, where strong bow shocks are produced by gravitational perturbations from protoplanets. The obtained results suggest that the formation of gas giant planets is suppressed owing to insufficient accretion of icy planetesimals onto the protoplanet within the {approx}<5 AU disk region.

  3. Bow and Oblique Shock Formation in Soap Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ildoo; Mandre, Shreyas; Sane, Aakash

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, soap films have been exploited primarily to approximate two-dimensional flows while their three-dimensional character is relatively unattended. An example of the three-dimensional character of the flow in a soap film is the observed Marangoni shock wave when the flow speed exceeds the wave speed. In this study, we investigated the formation of bow and oblique shocks in soap films generated by wedges with different deflection angles. When the wedge deflection angle is small and the film flows fast, oblique shocks are observed. When the oblique shock cannot exists, bow shock is formed upstream the wedge. We characterized the oblique shock angle as a function of the wedge deflection angle and the flow speed, and we also present the criteria for transition between bow and oblique Marangoni shocks in soap films.

  4. Electrostatic waves in the bow shock at Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, S.L.; Coroniti, F.V.; Kennel, C.F.; Scarf, F.L. ); Bagenal, F. ); Lepping, R.P. ); Quest, K.B. ); Kurth, W.S. )

    1989-10-01

    Electrostatic emissions measured by the Voyager 2 plasma wave detector (PWS) during the inbound crossing of the Uranian bow shock are shown to differ in some aspects from the waves measured during bow shock crossings at Jupiter and Saturn. The wave amplitudes in the foot of the bow shock at Uranus are in general much lower than those detected at the other out planets due to the unusually enhanced solar wind ion temperature during the crossing. This reduces the effectiveness of wave-particle interactions in heating the incoming electrons. Strong wave emissions are observed in the shock ramp that possibly arise from currents producing a Buneman mode instability. Plasma instrument (PLS) and magnetometer (MAG) measurements reveal a complicated shock structure reminiscent of computer simulations of high-Mach number shocks when the effects of anomalous resistivity are reduced, and are consistent with high ion temperatures restricting the growth of electrostatic waves.

  5. [Forensic medical characteristics of the injuries inflicted by modern sport bow].

    PubMed

    Babakhanian, R V; Isakov, V D; Gusev, N Iu; Lebedev, V N

    2006-01-01

    Modern bows are classified as representatives of darts. Construction characteristics of bows and arrows, damage to experimental cotton targets from shooting distance of 1-15 m are described. PMID:16826840

  6. Total wrist arthrodesis using bowed crossed K-wires.

    PubMed

    Minami, A; Kato, H; Iwasaki, N

    1999-08-01

    A method of total wrist arthrodesis using a combination of autogenous iliac crest bone graft and "bowed" crossed Kirschner wires is described. The method of bowing the K-wires results in a compressive force on the iliac bone graft. This technique resulted in bony union of 22 wrists in 20 patients. The mean time to union was 12 weeks (range, 8-14 weeks). There were no major postoperative complications. The advantages of this technique are its simplicity, versatility, and reliability which mean that special internal fixation devices are not needed. PMID:10473146

  7. Transient bow shock around a cylinder in a supersonic dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, John K.; Merlino, Robert L.

    2013-07-15

    Visual observations of the formation of a bow shock in the transient supersonic flow of a dusty plasma incident on a biased cylinder are presented. The bow shock formed when the advancing front of a streaming dust cloud was reflected by the obstacle. After its formation, the density jump of the bow shock increased as it moved upstream of the obstacle. A physical picture for the formation of the electrohydrodynamic bow shock is discussed.

  8. On the interaction of the PKS B1358–113 radio galaxy with the A1836 cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, Ł.; Simionescu, A.; Hagino, K.; Szostek, A.; Kozieł-Wierzbowska, D.; Ostrowski, M.; Cheung, C. C.; Siemiginowska, A.; Harris, D. E.; Werner, N.; Madejski, G.; Begelman, M. C.

    2014-10-20

    Here we present the analysis of multifrequency data gathered for the Fanaroff-Riley type-II (FR II) radio galaxy PKS B1358-113, hosted in the brightest cluster galaxy in the center of A1836. The galaxy harbors one of the most massive black holes known to date, and our analysis of the acquired optical data reveals that this black hole is only weakly active, with a mass accretion rate M-dot {sub acc}∼2×10{sup −4} M-dot {sub Edd}∼0.02 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup –1}. Based on analysis of new Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations and archival radio data, and assuming the well-established model for the evolution of FR II radio galaxies, we derive the preferred range for the jet kinetic luminosity L {sub j} ∼ (1-6) × 10{sup –3} L {sub Edd} ∼ (0.5-3) × 10{sup 45} erg s{sup –1}. This is above the values implied by various scaling relations proposed for radio sources in galaxy clusters, being instead very close to the maximum jet power allowed for the given accretion rate. We also constrain the radio source lifetime as τ{sub j} ∼ 40-70 Myr, meaning the total amount of deposited jet energy E {sub tot} ∼ (2-8) × 10{sup 60} erg. We argue that approximately half of this energy goes into shock heating of the surrounding thermal gas, and the remaining 50% is deposited into the internal energy of the jet cavity. The detailed analysis of the X-ray data provides indication for the presence of a bow shock driven by the expanding radio lobes into the A1836 cluster environment. We derive the corresponding shock Mach number in the range M{sub sh}∼2--4, which is one of the highest claimed for clusters or groups of galaxies. This, together with the recently growing evidence that powerful FR II radio galaxies may not be uncommon in the centers of clusters at higher redshifts, supports the idea that jet-induced shock heating may indeed play an important role in shaping the properties of clusters, galaxy groups, and galaxies in formation. In this context, we speculate on

  9. On the Interaction of the PKS B1358-113 Radio Galaxy with the A1836 Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stawarz, Ł.; Szostek, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Siemiginowska, A.; Kozieł-Wierzbowska, D.; Werner, N.; Simionescu, A.; Madejski, G.; Begelman, M. C.; Harris, D. E.; Ostrowski, M.; Hagino, K.

    2014-10-01

    Here we present the analysis of multifrequency data gathered for the Fanaroff-Riley type-II (FR II) radio galaxy PKS B1358-113, hosted in the brightest cluster galaxy in the center of A1836. The galaxy harbors one of the most massive black holes known to date, and our analysis of the acquired optical data reveals that this black hole is only weakly active, with a mass accretion rate \\dot{M}_acc ˜ 2 × 10-4 \\dot{M}_Edd ˜ 0.02 M⊙ yr-1. Based on analysis of new Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations and archival radio data, and assuming the well-established model for the evolution of FR II radio galaxies, we derive the preferred range for the jet kinetic luminosity L j ~ (1-6) × 10-3 L Edd ~ (0.5-3) × 1045 erg s-1. This is above the values implied by various scaling relations proposed for radio sources in galaxy clusters, being instead very close to the maximum jet power allowed for the given accretion rate. We also constrain the radio source lifetime as τj ~ 40-70 Myr, meaning the total amount of deposited jet energy E tot ~ (2-8) × 1060 erg. We argue that approximately half of this energy goes into shock heating of the surrounding thermal gas, and the remaining 50% is deposited into the internal energy of the jet cavity. The detailed analysis of the X-ray data provides indication for the presence of a bow shock driven by the expanding radio lobes into the A1836 cluster environment. We derive the corresponding shock Mach number in the range {M}_sh ˜ 2{--}4, which is one of the highest claimed for clusters or groups of galaxies. This, together with the recently growing evidence that powerful FR II radio galaxies may not be uncommon in the centers of clusters at higher redshifts, supports the idea that jet-induced shock heating may indeed play an important role in shaping the properties of clusters, galaxy groups, and galaxies in formation. In this context, we speculate on a possible bias against detecting stronger jet-driven shocks in poorer environments

  10. 77 FR 19661 - City of Broken Bow, OK; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission City of Broken Bow, OK; Notice of Technical Conference March 21, 2012. Take.... Forest Service on November 16, 2007 for the Broken Bow Re-Regulation Dam Hydroelectric Project No. 12470.... Forest Service's Hochatown Office, Route 4, Broken Bow, OK 74728. All local, state, and federal...

  11. Multifrequency Monitoring of 3C 120, 3C 279, and PKS 1510--089

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorstad, S. G.; Marscher, A. P.; Aller, M. F.; Balonek, T. J.; Gomez, J.-L.; McHardy, I. M.; Terasranta, H.; Raiteri, C.; Tosti, G.

    2001-01-01

    We analyze contemporaneous X-ray, optical, and radio light curves of 3C 120, ABC 279, and PKS 1510-089 on timescales from a few to hundreds of days over a 3-5 year period. The results show the diverse connections between variability properties at different frequencies for different blazers.

  12. Localization-Delocalization in Bridged Mixed-Valence Metal Clusters: Vibronic PKS Model Revisited.

    PubMed

    Palii, A; Tsukerblat, B; Clemente-Juan, J M; Aldoshin, S M

    2015-09-24

    Here we describe a new vibronic model of mixed valence (MV) dimer inspired by the conventional Piepho, Krausz, and Schatz (PKS) approach. We attempted to partially lift the main restriction of the PKS model dealing with the vibronically independent moieties of a MV molecule. The refined version of the PKS model in which the bridging ligands are included deals with the three main interactions: electron transfer (integral t0) related to the high-symmetric ligand configuration, on-site vibronic coupling (parameter υ) arising from the modulation of the crystal field on the metal sites by the breathing displacements of their nearest ligand surroundings, and intercenter vibronic coupling (parameter ζ) describing the dependence of the electron transfer on ligand positions in the course of their breathing movement. We apply the modified model to the analysis of the adiabatic potentials and electronic density distributions in the minima of their lower sheets for the cases of one-electron MV dimer with long and short bridges and for the two-electron MV dimer exhibiting a valence disproportionation effect. The inclusion of the intercenter interaction in addition to the conventional PKS coupling is shown to produce a strong effect on the degree of localization in MV dimers and, in particular, on the assignments to the Robin and Day classes and on the conditions of stabilization of valence disproportionated states in bielectron transfer systems. PMID:26305153

  13. ATel 7495: Near Infrared flaring of the blazar FSRQ PKS 1510-089: MIRO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameer; Kaur, Navpreet; Ganesh, S.; Kumar, V.; Baliyan, K. S.

    2015-05-01

    FSRQ PKS1510-089 (quasar BZQJ1512-0905, cross identified with the gamma-ray source 2FGLJ1512.8-0906) was detected as VHE source (E > 100MeV) at 5-sigma level by AGILE (Bulgarelli et al Atel # 6366) during the observations integrated over July 13-Aug 2, 2014. ...

  14. Swift follow-up of the flaring NLSy1 PKS 1502+036

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ammando, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Following the gamma-ray flare of the radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 PKS 1502+036 detected by Fermi LAT on 2015 December 20 (ATel #8447), a Swift target of opportunity observation was performed on December 22. Swift/XRT data were taken in Photon Counting mode for a net exposure of about 3.0 ksec.

  15. X-Ray Absorption Toward the Einstein Ring Source PKS 1830-211

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, Smita; Nair, Sunita

    1997-01-01

    PKS 1830-211 is an unusually radio-loud gravitationally lensed quasar. In the radio spectrum, the system appears as two compact, dominant features surrounded by relatively extended radio emission that forms an Einstein ring. As the line of sight to it passes close to our Galactic center, PKS 1830-211 has not been detected in wave bands other than the radio and X-ray so far. Here we present X-ray data of PKS 1830-211 observed with ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter. The X-ray spectrum shows that absorption in excess of the Galactic contribution is highly likely, which at the redshift of the lensing galaxy (z(sub t)=0.886) corresponds to N(sub H)=3.5((sup 0.6)(sub -0.5))x10(exp 22) atoms sq cm. The effective optical extinction is large, A(sub V)(observed) is greater than or approximately 5.8. When corrected for this additional extinction, the two-point optical to X-ray slope alpha(sub ox) of PKS 1830-211 lies just within the observed range of quasars. It is argued here that both compact images must be covered by the X-ray absorber(s) that we infer to be the lensing galaxy (galaxies). The dust-to-gas ratio along the line of sight within the lensing galaxy is likely to be somewhat larger than for our Galaxy.

  16. pks5-recombination-mediated surface remodelling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis emergence.

    PubMed

    Boritsch, Eva C; Frigui, Wafa; Cascioferro, Alessandro; Malaga, Wladimir; Etienne, Gilles; Laval, Françoise; Pawlik, Alexandre; Le Chevalier, Fabien; Orgeur, Mickael; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Stinear, Timothy P; Supply, Philip; Majlessi, Laleh; Daffé, Mamadou; Guilhot, Christophe; Brosch, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major, globally spread, aerosol-transmitted human pathogen, thought to have evolved by clonal expansion from a Mycobacterium canettii-like progenitor. In contrast, extant M. canettii strains are rare, genetically diverse, and geographically restricted mycobacteria of only marginal epidemiological importance. Here, we show that the contrasting evolutionary success of these two groups is linked to loss of lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis and subsequent morphotype changes. Spontaneous smooth-to-rough M. canettii variants were found to be mutated in the polyketide-synthase-encoding pks5 locus and deficient in lipooligosaccharide synthesis, a phenotype restored by complementation. Importantly, these rough variants showed an altered host-pathogen interaction and increased virulence in cellular- and animal-infection models. In one variant, lipooligosaccharide deficiency occurred via homologous recombination between two pks5 genes and removal of the intervening acyltransferase-encoding gene. The resulting single pks5 configuration is similar to that fixed in M. tuberculosis, which is known to lack lipooligosaccharides. Our results suggest that pks5-recombination-mediated bacterial surface remodelling increased virulence, driving evolution from putative generalist mycobacteria towards professional pathogens of mammalian hosts. PMID:27571976

  17. 20. FROM DECK ABOVE CREW'S BERTHING, LOOKING TOWARDS THE BOW, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. FROM DECK ABOVE CREW'S BERTHING, LOOKING TOWARDS THE BOW, SHOWING WINCH FIDLY, STACK, AND UPPER DECKS. TO EITHER SIDE OF THE FIDLY IS A RHI (RIGID HULL INFLATABLE) AND CRANES. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE LUPINE, U.S. Coast Guard Station Rockland, east end of Tillson Avenue, Rockland, Knox County, ME

  18. 18. FROM DECK ABOVE CO'S STATEROOM, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW, AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. FROM DECK ABOVE CO'S STATEROOM, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW, AT DECK ABOVE PILOT HOUSE AND BEYOND IS MAST. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE LUPINE, U.S. Coast Guard Station Rockland, east end of Tillson Avenue, Rockland, Knox County, ME

  19. 41. AUGUST 9, 1948 BOW STARBOARD VIEW. TAKEN SOON AFTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. AUGUST 9, 1948 BOW STARBOARD VIEW. TAKEN SOON AFTER COMMISSIONING INTO U.S. COAST GUARD. NOTE ORIGINAL CRANE AND HOISTING MECHANISM AND TWO ADDITIONAL PILES (SPUDS) THAT DROPPED INTO THE MUD BOTTOM TO STEADY THE VESSEL WHILE WORKING. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE PINE, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, South Broad Street, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  20. 16. Detail, northeast facade, operator's bow window and tower; note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Detail, northeast facade, operator's bow window and tower; note condition of slates on tower skirt roof, missing section of gutter at left side of skirt roof, missing window panes; note also knee braces carried on masonry ancons; view to southwest, 90mm lens. - Southern Pacific Depot, 559 El Camino Real, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  1. 41. BOW SPACES (YN OFFICES, AYN OFFICES & DECK SHOP, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. BOW SPACES (YN OFFICES, AYN OFFICES & DECK SHOP, LAUNDRY & BOS'N STORES), WITH HATCH TO PAINT LOCKER AT LEFT. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  2. Threequarter view of port bow of White Holly (WLM 543) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Three-quarter view of port bow of White Holly (WLM 543) on left, White Sage (WLM 544) on right. Note differences between the two. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HOLLY, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  3. Application of Bow-tie methodology to improve patient safety.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Zhaleh; Ravaghi, Hamid; Abbasi, Mohsen; Delgoshaei, Bahram; Esfandiari, Somayeh

    2016-05-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to apply Bow-tie methodology, a proactive risk assessment technique based on systemic approach, for prospective analysis of the risks threatening patient safety in intensive care unit (ICU). Design/methodology/approach - Bow-tie methodology was used to manage clinical risks threatening patient safety by a multidisciplinary team in the ICU. The Bow-tie analysis was conducted on incidents related to high-alert medications, ventilator associated pneumonia, catheter-related blood stream infection, urinary tract infection, and unwanted extubation. Findings - In total, 48 potential adverse events were analysed. The causal factors were identified and classified into relevant categories. The number and effectiveness of existing preventive and protective barriers were examined for each potential adverse event. The adverse events were evaluated according to the risk criteria and a set of interventions were proposed with the aim of improving the existing barriers or implementing new barriers. A number of recommendations were implemented in the ICU, while considering their feasibility. Originality/value - The application of Bow-tie methodology led to practical recommendations to eliminate or control the hazards identified. It also contributed to better understanding of hazard prevention and protection required for safe operations in clinical settings. PMID:27142951

  4. 20. DECK ABOVE CREW'S BERTHING, LOOKING TOWARDS THE BOW, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DECK ABOVE CREW'S BERTHING, LOOKING TOWARDS THE BOW, SHOWING BOAT WINCH IN FOREGROUND, BEHIND IT IS THE FIDLY AND TO EITHER SIDE OF THE FIDLY IS A RHI (RIGID HULL INFLATABLE). - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  5. The Contemplative Bow in Teaching and Learning Pastoral Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppel, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    This article elucidates theoretical underpinnings for the use of one's self in the pastoral theological classroom. The contemplative bow is developed as a capacious metaphor to describe appropriate self use and its necessary importance in the teaching and learning of pastoral arts in a theological curriculum. Central to the argument is the…

  6. A Study of Uranus' Bow Shock Motions Using Langmuir Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, S.; Cairns, I. H.; Smith, C. W.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    During the Voyager 2 flyby of Uranus, strong electron plasma oscillations (Langmuir waves) were detected by the plasma wave instrument in the 1.78-kHz channel on January 23-24, 1986, prior to the inbound bow shock crossing. Langmuir waves are excited by energetic electrons streaming away from the bow shock. The goal of this work is to estimate the location and motion of Uranus' bow shock using Langmuir wave data, together with the spacecraft positions and the measured interplanetary magnetic field. The following three remote sensing analyses were performed: the basic remote sensing method, the lag time method, and the trace-back method. Because the interplanetary magnetic field was highly variable, the first analysis encountered difficulties in obtaining a realistic estimation of Uranus' bow shock motion. In the lag time method developed here, time lags due to the solar wind's finite convection speed are taken into account when calculating the shock's standoff distance. In the new trace-back method, limits on the standoff distance are obtained as a function of time by reconstructing electron paths. Most of the results produced by the latter two analyses are consistent with predictions based on the standard theoretical model and the measured solar wind plasma parameters. Differences between our calculations and the theoretical model are discussed.

  7. 36. VIEW OF VESSEL IN DRYDOCK FROM OFF PORT BOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. VIEW OF VESSEL IN DRYDOCK FROM OFF PORT BOW Note by Robert S. Douglas written on back of original print: 'ALABAMA taken in drydock in Mobile 1966 all 10 photos this size.' Original 5'x5' photograph taken by Robert S. Douglas, 1966 - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  8. 30. View of main deck at bow (looking aft from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. View of main deck at bow (looking aft from samson post, upper deck removed), showing anchor windlass (left foreground), head (right foregound), and forward deckhouse; weather canopy overhead not an original or permanent feature - Schooner WAWONA, 1018 Valley Street, Seattle, King County, WA

  9. Multispacecraft observations of diffuse ions upstream of Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, A.; Scholer, M.; Klecker, B.; Moebius, E.; Lucek, E.; Reme, H.

    We present observations of upstream ions at times of large separation distance between the Cluster spacecraft (~5000 km). On 18 February, 2003, during particulary quiet interplanetary conditions, the Cluster spacecraft were moving inbound through the foreshock region, where for more than 12 hours they simultaneously observed a continuous presence of a diffuse ion population. Using the HIA and CODIF sensors of the CIS plasma instrument onboard SC-1 and -3, we were able to directly measure the upstream ion density gradients in the energy range 10-32 keV in several energy bands. During this time period, the spacecraft distance from the bow shock parallel to the local magnetic field varies considerably (between 0 and 15 Re). The distance to the bow shock has been determined by using upstream magnetic field and plasma parameters and a bow shock model. We find up to 10 Re from the bow shock an exponential decrease of the upstream ion density, with an e-folding distance increasing from 3.1 to 5.6 Re at energies from 10 keV to 32 keV, respectively. From the e-folding distance the parallel diffusion coefficient and its energy dependence can be determined. At distances more than 10 Re the gradient is close to zero.

  10. Significance of torsion modes in bowed-string dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inacio, Octavio; Antunes, Jose; Henrique, Luis

    2002-11-01

    Several aspects of bowed-string dynamics are still inadequately clarified. The importance of torsion modes on the motion regimes is one such issue. Experiments involving torsion are difficult and most of the results available pertain to numerical simulations. The authors' approach differs from previous efforts in two main aspects: (1) the development of a computational method distinct from the wave-propagation approach pioneered by McIntyre, Schumacher, and Woodhouse and (2) an extensive and systematic analysis of the coupling between torsion and transverse motions is performed. The numerical simulations are based on a modal representation of the unconstrained string and a computational approach for friction that enables accurate representations of the stick-slip forces and of the string dynamics, in both time and space. Many relevant aspects of the bowed-string can be readily implemented, including string inharmonic behavior, finite bow-width, and torsion effects. Concerning the later aspect, a realistic range of the torsional to transverse wave-speed ratio is investigated, for several values of the bow velocity and normal force. Results suggest that torsion modes can effect both transient durations and steady state regimes, in particular when the above-mentioned ratio is <4. Gut strings should then be particularly prone to torsion effects.

  11. 25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON STATION IN GULF OF MEXICO WITH MOTOR BOAT TIED AT STERN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  12. 23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted 3-1/2'x5-5/8' postcard; image taken on station in Gulf of Mexico, c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  13. 4. DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH, ACROSS HULL NEAR BOW END, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH, ACROSS HULL NEAR BOW END, TOP OF FORWARD STARBOARD CARGO HATCH IN FOREGROUND, OPENING FOR PORT HATCH BEYOND Edward Larrabee, photographer, November 1984 - Shooters Island, Ships Graveyard, Vessel No. 54, Newark Bay, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  14. Detail of bow showing new frames and planking on starboard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of bow showing new frames and planking on starboard side. Note oak trunnels used to fasten the planks to the frames. Frames are oak; planking is yellow pine. - Schooner ERNESTINA, New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park State Pier, New Bedford, Bristol County, MA

  15. 76 FR 12016 - MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ...The MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Walden, Colorado. The committee is meeting as authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110- 343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of the meeting is to review new project proposals and update RAC members on the progress of previously approved...

  16. Starter unit flexibility for engineered product synthesis by the nonreducing polyketide synthase PksA.

    PubMed

    Huitt-Roehl, Callie R; Hill, Eric A; Adams, Martina M; Vagstad, Anna L; Li, Jesse W; Townsend, Craig A

    2015-06-19

    Nonreducing polyketide synthases (NR-PKSs) are unique among PKSs in their domain structure, notably including a starter unit:acyl-carrier protein (ACP) transacylase (SAT) domain that selects an acyl group as the primer for biosynthesis, most commonly acetyl-CoA from central metabolism. This clan of mega-enzymes resembles fatty acid synthases (FASs) by sharing both their central chain elongation steps and their capacity for iterative catalysis. In this mode of synthesis, catalytic domains involved in chain extension exhibit substrate plasticity to accommodate growing chains as small as two carbons to 20 or more. PksA is the NR-PKS central to the biosynthesis of the mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 whose SAT domain accepts an unusual hexanoyl starter from a dedicated yeast-like FAS. Explored in this paper is the ability of PksA to utilize a selection of potential starter units as substrates to initiate and sustain extension and cyclization to on-target, programmed polyketide synthesis. Most of these starter units were successfully accepted and properly processed by PksA to achieve biosynthesis of the predicted naphthopyrone product. Analysis of the on-target and derailment products revealed trends of tolerance by individual PksA domains to alternative starter units. In addition, natural and un-natural variants of the active site cysteine were examined and found to be capable of biosynthesis, suggesting possible direct loading of starter units onto the β-ketoacyl synthase (KS) domain. In light of the data assembled here, the predictable synthesis of unnatural products by NR-PKSs is more fully defined. PMID:25714897

  17. Double tibial osteotomy for bow leg patients: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Nazem, Khalilollah; Fouladi, Arash; Chinigarzadeh, Mozhdeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: High tibia osteotomy (HTO) is a common surgical operation for correction of genu varum deformity. In some patients, there are concurrent tibia vara and genu varum (bow leg). This study aimed to consider the possibility of better correction of bow leg deformity after double level tibial osteotomy (DLTO). Materials and Methods: A case series of 10 patients of genu varum in addition to tibia vara (bow leg) deformity who were referred to orthopedic ward of an academic hospital of Isfahan- Iran during 2009–2011 were included in the study. The mean age was 17.3 ± 3.1 years and all of them underwent DLTO. The results of treatment have been assessed based on clinical and radiological parameters before and after surgery. Results: The mean pre- and post operative values for Tibia-Femoral Angle, Medial Proximal of Tibia Angle (MPTA), and Lateral Distal of Tibia Angle (LDTA) were 18.13 ± 3.05° vs. 3.93 ± 0.66°, 79.13 ± 3.4° vs. 89.7 ± 1.8° and 96.40 ± 1.8° vs. 88.73 ± 3.0° respectively (P < 0.05). Improvement of all radiological parameters was meaningful. Seventy three percent of patients had normal mechanical axis of limb after surgery. The remaining cases had varus deformity in distal femur that was corrected by valgus supracondylar osteotomy in an additional operation. Limited range of motion (ROM) near knee and ankle was not observed. Conclusion: DLTO correct bow leg deformity in the point of alignment of limb and paralleling of knee and ankle joint more effectively. This method can be used in metabolic and congenital bow leg which deformities are present in throughout of the lower limb. We described this technique for the first time. PMID:24523802

  18. Static model of a violin bow: influence of camber and hair tension on mechanical behavior.

    PubMed

    Ablitzer, Frédéric; Dalmont, Jean-Pierre; Dauchez, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Experienced bow makers empirically know the influence of wood, tapering, and camber on the playing and tonal qualities of a bow. However, the way each parameter affects the bow mechanical behavior is not clearly established. An in-plane finite element model is developed to highlight the link between the adjustable design parameters and the mechanical behavior of a bow. This model takes into account geometric nonlinearity as well as compliance of the hair. Its validity is discussed from measurements on a bow. Results from simulations are compared to experimental results from previous studies. The consequences of adjusting hair tension and camber are then investigated. PMID:22280700

  19. Investigating the function of play bows in adult pet dogs (Canis lupus familiaris).

    PubMed

    Byosiere, Sarah-Elizabeth; Espinosa, Julia; Smuts, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Play bows are a common, highly stereotyped canine behavior widely considered to be a 'play signal,' but only one study has researched their function. Bekoff (1995) found that play bows function as behavioral modifiers to help clarify playful intent before or after easily misinterpretable behaviors, such as bite-shakes. To further examine the function of play bows, the current study analyzed five types of behaviors displayed by the bower and the partner immediately before and after a play bow during dyadic play. We found that play bows most often occurred after a brief pause in play. Synchronous behaviors by the bower and the partner, or vulnerable/escape behaviors by the bower (such as running away) and complementary offensive behaviors by the partner (such as chasing) occurred most often after the play bow. These results indicate that during adult dog dyadic play, play bows function to reinitiate play after a pause rather than to mediate offensive or ambiguous actions. PMID:26923096

  20. Insertional mutagenesis and characterization of a polyketide synthase gene (PKS1) required for melanin biosynthesis in Bipolaris oryzae.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Akihiro; Kihara, Junichi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Toshiko; Arase, Sakae; Honda, Yuichi

    2004-09-01

    A polyketide synthase gene named PKS1, involved in the melanin biosynthesis pathway of the phytopathogenic fungus Bipolaris oryzae, was isolated using restriction enzyme-mediated integration. Sequence analysis showed that the PKS1 encodes a putative protein that has 2155 amino acids and significant similarity to other fungal polyketide synthases. Targeted disruption of the PKS1 gene showed that it is necessary for melanin biosynthesis in B. oryzae. Northern blot analysis showed that PKS1 transcripts were specifically enhanced by near-ultraviolet radiation (300-400 nm) and that its temporal transcriptional patterns were similar to those of THR1 and SCD1 genes involved in the melanin biosynthesis pathway of B. oryzae. PMID:15336395

  1. pks63787, a Polyketide Synthase Gene Responsible for the Biosynthesis of Benzenoids in the Medicinal Mushroom Antrodia cinnamomea.

    PubMed

    Yu, Po-Wei; Chang, Ya-Chih; Liou, Ruey-Fen; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Tzean, Shean-Shong

    2016-06-24

    Antrodia cinnamomea, a unique resupinate basidiomycete endemic to Taiwan, has potent medicinal activities. The reddish basidiocarps and mycelia generally exhibit abundant metabolites and higher biological activity. To investigate the pigments of A. cinnamomea, polyketide synthase (PKS) genes were characterized based on its partially deciphered genome and the construction of a fosmid library. Furthermore, a gene disruption platform was established via protoplast transformation and homologous recombination. Of four putative polyketide synthase genes, pks63787 was selected and disrupted in the monokaryotic wild-type (wt) strain f101. Transformant Δpks63787 was deficient in the synthesis of several aromatic metabolites, including five benzenoids and two benzoquinone derivatives. Based on these results, a biosynthetic pathway for benzenoid derivatives was proposed. The pks63787 deletion mutant not only displayed a reduced red phenotype compared to the wt strain but also displayed less 1,1-biphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging activity. This finding suggests that PKS63787 is responsible for the biosynthesis of pigments and metabolites related to the antioxidant activity of A. cinnamomea. The present study focuses on the functional characterization of the PKS gene, the fluctuations of its profile of secondary metabolites, and interpretation of the biosynthesis of benzenoids. PMID:27227778

  2. The electron distribution function upstream from the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1987-01-01

    A general analytic theory for the distribution function of particles backstreaming from an arbitrary shock in a magnetized plasma is presented. Particle motions are shown to be restricted to two-dimensional planes. A general form for the source term describing upstreaming particles accelerated at the shock is presented along with explicit source terms for planar and parabolic shocks. The origin and form of the escape velocity cutoff for a shock in a magnetized plasma are discussed. The distribution function upstream of a finite planar shock and a parabolic shock in two dimensions is calculated, and an analytic approximation of the cutoff velocity at points in the upstream region is derived. The theory is then applied to the earth's bow shock, calculating distribution functions and the nature and spatial variation of the cutoff velocity. The theory for the particle distribution upstream of the bow shock is compared with the model of Filbert and Kellogg (1979).

  3. Energy band bowing parameter in MgZnO alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xu; Saito, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Tooru; Nishio, Mitsuhiro; Guo, Qixin; Nagaoka, Takashi; Arita, Makoto

    2015-07-13

    We report on bandgap bowing parameters for wurtzite and cubic MgZnO alloys from a study of high quality and single phase films in all Mg content range. The Mg contents in the MgZnO films were accurately determined using the energy dispersive spectrometer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The measurement of bandgap energies by examining the onset of inelastic energy loss in core-level atomic spectra from XPS is proved to be valid for determining the bandgap of MgZnO films. The dependence of the energy bandgap on Mg content is found to deviate downwards from linearity. Fitting of the bandgap data resulted in two bowing parameters of 2.01 ± 0.04 eV and 1.48 ± 0.11 eV corresponding to wurtzite and cubic MgZnO films, respectively.

  4. Traumatic bowing of the forearm bones in roller machine injuries.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ramesh K; Jain, Jitender K; Nagi, O N

    2004-11-01

    Slow bending forces created by rollers of rotating machines and acting on forearm bones can result in traumatic bowing even in adults. Four patients having this peculiar injury pattern in industrial accidents have been reported in this paper. Three of these had concomitant fractures of ipsilateral humerus. There were problems in appropriate reduction of the deformity due to the presence of associated overlying soft tissue injury. The literature has also been reviewed for this injury and 13 reports defining the injury profile, problems in realigning forearm bones and their subsequent maintenance have been described. The eventual outcome of such machine injuries has not been good due to persistence of some degrees of bowing and associated restriction of forearm rotation. PMID:15488519

  5. Solar wind modification upstream of the bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbář, J.; Němeček, Z.; Přech, L.; Šafránková, J.; Jelínek, K.

    2013-06-01

    A spacecraft configuration with two monitors near L1 and a fleet of the spacecraft orbiting in front of the bow shock brings a great opportunity to test the propagation techniques for the solar wind and the assumption on a negligible solar wind parameter evolution. We use multi-point observations of the THEMIS-ARTEMIS mission and compare them with data from the Wind solar wind monitor in order to estimate different factors influencing solar wind speed evolution. We have found a significant deceleration (up to 6%) of the solar wind close to the bow shock and the effect extends up to 30 RE from the Earth. It is controlled by the level of magnetic field fluctuations and by the flux of reflected and accelerated particles. We can conclude that the reflected particles not only excite waves of large amplitudes but also modify mean values of the solar wind speed measured in an unperturbed solar wind.

  6. MESSENGER Observations of Mercury's Bow Shock and Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Sarantos, M.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Baker, D. N.; Benna, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Gold, R. E.; Ho, G. C.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S. M.; Livi, S. A.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Raines, J. M.; Schriver, D.; Solomon, S. C.; Travnicek, P.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    MESSENGER'S 14 January 2008 encounter with Mercury will provide the first new observations of the solar wind interaction with this planet since the Mariner 10 flybys that took place over 30 years ago. The closest approach distance for this first MESSENGER flyby is targeted for an altitude of 200 km as compared with the 707 km and 327 km attained by Mariner 10 on 29 March 1974 and 16 March 1975, respectively. The locations of the bow shock and magnetopause boundaries observed by MESSENGER will be examined and compared against those found in the earlier Mariner 10 measurements and the predictions of theoretical models and numerical simulations. The structure of the magnetopause will be investigated for the presence of flux transfer events or other evidence of magnetic reconnection as will the more general implications of these new MESSENGER bow shock and magnetopause observations for the global solar wind interaction with Mercury.

  7. Face bow and articulator for planning orthognathic surgery: 2 articulator.

    PubMed

    Walker, Fraser; Ayoub, Ashraf F; Moos, Khursheed F; Barbenel, Joseph

    2008-10-01

    Patients who require orthognathic surgery may have asymmetry of the position of the temporomandibular joints relative to the maxilla, which is impossible to reproduce on the current semiadjustable articulators used for surgical planning. We describe a highly-adjustable spirit level orthognathic face bow that allows records to be made of patients with asymmetrical maxillae. The orthognathic articulator also allows the position of the condylar components of the articulator to be adjusted in three dimensions. The use of the new face bow and articulator made it possible to mount the dental casts of asymmetrical faces to reproduce their clinical appearance. The devices were evaluated by comparing the measurements of anatomical variables obtained from cephalometric radiographs with equivalent values obtained from the orthognathic articulator and casts mounted on the articulator. Although the measurements showed significant intersubject variability, the angle between the horizontal and maxillary occlusal plane, occlusal cant angle, and intercondylar widths, were not significantly different. PMID:18462853

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic and gasdynamic theories for planetary bow waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    A bow wave was previously observed in the solar wind upstream of each of the first six planets. The observed properties of these bow waves and the associated plasma flows are outlined, and those features identified that can be described by a continuum magnetohydrodynamic flow theory. An account of the fundamental concepts and current status of the magnetohydrodynamic and gas dynamic theories for solar wind flow past planetary bodies is provided. This includes a critical examination of: (1) the fundamental assumptions of the theories; (2) the various simplifying approximations introduced to obtain tractable mathematical problems; (3) the limitations they impose on the results; and (4) the relationship between the results of the simpler gas dynamic-frozen field theory and the more accurate but less completely worked out magnetohydrodynamic theory. Representative results of the various theories are presented and compared.

  9. Bow-corridor local integrated resource plan: Draft plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This plan presents the Government of Alberta's resource management policy for public lands and resources within the Bow Corridor. Resource potentials and opportunities for development are identified to assist in the economic progress of the province. The plan includes identification of its purpose and scope and the context in which it is presented; and resource management objectives and guidelines for ecological and aesthetic resources, fisheries, forests, historical resources, minerals, range land, settlement, tourism/recreation, water and watersheds and wildlife.

  10. Cold ions at the Martian bow shock - PHOBOS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E.; Lundin, R.; Koskinen, H.; Norberg, O.

    1993-04-01

    Measurements carried out by the plasma spectrometer ASPERA aboard the Phobos 2 spacecraft show that the Martian bow shock is characterized by a sudden increase of ionization of the neutral corona. It acts as a source of new ions that can strongly modify the process of ion heating behind the shock front. The loss of momentum of solar wind protons due to their interaction with exospheric ions may lead to an increase in the effective scale of the obstacle.

  11. The effect of bow stiffeners in nonrigid airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P

    1923-01-01

    It is now well known that all nonrigid airships constructed at the present time have bow stiffeners consisting of battens curved to the form of the envelope and designed to hold the nose of the ship in its true form despite the very large pressure which exists at the extreme forward point. The effect of the stiffeners is to reduce considerably the apparent pressure which has to be maintained inside the envelope in order to prevent the nose from caving in.

  12. Analysis of Bow Shock Oscillations Observed by the Cluster Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruparova, O.; Maksimovic, M.; Krupar, V.; Santolik, O.; Soucek, J.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.

    2014-12-01

    We present preliminary results of an analysis of multiple bow shock crossings lasting several hours that were observed by the four Cluster spacecraft during separation distances less than 1000 km. Using a simple timing method, we determined shock normal and velocity along this normal for a large number of events. We have calculated bow shock standoff distances assuming that the shock surface has a parabolic shape. These distances have been compared with the distances predicted by gas-dynamic models based on upstream plasma parameters measured by the ACE spacecraft. We analyze the oscillations of the standoff distance during multiple crossings in order to define a typical frequency of the bow shock motion and to find upstream origin of these fluctuations. We also compare the angles θBn (the angle between the magnetic field and the shock normal) retrieved by the timing method with the angles calculated by an iterative method based on Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. We have achieved a good agreement between these two techniques.

  13. Planetary Embryo Bow Shocks as a Mechanism for Chondrule Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Christopher R.; Boley, Aaron C.; Morris, Melissa A.

    2016-02-01

    We use radiation hydrodynamics with direct particle integration to explore the feasibility of chondrule formation in planetary embryo bow shocks. The calculations presented here are used to explore the consequences of a Mars-size planetary embryo traveling on a moderately excited orbit through the dusty, early environment of the solar system. The embryo’s eccentric orbit produces a range of supersonic relative velocities between the embryo and the circularly orbiting gas and dust, prompting the formation of bow shocks. Temporary atmospheres around these embryos, which can be created via volatile outgassing and gas capture from the surrounding nebula, can non-trivially affect thermal profiles of solids entering the shock. We explore the thermal environment of solids that traverse the bow shock at different impact radii, the effects that planetoid atmospheres have on shock morphologies, and the stripping efficiency of planetoidal atmospheres in the presence of high relative winds. Simulations are run using adiabatic and radiative conditions, with multiple treatments for the local opacities. Shock speeds of 5, 6, and 7 km s-1 are explored. We find that a high-mass atmosphere and inefficient radiative conditions can produce peak temperatures and cooling rates that are consistent with the constraints set by chondrule furnace studies. For most conditions, the derived cooling rates are potentially too high to be consistent with chondrule formation.

  14. Polarization of circumstellar bow shocks due to electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Manisha; Hoffman, J. L.; Neilson, H.; Ignace, R.

    2014-01-01

    Circumstellar material (CSM) provides a link between interacting supernovae and their massive progenitor stars. This CSM arises from stellar winds, outflows, or eruptions from a massive star before it explodes and can be detected around stars or supernovae with polarimetric observations. We use a Monte Carlo based radiative transfer code (SLIP) to investigate the polarization created by different models for the CSM surrounding a central source such as supernovae or massive stars. We vary parameters such as the shape, optical depth, temperature, and brightness of the CSM and compare the simulated flux and polarization behavior with observational data. We present results from new simulations that assume a bow shock shape for the CSM. Bow shocks are commonly observed around massive stars; this shape forms when a star moving more quickly than the speed of sound in the local interstellar medium emits a stellar wind that drives a shock wave into the ISM. Since a bow shock projects an aspherical shape onto the sky, light from the central source that scatters in the shock region becomes polarized. We present electron-scattering polarization maps for this geometry and discuss the behavior of observed polarization with viewing angle in the unresolved case.

  15. Bow shocks and magnetotails of Venus and Mars - A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Ong, M.; Luhmann, J. G.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Eroshenko, E.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the bow shock location and the structure of the magnetotail of Mars by the Phobos spacecraft and of Venus by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter reveal the solar wind interactions with these two planets to be quite similar. The subsolar bow shocks of both Venus and Mars lie at 1.47 planetary radii while at the terminator they are at 2.40 and 2.65 planetary radii, respectively. Both bow shocks have oval cross sections when viewed from the sun whose major axes are controlled by the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field. The tail lobes of both planets are similarly controlled by the IMF orientation. The strength of the solar/antisolar component of the magnetic field is 17 nT at Venus and 14 nT at Mars. The component perpendicular to the tail axis is about 1/2 the corresponding IMF component at Venus and 2 times this component at Mars. However, when these measurements are compared in terms of the distance down the tail at which each were taken, the data from the two planets are quite consistent. Hence both Venus and Mars have principally induced magnetospheres and magnetotails which stand off the solar wind flow.

  16. Global hybrid simulations: foreshock and bow shock morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Omidi, Nojan; Russell, Christopher

    The solar wind interaction with earth's magnetosphere is mediated by the formation of a bow shock. Ahead of this shock a foreshock forms. Global hybrid simulations have proven to be very useful to study these complex regions, where kinetic effects play a major role in dissipation process and largely affect the large scale dynamics of the foreshock-bow shock-magnetosheath system. In this work we use global hybrid simulations to study solar wind coupling with the magnetosphere for oblique (45° ) and radial IMF geometries. We find that the foreshock morphology changes drastically from one case to the other. We study ULF waves' properties, evolution, and their impact on the quasi-parallel shock. We also investigate differences in suprathermal ion distributions under the two geometries and relate this to wave origin. We find that under the radial geometry the foreshock is permeated also by density cavities that are not clear for the oblique interaction. We discuss the properties of these cavities and their impact on the quasi-parallel bow shock. We also relate simulation cavities to observations in earth's foreshock.

  17. High-frequency electrostatic waves near earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onsager, T. G.; Holzworth, R. H.; Koons, H. C.; Bauer, O. H.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Electrostatic wave measurements from the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorer Ion Release Module have been used to investigate the wave modes and their possible generation mechanisms in the earth's bow shock and magnetosheath. It is demonstrated that electrostatic waves are present in the bow shock and magnetosheath with frequencies above the maximum frequency for Doppler-shifted ion acoustic waves, yet below the plasma frequency. Waves in this frequency range are tentatively identified as electron beam mode waves. Data from 45 bow shock crossings are then used to investigate possible correlations between the electrostatic wave properties and the near-shock plasma parameters. The most significant relationships found are anticorrelations with Alfven Mach number and electron beta. Mechanisms which might produce electron beams in the shock and magnetosheath are discussed in terms of the correlation study results. These mechanisms include acceleration by the cross-shock electric field and by lower hybrid frequency waves. A magnetosheath 'time of flight' mechanism, in analogy to the electron foreshock region, is introduced as another possible beam generation mechanism.

  18. Bow hunter's syndrome secondary to bilateral dynamic vertebral artery compression.

    PubMed

    Healy, Andrew T; Lee, Bryan S; Walsh, Kevin; Bain, Mark D; Krishnaney, Ajit A

    2015-01-01

    Bow hunter's syndrome is a condition in which vertebrobasilar insufficiency is resultant from head rotation, clinically manifested by presyncopal sensation, syncope, dizziness, and nausea. It is usually diagnosed clinically, with supporting vascular imaging demonstrating an occluded or at the very least compromised unilateral vertebral artery, while the dominant vertebral artery remains patent in the neutral position. Dynamic imaging is utilized to confirm the rotational compression of the dominant vertebral artery. We present the rare case of a patient with typical Bow hunter's symptoms, bilaterally patent vertebral arteries on neutral imaging, and bilateral compromise with head rotation. Our patient underwent posterior decompression of the culprit atlanto-axial transverse foramen and subaxial cervical fusion, with resolution of his symptoms. Our patient exemplifies the possibility of bilateral dynamic vertebral artery occlusion. We show that Bow hunter's syndrome cannot be ruled out in the setting of bilaterally patent vertebral arteries on neutral imaging and that severe cervical spondylosis should impart further clinical suspicion of this unusual phenomenon. PMID:25070633

  19. Multifactorial induction of an orphan PKS-NRPS gene cluster in Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Gressler, Markus; Zaehle, Christoph; Scherlach, Kirstin; Hertweck, Christian; Brock, Matthias

    2011-02-25

    Mining the genome of the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus terreus revealed the presence of an orphan polyketide-nonribosomal-peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS) gene cluster. Induced expression of the transcriptional activator gene adjacent to the PKS-NRPS gene was not sufficient for the activation of the silent pathway. Monitoring gene expression, metabolic profiling, and using a lacZ reporter strain allowed for the systematic investigation of physiological conditions that eventually led to the discovery of isoflavipucine and dihydroisoflavipucine. Phytotoxin formation is only activated in the presence of certain amino acids, stimulated at alkaline pH, but strictly repressed in the presence of glucose. Global carbon catabolite repression by CreA cannot be abolished by positive-acting factors such as PacC and overrides the pathway activator. Gene inactivation and stable isotope labeling experiments unveiled the molecular basis for flavipucine/fruit rot toxin biosynthesis. PMID:21236704

  20. Optical quasi-periodic oscillation and color behavior of blazar PKS 2155-304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing-Kai; Zhao, Xiao-Yun; Wang, Chun-Xiao; Dai, Ben-Zhong

    2014-08-01

    PKS 2155-304 is a well studied BL Lac object in the southern sky. The historical optical data during different periods have been collected and compiled. Light curves spanning 35 yr have been constructed. The R-band light curve has been analyzed by means of three methods: the epoch folding method, the Jurkevich method and the discrete correlation function method. It is derived that there is an evident periodic component of 317 d (i.e. 0.87 yr) superposed on a long-term trend with large-amplitude variation in the light curve. The variability of this source is accompanied by a slight color variation, and the brightness and color index are correlated with each other. On a long-term time scale, PKS 2155-304 exhibits a tendency of bluer-when-brighter, which means the spectrum becomes flatter when the source brightens.

  1. PKS 2123-463: A Confirmed Gamma-ray Blazar at High Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAmmando, F.; Rau, A.; Schady, P.; Finke, J.; Orienti, M.; Greiner, J.; Kann, D. A.; Ojha, R.; Foley, A. R.; Stevens, J.; Blanchard, J. M.; Edwards, P. G.; Kadler, M.; Lovell, J. E. J.

    2012-01-01

    The flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 2123-463 was associated in the First Fermi-LAT source catalog with the gamma-ray source 1FGL J2126.1-4603, but when considering the full first two years of Fermi observations, no gamma-ray source at a position consistent with this FSRQ was detected, and thus PKS 2123-463 was not reported in the Second Fermi-LAT source catalog. On 2011 December 14 a gamma-ray source positionally consistent with PKS 2123-463 was detected in flaring activity by Fermi-LAT. This activity triggered radio-to-X-ray observations by the Swift, GROND, ATCA, Ceduna, and KAT-7 observatories. Results of the localization of the gamma-ray source over 41 months of Fermi-LAT operation are reported here in conjunction with the results of the analysis of radio, optical, UV and X-ray data collected soon after the gamma-ray flare. The strict spatial association with the lower energy counterpart together with a simultaneous increase of the activity in optical, UV, X-ray and gamma-ray bands led to a firm identification of the gamma-ray source with PKS 2123-463. A new photometric redshift has been estimated as z = 1.46 +/- 0.05 using GROND and Swift/UVOT observations, in rough agreement with the disputed spectroscopic redshift of z = 1.67. We fit the broadband spectral energy distribution with a synchrotron/external Compton model. We find that a thermal disk component is necessary to explain the optical/UV emis- sion detected by Swift/UVOT. This disk has a luminosity of 1.8x1046 erg s-1, and a fit to the disk emission assuming a Schwarzschild (i.e., nonrotating) black hole gives a mass of 2 x 109 M(solar mass). This is the first black hole mass estimate for this source.

  2. High radio fluxes of PKS2023-07 measured with RATAN-600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushkin, S. A.; Nizhelskij, N. A.; Tsybulev, P. G.

    2016-04-01

    After the AGILE detection the gamma-ray flare from the quasar PSK2023-07 (correctly PKS B2022-077) by Piano et al, ATel #8879 we carried out its observations with the RATAN-600 radio telescope SAO RAS. The measured flux densities are equal to 1.50, 1.96, 2.54 Jy at 4.8, 11.2, 21.7 GHz respectively on 1 Apr 2016.

  3. ATel draft: Fermi LAT detection of a new Gamma-ray Source PKS 2247-131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, S.

    2016-07-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed strong gamma-ray emission from a source positionally consistent with the radio source PKS 2247-131 with coordinates RA=342.4983854 deg, Dec=-12.8546736 deg (J2000; Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13). This source is not in any published LAT catalog and was not detected by AGILE or EGRET.

  4. The High-energy Continuum Emission of the Gamma-Ray Blazar PKS 0528+134

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Urry, C. Megan; Maraschi, L.; Ghisellini, G.; Mukherjee, R.; Pesce, Joseph E.; Wagner, S. J.; Wehrle, A. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Lin, Y. C.; VonMintigny, C.

    1997-01-01

    We present Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) observations of the gamma-ray blazar PKS 0528 + 134, obtained at two separate epochs in 1994 August and 1995 March. These data represent the first measurement of the X-ray continuum emission of this source in the medium-hard X-ray band. Both ASCA spectra are consistent with a single power law with photon index GAMMA approx. = 1.7-1.8 and column density N(sub H) approx. = 5 x 10(exp 21)/ sq cm, higher than Galactic. The X-ray flux increased by a factor of 4 in approx. 7 months without appreciable change of the spectral shape. During the lower state of 1994 August, PKS 0528 + 134 was observed simultaneously in the optical, X-rays, and at gamma-ray energies with Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). The gamma-ray intensity is the faintest detected thus far in the source, with a steep spectrum (GAMMA approx. = 2.7). The extrapolation of the X-ray continuum to the gamma-ray range requires a sharp spectral break at approx. 10(exp 22) Hz. We discuss the radio through gamma-ray spectral energy distribution of PKS 0528 + 134, comparing the low state of 1994 August with the flare state of 1993 March. We show that in PKS 0528 + 134, a non-negligible contribution from the external radiation field is present and that, although synchrotron self-Compton scenarios cannot be ruled out, inverse Compton upscattering of thermal seed photons may be the dominant cooling process for the production of the high-energy continuum in this blazar.

  5. The High-Energy Continuum Emission of the Gamma-Ray Blazar PKS 0528+134

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Urry, C. Megan; Maraschi, L.; Ghisellini, G.; Mukherjee, R.; Pesce, Joseph E.; Wagner, S. J.; Wehrle, A. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Lin, Y. C.

    1997-01-01

    We present Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) observations of the gamma-ray blazar PKS 0528 + 134, obtained at two separate epochs in 1994 August and 1995 March. These data represent the first measurement of the X-ray continuum emission of this source in the medium-hard X-ray band. Both ASCA spectra are consistent with a single power law with photon index GAMMA approximate 1.7-1.8 and column density N(sub H) approximately 5 x 10(exp 21) /sq cm, higher than Galactic. The X-ray flux increased by a factor of 4 in approximately 7 months without appreciable change of the spectral shape. During the lower state of 1994 August, PKS 0528 + 134 was observed simultaneously in the optical, X-rays, and at gamma-ray energies with EGRET. The gamma-ray intensity is the faintest detected thus far in the source, with a steep spectrum (GAMMA approximately 2.7). The extrapolation of the X-ray continuum to the gamma-ray range requires a sharp spectral break at approximately 10(exp 22) Hz. We discuss the radio through gamma-ray spectral energy distribution of PKS 0528 + 134, comparing the low state of 1994 August with the flare state of 1993 March. We show that in PKS 0528 + 134, a non-negligible contribution from the external radiation field is present and that, although synchrotron self-Compton scenarios cannot be ruled out, inverse Compton upscattering of thermal seed photons may be the dominant cooling process for the production of the high-energy continuum in this blazar.

  6. Neocarzinostatin naphthoate synthase: an unique iterative type I PKS from neocarzinostatin producer Streptomyces carzinostaticus.

    PubMed

    Sthapit, Basundhara; Oh, Tae-Jin; Lamichhane, Rajan; Liou, Kwangkyoung; Lee, Hei Chan; Kim, Chun-Gyu; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2004-05-21

    Enediyne antibiotics are known for their potent antitumor activities. One such enediyne, neocarzinostatin (NCS), consists of a 1:1 complex of non-peptide chromophore (1a), and peptide apoprotein. The structurally diverse non-peptide chromophore is responsible for its biological activity. One of its structural components, the naphthoic acid moiety (2,7-dihydroxy-5-methyl-1-naphthoic acid, 1d) is synthesized by a polyketide synthase (PKS) pathway through condensing six intact acetate units. The 5.45 kb iterative type I PKS, neocarzinostatin naphthoate synthase (NNS), responsible for naphthoic acid moiety biosynthesis, shares sequence homology with 6-methyl salicylic acid synthase of fungi and orsellinic acid synthases (AviM and CalO5) of Streptomyces origin. Cultures of S. lividans TK24 and S. coelicolor YU105 containing plasmids with NNS were able to produce 2-hydroxy-5-methyl-1-naphthoic acid (2a), a key intermediate of naphthoic acid moiety in NCS. In addition to 2a, a novel product, 2-hydroxy-5-hydroxymethyl-1-naphthoic acid (2d) was isolated. This is the first report of a bacterial iterative type I PKS from an enediyne producer which enables the biosynthesis of bicyclic aromatic compounds. PMID:15147895

  7. Color Variations of Two Blazars: BL Lac and PKS 0736+017

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, S. D.

    2002-12-01

    Multi-night campaigns to monitor sources for microvariability were undertaken in the summer of 1997 for BL Lac and in early 2002 for PKS 0736+017. BL Lac was observed at Rosemary Hill Observatory in Bronson, Florida and PKS 0736+017 was observed with the SARA telescope on Kitt Peak in Arizona. Both sources underwent dramatic flares and exhibited substantial microvariability. During each campaign, the source was observed alternately through V and R filters so that color variations could be monitored as well. The most commonly reported behavior for such objects is that they become redder when fainter. This is observed in the BL Lac data. These data do not indicate that the point source varies in color however. Instead, they support the notion that the underlying host galaxy contributes a larger fraction of the total flux when the source is faint than when it is bright. More unusual was the observation that PKS 0736+017 was observed to be redder when brighter. The data support the notion that the observed color variation may be related more to the nature of the variation (flaring, subsiding, or quiescent) than to the flux level.

  8. The X-ray view of the gamma-NLS1 galaxy PKS 2004-447

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreikenbohm, A.; Schulz, R.; Kadler, M.; Wilms, J.; Markowitz, A.; M"uller, C.; Ojha, R.; Ros, E.; Gehrels, N.; Mannheim, K.

    2014-07-01

    The five most enigmatic members of the class of narrow-line Seyfert1 galaxies are five objects which exhibit both, bright radio and gamma-ray emission (hereafter γ-NLS1s). This demonstrates the existence of powerful relativistic jets similar to blazars and radio galaxies but whether γ-NLS1s really define a distinct sub-class of active galaxies is still under debate. As the radio-loudest of all γ-NLS1s, PKS 2004-447 plays a key role in settling this debate. We scrutinize the radio and X-ray properties of PKS 2004: the TANAMI VLBI program finds a high brightness-temperature core and a one-sided parsec-scale jet while Swift and XMM-Newton observations reveal a moderately variable unobscured X-ray spectrum, which is dominated by a flat power-law component. Radio-quiet NLS1s often show a soft X-ray excess, but this feature is missing in two deep XMM-Newton observations of PKS 2004-447 in 2012. We compare our results to the other four known γ-NLS1: moderate flux variability is always observed, while only some exhibit additional weak spectral variability. A strong soft excess is found in only one object. The main difference among the five γ-NLS1 is their X-ray luminosity, which spans almost two orders of magnitude.

  9. Sinogram bow-tie filtering in FBP PET reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Abella, M; Vaquero, J J; Soto-Montenegro, M L; Lage, E; Desco, M

    2009-05-01

    Low-pass filtering of sinograms in the radial direction is the most common practice to limit noise amplification in filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction of positron emission tomography studies. Other filtering strategies have been proposed to prevent the loss in resolution due to low-pass radial filters, although results have been diverse. Using the well-known properties of the Fourier transform of a sinogram, the authors defined a binary mask that matches the expected shape of the support region in the Fourier domain of the sinogram ("bow tie"). This mask was smoothed by a convolution with a ten-point Gaussian kernel which not only avoids ringing but also introduces a pre-emphasis at low frequencies. A new filtering scheme for FBP is proposed, comprising this smoothed bow-tie filter combined with a standard radial filter and an axial filter. The authors compared the performance of the bow-tie filtering scheme with that of other previously reported methods: Standard radial filtering, angular filtering, and stackgram-domain filtering. All the quantitative data in the comparisons refer to a baseline reconstruction using a ramp filter only. When using the smallest size of the Gaussian kernel in the stackgram domain, the authors achieved a noise reduction of 33% at the cost of degrading radial and tangential resolutions (14.5% and 16%, respectively, for cubic interpolation). To reduce the noise by 30%, the angular filter produced a larger degradation of contrast (3%) and tangential resolution (46% at 10 mm from the center of the field of view) and showed noticeable artifacts in the form of circular blurring dependent on the distance to the center of the field of view. For a similar noise reduction (33%), the proposed bow-tie filtering scheme yielded optimum results in resolution (gain in radial resolution of 10%) and contrast (1% increase) when compared with any of the other filters alone. Experiments with rodent images showed noticeable image quality

  10. Dependence of sound characteristics on the bowing position in a violin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, YuJi; Kim, Young H.

    2014-12-01

    A quantitative analysis of violin sounds produced for different bowing positions over the full length of a violin string has been carried out. An automated bowing machine was employed in order to keep the bowing parameters constant. A 3-dimensional profile of the frequency spectrum was introduced in order to characterize the violin's sound. We found that the fundamental frequency did not change for different bowing positions, whereas the frequencies of the higher harmonics were different. Bowing the string at 30 mm from the bridge produced musical sounds. The middle of the string was confirmed to be a dead zone, as reported in previous works. In addition, the quarter position was also found to be a dead zone. Bowing the string 90 mm from the bridge dominantly produces a fundamental frequency of 864 Hz and its harmonics.

  11. A comparison of magnetic overshoots at the bow shocks of Mercury and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, A.; Slavin, J. A.; Dibraccio, G. A.; Sundberg, T.; Winslow, R. M.; Johnson, C. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2013-07-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft at Mercury and the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn provide us with orbiters around planets at more diverse heliocentric distances than ever before. The dramatically different solar wind conditions at these two planets should mean that Mercury's bow shock is considerably weaker (lower Mach numbers) than Saturn's bow shock. This is expected to produce different magnetic overshoot amplitudes at each bow shock, because the Relative Overshoot Amplitude (ROA) has been shown to increase with both fast magnetosonic Mach number and upstream plasma β. We qualitatively compare the parameter regimes of Mercury's and Saturn's bow shock by determining ROAs. We analyze 133 MESSENGER encounters with Mercury's bow shock and 90 Cassini encounters with Saturn's bow shock, all with a clear shock ramp. At five of the 133 Mercury bow shock encounters, there is no resolvable magnetic overshoot, whereas all Saturn bow shock encounters have a clear overshoot. We find that the ROA of Mercury's bow shock ranges from ~0 (no overshoot) to ~0.6, with a typical value of ~0.2. We find that the ROA of Saturn's bow shock ranges from ~0.2 to ~5, with a typical value of ~2. This clear ROA difference is consistent with the expected lower fast magnetosonic Mach number and lower upstream plasma β at Mercury's bow shock, and we suggest that it is very likely to be primarily caused by the different Mach numbers. This confirmed variation in bow shock parameter regime may produce a different solar wind-magnetosphere interaction at these two planets.

  12. Congenital anterolateral bowing of the tibia with ipsilateral polydactyly of the great toe.

    PubMed

    Kitoh, H; Nogami, H; Hattori, T

    1997-12-31

    We report on two cases of congenital unilateral anterolateral bowing and focal defect of the tibia associated with ipsilateral polydactyly of the great toe. Computed tomographic examination showed an unusual partial cleft of the tibia at the site of bowing. A long follow-up of one patient showed spontaneous resolution of the bowing without progression to pseudoarthrosis. These anomalies should be considered as a new entity related to the tibial developmental field. PMID:9415465

  13. Modelling Near-IR polarization to constrain stellar wind bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Ignace, R.; Shrestha, M.; Hoffman, J. L.; Mackey, J.

    2013-06-01

    Bow shocks formed from stellar winds are common phenomena observed about massive and intermediate-mass stars such as zeta Oph, Betelgeuse and delta Cep. These bow shocks provide information about the motion of the star, the stellar wind properties and the density of the ISM. Because bow shocks are asymmetric structures, they also present polarized light that is a function of their shape and density. We present a preliminary work modeling dust polarization from a Wilkin (1996) analytic bow shock model and explore how the polarization changes as a function of stellar wind properties.

  14. Asymmetries in the location of the Venus and Mars bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T.-L.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    An examination of observations of the position of the terminator bow shock at Venus and Mars shows that the terminator bow shock varies with the angle between the local bow shock normal and the upstream magnetic field. The part of the shock on the quasi-parallel side is closer to the planet than the part on the quasi-perpendicular side, a result which had been suggested by an earlier computer simulation by Thomas and Winske (1990). This bow shock asymmetry is observed to be larger at Mars than at Venus.

  15. A novel group of type I polyketide synthases (PKS) in animals and the complex phylogenomics of PKSs.

    PubMed

    Castoe, Todd A; Stephens, Tricia; Noonan, Brice P; Calestani, Cristina

    2007-05-01

    Type I polyketide synthases (PKSs), and related fatty acid synthases (FASs), represent a large group of proteins encoded by a diverse gene family that occurs in eubacteria and eukaryotes (mainly in fungi). Collectively, enzymes encoded by this gene family produce a wide array of polyketide compounds that encompass a broad spectrum of biological activity including antibiotic, antitumor, antifungal, immunosuppressive, and predator defense functional roles. We employed a phylogenomics approach to estimate relationships among members of this gene family from eubacterial and eukaryotic genomes. Our results suggest that some animal genomes (sea urchins, birds, and fish) possess a previously unidentified group of pks genes, in addition to possessing fas genes used in fatty acid metabolism. These pks genes in the chicken, fish, and sea urchin genomes do not appear to be closely related to any other animal or fungal genes, and instead are closely related to pks genes from the slime mold Dictyostelium and eubacteria. Continued accumulation of genome sequence data from diverse animal lineages is required to clarify whether the presence of these (non-fas) pks genes in animal genomes owes their origins to horizontal gene transfer (from eubacterial or Dictostelium genomes) or to more conventional patterns of vertical inheritance coupled with massive gene loss in several animal lineages. Additionally, results of our broad-scale phylogenetic analyses bolster the support for previous hypotheses of horizontal gene transfer of pks genes from bacterial to fungal and protozoan lineages. PMID:17207587

  16. Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Polyketide Synthase 11 (PKS11) Reveals Intermediates in the Synthesis of Methyl-branched Alkylpyrones*

    PubMed Central

    Gokulan, Kuppan; O'Leary, Seán E.; Russell, William K.; Russell, David H.; Lalgondar, Mallikarjun; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2013-01-01

    PKS11 is one of three type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although many PKSs in M. tuberculosis have been implicated in producing complex cell wall glycolipids, the biological function of PKS11 is unknown. PKS11 has previously been proposed to synthesize alkylpyrones from fatty acid substrates. We solved the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis PKS11 and found the overall fold to be similar to other type III PKSs. PKS11 has a deep hydrophobic tunnel proximal to the active site Cys-138 to accommodate substrates. We observed electron density in this tunnel from a co-purified molecule that was identified by mass spectrometry to be palmitate. Co-crystallization with malonyl-CoA (MCoA) or methylmalonyl-CoA (MMCoA) led to partial turnover of the substrate, resulting in trapped intermediates. Reconstitution of the reaction in solution confirmed that both co-factors are required for optimal activity, and kinetic analysis shows that MMCoA is incorporated first, then MCoA, followed by lactonization to produce methyl-branched alkylpyrones. PMID:23615910

  17. Function analysis of a new type I PKS-SAT domain by SAT-EAT domain replacement.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Y L; Wang, L H; Jiao, B H; Wang, S J; Fang, Y W; Liu, S

    2010-01-01

    The function of a new starter unit acyltransferase (SAT) domain SAT-EF080951 (GenBank accession number) encoded in a new type I polyketide synthase (PKS) gene cluster EF568935 (GenBank accession number) isolated for this study was analyzed by domain replacement with an extender unit AT (EAT) domain of avermectin PKS. It was shown that the SAT-EF080951 incorporated malonyl-CoA specifically in vivo, which contradicted the specificity that we had previously determined by substrate binding test in vitro. The result of this study indicates that type I PKS-SAT can alter its specificity in vivo and functions well in extender units and proved the feasibility of the SAT-EAT domain replacement in type I PKS. We propose that SAT-EAT replacement strategy could be a novel route for increasing the diversity of new polyketides combinatorially biosynthesized. The new type I PKS-SAT-EF080951 studied herein may be further employed for related studies on enzymology or combinatorial biosynthesis of polyketides. PMID:20391758

  18. An unusual case of pediatric bow hunter's stroke

    PubMed Central

    Anene-Maidoh, Tony I.; Vega, Rafael A.; Fautheree, Gregory L.; Reavey-Cantwell, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bow Hunter's syndrome/stroke is defined as symptomatic, vertebrobasilar insufficiency provoked by physiologic head rotation. It is a diagnostically challenging cause of posterior circulation stroke in children. While there have been prior reports of this rare disorder, we describe an exceptional case of pediatric Bow Hunter's stroke resulting from a near complete occlusion the right vertebral artery (VA) secondary to an anomalous spur emanating from the right occipital condyle. Surgical and endovascular options and approaches are also detailed herein. Case Description: A 16-year-old male presented with multiple posterior circulation ischemic strokes. A dynamic computerized tomography angiogram performed with the patient's head in a rotated position revealed a near complete occlusion of the V3 segment of the right VA from a bone spur arising from his occipital condyle. The spur caused a focal dissection of the distal right VA with associated thrombus. He was initially managed with a cervical collar, antiplatelet therapy with aspirin 81 mg and anticoagulation with coumadin (INR goal 2-3) for 3 months. Despite the management plan, he had a subsequent thromboembolic event and a right VA sacrifice with coil embolization was then performed. At the 3-month follow-up, the patient was doing well with no reports of any subsequent strokes. Conclusion: We report the first reported pediatric case of Bow Hunter's stroke due to dynamic right VA occlusion from an occipital condylar bone spur. The vascular compression from this spur led to a right VA dissection and thrombus formation and ultimately caused multiple posterior circulation thromboembolic strokes. Endovascular treatment options including vessel sacrifice should be considered in cases that have failed maximal medical management. PMID:24340230

  19. From the bow shock to the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, E. A.; Sedykh, P. A.

    We suggest a description of magnetospheric processes in the form of a model consisting of three blocks 1 Block of electric current generation in the bow shock where the solar wind energy converts to electric energy This current closes through the magnetosphere in the form of the dawn-dusk current The bow shock can be a sufficient source of power for supplying energy to substorm processes The direction of current behind the bow shock front depends on the sign of the IMF Bz-component Ponomarev et al 2000 2003 It is this current which sets convection in motion by an Ampere force Any change in external current through the magnetosphere causes a convection restructuring within a time on the order of the travel time of the magnetosonic wave from the magnetopause to the center of the system because the restructuring wave comes from both flanks 2 Block of gas pressure relief formation The combined action of convection and strong pitch-angle diffusion of electrons and protons is responsible for the formation of gas pressure distribution in the magnetosphere Kennel C F 1969 Ponomarev E A 1985 that is steady bulk currents The divergence of these bulk currents brings about a spatial distribution of field-aligned currents i e magnetospheric sources of ionospheric current systems The combined action leads also to the formation of particle precipitation regions in the form of an oval corresponding to the location of the auroral zone The nonstationary solution of this problem with time-dependent boundary conditions reproduces the

  20. On Stellar Wind Bow Shocks with External Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkin, Francis P.

    2016-06-01

    Stellar wind bow shocks have been seen driven by stars of many types, from O to AGB stars as well as pulsars. Recent simulations (e.g. van Marle et al. 2014) have considered the bubble created by a stellar wind of a stationary star in a region of constant magnetic field. By applying a thin-shell formalism, I consider the problem of a stellar wind from a star moving supersonically with respect to a magnetized medium. The properties of the resulting shell are derived, and limitations to the application of the resulting solution are discussed.

  1. Radial head dislocation with acute plastic bowing of the ulna.

    PubMed

    Sai, Shigaku; Fujii, Katsuyuki; Chino, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Junichi

    2005-01-01

    Five radial head dislocations with acute plastic bowing of the ulna in patients aged 6-12 years were reviewed. Closed reduction was successful in two, and open reduction was required in three patients in whom treatment was started more than 2 weeks after injury. In one child who presented 2 months after injury, realignment by osteotomy of the ulna as well as open reduction of the radial head was necessary. Follow-up evaluations at 6-24 months revealed good clinical outcomes in all patients. Awareness of this type of radial head dislocation is important to avoid delays in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:15666132

  2. Modal Analysis of Reflector Backed Hybrid Printed Bow Tie Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dhiraj K.; Pande, D. C.; Bhattacharya, A.

    A reflector-backed hybrid of bow tie and elliptical antenna was designed and developed for UWB radar applications like ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and through-wall imaging radar (TWIR). Radiation pattern bandwidth of the antenna is found to be lesser than measured impedance bandwidth of the antenna. This anomaly was analyzed using characteristics modes of the antenna. Method of moments (MOM) using RWG basis function was used to calculate impedance matrix at each spot; frequencies and eigencurrents found were used to establish the optimum bandwidth of the antenna.

  3. Power aspects of processes in the bow shock region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedykh, Pavel

    Bow shock is a powerful transformer of the solar wind kinetic energy into the gas dynamic and electromagnetic energy. The solar wind energy also feeds the ion acceleration process, the generation of waves in the region of bow shock, and the energy necessary to build up the foreshock. A jump of the magnetic field tangential component at front crossing means that the front carries an electric current. The solar wind kinetic energy partly transforms to gas kinetic and electromagnetic energy during its passage through the bow shock front. The transition layer (magnetosheath) can use part of this energy for accelerating of plasma, but can conversely spend part its kinetic energy on the electric power generation, which afterwards may be used by the magnetosphere. Thereby, transition layer can be both consumer (sink) and generator (source) of electric power depending upon special conditions. The direction of the current behind the bow shock front depends on the sign of the IMF B _{z}-component. It is this electric current which sets convection of plasma in motion. The process of current penetration into the magnetosphere is two-step. First, a polarization field is formed that penetrates layer-by-layer into the magnetosphere. More exactly, a pulse corresponding to this field penetrates into the plasma. Then, if the system is inhomogeneous, the flow may redistribute the pressure so that gradients appearing in the plasma induce an electric current. In power terms, this electric current is required to maintain convection in the inhomogeneous system. Any change in the external current through the magnetosphere causes a convection restructuring within a time on the order of travel time of the magnetosonic wave from the magnetopause to the center of the system, because the restructuring wave comes from both flanks. Using the expressions obtained in this paper for normal components of the electric current, the flow of matter brought into the magnetosphere can be estimated. A

  4. Correlation of bow shock plasma wave turbulence with solar wind parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, P.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The r.m.s. field strengths of electrostatic and electromagnetic turbulence in the earth's bow shock, measured in the frequency range 20 Hz to 200 kHz with IMP-6 satellite, are found to correlate with specific solar wind parameters measured upstream of the bow shock.

  5. Rare Etiology of Bow Hunter’s Syndrome and Systematic Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Vaibhav; Rawls, Ashley; Moore, Omar; Victorica, Benjamin; Khan, Sheema; Saravanapavan, Pradeepan; Midivelli, Sunitha; Raviraj, Prathap; Khanna, Anna; Bidari, Sharathchandra; Hedna, Vishnumurthy S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bow Hunter’s Syndrome is a mechanical occlusion of the vertebral artery which leads to a reduction in blood flow in posterior cerebral circulation resulting in transient reversible symptomatic vertebrobasilar insufficiency. CASE DESCRIPTION We present a case of Bow Hunter’s syndrome in a 53-year-old male that occurred after the patient underwent surgical correction of a proximal left subclavian artery aneurysm. Shortly after the surgery, the patient began to complain of transient visual changes, presyncopal spells, and dizziness upon turning his head to the left. A transcranial doppler ultrasound confirmed the diagnosis of Bow Hunter’s syndrome. SYSTEMIC REVIEW We analyzed the data on 153 patients with Bow Hunter’s syndrome from the literature. An osteophyte was the most common cause of vertebral artery occlusion, and left vertebral artery was more commonly involved in patients with Bow Hunter’s syndrome. Dynamic angiography was the definitive imaging modality to confirm the diagnosis, and surgery was most successful in alleviating symptoms. CONCLUSION We believe that this is the first case of iatrogenic Bow Hunter’s syndrome after surgical intervention for an aneurysm repair, and the largest review of literature of Bow Hunter’s syndrome. Dynamic angiography is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Bow Hunter’s syndrome. Surgery should be considered as the primary treatment approach in these patients, especially those who have bony compression as the etiology. PMID:26301025

  6. 75 FR 33290 - City of Broken Bow, OK; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... Regulatory Commission's (Commission) regulations, 18 CFR part 380 (Order No. 486, 52 FR 47897), the Office of Energy Projects has reviewed the application for an Original Major License for the Broken Bow Re... Energy Regulatory Commission City of Broken Bow, OK; Notice of Availability of Environmental...

  7. DOUBLE BOW SHOCKS AROUND YOUNG, RUNAWAY RED SUPERGIANTS: APPLICATION TO BETELGEUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, Jonathan; Mohamed, Shazrene; Neilson, Hilding R.; Langer, Norbert; Meyer, Dominique M.-A.

    2012-05-20

    A significant fraction of massive stars are moving supersonically through the interstellar medium (ISM), either due to disruption of a binary system or ejection from their parent star cluster. The interaction of their wind with the ISM produces a bow shock. In late evolutionary stages these stars may undergo rapid transitions from red to blue and vice versa on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, with accompanying rapid changes to their stellar winds and bow shocks. Recent three-dimensional simulations of the bow shock produced by the nearby runaway red supergiant (RSG) Betelgeuse, under the assumption of a constant wind, indicate that the bow shock is very young (<30, 000 years old), hence Betelgeuse may have only recently become an RSG. To test this possibility, we have calculated stellar evolution models for single stars which match the observed properties of Betelgeuse in the RSG phase. The resulting evolving stellar wind is incorporated into two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations in which we model a runaway blue supergiant (BSG) as it undergoes the transition to an RSG near the end of its life. We find that the collapsing BSG wind bubble induces a bow shock-shaped inner shell around the RSG wind that resembles Betelgeuse's bow shock, and has a similar mass. Surrounding this is the larger-scale retreating bow shock generated by the now defunct BSG wind's interaction with the ISM. We suggest that this outer shell could explain the bar feature located (at least in projection) just in front of Betelgeuse's bow shock.

  8. Double Bow Shocks around Young, Runaway Red Supergiants: Application to Betelgeuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Mohamed, Shazrene; Neilson, Hilding R.; Langer, Norbert; Meyer, Dominique M.-A.

    2012-05-01

    A significant fraction of massive stars are moving supersonically through the interstellar medium (ISM), either due to disruption of a binary system or ejection from their parent star cluster. The interaction of their wind with the ISM produces a bow shock. In late evolutionary stages these stars may undergo rapid transitions from red to blue and vice versa on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, with accompanying rapid changes to their stellar winds and bow shocks. Recent three-dimensional simulations of the bow shock produced by the nearby runaway red supergiant (RSG) Betelgeuse, under the assumption of a constant wind, indicate that the bow shock is very young (<30, 000 years old), hence Betelgeuse may have only recently become an RSG. To test this possibility, we have calculated stellar evolution models for single stars which match the observed properties of Betelgeuse in the RSG phase. The resulting evolving stellar wind is incorporated into two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations in which we model a runaway blue supergiant (BSG) as it undergoes the transition to an RSG near the end of its life. We find that the collapsing BSG wind bubble induces a bow shock-shaped inner shell around the RSG wind that resembles Betelgeuse's bow shock, and has a similar mass. Surrounding this is the larger-scale retreating bow shock generated by the now defunct BSG wind's interaction with the ISM. We suggest that this outer shell could explain the bar feature located (at least in projection) just in front of Betelgeuse's bow shock.

  9. Large amplitude MHD waves upstream of the Jovian bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Smith, C. W.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of large amplitude magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves upstream of Jupiter's bow shock are analyzed. The waves are found to be right circularly polarized in the solar wind frame which suggests that they are propagating in the fast magnetosonic mode. A complete spectral and minimum variance eigenvalue analysis of the data was performed. The power spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations contains several peaks. The fluctuations at 2.3 mHz have a direction of minimum variance along the direction of the average magnetic field. The direction of minimum variance of these fluctuations lies at approximately 40 deg. to the magnetic field and is parallel to the radial direction. We argue that these fluctuations are waves excited by protons reflected off the Jovian bow shock. The inferred speed of the reflected protons is about two times the solar wind speed in the plasma rest frame. A linear instability analysis is presented which suggests an explanation for many of the observed features of the observations.

  10. Cluster Close Separation at the Bow Shock Campaign: Initial Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balikhin, M. A.; Sagdeev, R.; Walker, S. N.; Malkov, M.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Doss, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Cluster close separation at the terrestrial bow shock campaign was aimed at probing the terrestrial bow shock front using multi-scale spacecraft separations. The closest separation (< 10 km) was achieved between Cluster 3 and Cluster 4. The separation of two other spacecraft from this pair was in the range 100-1000 km. The data from this Cluster campaign have been used to study the fine structure of the magnetic ramp. It is shown that the magnetic field perturbations observed within the ramp along the shock normal possess spatial scales a few times shorter than the ramp region itself, and are accompanied by variations in the electric field with magnitudes of a few tens mV/m. Using dual spacecraft measurements enables us to show that in the plane of the shock front the characteristic width of these structures corresponds to electron scales. Comparison of the magnetic field profile obtained from Cluster 3 and 4 indicates possibility that the initial stage of the front reformation is observed. However alternative explanations ( kinetic instabilities, corrugation instability) are also discussed.

  11. Energetic Electrons as Evidence for a Bow Shock at Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, Michaela; Russell, Christopher; Prettyman, Thomas; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Jia, Ying Dong; Chi, Peter; Joy, Steven

    2016-04-01

    In late June 2016 when Dawn was in its Survey orbit around Ceres, the +Z Phoswich scintillator aboard GRaND (Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector) recorded a solar energetic particle event superimposed with distinctive spikes in its counts. The spikes appeared as Dawn crossed into the southern hemisphere on the dayside of the planet and reappeared twice at the same location on consecutive orbits after the solar event had ceased. The spike pattern was absent from the measurements of the Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillator. This suggests the radiation responsible for the bursts in the exterior phoswich scintillator and any of their by-products were fully absorbed by materials surrounding the BGO. The source particles causing the enhancements were likely swift electrons that penetrated directly into the phoswich or associated bremsstrahlung produced in surrounding materials. The phoswich detection threshold for electrons is 20 keV and energy deposition during spike events cut off at about 100 keV, providing an energy range for the electrons if the spikes are produced by bremsstrahlung. Electrons in planetary environments are known to reach such high energies via fast-Fermi acceleration at a bow shock. We investigate if the fast-Fermi acceleration process, which would imply a temporary bow shock at Ceres, can explain the energies and fluxes of the spikes detected by GRaND's +Z Phoswich scintillator.

  12. Quasi-perpendicular/quasi-parallel divisions of Earth's bow shock

    SciTech Connect

    Greenstadt, E.W. )

    1991-02-01

    Computer-drawn diagrams of the boundaries between quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel areas of Earth's bow shock are displayed for a few selected cone angles of static interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The effect on the boundary of variable IMF in the foreshock is also discussed and shown for one nominal case. The boundaries demand caution in applying them to the realistic, dynamic conditions of the solar wind and in interpreting the effects of small cone angles on the distributions of structures at the shock. However, the calculated, first-order boundaries are helpful in defining areas of the shock where contributions from active structures inherent in quasi-parallel geometry may be distinguishable from those derived secondarily from upstream reflected ion dynamics. The boundaries are also compatible with known behavior of daytime ULF geomagnetic waves and pulsations according to models postulating that cone angle-controlled, time-dependent ULF activity around the subsolar point of the bow shock provides the source of geomagnetic excitation.

  13. Ultra low frequency waves at the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Farris, M. H.

    1995-01-01

    The Earth's bow shock is a bountiful generator of waves. Some of these waves have group velocities that exceed the solar wind velocity directed into the shock and can propagate upstream against the flow. Upstream whistlers observed close to one Hertz in the spacecraft frame have been seen many Earth radii upstream. A second whistler mode wave, called the precursor, propagates upstream along the shock normal but is phase standing in the solar wind flow. The damping of both whistler mode waves is consistent with Landau damping. At low Mach numbers the precursor is connected to the non-coplanarity component in the shock ramp. At higher Mach numbers the upstream waves cannot propagate upstream and ion reflection becomes more important in providing free energy for wave particle interactions. The non-coplanarity component is still present but it now initiates a downstream wave train. Generally the waves just downstream from the bow shock are left hand circularly polarized ion cyclotron waves propagating along the magnetic field at the Alfven velocity. When the upstream Mach number is high and the helium content of the plasma is high, mirror mode waves are observed.

  14. Quasilinear simulations of interplanetary shocks and Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Ganse, Urs; Vainio, Rami; Palmroth, Minna; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new self-consistent Monte Carlo simulation model for particle acceleration in shocks. The model includes a prescribed large-scale magnetic field and plasma density, temperature and velocity profiles and a self-consistently computed incompressible ULF foreshock under the quasilinear approximation. Unlike previous analytical treatments, our model is time dependent and takes full account of the anisotropic particle distributions and scattering in the wave-particle interaction process. We apply the model to the problem of particle acceleration at traveling interplanetary (IP) shocks and Earth's bow shock and compare the results with hybrid-Vlasov simulations and spacecraft observations. A qualitative agreement in terms of spectral shape of the magnetic fluctuations and the polarization of the unstable mode is found between the models and the observations. We will quantify the differences of the models and explore the region of validity of the quasilinear approach in terms of shock parameters. We will also compare the modeled IP shocks and the bow shock, identifying the similarities and differences in the spectrum of accelerated particles and waves in these scenarios. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support. We acknowledge the computational resources provided by CSC - IT Centre for Science Ltd., Espoo.

  15. Lunar Surface Potential Increases during Terrestrial Bow Shock Traversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Hills, H. Kent; Halekas, Jasper; Farrell, William M.; Delory, Greg T.; Espley, Jared; Freeman, John W.; Vondrak, Richard R.; Kasper, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Since the Apollo era the electric potential of the Moon has been a subject of interest and debate. Deployed by three Apollo missions, Apollo 12, Apollo 14 and Apollo 15, the Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment (SIDE) determined the sunlit lunar surface potential to be about +10 Volts using the energy spectra of lunar ionospheric thermal ions accelerated toward the Moon. We present an analysis of Apollo 14 SIDE "resonance" events that indicate the lunar surface potential increases when the Moon traverses the dawn bow shock. By analyzing Wind spacecraft crossings of the terrestrial bow shock at approximately this location and employing current balancing models of the lunar surface, we suggest causes for the increasing potential. Determining the origin of this phenomenon will improve our ability to predict the lunar surface potential in support of human exploration as well as provide models for the behavior of other airless bodies when they traverse similar features such as interplanetary shocks, both of which are goals of the NASA Lunar Science Institute's Dynamic Response of the Environment At the Moon (DREAM) team.

  16. Transonic flow past a wedge profile with detached bow wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincenti, Walter G; Wagoner, Cleo B

    1952-01-01

    A theoretical study has been made of the aerodynamic characteristics at zero angle of attack of a thin, doubly symmetrical double-wedge profile in the range of supersonic flight speed in which the bow wave is detached. The analysis utilizes the equations of the transonic small-disturbance theory and involves no assumptions beyond those implicit in this theory. The mixed flow about the front half of the profile is calculated by relaxation solution of boundary conditions along the shock polar and sonic line. The purely subsonic flow about the rear of the profile is found by means of the method of characteristics specialized to the transonic small-disturbance theory. Complete calculations were made for four values of the transonic similarity parameter. These were found sufficient to bridge the gap between the previous results of Guderley and Yoshihara at a Mach number of 1 and the results which are readily obtained when the bow wave is attached and the flow is completely supersonic.

  17. Short-term VHE variability in blazars: PKS 2155-304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, F. M.; Volpe, F.

    2010-09-01

    Context. The γ-ray blazar PKS 2155-304 has attracted considerable attention because of its extreme TeV variability characteristics during an exceptional flaring period in 2006. Among the observed key findings are (i) a minimum variability timescale as short as ~200 s and (ii) highly variable TeV emission, which in the frequency interval [ 10-4 Hz, 10-2 Hz] can be described by a log-normal distribution and suggests an underlying multiplicative (and not additive) process. Aims: Simultaneously accounting for these findings appears difficult within conventional approaches. Following earlier suggestions for the TeV blazar Mkn 501, we explore a possible scenario where PKS 2155-304 is supposed to harbor a supermassive binary black hole system and where the observed TeV variability is dominated by emission from the less massive black hole. Methods: We analyze the constraints on the very high energy (VHE) source imposed by the observed variability characteristics and the integrated VHE luminosity output, and discuss its implications for a binary black hole system. Results: We show that for a secondary mass of mBH ~ 107 M⊙, fluctuations in the disk accretion rate that feed the jet could account for the observed red-noise type variability process down to frequencies of ~10-2 Hz. Jet curvature induced by orbital motion, on the other hand, could further relax constraints on the intrinsic jet speeds. Conclusions: Because a binary system can lead to different (yet not independent) periodicities in different energy bands, a longterm (quasi-) periodicity analysis could offer important insights into the real nature of the central engine of PKS 2155-304.

  18. A PANCHROMATIC VIEW OF PKS 0558-504: AN IDEAL LABORATORY TO STUDY THE DISK-JET LINK

    SciTech Connect

    Gliozzi, M.; Papadakis, I. E.; Grupe, D.; Brinkmann, W. P.; Raeth, C.; Kedziora-Chudczer, L.

    2010-07-10

    PKS 0558-504 is the brightest radio-loud Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1) at X-ray energies. Here we present results from the radio, optical, UV, and X-ray bands obtained with Swift, XMM-Newton, and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) during a ten-day monitoring campaign in 2008 September. The simultaneous coverage at several wavelengths makes it possible to investigate in detail the broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) and the energetics of this source. The main results can be summarized as follows. The ATCA reveals the presence of an extended radio emission in PKS 0558-504 with two lobe-like structures {approx}7'' from the bright central source. The extended radio structure and the low value of the radio loudness similar to radio-quiet Seyfert galaxies coupled with constraints from higher energy bands argue against a jet-dominated emission in PKS 0558-504. The study of the SED, which is dominated by a nearly constant optical-UV emission, supports the conclusion that PKS 0558-504 is accreting at a super-Eddington rate. This conclusion was reached by assuming M {sub BH} = 2.5 x 10{sup 8} M {sub sun}, which was obtained with a new scaling method based on X-ray spectral variability results. A comparison between the accretion luminosity and the kinetic power associated with the jet suggests that in this source, the accretion power dominates in agreement with the results obtained from radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of Galactic black holes (GBHs) accreting at the Eddington rate. The combined findings from this panchromatic investigation strongly suggest that PKS 0558-504 is a large-scale analog of GBHs in their highly accreting intermediate state. More importantly, PKS 0558-504 may also be the prototype of the parent population of the very radio-loud NLS1s recently detected at {gamma}-ray energies.

  19. Bow Shock Leads the Way for a Speeding Hot Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    As hot Jupiters whip around their host stars, their speeds can exceed the speed of sound in the surrounding material, theoretically causing a shock to form ahead of them. Now, a study has reported the detection of such a shock ahead of transiting exoplanet HD 189733b, providing a potential indicator of the remarkably strong magnetic field of the planet.Rushing PlanetsDue to their proximity to their hosts, hot Jupiters move very quickly through the stellar wind and corona surrounding the star. When this motion is supersonic, the material ahead of the planet can be compressed by a bow shock and for a transiting hot Jupiter, this shock will cross the face of the host star in advance of the planets transit.In a recent study, a team of researchers by Wilson Cauley of Wesleyan University report evidence of just such a pre-transit. The teams target is exoplanet HD 189733b, one of the closest hot Jupiters to our solar system. When the authors examined high-resolution transmission spectra of this system, they found that prior to the optical transit of the planet, there was a large dip in the transmission of the first three hydrogen Balmer lines. This could well be the absorption of an optically-thick bow shock as it moves past the face of the star.Tremendous MagnetismOperating under this assumption, the authors create a model of the absorption expected from a hot Jupiter transiting with a bow shock ahead of it. Using this model, they show that a shock leading the planet at a distance of 12.75 times the planets radius reproduces the key features of the transmission spectrum.This stand-off distance is surprisingly large. Assuming that the location of the bow shock is set by the point where the planets magnetospheric pressure balances the pressure of the stellar wind or corona that it passes through, the planetary magnetic field would have to be at least 28 Gauss. This is seven times the strength of Jupiters magnetic field!Understanding the magnetic fields of exoplanets is

  20. PKS 2123-463: A Confirmed Gamma-ray Blazar at High Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Ammando, F.; Rau, A.; Schady, P.; Finke, J.; Orienti, M.; Greiner, J.; Kann, D. A.; Ojha, R.; Foley, A. R.; Stevens, J.; Blanchard, J. M.; Edwards, P. G.; Kadler, M.; Lovell, J. E.

    2013-01-01

    The flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 2123-463 was associated in the first Fermi- Large Area Telescope (LAT) source catalogue with the gamma-ray source 1FGL J2126.1-4603, but when considering the full first two years of Fermi observations, no gamma-ray source at a position consistent with this FSRQ was detected, and thus PKS 2123-463 was not reported in the second Fermi-LAT source catalogue. On 2011 December 14 a gamma-ray source positionally consistent with PKS 2123-463 was detected in flaring activity by Fermi-LAT. This activity triggered radio-to-X-ray observations by the Swift,Gamma-ray Optical/Near-Infrared Detector (GROND), Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), Ceduna and Seven Dishes Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7) observatories. Results of the localization of the gamma-ray source over 41 months of Fermi-LAT operation are reported here in conjunction with the results of the analysis of radio, optical, ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray data collected soon after the gamma-ray flare. The strict spatial association with the lower energy counterpart together with a simultaneous increase of the activity in optical, UV, X-ray and gamma-ray bands led to a firm identification of the gamma-ray source with PKS 2123-463. A new photometric redshift has been estimated as z = 1.46 plus or minus 0.05 using GROND and Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) observations, in rough agreement with the disputed spectroscopic redshift of z = 1.67.We fit the broad-band spectral energy distribution with a synchrotron/external Compton model. We find that a thermal disc component is necessary to explain the optical/UV emission detected by Swift/UVOT. This disc has a luminosity of approximately 1.8 x 10(exp 46) erg s(exp -1), and a fit to the disc emission assuming a Schwarzschild (i.e. non-rotating) black hole gives a mass of approximately 2 x 10(exp 9) solar mass. This is the first black hole mass estimate for this source.

  1. Fermi LAT detection of a GeV flare from PKS 1124-186

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allafort, A.

    2011-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed an increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1124-186, also known as CGRaBS J1127-1857 and 1FGL J1126.8-1854 (RA=11h27m04.3924s, DEC=-18d57m17.440s, J2000; Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880). The source is located at redshift z=1.048 (Drinkwater et al.

  2. AGILE detection of increased gamma-ray emission from the FSRQ PKS 1313-333

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarelli, F.; Verrecchia, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Pittori, C.; Tavani, M.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Vercellone, S.; Donnarumma, I.; Piano, G.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    AGILE confirms the detection of enhanced gamma-ray activity from the FSRQ PKS 1313-333 (redshift z=1.210), as reported by the Fermi-LAT in ATel #8533. Integrating from 2016-01-10 02:00 UT to 2016-01-12 02:00 UT, a maximum likelihood analysis of AGILE data yields the detection of the source at a significance level of about 5 sigma with a flux of (1.6 +/- 0.6) x 10^-6 ph/cm2/s (E > 100 MeV), in agreement with the Fermi-LAT measurement.

  3. Anatomy of a blazar in the (sub-)millimeter: ALMA observations of PKS 0521-365

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, S.; Cortes, P. C.; Guerard, M.; Villard, E.; Hidayat, T.; Ocaña Flaquer, B.; Vila-Vilaro, B.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: We aim at analyzing the (sub-)millimeter emission in a nearby blazar, PKS 0521-365, to study the synchrotron and thermal emission in the different components detected at low frequency. Methods: We analyzed the archive public data of the ALMA Cycle 0 where PKS 0521-365 is used as a calibrator. A total of 13 projects with 23 dataset were analyzed in Bands 3, 6, and 7 and combined. The whole set of data was combined and wavelet-filtered to obtain a deep image toward PKS 0521-365, reaching a dynamic range of 47 000. The individual emission flux was measured on different dates over a period of 11 months in various components. Finally we analyzed the spectral energy distribution (SED) in each different component, including the radio jet and counter jet. Results: The point sources detected in the field follow a similar distribution to previous studies. The blazar flux shows large variation especially in Band 3. Different components are observed: core, radio jet, and newly detected counter jet, hot spot (HS), and a disky structure roughly perpendicular to the jet. The HS emission is formed by a point source surrounded by an extended emission. The viewing angle of the jet is about 30° with a Doppler factor of δ = 1.6. The HS is at a distance of 19 kpc from the center. The SED analysis shows a strong variation in the core spectral index, especially in Band 3. The two components in the radio jet have roughly a flat spectral index in Bands 6 and 7. Conclusions: The different weak and extended components in PKS 0521-365 are detected with the ALMA data. The analysis of both jets constrains the geometrical distance of the HS to the center. The SED presents a different shape in time and frequency for each component. Finally, a new structure is detected roughly perpendicular to the radio jet. and a thermal emission origin is currently favored. Further observations at higher spatial resolution are needed to confirm that hypothesis. FITS files for all the images are only

  4. May PKS 1155+251 be the habitat of a binary black hole?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xiang

    2016-02-01

    Close binary black holes (BBH) are important not only in astrophysics but they would be the strongest gravitational wave sources in the universe. Galaxy-galaxy merging systems are mostly found in optical and X-ray images. In radio, however, the VLBI can resolve the close binary system at pc scale, if their nuclei are radio loud. Recently we analyzed the archive VLBI data of PKS 1155+251, it shows twin core-jets like VLBI structure. In this poster, we present preliminary result from analyzing of the archive data. Further investigations with high frequency VLBI observations are required to confirm if it is a true BBH system.

  5. Diverse Bacterial PKS Sequences Derived From Okadaic Acid-Producing Dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Roberto; Liu, Li; Lopez, Jose; An, Tianying; Rein, Kathleen S.

    2008-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and the related dinophysistoxins are isolated from dinoflagellates of the genus Prorocentrum and Dinophysis. Bacteria of the Roseobacter group have been associated with okadaic acid producing dinoflagellates and have been previously implicated in OA production. Analysis of 16S rRNA libraries reveals that Roseobacter are the most abundant bacteria associated with OA producing dinoflagellates of the genus Prorocentrum and are not found in association with non-toxic dinoflagellates. While some polyketide synthase (PKS) genes form a highly supported Prorocentrum clade, most appear to be bacterial, but unrelated to Roseobacter or Alpha-Proteobacterial PKSs or those derived from other Alveolates Karenia brevis or Crytosporidium parvum. PMID:18728765

  6. Detection of extragalactic CF+ toward PKS 1830-211. Chemical differentiation in the absorbing gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, S.; Kawaguchi, K.; Black, J. H.; Amano, T.

    2016-05-01

    We report the first extragalactic detection of the fluoromethylidynium ion CF+ in the z = 0.89 absorber toward PKS 1830-211. We estimate an abundance of ~3 × 10-10 relative to H2 and that ~1% of fluorine is captured in CF+. The absorption line profile of CF+ is found to be markedly different from that of other species observed within the same tuning, and is notably anticorrelated with CH3OH. On the other hand, the CF+ profile resembles that of [C I]. Our results are consistent with expected fluorine chemistry and point to chemical differentiation in the column of absorbing gas.

  7. Period analysis of secular optical light variations of the quasar PKS 2251+158

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng-yue, Su

    2001-04-01

    We have collected optical observational data of the blazar PKS 2251+158 for nearly 100 years and analyzed its long-tem periodicity in the light variation. The maximum amplitude of light variation in B was found to be 2.86 mag. Using the Jurkevich method, a period of 12.39 yr was found. It is probable that at the center of this object there is a black hole of mass 8.0×10 5 and that the γ amplification factor is not less than 7.2. The Jurkevich method was also discussed.

  8. The long-term variability of BL Lac object PKS 0735+178

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.; Xie, G. Z.; Lin, R. G.; Qin, Y. P.; Li, K. H.; Zhang, X.

    1997-11-01

    The long-term variability of PKS 0735+178 in B band is shown with some new data presented and discussed by means of Jurkevich's method. The results show with good possibility the presence of a period of 14.2 years. The period of 4.89 years found by \\cite[Webb et al. (1988)]{web88} and \\cite[Smith et al. (1987)]{smi87} might be confirmed with more observations, and their period of 1.2 years can be ruled out.

  9. Fermi LAT detection of renewed activity from the blazar PKS 1502+106

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1502+106 (also known as OR 103, S3 1502+10 and 3FGL J1504.4+1029, Acero et al., arXiv:1501.02003), with radio coordinates, (J2000.0), R.A.: 226.10408 deg, Dec: 10.49422 deg (Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880). This blazar has a redshift of z=1.8383 (Hewett & Wild 2010, MNRAS, 405, 2302).

  10. Simulation of the oscillation regimes of bowed bars: a non-linear modal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inácio, Octávio; Henrique, Luís.; Antunes, José

    2003-06-01

    It is still a challenge to properly simulate the complex stick-slip behavior of multi-degree-of-freedom systems. In the present paper we investigate the self-excited non-linear responses of bowed bars, using a time-domain modal approach, coupled with an explicit model for the frictional forces, which is able to emulate stick-slip behavior. This computational approach can provide very detailed simulations and is well suited to deal with systems presenting a dispersive behavior. The effects of the bar supporting fixture are included in the model, as well as a velocity-dependent friction coefficient. We present the results of numerical simulations, for representative ranges of the bowing velocity and normal force. Computations have been performed for constant-section aluminum bars, as well as for real vibraphone bars, which display a central undercutting, intended to help tuning the first modes. Our results show limiting values for the normal force FN and bowing velocity ẏbow for which the "musical" self-sustained solutions exist. Beyond this "playability space", double period and even chaotic regimes were found for specific ranges of the input parameters FN and ẏbow. As also displayed by bowed strings, the vibration amplitudes of bowed bars also increase with the bow velocity. However, in contrast to string instruments, bowed bars "slip" during most of the motion cycle. Another important difference is that, in bowed bars, the self-excited motions are dominated by the system's first mode. Our numerical results are qualitatively supported by preliminary experimental results.

  11. The warm molecular hydrogen of PKS B1718-649. Feeding a newly born radio AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccagni, F. M.; Santoro, F.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Emonts, B. H. C.

    2016-04-01

    We present new SINFONI VLT observations of molecular hydrogen (H 2) in the central regions (<2.5 kpc) of the youngest and closest radio source PKS B1718-649. We study the distribution of the H 2 traced by the 1-0 S(1) ro-vibrational line, revealing a double disk structure with the kinematics of both disks characterised by rotation. An outer disk (r > 650 pc) is aligned with other components of the galaxy (atomic hydrogen, stars, dust), while the inner disk (r < 600 pc) is perpendicular to it and is polar with respect to the stellar distribution. However, in the innermost 75 pc, the data show the presence of H 2 gas redshifted with respect to the rotating inner disk (Δv ~ + 150 km s-1), which may trace gas falling into the super massive black hole associated with the central radio source. Along the same line of sight, earlier observations had shown the presence in the central regions of PKS B1718-649 of clouds of atomic hydrogen with similar unsettled kinematics. The range of velocities and mass of these unsettled clouds of H i and H 2 suggest they may be actively contributing to fuelling the central newly born radio source.

  12. The X-ray spectrum of the highly polarized quasar PKS 1502+106

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, I. M.; Nandra, K.; Turner, T. J.; Celotti, A.

    1994-01-01

    We report the detection and spectrum of the distant (z = 1.839), highly polarized quasar PKS 1502+106 in the X-ray band based on data collected over the period 1990-1994 using ROSAT and ASCA. We find the source to exhibit intensity variations of a factor approximately greater than 2 at 1 keV on timescales of years, small compared to the variability observed historically in the radio, millimeter, and optical bands. The (energy) spectral index is found in the range 0.4 approximately less than alpha(sub x) approximately less than 0.8 (at 90% confidence). Its multiwaveband spectral index is broadly consistent with other highly polarized quasars (HPQs). From the application of an inhomogeneous synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) jet we find that a model similar to that proposed for 3C 279 is consistent with the multiwaveband spectrum. We suggest that a change in the energy injection and/or transport mechanisms within such a jet could easily result in PKS 1502+106 being detectable at gamma-ray energies.

  13. Gamma-Rays from the Quasar PKS 1441+25: Story of an Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Aune, T.; Barnacka, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Biteau, J.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Coppi, P.; Cui, W.; Dickinson, H. J.; Dumm, J.; Eisch, J. D.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Flinders, A.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hütten, M.; Håkansson, N.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kelley-Hoskins, N.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Krennrich, F.; Kumar, S.; Lang, M. J.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Petrashyk, A.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Ratliff, G.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Rousselle, J.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Todd, N. W.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weiner, O. M.; Weinstein, A.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; VERITAS; Smith, P. S.; SPOL; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Prieto, J. L.; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Shappee, B.; ASAS-SN; Hovatta, T.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Pearson, T. J.; Reeves, R. A.; Richards, J. L.; Readhead, A. C. S.; OVRO; Madejski, G. M.; NuSTAR; Djorgovski, S. G.; Drake, A. J.; Graham, M. J.; Mahabal, A.; CRTS

    2015-12-01

    Outbursts from gamma-ray quasars provide insights on the relativistic jets of active galactic nuclei and constraints on the diffuse radiation fields that fill the universe. The detection of significant emission above 100 GeV from a distant quasar would show that some of the radiated gamma-rays escape pair-production interactions with low-energy photons, be it the extragalactic background light (EBL), or the radiation near the supermassive black hole lying at the jet's base. VERITAS detected gamma-ray emission up to ˜200 GeV from PKS 1441+25 (z = 0.939) during 2015 April, a period of high activity across all wavelengths. This observation of PKS 1441+25 suggests that the emission region is located thousands of Schwarzschild radii away from the black hole. The gamma-ray detection also sets a stringent upper limit on the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared EBL intensity, suggesting that galaxy surveys have resolved most, if not all, of the sources of the EBL at these wavelengths.

  14. ALMA and PKS 1830-211: the Molecular Absorption and the Background Blazar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, S.; PKS1830 Team

    2015-12-01

    The line of sight to the lensed blazar PKS1830-211 intercepts the disk of a foreground spiral galaxy at z=0.89, yielding absorption detected in 40+ molecular species. These molecules can be used as cosmological probes at a look-back time of more than half the present age of the Universe. We can determine their excitation and measure the temperature of the cosmic microwave background, compare their kinematics and set constraints on the variations of the fundamental constants, measure the isotopic ratios from different isotopologues and investigate the elemental enrichment from stellar processes, and, of course, investigate the chemistry in the disk of the absorber. Besides, we obtained ALMA data observed serendipitously at the time of a strong gamma-ray flare of the background blazar, allowing us to investigate its submm activity and the submm to gamma-ray connection. Last we present the first ALMA polarimetry results, with the highest Faraday rotation ever measured, revealing a strong magnetic field at the base of the jet in PKS 1830-211. In short, one target, but many and diverse science results !

  15. THE REMARKABLE {gamma}-RAY ACTIVITY IN THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED BLAZAR PKS 1830-211

    SciTech Connect

    Donnarumma, I.; De Rosa, A.; Vittorini, V.; Tavani, M.; Striani, E.; Pacciani, L.; Popovic, L. C.; Simic, S.; Kuulkers, E.; Vercellone, S.; Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.; Giommi, P.; Barbiellini, G.; Bulgarelli, A.

    2011-08-01

    We report the extraordinary {gamma}-ray activity (E > 100 MeV) of the gravitationally lensed blazar PKS 1830-211 (z = 2.507) detected by AGILE between 2010 October and November. On October 14, the source experienced a factor of {approx}12 flux increase with respect to its average value and remained brightest at this flux level ({approx}500 x 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) for about four days. The one-month {gamma}-ray light curve across the flare showed a mean flux F(E > 100 MeV) = 200 x 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which resulted in a factor of four enhancement with respect to the average value. Following the {gamma}-ray flare, the source was observed in near-IR (NIR)-optical energy bands at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and in X-Rays by Swift/X-Ray Telescope and INTEGRAL/IBIS. The main result of these multifrequency observations is that the large variability observed in {gamma}-rays does not have a significant counterpart at lower frequencies: no variation greater than a factor of {approx}1.5 appeared in the NIR and X-Ray energy bands. PKS 1830-211 is then a good '{gamma}-ray only flaring' blazar showing substantial variability only above 10-100 MeV. We discuss the theoretical implications of our findings.

  16. PKS and NRPS gene clusters from microbial symbiont cells of marine sponges by whole genome amplification.

    PubMed

    Siegl, Alexander; Hentschel, Ute

    2010-08-01

    Whole genome amplification (WGA) approaches provide genomic information on single microbial cells and hold great promise for the field of environmental microbiology. Here, the microbial consortia of the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba were sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and then subjected to WGA. A cosmid library was constructed from the WGA product of a sample containing two bacterial cells, one a member of the candidate phylum Poribacteria and one of a sponge-specific clade of Chloroflexi. Library screening led to the genomic characterization of three cosmid clones, encoding a polyketide synthase (PKS), a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and the Chloroflexi 16S rRNA gene. PCR screening of WGA products from additional, FACS-sorted single bacterial symbiont cells supports the assignment of the Sup-PKS gene to the Poribacteria and the novel NRPS gene to the Chloroflexi. This promising single-cell genomics approach has permitted cloning of entire gene clusters from single microbial cells of known phylogenetic origin and thus provides a sought-after link between phylogeny and function. PMID:23766222

  17. Fermi LAT detection of Increased Flux from new gamma-ray blazar PKS 0250-225

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Reyes, Luis C.

    2009-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST, launched June 11, 2008), has observed an increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with PKS 0250-225 (RA: 02h52m47.9s, Dec:-22d19m25s, J2000). Preliminary analysis indicates that PKS 0250-225 (z=1.427 ; as CGRaBS J0252-2219 in Healey S. et al. 2007, ApJS, 175, 97) has been in a high state since Feb 17 with a gamma-ray flux (E>100MeV) of (0.5 +/- 0.1) x 10-6 ph cm-2 s-1, which represents a > 3-fold increase in flux with respect to the average preliminary flux observed during the first 6 months of data of the Fermi mission and about an 8-fold increase with respect to the first 3 months, suggesting thus a long-term trend of increasing flux.

  18. PKS 1510-089: Fifteen years of X-ray Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Evan; Perlman, Eric S.; Holder, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    The blazar PKS 1510-089 is one of the best-monitored of all blazars, due to near-continuous monitoring by the RXTE and SWIFT satellites at weekly or better intervals. The RXTE data, in particular, provide a well-sampled (~twice per week for 10 months per year) 3-color (2-4 keV, 4-7 keV and 7-10 keV) light curve spanning from 1996 to 2011. SWIFT data both overlap with the RXTE data stream and extend it up through the present day. The resulting light-curve gives us an excellent tool to correlate with Fermi observations. Both Fermi and SWIFT have observed the source from 2008 to 2015. We will present an analysis of the light curve, including a search for orphan flares (i.e., flares observed in only a single band), one of which was detected in early 2009 in PKS 1510-089 by Marscher et al. (2010). Cross-correlation of multi-wavelength light curves and studies of orphan flares could provide insight into leptonic and hadronic blazar emission models.

  19. PKS 0483-436 - A high-redshift quasar with strong X-ray absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Elvis, Martin; Fiore, Fabrizio; Mcdowell, Jonathan C.; Tananbaum, Harvey; Lawrence, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    The first X-ray spectrum of a high-redshift (z = 2.85) quasar is reported. The Rosat PSPC spectrum of PKS 0438-436, covering 0.3-9 keV in the quasar's rest frame, reveals unexpected absorption of about 1 x 10 exp 22/sq cm, assuming it occurs at the source. Only one other high-luminosity quasar (of greater than about 50 observed by Einstein) shows significant absorption in its X-ray spectrum. Of the common line-of-sight absorbers, only highly ionized Ly-alpha forest clouds may be able to explain this amount of absorption. Candidates for an intrinsic absorber are discussed. Absorption at about 1 keV (rest frame) is due primarily to heavy elements. (O, Ne, Mg, Si, S) raising the possibility of measuring early universe abundances via X-ray absorption in this and like quasars. PKS 0438-436 may be a high-redshift member of a population of quasars which can contribute to the X-ray background above 2 keV, without being detectable by previous imaging missions.

  20. BL LAC OBJECT PKS B1144-379: AN EXTREME SCINTILLATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R. J.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Shabala, S. S.; Blanchard, J.; Lovell, J. E. J.; McCallum, J. N.; Cimo, G.

    2012-08-01

    Rapid variability in the radio flux density of the BL Lac object PKS B1144-379 has been observed at four frequencies, ranging from 1.5 to 15 GHz, with the Very Large Array and the University of Tasmania's Ceduna antenna. Intrinsic and line-of-sight effects were examined as possible causes of this variability, with interstellar scintillation best explaining the frequency dependence of the variability timescales and modulation indices. This scintillation is consistent with a compact source 20-40 {mu}as or 0.15-0.3 pc in size. The inferred brightness temperature for PKS B1144-379 (assuming that the observed variations are due to scintillation) is 6.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} K at 4.9 GHz, with approximately 10% of the total flux in the scintillating component. We show that scintillation surveys aimed at identifying variability timescales of days to weeks are an effective way to identify the active galactic nuclei with the highest brightness temperatures.

  1. Curvature and bow of bulk GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foronda, Humberto M.; Romanov, Alexey E.; Young, Erin C.; Roberston, Christian A.; Beltz, Glenn E.; Speck, James S.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the bow of free standing (0001) oriented hydride vapor phase epitaxy grown GaN substrates and demonstrate that their curvature is consistent with a compressive to tensile stress gradient (bottom to top) present in the substrates. The origin of the stress gradient and the curvature is attributed to the correlated inclination of edge threading dislocation (TD) lines away from the [0001] direction. A model is proposed and a relation is derived for bulk GaN substrate curvature dependence on the inclination angle and the density of TDs. The model is used to analyze the curvature for commercially available GaN substrates as determined by high resolution x-ray diffraction. The results show a close correlation between the experimentally determined parameters and those predicted from theoretical model.

  2. Hybrid simulation techniques applied to the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Leroy, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    The application of a hybrid simulation model, in which the ions are treated as discrete particles and the electrons as a massless charge-neutralizing fluid, to the study of the earth's bow shock is discussed. The essentials of the numerical methods are described in detail; movement of the ions, solution of the electromagnetic fields and electron fluid equations, and imposition of appropriate boundary and initial conditions. Examples of results of calculations for perpendicular shocks are presented which demonstrate the need for a kinetic treatment of the ions to reproduce the correct ion dynamics and the corresponding shock structure. Results for oblique shocks are also presented to show how the magnetic field and ion motion differ from the perpendicular case.

  3. On the peculiar shapes of some pulsar bow-shock nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandiera, Rino

    Pulsar bow-shock nebulae are pulsar-wind nebulae formed by the direct interaction of pulsar relativistic winds with the interstellar medium. The bow-shock morphology, well outlined in Hα for some objects, is an effect of the supersonic pulsar motion with respect to the ambient medium. However, in a considerable fraction of cases (e.g. the nebulae associated to PSR B2224+65, PSR B0740-28, PSR J2124-3358) clear deviations from the classical bow shock shape are observed. Such deviations are usually interpreted as due to ambient density gradients and/or to pulsar-wind anisotropies. Here I present a different interpretation, aiming at explaining deviations from the standard morphology as signs of the peculiar physical conditions present in these objects. Using dimensional arguments, I show that, unlike normal pulsar-wind nebulae, in pulsar bow-shock nebulae the mean free path of the highest-energy particles may be comparable with the bow-shock head. I then investigate whether this may affect the shape of the bow-shock; for instance, whether a conical bow shock (like that observed in the "Guitar", the nebula associated to PSR B2224+65) does really imply an ambient density gradient. Finally, I discuss some other possible signatures of these high-energy, long mean-free-path particles.

  4. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF BOW SHOCKS AND OUTFLOWS IN RCW 38

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, E.; Wolk, S. J.; Bourke, T. L.; Spitzbart, B.; Megeath, S. T.; Gutermuth, R.

    2012-01-10

    We report Spitzer observations of five newly identified bow shocks in the massive star-forming region RCW 38. Four are visible at Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) wavelengths, the fifth is only visible at 24 {mu}m. Chandra X-ray emission indicates that winds from the central O5.5 binary, IRS 2, have caused an outflow to the northeast and southwest of the central subcluster. The southern lobe of hot ionized gas is detected in X-rays; shocked gas and heated dust from the shock front are detected with Spitzer at 4.5 and 24 {mu}m. The northern outflow may have initiated the present generation of star formation, based on the filamentary distribution of the protostars in the central subcluster. Further, the bow-shock driving star, YSO 129, is photo-evaporating a pillar of gas and dust. No point sources are identified within this pillar at near- to mid-IR wavelengths. We also report on IRAC 3.6 and 5.8 {mu}m observations of the cluster DBS2003-124, northeast of RCW 38, where 33 candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) are identified. One star associated with the cluster drives a parsec-scale jet. Two Herbig-Haro objects associated with the jet are visible at IRAC and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) wavelengths. The jet extends over a distance of {approx}3 pc. Assuming a velocity of 100 km s{sup -1} for the jet material gives an age of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} yr, indicating that the star (and cluster) are likely to be very young, with a similar or possibly younger age than RCW 38, and that star formation is ongoing in the extended RCW 38 region.

  5. CHONDRULE FORMATION IN BOW SHOCKS AROUND ECCENTRIC PLANETARY EMBRYOS

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Melissa A.; Desch, Steven J.; Athanassiadou, Themis; Boley, Aaron C.

    2012-06-10

    Recent isotopic studies of Martian meteorites by Dauphas and Pourmand have established that large ({approx}3000 km radius) planetary embryos existed in the solar nebula at the same time that chondrules-millimeter-sized igneous inclusions found in meteorites-were forming. We model the formation of chondrules by passage through bow shocks around such a planetary embryo on an eccentric orbit. We numerically model the hydrodynamics of the flow and find that such large bodies retain an atmosphere with Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities allowing mixing of this atmosphere with the gas and particles flowing past the embryo. We calculate the trajectories of chondrules flowing past the body and find that they are not accreted by the protoplanet, but may instead flow through volatiles outgassed from the planet's magma ocean. In contrast, chondrules are accreted onto smaller planetesimals. We calculate the thermal histories of chondrules passing through the bow shock. We find that peak temperatures and cooling rates are consistent with the formation of the dominant, porphyritic texture of most chondrules, assuming a modest enhancement above the likely solar nebula average value of chondrule densities (by a factor of 10), attributable to settling of chondrule precursors to the midplane of the disk or turbulent concentration. We calculate the rate at which a planetary embryo's eccentricity is damped and conclude that a single planetary embryo scattered into an eccentric orbit can, over {approx}10{sup 5} years, produce {approx}10{sup 24} g of chondrules. In principle, a small number (1-10) of eccentric planetary embryos can melt the observed mass of chondrules in a manner consistent with all known constraints.

  6. On the shape and motion of the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziane, K.; Alrefay, T. Y.; Hamza, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    Multipoint-measurements by the magnetic field Cluster-FGM (Flux Gate Magnetometer) are used to determine the local shock normal, and in turn allow the study of shock location shape and the velocity of the Earth's bow shock. The shock crossings cover orbits in which the spacecraft separation is of the order of ~600 km or less. A data selection of 133 bow shock crossings, ranging from quasi-steady perpendicular to moderately noisy oblique geometries, have been analyzed using a standard timing analysis. Prior to applying the timing technique, the magnetic field fluctuations, when present, are suppressed using low band-pass filtering. The present study contributes to similar studies conducted in the past and available in the literature through the inclusion of a larger data set. The shock standoff distance is determined conjointly with a paraboloid model and the results from a timing analysis. A statistical study reveals a standoff distance well in agreement with the standard gas dynamics model prediction for high Mach number MA. We have also found that for about half the crossings, the timing shock normals agree, within 11°, with a conic-based shock model. Our results strongly indicate that the motion of the shock is predominantly along the Sun-Earth direction; a departure from this direction is not related to the shock-crossing location. Shock velocities below ~80 km/s satisfactorily follow a nearly Gaussian distribution with zero mean and a standard deviation of ~42 km/s. Finally, we show that high speed motions are correlated with sharp increases in the solar wind upstream ram pressure, and are consistent with gas dynamics model predictions.

  7. Global Hybrid Simulations: Applications to Bow Shock and Dayside Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, Nojan; Sibeck, David; Phan, Tai; Eastwood, Jonathan

    With the advent of global hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) simulations it has become possible to examine magnetospheric processes and their interconnections on ion time and spatial scales. This capability combined with multi-spacecraft missions such as Cluster and THEMIS provide an unprecedented opportunity to perform detailed, quantitative comparisons between theory and observations to examine basic paradigms and build new ones. To illustrate this capability, this presentation focuses on a number of topics related to the bow shock and dayside magnetosphere. One topic concerns the formation of the ion foreshock boundary predicted by global hybrid simulations and their relationship to the observed phenomenon of foreshock cavities. Interaction of solar wind discontinuities with the bow shock lead to a variety of phenomena such as hot flow anomalies (HFAs) or initiation of magnetic reconnection in the magnetosheath. We show examples of both processes in hybrid simulations and comparisons with spacecraft observations. In regards to HFAs, recent THEMIS measurements provide detailed information on their magnetosheath signatures. Understanding of these signatures and impacts on the magnetosphere/ionosphere system remains an important topic of investigation. Magnetic reconnection in the magnetosheath provides an opportunity to examine this important process in relative isolation and symmetric plasma conditions. Here, we address the impact of discontinuity thickness and magnetic shear on the nature of the resulting reconnection and the implications for time dependency and geometry (anti-parallel vs component) of reconnection at the magnetopause. The final topic of the presentation is the formation of flux transfer events (FTEs) at the magnetopause and their subsequent motion and interaction with the cusps. This interaction involves secondary magnetic reconnection and acceleration of plasma into the cusp. As we illustrate, this process may account for the formation of

  8. Violin Pedagogy and the Physics of the Bowed String

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Alexander Rhodes

    The paper describes the mechanics of violin tone production using non-specialist language, in order to present a scientific understanding of tone production accessible to a broad readership. As well as offering an objective understanding of tone production, this model provides a powerful tool for analyzing the technique of string playing. The interaction between the bow and the string is quite complex. Literature reviewed for this study reveals that scientific investigations have provided important insights into the mechanics of string playing, offering explanations for factors which both contribute to and limit the range of tone colours and dynamics that stringed instruments can produce. Also examined in the literature review are significant works of twentieth century violin pedagogy exploring tone production on the violin, based on the practical experience of generations of teachers and performers. Hermann von Helmholtz described the stick-slip cycle which drives the string in 1863, which replaced earlier ideas about the vibration of violin strings. Later, scientists such as John Schelleng and Lothar Cremer were able to demonstrate how the mechanics of the bow-string interaction can create different tone colours. Recent research by Anders Askenfelt, Knut Guettler, and Erwin Schoonderwaldt have continued to refine earlier research in this area. The writings of Lucien Capet, Leopold Auer, Carl Flesch, Paul Rolland, Kato Havas, Ivan Galamian, and Simon Fischer are examined and analyzed. Each author describes a different approach to tone production on the violin, representing a different understanding of the underlying mechanism. Analyzing these writings within the context of a scientific understanding of tone production makes it possible to compare these approaches more consistently, and to synthesize different concepts drawn from the diverse sources evaluated.

  9. A ketoreductase domain in the PksJ protein of the bacillaene assembly line carries out both α- and β-ketone reduction during chain growth

    PubMed Central

    Calderone, Christopher T.; Bumpus, Stefanie B.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Magarvey, Nathan A.

    2008-01-01

    The polyketide signaling metabolites bacillaene and dihydrobacillaene are biosynthesized in Bacillus subtilis on an enzymatic assembly line with both nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) modules acting along with catalytic domains servicing the assembly line in trans. These signaling metabolites possess the unusual starter unit α-hydroxyisocaproate (α-HIC). We show here that it arises from initial activation of α-ketoisocaproate (α-KIC) by the first adenylation domain of PksJ (a hybrid PKS/NRPS) and installation on the pantetheinyl arm of the adjacent thiolation (T) domain. The α-KIC unit is elongated to α-KIC-Gly by the second NRPS module in PksJ as demonstrated by mass spectrometric analysis. The third module of PksJ uses PKS logic and contains an embedded ketoreductase (KR) domain along with two adjacent T domains. We show that this KR domain reduces canonical 3-ketobutyryl chains but also the α-keto group of α-KIC-containing intermediates on the PksJ T-domain doublet. This KR activity accounts for the α-HIC moiety found in the dihydrobacillaene/bacillaene pair and represents an example of an assembly-line dual-function α- and β-KR acting on disparate positions of a growing chain intermediate. PMID:18723688

  10. PKS 2155-304 in July 2006: H.E.S.S. results and simultaneous multi-wavelength observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lenain, Jean-Philippe; Boisson, Catherine; Sol, Helne; Zech, Andreas; Benbow, Wystan; Buehler, Rolf; Costamante, Luigi; Raue, Martin; Giebels, Berrie; Superina, Giulia; Punch, Michael; Volpe, Francesca

    2008-12-24

    The high-frequency-peaked BL Lac PKS 2155-304 is one of the brightest and best-studied VHE {gamma}-ray sources in the southern hemisphere. The High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) has monitored PKS 2155-304 in 2006 and a multi-wavelength campaign involving X-ray, optical and radio observatories was triggered by the detection of an active state in July 2006, followed by the detection of two extraordinary flares on July, 28th and 30th, with peak fluxes {approx}100 times the usual values. We present results from the spectral and flux variability analysis of the VHE and simultaneous X-ray observations with Chandra during the second flare, as well as the detailed evolution of the VHE flux of PKS 2155-304 observed by H.E.S.S. in 2006. A study of flux correlations in the different frequency ranges during the second flare and the adjacent nights is discussed. We also present an interpretation of the active state of PKS 2155-304 in the framework of synchrotron self-Compton emission.

  11. RXTE, VLBA, Optical, and Radio Monitoring of the Quasars 3C 279, PKS 1510--089, and 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Jorstad, S. G.; Aller, M. F.; McHardy, I. M.; Balonek, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    We are continuing our combined RXTE X-ray, VLBA imaging (at 43 GHz), optical (several observatories), and radio (University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory) monitoring of the quasars 3C 279 and PKS 1510-089, and have started similar monitoring of 3C 273. X-ray flares in 3C 279 and PKS 1510-089 are associated with ejections of superluminal components. In addition, there is a close connection between the optical and X-ray variability of 3C 279. There is a strong correlation between the 14.5 GHz and X-ray variability of PKS 1510-089 in 1997 and 1998 (with the radio leading the X-ray) that becomes weaker in subsequent years. X-ray fluctuations occur on a variety of timescales in 3C 273, with a major prolonged outburst in mid-2001. The lead author will discuss the correlations in terms of inverse Compton models for the X-ray emission coupled with synchrotron models for the lower-frequency radiation. Synchrotron self-Compton models can explain the "reverse" time lag in PKS 1510-089 is well as the variable correlation between the X-ray variations and those at lower frequencies in this object and in 3C 279.

  12. Title: MAGIC detects exceptionally high activity from PKS 1510-089 at very high energy gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, Razmik

    2016-06-01

    The MAGIC telescopes have detected an increase in the Very High Energy gamma-ray flux from PKS 1510-089 (RA=15 12 50.5, dec=-09 06 00, J2000.0). The preliminary analysis of the MAGIC data taken on 2016/05/30 for 2.7 hours, indicates a highly significant signal (significance > 60 sigma).

  13. ATel 7453: Fermi LAT detection of a GeV flare from the FSRQ PKS 2032+107

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orienti, M.; D'Ammando, F.; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed gamma-ray flaring activity from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 2032+107 (also known as 3FGL J2035.3+1055, Acero et al. ...

  14. Fermi-LAT detection of hard spectrum gamma-ray activity from the FSRQ PKS 1532+01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, S.; Cheung, C. C.

    2015-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux and an unusually hard gamma-ray spectrum from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 1532+01 (also known as 3FGL J1534.5+0128, Acero et al.

  15. Acute plastic bowing of the forearm in adults: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tada, K; Ikeda, K; Tsubouchi, H; Tomita, K

    2008-08-01

    We report 2 adult cases where the diagnosis of acute plastic bowing of the forearm was either delayed or missed. In a 21-year-old man, ulnar bowing was missed and fixation was not performed because the patient had no limitation to his range of movement or pain. In a 24-year-old woman, the presentation of bowing in both the ulna and radius was delayed and corrective osteotomy was necessary for restoration of full range of movement. Prompt diagnosis enables manual reposition for easy restoration of full range of movement. PMID:18725680

  16. A Hybrid NRPS-PKS Gene Cluster Related to the Bleomycin Family of Antitumor Antibiotics in Alteromonas macleodii Strains

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; Kimes, Nikole E.; López-Pérez, Mario; Ausó, Eva; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Ghai, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Although numerous marine bacteria are known to produce antibiotics via hybrid NRPS-PKS gene clusters, none have been previously described in an Alteromonas species. In this study, we describe in detail a novel hybrid NRPS-PKS cluster identified in the plasmid of the Alteromonasmacleodii strain AltDE1 and analyze its relatedness to other similar gene clusters in a sequence-based characterization. This is a mobile cluster, flanked by transposase-like genes, that has even been found inserted into the chromosome of some Alteromonasmacleodii strains. The cluster contains separate genes for NRPS and PKS activity. The sole PKS gene appears to carry a novel acyltransferase domain, quite divergent from those currently characterized. The predicted specificities of the adenylation domains of the NRPS genes suggest that the final compound has a backbone very similar to bleomycin related compounds. However, the lack of genes involved in sugar biosynthesis indicates that the final product is not a glycopeptide. Even in the absence of these genes, the presence of the cluster appears to confer complete or partial resistance to phleomycin, which may be attributed to a bleomycin-resistance-like protein identified within the cluster. This also suggests that the compound still shares significant structural similarity to bleomycin. Moreover, transcriptomic evidence indicates that the NRPS-PKS cluster is expressed. Such sequence-based approaches will be crucial to fully explore and analyze the diversity and potential of secondary metabolite production, especially from increasingly important sources like marine microbes. PMID:24069455

  17. Varioxiranols A-G and 19-O-Methyl-22-methoxypre-shamixanthone, PKS and Hybrid PKS-Derived Metabolites from a Sponge-Associated Emericella variecolor Fungus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Wu, Chongming; Long, Hailin; Chen, Ran; Liu, Dong; Proksch, Peter; Guo, Peng; Lin, Wenhan

    2015-10-23

    Chemical examination of a sponge (Cinachyrella sp.)-associated Emericella variecolor fungus resulted in the isolation of seven new polyketide derivatives, namely, varioxiranols A-G (1-7), and a new hybrid PKS-isoprenoid metabolite, 19-O-methyl-22-methoxypre-shamixanthone (8), together with nine known analogues. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses, including ECD effects, Mosher's method, X-ray diffraction, and chemical conversion for the determination of absolute configurations. Varioxiranols F and G were found for the first time to link a xanthone moiety with a benzyl alcohol via an ether bond, while the dioxolanone group of 5 is unusual in nature. A cell-based lipid-lowering assay revealed that pre-shamixanthone (12) exerted significant inhibition against lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells without cytotoxic effects, accompanying the potent reduction of total cholesterol and triglycerides. Real-time quantitative PCR indicated that pre-shamixanthone (12) mediated the reduction of lipid accumulation related to the down-regulation of the expression of the key lipogenic transcriptional factor SREBP-1c and its downstream genes encoding FAS and ACC. PMID:26394166

  18. High zenith angle observations of PKS 2155-304 with the MAGIC-I telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, J.; Alvarez, E. A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Asensio, M.; Backes, M.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Borla Tridon, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido, D.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Kellermann, H.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Paiano, S.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puerto Gimenez, I.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vankov, H.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.

    2012-08-01

    Context. The high frequency peaked BL Lac PKS 2155-304 with a redshift of z = 0.116 was discovered in 1997 in the very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray range by the University of Durham Mark VI γ-ray Cherenkov telescope in Australia with a flux corresponding to 20% of the Crab Nebula flux. It was later observed and detected with high significance by the southern Cherenkov observatory H.E.S.S. establishing this source as the best studied southern TeV blazar. Detection from the northern hemisphere is difficult due to challenging observation conditions under large zenith angles. In July 2006, the H.E.S.S. collaboration reported an extraordinary outburst of VHE γ-emission. During the outburst, the VHE γ-ray emission was found to be variable on the time scales of minutes and with a mean flux of ~7 times the flux observed from the Crab Nebula. Follow-up observations with the MAGIC-I standalone Cherenkov telescope were triggered by this extraordinary outburst and PKS 2155-304 was observed between 28 July to 2 August 2006 for 15 h at large zenith angles. Aims: We studied the behavior of the source after its extraordinary flare. Furthermore, we developed an analysis method in order to analyze these data taken under large zenith angles. Methods: Here we present an enhanced analysis method for data taken at high zenith angles. We developed improved methods for event selection that led to a better background suppression. Results: The quality of the results presented here is superior to the results presented previously for this data set: detection of the source on a higher significance level and a lower analysis threshold. The averaged energy spectrum we derived has a spectral index of (-3.5 ± 0.2) above 400 GeV, which is in good agreement with the spectral shape measured by H.E.S.S. during the major flare on MJD 53 944. Furthermore, we present the spectral energy distribution modeling of PKS 2155-304. With our observations we increased the duty cycle of the source

  19. Acute plastic bowing of the radius with a distal radioulnar joint injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Masashi; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Acute plastic bowing is an incomplete fracture with a deformation that shows no obvious macroscopic fracture line or cortical discontinuity. Although cases of acute plastic bowing of the ulna with a dislocation of the radial head have been previously reported, we present here a rare case of acute plastic bowing of the radius with a distal radioulnar joint injury in a 16-year-old boy. Internal fixation of the detached fragment to the ulnar styloid and repair of the triangular fibrocartilagenous complex resulted in the disappearance of wrist pain. In cases of distal radioulnar joint injuries in children or adolescents, radiographs of the entire forearm should be taken to evaluate the existence of radial bowing. PMID:21089197

  20. A case of neurilemmoma in the infratemporal fossa showing the antral bowing sign.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Y; Uchida, A; Hiromatsu, T; Hida, K; Kikuta, T

    1993-11-01

    A case is reported of a neurilemmoma which arose in the right infratemporal fossa of a 23-year-old male. A benign tumour was suspected when bowing of the posterior maxillary antral wall was observed on CT. PMID:8181651

  1. Effect of ship bow overhang on water shipping for ship advancing in regular head waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmansour, Abdeljalil; Hamoudi, Benameur; Adjlout, Lahouari

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation dealing with the effect of bow overhang extensions on the quantity of shipping water over the foredeck in case of ships advancing in regular head waves. To perform this investigation, a series of free-running tests was conducted in regular waves using an experimental model of a multipurpose cargo ship to quantify the amount of shipping water. The tests were performed on five bow overhang variants with several combinations of wavelength and ship speed conditions. It was observed that the quantity of shipping water was affected by some parameters such as wavelength, ship speed, and bow shape in terms of an overhang extension. The results show the significant influence of an overhang extension, which is associated with the bow flare shape, on the occurrence of water shipping. These results involve the combined incoming regular waves and model speed.

  2. Oxygen foreshock of Mars and its implication on ion acceleration in the bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Lundin, Rickard; Frahm, Rudy; Sauvaud, Jean-Andre; Holmstrom, Mats; Barabash, Stas

    2016-04-01

    Ion acceleration inside the bow shock is one of the poorly understood phenomena that has been observed for more than 30 years as the foreshock phenomena. While the Fermi-acceleration mechanism explains the diffuse component of foreshock ions, we still do not know the detailed mechanism that produces the discrete intense ions flowing along the local magnetic field direction (with and without gyration). One of the reasons for such difficulty is that majority of the bow shock study was performed for the Earth's case where Oxygen ions cannot be used to understand the acceleration mechanisms. The planetary oxygen ions that reach the Earth's bow shock have already been significantly accelerated, and are not adequate for such a study. In this sense the Martian bow shock is an ideal place to study the acceleration mechanisms leading to foreshock ions, although the nature of the bow shock is slightly different between the Earth and Mars (Yamauchi et al., 2011). On 21 September 2008, the Mars Express (MEX) Ion Mass Analyser (IMA) detected foreshock-like discrete distributions of oxygen ions at around 1 keV in the solar wind attached to the bow shock. This was the first time that a substantial amount of planetary oxygen was observed upstream of the bow shock. The oxygen energy increased from low energy (< 300 keV) inside the magnetosheath (or it should be called an extended bow shock) to nearly 2 keV at more than 2000 km from the bow shock. Foreshock-like protons are also observed but at a shifted location from the oxygen by about 1000 km, at a slightly higher energy, and flowing in a slightly different direction than the oxygen ions. Both protons and oxygen ions are flowing anti-sunward at different angles with respect to the solar wind direction. The observation is consistent with an electric potential barrier at the bow shock that simultaneously accelerates the planetary oxygen ions outward (to form the foreshock oxygen ions) and reflects a portion of the solar wind (to

  3. Multispacecraft observations of energetic ions upstream and downstream of the bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Moebius, E.; Kistler, L. M.; Klecker, B.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1989-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of energetic protons and alpha particles were obtained inside and outside of the magnetopause and upstream and downstream of the bow shock. In the magnetosheath, no gradient or streaming is found in the upstream direction. The present results are consistent with first-order Fermi acceleration at the bow shock and subsequent downstream convection, and exclude the possibility of a magnetospheric source for these particles.

  4. Extended red objects and stellar-wind bow shocks in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, Remington O.; Povich, Matthew S.; Smith, Nathan; Babler, Brian L.; Meade, Marilyn R.; Rudolph, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of infrared photometry on 39 extended red objects (EROs) in the Carina Nebula, observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Most EROs are identified by bright, extended 8.0 μm emission, which ranges from 10 arcsec to 40 arcsec in size, but our sample also includes four EROs identified by extended 24 μm emission. Of particular interest are nine EROs associated with late O- or early B-type stars and characterized by arc-shaped morphology, suggesting dusty, stellar-wind bow shocks. These objects are preferentially oriented towards the central regions of the Carina Nebula, suggesting that these bow shocks are generally produced by the interactions of OB winds with the bulk expansion of the H II region rather than high proper motion. We identify preferred regions of mid-infrared colour space occupied by our bow shock candidates, which also contain bow shock candidates in M17 and RCW 49 but are well separated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission or circumstellar discs. Colour cuts identify an additional 12 marginally resolved bow shock candidates, 10 of which are also associated with known late O or early B stars. H II region expansion velocities derived from bow shock candidate standoff distances are ˜10 km s-1, assuming typical H II region gas densities, comparable to expansion velocities derived from bow shocks in M17 and RCW 49. One candidate bow shock provides direct evidence of physical interaction between the massive stellar winds originating in the Trumpler 15 and Trumpler 14 clusters, supporting the conclusion that both clusters are at similar heliocentric distances.

  5. Calculation of the reactivity feedback due to core-assembly bowing in LMFBRs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    The nonuniformity of the temperature distribution in an LMFBR leads to differential thermal expansion of the walls of an assembly hexcan. These thermal expansion differentials cause the hexcan to distort or bow. Consequentially, the assembly experiences a spatial displacement, which results in a change in reactivity for the core. A computational model to calculate the reactivity feedback due to material displacements induced by assembly bowing effects has been developed.

  6. The solar cycle dependence of the location and shape of the Venus bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T.-L.; Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    The Venus terminator bow shock position is monitored and it is shown that the shock radius increases as the solar cycle approaches a new maximum. It is also shown that the subsolar bow shock changes with the solar cycle, and that these positions are correlated with each other and with solar activity. It is hypothesized that, at solar minimum, the magnetic barrier is weak, and that some absorption of solar wind is to be expected.

  7. On the observability of bow shocks of Galactic runaway OB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. M.-A.; van Marle, A.-J.; Kuiper, R.; Kley, W.

    2016-06-01

    Massive stars that have been ejected from their parent cluster and supersonically sailing away through the interstellar medium (ISM) are classified as exiled. They generate circumstellar bow-shock nebulae that can be observed. We present two-dimensional, axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of a representative sample of stellar wind bow shocks from Galactic OB stars in an ambient medium of densities ranging from nISM = 0.01 up to 10.0 cm- 3. Independently of their location in the Galaxy, we confirm that the infrared is the most appropriated waveband to search for bow shocks from massive stars. Their spectral energy distribution is the convenient tool to analyse them since their emission does not depend on the temporary effects which could affect unstable, thin-shelled bow shocks. Our numerical models of Galactic bow shocks generated by high-mass ( ≈ 40 M⊙) runaway stars yield H α fluxes which could be observed by facilities such as the SuperCOSMOS H-Alpha Survey. The brightest bow-shock nebulae are produced in the denser regions of the ISM. We predict that bow shocks in the field observed at H α by means of Rayleigh-sensitive facilities are formed around stars of initial mass larger than about 20 M⊙. Our models of bow shocks from OB stars have the emission maximum in the wavelength range 3 ≤ λ ≤ 50 μm which can be up to several orders of magnitude brighter than the runaway stars themselves, particularly for stars of initial mass larger than 20 M⊙.

  8. An unusually strong Einstein ring in the radio source PKS1830 - 211

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jauncey, D. L.; Reynolds, J. E.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Murphy, D. W.; Preston, R. A.; Jones, D. L.; Meier, D. L.; Hoard, D. W.; Lobdell, E. T.; Skjerve, L.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution radio images of PKS1830 - 211 are obtained to study the possibility that the double structure is a gravitationally lensed object. The VLBI observations, taken from interferometric radiotelescope networks, reveal an elliptical ring that connects two bright spots of similar composition. Because the lens and the lensed object are closely aligned, and because of the structure of the two spots, the source is concluded to be a radio Einstein ring. The source is found to be close to the galactic plane, and the lens and the lensed object are extragalactic. The source is also found to be unusually bright, suggesting that it is aligned with a bright background source or amplified by some mechanism related to a source that is not so bright.

  9. The L-alpha/H-alpha intensity ratio in PKS 0237-23. [quasar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, A. R.; Becklin, E. E.; Neugebauer, G.

    1978-01-01

    The ratio I(L-alpha)/I(H-alpha) has been measured to be 1.7 plus or minus 0.6 in the quasar PKS 0237-23. The measured ratio is similar to that measured in 3C 273 by Davidsen et al. and to that inferred by Baldwin from a study of a large number of quasars; it is a factor of 5 to 14 smaller than expected from recombination theory. If the L-alpha radiation is resonantly scattered and there are modest amounts of dust within the ionized region, the measured ratio may be interpreted in terms of recombination theory, with L-alpha being depleted by absorption by the dust.

  10. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR PKS 0528+134 IN QUIESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, N. I.; Boettcher, M.; Li, Y.; De la Calle, I.; Agudo, I.; Jorstad, S. G.; Joshi, M.; Aller, M.; Aller, H.; Bach, U.; BenItez, E.; Buemi, C. S.; Leto, P.; Escande, L.; Gurwell, M. A.; Heidt, J.; Hiriart, D.; Laehteenmaeki, A.; Larionov, V. M. E-mail: marscher@bu.edu E-mail: jlgomez@iaa.es

    2011-07-01

    We present multiwavelength observations of the ultraluminous blazar-type radio loud quasar PKS 0528+134 in quiescence during the period 2009 July-December. Four Target-of-Opportunity observations with the XMM-Newton satellite in the 0.2-10 keV range were supplemented with optical observations at the MDM Observatory, radio and optical data from the GLAST-AGILE Support Program of the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope and the Very Long Baseline Array, additional X-ray data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (2-10 keV) and from Suzaku (0.5-10 keV) as well as {gamma}-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope in the 100 MeV-200 GeV range. In addition, publicly available data from the SMARTS blazar monitoring program and the University of Arizona/Steward Observatory Fermi Support program were included in our analysis. We found no evidence of significant flux or spectral variability in {gamma}-rays and most radio bands. However, significant flux variability on a timescale of several hours was found in the optical regime, accompanied by a weak trend of spectral softening with increasing flux. We suggest that this might be the signature of a contribution of unbeamed emission, possibly from the accretion disk, at the blue end of the optical spectrum. The optical flux is weakly polarized with rapid variations of the degree and direction of polarization, while the polarization of the 43 GHz radio core remains steady, perpendicular to the jet direction. Optical spectropolarimetry of the object in the quiescent state suggests a trend of increasing degree of polarization with increasing wavelength, providing additional evidence for an unpolarized emission component, possibly thermal emission from the accretion disk, contributing toward the blue end of the optical spectrum. Over an extended period of several months, PKS 0528+134 shows moderate (amplitude {approx}< 50%) flux variability in the X-rays and most radio frequencies on {approx}1-2 week timescales. We constructed four

  11. Distribution of gas and galaxies around the distant quasar PKS 1614 + 051

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, E.M.; Cowie, L.L.

    1987-06-01

    The results of narrow-band and broad-band filter observations of the region surrounding the z = 3.21 quasars, PKS 1614 + 051, made under subarcsec seeing conditions with the 3.6 m CFHT telescope at Mauna Kea are reported. The nuclear region of the Lyman-alpha companion to the quasar is resolved with a FWHM of about 0.9 arcsec A magnitude fainter. Limits on detectable continuum flux from this object suggest that it is a gas cloud interacting with the quasar, and its emission is consistent with simple photoionization by the quasar. However, the presence of several galaxies around the periphery of the quasar is noted. A search of 11 additional quasars at z greater than 3 has failed to show any other such systems. It is argued that this is consistent with the statistics of extended emission line systems in low-z quasars. 11 references.

  12. The Intriguing Giant Bow Shocks near HH 131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Noumaru, Junichi; Wang, Hongchi; Yang, Ji; Chen, Jiansheng

    2005-12-01

    Using the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) at the Subaru Telescope, echelle spectra of two giant arcs, i.e., nebulosities Cw and L associated with HH 131 in Orion are presented. Typical emission lines of Herbig-Haro (HH) objects have been detected toward nebulosity Cw with the broadband filter KV 408. With the low-dispersion spectrograph at the National Astronomical Observatories (NAO) 2.16 m telescope, spectra of nebulosities C, L, and K are obtained, which also show strong [S II] λ6717/λ6731, Hα, and [N II] λ6583 emission lines. Position-velocity distributions of Cw and L are analyzed from the long-slit spectra observed with the HDS Hα narrowband filter. The fastest radial velocity of Cw is Vr~-18.0 km s-1. When the flow at L goes to the south, it slows down. The fastest radial velocity of L has been observed at -45.0 km s-1, and the slowest value is about -18.3 km s-1 the radial velocity gradient is about 200 km s-1 pc-1. The similarity of the fastest radial velocity of Cw to the slowest value of L and their positional connection indicate that they are physically associated. There is a tendency for the entire flow to become less excited and less ionized when going further to the south (i.e., from nebulosities K to L and C), where the most extended (and presumably evolved) objects are seen. The electron densities of all the observed nebulosities are low (ne~102 cm-3). Double-peaked kinematic signatures have been found in Cw from its [N II] λ6583 profiles, while the observed Hα profiles of Cw are almost symmetric. Bow shock models appear to agree with the observed position-velocity diagrams of the [N II] spectra better than Hα spectra, and a bow shock with its wing, apex, and postshock has been possibly revealed near Cw from the [N II] emission. With the suggestion that these arcs are HH shocks possibly ejected out of the Orion A molecular cloud by an uncertain source, their spectra show low to intermediate excitation from their diagnostic line ratios

  13. MESSENGER observations of Mercury's bow shock and magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Acuña, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Benna, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Raines, J. M.; Schriver, D.; Trávníček, P.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract The MESSENGER spacecraft made the first of three flybys of Mercury on January 14, 2008 (1). New observations of solar wind interaction with Mercury were made with MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) (2,3) and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) - composed of the Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS) and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) (3,4). These MESSENGER observations show that Mercury's magnetosphere has a large-scale structure that is distinctly Earth-like, but it is immersed in a comet-like cloud of planetary ions [5]. Fig. 1 provides a schematic view of the coupled solar wind - magnetosphere - neutral atmosphere - solid planet system at Mercury. Here we present new models of bow shock and magnetopause shape and location that incorporate both the MESSENGER and earlier Mariner 10 measurements of these boundaries. A fast magnetosonic Mach number for the solar wind at Mercury's distance from the Sun of ~ 3 is derived from the shape of the bow shock. This value is consistent with earlier observations at these distances from the Sun by the Helios mission. The shape of Mercury's magnetopause and the thickness of the magnetosheath are found to be similar to that of the Earth, suggesting that the solar wind interaction is dominated by its dipolar magnetic field. MESSENGER measurements near the magnetopause do, however, indicate that internal plasma pressure does contribute to the pressure balance across this boundary. MAG and FIPS measurements are used to estimate the ratio of plasma thermal pressure to magnetic pressure at the dusk flank of the plasma sheet and dawn terminator regions, under the assumption that pressure is balanced across the inbound and outbound magnetopause crossings. To investigate the possible origins of the plasma ions in these regions, we utilize a combination of FIPS measurements and the results of 3-D hybrid [6] and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar wind interaction with Mercury for the upstream conditions

  14. Post-PKS Tailoring Steps of a Disaccharide-Containing Polyene NPP in Pseudonocardia autotrophica

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Kim, Min-Kyung; Lee, Mi-Jin; Won, Hyung-Jin; Choi, Si-Sun; Kim, Eung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A novel polyene compound NPP identified in a rare actinomycetes, Pseudonocardia autotrophica KCTC9441, was shown to contain an aglycone identical to nystatin but to harbor a unique di-sugar moiety, mycosaminyl-(α1-4)-N-acetyl-glucosamine, which led to higher solubility and reduced hemolytic activity. Although the nppDI was proved to be responsible for the transfer of first polyene sugar, mycosamine in NPP biosynthesis, the gene responsible for the second sugar extending glycosyltransferase (GT) as well as NPP post-PKS tailoring mechanism remained unknown. Here, we identified a NPP-specific second sugar extending GT gene named nppY, located at the edge of the NPP biosynthetic gene cluster. Targeted nppY gene deletion and its complementation proved that nppY is indeed responsible for the transfer of second sugar, N-acetyl-glucosamine in NPP biosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis on nppY also revealed several amino acid residues critical for NppY GT function. Moreover, a combination of deletions and complementations of two GT genes (nppDI and nppY) and one P450 hydroxylase gene (nppL) involved in the NPP post-PKS biosynthesis revealed that NPP aglycone is sequentially modified by the two different GTs encoded by nppDI and nppY, respectively, followed by the nppL-driven regio-specific hydroxylation at the NPP C10 position. These results set the stage for the biotechnological application of sugar diversification for the biosynthesis of novel polyene compounds in actinomycetes. PMID:25849545

  15. Time-dependent Modeling of Gamma-Ray Flares in Blazar PKS1510--089

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Stawarz, Ł.; Tanaka, Y. T.; Takahashi, T.; Sikora, M.; Moderski, R.

    2015-08-01

    Here we present a new approach for constraining luminous blazars, incorporating fully time-dependent and self-consistent modeling of bright γ-ray flares of PKS 1510-089, resolved with Fermi-LAT, in the framework of the internal shock scenario. The results of our modeling imply the location of the γ-ray flaring zone to be outside of the broad-line region, namely around ≃ 0.3 pc from the core for a free-expanding jet with the opening angle {{Γ }} {θ }{jet}≃ 1 (where Γ is the jet bulk Lorentz factor), up to ≃ 3 pc for a collimated outflow with {{Γ }} {θ }{jet}≃ 0.1. Moreover, under the {{Γ }} {θ }{jet}≃ 1 condition, our modeling indicates the maximum efficiency of the jet production during the flares, with the total jet energy flux strongly dominated by protons and exceeding the available accretion power in the source. This is in contrast to the quiescence states of the blazar, characterized by lower jet kinetic power and an approximate energy equipartition between different plasma constituents. We demostrate how strictly simultaneous observations of flaring PKS 1510-089 at optical, X-ray, and GeV photon energies, on hourly timescales, augmented by extensive simulations as presented in this paper, may help to impose further precise constraints on the magnetization and opening angle of the emitting region. In addition, our detailed modeling implies that a non-uniformity of the Doppler factor across the jet, caused by the radial expansion of the outflow, may lead to a pronounced time distortion in the observed γ-ray light curves, resulting, in particular, in asymmetric flux profiles with substantially extended decay phases.

  16. Detection of extragalactic argonium, ArH+, toward PKS 1830-211

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Holger S. P.; Muller, Sébastien; Schilke, Peter; Bergin, Edwin A.; Black, John H.; Gerin, Maryvonne; Lis, Dariusz C.; Neufeld, David A.; Suri, Sümeyye

    2015-10-01

    Context. Argonium has recently been detected as a ubiquitous molecule in our Galaxy. Model calculations indicate that its abundance peaks at molecular fractions in the range of 10-4 to 10-3 and that the observed column densities require high values of the cosmic ray ionization rate. Therefore, this molecular cation may serve as an excellent tracer of the very diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), as well as an indicator of the cosmic ray ionization rate. Aims: We attempted to detect ArH+ in extragalactic sources to evaluate its diagnostic power as a tracer of the almost purely atomic ISM in distant galaxies. Methods: We obtained ALMA observations of a foreground galaxy at z = 0.89 in the direction of the lensed blazar PKS 1830-211. Results: Two isotopologs of argonium, 36ArH+ and 38ArH+, were detected in absorption along two different lines of sight toward PKS 1830-211, known as the SW and NE images of the background blazar. The argonium absorption is clearly enhanced on the more diffuse line of sight (NE) compared to other molecular species. The isotopic ratio 36Ar/38Ar is 3.46 ± 0.16 toward the SW image, i.e., significantly lower than the solar value of 5.5. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate the suitability of argonium as a tracer of the almost purely atomic, diffuse ISM in high-redshift sources. The evolution of the isotopic ratio with redshift may help to constrain nucleosynthetic scenarios in the early Universe. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. IMPLICATIONS OF THE ANOMALOUS OUTBURST IN THE BLAZAR PKS 0208-512

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Ritaban; Myers, Adam D.; Nalewajko, Krzysztof

    2013-07-10

    The flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 0208-512 underwent three outbursts at the optical-near-infrared (OIR) wavelengths during 2008-2011. The second OIR outburst did not have a {gamma}-ray counterpart despite being comparable in brightness and temporal extent to the other two. We model the time variable spectral energy distribution of PKS 0208-512 during those three flaring episodes with leptonic models to investigate the physical mechanism that can produce this anomalous flare. We show that the redder-when-brighter spectral trend in the OIR bands can be explained by the superposition of a fixed thermal component from the accretion disk and a synchrotron component of fixed shape and variable normalization. We estimate the accretion disk luminosity at L{sub d} {approx_equal} 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1}. Using the observed variability timescale in the OIR band t{sub var,obs} {approx_equal} 2 days and the X-ray luminosity L{sub X} {approx_equal} 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1}, we are able to constrain the location of the emitting region to distance scales that are broadly comparable with the dusty torus. We show that variations in the Compton dominance parameter by a factor of {approx}4-which may result in the anomalous outburst-can be relatively easily accounted for by moderate variations in the magnetic field strength or the location of the emission region. Since such variations appear to be rare among FSRQs, we propose that most {gamma}-ray/OIR flares in these objects are produced in jet regions where the magnetic field and external photon fields vary similarly with distance along the jet, e.g., u{sub B}{sup '}{proportional_to}u{sub ext}{sup '}{proportional_to}r{sup -2}.

  18. Periodic Structure in the Megaparsec-scale Jet of PKS 0637-752

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, L. E. H.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Ekers, R.; Bicknell, G. V.; Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D. M.; Jauncey, D. L.; Schwartz, D. A.; Marshall, H. L.; Gelbord, J.; Perlman, E. S.; Georganopoulos, M.

    2012-10-01

    We present 18 GHz Australia Telescope Compact Array imaging of the megaparsec-scale quasar jet PKS 0637-752 with angular resolution ~0farcs58. We draw attention to a spectacular train of quasi-periodic knots along the inner 11'' of the jet, with average separation ~1.1 arcsec (7.6 kpc projected). We consider two classes of model to explain the periodic knots: those that involve a static pattern through which the jet plasma travels (e.g., stationary shocks) and those that involve modulation of the jet engine. Interpreting the knots as re-confinement shocks implies the jet kinetic power Q jet ~ 1046 erg s-1, but the constant knot separation along the jet is not expected in a realistic external density profile. For models involving modulation of the jet engine, we find that the required modulation period is 2 × 103 yr < τ < 3 × 105 yr. The lower end of this range is applicable if the jet remains highly relativistic on kiloparsec scales, as implied by the IC/CMB model of jet X-ray emission. We suggest that the periodic jet structure in PKS 0637-752 may be analogous to the quasi-periodic jet modulation seen in the microquasar GRS 1915+105, believed to result from limit cycle behavior in an unstable accretion disk. If variations in the accretion rate are driven by a binary black hole, the predicted orbital radius is 0.7 pc <~ a <~ 30 pc, which corresponds to a maximum angular separation of ~0.1-5 mas.

  19. PERIODIC STRUCTURE IN THE MEGAPARSEC-SCALE JET OF PKS 0637-752

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, L. E. H.; Ekers, R.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Bicknell, G. V.; Jauncey, D. L.; Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D. M.; Schwartz, D. A.; Marshall, H. L.; Gelbord, J.; Perlman, E. S.; Georganopoulos, M.

    2012-10-20

    We present 18 GHz Australia Telescope Compact Array imaging of the megaparsec-scale quasar jet PKS 0637-752 with angular resolution {approx}0.''58. We draw attention to a spectacular train of quasi-periodic knots along the inner 11'' of the jet, with average separation {approx}1.1 arcsec (7.6 kpc projected). We consider two classes of model to explain the periodic knots: those that involve a static pattern through which the jet plasma travels (e.g., stationary shocks) and those that involve modulation of the jet engine. Interpreting the knots as re-confinement shocks implies the jet kinetic power Q{sub jet} {approx} 10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, but the constant knot separation along the jet is not expected in a realistic external density profile. For models involving modulation of the jet engine, we find that the required modulation period is 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} yr < {tau} < 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} yr. The lower end of this range is applicable if the jet remains highly relativistic on kiloparsec scales, as implied by the IC/CMB model of jet X-ray emission. We suggest that the periodic jet structure in PKS 0637-752 may be analogous to the quasi-periodic jet modulation seen in the microquasar GRS 1915+105, believed to result from limit cycle behavior in an unstable accretion disk. If variations in the accretion rate are driven by a binary black hole, the predicted orbital radius is 0.7 pc {approx}< a {approx}< 30 pc, which corresponds to a maximum angular separation of {approx}0.1-5 mas.

  20. AGN feedback in X-ray luminous galaxy cluster: PKS 0745-191

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonkamble, Satish Shripati; Vagshette, Nilkanth Dattatray; Patil, Madhav Khushalrao

    2015-08-01

    We present 117 ks Chandra observation of the cooling flow cluster PKS 0745-191 providing evidence of the strong interaction between the radio source associated with the center dominant galaxy PGC 021813 and the intra-cluster gas. This system is one of the strongest cool core cluster, requiring extreme mechanical feedback from its central AGN to offset cooling of the ICM. This analysis has enabled us to detect two pairs of X-ray cavities in the central ˜ 20 kpc region. In addition to the cavities, we have also evidenced relatively cooler X-ray arc and a temperature jump due to the shock front at 92'' (184 kpc) on the western side. 2D temperature maps as well as spectral analysis of X-ray photons extracted from wedge shaped reigns revealed six different cold fronts, 3 along the eastern direction, 2 on the west direction and one in the south direction of the X-ray peak. The apparent positions of cold fronts are found to match with the spiral structure apparent in the X-ray surface brightness distribution of PKS 0745-191 that is probably due to the gas sloshing. The Mach number for this shock is found to be ˜ 1.36. Systematic study of the X-ray cavities revealed a mechanical power of ˜ 2.95 X 1045 erg s-1 and is sufficient to offset the cooling due to radiative loss. We found that the radio source associated with the center dominant galaxy of this cluster is efficient enough to carve the observed cavities. The ratio of radio luminosity to mechanical cavity power is ˜ 10-3 .

  1. Effect of bow-type initial imperfection on reliability of minimum-weight, stiffened structural panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. Jefferson; Krishnamurthy, Thiagaraja; Sykes, Nancy P.; Elishakoff, Isaac

    1993-01-01

    Computations were performed to determine the effect of an overall bow-type imperfection on the reliability of structural panels under combined compression and shear loadings. A panel's reliability is the probability that it will perform the intended function - in this case, carry a given load without buckling or exceeding in-plane strain allowables. For a panel loaded in compression, a small initial bow can cause large bending stresses that reduce both the buckling load and the load at which strain allowables are exceeded; hence, the bow reduces the reliability of the panel. In this report, analytical studies on two stiffened panels quantified that effect. The bow is in the shape of a half-sine wave along the length of the panel. The size e of the bow at panel midlength is taken to be the single random variable. Several probability density distributions for e are examined to determine the sensitivity of the reliability to details of the bow statistics. In addition, the effects of quality control are explored with truncated distributions.

  2. Flow performance of highly loaded axial fan with bowed rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Liu, X. J.; Yang, A. L.; Dai, R.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a partial bowed rotor blade was proposed for a newly designed high loaded axial fan. The blade was positively bowed 30 degrees from hub to 30 percent spanwise position. Flows of radial blade and bowed blade fans were numerically compared for various operation conditions. Results show that the fan's performance is improved. At the designed condition with flow coefficient of 0.52, the efficiency of the bowed blade fan is increased 1.44% and the static pressure rise is increased 11%. Comparing the flow structures, it can be found that the separated flow in the bowed fan is reduced and confined within 20 percent span, which is less than the 35 percent in the radial fan. It means that the bowed blade generates negative blade force and counteracts partial centrifugal force. It is alleviates the radial movements of boundary layers in fan's hub region. Flow losses due to 3D mixing are reduced in the rotor. Inlet flow to downstream stator is also improved.

  3. Global Explicit Particle-in-cell Simulations of the Nonstationary Bow Shock and Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhongwei; Huang, Can; Liu, Ying D.; Parks, George K.; Wang, Rui; Lu, Quanming; Hu, Huidong

    2016-07-01

    We carry out two-dimensional global particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction between the solar wind and a dipole field to study the formation of the bow shock and magnetosphere. A self-reforming bow shock ahead of a dipole field is presented by using relatively high temporal-spatial resolutions. We find that (1) the bow shock and the magnetosphere are formed and reach a quasi-stable state after several ion cyclotron periods, and (2) under the B z southward solar wind condition, the bow shock undergoes a self-reformation for low β i and high M A . Simultaneously, a magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail is found. For high β i and low M A , the shock becomes quasi-stationary, and the magnetotail reconnection disappears. In addition, (3) the magnetopause deflects the magnetosheath plasmas. The sheath particles injected at the quasi-perpendicular region of the bow shock can be convected downstream of an oblique shock region. A fraction of these sheath particles can leak out from the magnetosheath at the wings of the bow shock. Hence, the downstream situation is more complicated than that for a planar shock produced in local simulations.

  4. Bow shock models of ultracompact H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Van Buren, Dave; Wood, Douglas O. S.; Churchwell, ED

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents models of ultracompact H II regions as the bow shocks formed by massive stars, with strong stellar winds, moving supersonically through molecular clouds. The morphologies, sizes and brightnesses of observed objects match the models well. Plausible models are provided for the ultracompact H II regions G12.21 - 0.1, G29.96 - 0.02, G34.26 + 0.15, and G43.89 - 0.78. To do this, the equilibrium shape of the wind-blown shell is calculated, assuming momentum conservation. Then the shell is illuminated with ionizing radiation from the central star, radiative transfer for free-free emission through the shell is performed, and the resulting object is visualized at various angles for comparison with radio continuum maps. The model unifies most of the observed morphologies of ultracompact H II regions, excluding only those objects with spherical shells. Ram pressure confinement greatly lengthens the life of ultracompact H II regions, explaining the large number that exist in the Galaxy despite their low apparent kinematic ages.

  5. Multi-Spacecraft Investigation of Terrestrial Bow Shock: Cluster Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruparova, O.; Krupar, V.; Santolik, O.; Soucek, J.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Nemec, F.; Maksimovic, M.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere, a permanent collisionless bow shock (BS) is formed in front of the nose of the magnetopause. We investigate a large number of BS crossings observed by the Cluster spacecraft between years 2001 and 2015. The FGM instruments provide us with magnetic field measurements sampled at 22 Hz, which is sufficient for a precise identification of BS crossings. We compare observed BS locations with distances predicted by gas dynamical models based on upstream plasma parameters in the solar wind. We achieve a very good agreement in a case of a paraboloid with the Earth fixed in a focus point. We use a simple timing method for the estimation of a BS normal and velocity along this normal. We found that the deviations of calculated BS normals from the paraboloid shape are within 20 degrees. We compare calculated BS velocities with several upstream parameters. We also investigate BS ramp thickness which is comparable to the Larmor radius in the case of quasi-perpendicular BS crossings.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic and gasdynamic theories for planetary bow waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    The observed properties of bow waves and the associated plasma flows are outlined, along with those features identified that can be described by a continuum magnetohydrodynamic flow theory as opposed to a more detailed multicomponent particle and field plasma theory. The primary objectives are to provide an account of the fundamental concepts and current status of the magnetohydrodynamic and gas dynamic theories for solar wind flow past planetary bodies. This includes a critical examination of: (1) the fundamental assumptions of the theories; (2) the various simplifying approximations introduced to obtain tractable mathematical problems; (3) the limitations they impose on the results; and (4) the relationship between the results of the simpler gas dynamic-frozen field theory and the more accurate but less completely worked out magnetohydrodynamic theory. Representative results of the various theories are presented and compared. A number of deficiencies, ambiguities, and suggestions for improvements are discussed, and several significant extensions of the theory required to provide comparable results for all planets, their satellites, and comets are noted.

  7. Theory of 2 omegape radiation induced by the bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Wu, C. S.; Vinas, A. F.-; Reiner, M. J.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1994-12-01

    A new radiation emission mechanism is proposed to explain electomagnetic radiation observed at twice the electron plasma frequency, 2 omegape, in the upstream region of the Earth's bow shock. This radiation had its origin at the electron foreshock boundary where energetic electron beams and intense narrow-band Langmiur waves are observed. The proposed emission mechanism results from the interaction of the electron beam and Langmuir waves that are backscattered off thermal ions. This interaction is described by a nonlinear dispersion equation which incorporates an effect owing to electron trajectory modulation by the backscattered Langmuir waves. Subsequent analysis of the dispersion equation reveals two important consequences. First, a long-wavelength electrostatic quasi-mode with frequency at 2 omegape is excited, and second, the quasi-mode and the electomagnetic mode are nonlinearly coupled. The implication is that, when the excited 2 omegape quasi-mode propagates in an inhomgeneous medium with slightly decreasing density, the quasi-mode can be converted directly into an electromagnetic mode. Hense the electomagnetic radiation at twice the plasma frequency is generated. Numerical solutions of the dispersion equation with the choice of parameters that describe physical characteristics of the electron foreshock are presented, which illustrates the viability of the new mechanism.

  8. Whistler wave bursts upstream of the Uranian bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Wong, Hung K.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of magnetic field wave bursts upstream of the Uranian bow shock are reported which were recorded prior to the inbound shock crossing. Three wave types are identified. One exhibits a broad spectral enhancement from a few millihertz to about 50 mHz and is seen from 17 to 10 hr prior to the inbound shock crossing. It is argued that these waves are whistler waves that have propagated upstream from the shock. A second wave type has a spacecraft frame frequency between 20 and 40 mHz, is seen only within or immediately upstream of the shock pedestal, is right-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame, and has a typical burst duration of 90 s. The third wave type has a spacecraft frame frequency of about 0.15 Hz, is seen exclusively within the shock pedestal, is left-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame, and has a burst duration lasting up to 4 min. It is argued that the low-frequency bursts are whistler waves with phase speed comparable to, but in excess of, the solar wind speed.

  9. Designing and Implementing an Assay for the Detection of Rare and Divergent NRPS and PKS Clones in European, Antarctic and Cuban Soils

    PubMed Central

    Laskaris, Paris; Krsek, Martin; Berry, Andrew E.; Newsham, Kevin K.; Calvo-Bado, Leo; Pearce, David A.; Vallin, Carlos; Wellington, Elizabeth M. H.

    2015-01-01

    The ever increasing microbial resistome means there is an urgent need for new antibiotics. Metagenomics is an underexploited tool in the field of drug discovery. In this study we aimed to produce a new updated assay for the discovery of biosynthetic gene clusters encoding bioactive secondary metabolites. PCR assays targeting the polyketide synthases (PKS) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) were developed. A range of European soils were tested for their biosynthetic potential using clone libraries developed from metagenomic DNA. Results revealed a surprising number of NRPS and PKS clones with similarity to rare Actinomycetes. Many of the clones tested were phylogenetically divergent suggesting they were fragments from novel NRPS and PKS gene clusters. Soils did not appear to cluster by location but did represent NRPS and PKS clones of diverse taxonomic origin. Fosmid libraries were constructed from Cuban and Antarctic soil samples; 17 fosmids were positive for NRPS domains suggesting a hit rate of less than 1 in 10 genomes. NRPS hits had low similarities to both rare Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria; they also clustered with known antibiotic producers suggesting they may encode for pathways producing novel bioactive compounds. In conclusion we designed an assay capable of detecting divergent NRPS and PKS gene clusters from the rare biosphere; when tested on soil samples results suggest the majority of NRPS and PKS pathways and hence bioactive metabolites are yet to be discovered. PMID:26398766

  10. Multi-wavelength observations of PKS 2142–75 during active and quiescent gamma-ray states

    SciTech Connect

    Dutka, Michael S.; Ojha, Roopesh; Finke, Justin D.; Stevens, Jamie; Edwards, Philip G.; Blanchard, Jay; Lovell, James E. J.; Nesci, Roberto; Wilms, Joern; Krauss, Felicia; Tosti, Gino; Pursimo, Tapio; Gehrels, Neil

    2013-12-20

    PKS 2142–75 (a.k.a. 2FGL J2147.4–7534) is a flat-spectrum radio quasar that was observed quasi-simultaneously by a suite of instruments across the electromagnetic spectrum during two flaring states in 2010 April and 2011 August as well as a quiescent state from 2011 December through 2012 January. The results of these campaigns and model spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from the active and quiescent states are presented. The SED model parameters of PKS 2142–75 indicate that the two flares of the source are created by unique physical conditions. SED studies of flat-spectrum radio quasars are beginning to indicate that there might be two types of flares, those that can be described purely by changes in the electron distribution and those that require changes in other parameters, such as the magnetic field strength or the size of the emitting region.

  11. The upper Bow Island (Blackleaf) Formation of southwestern Alberta: Geological aspects and exploration approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, P.E.; Christensen, S.L. )

    1991-06-01

    The upper parts of the Bow Island Formation (Albian) of southwestern Alberta are significant gas reservoirs. The main westernmost reservoir zone is part of a complex package of interbedded lenticular sandstones, mudstones, and localized chert pebble conglomerates. The depositional setting for these sediments comprised a wave-dominated shoreline with conglomerates found proximal to drowned river mouths. The coarse nature of the upper Bow Island is related to tectonic movements associated with Crowsnest (Vaughn) volcanism. Conglomerates form the most impressive Bow Island reservoirs because of their thickness (up to 25 m) and petrophysical properties (17% porosity, 24 d permeability). Diagenesis dominantly comprises compaction features within grain-supported conglomerates. Increasing quartz content is related to decreasing grain size and is associated with porosity occlusion by quartz overgrowths. Bow Island reservoirs in southwestern Alberta are cool (under 50C) and significantly underpressured (0.2 psi). The high permeabilities and low pressures at depths of 1,000 to 1,500 m suggest the potential for formation damage is high, and many wells in the region were targeted for deeper, high-pressure zones. In spite of the low pressures, however, many Bow Island wells are capable of excellent gas deliveries with individual well recoveries of up to 10 bcf. All significant Bow Island porosity in the deepest, undisturbed parts of southwestern Alberta is gas saturated with updip aquifers flanking the gas. Seismic definition of the thickest Bow Island targets is feasible but has been hampered, in part, by difficult surface conditions and a prior emphasis on deeper targets.

  12. Extremely high cm-band radio flux level of the gamma-ray flaring FSRQ PKS 1510-089

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orienti, M.; D'Ammando, F.; Giroletti, M.; Orlati, A.

    2011-11-01

    The 32-m single dish antenna located at Medicina has been observing the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1510-089 starting from July 2011 with monthly frequency. The observations were organised as a follow-up of the gamma-ray flaring event reported in July 2011 by AGILE (ATel #3470) and Fermi (ATel #3473). Recently, radio observations were performed at 4.9 GHz and 8.0 GHz on 2011 November 16.

  13. Fermi LAT Detection of a Bright GeV Flare from the FSRQ PKS 1622-253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Bryce; Ojha, Roopesh

    2013-10-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1622-253 (RA=16h25m46.8916s, Dec=-25d27m38.326s, J2000; Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13) at z= 0.786 (di Serego Alighieri et al. 1994, MNRAS, 269, 998).

  14. Fermi LAT detection of a GeV flare from blazar NRAO 190 (PKS 0440-00)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, S.; Gasparrini, D.

    2013-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, observed a gamma-ray outburst from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar NRAO 190 (also known as PKS 0440-00, DA 145, OF -067; RA: 04h 42m 38.661s, Dec: -00d 17m 43.42s, J2000.0) with redshift 0.844 (Hewitt & Burbidge 1987, 63, 1).

  15. A blazar candidate counterpart of the new gamma-ray flare in the region of PKS 1451-375

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, F.; Cowperthwaite, P. C.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.

    2012-11-01

    Following the Fermi LAT detection of a new gamma-ray flare from a region near the flat spectrum radio quasar: PKS 1451-375 (ATEL #4534), we searched in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010 AJ, 140, 1868) catalog at the position of the Fermi source for a gamma-ray blazar candidate....

  16. The existence and nature of the interstellar bow shock

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi; Strumik, M.; Ratkiewicz, R.; Grygorczuk, J.

    2013-12-20

    We report a new diagnosis of two different states of the local interstellar medium (LISM) near our solar system by using a sensitivity study constrained by several distinct and complementary observations of the LISM, solar wind, and inner heliosphere. Assuming the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) He flow parameters for the LISM, we obtain a strength of ∼2.7 ± 0.2 μG and a direction pointing away from galactic coordinates (28, 52) ± 3° for the interstellar magnetic field as a result of fitting Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 in situ plasma measurements and IBEX energetic neutral atoms ribbon. When using Ulysses parameters for the LISM He flow, we recently reported the same direction but with a strength of 2.2 ± 0.1 μG. First, we notice that with Ulysses He flow, our solution is in the expected hydrogen deflection plane (HDP). In contrast, for the IBEX He flow, the solution is ∼20° away from the corresponding HDP plane. Second, the long-term monitoring of the interplanetary H I flow speed shows a value of ∼26 km s{sup –1} measured upwind from the Doppler shift in the strong Lyα sky background emission line. All elements of the diagnosis seem therefore to support Ulysses He flow parameters for the interstellar state. In that frame, we argue that reliable discrimination between superfast, subfast, or superslow states of the interstellar flow should be based on most existing in situ and remote observations used together with global modeling of the heliosphere. For commonly accepted LISM ionization rates, we show that a fast interstellar bow shock should be standing off upstream of the heliopause.

  17. Involvement of the cell-specific pigment genes pks and sult in bacterial defense response of sea urchins Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Konstantin V; Ageenko, Natalya V; Kurilenko, Valeria V

    2013-03-26

    Bacterial infections are one of the most important problems in mass aquaculture, causing the loss of millions of juvenile organisms. We isolated 22 bacterial strains from the cavity fluid of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus pallidus and used phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences to separate the bacterial strains into 9 genera (Aliivibrio, Bizionia, Colwellia, Olleya, Paenibacillus, Photobacterium, Pseudoalteromonas, Shewanella, and Vibrio). Incubating Strongylocentrotus intermedius larvae with a strain from each of the 9 bacterial genera, we investigated the viability of the larvae, the amount of pigment cells, and the level of polyketide synthase (pks) and sulfotransferase (sult) gene expression. Results of the assay on sea urchin development showed that all bacterial strains, except Pseudoalteromonas and Bizionia, suppressed sea urchin development (resulting in retardation of the embryos' development with cellular disorders) and reduced cell viability. We found that pks expression in the sea urchin larvae after incubation with the bacteria of 9 tested genera was significantly increased, while the sult expression was increased only after the treatment with Pseudoalteromonas and Shewanella. Shikimic acid, which is known to activate the biosynthesis of naphthoquinone pigments, increased the tolerance of the sea urchin embryos to the bacteria. In conclusion, we show that the cell-specific pigment genes pks and sult are involved in the bacterial defense response of sea urchins. PMID:23548362

  18. Rigidifying Acyl Carrier Protein Domain in Iterative Type I PKS CalE8 Does Not Affect Its Function

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jackwee; Sun, Huihua; Fan, Jing-Song; Hameed, Iman Fahim; Lescar, Julien; Liang, Zhao-Xun; Yang, Daiwen

    2012-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) domains shuttle acyl intermediates among the catalytic domains of multidomain type I fatty acid synthase and polyketide synthase (PKS) systems. It is believed that the unique function of ACPs is associated with their dynamic property, but it remains to be fully elucidated what type of protein dynamics is critical for the shuttling domain. Using NMR techniques, we found that the ACP domain of iterative type I PKS CalE8 from Micromonospora echinospora is highly dynamic on the millisecond-second timescale. Introduction of an interhelical disulfide linkage in the ACP domain suppresses the dynamics on the millisecond-second timescale and reduces the mobility on the picosecond-nanosecond timescale. We demonstrate that the full-length PKS is fully functional upon rigidification of the ACP domain, suggesting that although the flexibility of the disordered terminal linkers may be important for the function of the ACP domain, the internal dynamics of the helical regions is not critical for that function. PMID:23009853

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) from Cannabis sativa

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, Chiho; Taura, Futoshi; Tamada, Taro; Shoyama, Yoshinari; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kuroki, Ryota; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2008-03-01

    Polyketide synthase-1 from C. sativa has been crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution with sufficient quality for further structure determination. Polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) is a novel type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of hexanoyl triacetic acid lactone in Cannabis sativa (Mexican strain). PKS-1 was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and finally crystallized in two different space groups. The crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M calcium acetate and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.65 Å resolution and belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 59.3, c = 62.6 Å, α = 69, β = 81, γ = 80°. Another crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M sodium chloride and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 110, c = 130 Å. These data will enable us to determine the crystal structure of PKS-1.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) from Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Chiho; Taura, Futoshi; Tamada, Taro; Shoyama, Yoshinari; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kuroki, Ryota; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2008-03-01

    Polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) is a novel type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of hexanoyl triacetic acid lactone in Cannabis sativa (Mexican strain). PKS-1 was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and finally crystallized in two different space groups. The crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M calcium acetate and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.65 A resolution and belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 59.3, c = 62.6 A, alpha = 69, beta = 81, gamma = 80 degrees. Another crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M sodium chloride and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.55 A resolution and belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 110, c = 130 A. These data will enable us to determine the crystal structure of PKS-1. PMID:18323613

  1. Metagenomic Analysis of Upwelling-Affected Brazilian Coastal Seawater Reveals Sequence Domains of Type I PKS and Modular NRPS.

    PubMed

    Cuadrat, Rafael R C; Cury, Juliano C; Dávila, Alberto M R

    2015-01-01

    Marine environments harbor a wide range of microorganisms from the three domains of life. These microorganisms have great potential to enable discovery of new enzymes and bioactive compounds for industrial use. However, only ~1% of microorganisms from the environment can currently be identified through cultured isolates, limiting the discovery of new compounds. To overcome this limitation, a metagenomics approach has been widely adopted for biodiversity studies on samples from marine environments. In this study, we screened metagenomes in order to estimate the potential for new natural compound synthesis mediated by diversity in the Polyketide Synthase (PKS) and Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase (NRPS) genes. The samples were collected from the Praia dos Anjos (Angel's Beach) surface water-Arraial do Cabo (Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil), an environment affected by upwelling. In order to evaluate the potential for screening natural products in Arraial do Cabo samples, we used KS (keto-synthase) and C (condensation) domains (from PKS and NRPS, respectively) to build Hidden Markov Models (HMM) models. From both samples, a total of 84 KS and 46 C novel domain sequences were obtained, showing the potential of this environment for the discovery of new genes of biotechnological interest. These domains were classified by phylogenetic analysis and this was the first study conducted to screen PKS and NRPS genes in an upwelling affected sample. PMID:26633360

  2. The Periodicity Analysis of the Light Curve of PKS 0735+178 and Implications for its Central Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, S. X.; Xie, G. Z.; Liang, E. W.; Zhou, S. B.; Ma, L.

    The observation data in the B band for BL Lacerate object PKS 0735+178 during 1970-1998 from twenty two publications have been compiled into a light curve. The light curve shows that PKS 0735+178 is very active and exhibits very complicated non-sinusoidal variations. Using both Jurkevich's method and Power spectrum method to analyze these data we have found two periods of 5.26±0.98 years and 1.24±0.05 years for the outbursts in PKS 0735+178. It is of interest to note that the results of the two methods are the same (almost). In addition, these values are in good agreement with the results found by Smith et al.47 and Webb et al.61 We also apply the binary black hole model to explain the central structure of this object and obtain the masses of the primary and secondary black holes are 1.7×109M⊙ and 2.88×107M⊙ respectively. It should be monitored in future to obtain more data for further analysis to test the hypothesis.

  3. Metagenomic Analysis of Upwelling-Affected Brazilian Coastal Seawater Reveals Sequence Domains of Type I PKS and Modular NRPS

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrat, Rafael R. C.; Cury, Juliano C.; Dávila, Alberto M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Marine environments harbor a wide range of microorganisms from the three domains of life. These microorganisms have great potential to enable discovery of new enzymes and bioactive compounds for industrial use. However, only ~1% of microorganisms from the environment can currently be identified through cultured isolates, limiting the discovery of new compounds. To overcome this limitation, a metagenomics approach has been widely adopted for biodiversity studies on samples from marine environments. In this study, we screened metagenomes in order to estimate the potential for new natural compound synthesis mediated by diversity in the Polyketide Synthase (PKS) and Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase (NRPS) genes. The samples were collected from the Praia dos Anjos (Angel’s Beach) surface water—Arraial do Cabo (Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil), an environment affected by upwelling. In order to evaluate the potential for screening natural products in Arraial do Cabo samples, we used KS (keto-synthase) and C (condensation) domains (from PKS and NRPS, respectively) to build Hidden Markov Models (HMM) models. From both samples, a total of 84 KS and 46 C novel domain sequences were obtained, showing the potential of this environment for the discovery of new genes of biotechnological interest. These domains were classified by phylogenetic analysis and this was the first study conducted to screen PKS and NRPS genes in an upwelling affected sample PMID:26633360

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) from Cannabis sativa

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Chiho; Taura, Futoshi; Tamada, Taro; Shoyama, Yoshinari; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kuroki, Ryota; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    Polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) is a novel type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of hexanoyl triacetic acid lactone in Cannabis sativa (Mexican strain). PKS-1 was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and finally crystallized in two different space groups. The crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M calcium acetate and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.65 Å resolution and belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 59.3, c = 62.6 Å, α = 69, β = 81, γ = 80°. Another crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M sodium chloride and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution and belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 110, c = 130 Å. These data will enable us to determine the crystal structure of PKS-1. PMID:18323613

  5. ON THE RADIO AND NEAR-INFRARED JET OF PKS 2155-304 AND ITS CLOSE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Liuzzo, E.; Falomo, R.; Farinato, J.; Moretti, A.; Ragazzoni, R.; Treves, A.; Arcidiacono, C.; Diolaiti, E.; Lombini, M.; Torresi, E.; Donaldson, R.; Kolb, J.; Marchetti, E.; Tordo, S.

    2013-03-15

    PKS 2155-304 is one of the brightest BL Lac objects in the sky and a very well-studied target from radio to TeV bands. We report on high-resolution ({approx}0.''12) direct imaging of the field of PKS 2155-304 using adaptive optics near-IR (NIR) observations in the J and Ks bands obtained with the ESO Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Demonstrator on the Very Large Telescope. These data are complemented with archival Very Large Array images at various frequencies to investigate the properties of the close environment of the source. We characterize the faint galaxies that form the poor group associated with the target. No radio emission is present for these galaxies, while an old radio jet at {approx}20 kpc from the nucleus of PKS 2155-304 and a jet-like structure of {approx}2 kpc ({approx}1'') in the eastern direction are revealed. No counterparts of these radio jets are found in the NIR or in archival Chandra observations.

  6. Discovering Massive Runaway Stars with Infrared Bow Shock Nebulae: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Julian E.; Povich, Matthew S.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Chick, William T.; Dale, Daniel A.; Munari, Stephan; Olivier, Grace M.; Schurhammer, Danielle; Sorber, Rebecca L.; Wernke, Heather N.

    2016-01-01

    We have searched the plane of the Milky Way for candidate 22 μm and 24 μm infrared bow shock nebulae using the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) All-Sky Data Release and Spitzer GLIMPSE mosaic images. Infrared bow shocks driven by massive, OB stars can provide new constraints on stellar mass-loss rates and reveal new runaway late O- and early B-type stars. Candidate infrared bow shocks identified in this search were chosen using the criteria of a mostly symmetric arc-like morphology with the arc being bright in only 22 or 24 μm along with an apparent driving star associated with the bow shock in line with its axis of symmetry. Preliminary visible spectroscopic observations of candidate bow shock driving stars obtained using the Longslit Spectrograph at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO) reveal that these visual inspections yield a 95% success rate of finding late O- or early B-type stars.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grants AST-1063146 (REU), AST-1411851 (RUI), and AST-1412845.

  7. Bow-tie antennas on a dielectric half-space - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, Richard C.; Mcphedran, Ross C.; Popovic, Zorana; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.; Tong, Peter P.

    1987-01-01

    A new formulation is discussed for the rigous calculation of the radiation pattern of a bow-tie antenna of finite length and infinitesimal thickness, placed on a lossless dielectric substrate. The analysis is based on a representation of the current density on the metal surface of the antenna as a sum of an imposed (quasistatic) term and a set of current modes with unknown amplitudes. Free-space fields that are expressed in terms of continuous spectra of symmetrized plane waves are matched to the current modes using the method of moments. The resulting set of equations are solved for the unknown current amplitudes. The calculations show that for increasing bow length the antenna impedance spirals rapidly to a value predicted by transmission line theory. The theory also shows that the E-plane pattern of a two-wavelength, 60-deg bow-tie antenna is dominated by low-loss current modes propagating at the dielectric wavenumber. As the bow tie narrows, the loss of the modes increases, and the dominant wavenumber tends to the quasi-static value. Pattern measurements made at 94 GHz are shown to agree well with theoretical predictions. Measurements for a long-wire antenna, a linear array of bow-tie elements, and a log-periodic antenna are also presented.

  8. The dynamics of Bow-shock Pulsar Wind Nebula: Reconstruction of multi-bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Doosoo; Heinz, Sebastian

    2014-08-01

    Bow-shock pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) exhibit a characteristic cometary shape due to the supersonic motion of the pulsar interacting with the interstellar medium (ISM). One of the spectacular bow-shock is the Guitar Nebula, which is produced by the fast pulsar PSR B2224+65 (vpsr > 1000 km s-1 ), and consists of a bright head, a faint neck, a two larger bubbles. We present that the peculiar mophology arises from variations in the interstellar medium density. We perform 3-D hydrodynamic simulation to understand the evolution of the pulsar as its moves through the density discontinuity. We found that when the pulsar encounters the low-density medium, the pressure balance at the head of the bow shock begins to collapse, producing the second bubble. The expansion rate of the bubble is related to the properties of both the pulsar and the ambient medium. Assuming that the pulsar’s properties, including spin-down energy, are constant, we conclude that the ambient density around the second bubble should be 4.46 times larger than around the first bubble in the Guitar body. We further found that when the pulsar encounters the inclined density dicontinuity, it can produce the asymmetric shape of the bow shock observed in a subset of bow-shock PWNe including J2124-3358.

  9. Solar cycle variations in the neutral exosphere inferred from the location of the Venus bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Chou, E.; Luhmann, J. G.; Brace, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    Solar UV and EUV varies significantly during the solar cycle. Pioneer Venus can measure this variation both directly and indirectly. A direct measure of the EUV is obtained from the photoelectron current of the Langmuir probe when the spacecraft is in the solar wind. The indirect measure is by monitoring the location of the Venus bow shock. The UV and EUV both heat the upper atmosphere and ionize it. When solar activity is high, the upper atmosphere should be ionized more rapidly. This effect adds a greater number of planetary ions to the magnetosheath plasma as it flows by Venus. It is this increase in mass flow that causes the Venus bow shock to move away from its solar minimum location. Pioneer Venus has now monitored the location of the bow shock for an entire solar cycle. The bow shock location is well correlated with the variation in EUV flux as measured by the Langmuir probe. The bow shock is farther from Venus than expected from the sunspot number or 10.7 cm solar radio flux, indicating that solar UV radiation may be even stronger at the present time than would be predicted from the relationships determined during the previous solar cycle.

  10. Kinematic features of a bow echo in southern China observed with doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xindong; Zhang, Renhe; Wang, Hongyan

    2013-11-01

    A bow echo is a type of mesoscale convective phenomenon that often induces extreme weather and appears with strong reflectivity on radar images. A strong bow echo that developed from a supercell was observed over Foshan City in southern China on 17 April 2011. The intense gusty winds and showers caused huge losses of property and severely affected human lives. This paper presents an analysis of this strong meso- β-scale convective system based on Doppler radar observations. The isolated bow echo exhibited a horizontal scale of about 80 km in terms of reflectivity above 40 dB Z, and a life span of 8 hours. The system originated from the merging of a couple of weakly organized cells in a shear line, and developed into an arch shape as it moved through the shear zone. Sufficient surface moisture supply ensured the convective instability and development of the bow echo. The low-altitude winds retrieved from single Doppler radar observations showed an obvious rear-inflow jet along the notch area. Different from the conventional definition, no bookend anticyclone was observed throughout the life cycle. Very strong slantwise updrafts and downdrafts were recognizable from the retrieved winds, even though the spatial scale of the bow echo was small. Strong winds and induced damage on the surface are considered to have been caused by the mid-level rear-inflow jet and intense convective downdrafts.

  11. Bow Shock Fragmentation Driven by a Thermal Instability in Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Ciardi, A.; Pickworth, L. A.; Rodriguez, R.; Gil, J. M.; Espinosa, G.; Hartigan, P.; Swadling, G. F.; Skidmore, J.; Hall, G. N.; Bennett, M.; Bland, S. N.; Burdiak, G.; de Grouchy, P.; Music, J.; Suttle, L.; Hansen, E.; Frank, A.

    2015-12-01

    The role of radiative cooling during the evolution of a bow shock was studied in laboratory-astrophysics experiments that are scalable to bow shocks present in jets from young stellar objects. The laboratory bow shock is formed during the collision of two counterstreaming, supersonic plasma jets produced by an opposing pair of radial foil Z-pinches driven by the current pulse from the MAGPIE pulsed-power generator. The jets have different flow velocities in the laboratory frame, and the experiments are driven over many times the characteristic cooling timescale. The initially smooth bow shock rapidly develops small-scale nonuniformities over temporal and spatial scales that are consistent with a thermal instability triggered by strong radiative cooling in the shock. The growth of these perturbations eventually results in a global fragmentation of the bow shock front. The formation of a thermal instability is supported by analysis of the plasma cooling function calculated for the experimental conditions with the radiative packages ABAKO/RAPCAL.

  12. Active current sheets and candidate hot flow anomalies upstream of Mercury's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Sundberg, T.; Raines, J. M.; Gershman, D. J.; Collinson, G.; Sibeck, D.; Khazanov, G. V.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2014-02-01

    Hot flow anomalies (HFAs) represent a subset of solar wind discontinuities interacting with collisionless bow shocks. They are typically formed when the normal component of the motional (convective) electric field points toward the embedded current sheet on at least one of its sides. The core region of an HFA contains hot and highly deflected ion flows and rather low and turbulent magnetic field. In this paper, we report observations of possible HFA-like events at Mercury identified over a course of two planetary years. Using data from the orbital phase of the MESSENGER mission, we identify a representative ensemble of active current sheets magnetically connected to Mercury's bow shock. We show that some of these events exhibit magnetic and particle signatures of HFAs similar to those observed at other planets, and present their key physical characteristics. Our analysis suggests that Mercury's bow shock does not only mediate the flow of supersonic solar wind plasma but also provides conditions for local particle acceleration and heating as predicted by previous numerical simulations. Together with earlier observations of HFA activity at Earth, Venus, Mars, and Saturn, our results confirm that hot flow anomalies could be a common property of planetary bow shocks and show that the characteristic size of these events is controlled by the bow shock standoff distance and/or local solar wind conditions.

  13. AGILE detection of intense gamma-ray emission from the blazar PKS 1510-089

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucella, G.; Vittorini, V.; D'Ammando, F.; Tavani, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Villata, M.; Argan, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Boffelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Chen, A. W.; Cocco, V.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; de Paris, G.; Di Cocco, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Fiorini, M.; Froysland, T.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Gianotti, F.; Giuliani, A.; Labanti, C.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lipari, P.; Longo, F.; Marisaldi, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Morselli, A.; Pacciani, L.; Pellizzoni, A.; Perotti, F.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Rapisarda, M.; Rappoldi, A.; Soffitta, P.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.; Vallazza, E.; Vercellone, S.; Zambra, A.; Zanello, D.; Antonelli, L. A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cutini, S.; Gasparrini, D.; Giommi, P.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Salotti, L.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Carosati, D.; Larionov, V. M.; Ligustri, R.

    2008-11-01

    Context: We report the detection by the AGILE (Astro-rivelatore Gamma a Immagini LEggero) satellite of an intense gamma-ray flare from the source AGL J1511-0909, associated with the powerful quasar PKS 1510-089, during ten days of observations from 23 August to 1 September 2007. Aims: During the observation period, the source was in optical decrease following a flaring event monitored by the GLAST-AGILE Support Program (GASP) of the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT). The simultaneous gamma-ray, optical, and radio coverage allows us to study the spectral energy distribution and the theoretical models based on the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) emission mechanisms. Methods: AGILE observed the source with its two co-aligned imagers, the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector and the hard X-ray imager Super-AGILE sensitive in the 30 MeV div 50 GeV and 18 div 60 keV bands, respectively. Results: Between 23 and 27 August 2007, AGILE detected gamma-ray emission from PKS 1510-089 when this source was located 50° off-axis, with an average flux of (270 ± 65) × 10-8 photons cm-2 s-1 for photon energy above 100 MeV. In the following period, 28 August-1 September, after a satellite re-pointing, AGILE detected the source at 35° off-axis, with an average flux (E > 100 MeV) of (195 ± 30) × 10-8 photons cm-2 s-1. No emission was detected by Super-AGILE, with a 3-σ upper limit of 45 mCrab in 200 ks. Conclusions: The spectral energy distribution is modelled with a homogeneous one-zone synchrotron self Compton (SSC) emission plus contributions by external photons: the SSC emission contributes primarily to the X-ray band, whereas the contribution of the IC from the external disc and the broad line region match the hard gamma-ray spectrum observed.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalog of galaxies around PKS 0405-123 (Johnson+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. D.; Chen, H.-W.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2014-09-01

    We present new absorption-line analysis and new galaxy survey data obtained for the field around PKS 0405-123 at zQSO=0.57. Combining previously known OVI absorbers with new identifications in the higher S/N ultraviolet (UV) spectra obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, we have established a sample of 7 OVI absorbers and 12 individual components at z=0.0918-0.495 along the sightline towards PKS 0405-123. We complement the available UV absorption spectra with galaxy survey data that reach 100 percent completeness at projected distances {rho}<200kpc of the quasar sightline for galaxies as faint as 0.1L* (0.2L*) out to redshifts of z~0.35 (z~0.5). The high level of completeness achieved at faint magnitudes by our survey reveals that OVI absorbers are closely associated with gas-rich environments containing at least one low-mass, emission-line galaxy. An intriguing exception is a strong OVI system at z~0.183 that does not have a galaxy found at {rho}<4Mpc, and our survey rules out the presence of any galaxies of L>0.04L* at {rho}<250kpc and any galaxies of L>0.3L* at {rho}<1Mpc. We further examine the galactic environments of OVI absorbers and those 'Lyα-only' absorbers with neutral hydrogen column density log N(HI)<13.6 and no detectable OVI absorption features. The Lyα-only absorbers serve as a control sample in seeking the discriminating galactic features that result in the observed Ovi absorbing gas at large galactic radii. We find a clear distinction in the radial profiles of mean galaxy surface brightness around different absorbers. Specifically, Ovi absorbers are found to reside in regions of higher mean surface brightness at {rho}<~500kpc (ΔμR~+5magMpc-2 relative to the background at {rho}>500kpc), while only a mild increase in galaxy surface brightness is seen at small {rho} around Lyα-only absorbers (ΔμR~+2magMpc-2). The additional insights gained from our deep galaxy survey demonstrate the need to probe the galaxy populations to low

  15. Radio and X-ray observations of the gamma-ray bright quasar PKS 0528+134

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yun Fei; Marscher, Alan P.; Aller, Hugh D.; Aller, Margo F.; Terasranta, Harri; Valtaoja, Esko

    1994-01-01

    We present a study of the z = 2.07 quasar PKS 0528+134, which has been detected as an extraordinarily luminous gamma-ray source. Its radio properties are highly variable in both total and polarized flux density. Milliarcsecond-scale maps from global very long base interferometry (VLBI) experiments, an X-ray spectrum from ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) observations, and light curves in total flux density and polarization are used to investigate the geometry, radiation mechanism, and physical environment of the emission region in the source. The VLBI images reveal a bent jet extending toward the northeast on parsec scales, with less intense knots of emission appearing on the opposite side of the brightest spot. The position of the core usually found in such sources is unclear. The polarization angle is stable despite strong variability in polarized flux density and indicates that the magnetic field is aligned with the jet axis as defined by our 8.4 GHz image. The ROSAT X-ray flux density of PKS 0528+134 in 1991 March is measured to be 1.6 micro Jy at 1 keV, with a very steep spectral (`energy') index sigma(sub x) approximately equal to 2.2. The X-ray observations reveal the presence of cold gas along the line of sight significantly in excess of that present in the Galaxy. A strong radio flare began within two months of the first observation of a high flux of gamma-rays from PKS 0528+134 by Hunter et al. Using the geometry and spectral chacateristics determined by our VLBI observations, a synchrotron self-Compton calculation indicates that relativistic bulk motion is required in PKS 0528+134, with an estimated Doppler beaming factor delta approximately greater than 4.3, similar to the value delta approximately greater than 7 required to explain the low optical depth of the gamma-rays to photon-photon pair production. We suggest that the core activity of PKS 0528+134 is sporadic in nature, with the nonthermal outburst starting in 1991 representing

  16. Observations of low-energy electrons upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of electron fluxes with a lunar-based electron spectrometer when the moon was upstream of the earth have shown that a subset of observed fluxes are strongly controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field direction. The fluxes occur only when the IMF lines connect back to the earth's bow shock. Observed densities and temperatures were in the ranges 2-4 x 0,001/cu cm and 1.7-2.8 x 1,000,000 K. It is shown that these electrons can account for increases in effective solar wind electron temperatures on bow-shock connected field lines which have been observed previously by other investigators. It is further shown that if a model of the bow shock with an electrostatic potential barrier is assumed, the potential can be estimated to be 500 volts.

  17. Studies with Cluster upstream and downstream of the bow shock: An experimenter's perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moebius, E.

    1995-01-01

    Some open questions in the physics of bow shock formation, the evolution of the particle distributions from solar wind into the magnetosheath, and the acceleration of ions at the moment of the shock are summarized. A layout of the current situation is presented in view of recent theoretical developments and the new diagnostic tools provided by the Cluster mission. The transition of ions across the quasi-perpendicular bow shock and their downstream thermalization are discussed. The processes and spatial scales are found to be species dependent and are discussed for H(+), He(2+), and He(+). The theory of particle acceleration at quasi-parallel shocks are reviewed. It is shown how Cluster can study the time variable structures of the shock as predicted by hybrid simulation. It is emphasized that high time resolution measurement with simultaneous species separation is necessary for the study of the ion acceleration. Suggestions for the spacecraft separations at the bow shock are suggested.

  18. An analytic treatment of the structure of the bow shock and magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhuang, H. C.; Russell, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical examination of the jump conditions of the bow shock is used to investigate the influence of the solar wind magnetic fields on the structure of the parameters behind the bow shock. Through the assumption that the average values of the parameters along the radial direction in the magnetosheath are equal to their values just behind the bow shock, the influence of the direction of the solar wind magnetic fields on the average structure of the magnetosheath is determined. From this assumption, a zero-order formula for the thickness of the magnetosheath is deduced which satisfies the boundary conditions and conservation laws of mass and momentum flux. The theoretical estimate of the thickness is compared with satellite observations to check the assumption and select the optimum value of the polytropic exponent of the plasma gas.

  19. The incidence of transient particulate gunshot primer residue in Oregon and Washington bow hunters.

    PubMed

    Mann, M J; Espinoza, E O

    1993-01-01

    The interpretation of GSR/PA (gunshot primer residue particulate analysis) results in an alleged firearm violation of bow hunting regulations is complicated by the theoretical presence of contaminant GSR from prior legitimate shooting incidents. A total of 120 samples representing field collections from thirty Oregon and Washington bow hunters were analyzed for the presence of particulate gunshot residue in order to assess the level of contamination that may be present in this population. Of the bow hunters sampled, 50% stated that they shoot guns; 80% of the shooting group stated at the time of the GSR field collection that they were wearing the same outer clothing or driving the same vehicle, or both, when they last handled and fired a weapon. Analysis of the 120 samples resulted in the detection of one tricomponent particle of GSR. PMID:8426156

  20. Transport of Solar Wind H+ and He++ Ions across Earth’s Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, G. K.; Lee, E.; Fu, S. Y.; Kim, H. E.; Ma, Y. Q.; Yang, Z. W.; Liu, Y.; Lin, N.; Hong, J.; Canu, P.; Dandouras, I.; Rème, H.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the dependence of mass, energy, and charge of solar wind (SW) transport across Earth’s bow shock. An examination of 111 crossings during quiet SW in both quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shock regions shows that 64 crossings had various degrees of heating and thermalization of SW. We found 22 crossings where the SW speed was <400 km s‑1. The shock potential of a typical supercritical quasi-perpendicular shock estimated from deceleration of the SW and cutoff energy of electron flat top distribution is ˜50 Volts. We find that the temperatures of H+ and He++ beams that penetrate the shock can sometimes be nearly the same in the upstream and downstream regions, indicating little or no heating had occurred crossing the bow shock. None of the models predict that the SW can cross the bow shock without heating. Our observations are important constraints for new models of collisionless shocks.

  1. An Investigation of the Flow Structure Upstream of Slowly Moving Blunt Bows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, T. Darton

    The structure of two dimensional bow waves generated by blunt bows is investigated experimentally, analytically, and numerically. In tow tank experiments, bow wave profiles ahead of cylindrical and box shaped bow models, having drafts of 0.136m and 0.11m respectively, are measured using a capacitance type probe for flows in the 0.21 to 0.74 Froude number range. Far upstream several waves are observed, and using linear wave theory they are shown to be transient in nature, generated during the initial acceleration of the bow models. Measured profiles closer to the towed model show a non-breaking bow wave characterized by a sharp monotonic free surface rise to a relatively flat elevated plateau region located adjacent of the bow. In addition small scale waves are shed from the bow and at moderate Froude numbers these waves completely dissipate inside the plateau region, while at lower Froude numbers they propagate further upstream. Using regular perturbation methods first and second order asymptotic solutions are derived for small draft Froude numbers and their subsequent comparison with experimental results shows that both the double body (leading order) and higher order flow solutions poorly approximate the actual flow near the bow. It is found, however, that if the bow geometry is modified to include a triangular shaped separation region the leading order solution mimics measured wave profiles. This non-negligible region located beneath the plateau region is found to extend upstream to the plateau's leading edge. Moreover, results indicate that the location of the so-called separation point, the point at which the flow separates from the free surface and passes beneath the recirculating flow, coincides with the plateau's leading edge and that the sharp free surface rise is an inviscid flow phenomenon. The generation of a free surface shear layer and the flow separation phenomenon are examined as well as a possible cause and effect relationship between them

  2. Improved bow shock models for Herbig-Haro objects - Application to HH 2A-prime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.; Hartmann, Lee; Hartigan, Patrick

    1988-01-01

    An improved version of the bow shock theory previously applied to Herbig-Haro objects is presented. The modifications provide a more accurate calculation of the ionization state of material entering the bow shock. The revised preionization does not drastically affect the emission-line predictions for a 200 km/s bow shock model, though the effects will be more severe for slower shock velocities. The line profiles of the new models resemble the observed profiles somewhat more closely, and the relative emission-line intensities typically differ by 30 percent from those predicted by the older models. The models agree well with new IUE spectra and existing optical data for HH 2A-prime.

  3. Cone angle control of the interaction of magnetic clouds with the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turc, L.; Escoubet, C. P.; Fontaine, D.; Kilpua, E. K. J.; Enestam, S.

    2016-05-01

    We study the interaction of magnetic clouds (MCs) with the near-Earth environment. Recent works suggest that the bow shock crossing may modify significantly the magnetic structure of an MC, and thus its ability to drive geomagnetic storms. This change is largely controlled by the bow shock configuration, which depends on the upstream interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation. From the distribution of the magnetic field orientation in 152 Earth-impacting MCs, we determine for the first time the typical shock configuration during MC events. We find that 56% (6.3%) of the time, the subsolar bow shock configuration is exclusively quasi-perpendicular (quasi-parallel). The rest of the time, both configurations coexist. Furthermore, using a subset of 63 MCs observed simultaneously in the solar wind and in the dayside magnetosheath, we determine the magnitude of the magnetic field alteration, how it depends on the shock configuration, and how it relates to the IMF cone angle.

  4. Transport of Solar Wind H+ and He++ Ions across Earth’s Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, G. K.; Lee, E.; Fu, S. Y.; Kim, H. E.; Ma, Y. Q.; Yang, Z. W.; Liu, Y.; Lin, N.; Hong, J.; Canu, P.; Dandouras, I.; Rème, H.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the dependence of mass, energy, and charge of solar wind (SW) transport across Earth’s bow shock. An examination of 111 crossings during quiet SW in both quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shock regions shows that 64 crossings had various degrees of heating and thermalization of SW. We found 22 crossings where the SW speed was <400 km s‑1. The shock potential of a typical supercritical quasi-perpendicular shock estimated from deceleration of the SW and cutoff energy of electron flat top distribution is ∼50 Volts. We find that the temperatures of H+ and He++ beams that penetrate the shock can sometimes be nearly the same in the upstream and downstream regions, indicating little or no heating had occurred crossing the bow shock. None of the models predict that the SW can cross the bow shock without heating. Our observations are important constraints for new models of collisionless shocks.

  5. A numerical study on bow shocks around the lightning return stroke channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qiang Chen, Bin Yi, Yun; Chen, P. F.; Mao, Yunfei; Xiong, Run

    2015-03-15

    Bow shock structures are important to various hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) phenomena in geophysics and astrophysics. The formation and propagation of bow shocks around the lightning return stroke channel are investigated based on the self-similar motion theory and simulated with a two-dimensional Eulerian finite volume resistive radiation MHD code. In this framework, as verification of theoretical models, the evolving structures of many quantities, such as the plasma density, temperature, pressure, shock velocity, and magnetic field, can be obtained, which present all the characteristics of bow shocks in the lightning return stroke processes. The evolution characteristics and the configuration of the curved return stroke channels, e.g., the non-ideal effects and the scaling laws, are discussed in detail. The results may have applications for some observed features of the return stroke channels and other phenomena in the lightning discharge plasmas.

  6. Energetic interplanetary nucleon flux anisotropies - The effect of earth's bow shock and magnetosheath on sunward flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    Attention is given to the combined, average effects of the bow shock and magnetosheath on the diffusive flow of interplanetary nuclei. The observations presented show that differences between 'connected' and 'unconnected' data subsets are apparent from the beginning of the analysis. Through an investigation of the mean unconnected diffusive anisotropy (those fluxes least affected by the earth's bow shock and magnetosheath) it is confirmed that the cross-field transport of MeV energy nuclei in interplanetary space is statistically significant and in the direction expected from the large-scale particle flux gradients. The direction of particle flow relative to the IMF is then used to show that nucleon flow characteristics on connected IMF differ from those on unconnected IMF. A scenario for producing this difference is then presented. It is concluded that the inclusion of the bow shock connected information biases measurements of the flux anisotropies of MeV energy H.

  7. Effects of the bow on social organization in Western North America.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    The bow more than doubled, likely tripled, the success of individuals bent on killing animal or human targets (Box ). The advent of this revolutionary technology generated different responses in western North America depending on subsistence and sociopolitical organization at the time of its arrival, roughly 2300 - 1300 B.P. Its effect was substantial in California and the Great Basin, particularly on group size, which in many places diminished as a consequence of the bow's reliability. The counter-intuitive result was to increase within group-relatedness enough to encourage intensification of plant resources, previously considered too costly. The bow rose to greatest direct economic importance with the arrival of the horse, and was put to most effective use by former Great Basin groups who maintained the family band system that had developed around intensive Great Basin plant procurement, adapting the same organization to a lifestyle centered on the equestrian pursuit of buffalo and warfare. PMID:23776048

  8. The bow shock structure of IRS 7 - Wind-wind collision near the Galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Melia, Fulvio

    1992-01-01

    New structural details of ionized gas associated with IRS 7, a mass-losing supergiant near the Galactic center, are reported, and radio continuum and theoretical maps are compared. High-resolution multiconfiguration VLA observations of IRS 7 reveal ionized gas with a bow shock structure at a wavelength of 2 cm. The apex of the bow shock is facing more toward the cluster of blue stellar objects, known as IRS 16, than Sgr A*, the compact nonthermal source near the Galaxy's dynamical center. It is inferred that the shape of the mass-losing envelope of IRS 7 is influenced by Galactic winds from IRS 16. It is concluded from a comparison of the morphology of the ionized envelope of IRS 7 with simple theoretical modeling of the bow shock structure that the shape of the shock results from the collision between the Galactic center and stellar winds rather than from the motion of IRS 7 through the interstellar medium.

  9. An Infrared Study of the Large-Scale Jet in Quasar PKS 1136-135

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Urry, C.Megan; Coppi, Paolo; Van Duyne, Jeffrey; Cheung, C.C.; Sambruna, Rita M.; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Maraschi, Laura; /Brera Observ.

    2007-03-16

    We present Spitzer IRAC imaging of the large-scale jet in the quasar PKS 1136-135 at wavelengths of 3.6 and 5.8 {micro}m, combined with previous VLA, HST, and Chandra observations. We clearly detect infrared emission from the jet, resulting in the most detailed multifrequency data among the jets in lobe-dominated quasars. The spectral energy distributions of the jet knots have significant variations along the jet, like the archetypal jet in 3C 273. The infrared measurements with IRAC are consistent with the previous idea that the jet has two spectral components, namely (1) the low-energy synchrotron spectrum extending from radio to infrared, and (2) the high-energy component responsible for the X-ray flux. The optical fluxes may be a mixture of the two components. We consider three radiation models for the high-energy component: inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons by radio-emitting electrons in a highly relativistic jet, synchrotron radiation by a second distinct electron population, and synchrotron radiation by ultra high energy protons. Each hypothesis leads to important insights into and constraints on particle acceleration in the jet, as well as the basic physical properties of the jet such as bulk velocity, transporting power, and particle contents.

  10. Interstellar Broadening of Images in the Gravitational Lens Pks 1830-211

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. L.; Preston, R. A.; Murphy, D. W.; Jauncey, D. L.; Reynolds, J. E.; Tzioumis, A. K.; King, E. A.; McCulloch, P. M.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Costa, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    The remarkably strong radio gravitational lens PKS 1830-211 consists of a one arcsecond diameter Einstein ring with two bright compact (milliarcsecond) components located on opposite sides of the ring. We have obtained 22 GHz VLBA data on this source to determine the intrinsic angular sizes of the compact components. Previous VLBI observations at lower frequencies indicate that the brightness temperatures of these components are significantly lower than 10(exp 10) K (Jauncey, et al. 1991), less than is typical for compact synchrotron radio sources and less than is implied by the short timescales of flux density variations. A possible explanation is that interstellar scattering is broadening the apparent angular size of the source and thereby reducing the observed brightness temperature. Our VLBA data support this hypothesis. At 22 GHz the measured brightness temperature is at least 10(exp 11) K, and the deconvolved 2 size of the core in the southwest compact component is proportional to upsilon(sup -2) between 1.7 and 22 GHz. VLBI observations at still higher frequencies should be unaffected by interstellar scattering.

  11. A rapid energetic X-ray flare in the quasar PKS0558 - 504

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remillard, R. A.; Grossan, B.; Bradt, H. V.; Ohashi, T.; Hayashida, K.

    1991-01-01

    A recent observation from the Ginga satellite of the quasar PKS0558 - 504 is reported during which the X-ray flux increased by 67 percent in the space of only three minutes. There was no significant change in the spectrum. Comprehensive analysis of the data strongly indicates that this was a genuine X-ray flare originating in the quasar. The implied rate of change in luminosity in the 2-10 keV range, assuming a Hubble constant of 70 km/s/Mpc, and a cosmological deceleration parameter q0 = 0.5, is 3.2 x 10 to the 42nd erg/sq s, the highest value measured for a quasar. When photon scattering is considered, this is about 16 times greater than could be produced, with a three-minute rise time, in an isotropically emitting plasma. It is argued that the apparent luminosity must be enhanced by relativistic beaming. This is the first indication of beaming in an 'ordinary' unpolarized quasar.

  12. Colour variation of the BL Lacertae object PKS 0537-441

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaopan; Zhang, Li; Luo, Yuhui; Wang, Lisha; Zhou, Li

    2015-05-01

    We present the colour indices V - R of BL Lacertae object PKS 0537-441 on the basis of the photometric data monitored by the Rapid Eye Mounting (REM) telescope located at the ESO Cerro La Silla observatory (Chile). Nearly 700 quasi-simultaneous data groups were collected during the period from 2004 to 2010. Our colour analysis shows the existence of at least two variability mechanisms: one is the long-term chromatic mechanism in which the variation traces a 0.04 ± 0.01 slope in the V - R versus V plot, the other is the chromatic mechanism implying the spectral changes during the flares and on intraday time-scales. A general bluer-when-brighter trend is confirmed in both ascent and descent states during the flares and in the 2010 February flare interval, while a much stronger bluer-when-brighter chromatism is observed in both faint and bright states on intraday time-scales. The discrete correlation function analysis reveals the existence of a time-lag of 13^{+5.8}_{-1.2} d between colour indices and magnitudes during the period MJD 54404-54453, whereas no measurable time-lag during other periods is found. Our results suggest that geometric effects may be responsible for the long-term achromatic mechanism, while the intrinsic shock-in-jet mechanism may produce the chromatic variability during the flares and on intraday time-scales.

  13. Tentative detection of warm intervening gas towards PKS 0548-322 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcons, X.; Paerels, F. B. S.; Carrera, F. J.; Ceballos, M. T.; Sako, M.

    2005-06-01

    We present the results of a long (~93 ks) XMM-Newton observation of the bright BL-Lac object PKS 0548-322 (z= 0.069). Our Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) spectrum shows a single absorption feature at an observed wavelength λ= 23.33 +/- 0.01 Å, which we interpret as OVI Kα absorption at z= 0.058, i.e. ~3000 km s-1 from the background object. The observed equivalent width of the absorption line, ~30 mÅ, coupled with the lack of the corresponding absorption edge in the EPIC pn data, implies a column density of NOVI~ 2 × 1016 cm-2 and turbulence with a Doppler velocity parameter b > 100 km s-1. Within the limitations of our RGS spectrum, no OVII or OV Kα absorption are detected. Under the assumption of ionization equilibrium by both collisions and the extragalactic background, this is only marginally consistent if the gas temperature is ~2.5 × 105 K, with significantly lower or higher values being excluded by our limits on OV or OVII. If confirmed, this would be the first X-ray detection of a large amount of intervening warm absorbing gas through OVI absorption. The existence of such a high column density absorber, much stronger than any previously detected one in OVI, would place stringent constraints on the large-scale distribution of baryonic gas in the Universe.

  14. Spectral energy distributions of the BL Lac PKS 2155 - 304 from XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwan, Jai; Gupta, Alok C.; Papadakis, I. E.; Wiita, Paul J.

    2014-11-01

    We have used all 20 archival XMM-Newton observations of PKS 2155 - 304 with simultaneous X-ray and UV/optical data to study its long-term flux and spectral variability. We find significant variations, in all bands, on time-scales of years with an rms amplitude of ˜35-45 per cent, though the optical/UV variations are not correlated with those in the X-ray. We constructed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) that span more than three orders of magnitude in frequency and we first fitted them with a log-parabolic model; such models have been applied many times in the past for this, and other, blazars. These fits were poor, so we then examined combined power-law and log-parabolic fits that are improvements. These models indicate that the optical/UV and X-ray flux variations are mainly driven by model normalization variations, but the X-ray band flux is also affected by spectral variations, as parametrized with the model `curvature' parameter, b. Overall, the energy at which the emitted power is maximum correlates positively with the total flux. As the spectrum shifts to higher frequencies, the spectral `curvature' increases, in contrast to what is expected if a single log-parabolic model were an acceptable representation of the broad-band SEDs. Our results suggest that the optical/UV and X-ray emissions in this source may arise from different lepton populations.

  15. The Low-Power Nucleus of PKS 1246-410 in the Centaurus Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.B.; Sanders, J.S.; Fabian, A.C.; Allen, S.W.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-10-21

    We present Chandra, Very Large Array (VLA), and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of the nucleus of NGC 4696, a giant elliptical in the Centaurus cluster of galaxies. Like M87 in the Virgo cluster, PKS 1246-410 in the Centaurus cluster is a nearby example of a radio galaxy in a dense cluster environment. In analyzing the new X-ray data we have found a compact X-ray feature coincident with the optical and radio core. While nuclear emission from the X-ray source is expected, its luminosity is low, < 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}. We estimate the Bondi accretion radius to be 30 pc and the accretion rate to be 0.01 M{sub {circle_dot}} y{sup -1} which under the canonical radiative efficiency of 10% would overproduce by 3.5 orders of magnitude the radiative luminosity. Much of this energy can be directed into the kinetic energy of the jet, which over time inflates the observed cavities seen in the thermal gas. The VLBA observations reveal a weak nucleus and a broad, one-sided jet extending over 25 parsecs in position angle -150 degrees. This jet is deflected on the kpc-scale to a more east-west orientation (position angle of -80 degrees).

  16. Interaction of interplanetary shocks and rotational discontinuities with the Earth`s bow shock

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, M.; Lee, L.C.

    1996-03-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) aspects of the interaction between the Earth`s bow show and interplanetary shocks or rotational discontinues are systematically studied in this paper by MHD simulations. The interplanetary shocks under consideration include forward fast shocks, reverse fast shocks, forward slow shocks, and a reverse slow shocks. As an incident forward shock transmits through the bow shock, a fast shock, a slow expansion wave, a slow shock, and a contact discontinuity are generated downstream of the bow shock. At the same time, the bow shock is modified and moves earthward. If the incident shock is a reverse shock, the generated fast shock becomes a fast expansion wave, and the bow shock moves away from the earth. The generated fast shock or fast expansion wave carries most of the total pressure variation. The contact discontinuity also carries a significant part of the pressure variation. The slow expansion wave and the slow shock are both generated with a small variation in plasma density and pressure but a large variation in magnetic field. When the solar wind Alfven Mach number is small, the density variations associated with the slow shock or slow expansion wave can be significant. Through the interaction between an incident rotational discontinuity and the bow shock, a plateau in the plasma density and thermal pressure is formed. The magnetic pressure is depressed accordingly anticorrelated with the thermal pressure. If the incident rotational discontinuity proprogates toward the Earth (Sun) in the solar wind frame, the leading (trailing) edge of the plateau consists of an intermediate shock or a time-dependent intermediate shock and a slow shock, while the trailing (leading) edge is mainly a slow shock. The generated structure with enhanced plasma density and thermal pressure and a depressed magnetic pressure agrees very well with the observed slow-mode structure in the magnetosheath. 45 refs., 12 fig.

  17. 77 FR 16028 - Broken Bow Wind, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Broken Bow Wind, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market- Based Rate...-referenced proceeding of Broken Bow Wind, LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with...

  18. 76 FR 9320 - Foreign-Trade Zone 274-Butte-Silver Bow, MT; Application for Manufacturing Authority REC Silicon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 274--Butte-Silver Bow, MT; Application for Manufacturing... Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the Board) by the City and County of Butte-Silver Bow, grantee of FTZ...

  19. Voyager energetic particle observations at interplanetary shocks and upstream of planetary bow shocks - 1977-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The Voyager 1 and 2 vehicles include instrumentation that makes comprehensive electron and ion measurements in several energy channels with good energy, temporal, and compositional resolution. Data gathered from 1977 to 1988, including observations downstream and upstream of four planetary bow shocks (earth, Saturn, Uranus, Jupiter) and numerous interplanetary shocks to about 30 AU, are analyzed in the context of the Fermi and shock drift acceleration models. Overall results indicate that electrons and ions observed upstream of planetary bow shocks have their source inside the parent magnetosphere, with first order Fermi acceleration playing a secondary role at best.

  20. Asymptotic Steady-state Solution to a Bow Shock with an Infinite Mach Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalinewich, Almog; Sari, Re’em

    2016-08-01

    The problem of a cold gas flowing past a stationary obstacle is considered. We study the bow shock that forms around the obstacle and show that at large distances from the obstacle the shock front forms a parabolic solid of revolution. The profiles of the hydrodynamic variables in the interior of the shock are obtained by solution of the hydrodynamic equations in parabolic coordinates. The results are verified with a hydrodynamic simulation. The drag force on the obstacle is also calculated. Finally, we use these results to model the bow shock around an isolated neutron star.

  1. The distant bow shock and magnetotail of Venus - Magnetic field and plasma wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.; Scarf, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    An examination of the magnetic field and plasma wave data obtained by the Pioneer Venus orbiter in the wake region behind Venus discloses a well developed bow shock whose location is similar to that observed on previous missions in contrast to the dayside bow shock. Venus also has a well developed magnetotail in which the field strenght is enhanced over magnetosheath values and in which the magnetic field is aligned approximately with the solar wind direction. The boundary between magnetosheath and magnetotail is also marked by a change in the plasma wave spectrum.

  2. Distributions of electron plasma oscillations upstream from the earth's bow shock.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredricks, R. W.; Scarf, F. L.; Green, I. M.

    1972-01-01

    Evaluation of data from the 14.5- and 30-kHz plasma-wave detector channels aboard Ogo 5 for the period Dec. 2, 1968, to Apr. 8, 1969, demonstrating the relatively isotropic occurrence of electron plasma oscillations upstream from the bow shock. These plasma oscillations were shown previously to correlate with streams of electrons having energy greater than 700 eV. The present study implies the presence of such streams, most probably electrons reflected by the bow shock, irrespective of spacecraft longitude in the upstream solar wind.

  3. THEMIS Observations of Unusual Bow Shock Motion, Attending a Transient Magnetospheric Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotova, Galina; Sibeck, David; Omidi, N.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2013-01-01

    We present a multipoint case study of solar wind and magnetospheric observations during a transient magnetospheric compression at 2319 UT on October 15, 2008. We use high-time resolution magnetic field and plasma data from the THEMIS and GOES-11/12 spacecraft to show that this transient event corresponded to an abrupt rotation in the IMF orientation, a change in the location of the foreshock, and transient outward bow shock motion. We employ results from a global hybrid code model to reconcile the observations indicating transient inward magnetopause motion with the outward bow shock motion.

  4. The ultraviolet absorption spectrum of the quasar PKS 0405-12 and the local density of Lyman-alpha absorption systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, John N.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Hartig, George F.

    1993-01-01

    A sample of 32 absorption lines has been identified in the ultraviolet spectrum of the z = 0.57 quasar PKS 0405-12. Data cover the wavelength range 1190-3260 A. There are 10 extragalactic Ly-alpha absorption lines in the complete sample, all with observed equivalent widths greater than or equal to 0.40 A; three of the Ly-alpha lines have Ly-beta counterparts. The number of Ly-alpha lines observed in the spectrum of PKS 0405-12 is within 1 sigma of the number predicted on the basis of previous HST observations of 3C 273 and of H1821 + 643. Combining the HST observations of 3C 273, H1821 + 643, and PKS 0405-12, we estimate the local number density of Ly-alpha systems with rest equivalent widths larger than 0.32 A to be about 15 +/- 4 Ly-alpha lines per unit redshift. Ground-based images reveal a rich field of galaxies in the direction of PKS 0405-12, including many galaxies with the brightnesses and sizes expected if they belong to a cluster associated with the quasar. The quasar spectrum does not show any evidence for absorption at the redshift of the emission lines, indicating a covering factor of less than unity for the halos of galaxies in the cluster around PKS 0405 - 12.

  5. Ketide Synthase (KS) Domain Prediction and Analysis of Iterative Type II PKS Gene in Marine Sponge-Associated Actinobacteria Producing Biosurfactants and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Selvin, Joseph; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Lipton, Anuj N.; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Kiran, George S.

    2016-01-01

    The important biological macromolecules, such as lipopeptide and glycolipid biosurfactant producing marine actinobacteria were analyzed and their potential linkage between type II polyketide synthase (PKS) genes was explored. A unique feature of type II PKS genes is their high amino acid (AA) sequence homology and conserved gene organization. These enzymes mediate the biosynthesis of polyketide natural products with enormous structural complexity and chemical nature by combinatorial use of various domains. Therefore, deciphering the order of AA sequence encoded by PKS domains tailored the chemical structure of polyketide analogs still remains a great challenge. The present work deals with an in vitro and in silico analysis of PKS type II genes from five actinobacterial species to correlate KS domain architecture and structural features. Our present analysis reveals the unique protein domain organization of iterative type II PKS and KS domain of marine actinobacteria. The findings of this study would have implications in metabolic pathway reconstruction and design of semi-synthetic genomes to achieve rational design of novel natural products. PMID:26903957

  6. Simple Method for Converting Conventional Face-bow to Postural Face-bow for Recording the Relationship of Maxilla Relative to the Temporomandibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Gooya, Ali; Zarakani, Houman; Memari, Yeganeh

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental assumption in prosthetic dentistry is that the axis-orbital plane will usually be parallel to the horizontal reference plane. Most articulator systems have incorporated this concept into their designs and use orbitale as the anterior reference point for transferring the vertical position of the maxilla to the articulator. Clinical observations of Cantonese patients suggest that in some individuals the Frankfort plane may not be horizontal, thus the orientation of the casts in the articulator is incorrect with respect to the horizontal plane. The purpose of this study was to introduce a simple method for converting the conventional face-bow to postural face-bow to reproduce the orientation of the occlusal plane relative to the true horizontal plane with the patient in Natural Head Posture (NHP). PMID:26005456

  7. Observações simultâneas no óptico e infravermelho próximo dos BL Lacs PKS 2005-489 e PKS 2155-304 em diversas escalas de tempo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominici, T. P.; Abraham, Z.; Galo, A. L.

    2003-08-01

    A existência de variações rápidas de brilho em alguns blazares é um fenômeno bem comprovado, mas até agora não sabemos ao certo quais são os mecanismos físicos envolvidos. A maior dificuldade é a ausência de observações multibanda simultâneas que poderiam fornecer vínculos aos modelos. Buscando colaborar com a discussão estudamos o comportamento de dois BL Lacs, PKS 2005-489 e PKS 2155-304, em relação à variabilidade em diversas escalas de tempo, de poucos minutos até vários meses, com observações simultâneas em seis bandas espectrais (óptico e infravermelho próximo). Para tanto dois telescópios do LNA foram utilizados em conjunto nas campanhas observacionais realizadas em 2001 e 2002, cujos resultados são apresentados aqui. As duas fontes apresentaram características bastante diferentes, inclusive em relação à existência de variabilidade nos índices espectrais. Particularmente, registramos a primeira detecção de variações em escalas de tempo da ordem de poucos minutos em PKS 2005-489, com evidências da presença de um atraso entre as curvas de luz nas bandas V e R e a variação em R ocorrendo antes (o contrário do esperado no modelo de shock-in-jet). Em PKS 2155-304 detectamos pela primeira vez variabilidade em escalas de tempo de poucos minutos no infravermelho em um AGN. As observações indicam que as variações de brilho em blazares são o resultado da ação de mais de um fenômeno, especialmente em escalas de tempo muito curtas. Alguns cenários físicos são sugeridos para explicar os resultados observacionais.

  8. Multiscale whistler waves within Earth's perpendicular bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, A. J.; Muschietti, L.; Oka, M.; Larson, D. E.; Mozer, F. S.; Chaston, C. C.; Bonnell, J. W.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2012-12-01

    We present observations of intense whistler waves made by Polar in the frequency range from a few Hz to 600 Hz within Earth's nearly perpendicular bow shock. The long duration burst data provided by Polar reveal the detailed properties of whistler waves in context with the macrostructure of the layer of this supercritical shock. We show that the pedestal and ramp have superposed quasiperiodic, large amplitude precursor substructure occurring at a cadence of ˜3 sec, which is near the ion cyclotron period. With increasing penetration into the shock front, the amplitude of this substructure increases and ultimately reaches downstream values. The nonlinear substructure is shown to be concentrated regions of intense whistler wave activity. Power spectra in the whistler range show strong enhancements in two distinct bands: a relatively broadband lower frequency component occurring near the lower hybrid frequency (a few tens of Hertz) and a higher frequency component at a few hundred Hertz. The lower frequency component is composed of right-hand polarized whistler wave packets propagating quasiparallel to the magnetic coplanarity plane at oblique angles with respect to both the magnetic field and shock normal, with respective anglesθkb varying from 50°-70° and θkn ˜ 50°. These waves generally have relatively large amplitude (δB/B0˜ 0.1-0.4) magnetic fields ranging from a few nT to 15 nT. Given their preferential upstream propagation near the magnetic coplanarity plane, they are likely generated by a kinetic cross-field streaming instability driven by the relative drift between the reflected ion beam and the electrons. The high-frequency component appears to be the shock analog of whistler "lion roars" often observed in the magnetosheath. The lion roars occur within the foot and into the shock ramp in regions where sufficiently intense low-frequency whistlers exist. These are right-hand circularly polarized wave packets lasting up to ˜10 cycles, with amplitudes

  9. Wake Characteristics of the MOD-2 Wind Turbine at Medicine Bow, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, E. W.; Kelley, N. D.; McKenna, H. E.; Birkenheuer, N. B.

    1984-11-01

    The present paper summarizes results obtained from profile measurements of the MOD-2 wind turbine wake at Medicine Bow, Wyoming. Vertical profiles of wind speed, potential temperature, and turbulence at 3 and 7 rotor diameters downstream of the turbine, taken under near neutral or slightly stable atmospheric conditions, are presented.

  10. Turbulence at quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitna, Alexander; Zastenker, Georgy; Nemecek, Zdenek; Safrankova, Jana

    2016-07-01

    A solar wind is a highly turbulent medium carrying various modes of magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities. During its supersonic expansion, it meets obstacles like planetary magnetospheres and bow shocks are formed. Depending on the orientation of the ambient magnetic field with respect to the local shock normal, either quasi-parallel or quasi-perpendicular shocks can be formed. Particles reflected at the ramp of the quasi-parallel shock are streaming far upstream along the magnetic field lines, giving rise to all sorts of instabilities like SLAMS and ULF waves. In the case of the quasi-perpendicular bow shock, the reflected particles influence only a narrow upstream region of the order of the proton gyroradius but the downstream plasma becomes highly turbulent regardless of the shock type. We analyze the high cadence (31 ms) data from the BMSW instrument onboard the Spektr-R spacecraft and compare the frequency spectra of observed turbulence in MHD and kinetic ranges in upstream and downstream regions of the supercritical quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular bow shocks. We found that the change in the fluctuation level (from upstream to downstream) as well as the spectral indices differ substantially in the MHD and kinetic ranges for both types of bow shock.

  11. Fuzzy Bayesian Network-Bow-Tie Analysis of Gas Leakage during Biomass Gasification.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fang; Xu, Kaili; Yao, Xiwen; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Biomass gasification technology has been rapidly developed recently. But fire and poisoning accidents caused by gas leakage restrict the development and promotion of biomass gasification. Therefore, probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is necessary for biomass gasification system. Subsequently, Bayesian network-bow-tie (BN-bow-tie) analysis was proposed by mapping bow-tie analysis into Bayesian network (BN). Causes of gas leakage and the accidents triggered by gas leakage can be obtained by bow-tie analysis, and BN was used to confirm the critical nodes of accidents by introducing corresponding three importance measures. Meanwhile, certain occurrence probability of failure was needed in PSA. In view of the insufficient failure data of biomass gasification, the occurrence probability of failure which cannot be obtained from standard reliability data sources was confirmed by fuzzy methods based on expert judgment. An improved approach considered expert weighting to aggregate fuzzy numbers included triangular and trapezoidal numbers was proposed, and the occurrence probability of failure was obtained. Finally, safety measures were indicated based on the obtained critical nodes. The theoretical occurrence probabilities in one year of gas leakage and the accidents caused by it were reduced to 1/10.3 of the original values by these safety measures. PMID:27463975

  12. 3/4 VIEW OF PORT SIDE FROM BOW AFT SHOWING BILGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3/4 VIEW OF PORT SIDE FROM BOW AFT SHOWING BILGE KEEL STABILIZERS ON HULL BOTTOM. - U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tenders, 180' Class, U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, 2100 Second Street Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. "Heaven Starts at Your Parents' Feet": Adolescent Bowing to Parents and Associated Spiritual Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thanissaro, Phra Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    In a quantitative survey of religious attitudes and practices in a multi-religious sample of 369 school pupils aged between 13 and 15 in London, the practice of bowing to parents was found widespread in 22% of adolescents spanning several religious affiliations and ethnicities--especially Buddhists, Hindus and those of Indian, African and "Other…

  14. Prototype adaptive bow-tie filter based on spatial exposure time modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badal, Andreu

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the development of dynamic bow-tie filters that are able to provide patient-specific x-ray beam shaping. We introduce the first physical prototype of a new adaptive bow-tie filter design based on the concept of "spatial exposure time modulation." While most existing bow-tie filters operate by attenuating the radiation beam differently in different locations using partially attenuating objects, the presented filter shapes the radiation field using two movable completely radio-opaque collimators. The aperture and speed of the collimators is modulated in synchrony with the x-ray exposure to selectively block the radiation emitted to different parts of the object. This mode of operation does not allow the reproduction of every possible attenuation profile, but it can reproduce the profile of any object with an attenuation profile monotonically decreasing from the center to the periphery, such as an object with an elliptical cross section. Therefore, the new adaptive filter provides the same advantages as the currently existing static bow-tie filters, which are typically designed to work for a pre-determined cylindrical object at a fixed distance from the source, and provides the additional capability to adapt its performance at image acquisition time to better compensate for the actual diameter and location of the imaged object. A detailed description of the prototype filter, the implemented control methods, and a preliminary experimental validation of its performance are presented.

  15. 10. VIEW TOWARD PORT BOW IN THE FOC'S'LE OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW TOWARD PORT BOW IN THE FOC'S'LE OF THE EVELINA M. GOULART. OBJECT IN THE FOREGROUND IS A FOLDING MESS TABLE LOCATED BETWEEN THE TIERS OF BUNKS. - Auxiliary Fishing Schooner "Evelina M. Goulart", Essex Shipbuilding Museum, 66 Main Street, Essex, Essex County, MA

  16. Bowed stators: An example of CFD applied to improve multistage compressor efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Weingold, H.D.; Neubert, R.J.; Behlke, R.F.; Potter, G.E.

    1997-04-01

    Analysis of multistage compressor stator surface static pressure data reveals that the radial growth of suction surface corner separation prematurely separates core flow stator sections, limiting their pressure rise capability and generating endwall loss. Modeling of the stator flowfield, using a three-dimensional Euler analysis, has led to the development of bowed stator shapes, which generate radial forces that reduce diffusion rates in the suction surface corners, in order to delay the onset of corner separation. Experimental testing of the bowed stator concept in a three-stage research compressor has confirmed the elimination of suction surface corner separation, the resulting reduction of the endwall loss, and the increase in pressure rise capability of the stator core sections. This results in more robust pressure rise characteristics and substantially improved efficiency over the entire flow range of the compressor. The strong interaction effects of the bowed stator with the viscous endwall flowfield are shown to be predictable using a three-dimensional multistage Navier-Stokes analysis. This permits matching of the rotors to the altered stator exit profiles, in order to avoid potential stability limiting interactions. Application of bowed stators to a high bypass ratio engine eleven-stage high-pressure compressor has resulted in substantial improvement in efficiency, with no stability penalty.

  17. Further evidence for a dynamically generated secondary bow in 13C+12C rainbow scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.; Ogloblin, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    The existence of a secondary bow is confirmed for 13C+12C nuclear rainbow scattering in addition to the 16O+12C system. This is found by studying the experimental angular distribution of 13C+12C scattering at the incident 13C energy EL=250 MeV with an extended double-folding (EDF) model that describes all the diagonal and off-diagonal coupling potentials derived from the microscopic wave functions for 12C using a density-dependent nucleon-nucleon force. The Airy minimum at θ ≈70°, which is not reproduced by a conventional folding potential, is revealed to be a secondary bow generated dynamically by a coupling to the excited state 2+ (4.44 MeV) of 12C. The essential importance of the quadruple Y 2 term (reorientation term) of potential of the excited state 2+ of 12C for the emergence of a secondary bow is found. The mechanism of the secondary bow is intuitively explained by showing how the trajectories are refracted dynamically into the classically forbidden angular region beyond the rainbow angle of the primary rainbow.

  18. Fuzzy Bayesian Network-Bow-Tie Analysis of Gas Leakage during Biomass Gasification

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fang; Xu, Kaili; Yao, Xiwen; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Biomass gasification technology has been rapidly developed recently. But fire and poisoning accidents caused by gas leakage restrict the development and promotion of biomass gasification. Therefore, probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is necessary for biomass gasification system. Subsequently, Bayesian network-bow-tie (BN-bow-tie) analysis was proposed by mapping bow-tie analysis into Bayesian network (BN). Causes of gas leakage and the accidents triggered by gas leakage can be obtained by bow-tie analysis, and BN was used to confirm the critical nodes of accidents by introducing corresponding three importance measures. Meanwhile, certain occurrence probability of failure was needed in PSA. In view of the insufficient failure data of biomass gasification, the occurrence probability of failure which cannot be obtained from standard reliability data sources was confirmed by fuzzy methods based on expert judgment. An improved approach considered expert weighting to aggregate fuzzy numbers included triangular and trapezoidal numbers was proposed, and the occurrence probability of failure was obtained. Finally, safety measures were indicated based on the obtained critical nodes. The theoretical occurrence probabilities in one year of gas leakage and the accidents caused by it were reduced to 1/10.3 of the original values by these safety measures. PMID:27463975

  19. Properties and the origin of Almost Monoenergetic Ion (AMI) beams observed near the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsenko, V. N.; Gavrilova, E. A.

    2011-08-01

    Beams of Almost Monoenergetic Ions (AMI) in the energy range from 20 to 800 keV were discovered in the DOK-2 experiment (Interball project) in the magnetosheath and upstream of the Earth's bow shock. This work summarizes the analysis results of ~730 AMI events registered in 1995-2000. Statistics of AMI properties, their nature and origin are considered. The analysis of a large array of new data confirmed our earlier suggested ideas on the AMI nature, origin, and their acceleration model. These ideas were further developed and refined. According to this model, AMI are a result of solar wind ions acceleration in small regions with a potential electric field arising due to disruptions of the bow shock current sheet filaments. It has been found that the reason of the current filaments disruptions in most cases was the Hot Flow Anomaly phenomenon (HFA) caused by an interaction of a tangential discontinuity in the solar wind with the Earth's bow shock. It is shown that the study of AMI can provide new information on large-scale properties and dynamics of the bow shock current sheet.

  20. Investigation of plasma density bulge in front of Venus bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Significant ion and electron flux enhancements immediately upstream of the Venus bow shock were observed by the Electron Temperature Probe on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter. Mass loading of the solar wind by oxygen ions accounts for only about 10 percent of the observed effect.

  1. Active current sheets and hot flow anomalies in Mercury's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Sundberg, T.; Raines, J. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2012-12-01

    Hot flow anomalies (HFAs) represent a subset of heliospheric current sheets interacting with planetary bow shocks. They are typically formed when the normal component of the motional (convective) electric field is directed toward the embedded current sheet on at least one side. The core region of an HFA contains hot and highly deflected ion flows and rather low and turbulent magnetic field. In this talk, we report the first observations of HFA-like events at Mercury. Using the data from the orbital phase of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, we identify a representative ensemble of active current sheets magnetically connected to Mercury's bow shock. We show that some of these events exhibit unambiguous signatures of HFAs similar to those observed at other planets, and present their key physical characteristics. Our analysis suggests that Mercury's bow shock does not only mediate the flow of supersonic solar wind plasma but also provides conditions for local particle acceleration and heating as predicted by previous numerical simulations. Together with earlier studies of HFA activity at Earth, Venus, and Saturn, our results confirm that hot flow anomalies could be a common property of planetary bow shocks.

  2. Accretion disc/corona emission from a radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy PKS 0558-504

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, R.; Dewangan, G. C.; Raychaudhuri, B.

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 10-20 per cent of active galactic nuclei (AGN) are known to eject powerful jets from the innermost regions. There is very little observational evidence if the jets are powered by spinning black holes and if the accretion discs extend to the innermost regions in radio-loud AGN. Here, we study the soft X-ray excess, the hard X-ray spectrum and the optical/UV emission from the radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy PKS 0558-504 using Suzaku and Swift observations. The broad-band X-ray continuum of PKS 0558-504 consists of a soft X-ray excess emission below 2 keV that is well described by a blackbody (kT ˜ 0.13 keV) and high-energy emission that is well described by a thermal Comptonization (compps) model with kTe ˜ 250 keV, optical depth τ ˜ 0.05 (spherical corona) or kTe ˜ 90 keV, τ ˜ 0.5 (slab corona). The Comptonizing corona in PKS 0558-504 is likely hotter than in radio-quiet Seyferts such as IC 4329A and Swift J2127.4+5654. The observed soft X-ray excess can be modelled as blurred reflection from an ionized accretion disc or optically thick thermal Comptonization in a low-temperature plasma. Both the soft X-ray excess emission when interpreted as the blurred reflection and the optical/UV to soft X-ray emission interpreted as intrinsic disc Comptonized emission implies spinning (a > 0.6) black hole. These results suggest that disc truncation at large radii and retrograde black hole spin both are unlikely to be the necessary conditions for launching the jets.

  3. The multifrequency parsec-scale structure of PKS 2254-367 (IC 1459): a luminosity-dependent break in morphology for the precursors of radio galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingay, S. J.; Edwards, P. G.

    2015-03-01

    We present the first multifrequency very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) images of PKS 2254-367, a gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) radio source hosted by the nearby galaxy IC 1459 (D = 20.5 Mpc). PKS 2254-367 and the radio source in NGC 1052 (PKS 0238-084; D = 17.2 Mpc) are the two closest GPS radio sources to us, far closer than the next closest example, PKS 1718-649 (D = 59 Mpc). As such, IC 1459 and NGC 1052 offer opportunities to study the details of the parsec-scale radio sources as well as the environments that the radio sources inhabit, across the electromagnetic spectrum. Given that some models for the origin and evolution of GPS radio sources require a strong connection between the radio source morphology and the gaseous nuclear environment, such opportunities for detailed study are important. Our VLBI images of PKS 2254-367 show that the previously identified similarities between IC 1459 and NGC 1052 continue on to the parsec-scale. Both compact radio sources appear to have symmetric jets of approximately the same luminosity, much lower than typically noted in compact double GPS sources. Similarities between PKS 2254-367 and NGC 1052, and differences with respect to other GPS galaxies, lead us to speculate that a sub-class of GPS radio sources, with low luminosity and with jet-dominated morphologies, exists and would be largely absent from radio source surveys with ˜1 Jy flux density cut-offs. We suggest that this possible low-luminosity, jet-dominated population of GPS sources could be an analogue of the Fanaroff-Riley type I (FR I) radio galaxies, with the higher luminosity lobe-dominated GPS sources being the analogue of the FR II radio galaxies.

  4. Tentative detection of warm intervening gas towards PKS 0548-322 with XMM-Newton

    SciTech Connect

    Barcons, X.

    2005-03-17

    We present the results of a long ({approx} 93 ksec) XMM-Newton observation of the bright BL-Lac object PKS 0548-322 (z = 0.069). Our Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) spectrum shows a single absorption feature at an observed wavelength {lambda} = 23.33 {+-} 0.01 {angstrom} which we interpret as OVI K{alpha} absorption at z = 0.058, i.e., {approx} 3000 km s{sup -1} from the background object. The observed equivalent width of the absorption line {approx} 30m {angstrom}, coupled with the lack of the corresponding absorption edge in the EPIC pn data, implies a column density N{sub OVI} {approx} 2 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} and turbulence with a Doppler velocity parameter b > 100 km s{sup -1}. Within the limitations of our RGS spectrum, no OVII or OV K{alpha} absorption are detected. Under the assumption of ionization equilibrium by both collisions and the extragalactic background, this is only marginally consistent if the gas temperature is {approx} 2.5 x 10{sup 5} K, with significantly lower or higher values being excluded by our limits on OV or OVII. If confirmed, this would be the first X-ray detection of a large amount of intervening warm absorbing gas through OVI absorption. The existence of such a high column density absorber, much stronger than any previously detected one in OVI, would place stringent constraints on the large-scale distribution of baryonic gas in the Universe.

  5. Brightest Fermi-LAT flares of PKS 1222+216: implications on emission and acceleration processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kushwaha, Pankaj; Singh, K. P.; Sahayanathan, Sunder

    2014-11-20

    We present a high time resolution study of the two brightest γ-ray outbursts from a blazar PKS 1222+216 observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) in 2010. The γ-ray light curves obtained in four different energy bands, 0.1-3, 0.1-0.3, 0.3-1, and 1-3 GeV, with time bins of six hours, show asymmetric profiles with similar rise times in all the bands but a rapid decline during the April flare and a gradual one during the June flare. The light curves during the April flare show an ∼2 day long plateau in 0.1-0.3 GeV emission, erratic variations in 0.3-1 GeV emission, and a daily recurring feature in 1-3 GeV emission until the rapid rise and decline within a day. The June flare shows a monotonic rise until the peak, followed by a gradual decline powered mainly by the multi-peak 0.1-0.3 GeV emission. The peak fluxes during both the flares are similar except in the 1-3 GeV band in April, which is twice the corresponding flux during the June flare. Hardness ratios during the April flare indicate spectral hardening in the rising phase followed by softening during the decay. We attribute this behavior to the development of a shock associated with an increase in acceleration efficiency followed by its decay leading to spectral softening. The June flare suggests hardening during the rise followed by a complicated energy dependent behavior during the decay. Observed features during the June flare favor multiple emission regions while the overall flaring episode can be related to jet dynamics.

  6. MAGIC DISCOVERY OF VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM THE FSRQ PKS 1222+21

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksic, J.; Blanch, O.; Antonelli, L. A.; Bonnoli, G.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Berger, K.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Boller, A.; Braun, I.; Bock, R. K.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bretz, T.; Canellas, A. E-mail: antonio.stamerra@pi.infn.it E-mail: ksaito@mpp.mpg.de

    2011-03-20

    Very high energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray emission from the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 1222+21 (4C 21.35, z = 0.432) was detected with the MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes during a short observation ({approx}0.5 hr) performed on 2010 June 17. The MAGIC detection coincides with high-energy MeV/GeV {gamma}-ray activity measured by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi satellite. The VHE spectrum measured by MAGIC extends from about 70 GeV up to at least 400 GeV and can be well described by a power-law dN/dE {proportional_to} E {sup -}{Gamma} with a photon index {Gamma} = 3.75 {+-} 0.27{sub stat} {+-} 0.2{sub syst}. The averaged integral flux above 100 GeV is (4.6 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -10} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} ({approx}1 Crab Nebula flux). The VHE flux measured by MAGIC varies significantly within the 30 minute exposure implying a flux doubling time of about 10 minutes. The VHE and MeV/GeV spectra, corrected for the absorption by the extragalactic background light (EBL), can be described by a single power law with photon index 2.72 {+-} 0.34 between 3 GeV and 400 GeV, and is consistent with emission belonging to a single component in the jet. The absence of a spectral cutoff constrains the {gamma}-ray emission region to lie outside the broad-line region, which would otherwise absorb the VHE {gamma}-rays. Together with the detected fast variability, this challenges present emission models from jets in FSRQs. Moreover, the combined Fermi/LAT and MAGIC spectral data yield constraints on the density of the EBL in the UV-optical to near-infrared range that are compatible with recent models.

  7. ALMA observations of cold molecular gas filaments trailing rising radio bubbles in PKS 0745-191

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, H. R.; McNamara, B. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Edge, A. C.; Combes, F.; Murray, N. W.; Parrish, I. J.; Salomé, P.; Sanders, J. S.; Baum, S. A.; Donahue, M.; Main, R. A.; O'Connell, R. W.; O'Dea, C. P.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Tremblay, G.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Voit, G. M.

    2016-05-01

    We present ALMA observations of the CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) line emission tracing filaments of cold molecular gas in the central galaxy of the cluster PKS 0745-191. The total molecular gas mass of 4.6± 0.3× 109 M_{⊙}, assuming a Galactic XCO factor, is divided roughly equally between three filaments each extending radially 3-5 kpc from the galaxy centre. The emission peak is located in the SE filament ˜ 1 arcsec (2 kpc) from the nucleus. The velocities of the molecular clouds in the filaments are low, lying within ± 100 { km s^{-1}} of the galaxy's systemic velocity. Their full width at half-maximum (FWHM) are less than 150 { km s^{-1},} which is significantly below the stellar velocity dispersion. Although the molecular mass of each filament is comparable to a rich spiral galaxy, such low velocities show that the filaments are transient and the clouds would disperse on < 107 yr time-scales unless supported, likely by the indirect effect of magnetic fields. The velocity structure is inconsistent with a merger origin or gravitational free-fall of cooling gas in this massive central galaxy. If the molecular clouds originated in gas cooling even a few kpc from their current locations their velocities would exceed those observed. Instead, the projection of the N and SE filaments underneath X-ray cavities suggests they formed in the updraft behind bubbles buoyantly rising through the cluster atmosphere. Direct uplift of the dense gas by the radio bubbles appears to require an implausibly high coupling efficiency. The filaments are coincident with low temperature X-ray gas, bright optical line emission and dust lanes indicating that the molecular gas could have formed from lifted warmer gas that cooled in situ.

  8. Ultraviolet Continuum of the Quasar PKS 0405-123: Lyman Edge in the Accretion Disk Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, G.; Kriss, G. A.; Davidsen, A. F.; Zheng, W.

    1995-05-01

    We study the characteristics of the ultraviolet continuum of the quasar PKS 0405-123 using the archival HST/FOS spectrum. The spectrum from 1150 to 3300 Angstroms shows a steeply rising continuum in F_λ with a strong absorption feature ~ 100 Angstroms wide around the intrinsic Lyman limit of this z=0.574 quasar. The spectrum also shows Lyman absorption line systems in the wavelength range of the broad absorption feature. A Lyalpha absorption line whose corresponding Lyman limit could contribute to the broad absorption feature is also identified. We investigate the possibility that the broad absorption feature may be due to the sum of the contributions from each Lyman absorption system. The estimated opacity due to the Lyman absorption systems in the region of the broad absorption feature, however, is not high enough to completely account for it. We thus propose that a significant part of the continuum drop in the broad absorption feature may be due to a broadened Lyman edge in the spectrum of an accretion disk. We model the ultraviolet continuum using an alpha -disk with an adiabatic vertical structure. We compute the emitted spectrum by solving the radiative transfer numerically. The observed spectrum is corrected for relativistic effects assuming a Schwarzschild metric, and we also consider the effect of Comptonization by a surrounding hot corona on the observed spectrum. A realistic disk spectrum with a significant amount of Comptonization describes the steep continuum shape and the broad Lyman edge feature, and it is consistent with the X-ray flux observed with EINSTEIN observatory IPC. This work was supported by NASA Grant NAG 5-1630 to the FOS team and NASA contract NAS 5-27000 to the Johns Hopkins University.

  9. On the Location of the 2009 GeV Flares of Blazar PKS 1510-089

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotson, Amanda; Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen T.; McCann, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    Most of the radiated power of blazars is produced at GeV energies via inverse Compton scattering at an unknown distance from the central engine. Possible seed photon sources map to different locations along the jet spanning two orders of magnitude in distance from the black hole, ranging from the broad-line region (BLR, ˜0.1 pc), to the molecular torus (MT, ˜ 1- few pc), to the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) radio core zone at ˜10 pc. Here, we apply a diagnostic for identifying the GeV emission zone (GEZ) in blazar PKS 1510-089 using four bright gamma-ray flares detected by Fermi in 2009. As shown by Dotson et al., the flare decay time should be energy-independent for flares in the BLR, but faster at higher energies for flares in the MT. We find that in the two cases where the gamma-ray flare was not accompanied by an optical flare, the decay times show an energy-dependence suggesting a location in the MT. For the two GeV flares accompanied by optical flares, we obtained very fast decay times (≲3 hr) in both low and high energy Fermi bands. For these flares, considering the simultaneous >100 GeV detection by HESS (H.E.S.S. Collaboration et al.) and the ejection of a superluminal component from the VLBI radio core in one case, our results suggest that both flares came from the vicinity of the VLBI core. We thus suggest that the GEZ is spread over a wide range of locations beyond the BLR.

  10. THE NATURE OF A GALAXY ALONG THE SIGHT LINE TO PKS 0454+039

    SciTech Connect

    Takamiya, Marianne; Chun, Mark; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Gharanfoli, Soheila

    2012-10-01

    We report on the properties of a faint blue galaxy (G1) along the line of sight to the QSO PKS 0454+039 from spectroscopic and imaging data. We measured emission lines of H{alpha}, [S II] {lambda}{lambda}6716, 6732, and [N II] {lambda}6584 in the spectrum of G1 obtained with the Gemini/GMOS instrument. The spectroscopic redshift of G1 is z = 0.0715 {+-} 0.0002. From the extinction-corrected H{alpha} flux, we determine a modest star formation rate of SFR = 0.07 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and a specific SFR of log (sSFR) -8.4. Using three different abundance indicators, we determine a nebular abundance 12 + log (O/H) ranging from 7.6 to 8.2. Based on the velocity dispersion inferred from the emission line widths and the observed surface brightness profile, we estimate the virial mass of G1 to be M{sub vir} {approx} 6.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} with an effective radius of 2.0 kpc. We estimate the stellar mass of G1 using spectral energy distribution fitting to be M{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} and an r'-luminosity of L{sub r'} = 1.5x10{sup 8} L{sub Sun }. Overall, G1 is a faint, low-mass, low-metallicity Im/H II galaxy. We also report on the line flux limits of another source (G3) which is the most likely candidate for the absorber system at z = 0.8596. From the spectrum of the QSO itself, we report a previously undetected Mg II {lambda}{lambda}2796, 2803 absorption line system at z = 1.245.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: PKS 0405-385 flux-density monitoring (Kedziora-Chudczer+, 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedziora-Chudczer, L.

    2007-01-01

    The monitoring of PKS 0405-385 commenced in 1993 November, as part of the ATCA IDV Survey (Kedziora-Chudczer et al., 2001, Cat. ) with the Australia Telescope Compact Array.1 The source showed rapid variability in total flux density at 8.6, 4.8 and 2.4GHz during these observations. The time-scale of variability, defined throughout this paper as HWHP of auto-correlation function of flux density, was faster than 2h (the frequency of sampling used in the survey). (2 data files).

  12. ATel 7457: Confirmation by AGILE of increased gamma-ray emission from the FSRQ PKS 2032+107

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittori, C.; Lucarelli, F.; Verrecchia, F.; Tavani, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Fioretti, V.; Piano, G.; Striani, E.; Vercellone, S.; Donnarumma, I.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Cocco, G. Di; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Trois, A.; Pilia, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2015-04-01

    AGILE confirms the detection of enhanced gamma-ray activity from the FSRQ PKS 2032+107 (redshift z=0.601), as reported by the Fermi-LAT in ATel #7453. Integrating from 2015-04-25 07:00 UT to 2015-04-28 01:00 UT, a maximum likelihood analysis yields a detection at a significance level of about 5 sigma and a flux F(E > 100 MeV)=(2.0 +/- 0.7) x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1. ...

  13. Fermi-LAT detection of a GeV gamma-ray flare from the blazar PKS 0514-459

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 0514-459 (also known as RX J0515.7-4556 and 3FGL J0515.3-4557), with radio counterpart position R.A.: 78.938767 deg, Dec.: -45.945369 deg (J2000.0, Costa & Loyola 1996, A & AS, 115, 75) and with redshift z=0.194 (Stickel, Kuehr, & Fried 1993, A & AS, 97, 483).

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Absorption spectrum of the QSO PKS2126-158 (D'Odorico+ 1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, V.; Cristiani, S.; D'Odorico, S.; Fontana, A.; Giallongo, E.

    1997-10-01

    Spectra of the zem=3.268 quasar PKS 2126-158 have been obtai the wavelength range 430-662nm with a resolution R=27000 and an average signal to noise ratio s/n=25 per resolution element. 12 metal absorption systems have been identified, two of which were previously unknown. All the lines shortward of the Lymanα emission not identified as due to metals have been fitted as Lymanα and Lymanβ. We reported statistical analysis of this sample of lines. In particular, the two-point correlation function for metal systems has been computed. (1 data file).

  15. Fermi-LAT detection of a GeV gamma-ray flare from the blazar PKS 1313-333

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1313-333 (also known as TXS 1313-333, OP -322, 2EG J1314-3430 and 3FGL J1316.0-3338), with radio counterpart position R.A.: 199.033275 deg, Dec.: -33.64977 deg, (J2000.0, Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880) and with redshift z=1.210 (Jauncey et al. 1982, AJ, 87, 763).

  16. H.E.S.S. discovery of VHE γ-rays from the quasar PKS 1510-089

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Behera, B.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Fallon, L.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Gast, H.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Göring, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hague, J. D.; Hahn, J.; Hampf, D.; Harris, J.; Hauser, M.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; Méhault, J.; Menzler, U.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Naumann, C. L.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nguyen, N.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sheidaei, F.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorobiov, S.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Wouters, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H. S.

    2013-06-01

    The quasar PKS 1510-089 (z = 0.361) was observed with the H.E.S.S. array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes during high states in the optical and GeV bands, to search for very high energy (VHE, defined as E ≥ 0.1 TeV) emission. VHE γ-rays were detected with a statistical significance of 9.2 standard deviations in 15.8 h of H.E.S.S. data taken during March and April 2009. A VHE integral flux of I(0.15 TeV < E < 1.0 TeV)= (1.0 ± 0.2stat ± 0.2sys) × 10-11 cm-2 s-1 is measured. The best-fit power law to the VHE data has a photon index of Γ = 5.4 ± 0.7stat ± 0.3sys. The GeV and optical light curves show pronounced variability during the period of H.E.S.S. observations. However, there is insufficient evidence to claim statistically significant variability in the VHE data. Because of its relatively high redshift, the VHE flux from PKS 1510-089 should suffer considerable attenuation in the intergalactic space due to the extragalactic background light (EBL). Hence, the measured γ-ray spectrum is used to derive upper limits on the opacity due to EBL, which are found to be comparable with the previously derived limits from relatively-nearby BL Lac objects. Unlike typical VHE-detected blazars where the broadband spectrum is dominated by nonthermal radiation at all wavelengths, the quasar PKS 1510-089 has a bright thermal component in the optical to UV frequency band. Among all VHE detected blazars, PKS 1510-089 has the most luminous broad line region. The detection of VHE emission from this quasar indicates a low level of γ - γ absorption on the internal optical to UV photon field.

  17. Fermi and Swift observations of correlated outburst activity from the BL Lac object OT 081 (PKS 1749+096)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano; Gonzalez, Josefa Becerra; Pivato, Giovanna; Thompson, David J.

    2016-07-01

    We report a strong multi-wavelength outburst in the BL Lac object OT 081 (also known as PKS 1749+096, 4C +09.57) with the radio counterpart position R.A.: 267.88674 deg, Dec.: 9.65020 deg (J2000.0, Lanyi et al. 2010, AJ, 139, 1695) and with redshift z=0.322 (Stickel, Fried, Kuehr 1988, A & A, 191, 16). Gamma ray and X-ray flares reached peaks during the interval 2016 July 16 and 20 simultaneous with an optical outburst (Balonek et al, 2016, ATel #9259).

  18. Fermi LAT detection of increasing gamma-ray emission from the radio-loud NLSy1 PKS 1502+036

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ammando, Filippo; Ciprini, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed gamma-ray flaring activity from a source positionally consistent with the radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 PKS 1502+036 (also known as 3FGL J1505.1+0326, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23), with radio coordinates (J2000.0), R.A.: 226.2769879 deg, Dec.: 3.4418922 deg (Fey et al. 2004, AJ, 127, 3587) at redshift z = 0.4078 (Hewett & Wild 2010, MNRAS, 405, 2302).

  19. Confirming the gamma-ray blazar nature of the low energy counterpart QSO PKS1725+123 of 2FGL J1727.9+1220 with WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.

    2012-06-01

    Following the near infrared NIR brightening of the QSO PKS1725+123 (=BZQJ1728+1215) (ATEL #4201), associated to the gamma-ray source 2FGL J1727.9+1220 in Nolan et al. (2012 ApJS, 199, 31), we searched in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010 AJ, 140, 1868) catalog at the VLBI position of the QSO PKS1725+123 (R.A.(J2000): 17h28m07.0512s, Dec.(J2000): +12d15m39.485s) reported in Beasley et al.

  20. Mach 5 bow shock control by a nanosecond pulse surface dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Nishihara, M.; Takashima, K.; Rich, J. W.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2011-06-15

    Bow shock perturbations in a Mach 5 air flow, produced by low-temperature, nanosecond pulse, and surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), are detected by phase-locked schlieren imaging. A diffuse nanosecond pulse discharge is generated in a DBD plasma actuator on a surface of a cylinder model placed in air flow in a small scale blow-down supersonic wind tunnel. Discharge energy coupled to the actuator is 7.3-7.8 mJ/pulse. Plasma temperature inferred from nitrogen emission spectra is a few tens of degrees higher than flow stagnation temperature, T = 340 {+-} 30 K. Phase-locked Schlieren images are used to detect compression waves generated by individual nanosecond discharge pulses near the actuator surface. The compression wave propagates upstream toward the baseline bow shock standing in front of the cylinder model. Interaction of the compression wave and the bow shock causes its displacement in the upstream direction, increasing shock stand-off distance by up to 25%. The compression wave speed behind the bow shock and the perturbed bow shock velocity are inferred from the Schlieren images. The effect of compression waves generated by nanosecond discharge pulses on shock stand-off distance is demonstrated in a single-pulse regime (at pulse repetition rates of a few hundred Hz) and in a quasi-continuous mode (using a two-pulse sequence at a pulse repetition rate of 100 kHz). The results demonstrate feasibility of hypersonic flow control by low-temperature, repetitive nanosecond pulse discharges.

  1. X-RAY EMISSION LINE PROFILES FROM WIND CLUMP BOW SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ignace, R.; Waldron, W. L.; Cassinelli, J. P.; Burke, A. E. E-mail: wwaldron@satx.rr.com E-mail: burke.alexander@gmail.com

    2012-05-01

    The consequences of structured flows continue to be a pressing topic in relating spectral data to physical processes occurring in massive star winds. In a preceding paper, our group reported on hydrodynamic simulations of hypersonic flow past a rigid spherical clump to explore the structure of bow shocks that can form around wind clumps. Here we report on profiles of emission lines that arise from such bow shock morphologies. To compute emission line profiles, we adopt a two-component flow structure of wind and clumps using two 'beta' velocity laws. While individual bow shocks tend to generate double-horned emission line profiles, a group of bow shocks can lead to line profiles with a range of shapes with blueshifted peak emission that depends on the degree of X-ray photoabsorption by the interclump wind medium, the number of clump structures in the flow, and the radial distribution of the clumps. Using the two beta law prescription, the theoretical emission measure and temperature distribution throughout the wind can be derived. The emission measure tends to be power law, and the temperature distribution is broad in terms of wind velocity. Although restricted to the case of adiabatic cooling, our models highlight the influence of bow shock effects for hot plasma temperature and emission measure distributions in stellar winds and their impact on X-ray line profile shapes. Previous models have focused on geometrical considerations of the clumps and their distribution in the wind. Our results represent the first time that the temperature distribution of wind clump structures are explicitly and self-consistently accounted for in modeling X-ray line profile shapes for massive stars.

  2. CPR methodology with new steady-state criterion and more accurate statistical treatment of channel bow

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, S.; Bieli, R.; Bergmann, U. C.

    2012-07-01

    An overview is given of existing CPR design criteria and the methods used in BWR reload analysis to evaluate the impact of channel bow on CPR margins. Potential weaknesses in today's methodologies are discussed. Westinghouse in collaboration with KKL and Axpo - operator and owner of the Leibstadt NPP - has developed an optimized CPR methodology based on a new criterion to protect against dryout during normal operation and with a more rigorous treatment of channel bow. The new steady-state criterion is expressed in terms of an upper limit of 0.01 for the dryout failure probability per year. This is considered a meaningful and appropriate criterion that can be directly related to the probabilistic criteria set-up for the analyses of Anticipated Operation Occurrences (AOOs) and accidents. In the Monte Carlo approach a statistical modeling of channel bow and an accurate evaluation of CPR response functions allow the associated CPR penalties to be included directly in the plant SLMCPR and OLMCPR in a best-estimate manner. In this way, the treatment of channel bow is equivalent to all other uncertainties affecting CPR. Emphasis is put on quantifying the statistical distribution of channel bow throughout the core using measurement data. The optimized CPR methodology has been implemented in the Westinghouse Monte Carlo code, McSLAP. The methodology improves the quality of dryout safety assessments by supplying more valuable information and better control of conservatisms in establishing operational limits for CPR. The methodology is demonstrated with application examples from the introduction at KKL. (authors)

  3. Does a slow magnetosonic bow shock exist in the local interstellar medium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, B.; Opher, M.; Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D. J.; Toth, G.

    2012-12-01

    The currently accepted best estimates of plasma parameters in the local interstellar medium suggest that the speed of the interstellar wind (i.e. the relative speed of the local interstellar cloud with respect to the Sun) is very slow (i.e., sub-Alfvenic; Opher et al., Science, 2009; Schwadron et al., ApJ, 2011). This means that no fast magnetosonic bow shock can be formed in the local interstellar medium upstream of the heliosphere, [McComas et al., Science, 2012]. However, the existence of a slow magnetosonic bow shock may be possible. With current LISM parameters, the Mach number for upstream propagating slow magnetosonic waves in the pristine LISM is ~2.1, which suggests that a weak quasi-parallel slow bow shock (SBS) in front of our heliopshere may exist in some regions. Our new multi-ion, multi-fluid MHD model of the heliospheric interface [Prested et al., ApJ, 2012] produces such a slow magnetosonic bow shock only in the quasi-parallel region where theta_Bn (i.e. the angle between the interstellar magnetic field and the normal to the slow magnetosonic surface; SMS) is less than 45 degrees. The SBS divides the LISM into two distinct regions with different plasma populations. One is the pristine LISM and the other is the hotter and slower compressed plasma population of the outer heliosheath that is spatially restricted to the downstream region of the quasi-parallel shock. Slow magnetosonic shocks are generally not observed in space plasmas due to their lack of stability. However, the plasma in the local interstellar medium exists in a regime not commonly observed in interplanetary space. We discuss the possible existence of the magnetosonic bow shock in front of the heliosphere, the arguments for and against its stability, and its implications for heliospheric measurements.

  4. THE ROLE OF PICKUP IONS ON THE STRUCTURE OF THE VENUSIAN BOW SHOCK AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE TERMINATION SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Quanming; Shan Lican; Zhang Tielong; Wu Mingyu; Wang Shui; Zank, Gary P.; Yang Zhongwei; Du Aimin

    2013-08-20

    The recent crossing of the termination shock by Voyager 2 has demonstrated the important role of pickup ions (PUIs) in the physics of collisionless shocks. The Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft orbits Venus in a 24 hr elliptical orbit that crosses the bow shock twice a day. VEX provides a unique opportunity to investigate the role of PUIs on the structure of collisionless shocks more generally. Using VEX observations, we find that the strength of the Venusian bow shock is weaker when solar activity is strong. We demonstrate that this surprising anti-correlation is due to PUIs mediating the Venusian bow shock.

  5. Upstream particle events close to the bow shock and 200 earth radii upstream - ISEE-1 and ISEE-3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1980-01-01

    Two energetic particle events (28 keV - 145 keV) upstream of the earth's bow shock have been investigated with two identical experiments of the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland on ISEE-1 and ISEE-3. Close to the bow shock the particle distribution is more or less isotropic and indicates strong scattering of these particles in the upstream wave field. At ISEE-3 the particles move essentially scatter-free from the general bow shock direction. The temporal evolution of the particle bursts is discussed in terms of the interplanetary magnetic field topology and the scattering conditions.

  6. Discovery of Very High Energy Gamma Rays from PKS 1424+240 and Multiwavelength Constraints on its Redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V.A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Beilicke, M. Benbow, W.; Bottcher, M.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S.M.; Buckley, J.H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Chow, Y.C.; Ciupik, L.; Cogan, P.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.; Falcone, A.; /more authors..

    2012-04-05

    We report the first detection of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission above 140GeV from PKS 1424+240, a BL Lac object with an unknown redshift. The photon spectrum above 140GeV measured by VERITAS is well described by a power law with a photon index of 3.8 {+-}0.5{sub stat} {+-} 0.3{sub syst} and a flux normalization at 200 GeV of (5.1 {+-} 0.9{sub stat} {+-} 0.5{sub syst}) x 10{sup -11} TeV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, where stat and syst denote the statistical and systematical uncertainty, respectively. The VHE flux is steady over the observation period between MJD 54881 and 55003 (2009 February 19 to June 21). Flux variability is also not observed in contemporaneous high energy observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Contemporaneous X-ray and optical data were also obtained from the Swift XRT and MDM observatory, respectively. The broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) is well described by a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model favoring a redshift of less than 0.1. Using the photon index measured with Fermi in combination with recent extragalactic background light (EBL) absorption models it can be concluded from the VERITAS data that the redshift of PKS 1424+240 is less than 0.66.

  7. On the origin of the soft photons of the high synchrotron peaked blazar : PKS 1424+240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Shi-Ju; Zheng, Yong-Gang; Wu, Qingwen; Chen, Liang

    2016-06-01

    PKS 1424+240 is a distant very high energy gamma-ray BL Lac object with redshift z = 0.601. It was found that pure synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) process normally need extreme input parameters (e.g., very low magnetic field intensity and extraordinarily large Doppler factor) to explain its multi-wavelength spectral energy distributions (SEDs). To avoid the extreme model parameters, different models have been proposed (e.g., two-zone SSC model or lepto-hadronic model). In this work, we employ the traditional one-zone leptonic model after including a weak external Compton component to re-explore the simultaneous multi-wavelength SEDs of PKS 1424+240 in both high (2009) and low (2013) states. We find that the input parameters of magnetic field and Doppler factor are roughly consistent with those of other BL Lacs if a weak external photon field from either broad line region (BLR) or the dust torus. However, the required energy density of seed photons from BLR or torus is about 3 orders of magnitude less than that constrained in luminous quasars (e.g., flat-spectrum radio quasars, FSRQs). This result suggests that the BLR/torus in BL Lacs is much weaker than that of luminous FSRQs (but not fully disappear), and the inverse-Compton of external photons from BLR/torus may still play a role even in high synchrotron peaked blazars.

  8. First Fermi LAT detection of a strong GeV gamma-ray flare from blazar PKS 0403-13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 0403-13 (also known as TXS 0403-132, OF -105, RX J0405.5-1308, and 3FGL J0405.5-1307), with radio counterpart position R.A.: 61.391680 deg, Dec.: -13.137136 deg (J2000.0, Fey et al. 2004, AJ, 127, 3587) and with redshift z=0.5706+/-0.0001 (Marziani et al. 1996, ApJS, 104, 37). Preliminary analysis indicates that on 2016 July 11, PKS 0403-13 was in a high state with a daily averaged gamma-ray flux (E > 100 MeV) of (1.6+/-0.3) X 10^-6 photons cm^-2 s^-1 (statistical uncertainty only), about 140 times greater than its four-year average flux reported in the third Fermi-LAT source catalog (3FGL, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23). The corresponding daily averaged spectral photon index (E > 100 MeV) of 2.3+/-0.2 (statistical uncertainty only) is compatible with the 3FGL catalog value of 2.35+/-0.11.

  9. Fermi-LAT detection of a GeV gamma-ray flare from the blazar PKS 2023-07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 2023-07 (also known as NRAO 629, TXS 2022-077, 3EG J2025-0744, 1AGLR J2027-0747 and 3FGL J2025.6-0736), with radio counterpart position R.A.: 306.419418 deg, Dec.: -7.597969 deg (J2000.0, Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13) and with redshift z=1.388 (Drinkwater et al. 1997, MNRAS, 284, 85). Preliminary analysis indicates that on 2016 April 9, PKS 2023-07 was in a high state with a daily averaged gamma-ray flux (E > 100 MeV) of (2.0+/-0.3) X 10^-6 photons cm^-2 s^-1 (statistical uncertainty only), about 16 times greater than its four-year average flux reported in the third Fermi-LAT source catalog (3FGL, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23). The corresponding daily averaged spectral photon index (E > 100 MeV) of 2.4+/-0.2 (statistical uncertainty only) is compatible with the 3FGL catalog value of 2.18+/-0.03.

  10. Multiwavelength monitoring of the BL Lacertae object PKS 2155-304. 4: Multiwavelength analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, R.; Krolik, J.; Madejski, G.; Maraschi, L.; Pike, G.; Urry, C. M.; Brinkmann, W.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Ellithorpe, J.; Horne, K.

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneous X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, infrared, and radio monitoring data were used to test and constrain models of continuum emission from the BL Lacertae object PKS 2155-304. Intensively sampled ultraviolet and soft X-ray light curves showed a clear temporal correlation with the X-rays leading the ultraviolet by 2-3 hr. This lag was found to be significantly different from zero after an exhaustive comparison of four different techniques for measuring temporal correlations. Variations in the ultraviolet trough optical wave bands were also strongly correlated, with no measurable lag down to limiting timescales of approximately less than 1-2 hr. This strong correlation extends to the near-infrared, but the less intensive sampling precludes measurement of any lag beyomnd an upper limit of approximately less than 1 day. These lags and limits of the order of hours are much shorter than most rapid observed single-band variations. Because of the very sparse radio sampling, it was not possible to measure quantitatively the correlation and lag with shorter wavelengths, but the data do suggest that the radio may lag the optical/ultraviolet by approximately 1 week, with longer delays and weaker variations to longer radio wavelengths. The epoch-folding Q(exp 2) statistic was used to test for periodicity, and no evidence for strict or quasi-periodicity was found in any of the light curves. Because they lead the lower frequencies, the soft X-rays (approximately less than 1 keV) cannot arise from synchrotron self-Compton scattering. These results also rule out the accretion disk model, which predicts a measurable lag between ultraviolet/optical wavelength bands and a correlation between hardness and brightness, neither of which were seen. They are consistent with the entire radio through X-ray continuum arising from direct synchrotron emission from a relativistic jet. However, the tapered jet model, in which the X-ray emission is produced closer in, has problems explaining

  11. Hubble/COS Observations of Intergalactic Gas Toward PKS 0405-123

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Danforth, C.; Froning, C.; Green, J.; Keeney, B.; Stocke, J.; Yao, Y.; Savage, B.; Narayanan, A.; Sembach, K.

    2010-01-01

    We present an overview of far-UV Hubble Space Telescope observations (1150-1780 A, at 17 km/s resolution) taken by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) of the QSO PKS 0405-123 at redshift zem = 0.5726 and FUV flux 3.5x10-14 erg/s/cm2/A. This spectrum illustrates the the power of COS for studying metal-enriched gas between the galaxies, distributed throughout the multiphase intergalactic medium (IGM). We used 7 orbits with 9 FP-split positions, obtained S/N = 35-45 over much of the G130M band (1150-1440 A), and detected numerous absorption features of hydrogen (Lya, Lyb) and heavy-element probes of metallicity. Ions that can be studied include lines (O VI, N V, Ne VIII) sensitive to hot gas produced by strong shocks produced in gravitational inflows to the Cosmic Web, in circumgalactic gas, and in galactic winds. The high S/N allows a search for broad Ly-alpha possibly associated with O VI in hot gas (105 to 106 K). This sight line also intercepts a high-velocity cloud seen in Si III at 110-170 km/s (LSR) and b = -37.55 in the Galactic halo. In the absorption system at z = 0.495, the Ne VIII doublet (770.41, 780.32 A) shifts into the COS band, allowing us to probe the warm-hot IGM at log T = 5.5-6.0, several times deeper than previous (STIS) studies (Prochaska et al. 2004; Howk et al. 2009). In other posters, members of the COS science team describe the detection of O VI absorbers at redshifts z = 0.16710, 0.18292, 0.36156, 0.36332, and 0.49501, including a Lyman Limit system at z = 0.16710 with log N(HI) = 16.45 +/- 0.05. The high S/N observations allow us to measure important ions previously not detected and to evaluate the kinematical relationships and physical conditions among the detected ions.

  12. Application of the global Land-Potential Knowledge System (LandPKS) mobile apps to land degradation, restoration and climate change adaptation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Combatting land degradation, promoting restoration and adapting to climate change all require an understanding of land potential. A global Land-Potential Knowledge System (LandPKS) is being developed that will address many of these limitations using an open source approach designed to allow anyone w...

  13. An Aspergillus flavus secondary metabolic gene cluster containing a hybrid PKS-NRPS is necessary for synthesis of the 2-pyridones, leporins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of the filamentous fungus, Aspergillus flavus, has been shown to harbor as many as 55 putative secondary metabolic gene clusters including the one responsible for production of the toxic and carcinogenic, polyketide synthase (PKS)-derived family of secondary metabolites termed aflatoxins....

  14. MAGIC detects very high energy gamma-ray emission from the blazar OT 081 (PKS 1749+096, 4C +09.57)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, Razmik

    2016-07-01

    The MAGIC collaboration reports on the detection of very high energy (VHE; E > 150 GeV) gamma-ray emission from OT 081 (RA=17 51 32.82, dec=+09 39 00.73, J2000.0; also known as PKS 1749+096 and 4C +09.57).

  15. MASTER-SAAO follow-up to Fermi-LAT detection of FSRQ PKS B1035-281 activity. And OTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipunov, V. M.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Shurpakov, S.; Balanutsa, P.; Gress, O.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tiurina, N.; Kuznetsov, A.; Vladimirov, V.; Kornilov, V.; Vlasenko, D.; Gorbunov, I.; Popova, E.; Kuvshinov, D.; Kniazev, A.; Potter, S. B.; Kotze, M.; Rebolo, R.; Ricart, M. Serra; Israelian, G.; Lodieu, N.

    2016-02-01

    MASTER-SAAO auto-detection system (Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 349171 ) detected the brightening of the FSRQ PKS B1035-281 (RA=10 37 42.457 -28 23 04.11) during inspection of Fermi-LAT Detection of its unusual hard spectrum (Carpenter et al., ATEL #8740).

  16. Phylogeny of type I polyketide synthases (PKSs) in fungal entomopathogens and expression analysis of PKS genes in Beauveria bassiana BCC 2660.

    PubMed

    Punya, Juntira; Swangmaneecharern, Pratchya; Pinsupa, Suparat; Nitistaporn, Pornpen; Phonghanpot, Suranat; Kunathigan, Viyada; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Amnuaykanjanasin, Alongkorn

    2015-06-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi are able to invade and kill insects. Various secondary metabolites can mediate the interaction of a fungal pathogen with an insect host and also help the fungus compete with other microbes. Here we screened 23 isolates of entomopathogenic fungi for polyketide synthase (PKS) genes and amplified 72 PKS gene fragments using degenerate PCR. We performed a phylogenetic analysis of conserved ketosynthase and acyltransferase regions in these 72 sequences and 72 PKSs identified from four insect fungal genome sequences. The resulting genealogy indicated 47 orthologous groups with 99-100 % bootstrap support, suggesting shared biosynthesis of identical or closely related compounds from different fungi. Three insect-specific groups were identified among the PKSs in reducing clades IIa, IIb, and III, which comprised PKSs from 12, 9, and 30 fungal isolates, respectively. A IIa-IIb pair could be found in seven fungi. Expression analyses revealed that eleven out of twelve PKS genes identified in Beauveria bassiana BCC 2660 were expressed in culture. PKS genes from insect-specific clades IIa and IIb were expressed only in insect-containing medium, while others were expressed only in PDB or in CYB, PDB and SDY. The data suggest the potential production of several polyketides in culture. PMID:25986551

  17. Attenuation Distance of Low Frequency Waves Upstream of the Pre-Dawn Bow Shock: GEOTAIL snd ISEE-3 Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiyama, T.; Terasawa, T.; Kawano, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kokubun, S.; Frank, L.; Ackerson, K.; Tsurutani, B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical study of the spatial distribution of low frequency waves in the region upstream of the pre-dawn to dawn side bow shock using both GEOTAIL and ISEE-3 magnetometer data.

  18. Phylogeny and Expression Analyses Reveal Important Roles for Plant PKS III Family during the Conquest of Land by Plants and Angiosperm Diversification.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lulu; Liu, Pingli; Zhu, Zhixin; Zhang, Shifan; Zhang, Shujiang; Li, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guoliang; Wei, Yunxiao; Sun, Rifei

    2016-01-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) utilize the products of primary metabolism to synthesize a wide array of secondary metabolites in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. PKSs can be grouped into three distinct classes, types I, II, and III, based on enzyme structure, substrate specificity, and catalytic mechanisms. The type III PKS enzymes function as homodimers, and are the only class of PKS that do not require acyl carrier protein. Plant type III PKS enzymes, also known as chalcone synthase (CHS)-like enzymes, are of particular interest due to their functional diversity. In this study, we mined type III PKS gene sequences from the genomes of six aquatic algae and 25 land plants (1 bryophyte, 1 lycophyte, 2 basal angiosperms, 16 core eudicots, and 5 monocots). PKS III sequences were found relatively conserved in all embryophytes, but not exist in algae. We also examined gene expression patterns by analyzing available transcriptome data, and identified potential cis-regulatory elements in upstream sequences. Phylogenetic trees of dicots angiosperms showed that plant type III PKS proteins fall into three clades. Clade A contains CHS/STS-type enzymes coding genes with diverse transcriptional expression patterns and enzymatic functions, while clade B is further divided into subclades b1 and b2, which consist of anther-specific CHS-like enzymes. Differentiation regions, such as amino acids 196-207 between clades A and B, and predicted positive selected sites within α-helixes in late appeared branches of clade A, account for the major diversification in substrate choice and catalytic reaction. The integrity and location of conserved cis-elements containing MYB and bHLH binding sites can affect transcription levels. Potential binding sites for transcription factors such as WRKY, SPL, or AP2/EREBP may contribute to tissue- or taxon-specific differences in gene expression. Our data shows that gene duplications and functional diversification of plant type III PKS enzymes

  19. Phylogeny and Expression Analyses Reveal Important Roles for Plant PKS III Family during the Conquest of Land by Plants and Angiosperm Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lulu; Liu, Pingli; Zhu, Zhixin; Zhang, Shifan; Zhang, Shujiang; Li, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guoliang; Wei, Yunxiao; Sun, Rifei

    2016-01-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) utilize the products of primary metabolism to synthesize a wide array of secondary metabolites in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. PKSs can be grouped into three distinct classes, types I, II, and III, based on enzyme structure, substrate specificity, and catalytic mechanisms. The type III PKS enzymes function as homodimers, and are the only class of PKS that do not require acyl carrier protein. Plant type III PKS enzymes, also known as chalcone synthase (CHS)-like enzymes, are of particular interest due to their functional diversity. In this study, we mined type III PKS gene sequences from the genomes of six aquatic algae and 25 land plants (1 bryophyte, 1 lycophyte, 2 basal angiosperms, 16 core eudicots, and 5 monocots). PKS III sequences were found relatively conserved in all embryophytes, but not exist in algae. We also examined gene expression patterns by analyzing available transcriptome data, and identified potential cis-regulatory elements in upstream sequences. Phylogenetic trees of dicots angiosperms showed that plant type III PKS proteins fall into three clades. Clade A contains CHS/STS-type enzymes coding genes with diverse transcriptional expression patterns and enzymatic functions, while clade B is further divided into subclades b1 and b2, which consist of anther-specific CHS-like enzymes. Differentiation regions, such as amino acids 196-207 between clades A and B, and predicted positive selected sites within α-helixes in late appeared branches of clade A, account for the major diversification in substrate choice and catalytic reaction. The integrity and location of conserved cis-elements containing MYB and bHLH binding sites can affect transcription levels. Potential binding sites for transcription factors such as WRKY, SPL, or AP2/EREBP may contribute to tissue- or taxon-specific differences in gene expression. Our data shows that gene duplications and functional diversification of plant type III PKS enzymes

  20. Ion distributions in the Earth's foreshock upstream from the bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of suprathermal and energetic ion distributions are found upstream from shocks. Some distributions, such as field-aligned beams, are generated directly at the shock either through reflection processes or through leakage from the hotter downstream region. Other distributions, such as intermediate distributions, evolve from these parent distributions through wave-particle interactions. This paper reviews our current understanding of the creation and evolution of suprathermal distributions at shocks. Examples of suprathermal ion distributions are taken from observations at the Earth's bow shock. Particular emphasis is placed on the creation of field-aligned beams and specularly reflected ion distributions and on the evolution of these distributions in the Earth's ion foreshock. However, the results from this heavily studied region are applicable to interplanetary shocks, bow shocks at other planets, and comets.

  1. Computed tomography of humans and bowed stringed instruments. Some interesting similarities.

    PubMed

    Sirr, S A; Waddle, J R

    1999-09-01

    We have used computed tomography to evaluate bowed stringed instruments and have noted interesting analogies with CT scans of humans. In humans, CT commonly detects a broad range of normal anatomic variations. Similarly, CT of violins and cellos demonstrates a wide range of normal structural variations. CT, often used to detect infections in humans, also detects defects from wood infestations. In humans, the unrelenting effect of gravity causes deformity of the demineralized spine. In old stringed instruments, plastic deformity of wood results from unrelenting string pressure. Trauma causes bone fractures in humans and wood fractures in bowed stringed instruments, and repairing fractures in both humans and stringed instruments requires various splitting devices. In summary, CT provides the physician and the luthier with a unique, noninvasive tool that can characterize the broad range of normal structures, pathological conditions, and repair. PMID:10510617

  2. Highly modular bow-tie gene circuits with programmable dynamic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Laura; Angelici, Bartolomeo; Haefliger, Benjamin; Benenson, Yaakov

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic gene circuits often require extensive mutual optimization of their components for successful operation, while modular and programmable design platforms are rare. A possible solution lies in the 'bow-tie' architecture, which stipulates a focal component-a 'knot'-uncoupling circuits' inputs and outputs, simplifying component swapping, and introducing additional layer of control. Here we construct, in cultured human cells, synthetic bow-tie circuits that transduce microRNA inputs into protein outputs with independently programmable logical and dynamic behaviour. The latter is adjusted via two different knot configurations: a transcriptional activator causing the outputs to track input changes reversibly, and a recombinase-based cascade, converting transient inputs into permanent actuation. We characterize the circuits in HEK293 cells, confirming their modularity and scalability, and validate them using endogenous microRNA inputs in additional cell lines. This platform can be used for biotechnological and biomedical applications in vitro, in vivo and potentially in human therapy. PMID:25311543

  3. Theoretical study of the transonic lift of a double-wedge profile with detached bow wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincenti, Walter G; Wagoner, Cleo B

    1954-01-01

    A theoretical study is described of the aerodynamic characteristics at small angle of attack of a thin, double-wedge profile in the range of supersonic flight speed in which the bow wave is detached. The analysis is carried out within the framework of the transonic (nonlinear) small-disturbance theory, and the effects of angle of attack are regarded as a small perturbation on the flow previously calculated at zero angle. The mixed flow about the front half of the profile is calculated by relaxation solution of a suitably defined boundary-value problem for transonic small-disturbance equation in the hodograph plane (i.e., the Tricomi equation). The purely supersonic flow about the rear half is found by an extension of the usual numerical method of characteristics. Analytical results are also obtained, within the framework of the same theory, for the range of speed in which the bow wave is attached and the flow is completely supersonic.

  4. Zero-order bows in radially inhomogeneous spheres: direct and inverse problems.

    PubMed

    Adam, John A

    2011-10-01

    Zero-order ray paths are examined in radially inhomogeneous spheres with differentiable refractive index profiles. It is demonstrated that zero-order and sometimes twin zero-order bows can exist when the gradient of refractive index is sufficiently negative. Abel inversion is used to "recover" the refractive index profiles; it is therefore possible in principle to specify the nature and type of bows and determine the refractive index profile that induces them. This may be of interest in the field of rainbow refractometry and optical fiber studies. This ray-theoretic analysis has direct similarities with the phenomenon of "orbiting" and other phenomena in scattering theory and also in seismological, surface gravity wave, and gravitational "lensing" studies. For completeness these topics are briefly discussed in the appendixes; they may also be of pedagogic interest. PMID:22016245

  5. MAVEN observations of gyrotropic electron distributions upstream of Mars bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziane, Karim; McFadden, James; Hamza, A. M.; Mazelle, Christian; Jakosky, Bruce; Mitchell, David; Halekas, Jasper; Espley, Jared; Connerney, J. E. D.

    2016-07-01

    Recent observations upstream from the Martian bow shock by the MAVEN Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA) experiment are presented. Flux enhancements of electrons with energies 70-400 eV are always observed when MAVEN spacecraft is magnetically connected to the shock. A detailed examination of the pitch angle distribution shows that the enhanced fluxes are associated with electrons moving away from Mars. In the full 3-D angular distribution, the electrons appear in an 'annulus' centered along the IMF direction. Moreover, the gyrotropic character is observed over a large range of shock geometry from quasi-parallel to quasi-perpendicular. These signatures in the electron distribution function strongly suggest that the reflection off the shock is the main mechanism for the production of Martian foreshock electrons. A quantitative analysis of electron distributions is carried out in order to probe the characteristics of the Martian bow shock.

  6. UWB Bi-directional Bow-tie antenna loaded by rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lin; Sun, Kai; Xie, Ji-yang; Qiu, Yu-jie; Jiang, Xing

    2016-07-01

    Performances of bow-tie antennae can be improved by loading a ring. Specially, the distorted radiation patterns of the reference bow-tie antenna (RBA) at high frequencies become less distorted when a ring is added. That is due to the disciplined current flows trained by the ring. Furthermore, when more rings are loaded, which act as reflectors, higher directivities are obtained and, patterns become bi-directional. Antennae with no ring (RBA), one ring, two rings (three cases), three rings, and four rings are investigated. Research find that loading more rings means better directivity. The directivity of the RBA varies from 2.29 dB to 3.66 dB for the frequency band from 2.5 to 7.5 GHz while the directivity for the four-ring-loaded case varies from 4.27 dB to 7.61 dB in that frequency band.

  7. Nonthermal ions and associated magnetic field behavior at a quasi-parallel earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, W. P.; Pardaens, A. K.; Schwartz, S. J.; Burgess, D.; Luehr, H.; Kessel, R. L.; Dunlop, M.; Farrugia, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to ion and magnetic field measurements at the earth's bow shock from the AMPTE-UKS and -IRM spacecraft, which were examined in high time resolution during a 45-min interval when the field remained closely aligned with the model bow shock normal. Dense ion beams were detected almost exclusively in the midst of short-duration periods of turbulent magnetic field wave activity. Many examples of propagation at large elevation angles relative to the ecliptic plane, which is inconsistent with reflection in the standard model shock configuration, were discovered. The associated waves are elliptically polarized and are preferentially left-handed in the observer's frame of reference, but are less confined to the maximum variance plane than other previously studied foreshock waves. The association of the wave activity with the ion beams suggests that the former may be triggered by an ion-driven instability, and possible candidates are discussed.

  8. Comparison of plasma wave measurements in the bow shocks at Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, S. L.; Coroniti, F. V.; Kennel, C. F.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma wave measurements from the Voyager 2 crossing of Neptune's bow shock are presented and compared with measurements from the bow shocks of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. The wave amplitudes above 0.01fp, when normalized to the solar wind ion thermal energy density at each planet, are significantly higher at the outer planets than at Earth. Despite the differences in amplitude, the shock spectra of all the planets can be fitted to curves of similar form in this frequency range. The total normalized electric field energy densities exhibit an exponential dependence on ion thermal Mach number, Magnetosheath wave energies are comparable at all of the planets when normalized to the downstream plasma pressure.

  9. Intensity and energy spectrum of electrons accelerated in the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.

    1974-01-01

    Shock waves accelerate charged particles in the solar atmosphere, in interplanetary space and around the earth's magnetosphere. Acceleration of both electrons and protons occurs in the earth's bow-shock. The acceleration of protons up to 100 keV appears to be a steady state process and may even occur upstream from the bow shock due to waves generated by reflected solar wind protons. The electrons, on the other hand, are known to be accelerated in or near the shock. The intensity of these electrons ranges from about 100 to 2,000 per sr-sq cm-sec-keV at 14 keV. The energy spectrum is not a simple power low and is highly variable. If segments of the spectra are fitted to a power low, slopes ranging from -2 to -4.5 result over the energy range 0.5 to 100 keV.

  10. Interplanetary magnetic field control of the Mars bow shock - Evidence for Venuslike interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T. L.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Lichtenegger, H.; Riedler, W.; Russell, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    The Mars bow shock location and shape have been determined by examining the Phobos spacecraft magnetometer data. Observations show that the position of the terminator bow shock varies with interplanetary magnetic field orientation in the same way as at Venus. The shock is farthest from Mars in the direction of the interplanetary electric field, consistent with the idea that mass loading plays an important role in the solar wind interaction with Mars. The shock cross section at the terminator plane is asymmetric and is controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field. The shock is farther from Mars during solar maximum. Thus the solar wind interaction with Mars appears to be Venuslike, with a magnetic moment too small to affect significantly the solar wind interaction.

  11. Scale lengths in quasi-parallel shocks. [interplanetary and earth bow waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Burlaga, L. F.; Greenstadt, E. W.

    1984-01-01

    A review was carried out of ISEE and Voyager spacecraft magnetometer data to determine if quasi-parallel bow shocks are really broad, disordered regions. The key parameter was the deceleration scale (thickness, Lp) across which random energy would need to increase and a localized electrostatic field (E) would be present. Lp would define the breadth of the shock and be associated with a plasma deceleration. The ISEE 1 satellite collected data on the electron density, bulk speed, magnetic intensity, and electron temperature in November 1977 during five traverses of the bow shock. Similar data were gathered from an interplanetary shock wave in 1981. The evidence supported the concept of a plasma deceleration across a thin layer (Lp) in both types of shocks. The layers were about 50 times (interplanetary) and 20 times (earth) thinner than surrounding magnetic fluctuation regions. It is asserted that the regions of deceleration, although much thinner, are the actual shocks and not the entire regions of magnetic fluctuations.

  12. Upstream energetic ions and electrons - Bow shock-associated or magnetospheric origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is made of 35 proton bursts observed with the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland sensor system on ISEE 3 far upstream of the earth's bow shock. These upstream bursts are found to fall into two distinctive groups. The first is accompanied by energetic electrons (more than about 75 keV), and the proton spectrum extends up to energies greater than about 300 keV and higher and bends over toward lower energies (less than about 30 keV). The second group, which is unaccompanied by energetic electron bursts, exhibits spectra which can be represented extremely well by exponentials in energy with a mean e-folding energy of approximately 15 keV. The first group is thought to be of a magnetospheric origin, and the second to be bow-shock associated.

  13. Electrostatic noise at the plasma frequency beyond the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filbert, P. C.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    Scarf et al. (1971) and Dunckel (1974) have shown that there are, very frequently, intense electrostatic waves whose frequency is near the plasma frequency upstream of the earth's bow shock and that these waves are correlated with the presence of energetic electrons from the bow shock. Also, Fredericks et al. (1971) have postulated a two-stream instability. The paper investigates these phenomena further, by comparing electrostatic noise at or near the ambient solar wind plasma frequency with times when the interplanetary magnetic field probably connects to the shock. Evidence is presented that Scarf et al. and Fredericks et al. were correct in their explanation of the phenomenon, and that the double-humped distribution would be expected only in a region too small to be resolved by the plasma measurements made so far.

  14. Highly modular bow-tie gene circuits with programmable dynamic behavior

    PubMed Central

    Prochazka, Laura; Angelici, Bartolomeo; Häfliger, Benjamin; Benenson, Yaakov

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic gene circuits often require extensive mutual optimization of their components for successful operation, while modular and programmable design platforms are rare. A possible solution lies in the “bow-tie” architecture, which stipulates a focal component - a “knot” - uncoupling circuits’ inputs and outputs, simplifying component swapping, and introducing additional layer of control. Here we construct, in cultured human cells, synthetic bow-tie circuits that transduce microRNA inputs into protein outputs with independently programmable logical and dynamic behavior. The latter is adjusted via two different knot configurations: a transcriptional activator causing the outputs to track input changes reversibly, and a recombinase-based cascade, converting transient inputs into permanent actuation. We characterize the circuits in HEK293 cells, confirming their modularity and scalability, and validate them using endogenous microRNA inputs in additional cell lines. This platform can be used for biotechnological and biomedical applications in vitro, in vivo, and potentially in human therapy. PMID:25311543

  15. Diffuse ions produced by electromagnetic ion beam instabilities. [in earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Leroy, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of the electromagnetic ion beam instability driven by the reflected ion component backstreaming away from the earth's bow shock into the foreshock region is studied by means of computer simulation. The linear and quasi-linear stages of the instability are found to be in good agreement with known results for the resonant mode propagating parallel to the beam along the magnetic field and with theory developed in this paper for the nonresonant mode, which propagates antiparallel to the beam direction. The quasi-linear stage, which produces large amplitude delta B approximately B, sinusoidal transverse waves and 'intermediate' ion distributions, is terminated by a nonlinear phase in which strongly nonlinear, compressive waves and 'diffuse' ion distributions are produced. Additional processes by which the diffuse ions are accelerated to observed high energies are not addressed. The results are discussed in terms of the ion distributions and hydromagnetic waves observed in the foreshock of the earth's bow shock and of interplanetary shocks.

  16. Solar and interplanetary control of the location of the Venus bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Chou, E.; Luhmann, J. G.; Gazis, P.; Brace, L. H.; Hoegy, W. R.

    1988-01-01

    The Venus bow shock location has been measured at nearly 2000 shock crossings, and its dependence on solar EUV, solar wind conditions, and the interplanetary magnetic field determined. The shock position at the terminator varies from about 2.14 Venus radii at solar minimum to 2.40 Venus radii at solar maximum. The location of the shock varies little with solar wind dynamic pressure but strongly with solar wind Mach number. The shock is farthest from Venus on the side of the planet in which newly created ions gyrate away from the ionosphere. When the interplanetary magnetic field is perpendicular to the flow, the cross section of the shock is quite elliptical. This effect appears to be due to the anisotropic propagation of the fast magnetosonic wave. When the interplanetary magnetic field is aligned with the flow, the bow shock cross section is circular and only weakly sensitive to changing EUV flux.

  17. Upstream pressure variations associated with the bow shock and their effects on the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Baumjohann, W.; Paschmann, G.; Luehr, H.; Sibeck, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    The AMPTE IRM solar wind data are analyzed to determine the relationship between upstream pressure fluctuations and magnetospheric perturbations. It is argued that the upstream pressure variations are not inherent in the solar wind but rather are associated with the bow shock. This conclusion follows from the fact that the upstream field strength and density associated with perturbations are highly correlated with each other, while they tend to be anticorrelated in the undisturbed solar wind, and that the upstream perturbations occur within the foreshock or at its boundary. The results imply a mode of interaction between the solar wind upstream and the magnetosphere whereby density changes produced in the foreshock subsequently convect through the bow shock and impinge on the magnetosphere. Upstream pressure perturbations should create significant effects on the magnetopause and at the foot of nearby field lines that lead to the polar cusp ionosphere.

  18. ULF waves upstream of the Venus bow shock - Properties of one-hertz waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlowski, D. S.; Russell, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    Pioneer Venus Orbiter data are used here to study the properties of a class of ULF upstream waves with relatively high observed frequencies. These waves show significant similarity to 'one-Hz' waves identified at earth in the ISEE 1 and 2 observations and the whistler waves identified earlier by IMP 6 observations. The waves appear almost immediately after the spacecraft crosses the magnetic field tangent line to the bow shock surface into the region of connected field lines. The wave amplitude decreases with distance from the shock measured along the magnetic field line. Group velocities calculated using the cold plasma dispersion relation indicate that the waves have sufficient upstream velocities to propagate form the shock into the solar wind. The totality of observations seem best explained by a source of right-handed whistler mode waves at the bow shock.

  19. A Single Sfp-Type Phosphopantetheinyl Transferase Plays a Major Role in the Biosynthesis of PKS and NRPS Derived Metabolites in Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877

    PubMed Central

    Bunet, Robert; Riclea, Ramona; Laureti, Luisa; Hôtel, Laurence; Paris, Cédric; Girardet, Jean-Michel; Spiteller, Dieter; Dickschat, Jeroen S.; Leblond, Pierre; Aigle, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    The phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases) are responsible for the activation of the carrier protein domains of the polyketide synthases (PKS), non ribosomal peptide synthases (NRPS) and fatty acid synthases (FAS). The analysis of the Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877 genome has revealed the presence of four putative PPTase encoding genes. One of these genes appears to be essential and is likely involved in fatty acid biosynthesis. Two other PPTase genes, samT0172 (alpN) and samL0372, are located within a type II PKS gene cluster responsible for the kinamycin production and an hybrid NRPS-PKS cluster involved in antimycin production, respectively, and their products were shown to be specifically involved in the biosynthesis of these secondary metabolites. Surprisingly, the fourth PPTase gene, which is not located within a secondary metabolite gene cluster, appears to play a pleiotropic role. Its product is likely involved in the activation of the acyl- and peptidyl-carrier protein domains within all the other PKS and NRPS complexes encoded by S. ambofaciens. Indeed, the deletion of this gene affects the production of the spiramycin and stambomycin macrolide antibiotics and of the grey spore pigment, all three being PKS-derived metabolites, as well as the production of the nonribosomally produced compounds, the hydroxamate siderophore coelichelin and the pyrrolamide antibiotic congocidine. In addition, this PPTase seems to act in concert with the product of samL0372 to activate the ACP and/or PCP domains of the antimycin biosynthesis cluster which is also responsible for the production of volatile lactones. PMID:24498152

  20. First Detection in Gamma-Rays of a Young Radio Galaxy: Fermi-LAT Observations of the Compact Symmetric Object PKS 1718-649

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, G.; Siemiginowska, A.; Sobolewska, M.; Loh, A.; Corbel, S.; Ostorero, L.; Stawarz, Ł.

    2016-04-01

    We report the γ-ray detection of a young radio galaxy, PKS 1718-649, belonging to the class of compact symmetric objects (CSOs), with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi satellite. The third Fermi Gamma-ray LAT catalog (3FGL) includes an unassociated γ-ray source, 3FGL J1728.0-6446, located close to PKS 1718-649. Using the latest Pass 8 calibration, we confirm that the best-fit 1σ position of the γ-ray source is compatible with the radio location of PKS 1718-649. Cross-matching of the γ-ray source position with the positions of blazar sources from several catalogs yields negative results. Thus, we conclude that PKS 1718-649 is the most likely counterpart to the unassociated LAT source. We obtain a detection test statistics TS ˜ 36 (>5σ) with a best-fit photon spectral index Γ = 2.9 ± 0.3 and a 0.1-100 GeV photon flux density F 0.1-100 GeV = (11.5 ± 0.3) × 10-9 ph cm-2 s-1. We argue that the linear size (˜2 pc), the kinematic age (˜100 years), and the source distance (z = 0.014) make PKS 1718-649 an ideal candidate for γ-ray detection in the framework of the model proposing that the most compact and the youngest CSOs can efficiently produce GeV radiation via inverse-Compton scattering of the ambient photon fields by the radio lobe non-thermal electrons. Thus, our detection of the source in γ-rays establishes young radio galaxies as a distinct class of extragalactic high-energy emitters and yields a unique insight on the physical conditions in compact radio lobes interacting with the interstellar medium of the host galaxy.

  1. EVOLUTION OF THE PARSEC-SCALE STRUCTURE OF PKS 1934-638 REVISITED: FIRST SCIENCE WITH THE ASKAP AND NEW ZEALAND TELESCOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Tzioumis, A. K.; Reynolds, J. E.; Phillips, C. J.; Amy, S. W.; Edwards, P. G.; Bowen, M. A.; Leach, M. R.; Kesteven, M. J.; Chung, Y.; Stevens, J.; Forsyth, A. R.; Tingay, S. J.; Stansby, B.; Macquart, J.-P.; Reynolds, C.; Wayth, R. B.; Bignall, H. E.; Hotan, A.; Gulyaev, S.; Natusch, T.

    2010-11-15

    We have studied the archetypal Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum radio galaxy, PKS 1934 - 638, using the Australian Long Baseline Array augmented with two new telescopes that greatly improve the angular resolution of the array. These very long baseline interferometry observations represent the first scientific results from a new antenna in New Zealand and the first antenna of the Australian SKA Pathfinder. A compact double radio source, PKS 1934 - 638 has been monitored over a period of 40 years and the observation described here provides the latest datum, eight years after the previous observation, to aid in the study of the long-term evolution of the source structure. We take advantage of these new long baselines to probe PKS 1934 - 638 at the relatively low frequency of 1.4 GHz in order to examine the effects of optical depth on the structure of the radio source. Optical depth effects, resulting in the observation of frequency-dependent structure, may have previously been interpreted in terms of an expansion of the source as a function of time. Expansion and frequency-dependent effects are important to disentangle in order to estimate the age of PKS 1934 - 638. We show that frequency-dependent structure effects are likely to be important in PKS 1934 - 638 and present a simple two-dimensional synchrotron source model in which opacity effects due to synchrotron self-absorption are taken into account. Evidence for expansion of the radio source over 40 years is therefore weak with consequences for the estimated age of the radio source.

  2. Low-energy particles at the bow shock, magnetopause, and outer magnetosphere of Saturn

    SciTech Connect

    Maclennan, C.G.; Lanzerotti, L.J.; Krimigis, S.M.; Lepping, R.P.

    1983-11-01

    Low-energy electron (>22 keV) and protons (> or approx. =30 keV) measured by the Low-Energy Charged Particle Experiment (LECP) during the encounters of the two Voyager spacecraft with Saturn are described. The characteristics of the dayside bow shock, magnetopause, and outer magnetosphere are emphasized. Only one crossing of the Saturian bow shock was observed inbound during the Voyager 1 encounter, whereas five crossings of the bow shock were identified during the Voyager 2 approach to the planet. During several of these bow shock crossings, low energy protons were observed to be streaming from the direction of the dawnside of the magnetosphere. In the magnetosheath the protons were observed to be oriented primarily with pitch angles of approx.90/sup 0/. Prior to the inbound magnetopause crossings (as defined by the magnetometer experiment on Voyager), the low-energy protons and electrons were observed to increase in intensity. Further, during Voyager 2 encounter, an increase in the proton and electron fluxes accompanied a change in orientation of the magnetosheath magnetioc field from one with a vertical component opposite to the planetary field to one with a vertical component in the direction of the planetary field. Examination of the flux distributions of the protons suggests that the magnetopuase was moving inward with a lower limit speed of approx.10 km/s during the Voyager 2 approach to the planet. The observed average subsolar magnetopause position at the time of Voyager 2 encounter was 18.5 R/sub S/, whereas during the Voyager 1 encounter it was considerably more extended, at 23.5 R/sub S/.

  3. 3D hybrid simulations of the interaction of a magnetic cloud with a bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turc, L.; Fontaine, D.; Savoini, P.; Modolo, R.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the interaction of a magnetic cloud (MC) with a planetary bow shock using hybrid simulations. It is the first time to our knowledge that this interaction is studied using kinetic simulations which include self-consistently both the ion foreshock and the shock wave dynamics. We show that when the shock is in a quasi-perpendicular configuration, the MC's magnetic structure in the magnetosheath remains similar to that in the solar wind, whereas it is strongly altered downstream of a quasi-parallel shock. The latter can result in a reversal of the magnetic field north-south component in some parts of the magnetosheath. We also investigate how the MC affects in turn the outer parts of the planetary environment, i.e., from the foreshock to the magnetopause. We find the following: (i) The decrease of the Alfvén Mach number at the MC's arrival causes an attenuation of the foreshock region because of the weakening of the bow shock. (ii) The foreshock moves along the bow shock's surface, following the rotation of the MC's magnetic field. (iii) Owing to the low plasma beta, asymmetric flows arise inside the magnetosheath, due to the magnetic tension force which accelerates the particles in some parts of the magnetosheath and slows them down in others. (iv) The quasi-parallel region forms a depression in the shock's surface. Other deformations of the magnetopause and the bow shock are also highlighted. All these effects can contribute to significantly modify the solar wind/magnetosphere coupling during MC events.

  4. Self-assembled silver nanoparticles in a bow-tie antenna configuration.

    PubMed

    Eskelinen, Antti-Pekka; Moerland, Robert J; Kostiainen, Mauri A; Törmä, Päivi

    2014-03-26

    The self-assembly of silver nanoparticles into a bow-tie antenna configuration is achieved with the DNA origami method. Instead of complicated particle geometries, spherical silver nanoparticles are used. Formation of the structures in high yields is verified with transmission electron microscopy and agarose gel electrophoresis. According to finite-difference time-domain simulations, the antenna configuration could be used as a DNA sensor. PMID:24659271

  5. Note: auto-relock system for a bow-tie cavity for second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Haze, Shinsuke; Hata, Sousuke; Fujinaga, Munekazu; Mukaiyama, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    This Note reports on the implementation of an automatic relocking system for a bow-tie cavity for second harmonic generation to produce an ultra-violet laser source. The system is based on a sample-and-hold technique for controlling the cavity length using simple servo electronics. Long-term stabilization of the cavity output power is successfully achieved, which makes this system suitable for designing stable atomic physics experiments. PMID:23464273

  6. Optical Hydrogen Absorption Consistent with a Bow Shock Leading the Hot Jupiter HD 189733b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauley, Paul Wilson; Redfield, Seth; Jensen, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Bow shocks are ubiquitous astrophysical phenomena resulting from the supersonic passage of an object through a gas. Recently, pre-transit absorption in UV metal transitions of the hot Jupiter exoplanets HD 189733b and WASP12-b have been interpreted as being caused by material compressed in a planetary bow shock. Here we present a robust detection of a time-resolved pre-transit, as well as in-transit, absorption signature around the hot Jupiter exoplanet HD 189733b using high spectral resolution observations of several hydrogen Balmer lines. The line shape of the pre-transit feature and the shape of the time series absorption provide the strongest constraints on the morphology and physical characteristics of extended structures around an exoplanet. The in-transit measurements confirm the exospheric Hα detection of Jensen et al. (2012) although the absorption depth measured here is ~50% lower. The pre-transit absorption feature occurs 125 minutes before the predicted optical transit, a projected linear distance to the stellar disk of 7.2 Rp. The absorption strength observed in the Balmer lines indicates an optically thick, but physically small, geometry. We model this signal as the early ingress of a planetary bow shock. If the bow shock is mediated by a planetary magnetosphere, the large standoff distance derived from the model suggests a large planetary magnetic field strength. Better knowledge of exoplanet magnetic field strengths is crucial to understanding the role these fields play in star-planet interactions and protecting planets in the habitable zone from dangerous stellar flares.

  7. Note: Auto-relock system for a bow-tie cavity for second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haze, Shinsuke; Hata, Sousuke; Fujinaga, Munekazu; Mukaiyama, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    This Note reports on the implementation of an automatic relocking system for a bow-tie cavity for second harmonic generation to produce an ultra-violet laser source. The system is based on a sample-and-hold technique for controlling the cavity length using simple servo electronics. Long-term stabilization of the cavity output power is successfully achieved, which makes this system suitable for designing stable atomic physics experiments.

  8. Phenomenology of the earth's bow shock system - A summary description of experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.

    1976-01-01

    Observational data on the earth's bow shock system are classified and characterized. Foreshock components, midshock components, and aftershock components are discussed separately. Schematic representations of the field and plasma particle parameters are elaborated, with attention given to quasi-perpendicular geometry and quasi-parallel geometry. Magnetic pulsation structure is delineated. Schematic profiles of field, particle, and wave behavior through a representative quasi-perpendicular shock crossing are displayed.

  9. FORMATION OF COSMIC CRYSTALS IN HIGHLY SUPERSATURATED SILICATE VAPOR PRODUCED BY PLANETESIMAL BOW SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, H.; Yamada, J.; Tsukamoto, K.; Nozawa, J.; Tanaka, K. K.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakamoto, T.

    2010-08-10

    Several lines of evidence suggest that fine silicate crystals observed in primitive meteorite and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) nucleated in a supersaturated silicate vapor followed by crystalline growth. We investigated evaporation of {mu}m-sized silicate particles heated by a bow shock produced by a planetesimal orbiting in the gas in the early solar nebula and condensation of crystalline silicate from the vapor thus produced. Our numerical simulation of shock-wave heating showed that these {mu}m-sized particles evaporate almost completely when the bow shock is strong enough to cause melting of chondrule precursor dust particles. We found that the silicate vapor cools very rapidly with expansion into the ambient unshocked nebular region; for instance, the cooling rate is estimated to be as high as 2000 K s{sup -1} for a vapor heated by a bow shock associated with a planetesimal of radius 1 km. The rapid cooling of the vapor leads to nonequilibrium gas-phase condensation of dust at temperatures much lower than those expected from the equilibrium condensation. It was found that the condensation temperatures are lower by a few hundred K or more than the equilibrium temperatures. This explains the results of the recent experimental studies of condensation from a silicate vapor that condensation in such large supercooling reproduces morphologies similar to those of silicate crystals found in meteorites. Our results strongly suggest that the planetesimal bow shock is one of the plausible sites for formation of not only chondrules but also other cosmic crystals in the early solar system.

  10. The enigmatic nature of the circumstellar envelope and bow shock surrounding Betelgeuse as revealed by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decin, L.; Cox, N. L. J.; Royer, P.; van Marle, A. J.; Vandenbussche, B.

    2013-05-01

    The interaction between stellar winds and the interstellar medium (ISM) can create complex bow shocks. We have studied the bow shock region around Betelgeuse using Herschel PACS images at 70, 100, and 160 μm and SPIRE images at 250, 350, and 500 μm. These data were complemented with ultraviolet GALEX data, near-infrared WISE data, and radio 21 cm GALFA-HI data. The infrared Herschel images of the environment around Betelgeuse are spectacular, showing the occurrence of multiple arcs at ~6-7' from the central target and the presence of a linear bar at ~9'. Remarkably, no large-scale instabilities are seen in the outer arcs and linear bar. The dust temperature in the outer arcs varies between 40 and 140 K, with the linear bar having the same colour temperature as the arcs. The inner envelope shows clear evidence of a non-homogeneous clumpy structure (beyond 15''). The non-homogeneous distribution of the material even persists until the collision with the ISM. A strong variation in brightness of the inner clumps at a radius of ~2' suggests a drastic change in mean gas and dust density ~32 000 yr ago. Using hydrodynamical simulations (see van Marle & Decin, these proceedings), we try to explain the observed morphology of the bow shock around Betelgeuse. Different hypotheses, based on observational and theoretical constraints, are formulated to explain the origin of the multiple arcs and the linear bar and the fact that no large-scale instabilities are visible in the bow shock region. We infer that the two main ingredients for explaining these phenomena are a non-homogeneous mass-loss process and the influence of the Galactic magnetic field. The linear bar is probably an interstellar structure illuminated by Betelgeuse itself.

  11. Serendipitous discovery of an infrared bow shock near PSR J1549–4848 with Spitzer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhongxiang; Kaplan, David L.; Slane, Patrick; Morrell, Nidia; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2013-06-01

    We report on the discovery of an infrared cometary nebula around PSR J1549–4848 in our Spitzer survey of a few middle-aged radio pulsars. Following the discovery, multi-wavelength imaging and spectroscopic observations of the nebula were carried out. We detected the nebula in Spitzer Infrared Array Camera 8.0, Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer 24 and 70 μm imaging, and in Spitzer IRS 7.5-14.4 μm spectroscopic observations, and also in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer all-sky survey at 12 and 22 μm. These data were analyzed in detail, and we find that the nebula can be described with a standard bow shock shape, and that its spectrum contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and H{sub 2} emission features. However, it is not certain which object drives the nebula. We analyze the field stars and conclude that none of them can be the associated object because stars with a strong wind or mass ejection that usually produce bow shocks are much brighter than the field stars. The pulsar is approximately 15'' away from the region in which the associated object is expected to be located. In order to resolve the discrepancy, we suggest that a highly collimated wind could be emitted from the pulsar and produce the bow shock. X-ray imaging to detect the interaction of the wind with the ambient medium- and high-spatial resolution radio imaging to determine the proper motion of the pulsar should be carried out, which will help verify the association of the pulsar with the bow shock nebula.

  12. A numerical determination of the bow shock wave in transonic axisymmetric flow about blunt bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. J.; South, J. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A numerical method was developed for calculating axisymmetric transonic (M greater than 1) flow about a blunt body; the bow shock wave location was investigated. A Rankine-Hugoniot jump was applied at the shock while relaxation on the isentropic equation of motion was used between shock and body. The shock wave is adjusted by a Newton type iteration scheme. Results are given for a sphere in the Mach number range 1.62 down to 1.02.

  13. New waves at multiples of the plasma frequency upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, I. H.

    1986-01-01

    The first observations of waves at harmonics higher than the second of the electron plasma frequency are reported. The observations were made by the ISEE 1 spacecraft upstream of the earth's bow shock. The waves are interpreted as electromagnetic radiation at the fundamental and up to the fifth harmonic of the plasma frequency, with effective temperatures decreasing from 5 x 10 to the 17th K to 10 billion K over this range. Two models are proposed for the emission of the waves.

  14. Observation of Motion of Bowed Strings and Resonant Strings in Violin Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Akihiro

    2013-10-01

    The motion of a bowed string and a resonant string of a violin were simultaneously observed for the first time. The results of the direct observation of string motion in double stops and harmonics are also presented. The importance of the resonance was experimentally demonstrated from these observations. It is suggested that players should take account of the resonance and ideal Helmholtz motion in violin performances.

  15. Bilateral and Symmetrical Anteromedial Bowing of the Lower Limbs in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type-I

    PubMed Central

    Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    An 8-year-old girl was referred to our department because of generalized bowing of long bones (radii, ulnae, and femora) and significant bilateral and symmetrical posteromedial bowing of the tibiae and fibulae. The femora were laterally bowed whereas the tibiae and fibulae showed posteromedial bowing between the middle and distal thirds of the tibia with posterior cortical thickening effectively causing the development of bilateral congenital anterolateral bowing of the tibiae and fibulae. We referred to closing-wedge osteotomy of the left tibia along with fibular osteotomy in order to realign the deformity. Due to the delayed appearance of skin stigmata in her early life, the diagnosis of neurofibromatosis was ruled out. At the age of 9 years, café-au-lait spots and axillary freckling were apparent. Genetic tests confirmed von Recklinghausen disease (neurofibromatosis type-I (NF1)) (gene has been localised to 17q22). Interestingly, bilateral and symmetrical anteromedial bowing of the tibiae and fibulae has not been described in patients with NF-I. PMID:25815222

  16. The shape of the Venusian bow shock at solar minimum and maximum: Revisit based on VEX observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Lican; Lu, Quanming; Mazelle, Christian; Huang, Can; Zhang, Tielong; Wu, Mingyu; Gao, Xinliang; Wang, Shui

    2015-05-01

    Several factors control the bow shock position at Venus, including short-term period responses (solar wind dynamic pressure) and long-term period variations (solar activity). Based on Venus Express (VEX) observations, we revisit the influence of solar activity on the Venusian bow shock location, by accurately determining not only the shock terminator distance but also the subsolar point with a three-parameter fit (TPF) method. At the same time, VEX covers a larger range of solar zenith angles (SZA) at the Venusian bow shock (from about 10 to 135 degrees) than the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) spacecraft. Fitting results display that the Venusian bow shock is farther away from Venus at solar maximum than at solar minimum. The subsolar stand-off distance increases from 1.364 planetary radii at solar minimum to 1.459RV at solar maximum, while the terminator shock distance changes from 2.087RV to 2.146RV. Inspection of the bow shock and the induced magnetosphere boundary (IMB) locations clearly shows a positive correlation for every orbit, while the average bow shock location is not responsive to changes in the solar wind dynamic pressure.

  17. Interstellar Weather Vanes: GLIMPSE Mid-Infrared Stellar Wind Bow Shocks in M17 and RCW 49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povich, Matthew S.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Whitney, Barbara A.; Babler, Brian L.; Indebetouw, Rémy; Meade, Marilyn R.; Churchwell, Ed

    2008-12-01

    We report the discovery of six infrared stellar wind bow shocks in the Galactic massive star formation regions M17 and RCW 49 from Spitzer GLIMPSE (Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire) images. The Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope clearly resolves the arc-shaped emission produced by the bow shocks. We combine Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), Spitzer, MSX, and IRAS observations to obtain the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the bow shocks and their individual driving stars. We use the stellar SEDs to estimate the spectral types of the three newly identified O stars in RCW 49 and one previously undiscovered O star in M17. One of the bow shocks in RCW 49 reveals the presence of a large-scale flow of gas escaping the H II region at a few 102 km s-1. Radiation transfer modeling of the steep rise in the SED of this bow shock toward longer mid-infrared wavelengths indicates that the emission is coming principally from dust heated by the star driving the shock. The other five bow shocks occur where the stellar winds of O stars sweep up dust in the expanding H II regions.

  18. On the generation of magnetosheath high-speed jets by bow shock ripples

    PubMed Central

    Hietala, H; Plaschke, F

    2013-01-01

    [1]The terrestrial magnetosheath is embedded with coherent high-speed jets of about 1RE in scale, predominantly during quasi-radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). When these high dynamic pressure (Pdyn) jets hit the magnetopause, they cause large indentations and further magnetospheric effects. The source of these jets has remained controversial. One of the proposed mechanisms is based on ripples of the quasi-parallel bow shock. In this paper, we combine for the first time, 4 years of subsolar magnetosheath observations from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms mission and corresponding NASA/OMNI solar wind conditions with model calculations of a rippled bow shock. Concentrating on the magnetosheath close to the shock during intervals when the angle between the IMF and the Sun-Earth line was small, we find that (1) 97% of the observed jets can be produced by local ripples of the shock under the observed upstream conditions; (2) the coherent jets form a significant fraction of the high Pdyn tail of the magnetosheath flow distribution; (3) the magnetosheath Pdyn distribution matches the flow from a bow shock with ripples that have a dominant amplitude to wavelength ratio of about 9% (∼0.1RE/1RE) and are present ∼12% of the time at any given location. PMID:26167426

  19. Sociopolitical complexity and the bow and arrow in the American Southwest.

    PubMed

    VanPool, Todd L; O'Brien, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of sociopolitical complexity, including heightened relations of cooperation and competition among large nonkin groups, has long been a central focus of anthropological research. Anthropologists suggest any number of variables that affect the waxing and waning of complexity and define the precise trajectories that groups take, including population density, subsistence strategies, warfare, the distribution of resources, and trade relationships. Changes in weaponry, here the introduction of the bow and arrow, can have profound implications for population aggregation and density, subsistence and settlement strategies, and access to resources, trade, and warfare.Bingham and Souza provide a general conceptual model for the relationship between complexity and the bow and arrow, arguing that this compound weapon system, whereby smaller projectiles travel at higher speed and are capable of hitting targets more accurately and at greater distances than hand-thrown darts, fundamentally favors the formation of larger groups because it allows for cost-effective means of dealing with conflicts of interest through social coercion, thereby dramatically transforming kin-based social relations. Here we consider the impacts the introduction of the bow and arrow had on sociopolitical complexity in the North American Southwest. PMID:23776047

  20. Characterization of Saturn's bow shock: Magnetic field observations of quasi-perpendicular shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-05-01

    Collisionless shocks vary drastically from terrestrial to astrophysical regimes resulting in radically different characteristics. This poses two complexities. First, separating the influences of these parameters on physical mechanisms such as energy dissipation. Second, correlating observations of shock waves over a wide range of each parameter, enough to span across different regimes. Investigating the latter has been restricted since the majority of studies on shocks at exotic regimes (such as supernova remnants) have been achieved either remotely or via simulations, but rarely by means of in situ observations. Here we present the parameter space of MA bow shock crossings from 2004 to 2014 as observed by the Cassini spacecraft. We find that Saturn's bow shock exhibits characteristics akin to both terrestrial and astrophysical regimes (MA of order 100), which is principally controlled by the upstream magnetic field strength. Moreover, we determined the θBn of each crossing to show that Saturn's (dayside) bow shock is predominantly quasi-perpendicular by virtue of the Parker spiral at 10 AU. Our results suggest a strong dependence on MA in controlling the onset of physical mechanisms in collisionless shocks, particularly nontime stationarity and variability. We anticipate that our comprehensive assessment will yield deeper insight into high MA collisionless shocks and provide a broader scope for understanding the structures and mechanisms of collisionless shocks.

  1. Magnetosheath Filamentary Structures Formed by Ion Acceleration at the Quasi-Parallel Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidi, N.; Sibeck, D.; Gutynska, O.; Trattner, K. J.

    2014-01-01

    Results from 2.5-D electromagnetic hybrid simulations show the formation of field-aligned, filamentary plasma structures in the magnetosheath. They begin at the quasi-parallel bow shock and extend far into the magnetosheath. These structures exhibit anticorrelated, spatial oscillations in plasma density and ion temperature. Closer to the bow shock, magnetic field variations associated with density and temperature oscillations may also be present. Magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) form primarily in the quasi-parallel sheath; however, they may extend to the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath. They occur over a wide range of solar wind Alfvénic Mach numbers and interplanetary magnetic field directions. At lower Mach numbers with lower levels of magnetosheath turbulence, MFS remain highly coherent over large distances. At higher Mach numbers, magnetosheath turbulence decreases the level of coherence. Magnetosheath filamentary structures result from localized ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock and the injection of energetic ions into the magnetosheath. The localized nature of ion acceleration is tied to the generation of fast magnetosonic waves at and upstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The increased pressure in flux tubes containing the shock accelerated ions results in the depletion of the thermal plasma in these flux tubes and the enhancement of density in flux tubes void of energetic ions. This results in the observed anticorrelation between ion temperature and plasma density.

  2. On the generation of magnetosheath high speed jets by bow shock ripples (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, H.; Plaschke, F.

    2013-12-01

    The terrestrial magnetosheath is embedded with coherent high speed jets of about 1 RE in scale, predominantly during quasi-radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). When these high dynamic pressure (Pdyn) jets hit the magnetopause, they cause large indentations and further magnetospheric effects. The source of these jets has remained controversial. One of the proposed mechanisms is based on ripples of the quasi-parallel bow shock. In this paper, we combine for the first time four years of subsolar magnetosheath observations from the THEMIS mission and corresponding NASA/OMNI solar wind conditions with model calculations of a rippled bow shock. Concentrating on the magnetosheath close to the shock during low IMF cone-angles, we find that (1) 97% of the observed jets can be produced by local ripples of the shock under the observed upstream conditions; (2) the coherent jets form a significant fraction of the high Pdyn tail of the magnetosheath flow distribution; (3) the magnetosheath Pdyn distribution matches the flow from a bow shock with ripples that have a dominant amplitude to wavelength ratio of about 9% (~ 0.1 RE/1 RE) and are present ~12% of the time at any given location.

  3. Bow-shock instability induced by Helmholtz resonator-like feedback in slipstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Naofumi; Sato, Yosuke; Kikuchi, Yuta; Ohtani, Kiyonobu; Yasue, Kanako

    2015-06-01

    Bow-shock instability has been experimentally observed in a low-γ flow. To clarify its mechanism, a parametric study was conducted with three-dimensional numerical simulations for specific heat ratio γ and Mach number M. A critical boundary of the instability was found in the γ-M parametric space. The bow shock tends to be unstable with low γ and high M, and the experimental demonstration was designed based on this result. The experiments were conducted with the ballistic range of the single-stage powder gun mode using HFC-134a of γ = 1.12 at Mach 9.6. Because the deformation of the shock front was observed in a shadowgraph image, the numerical prediction was validated to some extent. The theoretical estimation of vortex formation in a curved shock wave indicates that the generated vorticity is proportional to the density ratio across the shock front and that the critical density ratio can be predicted as ˜10. A strong slipstream from the surface edge generates noticeable acoustic waves because it can be deviated by the upstream flow. The acoustic waves emitted by synchronizing the vortex formation can propagate upstream and may trigger bow-shock instability. This effect should be emphasized in terms of unstable shock formation around an edged flat body.

  4. Study and comparison of the parameters of five hot flow anomalies at a bow shock front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakov, A. Yu.; Vaisberg, O. L.

    2016-03-01

    Five hot flow anomalies ( HFA) recorded by the Tail Probe of the INTERBALL satellite in 1996 are analyzed in present work. For the five chosen events the authors determined the characteristics of current sheets whose interaction with the bow shock front led to formation of an HFA, as well as the directions of external electric fields and the directions of motion of these HFAs over a shock front. The analysis of plasma convection in an HFA body is carried out; the average velocities of plasma motion in the HFA are determined in a coordinate system linked with the normal to a current layer and with the normal to the bow shock. According to the character of plasma convection in an HFA body, these five events may be divided into two types, which also differ in the direction of the motion over the front of the bow shock. In the first-type HFAs, the convection of plasma has a component directed from the intermediate region confirming its identification as a source of energy for the formation of an HFA. In the second-type HFAs, plasma motion from the intermediate region in leading and trailing parts is less expressed. This fact, as well as the great variation of peculiar velocities in the body of anomalies, allowed the assumption that second-type anomalies are nonstationary. Evidence is presented that the anomalies considered in the paper are bordered with shocks formed in solar wind passing a large-scale, decelerated body of heated plasma.

  5. Interplanetary shock-bow shock interaction: Comparison of a global MHD model and observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, O.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.

    2015-09-01

    A fast forward shock passing through the bow shock would generate a train of new discontinuities that differ with the distance from the Sun-Earth line. However, interplanetary (IP) shocks are often followed by a rotation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) over a large angle and a presence of this rotation can modify the interaction process. The present paper analyzes in detail one IP shock where data measured by Wind are used as an input to a global BATS-R-US MHD model and the model prediction is compared with Geotail magnetosheath observations. The study is based on three runs of the global MHD model that use different modifications of upstream conditions. We have found that (1) about 45% of IP shocks is followed by a significant IMF rotation within 15 min after the shock ramp; (2) the IMF rotation modifies the dynamics of the magnetospheric response to the IP shock arrival; (3) a train of new discontinuities created by an interaction of the IP shock with bow shock can be identified in MHD simulations as well as in the experimental data; and (4) a new discontinuity is created by the interaction of the IMF rotation with the bow shock.

  6. Magnetosheath filamentary structures formed by ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, N.; Sibeck, D.; Gutynska, O.; Trattner, K. J.

    2014-04-01

    Results from 2.5-D electromagnetic hybrid simulations show the formation of field-aligned, filamentary plasma structures in the magnetosheath. They begin at the quasi-parallel bow shock and extend far into the magnetosheath. These structures exhibit anticorrelated, spatial oscillations in plasma density and ion temperature. Closer to the bow shock, magnetic field variations associated with density and temperature oscillations may also be present. Magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) form primarily in the quasi-parallel sheath; however, they may extend to the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath. They occur over a wide range of solar wind Alfvénic Mach numbers and interplanetary magnetic field directions. At lower Mach numbers with lower levels of magnetosheath turbulence, MFS remain highly coherent over large distances. At higher Mach numbers, magnetosheath turbulence decreases the level of coherence. Magnetosheath filamentary structures result from localized ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock and the injection of energetic ions into the magnetosheath. The localized nature of ion acceleration is tied to the generation of fast magnetosonic waves at and upstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The increased pressure in flux tubes containing the shock accelerated ions results in the depletion of the thermal plasma in these flux tubes and the enhancement of density in flux tubes void of energetic ions. This results in the observed anticorrelation between ion temperature and plasma density.

  7. The propagation and growth of whistler mode waves generated by electron beams in earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokar, R. L.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    In this study, the propagation and growth of whistler mode waves generated by electron beams within earth's bow shock is investigated using a planar model for the bow shock and a model electron distribution function. Within the shock, the model electron distribution function possesses a field-aligned T greater than T beam that is directed toward the magnetosheath. Waves with frequencies between about 1 and 100 Hz with a wide range of wave normal angles are generated by the beam via Landau and anomalous cyclotron resonances. However, because the growth rate is small and because the wave packets traverse the shock quickly, these waves do not attain large amplitudes. Waves with frequencies between about 30 and 150 Hz with a wide range of wave normal angles are generated by the beam via the normal cyclotron resonance. The ray paths for most of these waves are directed toward the solar wind although some wave packets, due to plasma convection travel transverse to the shock normal. These wave packets grow to large amplitudes because they spend a long time in the growth region. The results suggest that whistler mode noise within the shock should increase in amplitude with increasing upstream theta sub Bn. The study provides an explanation for the origin of much of the whistler mode turbulence observed at the bow shock.

  8. [Posterior iris bowing after accommodation--elucidation of the etiology of pigment dispersion syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ueda, J; Sawaguchi, S; Watanabe, J; Shirakashi, M; Abe, H

    1997-02-01

    Recent advancements in imaging the anterior segment structures using the ultrasound biomicro scope (UBM) have proven the involvement of posterior iris bowing due to reverse pupillary block as the cause of pigment dispersion syndrome. In this report, we examined whether the posterior iris bowing occurs even in normal eyes following accommodation, and whether the degree of iris concavity tends to be greater in myopic eyes than in emmetropic eyes. The subjects were normal eyes with sufficient accommodation power, i.e. 5 myopic eyes with less than-5 diopter reflection, 5 emmetropic eyes within +/- 1 dioptor reflection, respectively. We obtained UBM images of the iris at 4 portions before and after accommodation, and measured the degree of posterior iris bowing. We found that almost all data shift posteriorly after accommodation, and that the iris concavity is more distinct in myopic eyes than in emmetropic eyes both before and after accommodation (before: p = 0.0004, after: p < 0.0001). From these results, we confirmed that iris concavity after accommodation occurs in normal eyes but not enough for iridozonular contact, and that pigment dispersion syndrome results from augmented iris concavity owing to pre-existing factors such as iris flexibility, myopia, and sufficient accommodation power. PMID:9124102

  9. Reconstructing the Guitar: Blowing Bubbles with a Pulsar Bow Shock Backflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kerkwijk, Marten H.; Ingle, Ashleigh

    2008-08-01

    The Guitar Nebula is an Hα nebula produced by the interaction of the relativistic wind of a very fast pulsar, PSR B2224+65, with the interstellar medium. It consists of a ram-pressure confined bow shock near its head and a series of semicircular bubbles further behind, the two largest of which form the body of the Guitar. We present a scenario in which this peculiar morphology is due to instabilities in the backflow from the pulsar bow shock. From simulations, these backflows appear similar to jets and their kinetic energy is a large fraction of the total energy in the pulsar's relativistic wind. We suggest that, like jets, these flows become unstable some distance downstream, leading to rapid dissipation of the kinetic energy into heat, and the formation of an expanding bubble. We show that in this scenario the sizes, velocities, and surface brightnesses of the bubbles depend mostly on observables, and that they match roughly what is seen for the Guitar. Similar instabilities may account for features seen in other bow shocks.

  10. The Bow City structure, southern Alberta, Canada: The deep roots of a complex impact structure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glombick, Paul; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Xie, Wei; Bown, Todd; Hathway, Ben; Banks, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Geological and geophysical evidence is presented for a newly discovered, probable remnant complex impact structure. The structure, located near Bow City, southern Alberta, has no obvious morphological expression at surface. The geometry of the structure in the shallow subsurface, mapped using downhole geophysical well logs, is a semicircular structural depression approximately 8 km in diameter with a semicircular uplifted central region. Detailed subsurface mapping revealed evidence of localized duplication of stratigraphic section in the central uplift area and omission of strata within the surrounding annular region. Field mapping of outcrop confirmed an inlier of older rocks present within the center of the structure. Evidence of deformation along the eastern margin of the central uplift includes thrust faulting, folding, and steeply dipping bedding. Normal faults were mapped along the northern margin of the annular region. Isopach maps reveal that structural thickening and thinning were accommodated primarily within the Belly River Group. Evidence from legacy 2-D seismic data is consistent with the subsurface mapping and reveals additional insight into the geometry of the structure, including a series of listric normal faults in the annular region and complex faulting within the central uplift. The absence of any ejecta blanket, breccia, suevite, or melt sheet (based on available data) is consistent with the Bow City structure being the remnant of a deeply eroded, complex impact structure. Accordingly, the Bow City structure may provide rare access and insight into zones of deformation remaining beneath an excavated transient crater in stratified siliciclastic target rocks.

  11. The Influence of the Martian Bow Shock on Heavy Planetary Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Liemohn, M. W.; Stenberg, G.; Nilsson, H.; Ramstad, R.; Fraenz, M.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the extent of Mars' exosphere and the large gyroradii of some heavy planetary ions, it is expected that some atmospheric ions will encounter the bow shock. However, the effect that the bow shock has on these heavy ions is relatively unstudied. Mars Express (MEX) ion data is examined to determine whether significant differences exist in the velocity space distributions of energetic planetary ions inside and outside of the shock. To allow for determination of the solar wind motional electric field (Esw) using Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) magnetometer data, the study is focused on the time interval from early 2004 to late 2006 when MEX and MGS overlapped. For each 192 second measurement, an average velocity is assigned to heavy ions at high energies (> 2 keV). The possibility that there is turbulence in the magnetosheath altering the paths of heavy pickup ions will be tested by comparing flight directions relative to the direction of Esw in the magnetosheath to flight directions relative to the Esw direction upstream of the bow shock.

  12. Comparative Study of Electromagnetic Waves at the Bow Shocks of Venus and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hanying; Russell, Christopher T.; Strangeway, Robert J.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Zhang, Tielong

    2016-04-01

    Although the solar interactions with Venus and Earth are quite different in many ways, they both have bow shocks formed upstream of the planet where the solar wind decelerates from a super- to sub- magnetosonic flow. In the upstream foreshock region, there is abundant wave activity generated by the shock or by the back-streaming ions and electrons from the shock. In the downstream magnetosheath region, there is also abundant wave activity either locally generated by the heated electrons or ions from the shock or transported from the shock or foreshock regions by the solar wind. The magnetometers of Venus Express and Magnetospheric Multiscale missions both occasionally record 128 Hz data during their shock crossing, which allow us the search for and analyze waves at such high frequencies. We have found short-duration wave bursts around both Venus and Earth bow shocks, with certain similarities. These waves are mostly quasi-perpendicular propagating and have amplitude and occurrence rate decreasing with distance from the bow shock. In this paper we perform statistical and comparative studies on wave properties to understand their generation mechanisms and their effects to the shock or magnetosheath plasmas.

  13. Investigation of hot Flow Anomaly structure observed near the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakov, A. Yu.; Vaisberg, O. L.

    2012-02-01

    The work is dedicated to investigation of Hot Flow Anomaly (HFA), formed at the front of Earth's bows hock. Using Interball-Tail data we estimated orientation of the current sheet that was a cause of the anomaly. From the ion energy-time spectrogram we divided the anomaly into several regions. The motional electric fields near the HFA were estimated with 3D model of Earth's bow shock. In accordance with previous investigations of HFA's formation conditions these fields were directed towards the current sheet on both sides of it. We also provided the picture of HFA's motion along the bow shock and calculated its speed. Analyzing ions' bulk velocities within the HFA we found that the anomaly is expanding. This conclusion was supported by estimation of thermal and magnetic pressure balance. Ion energy-time spectrogram shows that anomaly is a complicated structure consisting of two parts—leading and trailing. Comparison of ion velocity distributions, magnetic field data and ion energy-time spectrogram provides better understanding of the phenomena and indicated the region that is the source of thermal and convective energy inside HFA.

  14. Electron distributions upstream of the Comet Halley bow shock - Evidence for adiabatic heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, D. E.; Anderson, K. A.; Lin, R. P.; Carlson, C. W.; Reme, H.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional plasma electron (22 eV to 30 keV) observations upstream of Comet Halley bow shock, obtained by the RPA-1 COPERNIC (Reme Plasma Analyzer - Complete Positive Ion, Electron and Ram Negative Ion Measurements near Comet Halley) experiment on the Giotto spacecraft are reported. Besides electron distributions typical of the undisturbed solar wind and backstreaming electrons observed when the magnetic field line intersects the cometary bow shock, a new type of distribution, characterized by enhanced low energy (less than 100 eV) flux which peaks at 90-deg pitch angles is found. These are most prominent when the spacecraft is on field lines which pass close to but are not connected to the bow shock. The 90-deg pitch angle electrons appear to have been adiabatically heated by the increase in the magnetic field strength resulting from the compression of the upstream solar wind plasma by the cometary mass loading. A model calculation of this effect which agrees qualitatively with the observed 90-deg flux enhancements is presented.

  15. Two-point observations of solar wind beam deceleration upstream the Earth bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbar, Jaroslav; Nemecek, Zdenek; Safrankova, Jana; Prech, Lubomir; Jelinek, Karel

    2015-04-01

    The ion energy distribution in front of the bow shock is often strongly non-Maxwellian. It can contain a large portion (up to 10 %) of energetic particles streaming in different directions than the original solar wind beam. The solar wind speed is thus computed as weighted averages of the speeds of all populations covered by the measured distribution. The moments computed from this distribution indicate a decrease of the solar wind speed in such cases and, based on these moments, the solar wind deceleration upstream the bow shock was reported. Nevertheless, we have found that there are cases, when the solar wind beam itself is undoubtedly decelerated in the foreshock region. In the present paper, we demonstrate several examples of two-point observations of closely-separated THEMIS spacecraft in front of the bow shock. One spacecraft is located in the solar wind while the other is in the foreshock and observes also reflected and accelerated particles. The speed computed as the moment of the distribution is lower than that in the solar wind but the separation of the solar wind beam reveals its deceleration as well. The paper discusses possible physical processes leading to this deceleration.

  16. High-energy properties of the high-redshift flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 2149-306

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ammando, F.; Orienti, M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the γ-ray and X-ray properties of the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 2149-306 at redshift z = 2.345. A strong γ-ray flare from this source was detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope satellite in 2013 January, reaching on January 20 a daily peak flux of (301 ± 36) × 10-8 ph cm-2 s-1 in the 0.1-100 GeV energy range. This flux corresponds to an apparent isotropic luminosity of (1.5 ± 0.2) × 1050 erg s-1, comparable to the highest values observed by a blazar so far. During the flare the increase of flux was accompanied by a significant change of the spectral properties. Moreover significant flux variations on a 6-h time-scale were observed, compatible with the light crossing time of the event horizon of the central black hole. The broad-band X-ray spectra of PKS 2149-306 observed by Swift-XRT and NuSTAR are well described by a broken power-law model, with a very hard spectrum (Γ1 ˜ 1) below the break energy, at E break = 2.5-3.0 keV, and Γ2 ˜ 1.4-1.5 above the break energy. The steepening of the spectrum below ˜3 keV may indicate that the soft X-ray emission is produced by the low-energy relativistic electrons. This is in agreement with the small variability amplitude and the lack of spectral changes in that part of the X-ray spectrum observed between the two NuSTAR and Swift joint observations. As for the other high-redshift FSRQ detected by both Fermi-LAT and Swift-BAT, the photon index of PKS 2149-306 in hard X-ray is 1.6 or lower and the average γ-ray luminosity higher than 2 × 1048 erg s-1.

  17. Transformation of solar wind plasma parameters at transition through the bow shock front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedykh, Pavel

    When the solar wind flows round the magnetosphere, its flow structure and interplanetary magnetic field lines are affected. This indicates the appearance of an electric current system in near-Earth space. The magnetized solar wind plasma moving at the solar wind velocity in the coordinate system of near-earth bow shock induces an electric field in this system. When crossing the bow shock front at the nose point, the tangential magnetic field component increases nearly four times, and the magnetic field density - 15 times. The physics of the phenomenon implies that the Earth in the solar wind stream disturbs the stream supersonic for the Earth. This suggests that a bow shock front is formed, the upstream wind plasma is undisturbed, and new scales of fluctuations appear downstream, where the minimum scale is the front thickness. This paper relies on the results of earlier researches (Ponomarev et al., JASTP, 2006), where we obtained the expression for electric current generated in the bow shock front. I shall assume the bow shock front to be a paraboloid of rotation with its axis coinciding with the x axis in the solar-magnetospheric coordinate system. In the paper I shall be limited to a simple case—I shall consider the dependence only from coordinate x. Certainly, more full decision of the general problem (when dependence not only on one coordinate is examined) has to be considered. However, it is not possible to solve at once a complex problem analytically. Therefore in this study I shall be limited to such statement of a problem. Further, the obtained solution can be generalized on more difficult case. A parabolic system of coordinates (Madelung, 1957) is convenient for the description. In this paper, the magnetopause electric potential and the power consumed by the magnetosphere as a function of solar wind parameters have been determined. It is clear that the primary energy source for magnetospheric processes is the solar wind, but the process of energy

  18. Measurement of bow tie profiles in CT scanners using a real-time dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, Bruce R.; Evans, Joshua D.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Dohatcu, Andreea C.; Politte, David G.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Several areas of computed tomography (CT) research require knowledge about the intensity profile of the x-ray fan beam that is introduced by a bow tie filter. This information is considered proprietary by CT manufacturers, so noninvasive measurement methods are required. One method using real-time dosimeters has been proposed in the literature. A commercially available dosimeter was used to apply that method, and analysis techniques were developed to extract fan beam profiles from measurements. Methods: A real-time ion chamber was placed near the periphery of an empty CT gantry and the dose rate versus time waveform was recorded as the x-ray source rotated about the isocenter. In contrast to previously proposed analysis methods that assumed a pointlike detector, the finite-size ion chamber received varying amounts of coverage by the collimated x-ray beam during rotation, precluding a simple relationship between the source intensity as a function of fan beam angle and measured intensity. A two-parameter model for measurement intensity was developed that included both effective collimation width and source-to-detector distance, which then was iteratively solved to minimize the error between duplicate measurements at corresponding fan beam angles, allowing determination of the fan beam profile from measured dose-rate waveforms. Measurements were performed on five different scanner systems while varying parameters such as collimation, kVp, and bow tie filters. On one system, direct measurements of the bow tie profile were collected for comparison with the real-time dosimeter technique. Results: The data analysis method for a finite-size detector was found to produce a fan beam profile estimate with a relative error between duplicate measurement intensities of <5%. It was robust over a wide range of collimation widths (e.g., 1–40 mm), producing fan beam profiles that agreed with a relative error of 1%–5%. Comparison with a direct measurement technique on

  19. Host galaxy and environment of the BL Lacertae object PKS 0548-322: Observations with subarcsecond resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falomo, Renato; Pesce, Joseph E.; Treves, Aldo

    1995-01-01

    We report on direct, subarcsecond resolution imaging of the nebulosity and spectroscopy of galaxies in the field of the BL Lacertae object PKS 0548-322. Surface photometry of the nebulosity is used to derive the properties of the host galaxy (M(sub V) = -23.4), which exhibits signs of interaction with a close companion galaxy at approximately 25 kpc. The radial brightness profile of the nebulosity is well fitted by the contribution of a bulge (r(exp 1/4)) plus a point source and a small internal disk. An analysis of the galaxies in the field shows that the source is located in a rich cluster of galaxies. Spectra of five galaxies in the field indicate that they are at the same redshift as the BL Lac object, thus supporting the imaging result of a surrounding cluster associated with the BL Lac. This cluster is most likely Abell S0549.

  20. Long-term monitoring of PKS0558­-504, a highly accreting AGN with a radio jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliozzi, Mario

    Mario Gliozzi, mgliozzi@gmu.edu George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, United States The radio-loud Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxy PKS 0558-504 is a highly variable, X-ray bright source with super-Eddington accretion rate and a powerful radio jet that does not dominate the emission beyond the radio band. Hence this source represents an ideal laboratory to study the link between accretion and ejection phenomena. Here we present the preliminary results from a 5-year monitoring campaign with RXTE as well as from a 1.5-year multi-wavelength campaign with Swift, complemented with radio observations from the ATCA and VLBI. We combine several pieces of information from different energy bands to shed some light on the energetics of accretion and ejection phenomena in this extreme black hole system.

  1. The X-ray spectra of the BL Lacertae objects PKS 0548 - 322 and 3C 66A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Maccagni, D.; Tarenghi, M.

    1983-01-01

    Einstein Observatory simultaneous imaging proportional counter and monitor proportional counter data are combined in order to derive the energy spectra of the BL Lac objects PKS 0548-322 and 3C 66A between 0.2 and 10 keV. While the latter is found to be variable in both intensity and spectral shape, the former, although constant in the present data, is found to have experienced a spectrum variation in view of results from other experiments. Attention is given to the implications of flux and spectral variability in BL Lac objects for models of X-ray emission mechanisms. It is suggested that the wide spread of the spectral index distribution is due to the detection of the highly variable synchrotron-produced X-rays that are generally undetected in QSOs.

  2. Fermi-LAT detection of increased gamma-ray activity from the blazar PKS 0727-115

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, D.; Hays, E. Gurwell, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST, launched June 11, 2008), has observed an increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with PKS 0727-115 (RA: 07h30m19.1s, Dec: -11d41m13s, J2000, z=1.59 ( Zensus et al. 2002)). Preliminary analysis indicates that over the past month the source has become, on average, brighter with a gamma-ray flux (E>100MeV) of approximately 5.0+/- 0.8 x 10^-7 photons cm^-2 s^-1 on weekly timescales and occasional day-scale detections at the level of approximately 4.0 +/- 1.0 x 10^-7 photons cm^-2 s^-1.

  3. Detection of high-energy gamma rays from quasar PKS 0528 + 134 by EGRET on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, S. D.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Kwok, P. W.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    The first several pointing directions of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, launched on 1991 April 5, were toward the Galactic anticenter. In addition to the known gamma-ray sources, Crab and Geminga, high-energy gamma-ray emission was observed from the quasar PKS 0528 + 134 by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). A redshift measurement, reported here, of 2.07 confirms the identification of this object as a quasar. The differential photon spectrum is well represented by a power law with an exponent of 2.56 +/- 0.09 and a photon intensity above 100 MeV of (8.4 +/- 1.0) x 10 exp -7 photons sq cm/s. There is evidence for time variability on a time scale of a few days.

  4. The New Surprising Behaviour of the Two 'Prototype' Blazars PKS 2155-304 and 3C 279

    SciTech Connect

    Costamante, Luigi; Aharonian, Felix; Buhler, Rolf; Khangulyan, Dmitry; Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-21

    Recent VHE observations have unveiled a surprising behaviour in two well-known blazars at opposite sides of the blazar sequence. PKS 2155-304 have shown for the first time in an HBL a large Compton dominance, high {gamma}-ray luminosities and a cubic relation between X-ray and VHE fluxes. 3C 279 is the first FSRQ detected at VHE. The high luminosity required to overcome the significant absorption caused by the BLR emission cannot be easily reconciled with the historical and quasi-simultaneous SED properties. Both cases shed a new light on the structure and ambient fields of blazars. Contrary to previous claims, it is also shown that 3C 279 - as any FSRQ - cannot provide robust constraints on the EBL.

  5. On the origin of the soft photons of the high-synchrotron-peaked blazar PKS 1424+240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Shi-Ju; Zheng, Yong-Gang; Wu, Qingwen; Chen, Liang

    2016-09-01

    PKS 1424+240 is a distant very-high-energy gamma-ray BL Lac object with redshift z = 0.601. It has been found that models utilizing pure synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) processes normally need extreme input parameters (e.g. a very low magnetic field intensity and an extraordinarily high Doppler factor) to explain this particular object spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In order to avoid these extreme model parameters, various other models have been proposed (e.g. the two-zone SSC model or lepto-hadronic model). In this work, we employ the traditional one-zone leptonic model after including a weak external Compton component in order to explore the simultaneous multiwavelength SEDs of PKS 1424+240 in both the high (2009) and the low (2013) state. We find that the input parameters of the magnetic field and Doppler factor are roughly consistent with those of other BL Lacs if a weak external photon field from either the broad line region (BLR) or the dust torus is assumed. However, the required energy density of seed photons from the BLR or torus is about three orders of magnitude lower than that the energy density estimated from the observations in luminous quasars (e.g. flat-spectrum radio quasars, FSRQs). This result suggests that the BLR/torus in BL Lacs is much weaker than that of luminous FSRQs (but has not fully disappeared), and that the inverse-Compton process of external photons from the BLR/torus may still play a role even in high-synchrotron-peaked blazars.

  6. The jet of the BL Lacertae object PKS 0521-365 in the near-IR: MAD adaptive optics observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falomo, R.; Pian, E.; Treves, A.; Giovannini, G.; Venturi, T.; Moretti, A.; Arcidiacono, C.; Farinato, J.; Ragazzoni, R.; Diolaiti, E.; Lombini, M.; Tavecchio, F.; Brast, R.; Donaldson, R.; Kolb, J.; Marchetti, E.; Tordo, S.

    2009-07-01

    Context: BL Lac objects are low-power active nuclei exhibiting a variety of peculiar properties caused by the presence of a relativistic jet and orientation effects. Aims: We present adaptive optics near-IR images at high spatial resolution of the nearby BL Lac object PKS 0521-365, which is known to display a prominent jet both at radio and optical frequencies. Methods: The observations were obtained in Ks-band using the ESO multi-conjugated adaptive optics demonstrator at the Very Large Telescope. This allowed us to obtain images with 0.1 arcsec effective resolution. We performed a detailed analysis of the jet and its related features from the near-IR images, and combined them with images previously obtained with HST in the R band and by a re-analysis of VLA radio maps. Results: We find a remarkable similarity in the structure of the jet at radio, near-IR, and optical wavelengths. The broad-band emission of the jet knots is dominated by synchrotron radiation, while the nucleus also exhibits a significant inverse Compton component. We discovered the near-IR counterpart of the radio hotspot and found that the near-IR flux is consistent with being a synchrotron emission from radio to X-ray wavelengths. The bright red object (red-tip), detached but well aligned with the jet, is well resolved in the near-IR and has a linear light profile. Since it has no radio counterpart, we propose that it is a background galaxy not associated with the jet. Conclusions: The new adaptive optics near-IR images and previous observations at other frequencies allow us to study the complex environment around the remarkable BL Lac object PKS 0521-365. These data exemplify the capabilities of multi conjugate adaptive optics observations of extragalactic extended sources. Based on observations collected at ESO, Paranal, Chile, as part of MAD Guaranteed Time Observations.

  7. INTERSTELLAR SILICATE DUST IN THE z = 0.89 ABSORBER TOWARD PKS 1830-211: CRYSTALLINE SILICATES AT HIGH REDSHIFT?

    SciTech Connect

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Som, Debopam; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni

    2012-03-20

    We present evidence of a >10{sigma} detection of the 10 {mu}m silicate dust absorption feature in the spectrum of the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211, produced by a foreground absorption system at redshift 0.886. We have examined more than 100 optical depth templates, derived from both observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources and laboratory measurements, in order to constrain the chemical structure of the silicate dust. We find that the best fit to the observed absorption profile is produced by laboratory crystalline olivine, with a corresponding peak optical depth of {tau}{sub 10} = 0.27 {+-} 0.05. The fit is slightly improved upon by including small contributions from additional materials, such as silica, enstatite, or serpentine, which suggests that the dust composition may consist of a blend of crystalline silicates. Combining templates for amorphous and crystalline silicates, we find that the fraction of crystalline silicates needs to be at least 95%. Given the rarity of extragalactic sources with such a high degree of silicate crystallinity, we also explore the possibility that the observed spectral features are produced by amorphous silicates in combination with other molecular or atomic transitions, or by foreground source contamination. While we cannot rule out these latter possibilities, they lead to much poorer profile fits than for the crystalline olivine templates. If the presence of crystalline interstellar silicates in this distant galaxy is real, it would be highly unusual, given that the Milky Way interstellar matter contains essentially only amorphous silicates. It is possible that the z = 0.886 absorber toward PKS 1830-211, well known for its high molecular content, has a unique star-forming environment that enables crystalline silicates to form and prevail.

  8. Gamma-Ray Flaring Activity from the Gravitationally Lensed Blazar PKS 1830-211 Observed by Fermi LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Amin, M. A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Buehler, R.; Bulmash, D.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C.; Ritz, S.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.

    2015-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope routinely detects the MeV-peaked flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1830-211 (z = 2.507). Its apparent isotropic γ-ray luminosity (E > 100 MeV), averaged over ~3 years of observations and peaking on 2010 October 14/15 at 2.9 × 1050 erg s-1, makes it among the brightest high-redshift Fermi blazars. No published model with a single lens can account for all of the observed characteristics of this complex system. Based on radio observations, one expects time-delayed variability to follow about 25 days after a primary flare, with flux about a factor of 1.5 less. Two large γ-ray flares of PKS 1830-211 have been detected by the LAT in the considered period, and no substantial evidence for such a delayed activity was found. This allows us to place a lower limit of about 6 on the γ-ray flux ratio between the two lensed images. Swift XRT observations from a dedicated Target of Opportunity program indicate a hard spectrum with no significant correlation of X-ray flux with the γ-ray variability. The spectral energy distribution can be modeled with inverse Compton scattering of thermal photons from the dusty torus. The implications of the LAT data in terms of variability, the lack of evident delayed flare events, and different radio and γ-ray flux ratios are discussed. Microlensing effects, absorption, size and location of the emitting regions, the complex mass distribution of the system, an energy-dependent inner structure of the source, and flux suppression by the lens galaxy for one image path may be considered as hypotheses for understanding our results.

  9. GAMMA-RAY FLARING ACTIVITY FROM THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED BLAZAR PKS 1830–211 OBSERVED BY Fermi LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Buehler, R.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Amin, M. A.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bonamente, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bulmash, D. E-mail: stefano.ciprini@asdc.asi.it E-mail: dammando@ira.inaf.it E-mail: sara.buson@pd.infn.it E-mail: dammando@ira.inaf.it; and others

    2015-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope routinely detects the MeV-peaked flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1830–211 (z = 2.507). Its apparent isotropic γ-ray luminosity (E > 100 MeV), averaged over ∼3 years of observations and peaking on 2010 October 14/15 at 2.9 × 10{sup 50} erg s{sup –1}, makes it among the brightest high-redshift Fermi blazars. No published model with a single lens can account for all of the observed characteristics of this complex system. Based on radio observations, one expects time-delayed variability to follow about 25 days after a primary flare, with flux about a factor of 1.5 less. Two large γ-ray flares of PKS 1830–211 have been detected by the LAT in the considered period, and no substantial evidence for such a delayed activity was found. This allows us to place a lower limit of about 6 on the γ-ray flux ratio between the two lensed images. Swift XRT observations from a dedicated Target of Opportunity program indicate a hard spectrum with no significant correlation of X-ray flux with the γ-ray variability. The spectral energy distribution can be modeled with inverse Compton scattering of thermal photons from the dusty torus. The implications of the LAT data in terms of variability, the lack of evident delayed flare events, and different radio and γ-ray flux ratios are discussed. Microlensing effects, absorption, size and location of the emitting regions, the complex mass distribution of the system, an energy-dependent inner structure of the source, and flux suppression by the lens galaxy for one image path may be considered as hypotheses for understanding our results.

  10. Effect of an isotropic outflow from the Galactic Centre on the bow-shock evolution along the orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajaček, M.; Eckart, A.; Karas, V.; Kunneriath, D.; Shahzamanian, B.; Sabha, N.; Mužić, K.; Valencia-S., M.

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the observations of several infrared-excess bow-shock sources and proplyd-like objects near the Galactic Centre, we analyse the effect of a potential outflow from the centre on bow-shock properties. We show that due to the non-negligible isotropic central outflow the bow-shock evolution along the orbit becomes asymmetric between the pre-peribothron and post-peribothron phases. This is demonstrated by the calculation of the bow-shock size evolution, the velocity along the shocked layer, the surface density of the bow shock, and by emission-measure maps close to the peribothron passage. Within the ambient velocity range of ≲2000 km s-1 the asymmetry is profound and the changes are considerable for different outflow velocities. As a case study we perform model calculations for the Dusty S-cluster Object (DSO/G2) as a potential young stellar object that is currently being monitored and has passed the pericentre at ˜2000 Schwarzschild radii from the supermassive black hole (Sgr A*) in 2014. We show that the velocity field of the shocked layer can contribute to the observed increasing line width of the DSO source up to the peribothron. Subsequently, supposing that the line emission originates in the bow shock, a decrease of the line width is expected. Furthermore, the decline of the bow-shock emission measure in the post-peribothron phase could help to reveal the emission of the putative star. The dominant contribution of circumstellar matter (either inflow or outflow) is consistent with the observed stable luminosity and compactness of the DSO/G2 source during its pericentre passage.

  11. The BL-Lacertae gamma-ray blazar PKS 1424+240 associated with a group of galaxies at z = 0.6010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovero, A. C.; Muriel, H.; Donzelli, C.; Pichel, A.

    2016-04-01

    Context. PKS 1424+240 is a BL-Lac blazar with unknown redshift that was detected at high-energy gamma rays by Fermi-LAT with a hard spectrum. At very high energy (VHE), it was first detected by VERITAS and later confirmed by MAGIC. Its spectral energy distribution is highly attenuated at VHE gamma rays, which is coherent with distant sources. Several estimations enabled the redshift to be constrained to the range 0.6 PKS 1424+240 in the very interesting condition of being probably the most distant blazar that has been detected at VHE. The ambiguity in the redshift is still large enough to prevent precise studies of the extragalatic background light and the intrinsic blazar spectrum. Aims: Given the difficulty of measuring spectroscopic redshifts for BL-Lac objects directly, we aim to establish a reliable redshift value for this blazar by finding its host group of galaxies. Methods: Elliptical galaxies are associated with groups, and BL-Lac objects are typically hosted by them, so we decided to search for the host group of the blazar. For this, we performed optical spectroscopic observations of thirty objects in the field of view of PKS 1424+240 using the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph. After analysing the data for groups, we evaluated the probability of finding groups of galaxies by chance around the position of PKS 1424+240, using a deep catalogue of groups. We also used photometric data from the SDSS catalogue to analyse the red sequence of the proposed blazar host group Results: We found a new group of galaxies with eight members at z = 0.6010 ± 0.003, a virial radius of Rvir = 1.53 Mpc, and a velocity dispersion of σv = 813 ± 187 km s-1. The photometric study indicates that more members are probably populating this previously uncatalogued group of galaxies. The probability of PKS 1424+240 being a member of this group was found to be ≳98%. Conclusions: The new group of galaxies found at z = 0.6010 ± 0.003 is very likely

  12. Effect of bow-type initial imperfection on the buckling load and mass of graphite-epoxy blade-stiffened panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. J.; Anderson, M. S.; Hennessy, K. W.

    1977-01-01

    A structural synthesis computer code which accounts for first order effects of an initial bow and which can be used for sizing stiffened composite panels having an arbitrary cross section is used to study graphite blade-stiffened panels. The effect of a small initial bow on both the load carrying ability of panels and on the mass of panels designed to carry a specified load is examined. Large reductions in the buckling load caused by a small initial bow emphasize the need for considering a bow when a panel is designed.

  13. Observational test of shock drift and Fermi acceleration on a seed particle population upstream of earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Sarris, E. T.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency of proposed shock acceleration mechanisms as they operate at the bow shock in the presence of a seed energetic particle population was examined using data from simultaneous observations of energetic solar-origin protons, carried out by the IMP 7 and 8 spacecraft in the vicinity of the quasi-parallel (dawn) and quasi-perpendicular (dusk) regions of the earth's bow shock, respectively. The results of observations (which include acceleration effects in the intensities of the energetic protons with energies as high as 4 MeV observed at the vicinity of the dusk bow shock, but no evidence for any particle acceleration at the energy equal to or above 50 keV at the dawn side of the bow shock) indicate that the acceleration of a seed particle population occurs only at the quasi-perpendicular bow shock through shock drift acceleration and that the major source of observed upstream ion populations is the leakage of magnetospheric ions of energies not less than 50 keV, rather than in situ acceleration.

  14. GYROSURFING ACCELERATION OF IONS IN FRONT OF EARTH's QUASI-PARALLEL BOW SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Kis, Arpad; Lemperger, Istvan; Wesztergom, Viktor; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Dandouras, Iannis E-mail: Kis.Arpad@csfk.mta.hu

    2013-07-01

    It is well known that shocks in space plasmas can accelerate particles to high energies. However, many details of the shock acceleration mechanism are still unknown. A critical element of shock acceleration is the injection problem; i.e., the presence of the so called seed particle population that is needed for the acceleration to work efficiently. In our case study, we present for the first time observational evidence of gyroresonant surfing acceleration in front of Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock resulting in the appearance of the long-suspected seed particle population. For our analysis, we use simultaneous multi-spacecraft measurements provided by the Cluster spacecraft ion (CIS), magnetic (FGM), and electric field and wave instrument (EFW) during a time period of large inter-spacecraft separation distance. The spacecraft were moving toward the bow shock and were situated in the foreshock region. The results show that the gyroresonance surfing acceleration takes place as a consequence of interaction between circularly polarized monochromatic (or quasi-monochromatic) transversal electromagnetic plasma waves and short large amplitude magnetic structures (SLAMSs). The magnetic mirror force of the SLAMS provides the resonant conditions for the ions trapped by the waves and results in the acceleration of ions. Since wave packets with circular polarization and different kinds of magnetic structures are very commonly observed in front of Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock, the gyroresonant surfing acceleration proves to be an important particle injection mechanism. We also show that seed ions are accelerated directly from the solar wind ion population.

  15. Vocal fold bowing in elderly male monozygotic twins: a case study.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Kristine; Sauder, Cara; Thibeault, Susan L; Dromey, Christopher; Smith, Marshall E

    2010-07-01

    This case study examined case histories, diagnostic features, and treatment response in two 79-year-old male monozygotic (identical) twins with vocal fold bowing, exploring both genetic and environmental factors. DNA concordance was examined via cheek swab. Case histories, videostroboscopy, auditory- and visual-perceptual assessment, electromyography, acoustic measures, and Voice Handicap ratings were undertaken. Both twins underwent surgical intervention and subsequent voice therapy. Monozygosity was confirmed for DNA polymorphisms, with 10 of 10 concordance for STR DNA markers. For both twins, auditory- and visual-perceptual assessments indicated severe bowing, hoarseness, and breathiness, although Twin 1 was judged to be extremely severe. Differences in reference to root-mean-square amplitudes were observed for thyroarytenoid and lateral cricoarytenoid muscles, with smaller relative amplitudes observed for the Twin 1 versus Twin 2. No consistent voice improvement was observed after surgical intervention(s), despite improved mid-membranous vocal fold closure. Marked reductions in Voice Handicap Index total scores were observed after behavioral voice therapy, coinciding with increased mid-membranous and posterior laryngeal (interarytenoid) glottal closure. No substantive differences in acoustic measures were observed. Vocal fold bowing was more severe for Twin 1 versus Twin 2 despite identical heritability factors. Overall voice improvement with treatment was greater for Twin 2 than Twin 1. Environmental factors might partially account for the differences observed between the twins, including variability in their responsiveness to behavioral voice therapy. Voice therapy was useful in improving mid-membranous and posterior laryngeal closure, although dysphonia remained severe in both cases. PMID:19664899

  16. AKARI/FIS Mapping of the ISM-Wind Bow Shock around α Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, Toshiya; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Yamamura, Issei; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Matsuura, Mikako; Ita, Yoshifusa; Tanabé, Toshihiko; Fukushi, Hinako; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Mito, Hiroyuki

    2008-12-01

    We present 10' × 50'scan maps around an M supergiant αOri at 65, 90, 140, and 160μm obtained with the AKARI Infrared Astronomy Satellite. Higher spatial resolution data with the exact analytic solution permit us to fit the de-projected shape of the stellar-wind bow shock around αOri to have a stand-off distance of 4'.8, position angle of 55° and inclination angle of 56°. The shape of the bow shock suggests that the velocity of αOri with respect to the local medium is v* = 40 nH-1/2, where nH is the hydrogen nucleus density at αOri. We found that the local medium is of nH = 1.5 to 1.9 cm-3 and the velocity of the local flow is at 11km s-1 by using the most recent astrometric solutions for αOri under the assumption that the medium local to αOri is moving away from the Orion OB 1 association. AKARI images may also reveal avortex ring due to instabilities on the surface of the bow shock, as demonstrated by numerical models. This research exemplifies the potential of AKARI All-Sky data as well as follow-up observations with Herschel Space Telescope and Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy for this avenue of research in revealing the nature of the interaction between the stellar wind and the interstellar medium.

  17. Gyrosurfing Acceleration of Ions in Front of Earth's Quasi-parallel Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, Arpad; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.; Dandouras, Iannis; Lemperger, Istvan; Wesztergom, Viktor

    2013-07-01

    It is well known that shocks in space plasmas can accelerate particles to high energies. However, many details of the shock acceleration mechanism are still unknown. A critical element of shock acceleration is the injection problem; i.e., the presence of the so called seed particle population that is needed for the acceleration to work efficiently. In our case study, we present for the first time observational evidence of gyroresonant surfing acceleration in front of Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock resulting in the appearance of the long-suspected seed particle population. For our analysis, we use simultaneous multi-spacecraft measurements provided by the Cluster spacecraft ion (CIS), magnetic (FGM), and electric field and wave instrument (EFW) during a time period of large inter-spacecraft separation distance. The spacecraft were moving toward the bow shock and were situated in the foreshock region. The results show that the gyroresonance surfing acceleration takes place as a consequence of interaction between circularly polarized monochromatic (or quasi-monochromatic) transversal electromagnetic plasma waves and short large amplitude magnetic structures (SLAMSs). The magnetic mirror force of the SLAMS provides the resonant conditions for the ions trapped by the waves and results in the acceleration of ions. Since wave packets with circular polarization and different kinds of magnetic structures are very commonly observed in front of Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock, the gyroresonant surfing acceleration proves to be an important particle injection mechanism. We also show that seed ions are accelerated directly from the solar wind ion population.

  18. Statistical analysis of diffuse ion events upstream of the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trattner, K. J.; Mobius, E.; Scholer, M.; Klecker, B.; Hilchenbach, M.; Luehr, H.

    1994-01-01

    A statistical study of diffuse energetic ion events and their related waves upstream of the Earth's bow shock was performed using data from the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Ion Release Module (AMPTE/IRM) satellite over two 5-month periods in 1984 and 1985. The data set was used to test the assumption in the self-consistent model of the upstream wave and particle populations by Lee (1982) that the particle acceleration through hydromagnetic waves and the wave generation are directly coupled. The comparison between the observed wave power and the wave power predicted on the observed energetic particle energy density and solar wind parameters results in a high correlation coefficient of about 0.89. The intensity of diffuse ions falls off approximately exponentially with the distance upstream from the bow shock parallel to the magnetic field with e-folding distances which vary from approximately 3.3 R(sub E) to approximately 11.7 R(sub E) over the energy range from 10 keV/e to 67.3 keV/e for both protons and alpha particles. After normalizing the upstream particle densities to zero bow shock distance by using these exponential variations, a good correlation (0.7) of the density of the diffuse ions with the solar wind density was found. This supports the suggestion that the solar wind is the source of the diffuse ions. Furthermore, the spectral slope of the diffuse ions correlates well with the solar wind velocity component in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (0.68 and 0.66 for protons and alpha particles) which concurs with the notion that the solar wind plays an important role in the acceleration of the upstream particles.

  19. Field-aligned ion beams upstream of the earth's bow shock Evidence for a magnetosheath source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.

    1983-01-01

    High time resolution ISEE-1 and -2 observations of upstream field-aligned ion beams at several crossings of the earth's bow shock indicate that some beams are due to high energy magnetosheath particles leaking through the shock into the upstream region. The distribution immediately downstream of these oblique shocks consists of a 'core' of directly transmitted, slightly heated ions, plus a crescent-shaped, high-velocity distribution, centered roughly on the magnetic field in the direction toward the upstream region, with a fairly well defined low velocity cutoff.

  20. Heavy Solar Wind Ion Dynamics at and Downstream from the Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Virginia M.

    1997-01-01

    This is a contract under the NASA Supporting Research and Technology Program for the analysis and interpretation of the scientific data from the Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun Earth Explorer 1 (ISEE-1) spacecraft and the Fast Plasma Experiment on the ISEE-1 and -2 spacecraft. These combined data sets will be used in a comprehensive study of the heavy solar wind ion dynamics at and downstream from the Earth's bow shock. The report summarizes activities during the above period and outlines expected activities during the forthcoming quarter.

  1. Bowing effect in elastic constants of dilute Ga(As,N) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berggren, Jonas; Hanke, Michael; Trampert, Achim

    2016-05-01

    We study the elastic properties of dilute Ga(As,N) thin films grown on GaAs(001) by means of nano-indentation and complementary dynamic finite element calculations. The experimental results of indentation modulus are compared with simulations in order to extract the cubic elastic constants cij as a function of nitrogen content of the Ga(As,N) alloys. Both, indentation modulus and elastic constants decrease with increasing nitrogen content, which proves a strong negative bowing effect in this system in contrast to Vegard's law.

  2. Near-field enhanced ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy using aluminum bow-tie nano-antenna.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Fang Lim, Shuang; Puretzky, Alexander A; Riehn, Robert; Hallen, H D

    2012-09-10

    An aluminum bow-tie nano-antenna is combined with the resonance Raman effect in the deep ultraviolet to dramatically increase the sensitivity of Raman spectra to a small volume of material, such as benzene used here. We further demonstrate gradient-field Raman peaks for several strong infrared modes. We achieve a gain of [Formula: see text] in signal intensity from the near field enhancement due to the surface plasmon resonance in the aluminum nanostructure. The on-line resonance enhancement contributes another factor of several thousands, limited by the laser line width. Thus, an overall gain of hundreds of million is achieved. PMID:23066168

  3. Analytic MHD Theory for Earth's Bow Shock at Low Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabbe, Crockett L.; Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    A previous MHD theory for the density jump at the Earth's bow shock, which assumed the Alfven M(A) and sonic M(s) Mach numbers are both much greater than 1, is reanalyzed and generalized. It is shown that the MHD jump equation can be analytically solved much more directly using perturbation theory, with the ordering determined by M(A) and M(s), and that the first-order perturbation solution is identical to the solution found in the earlier theory. The second-order perturbation solution is calculated, whereas the earlier approach cannot be used to obtain it. The second-order terms generally are important over most of the range of M(A) and M(s) in the solar wind when the angle theta between the normal to the bow shock and magnetic field is not close to 0 deg or 180 deg (the solutions are symmetric about 90 deg). This new perturbation solution is generally accurate under most solar wind conditions at 1 AU, with the exception of low Mach numbers when theta is close to 90 deg. In this exceptional case the new solution does not improve on the first-order solutions obtained earlier, and the predicted density ratio can vary by 10-20% from the exact numerical MHD solutions. For theta approx. = 90 deg another perturbation solution is derived that predicts the density ratio much more accurately. This second solution is typically accurate for quasi-perpendicular conditions. Taken together, these two analytical solutions are generally accurate for the Earth's bow shock, except in the rare circumstance that M(A) is less than or = 2. MHD and gasdynamic simulations have produced empirical models in which the shock's standoff distance a(s) is linearly related to the density jump ratio X at the subsolar point. Using an empirical relationship between a(s) and X obtained from MHD simulations, a(s) values predicted using the MHD solutions for X are compared with the predictions of phenomenological models commonly used for modeling observational data, and with the predictions of a

  4. Millimeter-wave near-field imaging with bow-tie antennas.

    PubMed

    Omarouayache, Rachid; Payet, Pierre; Raoult, Jérémy; Chusseau, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    A near-field reflectometry experiment operating at 60 GHz is built in view of material and circuit inspection. Experiments are always obtained in constant height mode of operation. The bow-tie near-field probe acts mostly as a linearly-polarized electric dipole and allows strongly subwavelength resolution of ≈ λ/130. Its interaction with sample is shown polarization dependent and sensitive to both the local topography and the local dielectric constant or metal conductivity. Resonant and non-resonant probes are both evaluated. PMID:25969302

  5. Formation of ion acoustic solitary waves upstream of the earth's bow shock. [in solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pangia, M. J.; Lee, N. C.; Parks, G. K.

    1985-01-01

    The turbulent plasma development of Lee and Parks is applied to the solar wind approaching the earth's bow shock region. The ponderomotive force contribution is due to ion acoustic waves propagating in the direction of the ambient magnetic field. In this case, the envelope of the ion acoustic wave is shown to satisfy the cubic Schroedinger equation. Modulational instabilities exist for waves in the solar wind, thereby predicting the generation of solitary waves. This analysis further identifies that the ion acoustic waves which exhibit this instability have short wavelengths.

  6. Broadband millimeter-wave GaAs transmitters and receivers using planar bow-tie antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konishi, Y.; Kamegawa, M.; Case, M.; Yu, R.; Rodwell, M. J. W.; York, R. A.; Rutledge, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    We report broadband monolithic transmitters and receivers IC's for mm-wave electromagnetic measurements. The IC's use nonlinear transmission lines (NLTL) and sampling circuits as picosecond pulse generators and detectors. The pulses are radiated and received by planar monolithic bow-tie antennas, collimated with silicon substrate lenses and off-axis parabolic reflectors. Through Fourier transformation of the received pulse, 30-250 GHz free space gain-frequency measurements are demonstrated with an accuracy approximately = 0.17 dB, RMS.

  7. Ram-pressure balance surfaces for an outwardly accelerating stellar wind bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raga, A. C.; Cantó, J.; Koenigsberger, G.; Esquivel, A.

    2014-10-01

    We study the problem of a stellar wind bow shock (produced by an isotropic wind/plane flowing environment interaction) that lies within the wind acceleration region in the simple, ram-pressure balance approximation. We show that this problem has a simple, approximate analytic solution that produces reasonably accurate results when applied to wind velocity profiles appropriate for radiatively driven winds. These solutions should be useful for initializing numerical simulations and for evaluating whether or not the simulations are giving physically reasonable solutions. Also, our analytic solutions should be useful in the interpretation of observations without the necessity of having to perform complex numerical simulations.

  8. Solar wind interaction with the earth's magnetic field. II - Magnetohydrodynamic bow shock.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Formisano, V.; Moreno, G.; Palmiotto, F.; Hedgecock, P. C.; Chao, J. K.

    1973-01-01

    The earth's bow shock has been investigated as a magnetohydrodynamic discontinuity using the plasma and magnetic data supplied by the European satellite Heos 1. The jumps of the fluid parameters through the shock have been studied as a function of the Mach number and of the geometry of the shock surface. The solar wind specific heat ratio has been found to be equal to 1.75 or 2.25, depending on the presence or absence of upstream waves. Computations of the shock velocity performed for 23 crossings gave an average speed of about 85 km/sec.

  9. Critical experiment tests of bowing and expansion reactivity calculations for LMRS

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments done in several LMR-type critical assemblies simulated core axial expansion, core radial expansion and bowing, coolant expansion, and control driveline expansion. For the most part new experimental techniques were developed to do these experiments. Calculations of the experiments basically used design-level methods, except when it was necessary to investigate complexities peculiar to the experiments. It was found that these feedback reactivities generally are overpredicted, but the predictions are within 30% of the experimental values. 14 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. The electromagnetic ion beam instability upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Gosling, J. T.; Forslund, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    The linear theory of the electromagnetic ion beam instability for arbitrary angles of propagation has been studied. The parameters considered in the theory are typical of the solar wind upstream of the earth's bow shock when a 'reflected' proton beam is present. Maximum growth occurs for propagation parallel to the ambient magnetic field B, but this instability also displays significant growth at wave-vectors oblique to B. Oblique, unstable modes seem to be the likely source of the compressive magnetic fluctuations recently observed in conjunction with the 'diffuse' ion population. An energetic ion beam does not directly give rise to linear growth of either ion acoustic or whistler mode instabilities.

  11. Collisionless dissipation in quasi-perpendicular shocks. [in terresrial bow waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forslund, D. W.; Quest, K. B.; Brackbill, J. U.; Lee, K.

    1984-01-01

    Microscopic dissipation processes in quasi-perpendicular shocks are studied by two-dimensional plasma simulations in which electrons and ions are treated as particles moving in self-consistent electric and magnetic fields. Cross-field currents induce substantial turbulence at the shock front reducing the reflected ion fraction, increasing the bulk ion temperature behind the shock, doubling the average magnetic ramp thickness, and enhancing the upstream field aligned electron heat flow. The short scale length magnetic fluctuations observed in the bow shock are probably associated with this turbulence.

  12. Dynamics of ion sound waves in the front of the terrestrial bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giagkiozis, I.; Walker, S. N.; Balikhin, M. A.

    2011-05-01

    Single spacecraft measurements from the Cluster 3 satellite are used to identify nonlinear processes in ion-sound turbulence observed within the front of the quasiperpendicular terrestrial bow shock. Ion sound waves possess spatial scales that are too small for the efficient use of multipoint measurements on inter-satellite separation scales. However, it is shown how frequency domain modelling can be applied to single spacecraft electric field data obtained using the EFW internal burst mode. The resulting characteristics of the nonlinear processes are used to argue about the possible wave sources and investigate their dynamics.

  13. Comparison of picked-up protons and water group ions upstream of Comet Halley's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M.; Coates, A. J.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1990-01-01

    The similarities and differences between the picked-up cometary protons and water-group (WG) ions upstream of the bow shock of Comet Halley are examined using measurements obtained by the ion mass spectrometer and plasma analyzer experiments on board Giotto. It was found that the dependencies of the pitch angle and the energy diffusion rates of the cometary protons and WG ions on the ion densities and on the angle alpha between the interplanetary field and the solar wind velocity vector were very different. This finding could not be explained in terms of presently available theories and models.

  14. Remote radio observations of solar wind parameters upstream of planetary bow shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowall, R. J.; Stone, R. G.; Gaffey, J. D., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Radio emission is frequently produced at twice the electron plasma frequency 2fp in the foreshock region upstream of the terrestrial bow shock. Observations of this emission provide a remote diagnostic of solar wind parameters in the foreshock. Using ISEE-3 radio data, we present the first evidence that the radio intensity is proportional to the kinetic energy flux and to other parameters correlated with solar wind density. We provide a qualitative explanation of this intensity behavior and predict the detection of similar emission at Jupiter by the Ulysses spacecraft.

  15. Role of the pks15/1 gene in the biosynthesis of phenolglycolipids in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Evidence that all strains synthesize glycosylated p-hydroxybenzoic methyl esters and that strains devoid of phenolglycolipids harbor a frameshift mutation in the pks15/1 gene.

    PubMed

    Constant, Patricia; Perez, Esther; Malaga, Wladimir; Lanéelle, Marie-Antoinette; Saurel, Olivier; Daffé, Mamadou; Guilhot, Christophe

    2002-10-11

    Diesters of phthiocerol and phenolphthiocerol are important virulence factors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, the two main mycobacterial pathogens in humans. They are both long-chain beta-diols, and their biosynthetic pathway is beginning to be elucidated. Although the two classes of molecules share a common lipid core, phthiocerol diesters have been found in all the strains of the M. tuberculosis complex examined although phenolphthiocerol diesters are produced by only a few groups of strains. To address the question of the origin of this diversity 8 reference strains and 10 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis were analyzed. We report the presence of glycosylated p-hydroxybenzoic acid methyl esters, structurally related to the type-specific phenolphthiocerol glycolipids, in the culture media of all reference strains of M. tuberculosis, suggesting that the strains devoid of phenolphthiocerol derivatives are unable to elongate the putative p-hydroxybenzoic acid precursor. We also show that all the strains of M. tuberculosis examined and deficient in the production of phenolphthiocerol derivatives are natural mutants with a frameshift mutation in pks15/1 whereas a single open reading frame for pks15/1 is found in Mycobacterium bovis BCG, M. leprae, and strains of M. tuberculosis that produce phenolphthiocerol derivatives. Complementation of the H37Rv strain of M. tuberculosis, which is devoid of phenolphthiocerol derivatives, with the fused pks15/1 gene from M. bovis BCG restored phenolphthiocerol glycolipids production. Conversely, disruption of the pks15/1 gene in M. bovis BCG led to the abolition of the synthesis of type-specific phenolphthiocerol glycolipid. These data indicate that Pks15/1 is involved in the elongation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid to give p-hydroxyphenylalkanoates, which in turn are converted, presumably by the PpsA-E synthase, to phenolphthiocerol derivatives. PMID:12138124

  16. A PKS/NRPS/FAS Hybrid Gene Cluster from Serratia plymuthica RVH1 Encoding the Biosynthesis of Three Broad Spectrum, Zeamine-Related Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Masschelein, Joleen; Mattheus, Wesley; Gao, Ling-Jie; Moons, Pieter; Van Houdt, Rob; Uytterhoeven, Birgit; Lamberigts, Chris; Lescrinier, Eveline; Rozenski, Jef; Herdewijn, Piet; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris; Lavigne, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica strain RVH1, initially isolated from an industrial food processing environment, displays potent antimicrobial activity towards a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Isolation and subsequent structure determination of bioactive molecules led to the identification of two polyamino antibiotics with the same molecular structure as zeamine and zeamine II as well as a third, closely related analogue, designated zeamine I. The gene cluster encoding the biosynthesis of the zeamine antibiotics was cloned and sequenced and shown to encode FAS, PKS as well as NRPS related enzymes in addition to putative tailoring and export enzymes. Interestingly, several genes show strong homology to the pfa cluster of genes involved in the biosynthesis of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in marine bacteria. We postulate that a mixed FAS/PKS and a hybrid NRPS/PKS assembly line each synthesize parts of the backbone that are linked together post-assembly in the case of zeamine and zeamine I. This interaction reflects a unique interplay between secondary lipid and secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Most likely, the zeamine antibiotics are produced as prodrugs that undergo activation in which a nonribosomal peptide sequence is cleaved off. PMID:23349809

  17. Multi-frequency investigation of the parsec- and kilo-parsec-scale radio structures in high-redshift quasar PKS ;1402+044

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Gurvits, L. I.; Lobanov, A. P.; Frey, S.; Hong, X.-Y.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: We investigate the frequency-dependent radio properties of the jet of the luminous high-redshift (z=3.2) radio quasar PKS 1402+044 (J1405+0415) by means of radio interferometric observations. Methods: The observational data were obtained with the VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP) at 1.6 and 5 GHz, supplemented by other multi-frequency observations with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA; 2.3, 8.4, and 15 GHz) and the Very Large Array (VLA; 1.4, 5, 15, and 43 GHz). The observations span a period of 7 years. Results: We find that the luminous high-redshift quasar PKS 1402+044 has a pronounced “core-jet” morphology from the parsec to the kilo-parsec scales. The jet shows a steeper spectral index and lower brightness temperature with increasing distance from the jet core. The variation of brightness temperature agrees well with the shock-in-jet model. Assuming that the jet is collimated by the ambient magnetic field, we estimate the mass of the central object as ~10^9~M_⊙. The upper limit of the jet proper motion of PKS 1402+044 is 0.03 mas yr-1 (~3c) in the east-west direction.

  18. DHN melanin biosynthesis in the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea is based on two developmentally regulated key enzyme (PKS)-encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Julia

    2016-02-01

    Botrytis cinerea is the causal agent of gray mold disease in various plant species and produces grayish macroconidia and/or black sclerotia at the end of the infection cycle. It has been suggested that the pigmentation is due to the accumulation of 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin. To unravel its basis and regulation, the putative melanogenic and regulatory genes were identified and functionally characterized. Unlike other DHN melanin-producing fungi, B. cinerea and other Leotiomycetes contain two key enzyme (PKS)-encoding enzymes. Bcpks12 and bcpks13 are developmentally regulated and are required for melanogenesis in sclerotia and conidia respectively. BcYGH1 converts the BcPKS13 product and contributes thereby to conidial melanogenesis. In contrast, enzymes acting downstream in conversion of the PKS products (BcBRN2, BcSCD1 and BcBRN1) are required for both, sclerotial and conidial melanogenesis, suggesting that DHN melanogenesis in B. cinerea follows a non-linear pathway that is rather unusual for secondary metabolic pathways. Regulation of the melanogenic genes involves three pathway-specific transcription factors (TFs) that are clustered with bcpks12 or bcpks13 and other developmental regulators such as light-responsive TFs. Melanogenic genes are dispensable in vegetative mycelia for proper growth and virulence. However, DHN melanin is considered to contribute to the longevity of the reproduction structures. PMID:26514268

  19. Comparison of theory with atomic oxygen 130.4 nm radiation data from the Bow Shock ultraviolet 2 rocket flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Deborah A.; Candler, Graham V.; Collins, Robert J.; Howlett, Carl L.; Espy, Patrick; Whiting, Ellis; Park, Chul

    1993-01-01

    Comparison is made between the results obtained from a state-of-the-art flow and radiative model and bow shock vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) data obtained the recent Bow Shock 2 Flight Experiment. An extensive data set was obtained from onboard rocket measurements at a reentry speed of 5 km/sec between the altitudes of approximately 65-85 km. A description of the NO photoionization cell used, the data, and the interpretation of the data will be presented. The primary purpose of the analyses is to assess the utility of the data and to propose a radiation model appropriate to the flight conditions of Bow Shock 2. Theoretical predictions based on flow modeling discussed in earlier work and a new radiation model are compared with data.

  20. Preliminary report on radioactive conglomerates of Middle Precambrian age in the Sierra Madre and Medicine Bow Mountains of southeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houston, Robert Stroud; Graff, P.J.; Karlstrom, K.E.; Root, Forrest

    1977-01-01

    Middle Precambrian miogeosynclinal metasedimentary rocks o# the Sierra Madre and Medicine Bow Mountains of southeastern Wyoming contain radioactive quartz-pebble conglomerates of possible economic interest. These conglomerates do not contain ore-grade uranium in surface outcrops, but an earlier report on the geochemistry of the Arrastre Lake area of the Medicine Bow Mountains shows that ore-grade deposits may be present in the subsurface. This report describes the stratigraphy of the host metasedimentary rocks and the stratigraphic setting of the radioactive conglomerates in both the Sierra Madre and Medicine Bow Mountains, and compares these rock units with those of the Blind River-Elliot Lake uranium district in Canada. The location of radioactive .conglomerates is given so that further exploration may be undertaken by interested parties.