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Sample records for plagioclase

  1. Elasticity of plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. Michael; Angel, Ross J.; Ross, Nancy L.

    2016-02-01

    Elastic properties are reported for eight plagioclase feldspars that span compositions from albite (NaSi3AlO8) to anorthite (CaSi2Al2O8). Surface acoustic wave velocities measured using Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering and compliance sums from high-pressure X-ray compression studies accurately determine all 21 components of the elasticity tensor for these triclinic minerals. The overall pattern of elasticity and the changes in individual elastic components with composition can be rationalized on the basis of the evolution of crystal structures and chemistry across this solid-solution join. All plagioclase feldspars have high elastic anisotropy; a* (the direction perpendicular to the b and c axes) is the softest direction by a factor of 3 in albite. From albite to anorthite the stiffness of this direction undergoes the greatest change, increasing twofold. Small discontinuities in the elastic components, inferred to occur between the three plagioclase phases with distinct symmetry (C1>¯, I1>¯, and P1>¯), appear consistent with the nature of the underlying conformation of the framework-linked tetrahedra and the associated structural changes. Measured body wave velocities of plagioclase-rich rocks, reported over the last five decades, are consistent with calculated Hill-averaged velocities using the current moduli. This confirms long-standing speculation that previously reported elastic moduli for plagioclase feldspars are systematically in error. The current results provide greater assurance that the seismic structure of the middle and lower crusts can be accurately estimated on the basis of specified mineral modes, chemistry, and fabric.

  2. Plagioclase flotation and lunar crust formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Hays, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    Anorthitic plagioclase floats in liquids parental to the lunar highlands crust. The plagioclase enrichment that is characteristic of lunar highlands rocks can be the result of plagioclase flotation. Such rocks would form a gravitationally stable upper crust on their parental magma.

  3. Melt segregation in plagioclase-poikilitic mesosiderites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewins, R. H.; Harriott, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Budalan and Mincy mesosiderites contain a poikilitic-plagioclase matrix with orthopyroxene chadacrysts and interstitial-subophitic inverted pigeonite. Orthopyroxene chadacrysts in both mesosiderites are uniformly more aluminous than orthopyroxene clasts, suggesting that they were not derived from clasts by metamorphism. Interstitial inverted pigeonite is more ferroan than adjacent orthopyroxene in the matrix, consistent with the crystallization of a melt with the sequence orthopyroxene followed by pigeonite. The magnesium chadcrysts in Mincy could not have formed from a melt in equilibrium with the clasts but could have crystallized from impact melt. The most Mg chadacrysts are enclosed in large reversely zoned plagioclase crystals as a result of the undercooling in melt-lacking plagioclase clasts and associated nuclei. Mincy contains both plagioclase-poor and plagioclase-rich regions, explained by a separation of silicate melt into pools. Reckling Peak A80258, a plagioclase-poikilitic mesosiderite with a very high chadacryst/plagioclase ratio, resembles Mincy material from which melt has been extracted. It is suggested that the origin of the plagioclase-poikilitic mesosiderites is impact melting of a metal-silicate mixture.

  4. Thermal expansion of plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribaudino, M.; Angel, R. J.; Cámara, F.; Nestola, F.; Pasqual, D.; Margiolaki, I.

    2010-12-01

    The volume thermal expansion coefficient and the anisotropy of thermal expansion were determined for nine natural feldspars with compositions, in terms of albite (NaAlSi3O8, Ab) and anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8, An), of Ab100, An27Ab73, An35Ab65, An46Ab54, An60Ab40, An78Ab22, An89Ab11, An96Ab4 and An100 by high resolution powder diffraction with a synchrotron radiation source. Unit-cell parameters were determined from 124 powder patterns of each sample, collected over the temperature range 298-935 K. The volume thermal expansion coefficient of the samples determined by a linear fit of V/ V 0 = α( T - T 0) varies with composition ( X An in mol %) as: αV = 2.90left( 4 right) × 10^{ - 5} - 3.0left( 2 right) × 10^{ - 7} *X_{text{An}} + 1.8left( 2 right) × 10^{ - 9} *X_{text{An}}2 Two empirical models for the non-linear behaviour of volume with temperature give a better fit to the experimental data. The change with composition in the a° parameter of the non-linear Holland-Powell model V/ V 0 = 1 + a°( T - T 0) + 20a° (√ T - √ T 0) is: a^circ = 4.96left( 5 right) × 10^{ - 5} - 4.7left( 2 right) × 10^{ - 7} *X_{text{An}} + 2.2left( 2 right) × 10^{ - 9} *X_{text{An}}2 For the Berman model, V/ V 0 = a 1( T - T 0) + a 2*( T- T 0)2, the parameters change with composition as: begin{aligned}& a1 = 2.44left( {15} right) × 10^{ - 5} - 3.1left( 6 right) × 10^{ - 7} *X_{text{An}}\\& quad + 1.8left( 5 right) × 10^{ - 9} *X_{text{An}}2 \\& a2 = 9left( 1 right) × 10^{ - 9} - 4left( 2 right) × 10^{ - 11} *X_{text{An}} \\ The thermal expansion of all plagioclases is very anisotropic, with more than 70% of the volume expansion being accommodated by a direction fairly close to the (100) plane normal, whereas perpendicular directions exhibit smaller, and in some cases slightly negative or zero, thermal expansion.

  5. Plagioclase mineralogy of olivine alkaline basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    A geological and mineralogical study of the Potrillo volcanics is reported. The investigation consisted first of field mapping to establish and identify the different rock types and volcanic features in order to determine the geological history. Next, samples were collected and analyzed petrographically to determine suitable rocks from the various stratigraphic units for study of plagioclase. Samples selected for further study were crushed and the plagioclase extracted for the determination of composition and structural state. These results were then related to the petrology and crystallization of the basalt.

  6. Effects of shock pressures on calcic plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, R. V.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Calcic plagioclase single crystals were subjected to shock loading up to a pressure of 496 kbar; optical and electron microscope studies were conducted to investigate the shock-induced effects on the mineral, which is found in terrestrial and lunar rocks and in meteorites. It was observed that up to 287 kbar pressure, the recovered samples are essentially crystalline, while samples subjected to pressures between 300 and 400 kbar are almost 100% diaplectic glasses, suggesting shock transformation in the solid state. Samples shock-loaded to pressures greater than 400 kbar yielded glasses with refractive indices similar to those of thermally fused glass. It is concluded that planar features, absent in all the specimens, may not be definitive shock indicators, but may be linked to local heterogeneous dynamic stresses experienced by plagioclase grains within shocked rocks.

  7. Thermochemistry of the high structural state plagioclases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, R. C.; Charlu, T. V.; Kleppa, O. J.

    1980-07-01

    The enthalpies of solution of a suite of 19 high-structural state synthetic plagioclases were measured in a Pb 2B 2O 5 melt at 970 K. The samples were crystallized from analyzed glasses at 1200°C and 20 kbar pressure in a piston-cylinder apparatus. A number of runs were also made on Amelia albite and Amelia albite synthetically disordered at 1050-1080°C and one bar for one month and at 1200°C and 20 kbar for 10 hr. The component oxides of anorthite, CaO, Al 2O 3 and SiO 2, were remeasured. The ΔH of disorder of albite inferred in the present study from albite crystallized from glass is 3.23 kcal, which agrees with the 3.4 found by HOLM and KLEPPA (1968). It is not certain whether this value includes the ΔH of a reversible displacive transition to monoclinic symmetry, as suggested by HELGESONet al. (1978) for the Holm-Kleppa results. The enthalpy of solution value for albite accepted for the solid solution series is based on the heat-treated Amelia albite and is 2.86 kcal less than for untreated Amelia albite. The enthalpy of formation from the oxides at 970 K of synthetic anorthite is -24.06 ± 0.31 kcal, significantly higher than the -23.16 kcal found by CHARLUet al. (1978), and in good agreement with the value of -23.89 ± 0.82 given by ROBIEet al. (1979), based on acid calorimetry. The excess enthalpy of mixing in high plagioclase can be represented by the expression, valid at 970 K: ΔHex(±0.16 kcal) = 6.7461 XabX2An + 2.0247 XAnX2Ab where XAb and XAn are, respectively, the mole fractions of NaAlSi 3O 8 and CaAl 2Si 2O 8. This ΔH ex, together with the mixing entropy of KERRICK and DARKEN'S (1975) Al-avoidance model, reproduces almost perfectly the free energy of mixing found by ORVILLE (1972) in aqueous cation-exchange experiments at 700°C. It is likely that Al-avoidance is the significant stabilizing factor in the high plagioclase series, at least for XAn≥ 0.3. At high temperatures the plagioclases have nearly the free energies of ideal one

  8. Uncommon behavior of plagioclase and the ancient lunar crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekvasil, Hanna; Lindsley, Donald H.; DiFrancesco, Nicholas; Catalano, Tristan; Coraor, Aron E.; Charlier, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Calcic plagioclase, the dominant mineral of the anorthositic lunar crust, fails to show the Na enrichment during cooling that is typical of magmatic plagioclase. We show that this enigmatic behavior may arise during fractionation of highly calcic plagioclase at depths greater than ~70 km in the lunar magma ocean because of the development of a negative azeotropic configuration at high anorthite contents that impedes and may even reverse the standard plagioclase albite enrichment with dropping temperature. This result supports a high-pressure origin of this plagioclase consistent with the lunar magma ocean model. It also provides a new mechanism for forming lunar lithologies with sodic plagioclase from a highly Na-depleted Moon through gravitational settling of spinel and refines the compositional characteristics of the late stage residual liquids of the lunar magma ocean.

  9. Europium anomaly in plagioclase feldspar: experimental results and semiquantitative model.

    PubMed

    Weill, D F; Drake, M J

    1973-06-01

    The partition of europium between plagioclase feldspar and magmatic liquid is considered in terms of the distribution coefficients for divalent and trivalent europium. A model equation is derived giving the europium anomaly in plagioclase as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity. The model explains europium anomalies in plagioclase synthesized under controlled laboratory conditions as well as the variations of the anomaly observed in natural terrestrial and extraterrestrial igneous rocks. PMID:17806582

  10. Petrogenesis of calcic plagioclase megacrysts in Archean rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, W. C.; Morrison, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Anorthositic complexes with large equidimensional plagioclase grains of highly calcic composition occur in nearly all Archean cratons. Similar plagioclase occur as megacrysts in many Archean sills, dikes, and volcanic flows. In the Canadian Shield these units occur throughout the Archean portions of the entire shield and are particularly common as dikes over an area of a few 100,000 sq km in Ontario and Manitoba during a period of at least 100 m.y. in many different rock types and metamorphic grades. The plagioclase generally occurs in three modes: as inclusions in mafic intrusions at various stages of fractionation, as crystal segregations in anorthosite complexes, or as megacrysts in fractionated sills, dikes, and flows. Most occurrences suggest that the plagioclase was formed elsewhere before being transported to its present location. The evidence seems to be quite clear that occurrences of these types of calcic plagioclase require: (1) ponding of a relatively undifferentiated Archean tholeiitic melt at some depth; (2) isothermal crystallization of large, equidimensional homogeneous plagioclase crystals; (3) separation of the plagioclase crystals from any other crystalline phases; (4) further fractionation of melt; (5)transport of various combinations of individual plagioclase crystals and clusters of crystals by variously fractionated melts; and (6) emplacement as various types of igneous intrusions or flows.

  11. Electron microprobe study of lunar and planetary zoned plagioclase feldspars: An analytical and experimental study of zoning in plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. K.; Lofgren, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    Natural and experimentally grown zoned plagioclase feldspars were examined by electron microprobe. The analyses revealed discontinuous, sector, and oscillary chemical zoning superimposed on continuous normal or reverse zoning trends. Postulated mechanisms for the origin of zoning are based on either physical changes external to the magma (P, T, H2O saturation) or kinetic changes internal to the magma (diffusion, supersaturation, growth rate). Comparison of microprobe data on natural zoned plagioclase with zoned plagioclase grown in controlled experiments show that it may be possible to distinguish zonal development resulting from physio-chemical changes to the bulk magma from local kinetic control on the growth of individual crystals.

  12. Plagioclase-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites - Liquid condensates?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wark, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics and formation of coarse-grained, plagioclase-rich inclusions are investigated. The textures, mineralogical compositions, and initial Al-26/Al-27 ratios for the plagioclase-rich inclusions are described. It is observed that plagioclase-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites are either Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) composed of 30-60 vol pct anorthite, and less than 35 vol pct Ti-Al-pyroxene and melilite, or CA chondrites composed of plagioclase, pyroxene, olivine, spinel, and melilite. It is observed that CA chondrules are chemically and mineralogically the most similar components shared by carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites. The textural changes observed in the inclusions are examined. The data reveal that the CAIs have three textural groups: coarse anorthite laths, equigranular anorthite and Ti-Al-pyroxene, and lacy Ti-Al-pyroxene and fine-grained anorthite.

  13. Plagioclase-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites - Liquid condensates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, D. A.

    1987-02-01

    The characteristics and formation of coarse-grained, plagioclase-rich inclusions are investigated. The textures, mineralogical compositions, and initial Al-26/Al-27 ratios for the plagioclase-rich inclusions are described. It is observed that plagioclase-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites are either Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) composed of 30-60 vol pct anorthite, and less than 35 vol pct Ti-Al-pyroxene and melilite, or CA chondrites composed of plagioclase, pyroxene, olivine, spinel, and melilite. It is observed that CA chondrules are chemically and mineralogically the most similar components shared by carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites. The textural changes observed in the inclusions are examined. The data reveal that the CAIs have three textural groups: coarse anorthite laths, equigranular anorthite and Ti-Al-pyroxene, and lacy Ti-Al-pyroxene and fine-grained anorthite.

  14. Plagioclase-Hosted Magnetite Inclusions From the Bushveld Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Scott, G. R.; Renne, P. R.; Wenk, H.

    2004-12-01

    Gabbros from the Main Zone of the 2.064 Ga Bushveld Complex have long been known to possess unusually stable magnetizations due to the presence of high coercivity, exsolved magnetite inclusions in plagioclase and clinopyroxene. The paleomagnetic pole for these rocks has been used to anchor apparent polar wander paths for the Kaapval craton during the Early-Mid Proterozoic. To better understand the rock magnetic properties of silicate-hosted magnetite inclusions, oriented paleomagnetic samples of gabbro were collected from quarries near Belfast and Rustenberg, South Africa, sampling the eastern and western limbs of the Complex, respectively. Plagioclase composition at both sites ranges from An55 (rims) to An65 (cores) based on optical and electron microprobe data. Four kinds of inclusions are present within the plagioclase: elongate magnetite needles, nanometer-scale magnetite particles (responsible for the "cloudy" appearance of some crystals), translucent brown hematite/ilmenite platelets, and colorless euhedral inclusions of pyroxene and/or feldspar. Magnetite inclusions are most abundant at the cores of the plagioclase crystals. Orientations of the needles and the platelets are crystallographically controlled by the silicate host. Although the elongation direction of the magnetite inclusions can occur in any of five possible orientations, only two or three of these directions dominates each plagioclase crystal. Alternating field demagnetization of bulk samples (NRM = 1.5 x 101 A m-1) shows univectorial remanence with average median destructive fields (MDF) of 115 mT (Belfast) and 90 mT (Rustenberg). AF demagnetization of single plagioclase crystals (NRM = 100 A m-1) also shows single component remanence with average MDFs >150 mT. The NRM coercivity spectra of single plagioclase crystals are indistinguishable from that of the bulk samples. When normalized to their abundance in bulk samples the magnetite-bearing plagioclase fully accounts for the NRM of Bushveld

  15. Linking Plagioclase Zoning Patterns to Active Magma Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Nicolaysen, K. P.; Neill, O. K.; Shcherbakov, V.; Plechov, P.; Eichelberger, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Plagioclase, one of the most common and abundant mineral phases in volcanic products, will vary in composition in response to changes in temperature, pressure, composition of the ambient silicate melt, and melt H2O concentration. Changes in these parameters may cause dissolution or growth of plagioclase crystals, forming characteristic textural and compositional variations (zoning patterns), the complete core-to-rim sequence of which describes events experienced by an individual crystal from its nucleation to the last moments of its growth. Plagioclase crystals in a typical volcanic rock may look drastically dissimilar despite their spatial proximity and the fact that they have erupted together. Although they shared last moments of their growth during magma ascent and eruption, their prior experiences could be very different, as plagioclase crystals often come from different domains of the same magma system. Distinguishing similar zoning patterns, correlating them across the entire population of plagioclase crystals, and linking these patterns to specific perturbations in the magmatic system may provide additional perspective on the variety, extent, and timing of magma processes at active volcanic systems. Examples of magma processes, which may be distinguished based on plagioclase zoning patterns, include (1) cooling due to heat loss, (2) heating and/or pressure build up due to an input of new magmatic material, (3) pressure drop in response to magma system depressurization, and (4) crystal transfer between different magma domains/bodies. This review will include contrasting examples of zoning patters from recent eruptions of Karymsky, Bezymianny, and Tolbachik Volcanoes in Kamchatka, Augustine and Cleveland Volcanoes in Alaska, as well as from the drilling into an active magma body at Krafla, Iceland.

  16. The origin of olivine-rich troctolites/plagioclase-dunites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garapic, G.; Faul, U.; Kruckenberg, S. C.; Wiejaczka, J.; Newton, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Olivine-rich troctolites or plagioclase dunites are a type of rock commonly found in oceanic crust and peridotite massifs that does not fit into a IUGS classification. Part of the reason is that their origin is poorly constrained, in particular whether these rocks are cumulates or residual mantle rocks. To avoid implications for origin or process Blackman et al. 2006 defined as olivine-rich troctolites rocks that contain > 70% olivine,with plagioclase, cpx and spinel. We examined this type of rock in Krivaja peridotite massif in Bosnia-Herzegovina where it occurs as massive outcrops with an area of several tens of square kilometres. The plagioclase dunites are underlain by peridotites that contain plagioclase patches indicative of melt migration. These peridotites are progressively depleted of pyroxene and cross-cut by gabbro veins. The plagioclase dunites have Mg# predominantly from 89 - 90 and Ni contents from 2500 - 3500 ppm, similar to the peridotites. EBSD mapping of whole thin sections shows orientation distribution functions (odf) that are unlike any of the fabric types observed in naturally or experimentally deformed rocks with a strong maximum in (001) near the foliation plane (although this plane is poorly defined) and weak girdles of the other two axes perpendicular to it. For comparison, we also mapped known cumulates from the Rum and Stillwater layered intrusions with somewhat lower Mg# of 84 - 86. The odf of these samples show a strong maximum of (010) perpendicular to the foliation plane and weak girdles of the other two axes in the plane. This fabric type has been explained by crystal settling and compaction in a magma chamber. Together these observations show that the plagioclase dunites from Krivaja, as well as rocks with similar characteristics e.g. from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Drouin et al. 2010) and Italy (Renna and Tribuzio, 2011) are not cumulates but are of mantle origin. An important characteristic of the plagioclase dunites is that the

  17. Synthesis for Lunar Simulants: Glass, Agglutinate, Plagioclase, Breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Michael; Wilson, Stephen A.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Stoeser, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The video describes a process for making glass for lunar regolith simulants that was developed from a patented glass-producing technology. Glass composition can be matched to simulant design and specification. Production of glass, pseudo agglutinates, plagioclase, and breccias is demonstrated. The system is capable of producing hundreds of kilograms of high quality glass and simulants per day.

  18. Porphyry copper enrichment linked to excess aluminium in plagioclase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, B. J.; Herrington, R. J.; Morris, A.

    2016-03-01

    Porphyry copper deposits provide around 75%, 50% and 20% of world copper, molybdenum and gold, respectively. The deposits are mainly centred on calc-alkaline porphyry magmatic systems in subduction zone settings. Although calc-alkaline magmas are relatively common, large porphyry copper deposits are extremely rare and increasingly difficult to discover. Here, we compile existing geochemical data for magmatic plagioclase, a dominant mineral in calc-alkaline rocks, from fertile (porphyry-associated) and barren magmatic systems worldwide, barren examples having no associated porphyry deposit. We show that plagioclase from fertile systems is distinct in containing `excess’ aluminium. This signature is clearly demonstrated in a case study carried out on plagioclase from the fertile La Paloma and Los Sulfatos copper porphyry systems in Chile. Further, the presence of concentric zones of high excess aluminium suggests its incorporation as a result of magmatic processes. As excess aluminium has been linked to high melt water contents, the concentric zones may record injections of hydrous fluid or fluid-rich melts into the sub-porphyry magma chamber. We propose that excess aluminium may exclude copper from plagioclase, so enriching the remaining melts. Furthermore, this chemical signature can be used as an exploration indicator for copper porphyry deposits.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Plagioclase Growth During Magma Storage and Ascent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, O. E.; Gorokhova, N. V.; Plechov, P.

    2012-12-01

    A mathematical model of plagioclase growth from a magmatic melt is developed. Plagioclase is one of the main rock-forming minerals. Plagioclase is composed of molecules of two types: anorthite and albite. Crystallization occurs as a result of component (albite and anorthite) diffusion to the boundary of the growing crystal and opposite diffusion of residual melt components. The model is based on multicomponent diffusion equations with the real dependencies between crystal and melt compositions, pressure and temperature. Mass conservation is applied as a boundary condition on a crystal-melt interface. Crystal growth rate depends on local magma undercooling in the vicinity of the crystal. We assume that the growth is in 1D and that the crystal is located in a cell with symmetry (no mass flux) conditions on the cell boundaries. Diffusion of components within the crystal is negligibly slow. Based on this model variation of plagioclase composition with respect of monotonic cooling or pressure drop is studied. It is shown that due to interplay between diffusion of melt components to crystal-melt interface and crystal growth rate crystal composition can vary in a non-monotonic way in response to linear decrease in temperature. A condition of presence of plagioclase zonation is obtained as a result of parametric studies. A growth of rims on plagioclase crystals related to magma ascent during dome building eruptions on Bezymianny volcano (Kamchatka) is simulated. Bezymianny Volcano supplies material to the Earth surface about every half a year. Eruptions of 2000, 2006 and 2007 were selected to determine the magma ascent conditions as the most typical for the last activity cycle. The role of initial conditions, crystal growth rate, the ratio between anorthite and albite diffusion rates and ascent conditions on the rim composition is investigated. The ascent conditions of magma for Bezymianny Volcano eruptions were reconstructed. Simulations suggest ascent from a pressure of

  20. A newly calibrated plagioclase-liquid hygrometer for rhyolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, R. A.; Waters, L.

    2012-12-01

    Rhyolite is the most differentiated silicate magma type on Earth and makes up some of the largest explosive eruptions (100-1000's km3), including those at Yellowstone and Long Valley calderas. Understanding the origin and evolution of large-volume rhyolitic magmatic systems is of considerable interest because their formation must fundamentally re-constitute and differentiate continental crust. The mineral phases in rhyolites often provide a rich opportunity to examine pre-eruptive temperatures, oxidation states, and melt water concentrations, as well as time scales for melt accumulation in the upper crust. Given the wealth of information that can be derived from various mineral phases in rhyolites, it is perhaps surprising that so few phase-equilibrium experiments exist for natural high-silica rhyolite melt compositions. The limitation in the experimental data set for rhyolites was a problem encountered by Lange et al. (2009) during their calibration of the plagioclase-liquid hygrometer. Available high-quality experiments (e.g., those with glass totals, including H2O, ≤ 97%) were restricted to those with plagioclase ≥ An37. Results from the experimental study of Couch et al. (2003) on a low-SiO2 rhyolite (71.4 wt%) were included in the Lange et al. (2009) calibration, whereas experiments on a rhyolite (75.2 wt% SiO2) from a more recent study (Tomiya et al., 2010) were published afterwards. Therefore, application of the 2009 plagioclase-liquid hygrometer to rhyolites with sodic plagioclase (plagioclase-liquid hygrometer well calibrated for rhyolites. Moreover, at fluid-saturated, shallow crustal conditions (100-250 MPa) plagioclase often saturates at higher pressures than quartz in many rhyolites, and therefore the

  1. Skaergaard Liquidus Temperatures and the Frailty of Plagioclase Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Because of its refractory nature and low diffusivity, plagioclase is the only mineral likely to record liquidus temperatures of mafic magmas. As such, it has become a talisman of such thermometry, but with limited success. Precise thermal information can perhaps best be obtained experimentally by finding the unique cotectic assemblage of all relevant mineral compositions with melt at relevant pressure. By repeating such experiments at more evolved compositions a relevant plagioclase thermometric history should be obtained. This principle of cotectic calibration was that used as a starting point by Morse (2008). By contrast, unfiltered literature results of experimental plagioclase - liquid determinations were used by Thy et al. (2009), with a T-X regression through all the data including evolved compositions, to describe the Skaergaard liquidus. Implicit in this exercise was the hypothesis that all the data represented stable equilibria and that low-melting components at static melting behaved the same as if in fractional crystallization. Tests for stable equilibrium in such a database [including that of Putirka (2005) and many others as e.g. in LEPR (lepr.ofm-research.org)] can usefully start with an examination of plagioclase loop width versus temperature or plagioclase composition. The loop width of a binary solution against either T or X is described by a slightly skewed parabola anchored at zero at both ends and rising to a broad maximum near An60 in the case of plagioclase. The peak width in XAn (Sol - Liq) has a value of 0.32 at 1 atm in Di-An-Ab and 0.24 at An-57 in a MORB fractional crystallization exercise. Values falling outside this range downward are likely to reflect metastable compositions. All of the 54 data points in one source used by Thy et al. (2009) fall below this range and are scattered to as low as 0.04. Such a shotgun scatter defines metastability and the loss of calibration. Moderate scatter at much higher values of loop width in the LEPR

  2. Plagioclase dissolution during CO₂-SO₂ cosequestration: effects of sulfate.

    PubMed

    Min, Yujia; Kubicki, James D; Jun, Young-Shin

    2015-02-01

    Geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) is one of the most promising methods to mitigate the adverse impacts of global climate change. The performance of GCS can be affected by mineral dissolution and precipitation induced by injected CO2. Cosequestration with acidic gas such as SO2 can reduce the high cost of GCS, but it will increase the sulfate's concentration in GCS sites, where sulfate can potentially affect plagioclase dissolution/precipitation. This work investigated the effects of 0.05 M sulfate on plagioclase (anorthite) dissolution and subsequent mineral precipitation at 90 °C, 100 atm CO2, and 1 M NaCl, conditions relevant to GCS sites. The adsorption of sulfate on anorthite, a Ca-rich plagioclase, was examined using attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and then simulated using density functional theory calculations. We found that the dissolution rate of anorthite was enhanced by a factor of 1.36 by the formation of inner-sphere monodentate complexes between sulfate and the aluminum sites on anorthite surfaces. However, this effect was almost completely suppressed in the presence of 0.01 M oxalate, an organic ligand that can exist in GCS sites. Interestingly, sulfate also inhibited the formation of secondary mineral precipitation through the formation of aluminum-sulfate complexes in the aqueous phase. This work, for the first time, reports the surface complexation between sulfate and plagioclase that can occur in GCS sites. The results provide new insights for obtaining scientific guidelines for the proper amount of SO2 coinjection and finally for evaluating the economic efficiency and environmental safety of GCS operations. PMID:25549263

  3. Grain-Recycling Zoning of Plagioclase and Metamorphic Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, M. A.; Wheeler, J.

    2008-12-01

    Quartzo-feldspathic gneisses make up much of the continental crust often having enjoyed a complex thermal history. Determining peak metamorphic conditions using conventional equilibrium thermodynamics is difficult because there are too many degrees of freedom. Zoned minerals are problematic, because of uncertainties in the exact equilibrium assemblage at any particular time, but provide a time-dependent measure of changes in equilibrium conditions. Zoning can arise due to diffusion of atoms into a homogeneous lattice from grain boundarys or through mineral growth under changing pressure, temperature or bulk rock composition. Conventional growth zoning considers a porphyroblast (commonly garnet) growing in an effectively homogeneous matrix with the growth rate controlled by reactions that produce new porphyroblast material. However, simulations of zoning developed by grain growth in a monophase domains of more complex rocks show boundary migration rates control the zoning geometry as shrinking grains are cannibalised by growing grains. This new grain-recycling zoning develops because chemical reactions change the composition of the material that is swept by the grain boundary without changing the mineral. A model of this process has been created using the Gibbs free energy minimisation software Theriak-Domino controlled by our custom written Matlab control program. This program assumes an initially homogeneous composition of equigranular plagioclase then uses the experimentally determined normal growth law for plagioclase to calculate the grain-size increase for a given time-step thus giving the amount of material swept. Assuming this is all available for reaction at the same time, the rest of the plagioclase is removed from the bulk composition, the equilibrium plagioclase composition calculated, and added to the growing grain. This fractionation alters the range of plagioclase compositions available over a given temperature range, changing PT estimates obtained

  4. A New Thermodynamic Model for the Plagioclase-Liquid Hygrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    A new thermodynamic model for the plagioclase-liquid hygrometer is presented, which is based on the equilibrium exchange of the An (CaAl2Si2O8) and Ab (NaAlSi3O8) components between plagioclase solid solution and magmatic liquid solution. The reaction is: CaAl2Si2O8 (plag) + NaAlSi3O8 (liq) = CaAl2Si2O8 (liq) + NaAlSi3O8 (plag). The equilibrium for this reaction as a function of temperature, pressure, and composition is calculated from: DeltaG(T,P)/RT = 0 = DeltaH°(T)/RT - DeltaS°(T)/R + lnK + intDeltaV°(P)/RT, where R is the universal gas constant and K is the equilibrium constant. In this equation, DeltaH°(T) and DeltaS°(T) are equal to the difference between the enthalpy and entropy of fusion of pure An and pure Ab, respectively, as a function of temperature. These data are obtained from the drop calorimetric experiments of Stebbins et al. (1983) and Richet and Bottinga (1984). Similarly, DeltaV°T(P) is the difference between the volume of fusion of pure An and that of pure Ab at temperature T as a function of pressure. The volumetric data for the crystalline phases are taken from Wruck et al. (1991), Berman (1988), Fei (1995), Downs et al. (1993), and Angel (2004). The volumetric data for the liquid phase are taken from Lange (1997), Kress et al. (1988) and Ai and Lange (2005). The THERMOCALC model of Powell et al. (1998) is used to calculate the activity- composition relation for crystalline plagioclase. For the liquid components, the ideal contribution to their activity terms is taken as the mole fraction of CaO for the An component and NaO0.5 for the Ab component. The ln ratio of their activity coefficient terms is equated to: aXH2O + b + cXSiO2, where a, b, and c are parameters fitted from regression against hydrous liquid-plagioclase equilibria. The fact that XH2O strongly affects the liquid activity coefficient terms for albite and anorthite forms the basis of the plagioclase hygrometer. The thermodynamic model outlined above was calibrated against

  5. Spectral properties of plagioclase and pyroxene mixtures and the interpretation of lunar soil spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crown, David A.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1987-01-01

    Pyroxene and plagioclase mixtures' spectral characteristics are investigated with a view to particle size and mineral proportion effects in the cases of variously proportioned labradorite/enstatite compositional mixtures. The amount of plagioclase that will allow its band to be observed in discrete absorption is particle size-dependent; plagioclase is detectable in the flattening of the pyroxene reflectance peak that lies between the 0.9 and 1.9 micron absorption bands, if sufficient plagioclase is present. Attention is given to the combined effects of mineral proportions and particle size for plagioclase/pyroxene mixtures in the case of analogs of mature and immature lunar highland soils.

  6. Weathering of plagioclase across variable flow and solute transport regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Fernando A. L.; Van der Weijden, Cornelis H.

    2012-02-01

    SummaryThe study area is situated in a fault zone with fractured granites and metasediments. In a conceptual model, infiltrating water first passes the bedrock cover of soil and saprolite and then partly enters the fractures. Weathering reactions of minerals occur in small pores and fissures in the bedrock cover zone to continue in the larger fractures. Pumping tests were carried out in a number of boreholes to measure the drawdown as a function of pumping time. From the results, values of transmissivity ( T) could be derived. In combination with the storage coefficient ( S) for similar fault zones, the hydraulic diffusivity ( D = T/ S) could be computed. Water samples, collected from the boreholes, represent fluid packets with a history of weathering reactions in the bedrock cover and in the larger fractures. The major element composition of these samples was used by means of the SiB mass balance algorithm ( Pacheco and Van der Weijden, 1996) to calculate the moles L -1 of dissolved plagioclase (oligoclase with An ≈ 0.20) and the moles L -1 of secondary phases (gibbsite, halloysite, smectite) precipitated along the flow paths of the samples. These results were then used to calculate the net dissolved silica concentrations ( [HSiO40]) related to dissolution of plagioclase followed by precipitation of each of the secondary phases. An interpretation of a plot of each of these [HSiO40] 's versusD is that at D < 0.7 m 2 s -1, dissolution of plagioclase is followed by precipitation of halloysite in the large fractures of the fault zone (open system), whereas at D ⩾ 0.7 m 2 s -1 precipitation of both halloysite and smectite occurs in the rock matrix with small fissures and pores (semi-open system). Before being pumped, the percolating fluids travelled 0.01-13.7 years. During these periods, plagioclase weathered at rates ( W Pl) of 10 -(12.9±1.1) moles m -2 s -1, which are approximately 2.2 orders of magnitude higher than solid-state weathering rates reported in

  7. Plagioclase twin laws in lunar highland rocks - Possible petrogenetic significance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowty, E.; Keil, K.; Prinz, M.

    1974-01-01

    Plagioclases in different types of lunar highland rocks (all highly feldspathic) are twinned according to different laws and in different styles. Carlsbad and Carlsbad-albite twins, presumed to be growth twins, occur mainly in rocks which show igneous texture, and which have not been severely brecciated. These two twin laws appear to be absent from cataclastic rocks, including cataclastic anorthosite, possibly because the original twins were preferentially broken up in cataclasis (the composition plane being a plane of weakness). Pericline and lamellar albite twins, presumed to be deformation twins (except for some albite growth twins) occur in all types of rocks, and obvious deformation features, such as bending of lamellae, are well shown in many cataclastic rocks. Surprisingly, some Carlsbad and Carlsbad-albite twins are found in rocks with granoblastic texture, which presumably recrystallized in the solid state.

  8. Origin of plagioclase-olivine inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y. J.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1991-02-01

    The origin of plagioclase-olivine inclusions (POIs) from three CV chondrites and one ungrouped chondrite was investigated by examining the chemical, mineralogical, and isotopic characteristics of a group of POIs from these chondrites. Results of these analyses demonstrate that the mixing and the partial melting processes in these inclusions were superimposed on more ancient isotopically heterogeneous material. A comparison of the essential characteristics of POIs and CAIs suggests that the major processes leading to the formation of POIs (such as condensation, dust/gas fractionation, aggregation of chemically and isotopically disparate materials, and partial melting) are common to most CAIs and chondrules. A scenario for the origin of POIs is proposed, showing that the homogeneity of the final assemblage (whether a POI, a CAI, or a chondrite) is primarily a reflection of the thermal history rather than the nature of precursor materials.

  9. The Petrogenetic significance of Plagioclase megacrysts in Archean rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. A.; Phinney, W. C.; Maczuga, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    The petrogenetic significance of plagioclase megacryst-bearing Archean rocks was considered. It was suggested that these developed in mid-to upper-crustal magma chambers that were repeatedly replenished. Crystallization of megacrysts from a primitive liquid that evolves to an Fe-rich tholeiite (with LREE enrichment) is nearly isothermal and is an equilibrium process. Cumulates probably form near the margins of the chambers and liquids with megacrysts are periodically extracted and can appear as volcanics. Some flows and intrusives are found in arc-like settings in greenstone belts. Megacrystic dikes represent large volumes of melt and dike swarms such as the Metachawan swarm of Ontario suggest multiple sources of similar compositions. A complex series of melt ponding and migration are probable and involve large amounts of liquid.

  10. Visible/Near-Infrared Spectra of Experimentally Shocked Plagioclase Feldspars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Minerals subjected to high shock pressures exhibit structural changes with increasing pressure (e.g., fractures, deformations, formation of diaplectic glass, and complete melting [1-6]). Petrologic and thermal infrared spectroscopic studies have shown that diaplectic glass (maskelynite) formation in feldspars occurs between 25-45 GPa, while significant melting occurs above 45 GPa [7- 12]. Past studies of visible/near-infrared spectra of shocked plagioclase feldspars demonstrated few variations in spectral features with pressure except for a decrease in the absorption feature near 1250 nm and an overall decrease in albedo [13-17]. We report new visible/near-infrared spectra of albite- and anorthiterich rocks experimentally shocked from 17-56 GPa.

  11. Thermal infrared spectroscopy and modeling of experimentally shocked plagioclase feldspars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Horz, F.; Staid, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal infrared emission and reflectance spectra (250-1400 cm-1; ???7???40 ??m) of experimentally shocked albite- and anorthite-rich rocks (17-56 GPa) demonstrate that plagioclase feldspars exhibit characteristic degradations in spectral features with increasing pressure. New measurements of albite (Ab98) presented here display major spectral absorptions between 1000-1250 cm-1 (8-10 ??m) (due to Si-O antisymmetric stretch motions of the silica tetrahedra) and weaker absorptions between 350-700 cm-1 (14-29 ??m) (due to Si-O-Si octahedral bending vibrations). Many of these features persist to higher pressures compared to similar features in measurements of shocked anorthite, consistent with previous thermal infrared absorption studies of shocked feldspars. A transparency feature at 855 cm-1 (11.7 ??m) observed in powdered albite spectra also degrades with increasing pressure, similar to the 830 cm-1 (12.0 ??m) transparency feature in spectra of powders of shocked anorthite. Linear deconvolution models demonstrate that combinations of common mineral and glass spectra can replicate the spectra of shocked anorthite relatively well until shock pressures of 20-25 GPa, above which model errors increase substantially, coincident with the onset of diaplectic glass formation. Albite deconvolutions exhibit higher errors overall but do not change significantly with pressure, likely because certain clay minerals selected by the model exhibit absorption features similar to those in highly shocked albite. The implication for deconvolution of thermal infrared spectra of planetary surfaces (or laboratory spectra of samples) is that the use of highly shocked anorthite spectra in end-member libraries could be helpful in identifying highly shocked calcic plagioclase feldspars.

  12. Infrared reflectance spectra (2.2-15 microns) of plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Douglas B.; Salisbury, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory results show that (1) the Christiansen frequency (CF) feature in mid-infrared reflectance spectra of powders can be used to accurately distinguish plagioclase composition, and (2) the wavelength position of the CF is not affected by vitrification of the plagioclase. Although the CF position does not distinguish glass from crystalline forms of plagioclase, other features (combination-tone, overtone, restrahlen bands) in the mid-IR spectra of plagioclase can be used for that purpose. These results have important implications for application of thermal emission spectroscopy to mapping the surface composition of regolith-covered planetary bodies like the moon, Mars, and asteroids.

  13. Diversity in the Visible-NIR Absorption Band Characteristics of Lunar and Asteroidal Plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiroi, T.; Kaiden, H.; Misawa, K.; Kojima, H.; Uemoto, K.; Ohtake, M.; Arai, T.; Sasaki, S.; Takeda, H.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.

    2012-01-01

    Studying the visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectral properties of plagioclase has been challenging because of the difficulty in obtaining good plagioclase separates from pristine planetary materials such as meteorites and returned lunar samples. After an early study indicated that the 1.25 m band position of plagioclase spectrum might be correlated with the molar percentage of anorthite (An#) [1], there have been few studies which dealt with the band center behavior. In this study, the VNIR absorption band parameters of plagioclase samples have been derived using the modified Gaussian model (MGM) [2] following a pioneering study by [3].

  14. Ion microprobe mass analysis of plagioclase from 'non-mare' lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C., Jr.; Anderson, D. H.; Bradley, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    The ion microprobe was used to measure the composition and distribution of trace elements in lunar plagioclase, and these analyses are used as criteria in determining the possible origins of some nonmare lunar samples. The Apollo 16 samples with metaclastic texture and high-bulk trace-element contents contain plagioclase clasts with extremely low trace-element contents. These plagioclase inclusions represent unequilibrated relicts of anorthositic, noritic, or troctolitic rocks that have been intermixed as a rock flour into the KREEP-rich matrix of these samples. All of the plagioclase-rich inclusions which were analyzed in the KREEP-rich Apollo 14 breccias were found to be rich in trace elements. This does not seem to be consistent with the interpretation that the Apollo 14 samples represent a pre-Imbrium regolith, because such an ancient regolith should have contained many plagioclase clasts with low trace-element contents more typical of plagioclase from the pre-Imbrium crust. Ion-microprobe analyses for Ba and Sr in large plagioclase phenocrysts in 14310 and 68415 are consistent with the bulk compositions of these rocks and with the known distribution coefficients for these elements. The distribution coefficient for Li (basaltic liquid/plagioclase) was measured to be about 2.

  15. The origin of amorphous rims on lunar plagioclase grains: Solar wind damage or vapor condensates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Mckay, David S.

    1991-01-01

    A distinctive feature of micron sized plagioclase grains from mature lunar soils is a thin (20 to 100 nm) amorphous rim surrounding the grains. These rims were originally described from high voltage electron microscope observations of lunar plagioclase grains by Dran et al., who observed rims up to 100 nm thick on plagioclase grains from Apollo 11 and 12 soils. These rims are believed to be the product of solar wind damage. The amorphous rims were studied on micron sized plagioclase grains from a mature Apollo 16 soil using a JEOL 200FX transmission electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive x ray spectrometer. It was found that the amorphous rims are compositionally distinct from the interior plagioclase and it is proposed that a major component of vapor condensates is present in the rims.

  16. Magmatic interactions as recorded in plagioclase phenocrysts of Chaos Crags, Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepley, F. J., III; Davidson, J.P.; Clynne, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    The silicic lava domes of Chaos Crags in Lassen Volcanic National Park contain a suite of variably quenched, hybrid basaltic andesite magmatic inclusions. The inclusions represent thorough mixing between rhyodacite and basalt recharge liquids accompanied by some mechanical disaggregation of the inclusions resulting in crystals mixing into the rhyodacite host preserved by quenching on dome emplacement. 87Sr/86Sr ratios (~0.7037-0.7038) of the inclusions are distinctly lower than those of the host rhyodacite (~0.704-0.7041), which are used to fingerprint the origin of mineral components and to monitor the mixing and mingling process. Chemical, isotopic, and textural characteristics indicate that the inclusions are hybrid magmas formed from the mixing and undercooling of recharge basaltic magma with rhyodacitic magma. All the host magma phenocrysts (biotite, plagioclase, hornblende and quartz crystals) also occur in the inclusions, where they are rimmed by reaction products. Compositional and strontium isotopic data from cores of unresorbed plagioclase crystals in the host rhyodacite, partially resorbed plagioclase crystals enclosed within basaltic andesite inclusions, and partially resorbed plagioclase crystals in the rhyodacitic host are all similar. Rim 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the partially resorbed plagioclase crystals in both inclusions and host are lower and close to those of the whole-rock hybrid basaltic andesite values. This observation indicates that some crystals originally crystallized in the silicic host, were partially resorbed and subsequently overgrown in the hybrid basaltic andesite magma, and then some of these partially resorbed plagioclase crystals were recycled back into the host rhyodacite. Textural evidence, in the form of sieve zones and major dissolution boundaries of the resorbed plagioclase crystals, indicates immersion of crystals into a hotter, more calcic magma. The occurrence of partially resorbed plagioclase together with plagioclase

  17. Effects of changing H2O concentrations and viscosities on plagioclase crystallization in a rhyolite obsidian: experiments and plagioclase speedometry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, L.; Andrews, B. J.; Lange, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    H2O-saturated phase equilibrium and decompression experiments on a rhyolite obsidian (73 wt% SiO2) from Medicine Lake Volcano, CA demonstrate the effect of changing melt H2O concentrations and melt viscosity on plagioclase crystallization. The natural sample is saturated in plagioclase + orthopyroxene + ilmenite + magnetite + apatite + zircon, despite low phenocryst abundances (<2.3%) and no microlite crystallization. Eruptive temperature and oxygen fugacity (×1σ), on the basis of Fe-Ti oxide thermometry, are 852 × 12°C and ΔNNO +0.3 × 0.1. Plagioclase compositions range from 33-53 mol% An. Given the low crystallinity and absence of significant cooling, the progressive loss of dissolved melt H2O during ascent best explains the broad range in phenocryst composition and the low crystallinity. Phase equilibrium experiments were conducted at temperatures and pressures ranging from 750-950°C and 50-300 MPa, respectively. Experiments were conducted in a Ni-rich pressure vessel (Waspaloy) with Ni filler rod, which produces an intrinsic fO2 of ΔNNO +1 × 0.5 (Geshwind & Rutherford, 1992) and pressurized with H2O (where Ptotal= PH2O). The results of the phase equilibrium experiments show that the most anorthitic plagioclase crystallized at ~3.95 wt% H2O and the most albitic at ~3.49 wt% H2O. Plagioclase crystallization in the natural sample ceased at relatively high melt H2O content (3.49 wt%), which corresponds to a viscosity of 4.85 log10 Pa s (Hui & Zhang, 2007). To evaluate the effect of decompression rate on plagioclase crystallization, experiments were conducted on the rhyolite at two different continuous decompression rates, 3.0 MPa/hr and 0.8 MPa/hr. Two decompression experiments were conducted for each rate over two pressure interals:150 to 89 MPa and from 150 to 58 MPa. The results from our study are combined with the results of single- and multi-step decompression experiments on rhyolites/rhyodacites from Geshwind & Rutherford (1995), Couch et al., (2003

  18. Visible/near-infrared spectra of experimentally shocked plagioclase feldspars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Horz, F.

    2003-01-01

    High shock pressures cause structural changes in plagioclase feldspars such as mechanical fracturing and disaggregation of the crystal lattice at submicron scales, the formation of diaplectic glass (maskelynite), and genuine melting. Past studies of visible/ near-infrared spectra of shocked feldspars demonstrated few spectral variations with pressure except for a decrease in the depth of the absorption feature near 1250-1300 nm and an overall decrease in reflectance. New visible/near-infrared spectra (400-2500 nm) of experimentally shocked (17-56 GPa) albite- and anorthite-rich rock powders demonstrate similar trends, including the loss of minor hydrated mineral bands near 1410, 1930, 2250, and 2350 nm. However, the most interesting new observations are increases in reflectance at intermediate pressures, followed by subsequent decreases in reflectance at higher pressures. The amount of internal scattering and overall sample reflectance is controlled by the relative proportions of micro-fractures, submicron grains, diaplectic glass, and melts formed during shock metamorphism. We interpret the observed reflectance increases at intermediate pressures to result from progressively larger proportions of submicron feldspar grains and diaplectic glass. The ensuing decreases in reflectance occur after diaplectic glass formation is complete and the proportion of genuine melt inclusions increases. The pressure regimes over which these reflectance variations occur differ between albite and anorthite, consistent with thermal infrared spectra of these samples and previous studies of shocked feldspars. These types of spectral variations associated with different peak shock pressures should be considered during interpretation and modeling of visible/near-infrared remotely sensed spectra of planetary and asteroidal surfaces.

  19. Visible/near-infrared spectra of experimentally shocked plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Hörz, Friedrich

    2003-11-01

    High shock pressures cause structural changes in plagioclase feldspars such as mechanical fracturing and disaggregation of the crystal lattice at submicron scales, the formation of diaplectic glass (maskelynite), and genuine melting. Past studies of visible/near-infrared spectra of shocked feldspars demonstrated few spectral variations with pressure except for a decrease in the depth of the absorption feature near 1250-1300 nm and an overall decrease in reflectance. New visible/near-infrared spectra (400-2500 nm) of experimentally shocked (17-56 GPa) albite- and anorthite-rich rock powders demonstrate similar trends, including the loss of minor hydrated mineral bands near 1410, 1930, 2250, and 2350 nm. However, the most interesting new observations are increases in reflectance at intermediate pressures, followed by subsequent decreases in reflectance at higher pressures. The amount of internal scattering and overall sample reflectance is controlled by the relative proportions of micro-fractures, submicron grains, diaplectic glass, and melts formed during shock metamorphism. We interpret the observed reflectance increases at intermediate pressures to result from progressively larger proportions of submicron feldspar grains and diaplectic glass. The ensuing decreases in reflectance occur after diaplectic glass formation is complete and the proportion of genuine melt inclusions increases. The pressure regimes over which these reflectance variations occur differ between albite and anorthite, consistent with thermal infrared spectra of these samples and previous studies of shocked feldspars. These types of spectral variations associated with different peak shock pressures should be considered during interpretation and modeling of visible/near-infrared remotely sensed spectra of planetary and asteroidal surfaces.

  20. Magma mixing, recharge and eruption histories recorded in plagioclase phenocrysts from El Chichon Volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepley, F. J., III; Davidson, J.P.; Tilling, R.I.; Arth, Joseph G.

    2000-01-01

    Consistent core-to-rim decreases of 87Sr/86Sr ratios and coincident increases in Sr concentrations in plagioclase phenocrysts of varying size (~ 1 cm to 2 mm) are reported from samples of the 1982 and pre-1982 (~ 200 ka) eruptions of El Chichon Volcano. Maximum 87Sr/86Sr ratios of ~ 0.7054, significantly higher than the whole-rock isotopic ratios (~ 0.7040-0.7045), are found in the cores of plagioclase phenocrysts, and minimum 87Sr/86Sr ratios of ~ 0.7039 are found near some of the rims. Plagioclase phenocrysts commonly display abrupt fluctuations in An content (up to 25 mol %) that correspond to well-developed dissolution surfaces The isotopic, textural and compositional characteristics suggest that these plagioclase phenocrysts grew in a system that was periodically recharged by higher-temperature magma with a lower 87Sr/86Sr ratio and a higher Sr concentration. Rim 87Sr/86Sr ratios in plagioclase phenocrysts of rocks from the 200 ka eruption indicate that, at that time, the magma had already attained the lowest recorded 87Sr/86Sr value of the system (~ 0.7039). In contrast, cores from plagioclase phenocrysts of the 1982 eruption, inferred to have grown in the past few thousand years, have the highest recorded 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the system. Collectively, the Sr isotopic data (for plagioclase and whole rock), disequilibrium textural features of the phenocrysts, known eruption frequencies, and inferred crystal-residence times of the plagioclases are best interpreted in terms of an intermittent magma chamber model. Similar processes, including crustal contamination, magma mixing, periodic recharge by addition of more mafic magma to induce plagioclase disequilibrium (possibly triggering eruption) and subsequent re-equilibration, apparently were operative throughout the 200 ky history of the El Chichon magma system.

  1. The Petrographic Distinction between Basalt and Andesite Based upon the Arrested Fractionation of Plagioclase Phenocrysts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garlick, G. Donald; Garlick, Benjamin J.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the need to take into account the effects of arrested fractional crystallization in the petrographic classification of volcanic rocks containing plagioclase phenocrysts. Describes the development and use of a computer program to accomplish this task graphically. (TW)

  2. Deconvolution of mixtures with high plagioclase content for the remote interpretation of lunar plagioclase-rich regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serventi, Giovanna; Carli, Cristian; Sgavetti, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Anorthositic rocks are widespread on the lunar surface and have probably been formed by flotation of PL over a magma ocean. A large portion of pristine rocks are characterized by a low Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratio, and have been classified as ferroan anorthosite, and recently, after observation from SELENE Spectral Profiler,pure anorthosites regions with more than 98% PL have been recognized. In this paper, we analyze a set of mixtures with PL content similar to the ferroan anorthosites and to the pure anorthosite regions, using the Origin Software and the Modified Gaussian Model. We consider three plagioclases with varying FeOwt% contents (PL1, PL2 and PL3)andthree mafic end-members (1) 100% orthopyroxene, (2) 56% orthopyroxene and 44% clinopyroxene, and (3) 100% olivine (OL). The spectral parameters considered here are: band depth, band center, band width, c0 (the continuum intercept) and c1 (the continuum offset). Here we have shown that in pyroxene (PX)-bearing mixtures, the PX is distinguishable even in mixtures with only 1% PX and that PX band at ca. 900 nm is always deeper than PL1 band while PL2 and PL3 are deeperthan OPX 900 nm band from 95, 96% PL. In OL-bearing mixtures, OL detection limit is 2% when mixed with PL1, and 3% and 4% if mixed with PL2 and PL3. We also demonstrated how spectral parameters vary with PL%, and, generally, increasing the PL content: (1) 1250 nm band depth decreases when mixed with OL, while it deepens in mixtures with PX; (2) 1250 nm band centers generally move towards longer wavelength for PL1-bearing mixtures, while do not show significant variations considering PL2/PL3-mixtures; (3) 1250 nm band width of PL1 in E1 and E5-mixtures substantially widens while in other mixtures it only slightly varies. Here we also proposed an application to a real case, from Proclus crater, revealing how studying terrestrial analogues is fundamental to infer hypothesis on the mineralogical composition of a planetary surface, but also how the spectral

  3. Oxygen isotopic determinations of sequentially erupted plagioclases in the 1974 magma of Fuego Volcano, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, W.I., Jr.; Friedman, I.; Woodruff, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    Plagioclases in the 1974 high-Al basalt from Fuego Volcano have ??O18 values of +6.0 to +8.5 per mil. Meteoric water cannot have played a significant role in Fuego's magma. Large, weakly zone clear phenocrysts had ??O18 values in the accepted mantle range, while patchyzoned and oscillatory-zoned plagioclases inferred to have formed later and shallower levels have slightly heavier oxygen isotopic ratios. ?? 1980 Intern. Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior.

  4. VERY High Temperature Hydrothermal Record in Plagioclase of BLACK Gabbros in Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudier, F. I.; Mainprice, D.; Nicolas, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    The lower crustal section in Oman ophiolite includes 'black gabbros' that have escaped the common medium-low temperature hydrous alteration. Their plagioclases are totally fresh, but contain in their mass, nebulous inclusions most times below the resolution of optical microscope, or expressed as solid silicate phases clinopyroxene and pargasitic amphibole, up to 10 µm sized, having T equilibrium above 900°C with their host plagioclase. These gabbros have a well-expressed magmatic foliation, relayed by plastic strain marked by stretched olivine crystals, and pinching twins in plagioclase. In addition to major elements analyses, the crystallographic relationships of these Mg silicate inclusions to their host plagioclase are explored by Electron Back Scattering Diffraction (EBSD) processing. - Diopsidic clinopyroxene inclusions are dominant over pargasitic amphibole that tend to locate close to the margins of host plagioclase (Fig 1). Some inclusions are mixed clinopyroxene-amphibole, separated by a non-indexed phase that could represent a pyribole-type structure, suggesting transformation from clinopyroxene to amphibole during cooling. High chlorine content in the amphibole sign the seawater contamination at least during the development of this phase. - Preliminary statistical pole figures (Fig. 2) in the six joined plagioclase grains studied, show that both plagioclase and diopside inclusions have a strong crystal preferred orientation (CPO) connected such that the strong [010]pl maximum coincide with the strong [100]di. In addition, a coincidence appears between three sub-maxima of [100]pl and [001]di. These interesting relationships are refined. It is inferred that clinopyroxene developed through corrosion of the plagioclase by a Mg-bearing hydrous fluid, penetrating possibly via twin interface and diffusing at T~1100°C, upper limit of clinopyroxene stability in hydrous conditions. Development of pargasite implies increasing hydration during cooling.

  5. Space weathering on Mercury: Simulation of plagioclase weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Sho; Hiroi, Takahiro; Helbert, Jorn; Arai, Tomoko

    ions may also increase the size of nanophase iron. The other possibility for attenuating space weathering on Mercury would be deeper mixing depth. The surface mixing by impacts on Mercury is greater than that on the Moon, because of higher impact flux and velocity of incoming meteoroid bodies. The difference of space weathering between the Moon and Mercury might be also due to the compositional effect. Mercury surface is considered to be plagioclase-rich like the highland of the Moon. We started experimental simulation of space weathering on Mercury (and the Moon) using anorthite samples. Although pure anorthite is in lack of iron, addition of iron-bearing material could alter the anorthite reflectance. Our experiments show that laser irradiation on pure anorthite should not alter its spectrum largely. The addition of small amount of pyroxene can change the anorthite reflectance upon laser irradiation (darkening/reddening of visible spectrum). Addition of 5 References: [1] Keller, L. P. and McKay, D. S. (1993), Science 261, 1305. [2] Sasaki, S. et al. (2001) Nature 410, 555. [3] Sasaki, S. and Kurahashi, E. (2004) Adv. Space Res. 33, 2152. [4] McClintock, W. E. et al. (2008) Science 321, 62. [5] Noble, S. K. and Pieters, C. M. (2001) Mercury: Space Environ. Surface Interior,8012.

  6. Crystal size distributions of plagioclase in lavas from the July-August 2001 Mount Etna eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaciai, Alessandro; Perinelli, Cristina; Armienti, Pietro; Favalli, Massimiliano

    2015-08-01

    During the 2001 eruption of Mount Etna, two independent vent systems simultaneously erupted two different lavas. The Upper Vents system (UV), opened between 3100 and 2650 m a.s.l., emitted products that are markedly porphyritic and rich in plagioclase, while the Lower Vents system (LV), opened at 2100 and 2550 m a.s.l., emitted products that are sparsely porphyritic with scarce plagioclase. In this study, the crystal size distributions (CSDs) of plagioclase were measured for a series of 14 samples collected from all the main flows of the 2001 eruption. The coefficient of R 2 determination was used to evaluate the goodness of fit of linear models to the CSDs, and the results are represented as a grid of R 2 values by using a numerical code developed ad hoc. R 2 diagrams suggest that the 2001 products can be separated into two main groups with slightly different characteristics: plagioclase CSDs from the UVs can be modeled by three straight lines with different slopes while the plagioclase CSDs from the LVs are largely concave. We have interpreted the CSDs of the UVs as representing three different populations of plagioclases: (i) the large phenocrysts (type I), which started to crystallize at lower cooling rate in a deep reservoir from 13 to 8 months before eruption onset; (ii) the phenocrysts (type II), which crystallized largely during continuous degassing in a shallow reservoir; and (iii) the microlites, which crystallized during magma ascent immediately prior to the eruption. The plagioclase CSD curves for the LVs lava are interpreted to reflect strong and rapid changes in undercooling induced by strong and sudden degassing.

  7. Nonlinear partitioning of OH between Ca-rich plagioclase and arc basaltic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, M.; Ushioda, M.; Takahashi, E.

    2011-12-01

    The hydrogen in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) is becoming a new proxy for dissolved H2O in silicate melts. Plagioclase is one of the NAMs which accommodates hydrogen as OH. Here, we report experimental results on the partitioning of OH between Ca-rich plagioclase and arc basaltic melt. We carried out hydrous melting experiments of arc basaltic magma at 350 MPa using an internally-heated pressure vessel. Starting material was hydrous glass (0.8 wt.%≦H2O≦4.5 wt.%) of an undifferentiated rock from Miyakejima volcano, a frontal-arc volcano in Izu-arc (MTL rock: 50.5% SiO2, 18.1% Al2O3, 4.9% MgO). A grain of Ca-rich plagioclase (≈ 1 mg, about An95, FeOt ≈ 0.5 wt.%) and ≈ 10 mg of powdered glasses were sealed in Au80Pd20 alloy capsule and kept at around the liquidus temperature. Liquidus phase of MTL rock at 350 MPa is always plagioclase with 0 to 4.5 wt.% H2O in melt, and therefore, a grain of plagioclase and hydrous melt are nearly in equilibrium. Oxygen fugacity during the melting experiments was not controlled; the estimated oxygen fugacity was 3 log unit above Ni-NiO buffer. Experiments were quenched after 24-48 hours. Concentrations of H2O in melt and concentration of OH in plagioclase were analyzed by infrared spectroscopy. Obtained correlation between H2O concentration in melt and OH concentration in plagioclase is nonlinear; partition coefficient in molar basis is ≈ 0.01 with low H2O in melt (≤ 1 wt.%), while it decreases down to ≈ 0.005 with increasing H2O in melt (Fig.1). The OH concentration of Ca-rich plagioclase (about An90) from the 1986 summit eruption of Izu-Oshima volcano, also a frontal-arc volcano in Izu arc, shows variation ranging from <50 ppm H2O through 300 ppm H2O as a result of polybaric degassing (Hamada et al. 2011, EPSL 308, 259-266). Melting experiments of hydrous basalts constrained that An90 plagioclase crystallizes form H2O-rich melt (up to 6 wt.% H2O). In consistent with previous studies, our experiments demonstrate

  8. Plagioclase sub-species in Chinese loess deposits: Implications for dust source migration and past climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tong; Liu, Lianwen; Chen, Yang; Sheng, Xuefen; Ji, Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    Plagioclase mineral sub-species in the Lingtai Section in central Chinese Loess Plateau are examined using Mineral Liberation Analyzer techniques, showing that loess and paleosol samples exhibit similar patterns in terms of plagioclase feldspar sub-species content. This suggests that both loess and paleosol units have preserved their primary Ca-bearing plagioclase compositions of loess source regions. Weighted average CaO (%) in Ca-bearing plagioclase lies within a narrow range and is equivalent to the average plagioclase composition for upper continental crust. This fact supports the hypothesis that Chinese loess deposits are the result of a thorough mixing of dust sources. The sum of Ca-bearing plagioclase content exhibits a general increasing trend superimposed by glacial-interglacial oscillations. In combination with observed plagioclase data in the deserts, the variations of Ca-bearing plagioclase minerals might be used as a proxy for dust source migration and climate changes in the loess source regions. Furthermore, linear relationship between lithogenic magnetic susceptibility (MS) component input and contents of Ca-bearing plagioclase in loess units revises a MS proxy for reconstructing paleo-monsoon precipitation history. The revised MS and plagioclase sub-species records help in understanding the mechanism of glaciation across northern Tibetan Plateau.

  9. Is plagioclase removal responsible for the negative Eu anomaly in the source regions of mare basalts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    The nearly ubiquitous presence of a negative Eu anomaly in the mare basalts has been suggested to indicate prior separation and flotation of plagioclase from the basalt source region during its crystallization from a lunar magma ocean (LMO). Are there any mare basalts derived from a mantle source which did not experience prior plagioclase separation? Crystal chemical rationale for REE substitution in pyroxene suggests that the combination of REE size and charge, M2 site characteristics of pyroxene, fO2, magma chemistry, and temperature may account for the negative Eu anomaly in the source region of some types of primitive, low TiO2 mare basalts. This origin for the negative Eu anomaly does not preclude the possibility of the LMO as many mare basalts still require prior plagioclase crystallization and separation and/or hybridization involving a KREEP component.

  10. Significance of major and minor element variations in plagioclase in sodic ferrogabbro and breccia matrix in lunar highlands sample 67915

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiblen, P. W.; Day, W. C.; Miller, J. D., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Attention is given to the significance of the results of a study of Ca, K, Ti, Fe, Mn, and Mg variations in plagioclase in highlands sample 67915,84. This polymict breccia from Outhouse Rock station 11 at the Apollo 16 site has been selected for study because it contains a wide variety of clast types, including a differentiated type-sodic ferrogabbro. It is found that the data on Ca, K, Ti, Fe, Mn, and Mg in plagioclase show no evidence of reaction between sodic ferrogabbro and breccia matrix clasts. Two groups of plagioclase compositions have been recognized in the breccia matrix. The data suggest that the prebreccia characteristics of plagioclase compositions have been preserved in 67915. Data on Mg/(Mg+FE) ratios suggest that the sodic ferrogabbro and the intermediate-Ca plagioclase clasts could be related to the Mg-rich plutonic rock suite and the high-Ca plagioclase clasts to the ferroan anorthosites.

  11. SCR and GCR exposure ages of plagioclase grains from lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etique, P.; Baur, H.; Signer, P.; Wieler, R.

    1986-01-01

    The concentrations of solar wind implanted Ar-36 in mineral grains extracted from lunar soils show that they were exposed to the solar wind on the lunar surface for an integrated time of 10E4 to 10E5 years. From the bulk soil 61501 plagioclase separates of 8 grain size ranges was prepared. The depletion of the implanted gases was achieved by etching aliquot samples of 4 grain sizes to various degrees. The experimental results pertinent to the present discussion are: The spallogenic Ne is, as in most plagioclases from lunar soils, affected by diffusive losses and of no use. The Ar-36 of solar wind origin amounts to (2030 + or - 100) x 10E-8 ccSTP/g in the 150 to 200 mm size fraction and shows that these grains were exposed to the solar wind for at least 10,000 years. The Ne-21/Ne-22 ratio of the spallogenic Ne is 0.75 + or - 0.01 and in very good agreement with the value of this ratio in a plagioclase separate from rock 76535. This rock has had a simple exposure history and its plagioclases have a chemical composition quite similar to those studied. In addition to the noble gases, the heavy particle tracks in an aliquot of the 150 to 200 mm plagioclase separate were investigated and found 92% of the grains to contain more than 10E8 tracks/sq cm. This corresponds to a mean track density of (5 + or - 1) x 10E8 tracks/sq cm. The exploration of the exposure history of the plagioclase separates from the soil 61501 do not contradict the model for the regolith dynamics but also fail to prove it.

  12. Comparative Planetary Mineralogy: Basaltic Plagioclase from Earth, Moon, Mars and 4 Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karner, J. M.; Papike, J. J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    Major, minor and trace element analysis of silicates has allowed for the study of planetary basalts in a comparative planetary mineralogy context. We continue this initiative by exploring the chemistry of plagioclase feldspar in basalts from the Earth, Moon, Mars and 4 Vesta. This paper presents new data on plagioclase from six terrestrial basalt suites including Keweenawan, Island Arc, Hawaiian, Columbia Plateau, Taos Plateau, and Ocean Floor; six lunar basalt suites including Apollo 11 Low K, Apollo 12 Ilmenite, Apollo 12 Olivine, Apollo 12 Pigeonite, Apollo 15 Olivine, and Apollo 15 Pigeonite; two basaltic martian meteorites, Shergotty and QUE 94201; and one unequilibrated eucrite, Pasamonte.

  13. Uptaking of plagioclase xenocryst into H2O-rich rear-arc basaltic magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, M.

    2015-12-01

    Kuritani et al. (2013, Mineral. Petrol.) and Kuritani et al. (2014, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol.) estimated genetic conditions of primary arc magmas beneath the Iwate volcano (a frontal arc volcano in the northeast Japan arc) and the Sannome-gata volcano (a rear-arc volcano in the northeast Japan arc) based on analyses of volcanic rocks and numerical simulation. They estimated that H2O concentrations of primary melts are 4-5 wt.% beneath the Iwate volcano and 6-7 wt.% beneath the Sannnome-gata volcano, respectively. Their arguments mean that primary melts beneath frontal-arc volcanoes and rear-arc volcanoes are both H2O-rich, yet there has been no direct evidence to support their arguments at the Sannnome-gata volcano because volcanic rocks are either almost aphyric and/or almost no melt inclusions were found. Hydrogen concentration in nominally anhydrous minerals serves as a hygrometer of arc basaltic melts (e.g., Hamada et al. 2013, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.). In this study, hydrogen concentration of plagioclase as a crustal xenocryst was analyzed to estimate H2O concentration of basaltic melt coexisted with plagioclase before the eruption. Plagioclase xenocrists were separated from crushed scoria which erupted from the Sannome-gata volcano 20,000-24,000 years ago. Composition of the plagioclase core is homogeneous and ranges from An30 through An35. The rim is 150 to 200-μm-thick dusty zone whose composition is around An60, suggesting that the rim crystallized rapidly from degassed basaltic melt. The profiles of infrared absorption area per unit thickness across the plagioclase core were obtained using Fourier Transform InfraRed spectrometer (FTIR). The inner core contains hydrogen of about 60 wt. ppm H2O, and hydrogen concentration elevates at outer core. Hydrogen concentration at the outermost core of plagioclase is >200 wt. ppm H2O, suggesting that plagioclase xenocrists were taken by hydrous melt (H2O>5 wt.%; Hamada et al. 2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.) and

  14. Compositional controls on spinel clouding and garnet formation in plagioclase of olivine metagabbros, Adirondack Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLelland, J.M.; Whitney, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    Olivine metagabbros from the Adirondacks usually contain both clear and spinel-clouded plagioclase, as well as garnet. The latter occurs primarily as the outer rim of coronas surrounding olivine and pyroxene, and less commonly as lamellae or isolated grains within plagioclase. The formation of garnet and metamorphic spinel is dependent upon the anorthite content of the plagioclase. Plagioclase more sodic than An38??2 does not exhibit spinel clouding, and garnet rarely occurs in contact with plagioclase more albitic than An36??4. As a result of these compositional controls, the distribution of spinel and garnet mimics and visually enhances original igneous zoning in plagioclase. Most features of the arrangement of clear (unclouded) plagioclase, including the shells or moats of clear plagioclase which frequently occur inside the garnet rims of coronas, can be explained on the basis of igneous zoning. The form and distribution of the clear zones may also be affected by the metamorphic reactions which have produced the coronas, and by redistribution of plagioclase in response to local volume changes during metamorphism. ?? 1980 Springer-Verlag.

  15. TEM observation of bacteria-induced plagioclase dissolution and secondary mineral formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, T.; Kyono, A.; Nishimiya, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Silicate minerals are the most common minerals in the earth's crust. Bacteria are also distributed throughout the earth's surface environment. The silicate minerals are known to be dissolved by organic acids and polysaccharides known as bacteria metabolites. The metabolic activity of bacteria therefore plays an important role in the interaction between dissolution of the silicate minerals and formation of secondary minerals. However, little is known about the secondary mineral formation process associated with the bacterial metabolism. To clarify the bacterial effect on the mineral dissolution and the secondary mineral formation, we closely investigated the effect of bacterial activity on surface texture modification and chemical composition changes of plagioclase which is the most abundant silicate mineral in the earth's crust. The bacteria were isolated from soil and then added in a suitable medium with several plagioclase fragments (Ab100% and An100%). It was incubated for 10 days. Al and Si concentrations in the medium were measured by ICP-AES to monitor the dissolution of the plagioclase. Secondary mineral formation during the incubation was observed by TEM, EDS and SAED methods. The authors will give the experiment results and discuss the effect of bacterial activity on the plagioclase dissolution and the secondary mineral formation in detail.

  16. FeO and MgO in plagioclase of lunar anorthosites: Igneous or metamorphic?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, W. C.

    1994-01-01

    The combined evidence from terrestrial anorthosites and experimental laboratory studies strongly implies that lunar anorthosites have been subjected to high-grade metamorphic events that have erased the igneous signatures of FeO and MgO in their plagioclases. Arguments to the contrary have, to this point, been more hopeful than rigorous.

  17. Shock effects in plagioclase feldspar from the Mistastin Lake impact structure, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickersgill, Annemarie E.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Flemming, Roberta L.

    2015-09-01

    Shock metamorphism, caused by hypervelocity impact, is a poorly understood process in feldspar due to the complexity of the crystal structure, the relative ease of weathering, and chemical variations, making optical studies of shocked feldspars challenging. Understanding shock metamorphism in feldspars, and plagioclase in particular, is vital for understanding the history of Earth's moon, Mars, and many other planetary bodies. We present here a comprehensive study of shock effects in andesine and labradorite from the Mistastin Lake impact structure, Labrador, Canada. Samples from a range of different settings were studied, from in situ central uplift materials to clasts from various breccias and impact melt rocks. Evidence of shock metamorphism includes undulose extinction, offset twins, kinked twins, alternate twin deformation, and partial to complete transformation to diaplectic plagioclase glass. In some cases, isotropization of alternating twin lamellae was observed. Planar deformation features (PDFs) are notably absent in the plagioclase, even when present in neighboring quartz grains. It is notable that various microlites, twin planes, and compositionally different lamellae could easily be mistaken for PDFs and so care must be taken. A pseudomorphous zeolite phase (levyne-Ca) was identified as a replacement mineral of diaplectic feldspar glass in some samples, which could, in some instances, also be potentially mistaken for PDFs. We suggest that the lack of PDFs in plagioclase could be due to a combination of structural controls relating to the crystal structure of different feldspars and/or the presence of existing planes of weakness in the form of twin and cleavage planes.

  18. High-temperature hydrothermal alteration of tje Boehls Butte anorthosite: Origin of a bimodal plagioclase assemblage

    SciTech Connect

    Mora, Claudia I; Riciputi, Lee R; Cole, David; Walker, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The Boehls Butte anorthosite consists predominantly of an unusual bimodal assemblage of andesine and bytownite anorthite. Oxygen isotope compositions of the anorthosite were profoundly altered by high temperature, retrograde interaction with meteorichydrothermal fluids that varied in composition from isotopically evolved to nearly pristine meteoric water. Oxygen isotope ratios of bulk plagioclase separates are in the range ?7.0 to -6.2% V-SMOW, however, secondary ion mass spectrometry indicates spot-sized isotope values as low as -16%. Typical inter- and intra-plagioclase grain variability is 3 6%, and extreme heterogeneity of up to 20%is noted in a few samples. High-temperature hydrothermal alteration of intermediate plagioclase is proposed to explain the origin of bytownite anorthite in the anorthosite and creation of its unusual bimodal plagioclase assemblage. The anorthite-forming reaction created retrograde reaction-enhanced permeability which, together with rapid decompression, extension, and unroofing of the anorthosite complex, helped to accommodated influx of significant volumes of meteoric-hydrothermal fluids into the anorthosite.

  19. Hydrogen concentration in plagioclase as a hygrometer of arc basaltic melts: Approaches from melt inclusion analyses and hydrous melting experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Morihisa; Ushioda, Masashi; Fujii, Toshitsugu; Takahashi, Eiichi

    2013-03-01

    The partition coefficients of hydrogen between plagioclase and basaltic melt were determined by two approaches. For the first part of this study, plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions in mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) from the Rodriguez Triple Junction in the Indian Ocean were analyzed. The hydrogen concentration in plagioclase is less than 60 wt ppm water, and the average H2O concentration in melt inclusions is 0.3 wt%. Therefore, the apparent partition coefficient of hydrogen between plagioclase and melt is ≈0.01 on a molar basis. For the second part of this study, hydrous melting experiments of arc basaltic magma were performed at 0.35 GPa using an internally-heated pressure vessel at f≈NNO+3. The starting material was hydrous basaltic glass with H2O ranging from 0.8 to 5.5 wt%. A grain of Ca-rich plagioclase (≈1 mg) and 10 mg of powdered basaltic glass were sealed in a Au80Pd20 alloy capsule, and then kept at near the crystallization temperature of plagioclase as a liquidus phase to attain an equilibrium of hydrogen between plagioclase and melt. Combining the results of these two parts of this study, we formulated two linear equations to correlate the hydrogen concentration in plagioclase and the H2O concentration in melt. When H2O in melt is ≤1 wt%, hydrogen in plagioclase (wt ppm water)≈80×H2O in melt (wt%). When H2O in melt is≥4 wt%, hydrogen in plagioclase (wt ppm water)≈40×H2O in melt (wt%). Hydrogen concentration in plagioclase lies between two equations when H2O in melt ranges from 1 to 4 wt%. In accordance with these formulations, the partition coefficients of hydrogen between plagioclase and basaltic melt switches from 0.01±0.005 under H2O-poor conditions (≤100 wt ppm water in plagioclase, ≤1 wt% H2O in melt) to 0.005±0.001 under H2O-rich conditions (≥150 wt ppm water in plagioclase, ≥4 wt% H2O in melt). Such switches of hydrogen partitioning with an increase in H2O can be related to change of the atomic site for hydrogen in the

  20. Anomalous Plagioclase Compositions from Apollo 16 Impact Melts: Modification of Impact Melts on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, A.; Neal, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    A study of Apollo 16 impact melts has been initiated as part of the NASA Lunar Science Institute's Center for Lunar Science and Exploration. The investigation uses a novel approach to investigate the crystallization conditions for the igneous textured samples returned by Apollo 16. This approach uses a combination of crystal size distributions and mineral chemistry to develop a crystal stratigraphy approach to examine crystallization conditions. The Apollo 16 impact melts are enriched in Al2O3 (~25-28%) and are highly feldspathic with only minor amounts of pyroxene, olivine, and opaque minerals. Initial studies focused on sample 60635 where previous whole rock analyses show that, surprisingly this sample possesses a small negative Eu anomaly [1,2]. This is intriguing given the feldspathic nature of the sample (~70% modal plagioclase), which should impart a strong positive Eu anomaly on the whole rock signature. The major element compositions of the plagioclases are relatively homogeneous with a range of An94-98 and an average of An97.2. Plagioclase trace element compositions exhibit a much wider compositional range with some crystals having the predicted positive Eu anomaly but other showing an unexpected negative Eu anomaly. There are about the same number of crystals with a negative Eu anomaly as there are with a positive anomaly and both are equally distributed through the thin section (60635,2). Intriguingly, 5 plagioclase crystals from this sample contain both positive and negative Eu anomalies in different sections of the crystals. Subsequent analyses of other impact melt samples show that a further 4 samples from the LM/Station 10 site also contain plagioclase with both positive and negative Eu anomalies (60235,5; 60335,13; 60615,8; 60618,3 and ,4), along with one sample from Station 4 (64817,3). The hypothesis we are considering is that the impact melt(s) represented by these anomalous samples were generated by impact into typical lunar highlands materials

  1. Spectral variability of plagioclase-mafic mixtures (3): Quantitative analysis applying the MGM algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serventi, Giovanna; Carli, Cristian; Sgavetti, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Among the techniques to detect planet's mineralogical composition remote sensing, visible and near-infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectroscopy is a powerful tool, because crystal field absorption bands are related to particular transitional metals in well-defined crystal structures, e.g., Fe2+ in M1 and M2 sites of olivine (OL) or pyroxene (PX). Although OL, PX and their mixtures have been widely studied, plagioclase (PL), considered a spectroscopically transparent mineral, has been poorly analyzed. In this work we quantitatively investigate the influence of plagioclase absorption band on the absorption bands of Fe, Mg minerals using the Modified Gaussian Model - MGM (Sunshine, J.M. et al. [1990]. J. Geophys. Res. 95, 6955-6966). We consider three plagioclase compositions of varying FeO wt.% contents and five mafic end-members (1) 56% orthopyroxene and 44% clinopyroxene, (2) 28% olivine and 72% orthopyroxene, (3) 30% orthopyroxene and 70% olivine, (4) 100% olivine and (5) 100% orthopyroxene, at two different particle sizes. The spectral parameters considered here are: band depth, band center, band width, c0 (the continuum intercept) and c1 (the continuum offset). In particular, we show the variation of the plagioclase and composite (plagioclase-olivine) band spectral parameters versus the volumetric iron content related to the plagioclase abundance in mixtures. Generally, increasing the vol. FeO% due to the PL: (1) 1250 nm band deepens with linear trend in mixtures with pyroxenes, while it decreases in mixtures with olivine, with trend shifting from parabolic to linear increasing the olivine content in end-member; (2) 1250 nm band center moves towards longer wavelengths with linear trend in pyroxene-rich mixtures and parabolic trend in olivine-rich mixtures; and (3) 1250 nm band clearly widens with linear trend in olivine-free mixtures, while the widening is only slight in olivine-rich mixtures. We also outline how spectral parameters can be ambiguous leading to an

  2. The effect of organic acids on plagioclase dissolution rates and stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Susan A.; Ullman, William J.

    1993-06-01

    The rates of plagioclase dissolution in solutions containing organic acids are up to ten times greater than the rates determined in solutions containing inorganic acids at the same acidity. Initial rates of dissolution are poorly reproduced in replicate experiments. After a day, however, the rates of plagioclase dissolution calculated from the rates of silicon release are reproducible and constant for up to nineteen days. Steady-state rates of dissolution are highest (up to 1.3 × 10 -8 mol/m 2/sec) in acidic solutions (pH ≈ 3) and decrease (to 1 × 10 -11 mol/m 2/sec) as acidity decreases toward neutral pH. The polyfunctional acids, oxalate, citrate, succinate, pyruvate, and 2-ketoglutarate, are the most effective at promoting dissolution. Acetate and propionate are not as effective as the other organic acids but are nonetheless more effective than solutions containing only inorganic acids. The degree of ligand-promoted enhancement of dissolution rate (rate in organic-containing solution/rate in inorganic solution at the same pH) decreases as acidity increases, indicating that the ligand-promoted dissolution mechanism becomes relatively more important as the rate of proton-promoted dissolution decreases. The stoichiometry of release to solution indicates that dissolution is selective even after the rates of dissolution become constant. As in previously published studies, Na and Ca are rapidly released from the plagioclase feldspar, leaving a surface enriched in Si and/or Al. The ratio of Al/Si released to solution indicates that the stoichiometry of the residual plagioclase surface is a function of pH and the nature of the organic ligand. The ligands which remove Al in preference to Si from the dissolving mineral surface are also those which enhance overall plagioclase dissolution rates.

  3. Plagioclase preferred orientation and induced seismic anisotropy in mafic igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shaocheng; Shao, Tongbin; Salisbury, Matthew H.; Sun, Shengsi; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Zhao, Weihua; Long, Changxing; Liang, Fenghua; Satsukawa, Takako

    2014-11-01

    Fractional crystallization and crystal segregation controlled by settling or floating of minerals during the cooling of magma can lead to layered structures in mafic and ultramafic intrusions in continental and oceanic settings in the lower crust. Thus, the seismic properties and fabrics of layered intrusions must be calibrated to gain insight into the origin of seismic reflections and anisotropy in the deep crust. To this end, we have measured P and S wave velocities and anisotropy in 17 plagioclase-rich mafic igneous rocks such as anorthosite and gabbro at hydrostatic pressures up to 650 MPa. Anorthosites and gabbroic anorthosites containing >80 vol% plagioclase and gabbros consisting of nearly equal modal contents of plagioclase and pyroxene display distinctive seismic anisotropy patterns: Vp(Z)/Vp(Y) ≥ 1 and Vp(Z)/Vp(X) ≥ 1 for anorthosites while 0.8 < Vp(Z)/Vp(Y) ≤ 1 and 0.8 < Vp(Z)/Vp(X) ≤ 1 for gabbros. Amphibolites lie in the same domain as gabbros, but show a significantly stronger tendency of Vp(X) > Vp(Y) than the gabbros. Laminated anorthosites with Vp(X) ≈ Vp(Y) ≪ Vp(Z) display a strong crystal preferred orientation (CPO) of plagioclase whose (010) planes and [100] and [001] directions parallel to the foliation. For the gabbros and amphibolites characterized by Vp(X) ≈ Vp(Y) > Vp(Z) and Vp(X) > Vp(Y) > Vp(Z), respectively, pyroxene and amphibole play a dominant role over plagioclase in the formation of seismic anisotropy. The Poisson's ratio calculated using the average P and S wave velocities from the three principal propagation-polarization directions (X, Y, and Z) of a highly anisotropic anorthosite cannot represent the value of a true isotropic equivalent. The CPO-induced anisotropy enhances and decreases the foliation-normal incidence reflectivity at gabbro-peridotite and anorthosite-peridotite interfaces, respectively.

  4. Degassing driving crystallization of plagioclase phenocrysts in lava tube stalactites on Mount Etna (Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzafame, Gabriele; Ferlito, Carmelo

    2014-10-01

    Basaltic lava flows can form tubes in response to the cooling of the outer surface. We collected lava stalactites (frozen lava tears) and sampled lava from the ceilings of three lava tubes on Mount Etna. Comparison of the petrographic characters between ceiling lavas and relative stalactites reveals surprising differences in the groundmass textures and crystal compositions. Major and trace element contents in stalactites show only a slight increase in alkali and SiO2 compared to ceiling lava, whereas significant differences exist in composition and textures between plagioclases within the ceiling lava and those within the stalactites, being in the last case definitively more An-rich. We advance the hypothesis that the high temperature reached in the cave caused the exsolution of the volatiles still trapped in the dripping melt. The volatiles, mainly H2O, formed bubbles and escaped from the melt; such a water-loss might have promoted the silicate polymerization in the stalactites resulting in the growth of An-rich plagioclase phenocrysts. Our results have important implications: in fact plagioclase phenocrysts are usually associated with intratelluric growth and are often considered as the main petrologic evidence for the existence of a magma chamber. The textural and chemical features of plagioclases in stalactites prove that phenocryst growth in syn to post-eruptive conditions is plausible and clearly explains the relatively low viscosity of many phenocryst-rich lava flows on Mount Etna, as well as on many other volcanoes around the world. Therefore, we can conclude that plagioclase phenocrysts cannot exclusively be considered as having originated within a magma chamber.

  5. Timescale of emplacement of the Panzhihua gabbroic layered intrusion recorded in giant plagioclase at Sichuan Province, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lilu; Zeng, Ling; Ren, Zhongyuan; Wang, Yu; Luo, Zhaohua

    2014-09-01

    Giant plagioclase crystals carried into the Panzhihua gabbroic layered intrusion from a deeper magma chamber can help constrain the timescales of emplacement of the Panzhihua intrusion in the Emeishan large igneous province (LIP). In this study, we present the petrographic textures and chemical compositions of giant plagioclase and fine-grained gabbro samples along a ~ 50 m horizontal outcrop of the low zone of the Panzhihua deposit. The giant plagioclase gabbro (GPG) dykes mostly intrude into the fine-grained gabbros without significant contact. Both types of gabbros have the similar bulk-rock major and trace element compositions. However, the mineral composition shows that most of the plagioclase megacrysts contain less An than the plagioclase in fine-grained gabbro samples. In situ analyses of Sr isotopes from core-to-rim transects of plagioclase megacrysts are constant, indicating that there are no recycled crystals. The textural characteristics of samples combined with petrological modeling using MELTS suggest that the plagioclase megacrysts should crystallize and grow in a deeper magma chamber. Textual studies of the GPG indicate that these plagioclase megacrysts mostly plot as straight lines on a classic crystal size distribution (CSD) diagram. For a plagioclase growth range of 10- 11-10- 10 mm/s, the plagioclase should have a growth time of 530-8118 years. In a 100 km3 magma chamber releasing thermal energy at a rate of 1000 MW, the Panzhihua intrusion should reach 50% crystallization after ~ 2400 years. The growth time recorded by the megacrysts in the GPG and numerical modeling may indicate that the emplacement and crystallization of the Panzhihua intrusion may have taken place in thousands of years. In the Emeishan LIP, therefore the combination of large volumes of Fe-rich magma flux and efficient metal precipitation led to the formation of a giant Fe-Ti-V oxide deposit in a short period.

  6. Investigation of Plagioclase Reactivity in Wet Supercritical CO2 by In Situ Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C.; Gauglitz, K.; Loring, J.; Schaef, T.; Miller, Q.; Johnson, K. T.; Wang, Z.; Rosso, K. M.; McGrail, P.

    2013-12-01

    Increasingly, CO2 capture and subsequent storage in deep geologic reservoirs is being implemented as a viable approach for reducing anthropogenic emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere. Several mechanisms may act to secure the injected CO2, including hydrodynamic confinement, dissolution into reservoir fluids, retention of CO2 as a separate phase in pore spaces, and carbonation of reservoir minerals. This latter mechanism is the most permanent, but it requires the presence of reactive minerals and potentially significant amounts of time for the reactions to proceed. Plagioclase feldspars are highly abundant in the earth's crust and are present in the caprocks and storage formations of many target reservoirs. Although the dissolution kinetics and carbonation reactions of feldspars have been well studied in the aqueous phase, comparatively little work has focused on plagioclase reactivity in the CO2-rich fluid at conditions relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. In this study, we used in situ infrared spectroscopy to investigate the carbonation potential of a powdered plagioclase sample similar to labradorite [(Ca,Na)(Al,Si)4O8] that had been isolated from a Hawaiian basalt. Experiments were carried out at 50 °C and 91 bar by circulating a stream of dry or wet supercritical CO2 (scCO2) past a sample overlayer deposited on the window of a high-pressure infrared flow cell. Water concentrations ranged from 0% to 125% relative to saturation, and transmission-mode absorbance spectra were recorded as a function of time for 24 hours. In experiments with excess water, a controlled temperature gradient was used to intentionally condense a film of liquid water on the overlayers' surfaces. No discernible reaction was detected when the samples were exposed to anhydrous scCO2. When water was added, a thin film of liquid-like water was observed on the samples' surfaces, and up to 0.3% of the plagioclase was converted to a carbonate phase. Calcite is the most likely reaction

  7. Plagioclase-melt (dis)equilibrium due to cooling dynamics: Implications for thermometry, barometry and hygrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollo, Silvio; Putirka, Keith; Iezzi, Gianluca; Del Gaudio, Pierdomenico; Scarlato, Piergiorgio

    2011-07-01

    The compositional variation of plagioclase and the partitioning of major elements between plagioclase and melt have been experimentally measured as a function of the cooling rate. Crystals were grown from a basaltic melt at a pressure of 500 MPa under (i) variable cooling rates of 0.5, 2.1, 3, 9.4, and 15 °C/min from 1250 °C down to 1000 °C, (ii) quenching temperatures of 1025, 1050, 1075, 1090, and 1100 °C at the fixed cooling rate of 0.5 °C/min, and (iii) isothermal temperatures of 1000, 1025, 1050, 1075, 1090, and 1100 °C. Our results show that euhedral, faceted plagioclases form during isothermal and slower cooling experiments exhibiting idiomorphic tabular shapes. In contrast, dendritic shapes are observed from faster cooled charges. As the cooling rate is increased, concentrations of Al + Ca + Fe + Mg increase and Si + Na + K decrease in plagioclase favoring higher An and lower Ab + Or contents. Significant variations of pl-liqKd are also observed by the comparison between isothermal and cooled charges; notably, pl-liqKdAb-An, pl-liqKdCa-Na and pl-liqKdFe-Mg progressively change with increasing cooling rate. Therefore, crystal-melt exchange reactions have the potential to reveal the departure from equilibrium for plagioclase-bearing cooling magmas. Finally, thermometers, barometers, and hygrometers derived through the plagioclase-liquid equilibria have been tested at these non-equilibrium experimental conditions. Since such models are based on assumption of equilibrium, any form of disequilibrium will yield errors. Results show that errors on estimates of temperature, pressure, and melt-water content increase systematically with increasing cooling rate (i.e. disequilibrium condition) depicting monotonic trends towards drastic overestimates. These trends are perfectly correlated with those of pl-liqKdCa-Na, pl-liqKdAb-An, and pl-liqKdFe-Mg, thus demonstrating their ability to test (dis)equilibrium conditions.

  8. Orientations of Exsolved Magnetite Inclusions in Clinopyroxene and Plagioclase Determined With Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Wenk, H.; Scott, G. R.; Renne, P. R.

    2003-12-01

    Crystallographically oriented magnetite inclusions occur as subsolidus exsolution features in slowly cooled mafic rocks and are of interest to paleomagnetism because of their highly stable magnetic remanence. Many inclusions in both clinopyroxene and plagioclase exist as elongate laths with generalized dimensions of 1 μ m x 2 μ m x 50 μ m. Of initial interest is the formation temperature and orientation of these elongate inclusions with respect to their silicate hosts. In this study, the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique is used to determine orientation relationships across exsolution boundaries for magnetite inclusions > 0.5 μ m in diameter in host crystals of both clinopyroxene and plagioclase. Magnetite inclusions in clinopyroxenes from the Early Cretaceous Messum Complex of Namibia occur as two arrays growing within (010) of clinopyroxene and elongated subparallel to either the [100] or [001] axes. Inclusions subparallel to [100]cpx have [-110]mag // [010]cpx, (-1-11)mag // (-101)cpx, and [112]mag // [101]cpx. Inclusions subparallel to [001]cpx have [-110]mag // [010]cpx, (111)mag // (100)cpx, and [-1-12]mag // [001]cpx. Both arrays of inclusions are oriented such that planes of roughly close-packed oxygen atoms in both phases, \\{111\\} in magnetite and (-101) and (100) in clinopyroxene, are aligned. These EBSD-derived orientation relationships agree well with previous TEM and X-ray diffraction studies on similar materials, and are consistent with a high-temperature exsolution origin for the magnetite and coexistent amphibole. In contrast to clinopyroxene, the orientation relationships between plagioclase and its exsolved magnetite inclusions have so far been unexplored. Such inclusions are responsible for stable magnetic remanence in both layered intrusions and oceanic gabbros. Exsolved magnetite inclusions in plagioclase crystals from anorthosites in the Early Jurassic Freetown Complex of Sierra Leone have been investigated. Preliminary

  9. Plagioclase nucleation and growth kinetics in a hydrous basaltic melt by decompression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Agostini, C.; Landi, P.; Fortunati, A.; Mancini, L.; Carroll, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Isothermal single-step decompression experiments (at temperature of 1075 °C and pressure between 5 and 50 MPa) were used to study the crystallization kinetics of plagioclase in hydrous high-K basaltic melts as a function of pressure, effective undercooling (Δ T eff) and time. Single-step decompression causes water exsolution and a consequent increase in the plagioclase liquidus, thus imposing an effective undercooling (∆ T eff), accompanied by increased melt viscosity. Here, we show that the decompression process acts directly on viscosity and thermodynamic energy barriers (such as interfacial-free energy), controlling the nucleation process and favoring the formation of homogeneous nuclei also at high pressure (low effective undercoolings). In fact, this study shows that similar crystal number densities ( N a) can be obtained both at low and high pressure (between 5 and 50 MPa), whereas crystal growth processes are favored at low pressures (5-10 MPa). The main evidence of this study is that the crystallization of plagioclase in decompressed high-K basalts is more rapid than that in rhyolitic melts on similar timescales. The onset of the crystallization process during experiments was characterized by an initial nucleation event within the first hour of the experiment, which produced the largest amount of plagioclase. This nucleation event, at short experimental duration, can produce a dramatic change in crystal number density ( N a) and crystal fraction ( ϕ), triggering a significant textural evolution in only 1 h. In natural systems, this may affect the magma rheology and eruptive dynamics on very short time scales.

  10. Recycled oceanic crust observed in 'ghost plagioclase' within the source of Mauna Loa lavas

    PubMed

    Sobolev; Hofmann; Nikogosian

    2000-04-27

    The hypothesis that mantle plumes contain recycled oceanic crust is now widely accepted. Some specific source components of the Hawaiian plume have been inferred to represent recycled oceanic basalts, pelagic sediments or oceanic gabbros. Bulk lava compositions, however, retain the specific trace-element fingerprint of the original crustal component in only a highly attenuated form. Here we report the discovery of exotic, strontium-enriched melt inclusions in Mauna Loa olivines. Their complete trace-element patterns strongly resemble those of layered gabbros found in ophiolites, which are characterized by cumulus plagioclase with very high strontium abundances. The major-element compositions of these melts indicate that their composition cannot be the result of the assimilation of present-day oceanic crust through which the melts have travelled. Instead, the gabbro has been transformed into a (high-pressure) eclogite by subduction and recycling, and this eclogite has then been incorporated into the Hawaiian mantle plume. The trace-element signature of the original plagioclase is present only as a 'ghost' signature, which permits specific identification of the recycled rock type. The 'ghost plagioclase' trace-element signature demonstrates that the former gabbro can retain much of its original chemical identity through the convective cycle without completely mixing with other portions of the former oceanic crust. PMID:10801125

  11. Tectonically emplaced ultra-depleted lithospheric mantle records garnet, spinel and plagioclase facies events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czertowicz, Thomas; Scott, James; Palin, Mike

    2014-05-01

    The poorly studied Anita Ultramafites in western New Zealand represent a several km wide slice of lithospheric mantle that was tectonically emplaced onto the Gondwana supercontinent margin. The peridotites are almost exclusively spinel facies dunite and harzburgite, although spinel-orthopyroxene symplectites indicate the former presence of Cr-garnet. Pyroxenite dikes are uncommon, and there is no sign of an ophiolitic type structure. Olivine (~Fo93) and chromite (~Cr# 70) attest to extreme degrees of melt depletion, likely under hydrous conditions. The rocks were decompressed and equilibrated at the spinel facies. The ultramafites were then refertilised by a fluid that was rich in Si, Ca, K, OH and LREE, and probably equates to a low-degree silicate melt. The occurrence of negative and positive Eu and Sr anomalies in amphibole points to the influence of plagioclase, and suggests that refertilisation occurred at a very shallow lithospheric level. An added complication is that the peridotite was metamorphosed to upper amphibolite facies in the Cretaceous after tectonic emplacement. This generated talc, tremolite and chlorite. P-T conditions from adjacent gneisses indicate that this event occurred at ~ 10-12 kbar in association with crustal thickening. Thus, the peridotite may have been pushed back out of plagioclase facies conditions, partially melted, and re-equilibrated back in the spinel facies. The Anita Ultramafics therefore record a sequence of attempts to equilibrate at garnet - spinel - plagioclase - spinel facies, before final exhumation.

  12. Anorthosites and anorthosites: Contrasting plagioclase-rich rocks in the Archaean and Proterozoic

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, B.E. . Dept. of Earth Planetary Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Anorthosites -- rocks consisting predominantly of plagioclase feldspar -- have figured prominently in at least two distinct intervals of Earth history: the late-Archaean and mid-Proterozoic. Archaean anorthosites (AA) are a key component of high-grade gneiss terranes, where they typically form laterally extensive deformed sheets or sills up to a km thick. In contrast, Proterozoic anorthosites (PA) form plutons or plutonic complexes, and are most abundant in a quasi-continuous belt across NE N. America. In addition to these temporal and structural contrasts, AA and PA display markedly different mineralogical and geochemical properties, including, respectively: (1) equant plagioclase megacrysts vs. tabular megacrysts; (2) highly calcic compositions vs. intermediate to alkalic compositions; (3) amphibole vs. olivine or orthopyroxene as the dominant mafic mineral; (4) the presence of chromite, locally in ore-grade layers vs. massive, cross-cutting Fe-Ti oxide ores; (5) low levels of Sr and Ba vs. high to extreme levels; (6) high levels of ferromagnesian trace elements vs. low levels; (7) Ga/Al values typical of basaltic plagioclase vs. much lower values; and (8) moderately vs. extremely fractionated REE patterns. Given these contrasts, it appears that the only property AA and PA share is their plag-rich nature, suggesting that there must be more than one process (and probably multiple processes) capable of producing anorthosite.

  13. Trace Elements in High-Ca Pyroxene and Plagioclase in the Bilanga Diogenite: Implications for the Magmatic Evolution of Diogenites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domanik, K. J.; Shearer, C. K.; Hagerty, J.; Kolar, S. E.; Drake, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    High-Ca pyroxene and plagioclase are typically present as minor phases in diogenites. However, although the trace element content of diogenite orthopyroxene has been measured in a number of studies; almost no trace element data is available for the high-Ca pyroxene and plagioclase with which it routinely coexists in these meteorites. These data could provide insights into the nature and evolution of the melts from which diogenites crystallized in the HED parent body. In this study we have obtained initial measurements of several REEs in high-Ca pyroxene, plagioclase, and orthopyroxene in the Bilanga. Measurement of additional incompatible trace element concentrations in these phases is currently in progress.

  14. Prediction of plagioclase-melt equilibria in anhydrous silicate melts at 1-atm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namur, Olivier; Charlier, Bernard; Toplis, Michael J.; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Many models for plagioclase-melt equilibria have been proposed over the past 30 years, but the focus is increasingly on the effects of water content and pressure. However, many geological and petrological applications concern low pressure and low water systems, such as the differentiation of large terrestrial basaltic magma chambers, and lunar and asteroidal magmatism. There is, therefore, a justified need to quantify the influence of anhydrous liquid composition on the composition of equilibrium plagioclase at 1-atm. With this in mind, a database of over 500 experimentally determined plagioclase-liquid pairs has been created. The selected low pressure, anhydrous, experiments include both natural and synthetic liquids, whose compositions range from basalt to rhyolite. Four equations are proposed, derived from this data. The first is based on a thermodynamically inspired formalism, explicitly integrating the effect of temperature. This equation uses free energies and activities of crystalline anorthite available from the literature. For the activity of anorthite in the liquid phase, it is found that current models of the activity of individual oxides are insufficient to account for the experimental results. We have therefore derived an empirical expression for the variation of anorthite activity in the liquid as a function of melt composition, based upon inversion of the experimental data. Using this expression allows the calculation of plagioclase composition with a relative error less than 10%. However, in light of the fact that temperature is not necessarily known for many petrological applications, an alternative set of T-independent equations is also proposed. For this entirely empirical approach, the database has been divided into three compositional groups, treated independently for regression purposes: mafic-ultramafic, alkali-rich mafic-ultramafic, and intermediate-felsic. This separation into distinct subgroups was found to be necessary to maintain errors

  15. Laser ICP-MS study of trace element partitioning between olivine, plagioclase, orthopyroxene and melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubier, M.; Grove, T. L.; Langmuir, C. H.

    2010-12-01

    Trace element contents in natural minerals such as plagioclase, olivine, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene can be used to correct melt compositions for fractionation and estimate the redox state of magmas. In order to appropriately address fractionation in the different magmatic settings, high precision, fO2 controlled measurements at low pressures and variable temperature of mineral-melt trace element partition coefficients are needed. This study consists of 0.1 Mpa experiments on two starting compositions, a normal MORB AII96-18-1 from the Kane Fracture Zone and a basaltic andesite 85-44 from Mt Shasta. The starting compositions were enriched in 13 elements by addition of elemental standard solutions. The experiments were carried out at MIT in a vertical-tube DelTech quenching furnace with a CO2-H2 gas atmosphere. Both isothermal and cooling rate experiments, as well as non-doped experiments, were performed. The range in temperature was 1150-1175°C for the MORB and 1155-1190°C for the basaltic andesite. The different fO2 conditions were QFM, NNO, and NNO+2. Glasses, olivine, plagioclase and orthopyroxene crystals in the run products were analyzed by laser ICP-MS using a variety of calibration glass and mineral standards. Clinopyroxene crystals were too small to be analyzed accurately for their trace element contents. Fe and Na loss in our experiments is generally low and unlikely to have significant effects on the liquidus temperature. For the MORB composition, the average values for the Ol/Melt exchange distribution coefficient KD Fe-Mg (0.28±0.01), Cpx/Melt KD Fe-Mg (0.24±0.01) and Plg/Melt KD Ca-Na (0.94±0.03) attest for the achievement of chemical equilibrium. Similarly, for the basaltic andesite, the average values are Ol/Melt KD Fe-Mg = 0.28±0.01, Cpx/Melt KD Fe-Mg = 0.291±0.005, Opx/Melt KD Fe-Mg = 0.275±0.015 and Plg/Melt KD Ca-Na = 1.03±0.1. Cooling experiments systematically show different phase proportions, mineral compositions and partition

  16. Origin of biotite-hornblende-garnet coronas between oxides and plagioclase in olivine metagabbros, Adirondack region, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, P.R.; McLelland, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Complex multivariant reactions involving Fe-Ti oxide minerals, plagioclase and olivine have produced coronas of biotite, hornblende and garnet between ilmenite and plagioclase in Adirondack olivine metagabbros. Both the biotite (6-10% TiO2) and the hornblende (3-6% TiO2) are exceptionally Titanium-rich. The garnet is nearly identical in composition to the garnet in coronas around olivine in the same rocks. The coronas form in two stages: (a) Plagioclase+Fe-Ti Oxides+Olivine+water =Hornblende+Spinel+Orthopyroxene??Biotite +more-sodic Plagioclase (b) Hornblende+Orthopyroxene??Spinel+Plagioclase =Garnet+Clinopyroxene+more-sodic Plagioclase The Orthopyroxene and part of the clinopyroxene form adjacent to olivine. Both reactions are linked by exchange of Mg2+ and Fe2+ with the reactions forming pyroxene and garnet coronas around olivine in the same rocks. The reactions occur under granulite fades metamorphic conditions, either during isobaric cooling or with increasing pressure at high temperature. ?? 1983 Springer-Verlag.

  17. A shock-metamorphic model for silicate darkening and compositionally variable plagioclase in CK and ordinary chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, A.E. )

    1992-04-01

    Silicate darkening in ordinary chondrites (OC) is caused by tiny grains of metallic Fe-Ni and troilite occurring mainly within curvilinear trails that traverse silicate interiors and decorate or, in some cases, cut across silicate grain boundaries. Highly shocked OC tend to have greater degrees of silicate darkening than lightly shocked OC; this indicates that silicate darkening is probably a result of shock metamorphism. The low Fe-FeS eutectic temperature (988C) renders metal and troilite susceptible to melting and mobilization during shock heating. Unshocked OC tend to have plagioclase with uniform compositions; shocked OC tend to have plagioclase with more variable (albeit still stoichiometric) compositions. The low impedance of plagioclase to shock compression makes it particularly susceptible to melting and mobilization; this is consistent with the molten appearance of plagioclase in highly shocked OC (e.g., Rose City and Paragould). CK chondrites also have compositionally variable plagioclase. The common association of silicate darkening with compositionally variable plagioclase is consistent with the hypothesis that both are products of shock metamorphism. Some CK and OC chondrites exhibit light shock effects in olivine that are consistent with equilibrium peak shock pressures that are too low to account for the silicate darkening or opaque shock veins in these meteorites. Therefore, the olivine in these chondrites may have been annealed after intense shock produced these effects. A few CK chondrites that contain olivine with undulose or mosaic extinction (e.g., LEW87009 and EET83311) may have been shocked again, after annealing.

  18. Thermal Emission Spectrometer Mosaics of Impact Craters: Progress on Shocked Plagioclase Detections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Staid, M. I.; Titus, T. N.; Gaddis, L.

    2003-01-01

    High shock pressures disorder the mineral lattice of plagioclase feldspars and cause weakening and shifts in thermal infrared absorption bands related to an increase in diaplectic glass content, particularly at shock pressures above 20-25 GPa [1- 9]. We are continuing our investigation of spectral deconvolutions of TES mosaics and mosaics using standard TES orbits for eight impact crater areas. Using a combination of mineral laboratory spectra and spectra of experimentally shocked bytownite feldspars [5] to deconvolve the TES spectra, we find that locations of shocked feldspar detections are not restricted to ejecta near large craters.

  19. Ion microprobe magnesium isotope analysis of plagioclase and hibonite from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, R. W.; Bischoff, A.

    1984-01-01

    Ion and electron microprobes were used to examine Mg-26 excesses from Al-26 decay in four Al-rich objects from the type 3 ordinary hibonite clast in the Dhajala chondrite. The initial Al-26/Al-27 ratio was actually significantly lower than Al-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites. Also, no Mg-26 excesses were found in three plagioclase-bearing chondrules that were also examined. The Mg-26 excesses in the hibonite chondrites indicated a common origin for chondrites with the excesses. The implied Al-26 content in a proposed parent body could not, however, be confirmed as a widespread heat source in the early solar system.

  20. Diffuse reflectance spectra of orthopyroxene, olivine, and plagioclase as a function of composition and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Le, L.; Galindo, C.; Morris, R.; Lauer, V.; Vilas, F.

    1993-01-01

    Although many similarities exist between meteorite spectra and 'primitive' asteroids, there are unexplained discrepancies. These discrepancies do not appear to arise from grain size effects. Assuming that primitive meteorites did in fact originate from the 'primitive' asteroids, we believe that there are two testable explanations for the observed spectral discrepancies: compositional or structural differences. We have begun to synthesize and collect reflectance and Mossbauer spectra of pertinent materials, beginning with olivine, pyroxene, and plagioclase (all found in primitive meteorites), and to assess the possible effects composition may have on spectral features. Our study focuses on the combination of composition and structural effects.

  1. Effect of Phase Transition of Intermediate Plagioclase on Elastic Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Y.; Ishikawa, M.; Arima, M.

    2005-12-01

    We measured compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocities of plagioclases with albite, labradorite, and bytownite composition up to 700°C at 1 GPa with a piston cylinder high-pressure apparatus. The Vp and Vs measurements were conducted with the pulse reflection method. Simultaneous Vp and Vs measurements were carried out using 10°Y-cut LiNbO3 transducer. The discontinuous change in temperature derivative of Vp and Vs at 400°C is observed in the labradorite while the albite and bytownite show linear Vp and Vs change with elevating temperature up to 700°C. The temperature derivative of Vp (dVp/dT) and Vs (dVs/dT) is -0.9x10-4 km s-1 °C-1 and -1.2x10-4 km s-1 °C-1 in the albite, respectively. In the bytownite dVp/dT is -1.2x10-4 km s-1 °C-1 and dVs/dT is -0.9x10-4 km s-1 °C-1. The dVp/dT and dVs/dT in the labradorite is -0.7x10-4 and -1.2x10-4 km s-1 °C-1 below 400°C, respectively. Above 400°C dVp/dT and dVs/dT increase to -3.0x10-4 and -3.3x10-4 km s-1 °C-1, respectively. The XRD analyses of the labradorite before and after high P-T measurements show that the discontinuous change in temperature derivative of Vp and Vs in the labradorite would be the result of phase transition of plagioclase. The present data suggest that Vp and Vs of intermediate plagioclase above 400°C could not be evaluated by the simple mixing theory using the low temperature Vp and Vs values of end-member plagioclases (albite and anorthite).

  2. A Plagioclase-Augite Inclusion in Caddo County: Low-Temperature Melt of Primitive Achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, H.; Baba, T.; Saiki, K.; Otsuki, M.; Ebihara, M.

    1993-07-01

    Caddo County is an IAB-iron meteorite with silicate inclusions. Its silicate inclusion with olivine and clinopyroxene as major minerals was studied by INAA by Palme et al. [1]. We report mineralogy and INAA data of an inclusion with abundant augite and plagioclase, which will provide us with information on the missing materials removed from sourse regions of the primitive achondrites. The PTS of Caddo County, 7.5 x 5.5 mm in size has been studied by mineralogical techniques including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with digital imaging utilities. A thick slice of the specimen next to the PTS was crushed and separated into metal- rich and a silicate-rich fractions for determination of lithophile and sidelophile element concentrations by INAA. The PTS shows aligned textures of silicate inclusions in metallic matrix, suggesting that some parts are intruded into this place. Augite (Aug) and plagioclase fragments are rounded and anhedral, and numerous metal veins fill interstices of the silicate grains. The silicate parts are mainly composed of augite and plagioclase with additional small amounts of minor orthopyroxene (Opx). Olivine is present only as small grains. Crystals of augite reach up to 0.8 x 0.4 mm in size and plagioclase crystals up to 0.6 x 0.3 mm in size. Many plagioclase grains in the metal matrix within one region shear a common crystallographic orientation as indicated by polysynthetic twin lamellae. The Opx distributes in a limited region and Opx and Aug are in contact with curved boundaries even within a grain. The pyroxene compositions are Aug (Ca44.5Mg52.5Fe3) and Opx (Ca2Mg91.5Fe6.5). The plagioclase compositions (Or3Ab80An17) are Na rich and show small ranges from grain to grain. The compositions of olivine (Fa97.5) are similar to that of winonaites [2]. The modal abundances are: Aug 20 vol%, plagioclase 28%, Opx 3%, metallic irons etc. 49% (excluding minor olivine and Opx). Na, Al and REE are enriched in

  3. Change in Magma Dynamics at Okataina Rhyolite Caldera revealed by Plagioclase Textures and Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shane, P. A. R.

    2015-12-01

    A fundamental reorganization of magma dynamics at Okataina volcano, New Zealand, occurred at 26 ka involving a change from smaller volume, high-temperature rhyodacite magmas to a lower eruptive tempo of larger volume, low-temperature, rhyolite magmas. Zircon studies demonstrate the presence of a periodically active, long-lived (100,000 yr) magmatic reservoir. However, there is little correlation between periods of zircon crystallization and eruption events. In contrast, the changing magmatic dynamics is revealed in plagioclase growth histories. Crystals from the ~0.7 ka Kaharoa eruption are characterized by resorbed cores displaying a cellular-texture of high-An (>40) zones partially replaced by low-An (<30) zones, surrounded by a resorption surface and a prominent normal-zoned rim (An50-20). Elevated An, Fe, Mg, Sr and Ti follow the resorption surface and display rimward depletion trends, accompanied by Ba and REE enrichment. The zonation is consistent with fractional crystallization and cooling. The cores display wide trace element diversity, pointing to crystallization in a variety of melts, before transport and mixing into a common magma where the rims grew. Plagioclase from the ~36 ka Hauparu eruption display several regrowth zones separated by resorption surfaces, which surround small resorbed cores with a spongy cellular texture of variable An content (An 40-50). The crystals display step-wise re-growth of successively higher An, Fe, Mg and Ti content, consistent with progressive mafic recharge. Two crystal groups are distinguished by trace element chemistry indicating growth in separate melts and co-occurrence via magma-mingling. The contrasting zoning patterns in plagioclase correspond to the evolutionary history of magmatism at Okataina. Emptying of the magma reservoir following caldera eruption at 46 ka reduced barriers to mafic magma ascent. This is recorded by the frequent resorption and recharge episodes in Hauparu crystals. Subsequent re

  4. A study of strontium diffusion in plagioclase using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Daniele J.; Watson, E. Bruce

    1994-12-01

    Strontium chemical diffusion has been measured in plagioclase of three intermediate compositions (between An 23 and An 67) under anhydrous, 1-atmosphere conditions. A strontium oxide-aluminosilicate powder mixture was used as the diffusant source material, with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) used to measure diffusion profiles. Over the temperature range 725-1075°C, the following Arrhenius relations were obtained for diffusion normal to (001) ( D in m 2 s -1): Oligoclase (An 23): log D = (-6.07 ± 0.58) + (-273 ± 13 kJ mol -1)/RT . Andesine (An 43): log D = (-6.75 ± 0.33) + (-265 ± 8 kJ mol -1)/RT . Labradorite (An 67): log D = (-7.03 ± 0.37) + (-268 ± 8 kJ mol -1)/RT . In the labradorite, diffusion of Sr normal to (010) was somewhat slower (by ~0.7 log units) than diffusion perpendicular to (001). The activation energy for diffusion normal to (010) appears to follow a trend similar to that observed for diffusion perpendicular to (001). In oligoclase, diffusion normal to (001) also appears to be somewhat faster than diffusion normal to (010), but the differences are less pronounced than in labradorite. No significant crystallographic anisotropy was noted in the andesine. The results show a clear trend of increasing Sr diffusivity with decreasing An content of the plagioclase. Profiles of Ca and Na, measured with RBS and Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) respectively, indicate that Sr is exchanging with both of these species in the plagioclase. In each feldspar composition, decreases in Ca and Na in the near-surface region are nearly proportional to their bulk concentrations, indicating that there is no significant substitutional preference of Sr for either cation in those feldspars investigated. NRA measurements of Al, showing a corresponding uptake of Al and Sr, suggest that a coupled exchange, possibly Sr +2 + Al +3 → Na +1 + Si +4, is taking place when Sr exchanges with Na. Chemical diffusion of Sr in calcic plagioclase is dominated by Sr +2

  5. Plagioclase-peridotites recording the incipient stage of oceanic basin formation: new constraints from the Nain ophiolites (central Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirnia Naeini, Tahmineh; Arai, Shoji; Saccani, Emilio

    2016-04-01

    Pargasite-bearing plagioclase peridotites of Nain have recorded a complex tectono-magmatic and -metamorphic history. Based on texture, as well as mineral major and trace element chemistry, two stages of facies exchange have been documented in the peridotites, namely, from plagioclase to spinel and vice versa. The earliest event that influenced the peridotites was a low degree of flux melting (<4%) which occurred at the pargasite stability field. Melting resulted in a small fraction of highly enriched melt as well as a depleted chemistry of the pargasites and coexisting pyroxenes. The produced melt fraction was scanty, and consequently hardly mobile. It crystallized in-situ in the peridotites in form of plagioclase. After the melting stage, cooling caused the peridotites to recrystallize in spinel facies. Recrystallization obliterated all textural features associated with formation of magmatic plagioclase in the peridotites. However, lines of evidence are documented by the chemistry of the spinel-facies mineral assemblage, which strongly suggest the pre-existence of plagioclases. This evidence includes a positive Eu anomaly in pargasites and pyroxenes, as well as a Zr negative anomaly in orthopyroxenes. The spinel-facies assemblage subsequently recrystallized in the plagioclase stability field. Recrystallization occurred in various degrees. Strong recrystallization resulted in the formation of modally typical, but atypically enriched, harzburgite from the lherzolite. Remarkable textural characteristics of peridotites that indicate subsolidus origin for plagioclases include: (1) plagioclase heterogeneous distribution, (2) plagioclase exclusive concurrence with spinel and, (3) plagioclase modal positive correlation with olivine but negative correlation with pyroxenes and pargasite. The transition from spinel to plagioclase-facies was associated with the following compositional variations in the peridotite minerals: (1) Al, Mg, Ni decrease and Cr, Ti, Fe increase in

  6. Evolution of groundwater chemical composition by plagioclase hydrolysis in Norwegian anorthosites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, David; Frengstad, Bjørn

    2006-03-01

    The Precambrian Egersund anorthosites exhibit a wide range of groundwater chemical composition (pH 5.40-9.93, Ca 2+ 1.5-41 mg/L, Na + 12.3-103 mg/L). They also exhibit an evolutionary trend, culminating in high pH, Na-rich, low-Ca groundwaters, that is broadly representative of Norwegian crystalline bedrock aquifers in general. Simple PHREEQC modelling of monomineralic plagioclase-CO 2-H 2O systems demonstrates that the evolution of such waters can be explained solely by plagioclase weathering, coupled with calcite precipitation, without invoking cation exchange. Some degree of reaction in open CO 2 systems seems necessary to generate the observed maximum solute concentrations, while subsequent system closure can be invoked to explain high observed pH values. Empirical data provide observations required or predicted by such a model: (i) the presence of secondary calcite in silicate aquifer systems, (ii) the buffering of pH at around 8.0-8.3 by calcite precipitation, (iii) significant soil gas CO 2 concentrations ( PCO 2 > 10 -2 atm) even in poorly vegetated sub-arctic catchments, and (iv) the eventual re-accumulation of calcium in highly evolved, high pH waters.

  7. A Clinopyroxene-Plagioclase Geobarometer for A-type Silicic Volcanic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J.; Iveson, A. A.; Davis, K.; Johnson, T. A.; Gahagan, S.; Ellis, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    Constraining the crustal storage depths of magmas is important in understanding volcanism. The reaction: anorthite (pl) = Ca-Tschermak's (cpx) + silica (Q or liq) has a large volume change and hence offers potential as a geobarometer, but has not been extensively exploited as such. One of the chief barriers to its wide application is consistent estimation of melt silica activity for assemblages that lack quartz. We have skirted this problem by confining attention to metaluminous silicic compositions (SiO2 > 60% by weight), for which silica activity during crystallization is presumed to be close to 1, and calibrated the barometer for the range 0 - 2 GPa using the LEPR database and additional experiments from the literature. Additional improvement is obtained by excluding hydrous phase-bearing assemblages. Despite the analytical uncertainties present in older experimental investigations, with knowledge of temperature, and clinopyroxene, plagioclase and host melt compositions, pressures for amphibole- and biotite-free dacites and rhyolites can be estimated to ±0.17 GPa (1 sigma). The limitations of the barometer render it most applicable to intraplate, A-type rhyolites. Application to one such system, the Snake River Plain rhyolites, indicate that both melt-hosted phenocrysts and clinopyroxene-plagioclase aggregate grains found in these rhyolites formed at low pressures, <0.5 GPa. This is consistent with isotopic evidence for a shallow crustal origin for Snake River Plain rhyolites.

  8. Chromite-Plagioclase Assemblages as a New Shock Indicator; Implications for the Shock and Thermal Histories of Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    Chromite in ordinary chondrites (OC) can be used as a shock indicator. A survey of 76 equilibrated H, L and LL chondrites shows that unshocked chromite grains occur in equant, subhedral and rounded morphologies surrounded by silicate or intergrown with metallic Fe-Ni and/or troilite. Some unmelted chromite grains are fractured or crushed during whole-rock brecciation. Others are transected by opaque veins; the veins form when impacts cause localized heating of metal-troilite intergrowths above the Fe-FeS eutectic (988 C), mobilization of metal-troilite melts, and penetration of the melt into fractures in chromite grains. Chromite-plagioclase assemblages occur in nearly every shock-stage S3-S6 OC; the assemblages range in size from 20-300 microns and consist of 0.2-20-micron-size euhedral, subhedral, anhedral and rounded chromite grains surrounded by plagioclase or glass of plagioclase composition. Plagioclase has a low impedance to shock compression. Heat from shock-melted plagioclase caused adjacent chromite grains to melt; chromite grains crystallized from this melt. Those chromite grains in the assemblages that are completely surrounded by plagioclase are generally richer in Al2O3, than unmelted, matrix chromite grains in the same meteorite. Chromite veinlets (typically 0.5-2 microns thick and 10-300 microns long) occur typically in the vicinity of chromite-plagioclase assemblages. The veinlets formed from chromite-plagioclase melts that were injected into fractures in neighboring silicate grains; chromite crystallized in the fractures and the residual plagioclase-rich melt continued to flow, eventually pooling to form plagioclase-rich melt pockets. Chromite-rich chondrules (consisting mainly of olivine, plagioclase-normative mesostasis, and 5-15 vol.% chromite) occur in many shocked OC and OC regolith breccias but they are absent from primitive type-3 OC. They may have formed by impact melting chromite, plagioclase and adjacent mafic silicates during higher

  9. Crystal Zoning in Deccan Giant Plagioclase Basalts: Implications for a Short Duration of Deccan Trap Eruption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, M. R.; Sen, G.; Hart, G. L.; Wolff, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    The lower formations in the Western Ghats Type Section of the 65 Ma Deccan Traps are characterized by spectacular Giant Plagioclase Basalt (GPB) flows that cap individual formations. These flows have plagioclase phenocrysts that reach up to 5 cm in length and constitute as much as 40% by mode of the rock. The lavas that host these giant crystals are also the most differentiated members of their respective formations. In this study, we present new data on crystal sizes, elemental and Sr-isotopic compositions of GPB crystals from the oldest Jawhar Formation, infer their petrogenesis, and discuss their implications for the duration of the Deccan eruption in the Western Ghats. Surprisingly, liquid line of descent calculations (COMAGMAT) suggest that a high-MgO lava from a younger formation represents the most likely parent for the lavas belonging to this oldest formation. Replenishment of magma chambers by less evolved magma along with fractionation and contamination in the conduit system may give rise to the differences in chemistry within and among formations. Individual giant crystals are compositionally near-homogeneous with small (2-3%) changes in An-content, and show oscillatory zoning. Though the crystals are near-homogeneous in major and trace elements, cathodoluminescence imaging reveals distinct core and rim zonations in some crystals. These cores and rims also differ markedly in their 87Sr/86Sr ratio, with ratios of ~0.7096 in the cores and ~0.7106 in the rims. 87Sr/86Sr of the core is similar to that of the groundmass plagioclase in a flow that directly underlies the GPB, whereas the rims have the same composition as the groundmass plagioclase of the GPB flow itself. Thus, the cores of the giant phenocrysts grew in the magma that fed the older flow and their rims grew in the mixed and differentiated batch of magma that later erupted as a GPB flow. Assuming that crystal growth continued uninterrupted, the growth time of the crystal would be the incubation

  10. High geomagnetic intensity during the mid-Cretaceous from Thellier analyses of single plagioclase crystals.

    PubMed

    Tarduno, J A; Cottrell, R D; Smirnov, A V

    2001-03-01

    Recent numerical simulations have yielded the most efficient geodynamo, having the largest dipole intensity when reversal frequency is low. Reliable paleointensity data are limited but heretofore have suggested that reversal frequency and paleointensity are decoupled. We report data from 56 Thellier-Thellier experiments on plagioclase crystals separated from basalts of the Rajmahal Traps (113 to 116 million years old) of India that formed during the Cretaceous Normal Polarity Superchron. These data suggest a time-averaged paleomagnetic dipole moment of 12.5 +/- 1.4 x 10(22) amperes per square meter, three times greater than mean Cenozoic and Early Cretaceous-Late Jurassic dipole moments when geomagnetic reversals were frequent. This result supports a correlation between intervals of low reversal frequency and high geomagnetic field strength. PMID:11230692

  11. Strong climate and tectonic control on plagioclase weathering in granitic terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, C.; Brantley, S.; Richter, D.D.B.; Blum, A.; Dixon, J.; White, A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Investigations to understand linkages among climate, erosion and weathering are central to quantifying landscape evolution. We approach these linkages through synthesis of regolith data for granitic terrain compiled with respect to climate, geochemistry, and denudation rates for low sloping upland profiles. Focusing on Na as a proxy for plagioclase weathering, we quantified regolith Na depletion, Na mass loss, and the relative partitioning of denudation to physical and chemical contributions. The depth and magnitude of regolith Na depletion increased continuously with increasing water availability, except for locations with mean annual temperature <5??C that exhibited little Na depletion, and locations with physical erosion rates <20gm-2yr-1 that exhibited deep and complete regolith Na depletion. Surface Na depletion also tended to decrease with increasing physical erosion. Depth-integrated Na mass loss and regolith depth were both three orders of magnitude greater in the fully depleted, low erosion rate sites relative to other locations. These locations exhibited strong erosion-limitation of Na chemical weathering rates based on correlation of Na chemical weathering rate to total Na denudation. Sodium weathering rates in cool locations with positive annual water balance were strongly correlated to total Na denudation and precipitation, and exhibited an average apparent activation energy (Ea) of 69kJmol-1 Na. The remaining water-limited locations exhibited kinetic limitation of Na weathering rates with an Ea of 136kJmol-1 Na, roughly equivalent to the sum of laboratory measures of Ea and dissolution reaction enthalpy for albite. Water availability is suggested as the dominant factor limiting rate kinetics in the water-limited systems. Together, these data demonstrate marked transitions and nonlinearity in how climate and tectonics correlate to plagioclase chemical weathering and Na mass loss. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Sims Analysis of Water Abundance and Hydrogen Isotope in Lunar Highland Plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Guan, Yunbin; Chen, Yang; Peslier, Anne H.; Zhang, Youxue; Liu, Yang; Rossman, George R.; Eiler, John M.; Neal, Clive R.

    2015-01-01

    The detection of indigenous water in mare basaltic glass beads has challenged the view established since the Apollo era of a "dry" Moon. Since this discovery, measurements of water in lunar apatite, olivine-hosted melt inclusions, agglutinates, and nominally anhydrous minerals have confirmed that lunar igneous materials contain water, implying that some parts of lunar mantle may have as much water as Earth's upper mantle. The interpretation of hydrogen (H) isotopes in lunar samples, however, is controversial. The large variation of H isotope ratios in lunar apatite (delta Deuterium = -202 to +1010 per mille) has been taken as evidence that water in the lunar interior comes from the lunar mantle, solar wind protons, and/or comets. The very low deuterium/H ratios in lunar agglutinates indicate that solar wind protons have contributed to their hydrogen content. Conversely, H isotopes in lunar volcanic glass beads and olivine-hosted melt inclusions being similar to those of common terrestrial igneous rocks, suggest a common origin for water in both Earth and Moon. Lunar water could be inherited from carbonaceous chondrites, consistent with the model of late accretion of chondrite-type materials to the Moon as proposed by. One complication about the sources of lunar water, is that geologic processes (e.g., late accretion and magmatic degassing) may have modified the H isotope signatures of lunar materials. Recent FTIR analyses have shown that plagioclases in lunar ferroan anorthosite contain approximately 6 ppm H2O. So far, ferroan anorthosite is the only available lithology that is believed to be a primary product of the lunar magma ocean (LMO). A possible consequence is that the LMO could have contained up to approximately 320 ppm H2O. Here we examine the possible sources of water in the LMO through measurements of water abundances and H isotopes in plagioclase of two ferroan anorthosites and one troctolite from lunar highlands.

  13. Black Butte Dacitic Dome, Ca: A Study of Ascent Rates Using Amphibole and Plagioclase Reactions and Crystal Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCanta, M.; Rutherford, M.; Hammer, J.

    2001-12-01

    Magma ascent rate can be quantified petrologically utilizing measurement of (1) decompression-driven amphibole breakdown rims, (2) compositional changes in plagioclase phenocryst rims and (3) crystal size distribution (CSD) of groundmass plagioclase microlites, that are known to have grown during ascent and cooling. Measurements of these parameters in both natural and experimental samples allows for an investigation into the relative rates and correlations between amphibole breakdown, plagioclase growth (of both phenocrysts and microlites) and magma ascent. Black Butte, Ca provides a good opportunity to study the effects of ascent rate as determined using the above three methods. Black Butte consists of four overlapping dacitic domes on the southwest flank of Mt. Shasta. At Black Butte the natural phase assemblage consists of amphiboles with well developed breakdown rims, homogeneous An74 plagioclase phenocryst cores decreasing monotonically to An55 rims, and extensive groundmass plagioclase microphenocryst growth. Amphibole breakdown rim widths in natural samples are 30-45 μ m, consistent over all four domes. It is important to note that unlike any other studied dome, these samples exhibit a lack of variable rim thicknesses in any one section, indicating little to no magma mixing in the conduit. Plagioclase phenocryst rim widths, defined by a compositional change, are 10-30 μ m. Textural analysis of the groundmass indicates that crystallization of plagioclase microlites accounts for ~57 volume%, with little variation between samples. CSD plots are approximately log-linear over the size range 1-250 μ m. The characteristic microphenocryst size, volumetric number density, and growth rate are 33μ m, 1.5E-5, ~1.3E-5, respectively. Isothermal, constant rate decompression (P1=200 MPa, P2=2 MPa, dP/dt=6 MPa/day) experiments were run to determine the conditions necessary to produce the rims measured in the natural samples. The starting material was a partially crushed

  14. Crystal-chemical controls on the partitioning of Sr and Ba between plagioclase feldspar, silicate melts, and hydrothermal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundy, Jonathan D.; Wood, Bernard J.

    1991-01-01

    The isothermal (750°C) experiments of LAGACHE and DUJON (1987) reveal that the partitioning of Sr between plagioclase feldspar and hydrothermal solutions is a funtion of the anorthite (An) content of the plagioclase, indicating that crystal chemistry may exert a powerful influence on trace element partitioning. In order to compare these results with those on trace element partitioning between plagioclase and silicate melts we have compiled from the literature a large dataset of experimental and volcanic distribution coefficients ( D's) for Sr (and Ba). These data, which span a compositional range from lunar basalt to high silica rhyolite and a temperature range of over 650°C, show a relationship between DSr (and DBa) and mole fraction An ( XAn) which is similar to that exhibited by the hydrothermal results obtained at constant temperature. Plots of In DSr and In DBa versus XAn are linear with negative slope, indicating that both elements are more compatible in albite than anorthite. In terms of molar distribution coefficients ( D Sr∗) the hydrothermal and silicate melt data display an identical linear relationship between RT In D Sr∗ (where T is the absolute temperature in K and R is the gas constant, 8.314 JK -1 mol -1) and XAn. We conclude therefore that crystal chemistry provides the dominant control on partitioning of Sr and Ba into plagioclase and that the effects of temperature, pressure, and fluid composition are minor. Apparent relationships between DSr (and DBa) and the reciprocal temperature (1/ T) are artefacts of the linear relationships between XAn and 1/ T in the experimental studies. By defining a Henry's law standard state for the silicate melts and hydrothermal solutions, and considering plagioclases to be ternary regular solutions, we are able to relate the observed relationships between RT In D i∗ (where i is Ba or Sr) and XAn to the excess free energies of the trace element partitioning reactions between plagioclase and melt or

  15. Calc-alkalic vs. tholeiitic series revisited: new insight from isotopic micro-analyses of plagioclase phenocrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Shimizu, N.

    2004-12-01

    Major, trace and Sr isotopic compositions of plagioclase phenocrysts in calc-alkalic and tholeiitic rocks from Zao volcano, NE Japan were mapped with micro-analyses techniques. Plagioclase in tholeiitic rocks possesses a constant Sr isotopic ratio of ~0.7042, regardless with its Ca/Na ratio or the degree of magmatic differentiation. On the other hand, Sr isotopic ratios of plagioclase in calc-alkalic rocks are lower (0.7034-0.7041) than those for tholeiites, and more importantly, increase with decreasing Ca/Na ratios. Generally accepted mechanisms for production of those two types of arc magmas are fractional crystallization of a mantle-derived basalt magma for tholeiitic rocks and mixing between tholeiitic, mafic magmas and crust-derived, felsic magmas for calc-alkalic rocks. However, the above observation does not support this. Alternatively, tholeiitic magmas could be produced by anatexis of isotopically enriched, lower crustal material; calc-alkalic andesites are mixing products between a mantle-derived, isotopically depleted basalt magma and crust-derived, tholeiitic felsic magmas. Trace element characteristics of such mantle-derived, primary O^calc-alkalicO basalt are deduced based on plagioclase compositions and inferred distribution coefficients.

  16. Valid garnet biotite (GB) geothermometry and garnet aluminum silicate plagioclase quartz (GASP) geobarometry in metapelitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chun-Ming; Cheng, Ben-He

    2006-06-01

    At present there are many calibrations of both the garnet-biotite (GB) thermometer and the garnet-aluminum silicate-plagioclase-quartz (GASP) barometer that may confuse geologists in choosing a reliable thermometer and/or barometer. To test the accuracy of the GB thermometers we have applied the various GB thermometers to reproduce the experimental data and data from natural metapelitic rocks of various prograde sequences, inverted metamorphic zones and thermal contact aureoles. We have concluded that the four GB thermometers (Perchuk, L.L., Lavrent'eva, I.V., 1983. Experimental investigation of exchange equilibria in the system cordierite-garnet-biotite. In: Saxena, S.K. (ed.) Kinetics and equilibrium in mineral reactions. Springer-Verlag New York, Berlin, Heidelberg. pp. 199-239.; Kleemann, U., Reinhardt, J., 1994. Garnet-biotite thermometry revised: the effect of Al VI and Ti in biotite. European Journal of Mineralogy 6, 925-941.; Holdaway, M.J., 2000. Application of new experimental and garnet Margules data to the garnet-biotite geothermometer. American Mineralogist 85, 881-892., Model 6AV; Kaneko, Y., Miyano, T., 2004. Recalibration of mutually consistent garnet-biotite and garnet-cordierite geothermometers. Lithos 73, 255-269. Model B) are the most valid and reliable of this kind of thermometer. More specifically, we prefer the Holdaway (Holdaway, M.J., 2000. Application of new experimental and garnet Margules data to the garnet-biotite geothermometer. American Mineralogist 85, 881-892.) and the Kleemann and Reinhardt (Kleemann, U., Reinhardt, J., 1994. Garnet-biotite thermometry revised: the effect of Al VI and Ti in biotite. European Journal of Mineralogy 6, 925-941.) calibrations due to their small errors in reproducing the experimental temperatures and good accuracy in successfully discerning the systematic temperature changes of the different sequences. In addition, after applying the GASP barometer to 335 natural metapelitic samples containing one kind

  17. Application of the Plagioclase-Liquid Hygrometer to the Bishop Tuff: Consistency with Melt Inclusion H2O Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolles, J.; Lange, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    High-silica (74-77 wt% SiO2) rhyolites are the most evolved magmas on Earth and constitute some of the largest eruptions (1000s of km3). Of these, one classic example is the Bishop Tuff, a 760 ka eruption of >670 km3 of high-silica rhyolite erupted from Long Valley caldera, CA. Documenting dissolved H2O contents is crucial for understanding its origin and evolution. Analyses of water contents measured in quartz-hosted melt inclusions from the Bishop Tuff (Wallace et al. 1999; Anderson et al. 2000) show that the Early and Middle Bishop Tuff (Ig1Eb, Ig2Ea) have higher water contents (≤ 6.3 wt% H2O) than the Late Bishop Tuff (Ig2NWa; ≤ 5.2 wt%). Our work utilizes the revised plagioclase-liquid hygrometer (Waters & Lange, 2015), which is applicable to rhyolite, to evaluate internal consistency between Fe-Ti oxide temperatures, the plagioclase hygrometer, and melt inclusion H2O analyses. Two-oxide thermometry (Ghiorso & Evans, 2008), using all possible Fe-Ti oxide pairs (between 56 and 1500 pairs for individual samples), was carried out on 2-3 pumice clasts for each sampled eruptive unit. Resulting temperatures (°C ± 1σ) for individual clasts are: 705 ± 12, 728 ± 10 for unit Ig1Eb; 710 ± 12, 728 ± 11 for unit Ig2Ea; 752 ±10, 776 ± 8, 778 ± 7 for unit Ig2NWa; 791 ± 7, 795 ± 8 for unit Ig2Nb. The compositions of the most calcic plagioclase phenocrysts in the Early and Middle units are An17-19, whereas in the Late units they are An29-30. When the Fe-Ti oxide temperatures, whole rock analyses, and plagioclase compositions are incorporated into the plagioclase hygrometer, they give water contents at the onset of plagioclase crystallization of 6.6-6.9 wt% for the Early and Middle units and 4.8-4.9 wt % for the Late units. These results show internal consistency between melt inclusion analyses of water, Fe-Ti oxide thermometry, and the plagioclase-liquid hygrometer; they further support a temperature gradient across the Early, Middle, and Late Bishop Tuff units.

  18. Multiphase inclusions in plagioclase from anorthosites in the Stillwater Complex, Montana: implications for the origin of the anorthosites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loferski, P.J.; Arculus, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Multiphase inclusions, consisting of clinopyroxene+ilmenite+apatite, occur within cumulus plagioclase grains from anorthosites in the Stillwater Complex, Montana, and in other rocks from the Middle Banded series of the intrusion. The textures and constant modal mineralogy of the inclusions indicate that they were incorporated in the plagioclase as liquid droplets that later crystallized rather than as solid aggregates. Their unusual assemblage, including a distinctive manganiferous ilmenite and the presence of baddeleyite (ZrO2), indicates formation from an unusual liquid. A process involving silicater liquid immiscibility is proposed, whereby small globules of a liquid enriched in Mg, Fe, Ca, Ti, P, REE, Zr and Mn exsolved from the main liquid that gave rise to the anorthosites, became trapped in the plagioclase, and later crystallized to form the inclusions. The immiscibility could have occurred locally within compositional boundaries around crystallizing plagioclase grains or it could have occurred pervasively throughout the liquid. It is proposed that the two immiscible liquids were analogous, n terms of their melt structures, to immiscible liquid pairs reported in the literature both in experiments and in natural basalts. For the previously reported pairs, immiscibility is between a highly polymerized liquid, typically granitic in composition, and a depolymerized liquid, typically ferrobasaltic in composition. In the case of the anorthosites, the depolymerized liquid is represented by the inclusions, and the other liquid was a highly polymerized aluminosilicate melt with a high normative plagioclase content from which the bulk of the anorthosites crystallized. Crystallization of the anorthosites from this highly polymerized liquid accounts for various distinctive textural and chemical features of the anorthosites compared to other rocks in the Stillwater Complex. A lack of correlation between P contents and chondrite-normalized rare earth element (REE) ratios

  19. Magnetic and plagioclase fabrics in Early Cretaceous mafic dykes from Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, M.; Greiling, R. O.; Kontny, A. M.; Trumbull, R. B.

    2011-12-01

    Mafic dyke swarms are major components of the South Atlantic Large Igneous Province, which originated during the Cretaceous break up of Africa and South America. We present data from the major Henties Bay-Outjo dyke swarm (HOD) in coastal and inland NW Namibia where dykes have been emplaced into the Neoproterozoic Damara mobile belt. Most of the dykes strike at a high angle to the coast (NE-SW), but minor proportions are coast-parallel (NNW-SSE), N-S or NNE-SSW. Depending on dyke thickness (ca. 0.1 m to >100 m), the rocks are variably fine- to medium grained with chilled margins. With few exceptions the dyke compositions are tholeiitic basalt to basaltic andesite. Main minerals are plagioclase, clinopyroxene, olivine, Fe-Ti oxides, and accessory apatite and sulphides. For the magnetic study, we investigated 1140 standard cylinders from 41 dykes. The samples were studied microscopically and the following magnetic properties were determined: bulk susceptibility, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (P'), field dependence, hysteresis, Natural Remanent Magnetization (NRM) and Anisotropy of Anhysteretic Remanent Magnetization (AARM). Magnetic susceptibilities vary between 0.16 and 151*10-3 SI units. Microscopic studies and measurements of the temperature-dependent susceptibility identify magnetite and titanomagnetite as the dominant magnetic minerals. Hysteresis loops show that the magnetic domain states of titanomagnetite are pseudo-single or a mixture of single and multi-domain. Anisotropy is mostly low, with P' values between 1.01 and 1.15. Rare values of up to 1.33 reflect a strong magmatic flow fabric. The shapes of the AMS ellipsoids range from prolate to neutral and oblate. Two main fabric types (normal and inverse) can be recognized. We used the normal fabric type samples to interpret magmatic flow fabrics and attribute steep magnetic lineations of normal fabrics to vertical magma flow and shallow magnetic lineations to horizontal flow along the dyke planes. In

  20. Crystal origins and magmatic system beneath Ngauruhoe volcano (New Zealand) revealed by plagioclase textures and compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coote, Alisha C.; Shane, Phil

    2016-09-01

    The textural variation and compositional zoning of plagioclase in pre-historic and historic basaltic andesite lava flows from Ngauruhoe volcano reveals extensive crystal recycling from a multi-level magma system. Most phenocrysts have a calcic (~ An80-90) resorbed core with diffuse or no zonation that is depleted in Fe and Mg. Some cores display patchy zonation from replacement by high An crystallization prior to resorption. The cores are mantled by oscillatory-zoned rims of lower An content (< An60), and are enriched in Fe and Mg. Rim zones vary in relative thickness and textural complexity, and include sieve-textured bands, and/or cyclic calcic growth following dissolution events. A subordinate crystal population display similar features, but lack a resorbed core. These latter crystals display overall rimward enrichment in An, Fe and Mg. The resorbed cores crystallized from magmas more mafic than those erupted at Ngauruhoe, and slow cooling and prolonged storage resulted in loss of An zoning patterns and depletion of Fe and Mg by diffusion. These crystals are likely to have originated from deep cumulates or intrusions, and were subsequently entrained in ascending magmas. Patchy-textured cores were produced during decompression in a water under-saturated magma and staged ascent. The diversity in crystal cores reflect different conduits and ascent histories. The crystal rims grew in a more differentiated magma reservoir, and are in equilibrium with the erupted melt. Most of the zoning patterns in the rim zone require water pressure and/or temperature changes. These changes could have been caused by convective self-mixing in a closed system and/or the intrusion of hydrous melts of similar bulk composition. Other crystals display rimward elemental enrichments consistent with mafic recharge. Previously reported rimward enrichment in 87Sr-86Sr compositions can be explained by the re-cycled origin of the crystal cores and progressive crustal assimilation at shallower

  1. Lunar rock types - The role of plagioclase in non-mare and highland rock types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, N. J.; Gast, P. W.; Nyquist, L. E.; Rhodes, J. M.; Bansal, B. M.; Wiesmann, H.; Shih, C.-Y.

    1973-01-01

    Some nonmare and highland rock types (14310 type KREEP and very high Al2O3 basalts) have the internal chemical variations expected for a plagioclase-liquid system. The observed Eu variations in these rock types suggest a D(Eu) 1/p of 0.6 to 0.7. The Sr variations suggest a D(Sr) 1/p of about 0.6, with values as low as 0.35 suggested for some materials from sample 14063. Common Apollo 14 KREEP and Apollo 15 KREEP do not show internal Sr, Eu, Al2O3 variations consistent with the D(Eu, Sr) 1/p values derived for 14310 type KREEP. Major element and experimental data indicate that olivine or pyroxene is a large, perhaps dominant, controller of chemical variations within common Apollo 14 KREEP. The application of these distribution coefficients to pure anorthosites like 15415 yields the model dependent conclusion that the silicate liquids with which such anorthosites may have been chemically equilibrated have not yet been analyzed and perhaps not directly sampled.

  2. Crystallization temperature determination of Itokawa particles by plagioclase thermometry with X-ray diffraction data obtained by a high-resolution synchrotron Gandolfi camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masahiko; Nakamura, Tomoki; Noguchi, Takaaki; Nakato, Aiko; Ishida, Hatsumi; Yada, Toru; Shirai, Kei; Fujimura, Akio; Ishibashi, Yukihiro; Abe, Masanao; Okada, Tatsuaki; Ueno, Munetaka; Mukai, Toshifumi

    2014-02-01

    The crystallization temperatures of Itokawa surface particles recovered by the space probe Hayabusa were estimated by a plagioclase geothermometer using sodic plagioclase triclinicity. The Δ131-index required for the thermometer, which is the difference in X-ray diffraction peak positions between the 131 and 13¯1 reflections of plagioclase, was obtained by a high-resolution synchrotron Gandolfi camera developed for the third generation synchrotron radiation beamline, BL15XU at SPring-8. Crystallization temperatures were successfully determined from the Δ131-indices for four particles. The observed plagioclase crystallization temperatures were in a range from 655 to 660 °C. The temperatures indicate crystallization temperatures of plagioclases in the process of prograde metamorphism before the peak metamorphic stage.

  3. Oxygen isotope heterogeneity of arc magma recorded in plagioclase from the 2010 Merapi eruption (Central Java, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Anastassia Y.; Gurenko, Andrey A.; Martel, Caroline; Kouzmanov, Kalin; Cathala, Annick; Bohrson, Wendy A.; Pratomo, Indyo; Sumarti, Sri

    2016-10-01

    Chemical and isotopic compositions of magmatic crystals provide important information to distinguish between deep juvenile and crustal contributions. In this work, high-resolution multicollector secondary ion mass spectrometry data reveal strong variations of δ18O values in three plagioclase crystals (800-1700 μm) from two representative basaltic andesite samples of the 2010 Merapi eruption (Central Java, Indonesia). The δ18O values (from 4.6‰ to 7.9‰) are interpreted to reflect oxygen isotope heterogeneity in the melt composition during plagioclase growth. The lowest δ18O values (4.6-6.6‰) are found in anorthite-rich cores (An82-97), whereas higher δ18O values (5.7-7.9‰) are found in anorthite-poorer zones (An33-86), typically in crystal rims. Combining these new plagioclase δ18O data with δ18O of calc-silicate crustal xenoliths erupted between 1994 and 1998, the composition of glass inclusions hosted by the anorthite-rich plagioclase (An82-92), available experimental data, and the results of thermodynamic modeling using the Magma Chamber Simulator code, we conclude that the abundant anorthite-rich cores crystallized from a mantle-derived hydrous basaltic to basaltic trachyandesite melt that recharged a deeper (200-600 MPa) magma storage zone, whereas lower anorthite zones crystallized at shallower levels (100-200 MPa). The oxygen isotope variations in the plagioclase are explained by a two-stage model of interaction of the hydrous, mafic mantle-derived magma (1) with old crustal rocks depleted in 18O due to high temperature alteration that yielded the low δ18O values in the anorthite-rich cores at deep levels (13-20 km), and later (2) with 18O-enriched carbonate material that yielded the high δ18O values in anorthite-poorer zones at shallow levels (∼4.5-9 km). Thermodynamic modeling is consistent with ∼18 wt.% assimilation of crustal calc-silicate material at 925-950 °C and 100-200 MPa by the 2010 Merapi basaltic andesite magma prior to

  4. Magma mixing recorded by Sr isotopes of plagioclase from dacites of the Quaternary Tengchong volcanic field, SE Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian-Feng; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Robinson, Paul T.; Wang, Christina Yan; Zhao, Jun-Hong; Malpas, John

    2015-02-01

    The Tengchong volcanic field east of the Burma arc in SW China comprises numerous Quaternary volcanoes. The volcanic rocks can be grouped into four units, numbered 1-4 from oldest to youngest. Units 1, 3 and 4 are composed of trachybasalt, basaltic trachyandesite and trachyandesite, respectively, whereas Unit 2 consists of hornblende dacite. Primary minerals in the dacite include plagioclase, clinopyroxene, amphibole and magnetite, all set in a glassy groundmass. Some of the dacites are moderately to highly weathered and show effects of low temperature alteration, with loss on ignition (LOI) up to 9.6 wt% and positive correlations of LOI with Al2O3, but negative correlations with SiO2, CaO and Na2O. Fresh dacites (LOI <3 wt%) belong to the calk-alkaline series and have pronounced negative Ti, Nb and Ta anomalies. They have whole-rock 87Sr/86Sr ratios ranging from 0.7090 to 0.7101, εNd values from -10.8 to -11.8, and εHf values from -5.1 to -6.8. Many of the large plagioclase crystals in the fresh dacites have reverse zoning, ranging from An55 in the cores to An72 in the rims. The smaller phenocrysts have relatively uniform An values between 56 and 50. One plagioclase crystal has an An value of 33.5. Plagioclase in the fresh dacite has relatively high Sr contents and 87Sr/86Sr ratios ranging from 0.7050 to 07125 except for one value of 0.7516, whereas plagioclase in the altered dacite has low Sr contents and highly variable Sr isotopic compositions (0.7039-0.7138), indistinguishable from those of the fresh rocks. Both An values and Sr isotopic compositions of the plagioclase indicate mixing of mantle- and crustally-derived magmas. We therefore propose that mantle-derived basaltic magma caused partial melting of the lower-middle crust and that mixing of the mafic and felsic magmas produced the dacite in staging magma chambers. The dacites contain minerals crystallized from both the mafic and felsic magmas, as well as a few xenocrysts plucked from the country rocks.

  5. Preferred lattice orientations of plagioclase from amphibolite and greenschist facies rocks near the Insubric Line (Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruhl, Jörn H.

    1987-04-01

    Preferred lattice orientations of plagioclase, measured by the universal stage, from deformed amphibolite and greenschist facies rocks near the Insubric Line (Western Alps), reflect the type and orientation of the strain system: either (001) or (010) are oriented parallel or subparallel to the schistosity and form more or less complete girdles around the stretching direction. By the preferred orientation patterns dominant (010) [001] slip is indicated and, additionally, slip on (001) parallel to the a direction, possibly at somewhat higher temperatures and/or at a higher An content of the plagioclase. It is suggested that obliquities of the symmetry-planes of the orientation patterns against the principle axes of strain are related to the sense of shearing.

  6. Modeling H, Na, and K diffusion in plagioclase feldspar by relating point defect parameters to bulk properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baohua; Shan, Shuangming; Wu, Xiaoping

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen and alkali ion diffusion in plagioclase feldspars is important to study the evolution of the crust and the kinetics of exsolution and ion-exchange reactions in feldspars. Using the available PVT equation of state of feldspars, we show that the diffusivities of H and alkali in plagioclase feldspars as a function of temperature can be successfully reproduced in terms of the bulk elastic and expansivity data through a thermodynamic model that interconnects point defect parameters with bulk properties. Our calculated diffusion coefficients of H, Na, and K well agree with experimental ones when uncertainties are considered. Additional point defect parameters such as activation enthalpy, activation entropy, and activation volume are also predicted. Furthermore, the electrical conductivity of feldspars inferred from our predicted diffusivities of H, Na, and K through the Nernst-Einstein equation is compared with previous experimental data.

  7. Constraints on the accretion of the gabbroic lower oceanic crust from plagioclase lattice preferred orientation in the Samail ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanTongeren, J. A.; Hirth, G.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2015-10-01

    Oceanic crust represents more than 60% of the earth's surface and despite a large body of knowledge regarding the formation and chemistry of the extrusive upper oceanic crust, there still remains significant debate over how the intrusive gabbroic lower oceanic crust is accreted at the ridge axis. The two proposed end-member models, the Gabbro Glacier and the Sheeted Sills, predict radically different strain accumulation in the lower crust during accretion. In order to determine which of these two hypotheses is most applicable to a well-studied lower crustal section, we present data on plagioclase lattice preferred orientations (LPO) in the Wadi Khafifah section of the Samail ophiolite. We observe no systematic change in the strength of the plagioclase LPO with height above the crust-mantle transition, no dominant orientation of the plagioclase a-axis lineation, and no systematic change in the obliquity of the plagioclase LPO with respect to the modal layering and macroscopic foliation evident in outcrop. These observations are most consistent with the Sheeted Sills hypothesis, in which gabbros are crystallized in situ and fabrics are dominated by compaction and localized extension rather than by systematically increasing shear strain with increasing depth in a Gabbro Glacier. Our data support the hypothesis of MacLeod and Yaouancq (2000) that the rotation of the outcrop-scale layering from sub-horizontal in the layered gabbros to sub-vertical near the sheeted dikes is due to rapid vertical melt migration through upper gabbros close to the axial magma chamber. Additionally, our results support the hypothesis that the majority of extensional strain in fast spreading ridges is accommodated in partially molten regions at the ridge axis, whereas in slow and ultra-slow ridges large shear strains are accommodated by plastic deformation.

  8. Chemical bonding and electronic structures of microcline, orthoclase and the plagioclase series by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kloprogge, J Theo; Wood, Barry J

    2015-02-25

    A detailed analysis was undertaken of the X-ray photoelectron spectra obtained from microcline, orthoclase and several samples of plagioclase with varying Na/Ca ratio. Comparison of the spectra was made based on the chemical bonding and structural differences in the Al- and Si-coordination within each specimen. The spectra for Si 2p and Al 2p vary with the change in symmetry between microcline and orthoclase, while in plagioclase an increase in Al-O-Si linkages results in a small but observable decrease in binding energy. The overall shapes of the O 1s peaks observed in all spectra are similar and show shifts similar to those observed for Si 2p and Al 2p. The lower-VB spectra for microcline and orthoclase are similar intermediate between α-SiO2 and α-Al2O3 in terms of binding energies. In the plagioclase series increasing coupled substitution of Na and Si for Ca and Al results in a change of the overall shape of the spectra, showing a distinct broadening associated with the presence of two separate but overlapping bands similar to the 21 eV band observed for quartz and the 23 eV band observed for corundum. The bonding character for microcline and orthoclase is more covalent than that of α-Al2O3, but less than that of α-SiO2. In contrast, the plagioclase samples show two distinct bonding characters that are comparable with those of α-SiO2 and α-Al2O3. PMID:25261735

  9. Pristine moon rocks - An alkali anorthosite with coarse augite exsolution from plagioclase, a magnesian harzburgite, and other oddities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, P. H.; Jerde, E. A.; Kallemeyn, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on the analyses of 18 samples of pristine rocks obtained from the primarily mare Apollo 12 site and from the primarily highland Apollo 14 site, as well as samples from the nonmare Apollo 15 site. It was found that, while two of anorthosites from Apollo 12 were similar in composition to most other anorthosites from the west-central near region, the texture of an alkali anorthosite featured a long and narrow crystal of augite surrounded by a single crystal of plagioclase, clearly suggesting that the augite formed by exsolution out of the plagioclase. Another Apollo 12 rocklet was an unusual magnesian harzburite, with subequal amounts of enstatite and olivine, traces of Cr-Fe spinel, and FeNi metal, but no plagioclase; the bulk composition was found to be remarkably Ir-rich (53 percent) for a pristine rock, and the texture was also unusual. Apollo 14 samples included several uncommonly Al-rich and REE-poor impact melt breccias.

  10. FTIR Analysis of Water in Pyroxene and Plagioclase in ALH 84001 and Nakhlites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, A. H.; Cintala, M. J.; Montes, R.; Cardenas, F.

    2016-01-01

    with crustal reservoirs or hydrothermal fluids. Here, nominally anhydrous minerals (pyroxene, olivine, plagioclase, or maskelynite) in orthopyroxenite ALH 84001 and selected nakhlites are analyzed for water and major elements, in order to determine 1) whether they contain any water; 2) if they do, what controls its distribution (crystallization, degassing, hydrothermal or impact processes); and 3) if any of these measurements can be used to infer the water contents of the parent magma and their mantle sources. A shock-reverberation experiment was also performed on terrestrial orthopyroxenes (opx) to simulate the heavily shocked conditions of ALH 84001 (> 31 GPa [17]).

  11. The origin of felsic microgranitoid enclaves: Insights from plagioclase crystal size distributions and thermodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Adriana; Pereira, Giovanna de Souza; Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; Higgins, Michael; Polo, Liza Angelica; Juriaans, Orlando Stanley; Ribeiro, Bruno Vieira

    2015-12-01

    Magma mixing is widely recognized in contemporary petrology as one of the primary igneous processes. Microgranitoid enclaves (MEs) are considered to be remnants of such mixing processes, and the term has a well-established genetic implication. However, microgranitoid enclaves span a wide range of compositions, and felsic varieties are also frequently reported. Nd-Sr isotope and textural data from felsic microgranitoid enclaves (FMEs), mafic microgranitoid enclaves (MMEs) and host granites from the Salto pluton, Itu Granitic Province, show that the cm-sized MMEs are dioritic, have medium-grained igneous textures and xenocrysts of alkali feldspar and quartz. The FMEs are cm- to meter-sized, have spheric shapes, show corrugated contacts with the host granites, and have resorbed feldspars and deformed quartz crystals interpreted as xenocrysts set in a fine-grained groundmass. Compared to the host granites, both MME and FME samples have increased FeO, MgO, TiO2, P2O5 and Zr contents, but their Sr and Nd isotope signatures are identical: FME 87Sr/86Sri = 0.7088-0.7063, εNdi = - 10.0 to - 10.2; MME 87Sr/86Sri = 0.7070, εNdi = - 10.5; host granite 87Sr/86Sri 0.7056-0.7060, εNdi = - 10.2 to - 10.3. These indicate that the enclaves derive from a similar source, although the melts from which they formed were probably hotter and chemically more primitive than their host granites. Crystal size distributions (CSDs) of plagioclase in samples drilled from rinds and cores of three FMEs show that the rind samples are systematically finer-grained than the samples from the cores, which indicates that the FMEs cooled inwards and contradict interpretations that the FMEs are autoliths. Thermal modeling suggests that a slightly more primitive, hotter magma would be thermally equilibrated with an evolved resident melt within weeks after mixing/mingling. Upon thermal equilibrium, the FMEs would have an increased crystal cargo, and the resulting touching framework would impart a solid

  12. Anomalous isotopes and trace element zoning in plagioclase peridotite xenoliths of Oahu (Hawaii): implications for the Hawaiian plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Gautam; Yang, Huai-Jen; Ducea, Mihai

    2003-02-01

    Survival of plagioclase in the residual melting column during melting can have a significant impact on the melting process beneath a mid-oceanic ridge [Asimow et al., Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London Ser. A 355 (1997) 255-281]. Here we investigate the origin of plagioclase that occurs in some rare mantle xenoliths from Oahu, Hawaii. The xenoliths are harzburgitic with less than 2 modal% clinopyroxene and are characterized by strong foliation and porphyroclastic texture. Olivine and orthopyroxene are common porphyroclasts; and only one xenolith (77PAII-9) contains a single large clinopyroxene porphyroclast with thick exsolved orthopyroxene lamellae. The strongly foliated groundmass shows well-developed triple-point junctions and is dominantly composed of olivine (ol 85-90 opx 7-14 cpx <1-2 plag 3-5 spinel trace). Spinel grains are small and dispersed through the groundmass and show extreme variation in Cr/Al ratio within individual thin sections, indicating that they are out of equilibrium with the other phases in these xenoliths. A highly anorthitic plagioclase (An 92-96) occurs only in the groundmass and its modal abundance (˜3-5%) is too high relative to the abundance of clinopyroxene (commonly <1%) for it to be a residual phase, implying that plagioclase may have an exotic origin. The porphyroclasts show strong compositional zoning near the rims and appear to be relict phases (as are all the spinel grains) that had once equilibrated with melts within the stability field of spinel peridotite (pressure ˜1-3 GPa). Clinopyroxene neoblasts and the single porphyroclast in PAII-9 are all characterized by lithosphere-like strongly depleted light rare earth element (chondrite-normalized) patterns. The clinopyroxene porphyroclast in PAII-9 is zoned in Al, Eu, Cr, and Na. The porphyroclastic ortho- and clinopyroxenes give a homogenized (host+exsolution) temperature of 1300°C, which is inferred to be the temperature at which the porphyroclast cores equilibrated with a MORB

  13. Ion microprobe investigation of plagioclase and orthopyroxene from lunar Mg-suite norites: Implications for calculating parental melt REE concentrations and for assessing postcrystallization REE redistribution

    SciTech Connect

    Papike, J.J.; Fowler, G.W.; Shearer, C.K.; Layne, G.D.

    1996-10-01

    The lunar Mg-suite, which includes dunites, troctolites, and norites, makes up to 20-30% of the Moon`s crust down to a depth of {approximately}60 km. The remainder is largely anorthosite. This report focuses on norites (which consist mostly of orthopyroxene and plagioclase) because we have found that both phases are effective recorders of their parental melt compositions. In an earlier report, we analyzed orthopyroxene from twelve samples (three from Apollo 14, two from A-15, and seven from A-17) by orthopyroxene from twelve samples (three from Apollo 14, two from A-15, and seven from A-17) by SIMS for eight REE (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Dy, Er, Yb). Inversion of these data to estimated melt compositions yielded extremely high REE concentrations similar to KREEP. In this study, we report SIMS REE data for plagioclase from these same twelve samples. The major objective of this study is to estimate parental REE concentrations from both orthopyroxene and plagioclase data to see if both data inversions produce concordant from both orthopyroxene and plagioclase data to see if both data inversions produce concordant melt compositions and thus better constrain the composition of melts parental to Mg-suite norites. The estimated REE concentrations from both phases show some evidence of slight postcrystallization REE redistribution. Comparison of the observed ratio of REE for pyroxene/plagioclase to the ratio of the Ds for pyroxene/plagioclase is consistent with REE redistribution which involves LREE diffusing from pyroxene into plagioclase and HREE diffusing from plagioclase into pyroxene. However, apparently these postcrystallization exchanges have not seriously affected our ability to estimate melt REE concentrations. 34 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Water content in arc basaltic magma in the Northeast Japan and Izu arcs: an estimate from Ca/Na partitioning between plagioclase and melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushioda, M.; Takahashi, E.; Hamada, M.; Suzuki, T.

    2015-12-01

    The variation in water content of arc basaltic magmas in the Northeast Japan arc and the Izu arc was estimatedusing a simple plagioclase phenocryst hygrometer. In order to construct a plagioclase phenocryst hygrometeroptimized for arc basalt magmas, we have conducted hydrous melting experiments of relatively primitive basaltfrom the Miyakejima volcano, a frontal-arc volcano in the Izu arc. As a result of the experiments, we found that theCa/Na partition coefficient between plagioclase and hydrous basaltic melt increases linearly with an increase in H2Ocontent in the melts. We then compiled published geochemical data sets of relatively primitive basaltic rocks with no evidence of magma mixing and the most frequent Ca-rich plagioclase phenocrysts from 15 basaltic arc volcanoesincluding both frontal-arc and rear-arc volcanoes. In the 15 volcanoes studied, plagioclase phenocrysts of high anorthitecontent (An > 90) were commonly observed, whereas plagioclase phenocrysts in rear arc volcanoes usually had a loweranorthite content (90 > An > 80). In all volcanoes studied, the estimated H2O content of basaltic magma was at least3 wt.% H2O or higher. The magmas of volcanoes located on the volcanic front have about 5 wt.% H2O in magmawhereas those from the rear-arc side are slightly lower in H2O content.

  15. Water content in arc basaltic magma in the Northeast Japan and Izu arcs: an estimate from Ca/Na partitioning between plagioclase and melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushioda, Masashi; Takahashi, Eiichi; Hamada, Morihisa; Suzuki, Toshihiro

    2014-12-01

    The variation in water content of arc basaltic magmas in the Northeast Japan arc and the Izu arc was estimated using a simple plagioclase phenocryst hygrometer. In order to construct a plagioclase phenocryst hygrometer optimized for arc basalt magmas, we have conducted high-pressure melting experiments of relatively primitive basalt from the Miyakejima volcano, a frontal-arc volcano in the Izu arc. As a result of the experiments, we found that the Ca/Na partition coefficient between plagioclase and hydrous basaltic melt increases linearly with an increase in H2O content in the melts. We then selected from literature geochemical data sets of relatively primitive basaltic rocks with no evidence of magma mixing and the most frequent Ca-rich plagioclase phenocrysts from 15 basaltic arc volcanoes including both frontal-arc and rear-arc volcanoes. In the 15 volcanoes studied, plagioclase phenocrysts of high anorthite content (An > 90) were commonly observed, whereas plagioclase phenocrysts in rear arc volcanoes usually had a lower anorthite content (90 > An > 80). In all volcanoes studied, the estimated H2O content of basaltic magma was at least 3 wt.% H2O or higher. The magmas of volcanoes located on the volcanic front have about 5 wt.% H2O in magma whereas those from the rear-arc side are slightly lower in H2O content.

  16. Melting of plagioclase + spinel lherzolite at low pressures (0.5 GPa): An experimental approach to the evolution of basaltic melt during mantle refertilisation at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalot-Prat, Françoise; Falloon, Trevor J.; Green, David H.; Hibberson, William O.

    2013-07-01

    The presence of plagioclase + spinel lherzolites among ocean floor samples and in some ophiolite complexes invites speculation on their origin and relationships to processes of magmatism and lithosphere refertilisation beneath mid-ocean ridges. In an experimental approach to their petrogenesis, we have determined the compositions of liquids and co-existing minerals in the six phase assemblage [liquid + olivine + orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene + plagioclase + spinel] at 0.5 GPa and 1100 °C to 1200 °C. In our experimental approach we maintained the olivine Mg# [Mg / (Mg + Fe)] close to 90 (i.e., 88.8-95.5) but varied plagioclase from anorthite to albite. The major variations in liquid compositions are related to plagioclase composition. Liquids have much lower MgO and FeO and higher SiO2 and Al2O3 than liquids in the 6-phase plagioclase + spinel lherzolite at 0.75 GPa and 1 GPa. Liquids are quartz-normative (silica-oversaturated) for plagioclase that are more calcic than An40 but nepheline-normative (critically silica-undersaturated) for plagioclase that are more sodic than An25. Liquid compositions are quite unlike natural MORB glasses with similar Mg# (i.e., compatible with parental magmas from lherzolitic mantle with Mg# ≈ 90). Our study provides no support for models of MORB petrogenesis which suggest extraction of near-solidus melts from plagioclase lherzolite at low pressure. Similarly, referring to numerical models of melting volumes beneath mid-ocean ridges (Langmuir et al., 1992; McKenzie and Bickle, 1988) in which melt increments are calculated for different sites and these increments pooled to form MORB, our data argue that melts equilibrated with plagioclase ± spinel lherzolite at < 1 GPa cannot be significant components of such ‘pooled melt’ focussed from within the melting volume. The compositions of minerals from plagioclase ± spinel lherzolite at Lanzo (northern Italy; Piccardo et al., 2007) are compared with our experimental assemblages at 0

  17. Constraints on the accretion of the gabbroic lower oceanic crust from plagioclase lattice preferred orientation in the Samail ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanTongeren, J. A.; Hirth, G.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    The debate over the processes of igneous accretion of gabbroic lower crust at submarine spreading centers is centered on two end-member hypotheses: Gabbro Glaciers and Sheeted Sills. In order to determine which of these two hypotheses is most applicable to a well-studied lower crustal section, we present newly published data (VanTongeren et al., 2015 EPSL v. 427, p. 249-261) on plagioclase lattice preferred orientations (LPO) in the Wadi Khafifah section of the Samail ophiolite, Oman. Based on our results we provide five critical observations that any model for the accretion of the lower oceanic crust must satisfy: (1) There is a distinctive change in the orientation of the outcrop-scale layering from near-vertical to sub-horizontal that is also reflected in the plagioclase fabrics in the uppermost ~1000-1500 m of the gabbroic crust; (2) The distinction between the upper gabbros and lower gabbros is not a geochemical boundary. Rather, the change in outcrop-scale orientation from near-vertical to sub-horizontal occurs stratigraphically lower in the crust than a change in whole-rock geochemistry; (3) There is no systematic difference in plagioclase fabric strength in any crystallographic axis between the upper gabbros and the lower gabbros; (4) Beneath the abrupt transition from sub-vertical to sub-horizontal fabric, there is no systematic change in the geographic orientation of the plagioclase fabric, or in the development of a dominant lineation direction within the upper gabbros or the lower gabbros; (5) In the lower gabbros, the obliquity between the (010) and the modal layering remains approximately constant and indicates a consistent top to the right sense of shear throughout the stratigraphy. Our observations are most consistent with the Sheeted Sills hypothesis, in which the majority of lower crustal gabbros are crystallized in situ and fabrics are dominated by compaction and localized extension rather than by systematically increasing shear strain with

  18. Experimental determination of plagioclase dissolution rates as a function of its composition and pH at 22 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudbrandsson, Snorri; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Gislason, Sigurdur R.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2014-08-01

    The steady-state, far-from-equilibrium dissolution rates of nine distinct plagioclases ranging in composition from An2 to An89 were measured in mixed flow reactors at 22 ± 2 °C and pH from 2 to 11. The dissolution rates of all plagioclases based on silica release show a common U-shaped behaviour as a function of pH, where rates decrease with increasing pH at acid condition but rise with increasing pH at alkaline conditions. Consistent with literature findings, constant pH plagioclase dissolution rates increase with increasing anorthite content at acidic conditions; measured anorthite dissolution rates are ∼2.5 orders of magnitude faster than those of albite at pH ∼2. Perhaps more significantly, rates are independent of plagioclase composition at alkaline conditions. Interpretation and data fitting suggests that plagioclase dissolution rates are consistent with their control by the detachment of Si-rich activated complexes formed by the removal of Al from the mineral framework. Taking account of this mechanism and transition state theory yields equations describing plagioclase dissolution rates (r+) as a function of both the mineral and aqueous fluid compositions found in natural Earth surface systems. For pH ⩾ 6 rates are consistent with Log(r+/(mol/cm/s))=0.35Log(aH3/aAl)-11.53 and for pH < 6 rates are consistent with Log(r+/(mol/cm/s))=nacidLog(aH3/aAl)+0.033An%-14.77 where An% represents the percent anorthite in the plagioclase solid solution, ai corresponds to the activity of the ith aqueous species, and nacid is given by nacid=0.004An%+0.05 .

  19. Plagioclase deformation in upper-greenschist facies meta-pegmatite mylonites from the Austroalpine Matsch Unit (Eastern Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberlei, Tobias; Habler, Gerlinde; Abart, Rainer; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Feldspars are common rock forming minerals as they are stable over a wide range of bulk rock compositions and metamorphic conditions within the Earth's crust. The deformation mechanisms of feldspar play an important role in rheological models for the crust and therefore have received considerable attention in studies on natural rocks and in experimental studies. The interaction of frictional and viscous deformation mechanisms and the onset of crystal plastic deformation in feldspars occur over a broad range of pressures and temperatures. In this work, we present new microstructural, textural and mineral chemical data of plagioclase from Permian metapegmatites within the Austroalpine Matsch Unit in Southern Tyrol (Italy). These crystalline basement rocks were deformed and metamorphosed at conditions close to the greenschist/amphibolites facies transition at 480±26°C during the Cretaceous (Habler et al., 2009). The investigated samples have been collected from meter-scale shear zones which typically occur at boundaries of lithological subunits. The southern tectonic boundary of this unit is commonly referred to as the "Vinschgau Shear Zone" (Schmid & Haas, 1989). We applied the Electron Backscatter Diffraction method to investigate the grain- and subgrain-boundaries and the nature of effective deformation mechanisms in plagioclase. Large albite porphyroclasts in the mylonitic Permian metapegmatites show grain internal traces of dissolution surfaces and the formation of new, strain-free grains with straight grain boundary segments and partly 120° grain boundary triple junctions in dilatant sites. The aggregates of new grains neither have a lattice preferred orientation nor a crystallographic orientation relation with the adjacent clast, and are characterized by the lack of grain internal deformation, suggesting that these are new precipitates rather than clast-fragments or recrystallized subgrains. Furthermore, the porphyroclasts show cracks and kinks, associated

  20. Formation of plagioclase-bearing peridotite and a peridotite-wehrlite-gabbro suite through melt-rock reaction: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saper, L.; Liang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Plagioclase-bearing peridotites are observed among abyssal peridotites, massif peridotites, and mantle sections of ophiolites of lherzolite subtype. Formation of plagioclase-bearing peridotites is often attributed to basalt impregnation into host harzburgite or lherzolite in a thermal boundary layer. During transport through asthenospheric mantle, melt generated in the deep mantle will inevitably interact with the overlying mantle column through reactive dissolution and may leave geochemical imprints on plagioclase-bearing peridotites. To assess the role of melt-rock reaction on the formation of plagioclase-bearing peridotites and its implications for lithosphere composition, we conducted dissolution experiments in which a 88% spinel lherzolite + 12% basalt starting mixture was juxtaposed against a primitive MORB in a graphite-lined molybdenum capsule. The reaction couples were run at 1300°C and 1 GPa for 1 or 24 hrs, and then stepped cooled to 1050°C and 0.7 GPa over the next several days. Cooling promotes in situ crystallization of interstitial melts, allowing us to better characterize the mineral compositional trends produced and observed by melt-rock reaction and crystallization. A gabbro and a plagioclase-bearing peridotite were observed in the two halves of the reaction couple after the experiments were completed. The peridotite from the 24 hr reaction experiment is mostly composed of subhedral to euhedral olivines (10-50 μm in size, Mg# 75-83), poikilitic clinopyroxene (~100 μm in size, Mg# 73-83) with olivine and spinel chadocrysts, and interstitial plagioclase (An# 68-78) and melt. In a control experiment quenched after a 24 hour reaction at 1300°C the basalt completely dissolved the pyroxenes and spinels leaving a residue of rounded olivine grains (10-100 μm in size) surrounded by a relatively large melt fraction. Textural results from the step-cooling experiments suggest the following crystallization sequence from the olivine+melt mush: olivine

  1. Plagioclase-free andesites from Zitácuaro (Michoacán), Mexico: petrology and experimental constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Dawnika L.; Carmichael, Ian S. E.

    Approximately 150km west of Mexico City in the central part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) near Zitácuaro, Mexico, young volcanism has produced shield volcanoes, large volume silicic deposits, and fault-related basalt and andesite lava flows and cinder cones. This paper concerns a small cluster of Pleistocene andesite cones and flows which can be separated into two distinct groups: high-magnesium andesites (>6% MgO, 57-59% SiO2), conveniently called basaltic andesites, with phenocrysts of orthopyroxene and augite, or augite and olivine; and andesites (60-62% SiO2, <4.6% MgO), which have phenocrysts of orthopyroxene and augite, and ghosts of relict hornblende. Remarkably, plagioclase phenocrysts are absent, and evenly distributed but sparse (0.5-3.5%) quartz xenocrysts are present in all the lavas. In order to establish the conditions under which early crystallizing plagioclase is suppressed in these lavas, water saturated experiments up to 3 kbars were performed on one of the basaltic andesites. The conditions required to reproduce the phenocryst assemblages (either olivine + augite or opx + augite) are temperatures in excess of 1000°C, with water saturated liquids (>3 wt%) at pressures of about 1 kbar. Compared to basaltic andesites of western Mexico, the Zitácuaro basaltic andesites have 2wt% lower Al2O3 concentrations, which causes plagioclase to precipitate at significantly lower temperatures, and it therefore follows the crystallization sequence: olivine, augite, and orthopyroxene. Based on ubiquitous quartz xenocrysts, with glassy rhyolitic inclusions, a reasonable conclusion is that substantial mixing of a quartz-bearing rhyolitic magma with a parental basaltic andesite has occurred at low pressure (shallow depth), and this would account for the low Al2O3 concentrations in the Zitácuaro basaltic andesites. Whatever the mechanism of incorporation, the quartz xenocrysts are evidence of contamination of basaltic magma with more siliceous material, thus

  2. Experimental quantification of P-T conditions of mantle refertilisation at shallow depth under spreading ridges and formation of plagioclase + spinel lherzolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalot-Prat, Françoise; Falloon, Trevor J.; Green, David H.

    2014-05-01

    We studied the first-order melting process of differentiation in the Earth, and the major process of rejuvenation of the upper mantle after melting related to plate spreading (Chalot-Prat et al, 2010; 2013). We conducted experiments at High Pressure (0.75 and 0.5 GPa) and High Temperature (1260-1100°C) to obtain magma compositions in equilibrium with the mineral assemblages of a plagioclase + spinel lherzolite. These PT conditions prevail at 17-30km below axial oceanic spreading ridges. We used a "trial and error" approach in a system involving nine elements (Cr-Na-Fe-Ca-Mg-Al-Si-Ti-Ni). This approaches as closely as possible a natural mantle composition, Cr being a key element in the system. Our objectives were : • to determine experimentally the compositions of melts in equilibrium with plagioclase + spinel lherzolite, with emphasis on the role of plagioclase composition in controlling melt compositions; • to test the hypothesis that MORB are produced at shallow depth (17-30kms) • to quantify liquid- and mantle residue compositional paths at decreasing T and low P to understand magma differentiation by "percolation-reaction" at shallow depth in the mantle; • to compare experimental mantle mineral compositions to those of re-fertilised oceanic mantle lithosphere outcropping at the axis of oceanic spreading ridges, enabling quantification of the pressure (i.e. depth) and temperature of the re-fertilisation process that leads to formation of plagioclase and indicates the minimum thickness of the lithosphere at ridge axes. In the normative basalt tetrahedron, liquids plot on two parallel cotectic lines from silica-oversaturated (basaltic andesite at 0.75 GPa or andesite at 0.5 GPa) at the calcic end to silica-undersaturated compositions (trachyte) at the sodic end. The lower the pressure, the greater the silica oversaturation. Besides the plagioclase solid solution has a dominant role in determining the solidus temperature of plagioclase + spinel lherzolites

  3. Calcic amphibole thermobarometry in metamorphic and igneous rocks: New calibrations based on plagioclase/amphibole Al-Si partitioning and amphibole/liquid Mg partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, J. F.; Moreno, J. A.; Castro, A.; Rodríguez, C.; Fershtater, G. B.

    2015-09-01

    Dependencies of plagioclase/amphibole Al-Si partitioning, DAl/Siplg/amp, and amphibole/liquid Mg partitioning, DMgamp/liq, on temperature, pressure and phase compositions are investigated employing robust regression methods based on MM-estimators. A database with 92 amphibole-plagioclase pairs - temperature range: 650-1050 °C; amphibole compositional limits: > 0.02 apfu (23O) Ti and > 0.05 apfu Al - and 148 amphibole-glass pairs - temperature range: 800-1100 °C; amphibole compositional limit: CaM4/(CaM4 + NaM4) > 0.75 - compiled from experiments in the literature was used for the calculations (amphibole normalization scheme: 13-CNK method). Statistical analysis reveals a significant dependence of DAl/Siplg/amp on pressure, temperature, Al fraction in amphibole T1-site, XAlT1, and albite fraction in plagioclase, XAb, leading to the barometric expression:

  4. Lingunite-a high-pressure plagioclase polymorph at mineral interfaces in doleritic rock of the Lockne impact structure (Sweden)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Amar; Reznik, Boris; Kontny, Agnes; Heissler, Stefan; Schilling, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Lingunite nanocrystals and amorphous plagioclase (maskelynite) are identified at the contacts between augite and labradorite wedge-shaped interfaces in the doleritic rocks of the Lockne impact structure in Sweden. The occurrence of lingunite suggests that the local pressure was above 19 GPa and the local temperature overwhelmed 1000 °C. These values are up to 10 times higher than previous values estimated numerically for bulk pressure and temperature. High shock-induced temperatures are manifested by maskelynite injections into microfractures in augite located next to the wedges. We discuss a possible model of shock heterogeneity at mineral interfaces, which may lead to longer duration of the same shock pressure and a concentration of high temperature thus triggering the kinetics of labradorite transformation into lingunite and maskelynite.

  5. Lingunite-a high-pressure plagioclase polymorph at mineral interfaces in doleritic rock of the Lockne impact structure (Sweden)

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Amar; Reznik, Boris; Kontny, Agnes; Heissler, Stefan; Schilling, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Lingunite nanocrystals and amorphous plagioclase (maskelynite) are identified at the contacts between augite and labradorite wedge-shaped interfaces in the doleritic rocks of the Lockne impact structure in Sweden. The occurrence of lingunite suggests that the local pressure was above 19 GPa and the local temperature overwhelmed 1000 °C. These values are up to 10 times higher than previous values estimated numerically for bulk pressure and temperature. High shock-induced temperatures are manifested by maskelynite injections into microfractures in augite located next to the wedges. We discuss a possible model of shock heterogeneity at mineral interfaces, which may lead to longer duration of the same shock pressure and a concentration of high temperature thus triggering the kinetics of labradorite transformation into lingunite and maskelynite. PMID:27188436

  6. Lingunite-a high-pressure plagioclase polymorph at mineral interfaces in doleritic rock of the Lockne impact structure (Sweden).

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amar; Reznik, Boris; Kontny, Agnes; Heissler, Stefan; Schilling, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Lingunite nanocrystals and amorphous plagioclase (maskelynite) are identified at the contacts between augite and labradorite wedge-shaped interfaces in the doleritic rocks of the Lockne impact structure in Sweden. The occurrence of lingunite suggests that the local pressure was above 19 GPa and the local temperature overwhelmed 1000 °C. These values are up to 10 times higher than previous values estimated numerically for bulk pressure and temperature. High shock-induced temperatures are manifested by maskelynite injections into microfractures in augite located next to the wedges. We discuss a possible model of shock heterogeneity at mineral interfaces, which may lead to longer duration of the same shock pressure and a concentration of high temperature thus triggering the kinetics of labradorite transformation into lingunite and maskelynite. PMID:27188436

  7. 40Ar/39Ar and cosmic ray exposure ages of plagioclase-rich lithic fragments from Apollo 17 regolith, 78461

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, J. P.; Baldwin, S. L.; Delano, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    Argon isotopic data is used to assess the potential of low-mass samples collected by sample return missions on planetary objects (e.g., Moon, Mars, asteroids), to reveal planetary surface processes. We report the first 40Ar/39Ar ages and 38Ar cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages, determined for eleven submillimeter-sized (ranging from 0.06 to 1.2 mg) plagioclase-rich lithic fragments from Apollo 17 regolith sample 78461 collected at the base of the Sculptured Hills. Total fusion analysis was used to outgas argon from the lithic fragments. Three different approaches were used to determine 40Ar/39Ar ages and illustrate the sensitivity of age determination to the choice of trapped (40Ar/36Ar)t. 40Ar/39Ar ages range from ~4.0 to 4.4 Ga with one exception (Plag#10). Surface CRE ages, based on 38Ar, range from ~1 to 24 Ma. The relatively young CRE ages suggest recent re-working of the upper few centimeters of the regolith. The CRE ages may result from the effect of downslope movement of materials to the base of the Sculptured Hills from higher elevations. The apparent 40Ar/39Ar age for Plag#10 is >5 Ga and yielded the oldest CRE age (i.e., ~24 Ma). We interpret this data to indicate the presence of parentless 40Ar in Plag#10, originating in the lunar atmosphere and implanted in lunar regolith by solar wind. Based on a chemical mixing model, plagioclase compositions, and 40Ar/39Ar ages, we conclude that lithic fragments originated from Mg-suite of highland rocks, and none were derived from the mare region.

  8. Deformation of the deep crust: Insights from physiochemical characteristics of deformation microstructures of plagioclase and quartz in gneiss from the Salt Mylonite Zone, Western Gneiss Region, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renedo, R. N.; Piazolo, S.; Whitney, D. L.; Teyssier, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    The deformation behavior of quartz and feldspar controls the rheology of large parts of the continental crust. One way to understand the deformation of these abundant and important minerals in the deep crust is to compare their behavior within and outside of naturally-deformed shear zones. To this end, three samples of quartzofeldspathic gneiss within and adjacent to the Salt Mylonite Zone, a discrete ductile deformation zone in the ultrahigh-pressure Western Gneiss Region of Norway, are investigated in terms of microstructure, chemical composition, and fabric. The three samples represent the microstructural variation across the shear zone including grain size variation, layered (quartz ribbon bearing) v. non-layered gneiss, and variation in modal abundance. Layered gneiss is composed of one grain thick, laterally continuous quartz ribbons with plagioclase and accessory phases in the intervening regions. Non-layered gneiss consists of isolated quartz (individual grains or clusters of up to four grains) within an interconnected network of plagioclase and accessory phases. In layered gneiss, quartz preserves a well-developed crystallographic preferred orientation consistent with dominant activation of the prism and rhomb slip systems, and plagioclase preserves a nearly random fabric. Quartz fabrics from layered shear zone gneiss are stronger than those of quartz from layered gneiss outside of the shear zone. In non-layered gneiss, plagioclase develops a fabric that is consistent with activation of the (001) <010> slip system whereas quartz exhibits a random fabric. Plagioclase in all samples is zoned from Na-richer cores to Ca-richer rims (reverse zoning); zoning is weaker outside of the shear zone (average core-to-rim ΔAn 6%) than within the shear zone (average core-to-rim ΔAn 10%). Results suggest a change in plagioclase and quartz deformation mechanisms occurred during decompression and shear zone development owing to strain/strain-rate variation.

  9. Plagioclase and epidote buffering of cation ratios in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal fluids: Experimental results in and near the supercritical region

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, M.E.; Seyfried, W.E. Jr. ); Janecky, D.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Experiments have been performed with Na-Ca-K-Cl fluids of seawater chlorinity and diabase, basalt, and plagioclase bearing mineral mixtures at 350-425{degree}C and 250-400 bars to help constrain hydrothermal alteration processes at mid-ocean ridges. Dissolved Ca, Na, and pH for all experiments responded systematically to differences in dissolved SiO{sub 2} concentrations and the compositions of plagioclase reactants. Diabase alteration at low fluid/rock mass ratios (0.5 to 1) produces fluids undersaturated with respect to quartz during hydration of primary olivine and orthopyroxene, whereas basalt alteration under similar conditions yields fluids slightly supersaturated with respect to quartz during breakdown of glass to smectite and amphibole. Fluid chemistry in all experiments appears to approach a partial equilibrium state with the albite and anorthite components in plagioclase and approaches a pH consistent with plagioclase alteration to epidote. Trace element data from vent fluids, specifically B and Sr, together with major element chemistry, provides evidence that the reaction zone for black-smoker fluids at mid-ocean ridges is composed of only slightly altered diabase and is characterized by small amounts of epidote, nearly fresh plagioclase and clinopyroxene, and partially to completely hydrated olivine and orthopyroxene. Using equilibrium between plagioclase, the dominant reactant, and epidote, the dominant reaction product in experiments, the authors estimate that temperatures in reaction zones are in excess of 375{degree}C for most vent systems. These temperatures are higher than measured vent temperatures, suggesting that hot spring fluids commonly loose heat during ascent to the sea floor.

  10. Trace element and Pb isotope composition of plagioclase from dome samples from the 2004-2005 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington: Chapter 35 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kent, Adam J.R.; Rowe, Michael C.; Thornber, Carl R.; Pallister, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Plagioclase crystals from gabbronorite inclusions in three dacite samples have markedly different trace-element and Pbisotope compositions from those of plagioclase phenocrysts, despite having a similar range of anorthite contents. Inclusions show some systematic differences from each other but typically have higher Ti, Ba, LREE, and Pb and lower Sr and have lower 208Pb/206Pb and 207Pb/206Pb ratios than coexisting plagioclase phenocrysts. The compositions of plagioclase from inclusions cannot be related to phenocryst compositions by any reasonable petrologic model. From this we suggest that they are unlikely to represent magmatic cumulates or restite inclusions but instead are samples of mafic Tertiary basement from beneath the volcano.

  11. Plagioclase zonation styles in hornblende gabbro inclusions from Little Glass Mountain, Medicine Lake volcano, California: Implications for fractionation mechanisms and the formation of composition gaps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brophy, J.G.; Dorais, M.J.; Donnelly-Nolan, J.; Singer, B.S.

    1997-01-01

    The rhyolite of Little Glass Mountain (73-74% SiO2) is a single eruptive unit that contains inclusions of quenched andesite liquid (54-61% SiO2) and partially crystalline cumulate hornblende gabbro (53-55% SiO2). Based on previous studies, the quenched andesite inclusions and host rhyolite lava are related to one another through fractional crystallization and represent an example of a fractionation-generated composition gap. The hornblende gabbros represent the cumulate residue associated with the rhyolite-producing and composition gap-forming fractionation event. This study combines textural (Nomarski Differential Interference Contrast, NDIC, imaging), major element (An content) and trace element (Mg, Fe, Sr, K, Ti, Ba) data on the style of zonation of plagioclase crystals from representative andesite and gabbro inclusions, to assess the physical environment in which the fractionation event and composition gap formation took place. The andesite inclusions (54-61% SiO2) are sparsely phyric with phenocrysts of plagioclase, augite and Fe-oxide??olivine, +/-orthopyroxene, +/-hornblende set within a glassy to crystalline matrix. The gabbro cumulates (53-55% SiO2) consist of an interconnected framework of plagioclase, augite, olivine, orthopyroxene, hornblende and Fe-oxide along with highly vesicular interstitial glass (70-74% SiO2). The gabbros record a two-stage crystallization history of plagioclase + olivine + augite (Stage I) followed by plagioclase+orthopyroxene + hornblende + Fe-oxide (Stage II). Texturally, the plagioclase crystals in the andesite inclusions are characterized by complex, fine-scale oscillatory zonation and abundant dissolution surfaces. Compositionally (An content) the crystals are essentially unzoned from core-to-rim. These features indicate growth within a dynamic (convecting?), reservoir of andesite magma. In contrast, the plagioclase crystals in the gabbros are texturally smooth and featureless with strong normal zonation from An74 at the

  12. Petrology and Geochemistry of Plagioclase-Phyric Basaltic Lava Flows on St. George Island, Alaska: Evidence for a Genetic Link Between Magmatic Centers of the Pribilof Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deraps, M. R.; Feeley, T. C.; Underwood, S. J.; Winer, G. S.

    2006-12-01

    St. George and St. Paul Islands, the two largest Pribilof Islands (Alaska), are located 70 km apart in the Bering Sea 400-450 km north of the Aleutian arc front. The islands are centers of alkaline basaltic volcanism associated with the diffuse Bering Sea basalt province. On St. George an extensive history of volcanism (~2.6-1.4 Ma; Mukasa and Andronikov, JGR, submitted) is exposed in high sea cliffs and several NE-SW and E-W trending fault blocks that define the present topography of the island. In contrast, St. Paul is a potentially active volcanic center (~550-3 ka) with numerous young tephra cones and associated lava flows that show minimal erosion and deformation by faulting. Volcanic rocks erupted on St. George are mainly olivine- + clinopyroxene-phyric basalts and trachy-basalts with high to moderate MgO contents (12-8 wt%). In addition, distinct plagioclase-phyric lavas are present at high stratigraphic levels. The plagioclase-phyric lavas are relatively evolved with 47-51 wt% SiO2 and 6.6-4.9 wt% MgO. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns are LREE-enriched with little to no Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 1.03-1.06), indicating that the evolved compositions and plagioclase-rich nature of the flows are not due to phenocryst accumulation. Instead, production of plagioclase-phyric lavas on St. George likely involved a complex set of differentiation processes, including fractional crystallization and magma mixing. This assertion is supported by major and trace element compositions of the rocks, which define distinct trends on chemical variation diagrams relative to less evolved plagioclase-poor rocks. For example, whereas MgO contents of most St. George lavas as a group decrease with increasing SiO2 contents, these elements show a positive linear correlation for plagioclase-phyric lavas. The linear trends of these samples on chemical variation diagrams are best explained by mixing of at least two distinct evolved endmember magmas. Major element mass balance calculations

  13. Grain Growth Pinning and Strain Localization: Implications for Plagioclase Flow Laws and Strength of the Lower Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehl, L.; Hirth, G.

    2005-12-01

    The rheology of the lower crust remains poorly understood despite its importance for understanding the strength of plates, driving forces for plate motion, and how strain is translated up to and/or down from the brittle upper crust. In this study we evaluate the applicability of experimental flow laws using insights from the analysis of naturally deformed gabbros from lower oceanic crust (Hole 735B, Southwest Indian Ridge). For comparison with experimentally-derived flow laws, we evaluate stress, temperature, and deformation mechanism in the SWIR samples. Strain is localized in discrete shear zones, and we assume a strain rate of 10-12 to 10-14 s-1. Differential stress ranges from ~20 to 150 MPa, estimated by grain size piezometry with the empirical relationship of Twiss (1977). Syn-deformation temperatures are 800-950 °C, calculated by Fe-Mg-Ca exchange between recrystallized orthopyroxene-clinopyroxene pairs using QUILF (Andersen et al., 1993). Finally, deformation mechanisms were analyzed by measuring the lattice preferred orientation (LPO) with an electron back scattered detector (EBSD) on a scanning electron microscope. Monophase layers within the shear zones have LPOs indicative of deformation by dislocation creep at all grain sizes (down to 12.5 μm). Polyphase layers have random or very weak fabrics implying dominance of diffusion creep, even in samples with a relatively coarse grain size (well within the dislocation creep field). Plagioclase grains in the polyphase layers are smaller than those in monophase layers indicating that grain growth is apparently inhibited by clinopyroxene at grain boundaries. The variation in plagioclase grain size fits models that account for the size and abundance of a pinning phase. We conclude: 1) Flow law parameters for dry An100 (Rybacki and Dresen, 2000) agree well with natural polyphase gabbro shear zones. This is a relatively `strong' flow law that predicts viscosities higher than olivine flow laws for a wet upper

  14. Dry and Wet Friction of Plagioclase: Pure Cataclastic Flow(CF) vs. CF with Concurrent Pressure Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, C.; Tan, W.

    2015-12-01

    To distinguish different deformation mechanisms at hydrothermal conditions, friction experiments of plagioclase under nominally dry conditions were compared with that at hydrothermal conditions documented in a previous study[He et al.,2013]. Preliminary result[Tan and He, 2008] shows that the rate dependence of plagioclase under confining pressure of 150MPa and nominally dry conditions is velocity strengthening at temperatures of 50-600oC, in contrast to the full velocity weakening at hydrothermal conditions. Here a) we conducted data fitting to the rate and state friction law to compare with the hydrothermal case; b) microstructural comparison was performed to understand the difference between the dry and wet conditions in the operative deformation mechanisms. The evolution effect (b value) under dry conditions exhibits much smaller values than that at wet conditions, and in contrast to the increasing trend at wet conditions, b values under dry conditions have a decreasing trend as temperature increases, from ~0.007 at 300oC down to 0 at 600oC. The direct effect (a value) at dry conditions has a peak of ~0.01 at 300oC and decreases to a level of 0.007-0.008 at higher temperatures, in contrast to the increasing trend seen at hydrothermal conditions. In the dry case, microstructure at temperatures of 300-600oC transitions gradually from a fabric characterized by localized Riedel shear zones to pervasive shear deformation, with the grain size reduced to a level of 1-3 micron in a submicron matrix in the latter case, corresponding to a lower porosity. The close association between porosity evolution and that of state variable revealed in previous studies[Morrow and Byerlee, 1989; Marone et al.,1990] suggests that the porosity change contributes largely to the evolution effect in addition to plasticity at intergranular contacts, probably due to gradual switching between different densities of packing. Our dry experiments indicate a cataclastic flow where the evolution

  15. Crystal residence times from trace element zoning in plagioclase reveal changes in magma transfer dynamics at Mt. Etna during the last 400 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viccaro, Marco; Barca, Donatella; Bohrson, Wendy A.; D'Oriano, Claudia; Giuffrida, Marisa; Nicotra, Eugenio; Pitcher, Bradley W.

    2016-04-01

    Trace element zoning in plagioclase of selected alkaline lavas from the historic (1607-1892 AD) and recent (1983-2013 AD) activity of Mt. Etna volcano has been used to explore the possible role that volcano-tectonics exert on magma transfer dynamics. The observed textural characteristics of crystals include near-equilibrium textures (i.e., oscillatory zoning) and textures with variable extent of disequilibrium (patchy zoning, coarse sieve textures and dissolved cores). Historic crystals exhibit lower K concentrations at lower anorthite contents, a feature in agreement with the general more potassic character of the recent lavas if compared to the historic products. Historic plagioclases have statistically higher Ba and lower Sr concentrations than the recent crystals, which result in different Sr/Ba ratios for the two suites of plagioclase. Variations in the anorthite content along core-to-rim profiles obtained on crystals with different types of textures for both the historic and recent eruptive periods were evaluated particularly versus Sr/Ba. At comparable average An contents, crystals characterized by oscillatory zoning, which are representative of near-equilibrium crystallization from the magma, display distinct Sr/Ba ratios. We suggest that these features are primarily related to recharge of a new, geochemically-distinct magma into the storage and transport system of the volcano. In addition to distinct trace element and textural characteristics of plagioclase, Sr diffusion modeling for plagioclase suggests that residence times are generally shorter for crystals found in recently erupted lavas (25-77 years, average 43 years) compared to those of the historic products (43-163 years, average 99 years). Shorter residences times correlate with gradual increases in eruption volume and eruption frequency rates through time. We attribute these features to an increasing influence, since the 17th century, of extensional tectonic structures within the upper 10 km of

  16. Formation of andesite melts and Ca-rich plagioclase in the submarine Monowai volcanic system, Kermadec arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemner, Fabian; Haase, Karsten M.; Beier, Christoph; Krumm, Stefan; Brandl, Philipp A.

    2015-12-01

    Andesites are typical rocks of island arcs and may either form by fractional crystallization processes or by mixing between a mafic and a felsic magma. Here we present new petrographic and geochemical data from lavas of the submarine Monowai volcanic system in the northern Kermadec island arc that display a continuous range in composition from basalt to andesite. Using petrology, major, trace, and volatile element data, we show that basaltic magmas mostly evolve to andesitic magmas by fractional crystallization. Our thermobarometric calculations indicate that the formation of the large caldera is related to eruption of basaltic-andesitic to andesitic magmas from a magma reservoir in the deeper crust. Small variations in trace element ratios between the caldera and the large active cone imply a homogeneous mantle source. Contrastingly, resurgent dome melts of the caldera stagnated at shallower depths are more depleted and show a stronger subduction input than the other edifices. The Monowai basaltic glasses contain less than 1 wt % H2O and follow typical tholeiitic fractionation trends. High-An plagioclase crystals observed in the Monowai lavas likely reflect mixing of H2O-saturated melt batches with hot and dry tholeiitic, decompression melt batches. The result is a relatively H2O-poor mafic magma at Monowai implying that partial melting of the mantle wedge is only partly due to the volatile flux and that adiabatic melting may play a significant role in the formation of the parental melts of the Monowai volcanic system and possibly other arc volcanoes.

  17. Effects of Al/Si ordering on feldspar dissolution: Part II. The pH dependence of plagioclases' dissolution rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Min, Yujia; Jun, Young-Shin

    2014-02-01

    The rate of mineral dissolution in an aquatic environment is sensitive to the pH of the contacting solution. The pH dependence of mineral dissolution rate has been interpreted by the Transition State Theory-Surface Complexation Model (TST-SCM) formalism in terms of pH-sensitive variability in surface chemistry. In this study, we provide an alternative interpretation for the experimentally observed nonlinear pH dependence of feldspar dissolution rates. The interpretation is based on a new formalism for feldspar dissolution which, while compatible with the TST-SCM formalism, incorporates the effects of both surface chemistry and bulk chemistry on feldspar dissolution into the quantification of dissolution rate. The pH dependence of dissolution rate varies from one feldspar specimen to another because different TOT linkages within one solid matrix can respond differently to the attack of proton. Our results suggest that the pH dependence of feldspar dissolution rate is not a constant in general, and could be affected by pH, substitutional Al/Si ordering, chemical composition of the specimen, and the relative rapidness of linkage hydrolysis according to different mechanisms. The rate law proposed in this study is able to capture the experimentally observed pH dependence of the dissolution rates of a series of plagioclases, including albite, andesine, labradorite, bytownite, and anorthite. The effectiveness of the newly proposed formalism for feldspar dissolution, hence, suggests that dissolution reactions of minerals are combinations of surface renewal and heterogeneous chemical reactions. The currently widely used TST-SCM-based rate laws can be further improved by taking into account the effects of bulk chemistry and surface renewal in the prediction of mineral dissolution rates. An improved formalism for mineral dissolution will be mineral-specific, and will reflect the effects of the temporal decay in the availability of reactive surface sites as well as the

  18. Albitization of plagioclase crystals in the Stevens sandstone (Miocene), San Joaquin Basin, California, and the Frio Formation (Oligocene), Gulf Coast, Texas. A TEM/AEM study

    SciTech Connect

    Hirt, W.G. ); Wenk, H.R. ); Boles, J.R. )

    1993-06-01

    Conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy (CTEM) and Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) studies of partially albitized plagioclase crystals taken from drill cores from the Stevens sandstone (Miocene), San Joaquin, California, and the Frio Formation (Oligocene), Gulf Coast, Texas, reveal that replacement of Ca-rich plagioclase cores by nearly pure albite (Ab[sub 96]-Ab[sub 100]) occurs along submicroscopic ([minus]15 nm wide) en echelon (001) and (110) cleavages. The cleavages are the result of changes in the localized stress regime created by dissolution of adjacent phases. Photomicrographs show albite-lined brittle cleavage crosscutting albitized semibrittle fractures. Such crosscutting relationships can be explained by a reduction in effective stress associated with the albitization process. On a macroscopic scale, this reduction in effective stress implies that the transition from hydrostatic to lithostatic pressure is discontinuous. 30 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Timescales of magma processes occurred prior to recent Campi Flegrei caldera eruptions: first results from diffusion profiles on plagioclase phenocrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antonio, Massimo; Arienzo, Ilenia; Fedele, Lorenzo; Iovine, Raffaella; Carmine Mazzeo, Fabio; Civetta, Lucia; Orsi, Giovanni; Wörner, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the timescales of magma rising and stagnation, as well as mingling/mixing processes occurring in the shallow plumbing system of an active volcano is crucial for volcanic hazard assessment and risk mitigation. Among few recently developed methodologies, high-precision, high spatial resolution analysis of major-, minor- and trace elements on zoned phenocrysts through electron microprobe techniques represents a powerful tool to provide good estimates of timescales of pre-eruptive magma rising, stagnation and/or mingling/mixing processes. To this purpose, volcanic rock samples of trachytic composition representative of the Agnano-Monte Spina eruption (4.7 ka CAL BP) occurred at the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy) have been selected. The investigation has been carried out in the framework of Project V2 - Precursori di Eruzioni, funded by the Italian Dipartimento per la Protezione Civile - Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia. The investigated rock samples are pumice fragments from which double-polished, 100 µm thick thin sections have been prepared for analytical purposes. Back-scattered electrons (BSE) images have been acquired at the scanning electron microscope (SEM), in order to identify the plagioclase phenocrysts suitable to be analyzed successively, selected among those that best display their zoning. After a careful observation of the BSE images, major-, minor- and selected trace element contents have been determined through combined energy-dispersive and wavelength-dispersive system electron microprobe analyses (EDS-WDS-EMPA) on transects crossing the growth zones of the selected phenocrysts. This methodology has allowed reconstructing the diffusion profile of some key-elements through the growth zones of the investigated phenocrysts. Successively, the diffusion profiles have been combined with textural features obtained through BSE images in order to obtain diffusion models aimed at estimating the timescales of crystals

  20. 26Al in plagioclase-rich chondrules in carbonaceous chondrites: Evidence for an extended duration of chondrule formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheon, I. D.; Marhas, K. K.; Krot, A. N.; Goswami, J. N.; Jones, R. H.

    2009-09-01

    The 26Al- 26Mg isotope systematics in 33 petrographically and mineralogically characterized plagioclase-rich chondrules (PRCs) from 13 carbonaceous chondrites (CCs) - one ungrouped (Acfer 094), six CR, five CV, and one CO - reveal large variations in the initial 26Al/ 27Al ratio, ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0. Well-resolved 26Mg excesses (δ 26Mg) from the in situ decay of the short-lived nuclide 26Al ( t1/2 ˜ 0.72 Ma) were found in nine chondrules, two from Acfer 094, five from the CV chondrites, Allende and Efremovka, and one each from the paired CR chondrites, EET 92147 and EET 92042, with ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 values ranging from ˜3 × 10 -6 to ˜1.5 × 10 -5. Data for seven additional chondrules from three CV and two CR chondrites show evidence suggestive of the presence of 26Al but do not yield well defined values for ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0, while the remaining chondrules do not contain excess radiogenic 26Mg and yield corresponding upper limits of (11-2) × 10 -6 for ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0. The observed range of ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 in PRCs from CCs is similar to the range seen in chondrules from unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs) of low metamorphic grade (3.0-3.4). However, unlike the UOC chondrules, there is no clear trend between the ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 values in PRCs from CCs and the degree of thermal metamorphism experienced by the host meteorites. High and low values of ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 are found equally in PRCs from both CCs lacking evidence for thermal metamorphism (e.g., CRs) and CCs where such evidence is abundant (e.g., CVs). The lower ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 values in PRCs from CCs, relative to most CAIs, are consistent with a model in which 26Al was distributed uniformly in the nebula when chondrule formation began, approximately a million years after the formation of the majority of CAIs. The observed range of ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 values in PRCs from CCs is most plausibly explained in terms of an extended duration of ˜2-3 Ma for the formation of CC chondrules. This interval is in sharp

  1. P- T conditions of crystallization and origin of plagioclase-mantled alkali feldspar megacrysts in the Mesozoic granitoids in the Qinling orogen (China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Tao; Haapala, Ilmari; Mao, Jingwen

    2008-07-01

    The Qinling orogen between the North China and South China cratons was intruded at 211-217 Ma by calc-alkaline quartz monzonitic to monzogranitic plutons characterized by I- to A-type geochemistry and in many places contain plagioclase-mantled alkali feldspar megacrysts (rapakivi texture sensu lato). The felsic rocks contain mafic to intermediate magmatic enclaves suggestive of mingling and mixing of mafic and felsic magmas. The P- T conditions of crystallization have been determined for early mineral assemblages (inner parts of alkali feldspar megacrysts and their plagioclase, quartz, amphibole and biotite inclusions) and late assemblages (matrix minerals) of the rapakivi-textured granitoids. Al contents in amphibole from the early and late mineral assemblages yield pressures of 1.2-3.0 and 0.7-3.0 kbar, respectively, and indicate only minor pressure change between the crystallization of the early and late assemblages. Amphibole-plagioclase thermometry gives temperatures mainly of the order of 900 to 1000 °C for both the early and late assemblages indicating nearly isothermal conditions. Feldspar thermometers yield lower temperatures. Relative abundances of minerals and their chemical compositions indicate that the late mineral assemblages tend to be richer in MgO, Na 2O and CaO than the early assemblages. Rapakivi texture is interpreted in this case mainly as a result of compositional changes related to the hybridization between granitic and more mafic magmas. Small release of pressure during crystallization of the magmas may have contributed to the origin of the mantled alkali feldspar megacrysts.

  2. A Mechanism For Production Of Calc-alkalic And Tholeiitic Magma Series In Zao Volcano, NE Japan (II) - Sr Isotope Micro-analysis Of Plagioclase Phenocrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.; Hirahara, Y.; Tatsumi, Y.; Kimura, J.; Ban, M.

    2006-12-01

    It was discussed from the investigation of bulk rock chemical compositions and isotopes ratio that the origin magma or material of calc-alkalic series (CA) and tholeiitic series (TH) from Zao volacano, NE Japan was several necessity (Hirahara et al., 2006). Consequently, we paid attention to Sr isotope ratio of phenocrystic minerals in volcanic rocks, because it can be thought to recorded such magmatic processes, and proposed a mechanism for producing these two magma series based on data obtained by Sr isotopic micro-analyses of plagioclase in volcanic rocks from Zao Volcano. The Sr isotope micro-analyses were performed by two methods. One is the Laser Ablation Multicollector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. The ablate crater size is 0.2mm. Other one is combined method of microdrilling and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometey. The microdrilling is the sampling technique of drilling a sample mechanically with a small drill and collecting the sample powder milled. The diameter at the tip of the drills used for sampling is 0.1 and 0.27mm. The collected sample powder was dissolved with acid, and Sr was separated using micro-columns Sr selective resin. Sr isotope measurement was carried out on the Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer. Core part of plagioclases in CA has widely An% and Sr isotope ratio (52 ~ 93 and 0.7035 ~ 0.7045), and there are divided into several types by the isotopical and compositional characteristics. Especially, plagioclase of most high An% (90 ~ 93) type in CA shows the lowest Sr isotope ratio (0.7035 ~ 0.7037). On the other hand, plagioclase in TH possesses relatively narrow range of An% and Sr isotope ratio (85 ~ 95 and 0.7042 ~ 0.7045), and there is a tendency that Sr isotope ratio slightly increase with decreasing An%. Results of Sr isotope micro-analyses show that CA formed by magma mixing between isotopically depleted basalt magma and isotopically enriched felsic magma. On the other hand, it shows that the primary basalt magma

  3. Magma generation and evolution processes of calc-alkalic and tholeiitic suites in Azuma volcano, NE Japan - Sr isotope micro-analysis study of plagioclase phenocrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.; Hirahara, Y.; Kimura, J.; Chang, Q.; Tatsumi, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Magma generation and evolution processes of island-arc tholeiitic (TH) and calc-alkalic (CA) suites in the NE Japan arc have been thought that the former is produced by fractional crystallization from mantle-derived basalt magma and the latter is formed by magma mixing between basic and felsic magmas. However, based on Sr isotope micro-analyses of plagioclase phenocrysts in basalt and andesite lavas from Zao volcano, Tatsumi et al. (2008) argued that TH basalt was formed by melting of lower-crustal amphibolite, and CA was formed by magma mixing between mantle-derived basalt magma and the crust-derived basaltic andesite to dacite magmas. We present another example from Azuma volcano in the NE Japan arc which verifies our model. Sr isotope micro-analyses were performed by laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICPMS, NEPTUNE coupled to 193nm excimer laser system) and the combined method of micro-milling and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MM-TIMS, micro-mill system and TRITON). The sampling crater size of LA-ICP-MS and MM-TIMS are 0.2mm and 0.27mm in both diameter and depth, respectively. Inner part of plagioclase phenocrysts in TH basalts have narrow range in An% and Sr isotope ratios (80 ~ 95% and 0.7058 ~ 0.7062). In contrast, plagioclases in CA basalts and andesites have widely ranges in An% and Sr isotope ratio (48 ~ 94%, 0.7039 ~ 0.7056). This observed variations are similar to that found in Zao samples, except that Sr isotope ratio is overall higher than that in Zao (Zao TH: 0.7043 ~ 0.7045, Zao CA: 0.7035 ~ 0.7045). We conclude that the magma generation and evolution model proposed by Tatsumi et al. (2008) is applicable to the Azuma TH and CA suites. Difference in the Sr isotope ratio of plagioclase between Azuma and Zao, particularly found in each TH suite lavas, can be explained by the difference in crust composition beneath the volcanoes.

  4. Spectral emissivity measurements of Mercury's surface indicate Mg- and Ca-rich mineralogy, K-spar, Na-rich plagioclase, rutile, with possible perovskite, and garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, A. L.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Kozlowski, R. W. H.; Helbert, J.; Maturilli, A.; Warell, J. B.; Hora, J. L.

    2009-03-01

    Mid-infrared 2-D spectroscopic measurements from 8.0 to 12.7 μm of Mercury were taken using Boston University's Mid-Infrared Spectrometer and Imager (MIRSI) mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, 7-11 April 2006. Measurements reported here cover radar bright region C, a dark plains region west of Caloris Basin, and the interior of Caloris Basin. By use of spectral deconvolution with a large spectral library composed of many mineral compositions and grain size separates, we fitted, or "unmixed", the Mercury spectra. We find mineral suites composed of magnesium-rich orthopyroxene and olivine, Ca-, Mg-, Na-rich clinopyroxene, potassium feldspar, and Na-bearing plagioclase feldspar. Both Ca- and Mg-rich garnet (pyrope and grossular, respectively) are apparently present in small amounts. Opaque minerals are required for spectral matching, with rutile (TiO 2) repeatedly providing the "best fit". However, in the case of the radar bright region C, perovskite also contributed to a very good fit. Caloris Basin infill is rich in both potassium feldspar and Na-rich plagioclase. There is little or no olivine in the Caloris interior smooth plains. Together with the high alkali content, this indicates that resurfacing magmas were low to intermediate in SiO 2. Data suggest the dark plains exterior to Caloris are highly differentiated low-iron basaltic magmas resulting in material that might be classified as oligoclase basalts.

  5. Toward quantification of strain-related mosaicity in shocked lunar and terrestrial plagioclase by in situ micro-X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickersgill, Annemarie E.; Flemming, Roberta L.; Osinski, Gordon R.

    2015-11-01

    Studies of shock metamorphism of feldspar typically rely on qualitative petrographic observations, which, while providing invaluable information, can be difficult to interpret. Shocked feldspars, therefore, are now being studied in greater detail by various groups using a variety of modern techniques. We apply in situ micro-X-ray diffraction (μXRD) to shocked lunar and terrestrial plagioclase feldspar to contribute to the development of a quantitative scale of shock deformation for the feldspar group. Andesine and labradorite from the Mistastin Lake impact structure, Labrador, Canada, and anorthite from Earth's Moon, returned during the Apollo program, were examined using optical petrography and assigned to subgroups of the optical shock level classification system of Stöffler (1971). Two-dimensional μXRD patterns from the same samples revealed increased peak broadening in the chi dimension (χ), due to strain-related mosaicity, with increased optical signs of deformation. Measurement of the full width at half maximum along χ (FWHMχ) of these peaks provides a quantitative way to measure strain-related mosaicity in plagioclase feldspar as a proxy for shock level.

  6. Inherited argon in a Pleistocene andesite lava: 40Ar/39Ar incremental-heating and laser-fusion analyses of plagioclase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Nelson, S. T.; Pringle, M. S.; Feeley, T. C.; Dungan, M. A.

    1998-05-01

    By using 40Ar/39Ar incremental-heating and laser-fusion techniques, xenocrystic plagioclase was discovered in a late Pleistocene andesitic lava that erupted through the Andean Cordillera. Inherited argon in the xenocrysts is as much as ˜450 times older than the host lava, the age of which is independently known, and is an obstacle to dating the lava by using a whole-rock sample. The xenocrysts are impossible to identify from petrography or chemical parameters such as their K/Ca ratios. Holocrystalline groundmass, carefully separated from plagioclase and other phenocrysts, gives an accurate 40Ar/39Ar age for the lava. The xenocrysts could not have been degassed for more than several days in the magma and probably were assimilated from Paleozoic rocks buried under kilometers of Mesozoic and Tertiary arc rocks composing the Cordillera in central Chile. The required magma ascent velocity, on the order of kilometers/day, is extraordinarily high compared to the 10-4 km/day minimum implied by the 226Ra excess in continental arc lavas. These data permit magma migration and storage in the mantle and lower crust for as much as thousands of years, followed abruptly by rapid ascent to the surface.

  7. Garnet-orthopyroxene-plagioclase-quartz barometry: refinement and application to the English River subprovince and the Minnesota River valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Dexter; Chipera, Steve J.

    1985-03-01

    Recent experimental, theoretical, and thermodynamic studies permit better calibration of two reactions for geobarometry: grossular+pyrope+quartz=anorthite+enstatite grossular+almandine+quartz=anorthite+ferrosilite If both reactions are applied using the same thermodynamic data and activity models they should yield the same pressure for a given garnet-pyroxene-plagioclase-quartz assemblage. Application to a variety of high-grade terrains generally yielded excellent results. However, poor results have been obtained for high-Fe rocks which can be traced to errors in activity models for garnet and/or pyroxene. Either a two-site ideal mixing model for orthopyroxene (cf. Wood and Banno 1973) underestimates enstatite activity for high-Fe orthopyroxenes or the Ganguly and Saxena (1984) model overestimates pyrope activity in low-Mg garnets. Application of both barometers to a variety of high-grade terrains gives the following average pressures: Terrain Mg-reaction Fe-reaction Adirondacks, New York 11.2 8.0 Buksefjorden, Greenland 9.5 8.89 Doubtful Sound, New Zealand 12.6 12.0

  8. Evolution of the Craters of the Moon Lavas from primitive Snake River Plain basalts: inferences from plagioclase-melt thermobarometers and whole rock compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaid, N.; Putirka, K.; Kuntz, M.

    2005-12-01

    The volcanic rocks of the Craters of the Mon Lava field provide an ideal laboratory for testing models of magma transport and evolution. Their compositions, relative ages and volumes are well known, as are the fractionation processes leading to their evolution (Leeman, 1976). The COM is somewhat distinctive in the Snake River Plain (SRP) region, due to its evolved character, and an apparent compositional segregation from associated SRP basalts. Some have suggested that the high Fe liquids of the COM demand an origin separate from that of SRP basalts, possibly involving an Fe-enriched mantle, while others have suggested that the COM lavas may be derived by fractionation at moderate depths (30 km). In either case, there are important implications in regard to mantle composition and the nature and distribution of thermal energy. We use plagioclase-melt pairs and an analysis of whole rock compositions in attempt to test models of COM magmatic evolution. Plagioclase-melt thermobarometers provide rough estimates of crystallization depths, and show that COM and SRP lavas partially crystallized at similar depths of 14 +/- 6 km. However, plagioclase crystallization temperatures for SRP basalts (1400 +/- 25 K; Kings Bowl, Cerro Grande, North and South Robbers) exceed temperatures for COM lavas (1358 +/- 45 K) by 40 K. Our data also show that fractional crystallization (ol + plag) can explain the evolution of surrounding SRP basalt flows, and that the most evolved SRP basalts approach primitive COM lava compositions. The most primitive of COM magmas appear to be characterized by the appearance of apatite + magnetite as fractionating phases. Our results thus confirm the geochemical model of Leeman (1976) and the physical model of Kuntz (1992), with the added insight that SRP basalts are parental to the more evolved COM lavas, through low-pressure fractional crystallization in the upper crust. The principal differences between SRP and COM magmas appear to relate more to the

  9. 238U-230Th-226Ra disequilibria in dacite and plagioclase from the 2004-2005 eruption of Mount St. Helens: Chapter 36 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, Kari M.; Donnelly, Carrie T.

    2008-01-01

    230Th)/(232Th) measured for the 1980s reference suite. However, (230Th)/(232Th) for plagioclase separates for dome samples erupted during October and November 2004 are significantly different from corresponding whole-rock values, which suggests that a large fraction (>30 percent) of crystals in each sample are foreign to the host liquid. Furthermore, plagioclase in the two 2004 samples have U-series characteristics distinct from each other and from plagioclase in dacite erupted in 1982, indicating that (1) the current eruption must include a component of crystals (and potentially associated magma) that were not sampled by the 1980-86 eruption, and (2) dacite magmas erupted only a month apart in 2004 contain different populations of crystals, indicating that this foreign component is highly heterogeneous within the 2004-5 magma reservoir.

  10. Mineralogy of Inverted Pigeonite and Plagioclase in Cumulate Eucrites Y-980433 and Y-980318 with Reference to Early Crust Formation of the Vesta-Like Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, H.; Ohtake, M.; Hiroi, T.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Yamaguchi, A.; Nagaoka, H.

    2011-01-01

    On July 16, the Dawn spacecraft became the first probe to enter orbit around asteroid 4 Vesta and will study the asteroid for a year before departing for Ceres. The Vesta-HED link is directly tied to the observed and inferred mineralogy of the asteroid and the mineralogy of the meteorites [1]. Pieters et al. [2] reported reflectance spectra of the Yamato- (Y-)980318 cumulate eucrite as a part of their study on the Asteroid-Meteorite Links in connection with the Dawn Mission. Pyroxenes and calcic plagioclase are the dominant minerals present in HED meteorites and provide multiple clues about how the parent body evolved [1]. The differentiation trends of HED meteorites are much simpler than those of the lunar crust

  11. Shock melting of K-feldspar and interlacing with cataclastically deformed plagioclase in granitic rocks at Toqqusap Nunaa, southern West Greenland: Implications for the genesis of the Maniitsoq structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keulen, Nynke; Garde, Adam A.; Jørgart, Tommy

    2015-11-01

    Folded sheets of Mesoarchaean, leucocratic plagioclase-K-feldspar-mesoperthite-bearing granitic rocks in the Toqqusap Nunaa area of the Maniitsoq structure, West Greenland, are characterised by their very fine grain sizes and microstructures without normal igneous or planar/linear tectonic fabrics. Quartz forms equidimensional and branching, ductilely deformed aggregates and bifurcating panels with protrusions, constrictions and chains of ball-shaped grains with healed, radiating intergranular fractures. Plagioclase (An10-20) was cataclastically deformed and comminuted, whereas K-feldspar and mesoperthite are devoid of cataclastic microstructures. K-feldspar forms dispersed, highly irregular grains with numerous cusps and saddles, indicating almost ubiquitous direct (shock) melting of this mineral. It is commonly located along former fractures in plagioclase, resulting in an 'interlaced' feldspar microstructure with contact shapes indicating subsequent melting of plagioclase directly adjacent to K-feldspar. Mesoperthite forms separate, rounded, and irregular grains with protrusions and cusped margins indicating crystallisation from melts. Some mesoperthite grains are texturally and compositionally heterogeneous and contain internal lenses of K-feldspar and/or plagioclase. Other mesoperthite grains comprise coarsened, 'unzipped' areas, presumably due to localised, fluid-controlled dissolution-reprecipitation processes. The ternary feldspar precursor of the mesoperthite is interpreted as having crystallised from variably effectively mixed K-feldspar shock melts and plagioclase contact melts. Direct melting of K-feldspar, but no whole-rock melting, requires shock metamorphism with a short-lived temperature excursion to above the melting temperature of K-feldspar (~ 1300 °C). The presence of three different feldspar species and absence of chemical zonation, magmatic mantling, or metamorphic coronas furthermore hinders interpretations solely by means of endogenic

  12. A coupled model between mechanical deformation and chemical diffusion: An explanation for the preservation of chemical zonation in plagioclase at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xin; Vrijmoed, Johannes; Moulas, Evangelos; Tajcmanová, Lucie

    2016-04-01

    Compositional zoning in metamorphic minerals have been generally recognized as an important geological feature to decipher the metamorphic history of rocks. The observed chemical zoning of, e.g. garnet, is commonly interpreted as disequilibrium between the fractionated inner core and the surrounding matrix. However, chemically zoned minerals were also observed in high grade rocks (T>800 degree C) where the duration of metamorphic processes was independently dated to take several Ma. This implies that temperature may not be the only factor that controls diffusion timescales, and grain scale pressure variation was proposed to be a complementary factor that may significantly contribute to the formation and preservation of chemical zoning in high temperature metamorphic minerals [Tajcmanová 2013, 2015]. Here, a coupled model is developed to simulate viscous deformation and chemical diffusion. The numerical approach considers the conservation of mass, momentum, and a constitutive relation developed from equilibrium thermodynamics. A compressible viscoelastic rheology is applied, which associates the volumetric change triggered by deformation and diffusion to a change of pressure. The numerical model is applied to the chemically zoned plagioclase rim described by [Tajcmanová 2014]. The diffusion process operating during the plagioclase rim formation can lead to a development of a pressure gradient. Such a pressure gradient, if maintained during ongoing viscous relaxation, can lead to the preservation of the observed chemical zonation in minerals. An important dimensionless number, the Deborah number, is defined as the ratio between the Maxwell viscoelastic relaxation time and the characteristic diffusion time. It characterizes the relative influence between the maintenance of grain scale pressure variation and chemical diffusion. Two extreme regimes are shown: the mechanically-controlled regime (high Deborah number) and diffusion-controlled regime (low Deborah number

  13. Peraluminous websterite and granulite xenoliths from the Chyulu Hills volcanic field, Kenya: Plagioclase-rich cumulates re-equilibrated at uppermost mantle and crustal conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulianov, A.; Kalt, A.; Pettke, T.

    2004-12-01

    Basanites of the Chyulu Hills volcanic field, Kenya, contain a suite of meta-igneous peraluminous spinel-garnet olivine websterite, Mg-Al sapphirine-bearing and Ca-Al hibonite-bearing granulite xenoliths. The websterites are the most mafic and magnesian members of this sequence. The Mg-Al sapphirine-bearing granulites are more Si- and Al-rich and less magnesian. They consist of ortho- and clinopyroxene, corundum, spinel, sapphirine, sillimanite, plagioclase and garnet. The Ca-Al hibonite-bearing granulites are most enriched in Si and Al. They are dominated by clinopyroxene and plagioclase and may contain hibonite closely associated with spinel, mullite, sapphirine and sillimanite. Hibonite, which is very rare in terrestrial rocks, is the earliest mineral in the crystallization sequence. All rocks are poor in REE, HFSE and Cr and enriched in LILE and Ni. They follow a magmatic fractionation trend and form a cumulate sequence finally equilibrated in the range of uppermost mantle (websterites) and crustal (granulites) depths. The websterites could have formed by high-pressure metamorphism of low-pressure troctolite-like cumulates and appear similar to some websteritic lithologies from exhumed high-pressure ultramafic complexes (Kornprobst, 1990; Morishita et al., 2003). The final P-T conditions for most websterites correspond to 920-1000 C / 17-22 kbar, whereas the final equilibration in granulites occurred at ca. 600-740 C / <8 kbar, the pressure limit being defined by the stability field of sillimanite. The geodynamic interpretation of spatially close granulite terranes (Moeller et al., 1998) coupled with the petrological evidence suggest that the studied rocks were metamorphosed and may have formed in the environment of a Pan-African active continental margin. Moeller, A., Mezger, K., Schenk, V. (1998). Journal of Petrology 39, 749-783. Kornprobst, J., Piboule, M., Roden, M., Tabit, A. (1990). Journal of Petrology 31, 717-745. Morishita, T., Arai, S., Gervilla, F

  14. Chemistry, reaction mechanisms and micro-structures during retrograde metamorphism of gedrite-biotite-plagioclase bearing rocks from Bergslagen, south-central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrow, Embaie A.; Ripa, Magnus

    1991-01-01

    The Proterozoic rhyolitic volcanics constituting the foot-wall rocks in the Stollberg ore-field, Bergslagen, south-central Sweden, locally contain gedrite altered to chlorite and serpentine, biotite altered to chlorite and plagioclase altered to epidote. The intergrowths between the host gedrite and the chlorite/serpentine inclusions are oriented with the a ∗ of gedrite parallel to the c ∗ of serpentine and chlorite. The biotite has been altered to chlorite by brucitization of both the K-interlayer and talc-like layer. In both cases the net change in volume during chloritization is small. The assumption that Al is conserved during alteration of gedrite and biotite agrees very well with the micro-structures and orientation relations observed by transmission electron microscopy. Normalizing the chlorite to 1.00 mole, the overall chemical change that took place during the retrograde metamorphism of the Stollberg rocks can be written as: 0.84Ged+0.14Bio+0.65Mg+4.76H 2O+0.42H=1.00Chl+0.57Alb+0.72Fe+0.01Na+0.12K+0.01Ti+0.05Mn+0.95H 4SiO 4 The reaction results in ca 9% increase in volume for the solid phases. Thus, a slightly acidic Mg-rich fluid started the reaction and, upon leaving the system, the metasomatic fluid was enriched in Na, Fe, K, and Si.

  15. Crystallography of some lunar plagioclases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, D.B.; Appleman, D.E.; Huebner, J.S.; Clark, J.R.

    1970-01-01

    Crystals of calcic bytownite from type B rocks have space group U with c ??? 14 angstroms. Bytownite crystals from type A rocks are more sodic and have space group C1, c ??? 7 angstroms. Cell parameters of eight bulk feldspar separates from crystalline rocks indicate that the range of angle gamma is about 23 times the standard error of measurement, and its value might be useful for estimation of composition. Cell parameters of seven ilmenites are close to those of pure FeTiO3.

  16. The Late Cretaceous igneous rocks of Romania (Apuseni Mountains and Banat): the possible role of amphibole versus plagioclase deep fractionation in two different crustal terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Auwera, Jacqueline; Berza, Tudor; Gesels, Julie; Dupont, Alain

    2016-04-01

    We provide new whole-rock major and trace elements as well as 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd isotopic data of a suite of samples collected in the Late Cretaceous volcanic and plutonic bodies of the Apuseni Mts. (Romania) that belong to the Banatitic Magmatic and Metallogenic Belt, also called the Apuseni-Banat-Timok-Srednogorie belt. The samples define a medium- to high-K calc-alkaline differentiation trend that can be predicted by a three-step fractional crystallization process which probably took place in upper crustal magma chambers. Published experimental data indicate that the parent magma (Mg# = 0.47) of the Apuseni Mts. trend could have been produced by the lower crustal differentiation of a primary (in equilibrium with a mantle source) magma. The Late Cretaceous magmatic rocks of the Apuseni Mts. and Banat display overlapping major and trace element trends except that Sr is slightly lower and Ga is higher in the Apuseni Mts. parent magma. This difference can be accounted for by fractionating plagioclase-bearing (Apuseni Mts.) or amphibole-bearing (Banat) cumulates during the lower crustal differentiation of the primary magma to the composition of the parent magma of both trends. This, together with results obtained on the Late Cretaceous igneous rocks from the Timok area in Eastern Serbia, further suggests variation of the water content of the primary magma along and across the belt. The Apuseni Mts. versus the Banat samples display different isotopic compositions that likely resulted from the assimilation of two distinct crustal contaminants, in agreement with their emplacement in two separate mega-units of Alpine Europe.

  17. Timing of degassing and plagioclase growth in lavas erupted from Mount St. Helens, 2004-2005, from 210Po-210Pb-226Ra disequilibria: Chapter 37 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reagan, Mark K.; Cooper, Kari M.; Pallister, John S.; Thornber, Carl R.; Wortel, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Disequilibrium between 210Po, 210Pb, and 226Ra was measured on rocks and plagioclase mineral separates erupted during the first year of the ongoing eruption of Mount St. Helens. The purpose of this study was to monitor the volatile fluxing and crystal growth that occurred in the weeks, years, and decades leading up to eruption. Whole-rock samples were leached in dilute HCl to remove 210Po precipitated in open spaces. Before leaching, samples had variable initial (210Po) values, whereas after leaching, the groundmasses of nearly all juvenile samples were found to have had (210Po) ≈ 0 when they erupted. Thus, most samples degassed 210Po both before and after the magmas switched from open- to closed-system degassing. All juvenile samples have (210Pb)/(226Ra) ratios within 2 δ of equilibrium, suggesting that the magmas involved in the ongoing eruption did not have strong, persistent fluxes of 222Rn in or out of magmas during the decades and years leading to eruption. These equilibrium values also require a period of at least a century after magma generation and the last significant differentiation of the Mount St. Helens dacites. Despite this, the elevated (210Pb)/(226Ra) value measured in a plagioclase mineral separate from lava erupted in 2004 suggests that a significant proportion of this plagioclase grew within a few decades of eruption. The combined dataset suggests that for most 2004-5 lavas, the last stage of open-system degassing of the dacite magmas at Mount St. Helens is confined to the period between 1-2 years and 1-2 weeks before eruption, whereas plagioclase large enough to be included in the mineral separate grew around the time of the 1980s eruption or earlier.

  18. Formation conditions of leucogranite dykes and aplite-pegmatite dykes in the eastern Mt. Capanne plutonic complex (Elba, Italy): fluid inclusion studies in quartz, tourmaline, andalusite and plagioclase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Ronald J.; Schilli, Sebastian E.

    2016-02-01

    Leucogranite and aplite-pegmatite dykes are associated with the Mt. Capanne pluton (Elba) and partly occur in the thermally metamorphosed host rock (serpentinites). Crystallization conditions of these dykes in the late magmatic-hydrothermal stage are estimated from fluid inclusion studies and mineralogical characterisation, obtained from detailed microthermometry, Raman spectroscopy, and electron microprobe analyses. Fluid inclusion assemblages are analysed in andalusite, quartz, and plagioclase from the leucogranite dykes, and in tourmaline and quartz from the aplite-pegmatite dykes. The fluid inclusion assemblages record multiple pulses of low salinity H2O-rich magmatic and reduced metamorphic fluid stages. Magmatic fluids are characterized by the presence of minor amounts of CO2 and H3BO3, whereas the metamorphic fluids contain CH4 and H2. The highly reduced conditions are also inferred from the presence of native arsenic in some fluid inclusions. Several fluid inclusion assemblages reveal fluid compositions that must have resulted from mixing of both fluid sources. In leucogranite dykes, magmatic andalusite contains a low-density magmatic CO2-rich gas mixture with minor amounts of CH4 and H2. Accidentally trapped crystals (mica) and step-daughters (quartz and diaspore) are detected in some inclusions in andalusite. The first generation of inclusions in quartz that crystallized after andalusite contains a highly reduced H2O-H2 mixture and micas. The second type of inclusions in quartz from the leucogranite is similar to the primary inclusion assemblage in tourmaline from the aplite-pegmatite, and contains up to 4.2 mass% H3BO3, present as a sassolite daughter crystal or dissolved ions, in addition to a CO2-CH4 gas mixture, with traces of H2, N2, H2S, and C2H6. H2O is the main component of all these fluids ( x = 0.91 to 0.96) with maximally 7 mass% NaCl. Some accidentally trapped arsenolite and native arsenic are also detected. These fluids were trapped in the

  19. Immiscible Fe- and Si-rich silicate melts in plagioclase from the Baima mafic intrusion (SW China): Implications for the origin of bi-modal igneous suites in large igneous provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping-Ping; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Ren, Zhongyuan; Wang, Christina Yan; Wang, Kun

    2016-09-01

    The Emeishan large igneous province (ELIP) in SW China is characterized by voluminous high-Ti and low-Ti basalts and spatially associated Fe-Ti oxide-bearing mafic-ultramafic and syenitic/granitic intrusions. The Baima layered mafic intrusion in the central part of the ELIP is surrounded by syenitic and granitic rocks and contains a Lower Zone of interlayered Fe-Ti oxide ores, troctolites and clinopyroxenites and an Upper Zone of isotropic olivine gabbros and gabbros (UZa) and apatite gabbros and Fe-Ti-P oxide ores (UZb). Polycrystalline mineral inclusions, for the first time, were observed in primocryst plagioclase from the basal part of the UZa through to the top of the UZb and consist mostly of clinopyroxene, plagioclase, magnetite, ilmenite and apatite with minor orthopyroxene, sulfide and hornblende. These minerals are commonly anhedral and form irregular shapes. Daughter plagioclase usually crystallizes on the walls of host primocryst plagioclase and has An contents typically 3-6 An% lower than the host plagioclase. Daughter clinopyroxene has similar Mg# but lower TiO2 and Al2O3 contents than primocryst clinopyroxene. These polycrystalline mineral inclusions are considered to crystallize from melts contemporaneous with host plagioclase. The compositional differences between daughter and primocryst minerals can be attributed to equilibrium crystallization in a closed system of the trapped melt inclusions in contrast to fractional crystallization and possible magma replenishment in an open system typical for primo-cumulates of large layered intrusions. Heated and homogenized melt inclusions have variable SiO2 (33-52 wt%), CaO (7-20 wt%), TiO2 (0.1-12 wt%), FeOt (5-20 wt%), P2O5 (0.2-10 wt%) and K2O (0-2.2 wt%). The large ranges of melt compositions are interpreted to result from heterogeneous trapping of different proportions of immiscible Si-rich and Fe-Ti-rich silicate liquids, together with entrapment of various microphenocrysts. The separation of micrometer

  20. The thermodynamics of the I overline{1} - P overline{1} phase transition in Ca-rich plagioclase from an assessment of the spontaneous strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribaudino, Mario; Angel, Ross J.

    2012-10-01

    In-situ powder diffraction measurements between 90 and 935 K on four anorthite-rich plagioclase samples (An100, An96Ab4, An89Ab11 and An78Ab22) were used to determine the detailed evolution of these samples through the I overline{1} -P overline{1} phase transition. The c-type reflections indicative of P overline{1} symmetry were detected only in An100, An96Ab4, whereas deviations in the evolution of the unit-cell parameters with temperature were observed in all samples, most prominently in the β unit-cell angle. The c-type reflections disappear at 510 and 425 K in An100 and An96Ab4 respectively, and their intensity decreases according to a tricritical trend I2 ∝ ( {T - T_{{c}} } ) . The cell parameter changes were used to determine the spontaneous strains arising from the transition which were modelled with Landau theory, allowing for low-temperature quantum saturation, in order to determine the thermodynamic behaviour. In An100 tricritical behaviour was observed [ T c = 512.7(4) K; θs = 394(4)] in good agreement with previous studies, and the c-type superlattice reflections indicative of P overline{1} symmetry persist up to the T c determined from the spontaneous strain, and then disappear. The evolution of the spontaneous strain in An96Ab4 is tricritical at low temperatures [ T c = 459(1) K, θs = 396(5)] up to the temperature of disappearance of c-type reflections, but becomes second order beyond 440 K. In An89Ab11 the strain displays second-order behaviour throughout [ T c = 500(1) and θs = 212(5)], and the c-type reflections are not detected in the powder diffraction patterns at any temperature. The apparent discrepancy between the absence of c-type reflections in temperature ranges where the cell parameters display significant spontaneous strain is resolved through consideration of the sizes of the anti-phase domains within the crystals. It is deduced that the tricritical phase transition occurs in well-ordered crystals with large domains in which the

  1. Abundance and Charge State of Implanted Solar Wind Transition Metals in Individual Apollo 16 and 17 Lunar Soil Plagioclase Grains Determined In Situ Using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Kitts, K.; Sutton, S.; Newville, M.

    2007-03-06

    We report (1) a new method for determining the relative abundances in situ of Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni in implanted solar wind in individual Apollo 16 and 17 lunar plagioclases via synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and (2) the charge states of these metals. By virture of its mass alone, the Sun provides a representative composition of the solar system and can be used as a background against which to gauge excesses or deficiencies of specific components. One way of sampling the Sun is by measuring solar wind implanted ions in lunar soil grains. Such measurements are valuable because of their long exposure ages which compliment shorter time scale collections, such as those obtained by the Genesis spacecraft. Kitts et al. sought to determine the isotopic composition of solar Cr by analyzing the solar wind implanted into plagioclase grains from Apollo 16 lunar soils. The isotopic composition of the solar wind bearing fraction was anomalous and did not match any other known Cr isotopic signature. This could only be explained by either (1) an enrichment in the solar wind of heavy Cr due to spallation in the solar atmosphere or (2) that the Earth and the various parent bodies of the meteorites are distinct from the Sun and must have formed from slightly different mixes of presolar materials. To help resolve this issue, we have developed a wholly independent method for determining the relative abundances of transition metals in the solar wind implanted in individual lunar soil grains. This method is based on in situ abundance measurements by microbeam x-ray fluorescence in both the implantation zone and bulk grains using the synchrotron x-ray microprobe at the Advanced Photon Source (GSECARS sector 13) at Argonne National Laboratory. Here, we report results for Apollo 16 and 17 plagioclase grains. Additionally, a micro-XANES technique was used to determine charge states of the implanted Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni.

  2. Mercury'S Dark Plains West Of Caloris Basin--high Ca Clinopyroxene, Na-rich Plagioclase, Mg-rich Olivine, Tio2: Caloris Basin--k-spar, High Ca Clinopyroxene, Tio2, Na-rich Plagioclase, Hornblende And Mg- And Ca-rich Garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, Ann L.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Kozlowski, R. W. H.; Helbert, J.; Maturilli, A.

    2008-09-01

    We identify mineral phases and approximate abundances on Mercury's surface for spectral measurements made over Caloris Basin and the dark plains to the west. Our results are obtained by fitting spectra obtained with the Mid-Infrared Spectrometer and Imager (MIRSI) at the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) using an established spectral deconvolution algorithm (Ramsey 1996, Ph.D. Dissertation, ASU; Ramsey and Christiansen 1998, JGR). We have assembled several laboratory mineral spectral libraries (JHU, Salisbury et al. 1987, Open-File Report 87-263, USGS; JPL, http://speclib.jpl.nasa.gov; RELAB, http://www.planetary.brown.edu/relab; ASU, Christensen et al. 2000, JGR; BED, Helbert et al. 2007, Adv. Space Res.; USGS, Clark et al. 2007, USGS digital spectral library) with a wide range of known mineral compositions with grain sizes ranging from the finest separates, 0 - 45 µm, incrementally increasing to 250 - 400 µm. Head et al. and Murchie et al. (Science, 2008) show ample evidence for one or more episodes of extrusive volcanism in around Caloris Basin. Our spectral fitting suggests similarities and differences between Caloris infill and the dark plains to the west. Both contain high-Ca clinopyroxene, Mg-rich orthopyroxene (Sprague et al. 1998, Icarus), Na-rich to intermediate plagioclase (Sprague et al. 1994, Icarus), and TiO2 likely in the form of rutile. Sanidine appears to be the dominate K-spar in Caloris Basin, but not in the dark plains (Donaldson Hanna et al. 2008, EGU Abs). A slight improvement in spectral fitting was made to one spectrum from Caloris by including a Na- and K-rich hornblende. In addition small abundances of pyrope and grossular (Ca- and Mg-rich garnets) are apparently present in Caloris Basin infill. This indicates extrusive volcanic episodes moved lava to the surface quickly before entrained garnets from the upper mantle could dissolve and equilibrate with the source magma. This work was funded by NSF AST0406796.

  3. Plagioclase populations and zoning in dacite of the 2004-2005 Mount St. Helens eruption: constraints for magma origin and dynamics: Chapter 34 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Streck, Martin J.; Broderick, Cindy A.; Thronber, Carl R.; Clynne, Michael A.; Pallister, John S.

    2008-01-01

    We propose that crystals with no dissolution surfaces are those that were supplied last to the shallow reservoir, whereas plagioclase with increasingly more complex zoning patterns (that is, the number of zoned bands bounded by dissolution surfaces) result from prolonged residency and evolution in the reservoir. We propose that banding and An zoning across multiple bands are primarily a response to thermally induced fluctuations in crystallinity of the magma in combination with recharge; a lesser role is ascribed to cycling crystals through pressure gradients. Crystals without dissolution surfaces, in contrast, could have grown only in response to steady(?) decompression. Some heating-cooling cycles probably postdate the final eruption in 1986. They resulted from small recharge events that supplied new crystals that then experienced resorption-growth cycles. We suggest that magmatic events shortly prior to the current eruption, recorded in the outermost zones of plagioclase phenocrysts, began with the incorporation of acicular orthopyroxene, followed by last resorption, and concluded with crystallization of euhedral rims. Finally, we propose that 2004-5 dacite is composed mostly of dacite magma that remained after 1986 and underwent subsequent magmatic evolution but, more importantly, contains a component of new dacite from deeper in the magmatic system, which may have triggered the new eruption.

  4. Multiple plagioclase crystal populations identified by crystal size distribution and in situ chemical data: Implications for timescales of magma chamber processes associated with the 1915 eruption of Lassen Peak, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salisbury, M.J.; Bohrson, W.A.; Clynne, M.A.; Ramos, F.C.; Hoskin, P.

    2008-01-01

    Products of the 1915 Lassen Peak eruption reveal evidence for a magma recharge-magma mixing event that may have catalyzed the eruption and from which four compositional members were identified: light dacite, black dacite, andesitic inclusion, and dark andesite. Crystal size distribution, textural, and in situ chemical (major and trace element and Sr isotope) data for plagioclase from these compositional products define three crystal populations that have distinct origins: phenocrysts (long axis > 0??5 mm) that typically have core An contents between 34 and 36 mol %, microphenocrysts (long axis between 0??1 and 0??5 mm) that have core An contents of 66-69, and microlites (long axis < 0??1 mm) with variable An core contents from 64 to 52. Phenocrysts are interpreted to form in an isolated dacitic magma chamber that experienced slow cooling. Based on textural, compositional, and isotopic data for the magma represented by the dacitic component, magma recharge was not an important process until just prior to the 1915 eruption. Average residence times for phenocrysts are in the range of centuries to millennia. Microphenocrysts formed in a hybrid layer that resulted from mixing between end-member reservoir dacite and recharge magma of basaltic andesite composition. High thermal contrast between the two end-member magmas led to relatively high degrees of undercooling, which resulted in faster crystal growth rates and acicular and swallowtail crystal habits. Some plagioclase phenocrysts from the dacitic chamber were incorporated into the hybrid layer and underwent dissolution-precipitation, seen in both crystal textures and rim compositions. Average microphenocryst residence times are of the order of months. Microlites may have formed in response to decompression and/ or syn-eruptive degassing as magma ascended from the chamber through the volcanic conduit. Chemical distinctions in plagioclase microlite An contents reveal that melt of the dark andesite was more mafic than

  5. Mineralogy, Petrology, Chemistry, and Ar-39 - Ar-40 and Ages of the Caddo County IAB Iron: Evidence for Early Partial Melt Segregation of a Gabbro Area Rich in Plagioclase-Diopside

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Bogard, Donald D.; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Garrison, Daniel H.

    2000-01-01

    We found coarse-grained gabbroic material rich in plagioclase and diopside in the Caddo County IAB iron meteorite. The polished thin sections studied were made from areas rich in Al and Ca detected by a micro-focus X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping technique. The gabbro is not a clast within a breccia, but rather this area is located mainly at silicate-metal boundaries only a few cm away from an area with fine-grained, ultramafic silicate similar to winonaites. Medium-grained orthopyroxene and olivine are found in transitional areas showing no disturbance of their crystalline textures. A vein-like region, starting at the area rich in fine-grained mafic silicate, extends towards the gabbroic area with a gradual increase in abundance of plagioclase and diopside. This texture and our accumulated knowledge of the formation mechanism of IAB/winonaltes meteorites, suggest that the gabbroic materials were formed by inhomogeneous segregation of partial melts of chondritic source materials. Compositional data on two mineralogically distinct samples of the gabbro-rich portion of the inclusion were obtained by INAA. Compared to an average of LAB silicate inclusions or winonaites, the Caddo County gabbro is enriched in the incompatible lithophile elements Na, Ca, Sc, REE and Hf, which is consistent with a melt origin for the gabbro. The cosmogenic space exposure age of Caddo County (511 Ma) is significantly younger than exposure ages of some other IAB meteorites, An 39Ar-40Ar age determination of the gabbroic material indicates a series of upward steps in age from 4.516 Ga to 4.523 Ga, with a few high temperature ages up to 4.54 Ga. The older age could approximate the primary recrystallization age of silicates. The stepped Ar age spectrum may indicate differences in Ar closure temperatures during slow cooling of -2-20'C/Myr in the parent body. Alternatively, the younger Ar-Ar ages may date a shock event which occurred while Caddo County was hot and which also created textures

  6. Microbial extracellular polysaccharides and plagioclase dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, S.A.; Barker, W.W.; Banfield, J.F.

    1999-05-01

    Bytownite feldspar was dissolved in batch reactors in solutions of starch (glucose polymer), gum xanthan (glucose, mannose, glucuronic acid), pectin (poly-galacturonic acid), and four alginates (mannuronic and guluronic acid) with a range of molecular weights (low, medium, high and uncharacterized) to evaluate the effect of extracellular microbial polymers on mineral dissolution rates. Solutions were analyzed for dissolved Si and Al as an indicator of feldspar dissolution. At neutral pH, feldspar dissolution was inhibited by five of the acid polysaccharides, gum xanthan, pectin, alginate low, alginate medium, alginate high, compared to an organic-free control. An uncharacterized alginate substantially enhanced both Si and Al release from the feldspar. Starch, a neutral polysaccharide, had no apparent effect. Under mildly acidic conditions, initial pH {approx} 4, all of the polymers enhanced feldspar dissolution compared to the inorganic controls. Si release from feldspar in starch solution exceeded the control by a factor of three. Pectin and gum xanthan increased feldspar dissolution by a factor of 10, and the alginates enhanced feldspar dissolution by a factor of 50 to 100. Si and Al concentrations increased with time, even though solutions were supersaturated with respect to several possible secondary phases. Under acidic conditions, initial pH {approx} 3, below the pK{sub a} of the carboxylic acid groups, dissolution rates increased, but the relative increase due to the polysaccharides is lower, approximately a factor of two to ten. Microbial extracellular polymers play a complex role in mineral weathering. Polymers appear to inhibit dissolution under some conditions, possibly by irreversibly binding to the mineral surfaces. The extracellular polysaccharides can also enhance dissolution by providing protons and complexing with ions in solution.

  7. Chapter G: Tentative Correlation Between CIPW Normin pl (Total Plagioclase) and Los Angeles Wear in Precambrian Midcontinental Granites-Examples from Missouri and Oklahoma, with Applications and Limitations for Use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, George H.

    2004-01-01

    The normative chemical classification of Cross, Iddings, Pirsson, and Washington (CIPW) is commonly used in igneous petrology to distinguish igneous rocks by comparing their magmatic chemistries for similar and dissimilar components. A potential use for this classification other than in petrologic studies is in the rapid assessment of aggregate sources, possibly leading to an economic advantage for an aggregate producer or user, by providing the opportunity to determine whether further physical testing of an aggregate is warranted before its use in asphalt or concrete pavement. However, the CIPW classification currently should not be substituted for the physical testing required in specifications by State departments of transportation. Demands for physical testing of aggregates have increased nationally as users seek to maximize the quality of the aggregate they purchase for their pavements. Concrete pavements are being laid with increased thicknesses to withstand increasing highway loads. New pavement mixes, most notably Superior Performance Asphalt Pavement ('Superpave'), are designed for additional service life. For both concrete and asphalt, the intent is to generate a durable pavement with a longer service life that should decrease overall life-cycle costs. Numerous aggregate producers possess chemical-composition data available for examination to answer questions from the potential user. State geological surveys also possess chemical-composition data for stone sources. Paired with the results of physical testing, chemical- composition data provide indicative information about stone durability and aggregate strength. The Missouri Department of Transportation has noted a possible relation among coarse-grained Precambrian granites of the midcontinental region, correlating the results of abrasion testing with the contents of normative minerals, also known as normins, calculated from chemical composition data. Thus, normin pl ( total plagioclase) can predict, by

  8. Shocked plagioclase signatures in Thermal Emission Spectrometer data of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Staid, M.I.; Titus, T.N.; Becker, K.

    2006-01-01

    The extensive impact cratering record on Mars combined with evidence from SNC meteorites suggests that a significant fraction of the surface is composed of materials subjected to variable shock pressures. Pressure-induced structural changes in minerals during high-pressure shock events alter their thermal infrared spectral emission features, particularly for feldspars, in a predictable fashion. To understand the degree to which the distribution and magnitude of shock effects influence martian surface mineralogy, we used standard spectral mineral libraries supplemented by laboratory spectra of experimentally shocked bytownite feldspar [Johnson, J.R., Ho??rz, F., Christensen, P., Lucey, P.G., 2002b. J. Geophys. Res. 107 (E10), doi:10.1029/2001JE001517] to deconvolve Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data from six relatively large (>50 km) impact craters on Mars. We used both TES orbital data and TES mosaics (emission phase function sequences) to study local and regional areas near the craters, and compared the differences between models using single TES detector data and 3 ?? 2 detector-averaged data. Inclusion of shocked feldspar spectra in the deconvolution models consistently improved the rms errors compared to models in which the spectra were not used, and resulted in modeled shocked feldspar abundances of >15% in some regions. However, the magnitudes of model rms error improvements were within the noise equivalent rms errors for the TES instrument [Hamilton V., personal communication]. This suggests that while shocked feldspars may be a component of the regions studied, their presence cannot be conclusively demonstrated in the TES data analyzed here. If the distributions of shocked feldspars suggested by the models are real, the lack of spatial correlation to crater materials may reflect extensive aeolian mixing of martian regolith materials composed of variably shocked impact ejecta from both local and distant sources. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Heterogeneous plagioclase compositions in the Maralinga CK4 chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.

    1993-01-01

    One of the characteristic features of CK chondrites is the wide compositional range displayed by feldspar grains in matrix relative to the narrow range of compositions exhibited by the highly equilibrated olivines and pyroxenes. Recently, it was suggested that these heterogeneous feldspar compositions may have been strongly influenced by shock metamorphisms. It is shown that the apparent range of feldspar compositions in Maralinga probably results from annealing during parent body thermal metamorphism rather than shock. The majority of matrix feldspars in Maralinga are typically 50 microns in size and are compositionally zoned, with oligoclase cores (approximately An40) and bytownite rims (approximately An80). The contact between core and rim is sharp and abrupt and is readily observed in backscattered scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images.

  10. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in alkali feldspar and plagioclase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Andrea R.; Pettke, Thomas; Angel, Ross J.; Hirt, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Feldspars are the most abundant rock-forming minerals in the Earth's crust, but their magnetic properties have not been rigorously studied. This work focuses on the intrinsic magnetic anisotropy of 31 feldspar samples with various chemical compositions. Because feldspar is often twinned or shows exsolution textures, measurements were performed on twinned and exsolved samples as well as single crystals. The anisotropy is controlled by the diamagnetic susceptibility and displays a consistent orientation of principal susceptibility axes; the most negative or minimum susceptibility is parallel to [010], and the maximum (least negative) is close to the crystallographic [001] axis. However, the magnetic anisotropy is weak when compared to other rock-forming minerals, 1.53*10-9 m3 kg-1 at maximum. Therefore, lower abundance minerals such as augite, hornblende or biotite often dominate the bulk paramagnetic anisotropy of a rock. Ferromagnetic anisotropy is not significant in most samples. In the few samples that do show ferromagnetic anisotropy, the principal susceptibility directions of the ferromagnetic subfabric do not display a systematic orientation with respect to the feldspar lattice. These results suggest that paleointensity estimates of the geomagnetic field made on single crystals of feldspar will not be affected by a systematic orientation of the ferromagnetic inclusions within the feldspar lattice.

  11. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in alkali feldspar and plagioclase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Andrea R.; Pettke, Thomas; Angel, Ross J.; Hirt, Ann M.

    2016-04-01

    Feldspars are the most abundant rock-forming minerals in the Earth's crust, but their magnetic properties have not been rigorously studied. This work focuses on the intrinsic magnetic anisotropy of 31 feldspar samples with various chemical compositions. Because feldspar is often twinned or shows exsolution textures, measurements were performed on twinned and exsolved samples as well as single crystals. The anisotropy is controlled by the diamagnetic susceptibility and displays a consistent orientation of principal susceptibility axes; the most negative or minimum susceptibility is parallel to [010], and the maximum (least negative) is close to the crystallographic [001] axis. However, the magnetic anisotropy is weak when compared to other rock-forming minerals, 1.53 × 10-9 m3 kg-1 at maximum. Therefore, lower abundance minerals, such as augite, hornblende or biotite, often dominate the bulk paramagnetic anisotropy of a rock. Ferromagnetic anisotropy is not significant in most samples. In the few samples that do show ferromagnetic anisotropy, the principal susceptibility directions of the ferromagnetic subfabric do not display a systematic orientation with respect to the feldspar lattice. These results suggest that palaeointensity estimates of the geomagnetic field made on single crystals of feldspar will not be affected by a systematic orientation of the ferromagnetic inclusions within the feldspar lattice.

  12. Shocked Plagioclase Signatures in Thermal Emission Spectrometer Data of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Staid, M. I.; Titus, T. N.

    2002-01-01

    Deconvolution of TES (Thermal Emission Spectrometer) data using a spectral library that includes spectra of experimentally shocked anorthosite (bytownite) suggests that shocked materials can be identified on Mars at low to intermediate abundances (10 - 20%) over a range of pressures. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Oxalate adsorption at a plagioclase (An47) surface and models for ligand-promoted dissolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stillings, L.L.; Drever, J.I.; Poulson, S.R.

    1998-01-01

    Previous work on adsorption of oxalate at aluminosilicate surfaces suggests that maximum adsorption occurs through a bidentate attachment of the organic ligand, at near-neutral pH. Rates of ligand-promoted dissolution are expected to be greatest at this pH as well. We tested this model by measuring oxalate adsorption on the surface of andesine (An47), in solutions of pH 3- 5 and total oxalate concentrations of 0-8 mM. Contrary to expectation, the greatest adsorption density of 24 ??mol m-2 total oxalate was observed at pH 3 and 8 mM total oxalate. Adsorption is dependent upon the activities of both oxalate (C2O42-) and bioxalate (HC2O4-) in solution and can be modeled with either a two-term Langmuir or a two-term Freundlich isotherm. A Freundlich adsorption model provided the best fit to rate data because it was not constrained to a finite number of adsorption sites, as was the Langmuir model. The two-term ligand adsorption model was incorporated into a rate model: R(tot) = k(H-)[H(ads)/+](L) + k(HOx-)[HOx(ads)/-] + k(Ox2- )[Ox2(ads)/-] where R(tot) is the net dissolution rate of the feldspar, [i(ads)] is the concentration of species i adsorbed to the surface, and k(i) is the rate constant for release of the surface complex. The model was fit to data for oxalate-promoted dissolution of andesine, resulting in estimates for the rate constants of k(HOx-) = 1.16 x 10-12, k(Ox2-) = 1.05 x 10-12, and k(H-) = 9.61 x 10-13 mol of feldspar (??mol of i) (??mol of i)-1 s-1.Previous work on adsorption of oxalate at aluminosilicate surfaces suggests that maximum adsorption occurs through a bidentate attachment of the organic ligand, at near-neutral pH. Rates of ligand-promoted dissolution are expected to be greatest at this pH as well. We tested this model by measuring oxalate adsorption on the surface of andesine (An47), in solutions of pH 3-5 and total oxalate concentrations of 0-8 mM. Contrary to expectation, the greatest adsorption density of 24 ??mol m-2 total oxalate was observed at pH 3 and 8 mM total oxalate. Adsorption is dependent upon the activities of both oxalate (C2O42-) and bioxalate (HC2O4-) in solution and can be modeled with either a two-term Langmuir or a two-term Freundlich isotherm. A Freundlich adsorption model provided the best fit to rate data because it was not constrained to a finite number of adsorption sites, as was the Langmuir model. The two-term ligand adsorption model was incorporated into a rate model: Rtot = kH(+)[Hads+]L +kHOx(-) [HOxads-]+kOx(2-) [Oxads 2-] where Rtot is the net dissolution rate of the feldspar, [iads] is the concentration of species i adsorbed to the surface, and ki is the rate constant for release of the surface complex. The model was fit to data for oxalate-promoted dissolution of andesine, resulting in estimates for the rate constants of kHOx(-) = 1.16??10-12, kOx(2-) = 1.05??10-12, and kH(+) = 9.61??10-13 mol of feldspar (??mol of i)-1 s-1.

  14. A re-examination of relationships among pyroxene-plagioclase achondrites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerome, D. Y.; Goles, G. G.

    1971-01-01

    In light of the new data of Jerome (1970), a brief discussion of genetic relationships between eucrites, howardites and diogenites is presented. Howardites are not direct products of magmatic crystallization, as has sometimes been postulated, but instead are interpreted as polymict breccias resulting from the mechanical mixture of eucrites and diogenites. Testing of this model by means of chemical arguments is made complicated however by the probable presence of a chondritic component in howardites and by a sequence analogous to terrestrial differentiation series, among the eucrites themselves.

  15. Use of olivine and plagioclase saturation surfaces for the petrogenetic modeling of recrystallized basic plutonic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, G. N.

    1983-01-01

    During petrogenetic studies of basic plutonic rocks, there are at least three major questions to be considered: (1) what were the relative proportions of cumulate crystals and intercumulus melt in a given sample? (2) what is the composition and variation in composition of the melts within the pluton? and (3) what is the original composition of the liquids, their source and evolution prior to the time of emplacement? Use of both saturation surfaces can place strong limits on the compositions of potential cumulate phases and intercumulus melts. Consideration of appropriate trace elements can indicate whether a sample is an orthocumulate, adcumulate or mesocumulate. Thus, when trace element and petrographic data are considered together with the saturation surfaces, it should be possible to begin to answer the three major questions given above, even for strongly recrystallized basic plutons.

  16. An experiment-based model for the petrogenesis of high-alumina basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, J. S.; Lofgren, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    To understand magmatism at convergent margins, one must know the origin of their characteristic plagioclase-rich high-alumina basalts (HABs). Wet melting experiments on basalts at 3 kilobars yielded high-alumina liquids and a coexisting mineral assemblage with plagioclase crystallization in these melts, while mafic minerals underwent limited crystallization or even resorption. These results suggest that hydrous HAB liquids, presumably formed by fractionation of a hydrous basalt at depth, precipitate voluminous plagioclase as pressure drops during ascent and eruption. Plagioclase accumulation is not necessarily required to explain the petrogenesis of plagioclase-rich HAB.

  17. Genesis of compositional characteristics of Stillwater AN-I and AN-II thick anorthosite units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.; Salpas, Peter A.

    1992-01-01

    Compositional variations among samples of the thick Stillwater anorthosite units are used here to model the mechanism by which the anorthosite formed. Suspended plagioclase, on reaching a volumetric crystal concentration of about 65 percent, formed a plagioclase framework here called cumulus plagioclase (CP). Within the interstices among the crystals, some plagioclase and pyroxene precipitated, producing what is here called adcumulus plagioclase and pyroxene (APP). The final materials consists mainly of plagioclase and pyroxene formed from complete crystallization of trapped supporting liquid and called intercumulus plagioclase and pyroxene (IPP). Where the CP framework was relatively open initially, bulk liquid communicated with the interior of the framework to produce APP. Where this communication with the bulk liquid stopped or was prevented initially, the intercumulus liquid froze. Where the CP framework was more tightly packed initially, a relatively higher proportion of IPP to APP was produced.

  18. Shock and thermal metamorphism of basalt by nuclear explosion, Nevada test site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, O.B.

    1969-01-01

    Olivine trachybasalt metamorphosed by nuclear explosion is classified into categories of progressive metamorphism: (i) Weak. Plagioclase is microfractured, and augite cotainis fine twin lamellae. (ii) Moderate. Plagioclase is converted to glass, and mafic minerals show intragranular deformation (undulatory extinction, twin lamellae, and, possibly, deformation lamellae), but rock texture is preserved. (iii) Moderately strong. Plagioclase glass shows small-scale flow, mafic minerals are fractured and show intragranular deformation, and rocks contain tension fractures. (iv) Strong. Plagioclase glass is vesicular, augite is minutely fractured, and olivine is coarsely fragmented, shows mosaic extinction, distinctive lamellar structures, and is locally recrystallized. (v) Intense. Rocks are converted to inhomogeneous basaltic glass.

  19. Mineralogy of Apollo 15415 ?genesis rock' - Source of anorthosite on moon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, I. M.; Smith, J. V.

    1971-01-01

    Results of electron microprobe analyses of plagioclase points and pyroxene grains of Apollo 15415 ?genesis rock.' It is pointed out that no evidence of cumulate textures has yet appeared to support suggestions of extensive crystal-liquid differentiation producing an anorthositic crust or a lunar crust composed of a mixture of plagioclase-rich rock, basalts and minor ultramafic material, which require that plagioclase crystals float in a basaltic liquid. The plagioclase in 15415 does not show cumulate texture either. It is noted that it remains to be seen whether rock 15415 is correctly named the ?genesis rock.'

  20. Shock and thermal metamorphism of basalt by nuclear explosion, nevada test site.

    PubMed

    James, O B

    1969-12-26

    Olivine trachybasalt metamorphosed by nuclear explosion is classified into categories of progressive metamorphism: (i) Weak. Plagioclase is microfracruree, and augite contains twin lamellae. (ii) Moderate. Plagioclase is converted to glass, amd mafic minerals show intragranular deformation (undulatory extinction, twin lamellae, and, possibly, defomation lamellae), but rock texture is preserved. (iii) Moderately strong. Plagioclase glass shows small-scale flow, mafic minerals are fractured and show intragranular deformation, and rocks contain tension fractures. (iv) Strong. Plagioclase glass is vesicular, augite is minutely fractured, and olivine is coarsely fragmented, shows moscaic extinction, distinctive lamellar structures, and is locally recrystallized. (v) Intense. Rocks are converted to inhomogeneous basaltic glass. PMID:17758716

  1. Beneficiation of Stillwater Complex Rock for the Production of Lunar Simulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, D. L.; Young, C.; Stoeser, D.; Edmunson, J.

    2014-01-01

    The availability of pure, high calcium plagioclase would be a significant asset in any attempt to manufacture high-quality lunar simulants. A suitable plagioclase product can be obtained from materials obtained from the Stillwater Complex of Montana. The access, geology, petrology, and mineralogy of the relevant rocks and the mill tailings are described here. This study demonstrates successful plagioclase recovery from mill tailings produced by the Stillwater Mine Company. Hydrogen peroxide was used to remove carboxymethyl cellulose from the tailing. The characteristics of the plagioclase products are shown and locked grains are identified as a limit to achievable purity. Based on the experimental results, flowsheets were developed showing how these resources could be processed and made into 'separates' of (1) high calcium plagioclase and (2) orthopyroxene/clinopyroxene with the thought that they would be combined later to make simulant.

  2. Using Apollo 17 high-Ti mare basalts as windows to the lunar mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Clive R.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    1992-01-01

    The Apollo 17 high-Ti mare basalts are derived from source regions containing plagioclase that was not retained in the residue. Ilmenite appears to remain as a residual phase, but plagioclase is exhausted. The open-system behavior of the type B2 basalts results in slightly higher Yb/Hf and La/Sm ratios. The nature of the added component is not clear, but may be a KREEP derivative or residue. The recognition of plagioclase in the source(s) of these basalts suggests that the location of the source region(s) would be more likely to be less than 150 km (i.e., closer to the plagioclase-rich crust), which would allow incorporation of plagioclase into the source through incomplete separation of crustal feldspar.

  3. Petrology of crystalline matrix breccias from Apollo 17 rake samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. D.; Taylor, G. J.; Keil, K.

    1977-01-01

    The petrology, mineralogy, and composition of 13 crystalline matrix breccias from the Apollo 17 rake samples are described. The breccias have matrices of uniform modal mineralogy (plagioclase, 50-54%; olivine and pyroxene, 41-46%) but diverse textures. Clast characteristics, including the proportion of plagioclase, the composition in comparison with matrix, and the textures of different clast types, are reported. The majority of bulk matrix compositions plot on or very near the plagioclase-olivine cotectic in the system olivine-anorthite-silica. If the matrix compositions represent impact total melts, the inferred cotectic control requires that the source material was itself an igneous differentiate with compositions along the plagioclase-olivine cotectic. Alternatively, the proximity of the matrix compositions to the plagioclase-olivine cotectic could be accounted for if the breccia matrices represent a suite of impact-generated partial melts.

  4. Hydrogen concentration in plagioclaes as a hygrometer of magmas: Approaches from melt inclusion analyses and hydrous melting experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, M.; Ushioda, M.; Fujii, T.; Takahashi, E.

    2012-12-01

    Plagioclase is one of the nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) which accommodates hundreds wt. ppm of hydrogen. Hydrogen in igneous plagioclase (OH) can act as a proxy of dissolved H2O in silicate melt. In order to use it as a practical hygrometer of magmas, we studied partitioning of hydrogen between plagioclase and basaltic melt dis-solving H2O (0.3˜5.5 wt.%) by two approaches: analyses of plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions (H2O≈0.3 wt.%) from mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) and hydrogen partitioning experiments between An96 plagioclase and hydrous basaltic melt (0.8 wt.%≦H2O≦5.5 wt.%) at 0.35 GPa. Concentration hydrogen in plagioclase and concentration of H2O in basaltic glasses were analyzed by infrared spectroscopy. As a first series of this study, plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions in MORB (50.5% SiO2, 15.1% Al2O3, 7.4% MgO) from the Rodriguez triple junction in the Indian Ocean were analyzed. The hydrogen concentration of plagioclase is less than 50 wt. ppm water, and no correlation between hydrogen concentration and anorthite content is recognized. Average H2O concentrations in melt inclusions is 0.3 wt.%. Therefore, apparent partition coefficient of hydrogen between plagioclase and melt is ≈ 0.01 in molar basis. As a second series of this study, hydrous melting experiments of arc basaltic magma were performed at 350 MPa using internally-heated pressure vessel. Starting material was hydrous glass (0.8 wt.%≦H2O≦5.5 wt.%) of an undifferentiated rock from Miyakejima volcano, a frontal-arc volcano in Izu-arc (MTL rock: 50.5% SiO2, 18.1% Al2O3, 4.9% MgO). A grain of Ca-rich plagioclase (≈1 mg, about An96) and 10 mg of powdered glasses were sealed in Au80Pd20 alloy capsule, and then kept at temperature at around the liquidus. Liquidus phase of MTL rock at 350 MPa is always plagioclase with 0 to 5.5 wt.% H2O in melt, and therefore, a grain of plagioclase and hydrous melt were nearly in equilibrium. Oxygen fugacity (fO2) during the melting experiments

  5. Understanding Magmatic Plumbing System Dynamics at Fernandina Island, Galapagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, K. C.; McGuire, M.; Geist, D.; Harpp, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    Fernandina is the most active Galápagos volcano, and is located closest to the seismically defined hotspot. Allan and Simkin (2000) observed that the subaerial edifice is constructed of homogeneous basalts (Mg# = 49 ± 2) with highly variable plagioclase phenocryst contents and sparse olivine. Geist et al. (2006) proposed a magmatic plumbing system in which the volcano is supplied by interconnected sills, the shallowest of which is density-stratified: olivine and pyroxene are concentrated at greater depths, whereas less dense plagioclase mush is higher in the sill. Consequently, olivine-rich lava erupts laterally during submarine events, but plagioclase-rich lava supplies subaerial vents. To test this hypothesis, we examine lavas erupted in 1995, 2005, and 2009. These SW flank eruptions emerged alternatively from en echelon radial fissures on the lower flanks and circumferential fissures near the caldera rim. The 1995 radial fissure unzipped downslope and then formed a cone 4 km from the coast, sending flows to the ocean. In 2005, circumferential fissures erupted five flows south of the 1995 fissure. As in 1995, the 2009 fissures opened down the SW flank before focusing to a cone near the 1995 vents, producing 6 km-long flows that also reached the ocean. By correlating plagioclase crystal size distribution and morphologies with single event chronological sequences, we examine Fernandina's magmatic plumbing system. Modal plagioclase in 1995 lava decreases (20% to <5%) throughout the middle eruptive phase. Early 2005 samples are nearly aphyric (Chadwick et al., 2010), with 1-2% plagioclase. The 2009 eruption has reduced plagioclase, similar to mid-1995 samples. Preliminary observations suggest that less plagioclase-rich mush is being flushed out during early-to-medial event sequences, whereas plag phenocrysts are transported more during later phases. Plausible plumbing dynamics suggest a zone of plagioclase-rich mush that is eroded and incorporated into radial

  6. Lunar ferroan anorthosite petrogenesis: clues from trace element distributions in FAN subgroups

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Floss, C.; James, O.B.; McGee, J.J.; Crozaz, G.

    1998-01-01

    The rare earth elements (REE) and selected other trace elements were measured in plagioclase and pyroxene from nine samples of the lunar ferroan anorthosite (FAN) suite of rocks. Samples were selected from each of four FAN subgroups previously defined by James et al. (1989). Plagioclase compositions are homogeneous within each sample, but high- and low-Ca pyroxenes from lithic clasts typically have different REE abundances from their counterparts in the surrounding granulated matrices. Measured plagioclase/low-Ca pyroxene concentration ratios for the REE have steeper patterns than experimentally determined plagioclase/low-Ca pyroxene partition coefficients in most samples. Textural and trace element evidence suggest that, although subsolidus equilibration may be responsible for some of the discrepancy, plagioclase compositions in most samples have been largely unaffected by intermineral redistribution of the REE. The REE systematics of plagioclase from the four subgroups are broadly consistent with their deviation through crystallization from a single evolving magma. However, samples from some of the subgroups exhibit a decoupling of plagioclase and pyroxene compositions that probably reflects the complexities inherent in crystallization from a large-scale magmatic system. For example, two anorthosites with very magnesian mafic minerals have highly evolved trace element compositions; major element compositions in plagioclase also do not reflect the evolutionary sequence recorded by their REE compositions. Finally, a noritic anorthosite breccia with relatively ferroan mafic minerals contains several clasts with high and variable REE and other trace element abundances. Although plagioclase REE compositions are consistent with their derivation from a magma with a KREEPy trace element signature, very shallow REE patterns in the pyroxenes suggest the addition of a component enriched in the light REE.

  7. Cryptic trace-element alteration of Anorthosite, Stillwater complex, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, G.K.; Loferski, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Evidence of cryptic alteration and correlations among K, Ba, and LREE concentrations indicate that a post-cumulus, low-density aqueous fluid phase significantly modified the trace-element contents of samples from Anorthosite zones I and II of the Stillwater Complex, Montana. Concentrations of Ba, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Sc, Sr, Th, Zn, and the rare-earth elements (REE) were measured in whole rocks and plagioclase separates from five traverses across the two main plagioclase cumulate (anorthosite) zones and the contiguous cumulates of the Stillwater Complex in an attempt to better understand the origin and solidification of the anorthosites. However, nearly the entire observed compositional range for many trace elements can be duplicated at a single locality by discriminating between samples rich in oikocrystic pyroxene and those which are composed almost entirely of plagioclase and show anhedral-granular texture. Plagioclase separates with high trace-element contents were obtained from the pyroxene-poor samples, for which maps of K concentration show plagioclase grains to contain numerous fractures hosting a fine-grained, K-rich phase, presumed to be sericite. Secondary processes in layered intrusions have the potential to cause cryptic disturbance, and the utmost care must be taken to ensure that samples provide information about primary processes. Although plagioclase from Anorthosite zones I and II shows significant compositional variation, there are no systematic changes in the major- or trace-element compositions of plagioclase over as much as 630 m of anorthosite thickness or 18 km of strike length. Plagioclase in the two major anorthosite zones shows little distinction in trace-element concentrations from plagioclase in the cumulates immediately below, between, and above these zones.

  8. Shock Metamorphism of the Dhofar 378 Basaltic Shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; McKay, G.

    2006-01-01

    Shock metamorphism is one of the most fundamental processes in the history of Martian meteorites, especially shergottites, which affect their mineralogy and chronology. The formation of "maskelynite" from plagioclase and shock melts is such major mineralogical effects. Dhofar 378 is one of the recently found desert shergottites that is mainly composed of plagioclase and pyroxene. This shergottite is important because of its highly shocked nature and unique plagioclase texture, and thus has a great potential for assessing a "shock" age of shergottites. We have been working on a combined study of mineralogy and chronology of the same rock chip of Dhofar 378. This abstract reports its mineralogical part.

  9. Rb-Sr age of the Civet Cat clast, 72255, 41. [radioactive age determination for lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compston, W.; Gray, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Plagioclase rich clasts, orthopyroxene rich matrix, purified pyroxene, and plagioclase from the Civet Cat clast define a Rb-Sr isochron age of 4.18 + or - 0.04 x 10 to the 9th power yr and an initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio of 0.69922 + or - 0.00005. The fit of all data to the line is within error except for plagioclase 3, and blank corrections are essentially negligible. The decay constant used is 1.39 x 10 to the minus 11th power yr.

  10. Thermoluminescence of the mineral components in granite

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, R.G.; Kierstead, J.A.; Levy, P.W.

    1982-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) of the minerals in Climax Stock (Nevada, USA) granite has been studied. The principal mineral constituents are plagioclase, quartz, potassium feldspar and biotite. Pyrite, sphene apatite and zircon occur at one percent or less. All exhibit TL except biotite. The TL kinetics were determined for plagioclase, quartz, potassium feldspar and pyrite. Plagioclase and potassium feldspar exhibit second order and pyrite first orker kinetics. Natural TL of quartz follows second order and artificial TL first order kinetics. However, in these four minerals unrealistic kinetic parameters are often obtained; thus more general kinetics, e.g. interactive kinetics, may apply. 8 figures.

  11. Mineralogic and petrologic study of lunar anorthosite slide 15415,18.

    PubMed

    Hargraves, R B; Hollister, L S

    1972-01-28

    The anorthosite slide 15415,18 contains 98 percent subhedral plagioclase (97 mole percent anorthite), two pyroxenes: diopsidic augite (46 percent wollastonite, 39 percent enstatite, 16 percent ferrosilite) with subsidiary (100) lamellae and grains of hypersthene (2.5 percent wollastonite, 58 percent enstatite, 39.5 percent ferrosilite), and traces of ilmenite. The pyroxene occurs interstitial to, and as small grains enclosed within, plagioclase. The textures and compositions of the phases appear compatible with an origin by concentration and adcumulus growth of plagioclase from a gabbroic anorthosite (or hyperaluminous) magma in a "plutonic" environment. PMID:17731366

  12. Effects of kinetics on the crystallization of quartz normative basalt 15597 - An experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, T. L.; Raudsepp, M.

    1978-01-01

    Equilibrium experiments on a residual liquid composition from the dynamic crystallization study on quartz normative basalt (QNB) 15597 are used to evaluate the effects of kinetics on the crystallization of pyroxene-porphyritic basalts. The results indicate that the liquids coexisting with pyroxene phenocryst rims before the precipitation of groundmass plagioclase + pyroxene have left the equilibrium liquid line of descent and metastably penetrated the plagioclase primary phase volume. The precipitation of groundmass plagioclase + pyroxene brings the basalt system closer to equilibrium with respect to the residual liquid and crystals. At rapid cooling rates pyroxene phenocryst growth produces substantial compositional gradients in the residual silicate liquid at the pyroxene/liquid interface. The compositional gradients enhance the nucleation and growth of groundmass phases at the phenocryst interface, because effects related to constitutional supercooling for these phases (e.g., plagioclase, pyroxene, etc.) favor nucleation at the interface.

  13. Implications for the origins of pure anorthosites found in the feldspathic lunar meteorites, Dhofar 489 group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Karouji, Yuzuru; Ohtake, Makiko; Yamaguchi, Akira; Yoneda, Shigekazu; Hasebe, Nobuyuki

    2014-12-01

    Remote observation by the reflectance spectrometers onboard the Japanese lunar explorer Kaguya (SELENE) showed the purest anorthosite (PAN) spots (>98% plagioclase) at some large craters. Mineralogical and petrologic investigations on the feldspathic lunar meteorites, Dhofar 489 and Dhofar 911, revealed the presence of several pure anorthosite clasts. A comparison with Apollo nearside samples of ferroan anorthosite (FAN) indicated that of the FAN samples returned by the Apollo missions, sample 60015 is the largest anorthosite with the highest plagioclase abundance and homogeneous mafic mineral compositions. These pure anorthosites (>98% plagioclase) have large chemical variations in Mg number (Mg# = molar 100 × Mg/(Mg + Fe)) of each coexisting mafic mineral. The variations imply that these pure anorthosites underwent complex formation processes and were not formed by simple flotation of plagioclase. The lunar highland samples with pure anorthosite and the PAN observed by Kaguya suggest that pure anorthosite is widely distributed as lunar crust lithology over the entire Moon.

  14. Lunar anorthosite paradox - An alternative explanation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    In most lunar terrae samples a trend of decreasing Ab-content of plagioclase with increasing Fa-content of olivine is observed. This covariance of composition is the opposite of the trend observed in terrestrial layered intrusions, and contradicts Bowen's reaction series. The 'anomalous' trend is considered in terms of olivine-melt and plagioclase-melt equilibria. The composition of plagioclase crystallizing from a melt depends directly upon the activity of silica in the melt, while the composition of olivine does not. It is proposed that the inverse correlation of plagioclase and olivine compositions in most lunar terrae rocks is a predictable consequence of crystallization from a lunar bulk composition which is poorer in silica than the bulk compositions of terrestrial layered intrusions. The data of Roedder and Weiblen (1974) lend support to this hypothesis.

  15. The global distribution of pure anorthosite on the Moon.

    PubMed

    Ohtake, Makiko; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Haruyama, Junichi; Yokota, Yasuhiro; Morota, Tomokatsu; Honda, Chikatoshi; Ogawa, Yoshiko; Torii, Masaya; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Arai, Tomoko; Hirata, Naru; Iwasaki, Akira; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Hiroi, Takahiro; Sugihara, Takamitsu; Takeda, Hiroshi; Otake, Hisashi; Pieters, Carle M; Saiki, Kazuto; Kitazato, Kohei; Abe, Masanao; Asada, Noriaki; Demura, Hirohide; Yamaguchi, Yasushi; Sasaki, Sho; Kodama, Shinsuke; Terazono, Junya; Shirao, Motomaro; Yamaji, Atsushi; Minami, Shigeyuki; Akiyama, Hiroaki; Josset, Jean-Luc

    2009-09-10

    It has been thought that the lunar highland crust was formed by the crystallization and floatation of plagioclase from a global magma ocean, although the actual generation mechanisms are still debated. The composition of the lunar highland crust is therefore important for understanding the formation of such a magma ocean and the subsequent evolution of the Moon. The Multiband Imager on the Selenological and Engineering Explorer (SELENE) has a high spatial resolution of optimized spectral coverage, which should allow a clear view of the composition of the lunar crust. Here we report the global distribution of rocks of high plagioclase abundance (approaching 100 vol.%), using an unambiguous plagioclase absorption band recorded by the SELENE Multiband Imager. If the upper crust indeed consists of nearly 100 vol.% plagioclase, this is significantly higher than previous estimates of 82-92 vol.% (refs 2, 6, 7), providing a valuable constraint on models of lunar magma ocean evolution. PMID:19741704

  16. Maskelynite: Formation by explosive shock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milton, D.J.; De Carli, P. S.

    1963-01-01

    When high pressure (250 to 300 kilobars) was applied suddenly (shock-loading) to gabbro, the plagioclase was transformed to a noncrystalline phase (maskelynite) by a solid-state reaction at a low temperature, while the proxene remained crystalline. The shock-loaded gabbro resembles meteorites of the shergottite class; this suggests that the latter formed as a result of shock. The shock-loading of gabbro at 600 to 800 kilobars raised the temperature above the melting range of the plagioclase.

  17. Expanding the REE Partitioning Database for Lunar Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Jennifer F.; Draper, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Positive europium anomalies are ubiquitous in the plagioclase-rich rocks of the lunar highlands, and complementary negative Eu anomalies are found in most lunar basalts. This is taken as evidence of a large-scale differentation event, with crystallization of a global-scale lunar magma ocean (LMO) resulting in a plagioclase flotation crust and a mafic lunar interior from which mare basalts were later derived. However, the extent of the Eu anomaly in lunar rocks is variable. Some plagioclase grains in a lunar impact rock (60635) have been reported to display a negative Eu anomaly, or in some cases single grains display both positive and neagtive anomalies. Cathodoluminescence images reveal that some crystals have a negative anomaly in the core and positive at the rim, or vice versa, and the negative anomalies are not associated with crystal overgrowths. Oxygen fugacity is known to affect Eu partitioning into plagioclase, as under low fO2 conditions Eu can be divalent, and has an ionic radius similar to Ca2+ - significant in lunar samples where plagioclase compositions are predominantly anorthitic. However, there are very few experimental studies of rare earth element (REE) partitioning in plagioclase relevant to lunar magmatism, with only two plagioclase DEu measurements from experiments using lunar materials, and little data in low fO2 conditions relevant to the Moon. We report on REE partitioning experiments on lunar compositions. We investigate two lunar basaltic compositions, high-alumina basalt 14072 and impact melt breccia 60635. These samples span a large range of lunar surface bulk compositions. The experiments are carried out at variable fO2 in 1 bar gas mixing furnaces, and REE are analysed by and LA-ICP-MS. Our results not only greatly expand the existing plagioclase DREE database for lunar compositions, but also investigate the significance of fO2 in Eu partitioning, and in the interpretation of Eu anomalies in lunar materials.

  18. Petrologic evidence for a plutonic igneous origin of anorthositic norite clasts in 67955 and 77017

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    Clasts of anorthositic norite in 67955 and 77017, and several other samples, are suggested to represent material which crystallized from a silicate magma in a plutonic environment. Although no statement can be made regarding the ultimate origin of the parent melt, its composition was relatively felsic, starting within the primary field of crystallization of either plagioclase or spinel. The sequence of crystallization was: plagioclase (and/or spinel) olivine - low-Ca pyroxene - high-Ca pyroxene.

  19. Magnetic and microscopic features of silicate-hosted Fe-oxide inclusions in an oceanic gabbro section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, Jessica

    2015-04-01

    The magnetic mineralogy of oceanic gabbros is typically dominated by magnetite, which occurs in several forms: as a cumulus or intercumulus phase, as a secondary phase formed through alteration, or as exsolved inclusions in plagioclase and pyroxene. This study characterizes the contribution of magnetic inclusions in plagioclase and pyroxene to the bulk rock remanence and examines changes in the distribution of remanence carriers with crustal depth. Selected samples were taken throughout a 1500-m-long section of drilled oceanic gabbro cores collected from the Oceanic Drilling Program Site 735B at Atlantis Bank on the Southwest Indian Ridge. Hysteresis parameters and curves of isothermal remanence acquisition were measured for plagioclase and clinopyroxene mineral separates and compared with whole rock measurements for samples from various depths to determine the relative contributions of each to the bulk sample remanence properties. In whole-rock samples, bulk saturation magnetization decreases and coercivity distributions become dominated by harder magnetic components with increasing depth. The changes in rock magnetic properties with depth are interpreted to result from variations in composition as well as cooling rates. Coercivity distributions in both plagioclase and pyroxene systematically shift to higher coercivities with increasing depth in the section, although the change is more pronounced in plagioclase, indicating that the size distributions of magnetic inclusions in plagioclase become progressively finer. First-order reversal curves for plagioclase separates provide a striking example of non-interacting single-domain particles. Variations in exsolution textures and compositions of the inclusions were also investigated by microanalysis and electron microscopy. Microscopic examination revealed unexpected complexity in the structure of exsolution features, with several oxide phases commonly present as inclusions in plagioclase and multiple generations of

  20. Shape of pinch and swell structures as a viscosity indicator: Application to lower crustal polyphase rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Robyn L.; Piazolo, Sandra; Daczko, Nathan R.

    2016-07-01

    Pinch and swell structures occur where a more competent layer in a weaker matrix is subjected to layer-parallel extension. In this contribution, we use numerical models to explore the use of pinch and swell structure shape symmetry and asymmetry as a determinant of relative viscosity between layers. Maximum asymmetry is attained when the matrix viscosity on one side is subtly weaker than the competent layer, while the other side is significantly weaker. Our numerical results are directly applied to asymmetrically developed pinch and swell structures in exposed lower continental crust. Here, shape geometries observed in a shear zone comprised of plagioclase-dominated, garnet-dominated and mixed amphibole-plagioclase-dominated bands, reveals that the plagioclase-dominated band is the most competent band and is marginally stronger (2×) and significantly stronger (10-40×) than the fine grained garnet-dominated and mixed amphibole-plagioclase-dominated band, respectively. Based on the experimentally determined viscosity of a plagioclase-dominated material and quantitative microstructural analysis, the viscosity range of the natural rock bands is 2.8 × 1015 to 1.1 × 1017 Pa s. Consequently, the assumption that the experimentally-derived plagioclase flow law is an appropriate proxy for the middle to lower continental crust may lead to a viscosity over-estimation by up to forty times.

  1. Metamorphism of San Antonio Terrane metapelites, San Gabriel Mountains, California

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, L.; Ishimatsu, J.; Schneiderman, J.S. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Pelitic schists and gneisses from the San Antonio terrane in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains consist of garnet, biotite, plagioclase, quartz, sillimanite, cordierite, hercynite [+-] alkali feldspar. Large garnet porphyroblasts contain quartz, plagioclase and sillimanite inclusions. Cordierite occurs as haloes around garnet porphyroblasts and as small subgrains always associated with hercynite and together replacing sillimanite blades. Hercynite additionally appears to have nucleated on the edges of sillimanite blades. Contrary to previous investigations, hercynite appears to be a late mineral phase. Reaction textures described above have been used to calculate a set of net-transfer reactions that can be used (1) to characterize all possible exchanges of matter between minerals in the system and (2) to construct a reaction space for the system. Fourteen thin sections with large garnet porphyroblasts and abundant biotite were used for microprobe analysis. Detailed probe analyses show well-developed zoning in the plagioclase and alkali feldspar whose character varies depending on location in the thin section relative to neighboring minerals. Generally, large plagioclase porphyroblasts display normal zoning and are not as calcium-rich as plagioclase inclusions in the garnet. Garnet porphyroblasts have flat zoning profiles due to high temperatures of metamorphism. Pressures and temperatures of metamorphism have been calculated from these assemblages using garnet-biotite geothermometry and quartz-garnet-aluminosilicate-plagioclase geobarometry.

  2. Calcic myrmekite in anorthositic and gabbroic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffries, C.M.; Dymek, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Myrmekite is a common feature of granitic plutonic rocks and quartzo-feldspathic gneisses, but it is rarely reported in anorthositic and gabbroic rocks. The authors have identified myrmekitic intergrowths of quartz and calcic plagioclase in a variety of plagioclase-rich cumulate rocks, including samples from a number of massif anorthosites and layered igneous intrusions. It appears that calcic myrmekite has been frequently overlooked, and is a common accessory feature in these rock types. Chemical and textural characteristics of myrmekite in the St-Urbain massif anorthosite (Quebec) and the Bushveld Igneous Complex (South Africa) have several features in common, but this myrmekite appears to be fundamentally different from that described by most previous investigators. Whereas myrmekite typically consists of a vermicular intergrowth of sodic plagioclase and quartz that occurs adjacent to alkali feldspar, the intergrowths in these rocks contain highly calcic plagioclase and lack the intervening alkali feldspar. In addition, the plagioclase in the myrmekite is more calcic than that in the surrounding rock. The boundary between the myrmekite and the host material is generally extremely sharp, although reverse zoning of host plagioclase may obscure the contact in some cases. The textural and chemical evidence is consistent with a replacement origin for these intergrowths; the proportion of quartz in the myrmekite is in close agreement with the predicted amount of silica that is generated by the theoretical replacement reaction. It appears that water played a key role in the replacement process.

  3. The Case for a Heat-Pipe Phase of Planet Evolution on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, J. I.; Moore, W. B.; Webb, A. A. G.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of anorthosite in the lunar highlands is generally attributed to the flotation of less dense plagioclase in the late stages of the solidification of the lunar magma ocean. It is not clear, however, that these models are capable of producing the extremely high plagioclase contents (near 100%) observed in both Apollo samples and remote sensing data, since a mostly solid lithosphere forms (at 60-70% solidification) before plagioclase feldspar reaches saturation (at approximately 80% solidification). Formation as a floating cumulate is made even more problematic by the near uniformity of the alkali composition of the plagioclase, even as the mafic phases record significant variations in Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratios. These problems can be resolved for the Moon if the plagioclase-rich crust is produced and refined through a widespread episode of heat-pipe magmatism rather than a process dominated by density-driven plagioclase flotation. Heat-pipes are an important feature of terrestrial planets at high heat flow, as illustrated by Io's present activity. Evidence for their operation early in Earth's history suggests that all terrestrial bodies should experience an early episode of heat-pipe cooling. As the Moon likely represents the most wellpreserved example of early planetary thermal evolution in our solar system, studies of the lunar surface and of lunar materials provide useful data to test the idea of a universal model of the way terrestrial bodies transition from a magma ocean state into subsequent single-plate, rigid-lid convection or plate tectonic phases.

  4. Two stage melt-rock interaction in the lower oceanic crust of the Parece Vela basin (Philippine sea), evidence from the primitive troctolites from the Godzilla Megamullion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfilippo, A.; Dick, H. J.; Ohara, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Godzilla Megamullion is a giant oceanic core complex exposed in an extinct slow- to intermediate-spreading segment of the Parece Vela Basin (Philippine sea) [1; 2]. It exposes lower crust and mantle rocks on the sea-floor, offering a unique opportunity to unravel the architecture and the composition of the lower oceanic lithosphere of an extinct back arc basin. Here we present data on primitive troctolites and associated olivine-gabbros from the breakaway area of the Godzilla Megamullion. On the basis of the olivine/plagioclase volume ratio, the troctolites are subdivided into Ol-troctolites (Ol/Pl >1) and Pl-troctolites (Ol/Pl<1), which show evident textural differences. Ol-troctolites have rounded to polygonal olivine, subhedral plagioclase, and poikilitic clinopyroxene. This texture suggests chemical disequilibrium between the olivine and a melt crystallizing plagioclase and clinopyroxene. We interpret these rocks as reaction products of a dunite matrix with transient basaltic melts [e.g. 3; 4]. Pl-troctolites have euhedral plagioclase and poikilitic olivine and clinopyroxene. Irregular shapes and inverse zoning of the plagioclase chadacrysts within the olivine indicate disequilibrium between existing plagioclase and an olivine-clinopyroxene saturated melt. The occurrence of plagioclase chadacrysts within clinopyroxene ranging from irregular to euhedral in shape suggests crystallization of new lower-Na plagioclase with the clinopyroxene. Olivine oikocrysts in the Pl-troctolites have low-NiO olivine in equilibrium with a high-MgO melt. The Pl-troctolites, then, may be the product of reaction between a plagioclase cumulate and a basaltic melt produced by mixing the high-MgO melt residual to the formation of the Ol-troctolites with new magma. The effect of melt-rock reaction in the Pl- and Ol- troctolites explains the sharp decrease in plagioclase An with respect to Mg# in clinopyroxene and olivine. Furthermore, the melt is shifted towards lower Na, which is

  5. Dissolution kinetics of oceanic lower-crustal cumulate-minerals and the potential effect of the melts on ascending magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvassnes, A. J.; Grove, T. L.; Dick, H. J.

    2003-12-01

    The most primitive Atlantis Bank (SWIR) olivine-gabbros have augite oikocrysts surrounding more evolved plagioclase chadacrysts. In addition, this coarse type of augite commonly shows reverse zoning. The observations motivated an experimental study. We investigated the kinetics of melting of the grain-boundaries between mineral-pairs commonly found in lower ocean-crust, and discovered rapid melting rates and melt-compositions that may explain the phenomenon. In our study, An62 and An54 plagioclase were melted together with Fo73 or Fo82 and with Mg#86 augite. The experiments were distributed over a melting interval of 1240-1330° C and 1180-1300° C respectively. No melting was observed below 1210° C (augite - An54) and 1255° C (Fo82 - An54). Plagioclase is buoyant in the melt, therefore the minerals were melted with the heavier mineral on top, to preserve a short distance between them. The duration of the experiments varied from 30 minutes to 24 hours. The solidus for the plagioclase-clinopyroxene-olivine system was determined to be 1150° C, and the solidus for augite-plagioclase and olivine-plagioclase was inferred to be 5° C and 40degC higher, respectively, on the basis of previous studies. Olivine, the mineral that experiences the fastest internal solid-state diffusion, has very narrow (tens of μ ms) or no observable diffusion gradient along the actively melting surface, indicating that the melting rate is similar to or faster than the diffusion rate for Fe/Mg in olivine. Some recrystallization occurred in the melt close to olivine, away from the most active melt interface. Plagioclase and clinopyroxene grains melted without internal diffusion of major elements in the crystals. Augite starts disintegrating internally at the highest temperatures, but does not show any sign of preferential melting of exsolution lamellae or preferential melting of different crystal faces. Plagioclase show a very narrow (10μ m) jagged reaction zone, but no significant

  6. Structure and petrology of the La Perouse gabbro intrusion, Fairweather Range, southeastern Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loney, R.A.; Himmelberg, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The gabbro was intruded during the Middle Tertiary into a Mesozoic granulite-facies metamorphic environment dominated by strike-slip fault movement, compression and possible minor subduction. The asymmetric funnel form of the intrusion is due to subsidence from magmatic loading at high T, coupled with control from pre-existing structures, and not from tectonic compression. The intrusion is 12 X 27 km and has exposed cumulate layering of approx 6000 m. Probe analyses of olivines (24), Ca-poor pyroxenes (28), augites (22) and plagioclases (35) are tabulated. Cumulus mineral compositions in the basal cumulates are: olivine Fo86-71, plagioclase An81-63, bronzite Ca3Mg82Fe15 - Ca4Mg75Fe21, augite Ca45Mg47Fe8 - Ca42Mg48Fe10. The layered gabbro above the basal cumulates consists dominantly of lenticularly interlayered plagioclase-augite-orthopyroxene-olivine, plagioclase-augite- olivine and plagioclase-orthopyroxene-augite cumulates, the composition ranges being olivine Fo75-50, plagioclase An78-42, orthopyroxene and inverted pigeonite Ca2.8Mg76.4Fe20.8 - Ca1.4Mg31.0Fe67.6, augite Ca43.1Mg46.9Fe10.0 - Ca40.5Mg27.1Fe32.4. The most iron-rich pyroxene and albite-rich plagioclase occur in a zone near the margin of the intrusion and are probably related to exchange reactions with the country rock. It is considered that the gabbro did not accumulate by simple fractional crystallization of a single or even several large batches of magma, but by numerous influxes of previously fractionated magma from a deeper reservoir. Conditions of crystallization are interpreted as approx 1055oC, 5.4 kbar and fO2 near the wustite-magnetite buffer.-R.A.H.

  7. Cogenetic Rock Fragments from a Lunar Soil: Evidence of a Ferroan Noritic-Anorthosite Pluton on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Haskin, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    The impact that produced North Ray Crater, Apollo 16 landing site, exhumed rocks that include relatively mafic members of the lunar ferroan anorthositic suite. Bulk and mineral compositions indicate that a majority of 2-4 mm lithic fragments from sample 67513, including impact breccias and monomict igneous rocks, are related to a common noritic-anorthosite precursor. Compositions and geochemical trends of these lithic fragments and of related samples collected along the rim of North Ray Crater suggest that these rocks derived from a single igneous body. This body developed as an orthocumulate from a mixture of cumulus plagioclase and mafic intercumulus melt, after the plagioclase had separated from any cogenetic mafic minerals and had become concentrated into a crystal mush (approximately 70 wt% plagioclase, 30 wt% intercumulus melt). We present a model for the crystallization of the igneous system wherein "system" is defined as cumulus plagioclase and intercumulus melt. The initial accumulation of plagioclase is analogous to the formation of thick anorthosites of the terrestrial Stillwater Complex; however, a second stage of formation is indicated, involving migration of the cumulus-plagioclase-intercumulus-melt system to a higher crustal level, analogous to the emplacement of terrestrial massif anorthosites. Compositional variations of the lithic fragments from sample 67513 are consistent with dominantly equilibrium crystallization of intercumulus melt. The highly calcic nature of orthocumulus pyroxene and plagioclase suggests some reaction between the intercumulus melt and cumulus plagioclase, perhaps facilitated by some recrystallization of cumulus plagioclase. Bulk compositions and mineral assemblages of individual rock fragments also require that most of the mafic minerals fortned in close contact with cumulus plagioclase, not as separate layers. The distribution of compositions (and by inference, modes) has a narrow peak at anorthosite and a broader, larger

  8. A new approach to relate kinetic parameters, composition and temperatures of igneous minerals: the case of Villarrica Volcano 1971 eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, C.; Parada, M. A.; Morgado, E. E.; Castruccio, A.

    2014-12-01

    This contribution provides a new approach to calculate the plagioclase composition of a given igneous rock based on kinetics parameters of crystallization obtained from CSD analyses of plagioclase. The procedure we use includes the following steps: 1) determination of the effective rates of crystal growth and nucleation based on the maximum time interval of mineral crystallization obtained from the CSD segment with the minimum slope and extrapolated to rest of the segments; 2) calculation of the total crystallization time; 3) determination of the time-dependent variation of plagioclase volume fraction based on crystal population density and CSD slopes; 4) calculation of the ideal rates of crystal growth and nucleation; 5) determination of temperature of plagioclase crystallization as a function of the ideal crystal growth rate; 6) determination of plagioclase composition as a function of the ideal crystal growth rate. We apply our model for plagioclase of 17 samples of The Villarrica Volcano 1971 eruption lava flow. All CSD show two segments with a break at 0.3 mm. The first segment is interpreted as the syn-eruptive crystallization and the second as the within-reservoir crystallization. An interval of 1.5 years as a maximum crystallization time for the syn-eruptive stage was estimated from Cashman's (1993) expression. Crystal growth rates in the reservoir stage took place during two stages. The first stage varies from 10^-8.9 to 10^-9.4 mm s-1 and the second one varied from 10^-9.4 to 10^-9.1 mm s-1. Finally, the crystal growth rate as high as 10^-7.8 mm s-1 were estimated for the syn-eruptive stage. Nucleation rates varies exponentially from 10^-13 to 10^-8 s-1 in the reservoir stage and from 10^-8 to 10^-1 s^-1 in the syn-eruptive stage. The total crystallization interval varies from 120 to 390 years. A mean total volume fraction of plagioclase of 0.55 was obtained (0.98 for all minerals) whereas a mean value of 0.054 was obtained at the onset of the eruption (0

  9. Melt inclusion data from the July/August 2006 and May 2010 eruptions of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, M.; Geist, D.; Rowe, M. C.; Harpp, K. S.; Dufek, J.

    2011-12-01

    Tungurahua volcano, located in the eastern Cordillera of the Ecuadorian Andes, began a new eruptive sequence in 1999 after ~80 years of inactivity, which persists as of August 2011. This study focuses on the pyroclastic flow-forming eruptions of 2006 and May 2010, using melt inclusions within plagioclase and pyroxene to complement the whole rock compositions presented by Samaniego et al. (2011). Melt inclusions in pyroxene from the 2006 eruption have higher silica concentrations (61-64 wt%) than those hosted within plagioclase (59-62 wt%), the matrix glass (61-62 wt%), and the bulk rock (58 wt%). The 2010 eruption shows a similar but more exaggerated trend, with pyroxene-hosted melt inclusions having silica concentrations ranging from 58-67 wt%, plagioclase between 61-63 wt% and glass between 59-62 wt%. These differences are not attributable to post-entrapment modification. The more evolved inclusions in the 2010 pyroxenes can be created through fractional crystallization of the 2006 glass compositions, using pressures ~2-3 kb and water concentrations ~3 wt%, as simulated by MELTs. Phenocrysts in the 2006 samples have reabsorbed rims and sieve textures, whereas few of the 2010 plagioclases are sieve textured. The 2006 and 2010 melt inclusion compositions plot within the trend formed by the whole rock data from historical eruptions, suggesting that they originated from similar petrogenetic processes. The 2006 pyroxene-hosted melt inclusions have aluminum concentrations above the whole rock trend, whereas the 2010 fall below; otherwise, rocks and inclusions from the two eruptions have similar compositions. Because the pyroxene-hosted melt inclusions contain more evolved melt than the plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions, it is possible that: 1) plagioclase crystallized at higher temperature, along with iron-titanium oxides, increasing the silica concentrations in liquids that were captured by pyroxene, followed by a mafic intrusion that triggered the eruption or 2

  10. Interaction between two contrasting magmas in the Albtal pluton (Schwarzwald, SW Germany): textural and mineral-chemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Lorenz; Wenzel, Thomas; Markl, Gregor

    2016-07-01

    The magmatic evolution of the Variscan Albtal pluton, Schwarzwald, SW Germany, is explored using detailed textural observations and the chemical composition of plagioclase and biotite in both granite and its mafic magmatic enclaves (MMEs). MMEs probably formed in a two-step process. First, mafic magma intruded a granitic magma chamber and created a boundary layer, which received thermal and compositional input from the mafic magma. This is indicated by corroded "granitic" quartz crystals and by large "granitic" plagioclase xenocrysts, which contain zones of higher anorthite and partly crystallized from a melt of higher Sr content. Texturally, different plagioclase types (e.g. zoned and inclusion-rich types) correspond to different degrees of overprint most likely caused by a thermal and compositional gradient in the boundary layer. The intrusion of a second mafic magma batch into the boundary layer is recorded by a thin An50 zone along plagioclase rims that crystallized from a melt enriched in Sr. Most probably, the second mafic intrusion caused disruption of the boundary layer, dispersal of the hybrid magma in the granite magma and formation of the enclaves. Rapid thermal quenching of the MMEs in the granite magma is manifested by An30 overgrowths on large plagioclase grains that contain needle apatites. Our results demonstrate the importance of microtextural investigations for the reconstruction of possible mixing end members in the formation of granites.

  11. Post-igneous redistribution of components in eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, W. C.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Martinez, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    In our analyses, we utilize a microdrilling technique that removes 40 to 100 micron diameter cores from mineral grains in thin sections analyzed by microprobe. The cores are then analyzed by INAA using the technique of Lindstrom. Three eucrites were selected for application of this analytical technique: monomict breccias Pasamonte and Stannern and unbrecciated EET90020. Pasamonte is among the most unequilibrated of the eucrites on the basis of zoning in pyroxenes and is considered to be an igneous rock not significantly affected by metamorphism. Stannern has igneous texture but its pyroxenes indicate some re-equilibration, although little, if any, recrystallization. EET90020 has a granulite texture and has been substantially recrystallized. Our sample of Pasamonte contains several clasts of different grain sizes ranging from glass to fine grained with diabasic texture containing lathy plagioclase, unexsolved pigeonite, and mesostasis. Cores were taken of the glass and from minerals and mesostases in six lithic clasts which normally allowed sampling of more than one phase per clast. Our sample of Stannern is also a breccia but with little difference in grain size between clasts and matrix. The plagioclase and pigeonite are blocky, twinned, and exsolved and coexist with a bit of mesostasis. Cores were taken of plagioclase and pigeonite with no attempt to distinguish separate clasts. EET90020 is a granular mixture of twinned plagioclase and pigeonite having rather uniform size and many triple junctions. Several cores were taken of both phases. Both clear and cloudy grains of plagioclase and pyroxene were sampled in all three eucrites.

  12. Precambrian tholeiitic-dacitic rock-suites and Cambrian ultramafic rocks in the Pennine nappe system of the Alps: Evidence from Sm-Nd isotopes and rare earth elements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stille, P.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1985-01-01

    Major element, trace element and Sm-Nd isotope analyses were made of polymetamorphic hornblendefelses, plagioclase amphibolites and banded amphibolites from the Berisal complex in the Simplon area (Italy, Switzerland) to determine their age, origin and genetic relationships. In light of major and rare earth element data, the hornblendefelses are inferred to have originally been pyroxene-rich cumulates, the plagioclase amphibolites and the dark layers of the banded amphibolites to have been tholeiitic basalts and the light layers dacites. The Sm-Nd isotope data yield isochron ages of 475??81 Ma for the hornblendefelses, 1,018??59 Ma for the plagioclase amphibolites and 1,071??43 Ma for the banded amphibolites. The 1 Ga magmatic event is the oldest one ever found in the crystalline basement of the Pennine nappes. The Sm -Nd isotope data support the consanguinity of the tholeiitic dark layers and the dacitic light layers of the banded amphibolites with the tholeiitic plagioclase amphibolites and the ultramafic hornblendefelses. The initial e{open}Nd values indicate that all three rock types originated from sources depleted in light rare earth elements. We suggest that plagioclase and banded amphibolites were a Proterozoic tholeiite-dacite sequence that was strongly deformed and flattened during subsequent folding. The hornblendefelses are thought to be Cambrian intrusions of pyroxene-rich material. ?? 1985 Springer-Verlag.

  13. Sm-Nd Age and Nd- and Sr- Isotopic Evidence for the Petrogenesis of Dhofar 378

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Ikeda, Y.; Shih, C.-Y.; Reese, Y. D.; Nakamura, N.; Takeda, H.

    2006-01-01

    Dhofar 378 (hereafter Dho 378) is one of the most ferroan lithologies among martian meteorites, resembling the Los Angeles basaltic shergottite in lithology and mineral chemistry, although it is more highly shocked than Los Angeles. All plagioclase (Pl) grains in the original lithology were melted by an intense shock in the range 55-75 GPa. Clinopyroxenes (Cpx) sometimes show mosaic extinction under a microscope showing that they, too, experienced intense shock. Nevertheless, they zone from magnesian cores to ferroan rims, reflecting the original lithology. Cpx grains also often contain exsolution lamellae, showing that the original lithology cooled slowly enough for the lamellae to form. Because all plagioclase grains were melted by the intense shock and subsequently quenched, the main plagioclase component is glass (Pl-glass) rather than maskelynite. Like Los Angeles, but unlike most basaltic shergottites, Dho 378 contains approximately equal modal abundances of Cpx and Pl-glass. The grain sizes of the original minerals were comparatively large (approximately 1 mm). The original plagioclase zoning has been severely modified. Following shock melting, the plagioclase melts crystallized from the outside inward, first forming outer rims of Cpx-Pl intergrowths (approximately 10 micrometers) followed by inner rims (10's to 100 micrometers) of An(sub 40-50) feldspar, and finally Pl-gl cores of compositions An(sub 33-50) with orthoclase compositions up to Or(sub 12).

  14. The petrogenesis of sodic island arc magmas at Savo volcano, Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. J.; Petterson, M. G.; Saunders, A. D.; Millar, I. L.; Jenkin, G. R. T.; Toba, T.; Naden, J.; Cook, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Savo, Solomon Islands, is a historically active volcano dominated by sodic, alkaline lavas, and pyroclastic rocks with up to 7.5 wt% Na2O, and high Sr, arc-like trace element chemistry. The suite is dominated by mugearites (plagioclase-clinopyroxene-magnetite ± amphibole ± olivine) and trachytes (plagioclase-amphibole-magnetite ± biotite). The presence of hydrous minerals (amphibole, biotite) indicates relatively wet magmas. In such melts, plagioclase is relatively unstable relative to iron oxides and ferromagnesian silicates; it is the latter minerals (particularly hornblende) that dominate cumulate nodules at Savo and drive the chemical differentiation of the suite, with a limited role for plagioclase. This is potentially occurring in a crustal “hot zone”, with major chemical differentiation occurring at depth. Batches of magma ascend periodically, where they are subject to decompression, water saturation and further cooling, resulting in closed-system crystallisation of plagioclase, and ultimately the production of sodic, crystal and feldspar-rich, high-Sr rocks. The sodic and hydrous nature of the parental magmas is interpreted to be the result of partial melting of metasomatised mantle, but radiogenic isotope data (Pb, Sr, Nd) cannot uniquely identify the source of the metasomatic agent.

  15. Magma evolution in the Nain Complex, Labrador, and implications for the origin of anorthosite

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Analyses of over 50 chilled margins of plutons and contemporaneous dikes in the anorthositic Nain Complex reveal a well-defined trend of liquid evolution along a plagioclase-olivine cotectic. Fractional crystallization of olivine and plagioclase has resulted in extreme enrichment of TiO/sub 2/ and FeO/sub T/ and depletion of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in the more evolved compositions. The contemporaneous Harp Dikes and Seal Lake Volcanics of southern Labrador also fall along this trend. Although rare, other dikes in the Nain complex are very olivine-rich and the olivine is quench-textured. Modeling of major and trace elements indicates that the leucotroctolitic liquids can be derived from the melatroctolites by olivine removal, and that the more evolved cotectic liquids can be derived from the leucotroctolitic liquids by removal of o1 + plag in a 25:75 ratio. If the equilibrium saturation surface of plagioclase is ignored, continued olivine removal from the leucotroctolites is capable of producing compositions very similar to compositions of hypothesized anorthositic magmas. In the Nain Complex, field evidence for supersaturation of plagioclase is abundant. Since all of the compositions discussed above are low in normative diopside, it may be that such liquids are less capable of nucleating plagioclase than liquid with more normal diopside contents, thus permitting the supersaturation.

  16. Geochemistry of apollo 15 basalt 15555 and soil 15531.

    PubMed

    Schnetzler, C C; Philpotts, J A; Nava, D F; Schuhmann, S; Thomas, H H

    1972-01-28

    Major and trace element concentrations have been determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, colorimetry, and isotope dilution in Apollo 15 mare basalt 15555 from the Hadley Rille area; trace element concentrations have also been determined in plagioclase and pyroxene separates from basalt 15555 and in soil 15531 from the same area. Basalt 15555 most closely resembles in composition the Apollo 12 olivine-rich basalts. The concentrations of lithium, potassium, rubidium, barium, rare-earth elements, and zirconium in basalt 15555 are the lowest, and the negative europium anomaly is the smallest, reported for lunar basalts; this basalt might be the least differentiated material yet returned from the moon. Crystallization and removal of about 6 percent of plagioclase similar to that contained in the basalt would account for the observed europium anomaly; if plagioclase is not on the liquidus of this basalt, a multistage origin is indicated. Mineral data indicate that plagioclase and pyroxene approached quasi-equilibrium. Most of the chemical differences between basalt 15555 and soil 15531 would be accounted for if the soil were a mixture of 88 percent basalt, 6 percent KREEP (a component, identified in other Apollo soils, rich in potassium, rare-earth elements, and phosphorus) and 6 percent plagioclase (anorthosite?). PMID:17731364

  17. Th-230 - U-238 series disequilibrium of the Olkaria basalts Gregory Rift Valley, Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S.; Macdonald, R.; Kelly, M.

    1993-01-01

    U-Th disequilibrium analyses of the Naivasha basalts show a very small (U-238/Th-230) ratios which are lower than any previously analyzed basalts. The broadly positive internal isochron trend from one sample indicates that the basalts may have source heterogeneities, this is supported by earlier work. The Naivasha complex comprises a bimodal suite of basalts and rhyolites. The basalts are divided into two stratigraphic groups each of a transitional nature. The early basalt series (EBS) which were erupted prior to the Group 1 comendites and, the late basalt series (LBS) which erupted temporally between the Broad Acres and the Ololbutot centers. The basalts represent a very small percentage of the overall eruptive volume of material at Naivasha (less than 2 percent). The analyzed samples come from four stratigraphic units in close proximity around Ndabibi, Hell's Gate and Akira areas. The earliest units occur as vesicular flows from the Ndabibi plain. These basalts are olivine-plagioclase phyric with the associated hawaiites being sparsely plagioclase phyric. An absolute age of 0.5Ma was estimated for these basalts. The next youngest basalts flows occur as younger tuft cones in the Ndabibi area and are mainly olivine-plagioclase-clinopyroxcene phyric with one purely plagioclase phyric sample. The final phase of activity at Ndabibi resulted in much younger tuft cones consisting of air fall ashes and lapilli tufts. Many of these contain resorbed plagioclase phenocrysts with sample number 120c also being clinopyroxene phyric. The isotopic evidence for the basalt formation is summarized.

  18. Partial melting of amphibolite to trondhjemite at Nunatak Fiord, St. Elias Mountains, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, F.; McLellan, E.L.; Plafker, G.

    1985-01-01

    At Nunatak Fiord, 55km NE of Yakutat, Alaska, a uniform layer of Cretaceous basalt ca. 3km thick was metamorphosed ca. 67 million years ago to amphibolite and locally partially melted to pegmatitic trondhjemite. Segregations of plagioclase-quartz+/-biotite rock, leucosomes in amphibolite matrix, range from stringers 5-10mm thick to blunt pods as thick as 6m. They tend to be parallel to foliation of the amphibolite, but crosscutting is common. The assemblage aluminous hornblende-plagioclase-epidote-sphene-quartz gave a hydrous melt that crystallized to plagioclase-quartz+/-biotite pegmatitic trondhjemite. 5-10% of the rock melted. Eu at 2x chondrites is positively anomalous. REE partitioning in melt/residum was controlled largely by hornblende and sphene. Though the mineralogical variability precludes quantitative modeling, partial melting of garnet-free amphibolite to heavy-REE-depleted trondhjemitic melt is a viable process.

  19. Repeated shock and thermal metamorphism of the Abernathy meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, P.; Lewis, C.; Moore, C. B.

    1984-01-01

    Based on the example of Abernathy (L6 chondrite), it is shown how petrographic investigation can be used to unravel the nature, chronology and conditions of superposed metamorphic events in chondrites. Features considered include the texture of the rock, optical characteristics of olivine, pyroxene and plagioclase, refractive index of plagioclase, metallographical characteristics and microhardness of Fe-Ni alloys. It is deduced that Abernathy has been involved in at least six metamorphic events since the formation of the chondrite. Four distinct shock events and two separate reheating events have been identified. The chronology of these events is established. The conditions for the last four events are reasonably well constrained. These include severe reheating (T greater than 1200 C); severe shock causing complete melting of plagioclase and local melting of the rock (P between 90 and 110 GPa, T between 1250 and 1350 C); mild shock (P between 10 and 25 GPa, T less than 500 C); and reheating below 800 C.

  20. Theoretical prediction of phase relationships in planetary mantles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, B. J.; Holloway, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Thermodynamic and phase equilibrium data are used to generate an internally consistent set of enthalpies and entropies for important components of the CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS) system in silica-undersaturated compositions. The addition of Na and Fe(2+) to the CMAS system produces shifts in the plagioclase, spinel and garnet stability fields. While the Morgan and Anders (1979) model Martian composition has stability fields of plagioclase and garnet lherzolite, and a small spinel lherzolite field at temperatures below 900 C, the Martian mantle composition of McGetchin and Smyth (1978) would not contain orthopyroxene, and a low pressure assemblage of plagioclase-spinel wehrlite would be replaced by garnet-spinel wehrlite at higher pressure. In both cases, the Fe-Mg ratio would be substantially greater than that found in primitive terrestrial basalts.

  1. Shooting stars: Our guide to the early solar system`s formation

    SciTech Connect

    O`Reilly, J.

    1995-11-01

    Plagioclase grains were studied from the Allende meteorite, sample 916, to determine a chronology of events that occurred within the first ten million years of the solar system`s formation. Radiometric dating of the {sup 26}-Al-{sup 26}Mg system was accomplished on the ion microprobe mass spectromer. The excess {sup 26}-Mg in core plagioclase grains of calcium-aluminum rich inclusions (CAIs) provided a time of original condensation for {sup 26}-Al of {approximately}4.55 million years ago, a hundred million years prior to the formation of the planets. This data has been found to correlate with other excess {sup 26}-Mg samples. Measurements of plagioclase in the CAI`s periphery dated 1.52 million years later, suggesting an interesting history of collision and melting.

  2. Martian soil component in impact glasses in a Martian meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Borg, L. E.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical compositions of impact melt glass veins, called Lithology C (Lith C) in Martian meteorite EET79001 were determined by electron microprobe analysis. A large enrichment of S, and significant enrichments of Al, Ca, and Na were observed in Lith C glass compared to Lithology A (Lith A). The S enrichment is due to mixing of plagioclase- enriched Lith A material with Martian soil, either prior to or during impact on Mars. A mixture of 87% Lith A, 7% plagioclase, and 6% Martian soil reproduces the average elemental abundances observed in Lith C. Shock melting of such a mixture of plagioclase-enriched, fine-grained Lith A host rock and Martian soil could yield large excesses of S (observed in this study) and Martian atmospheric noble gases (found by Bogard et al., 1983) in Lith C. These mixing proportions can be used to constrain the elemental abundance of phosphorus in Martian soil.

  3. Epidote-amphibolite to amphibolite facies transition in the southern Appalachian Piedmont: P-T conditions across the garnet and calc-silicate isograds

    SciTech Connect

    Chalokwu, C.I. )

    1989-06-01

    Amphibolites occur in three distinct localities (Hudson Rapids, Davis Mill, and Lindsey Creek) in the west-central Georgia part of the Uchee belt, southern Appalachian Piedmont. Epidote-amphibolite facies assemblage (plagioclase (An{sub 24-36}) + hornblende + epidote + sphene + quartz) at the Davis Mill occurrence gives way to the amphibolite assemblage (calcic plagioclase (An{sub 33-88}) + hornblende + garnet + epidote + ilmenite + quartz) at Hudson Rapids. Mineral chemistries indicate that the transition was controlled by increasing pressure and unusual bulk compositions. Equilibrium mineral assemblages record temperatures ranging from 610 to 780 C at the garnet isograd, and from 570 to 634 C close to the calc-silicate isograd. Estimated pressures range from 7 to 9.25 {plus minus} 2 kbar. These P-T conditions are consistent with a thickened crustal section caused by emplacement of the Piedmont allochthon, followed by isobaric cooling (or isothermal compression), and the formation of symplectites of epidote + amphibole around plagioclase + clinopyroxene.

  4. Mechanical processess affecting differentiation of protolunar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaula, W. M.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanisms prior to lunar formation are sought to account for the loss of volatiles, the depletion of iron, and the enrichment of plagioclase. Some of the same mechanisms are necessary to account for achondritic, stony-iron, and iron meteorites. Collisions seem marginally capable of providing the heat to accomplish the differentiation into iron, magnesian silicates, and plagioclase. Once this differentiation is accomplished, the subsequent mechanical history should have been sufficient to sort material according to composition in the protolunar circumterrestrial cloud. Effects operating include the correlation of body size with mechanical strength; the lesser ability of the cloud to trap the larger, denser infalling bodies; the more rapid drawing into the Earth of the larger moonlets; and the higher energy orbits for dominantly plagioclase smaller pieces broken off by collision.

  5. Geochemistry of the lunar highlands as revealed by measurements of thermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peplowski, Patrick N.; Beck, Andrew W.; Lawrence, David J.

    2016-03-01

    Thermal neutron emissions from the lunar surface provide a direct measure of bulk elemental composition that can be used to constrain the chemical properties of near-surface (depth <1 m) lunar materials. We present a new calibration of the Lunar Prospector thermal neutron map, providing a direct link between measured count rates and bulk elemental composition. The data are used to examine the chemical and mineralogical composition of the lunar surface, with an emphasis on constraining the plagioclase concentration across the highlands. We observe that the regions of lowest neutron absorption, which correspond to estimated plagioclase concentrations of >85%, are generally associated with large impact basins and are colocated with clusters of nearly pure plagioclase identified with spectral reflectance data.

  6. Shock compression of a recrystallized anorthositic rock from Apollo 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Gibbons, R. V.; O'Keefe, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Hugoniot measurements on 15,418, a recrystallized and brecciated gabbroic anorthosite, yield a value of the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) varying from 45 to 70 kbar as the final shock pressure is varied from 70 to 280 kbar. Above the HEL and to 150 kbar, the pressure-density Hugoniot is closely described by a hydrostatic equation of state constructed from ultrasonic data for single-crystal plagioclase and pyroxene. Above 150 kbar, the Hugoniot states indicate that a series of one or more shock-induced phase changes are occurring in the plagioclase and pyroxene. From Hugoniot data for both the single-crystal minerals and the Frederick diabase, we infer that the shock-induced high-pressure phases in 15,418 probably consists of a 3.71 g/cu cm density, high-pressure structure for plagioclase and a 4.70 g/cu cm perovskite-type structure for pyroxene.

  7. Observations of silicate reststrahlen bands in lunar infrared spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E., Jr.; Morgan, T. H.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal emission spectra of three lunar sites (Apollo 11, Descartes Formation, and Tycho central peak) are measured in the 8-14 micron spectral range. Transmission and instrument effects are accounted for by forming ratios of the Descartes and Tycho spectra to the Apollo 11 spectrum. The ratio spectra are compared with ratios of published laboratory spectra of returned lunar samples and also with ratio spectra calculated using the Aronson-Emslie (1975) model. The comparisons show pyroxene bands in the Descartes ratio spectrum and plagioclase bands in the Tycho ratio spectrum. The Tycho spectrum is found to be consistent with the existence of fine plagioclase dust (approximately 1 micron) at the rock surface and a higher-than-usual sodium content of the plagioclase.

  8. Experiments and Spectral Studies of Martian Volcanic Rocks: Implications for the Origin of Pathfinder Rocks and Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, Malcolm J.; Mustard, Jack; Weitz, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    The composition and spectral properties of the Mars Pathfinder rocks and soils together with the identification of basaltic and andesitic Mars terrains based on Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data raised interesting questions regarding the nature and origin of Mars surface rocks. We have investigated the following questions: (1) are the Pathfinder rocks igneous and is it possible these rocks could have formed by known igneous processes, such as equilibrium or fractional crystallization, operating within SNC magmas known to exist on Mars? If it is possible, what P (depth) and PH2O conditions are required? (2) whether TES-based interpretations of plagioclase-rich basalt and andesitic terrains in the south and north regions of Mars respectively are unique. Are the surface compositions of these regions plagioclase-rich, possibly indicating the presence of old AI-rich crust of Mars, or are the spectra being affected by something like surface weathering processes that might determine the spectral pyroxene to plagioclase ratio?

  9. Melting behavior and phase relations of lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    An attempt was made to show that feldspar would float during melting. Large anorthite crystals were placed beneath a silicate glass representative of liquid in which plagioclase accumulation is thought to have occurred. In less than 3 hours at 1,300 C, the crystals rose to the top in a Pt crucible 3 cm deep equilibrated in air and in a Mo crucible 1.5 cm deep equilibrated in an H2/CO2 gas stream of log PO2 = -10.9 (below Fe/FeO). These results suggest that lunar crustal formation by feldspar flotation is possible without special recourse to differential sinking of plagioclase versus mafic minerals or selective elutriation of plagioclase.

  10. Mineralogy of the Ibitira eucrite and comparison with other eucrites and lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, I. M.; Smith, J. V.

    1976-01-01

    The mineralogy of the Ibitira meteorite is studied using single-crystal X-ray and energy-dispersive electron-probe techniques. It is shown that this strongly metamorphosed unbrecciated vesicular eucrite has a primary variolitic and secondary hornfelsic texture dominated by equant grains of pale-brown pyroxene (60%) set in an irregular matrix of plagioclase (30%). Minor phases are detected which indicate igneous crystallization, a prolonged metamorphic history, and vapor deposition. The following sequence of events is suggested as the simplest explanation for the mineralogical features observed: (1) crystallization of the meteorite in a lava flow; (2) prolonged annealing, reduction of primary spinel, and vapor deposition; (3) strong shock sufficient to modify the texture of the plagioclase grains; and (4) sufficient annealing to allow crystallization of the plagioclase as a subparallel mosaic and partial conversion to the low structural state. Evidence for this sequence is examined in detail, particularly in relation to the general features of eucrites, howardites, and mesosiderites

  11. Two-garnet rodingite from Amador County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.; Beeson, M.H.

    1973-01-01

    Two distinct phases of garnet have been discovered in rodingite from Amador County, Calif. The two garnets are hydrogrossular and (hydro?) grossular-andradite. Only one, generally hydrogrossular, has been reported in rodingitcs studied by other workers. The rodingite of this study formed from a mafic dike with abundant euhedral plagioclase laths. The hydrogrossular is concentrated within the areas of these laths and is volumetrically about as abundant. The (hydro?) grossular-andradite is concentrated in the groundmass and as incursions into the plagioclase laths. The garnets apparently grew during one general episode of metasomatism, and their spatial distribution and compositions were controlled principally by the unequal distribution of iron and aluminum caused by the presence of plagioclase laths (and mafic minerals?) in the original unaltered dike.

  12. Short-lived oxygen diffusion during hot, deep-seated meteoric alteration of anorthosite

    PubMed

    Mora; Riciputi; Cole

    1999-12-17

    Heterogeneous oxygen isotope compositions of plagioclase from the Boehls Butte anorthosite include some of the most oxygen-18-depleted values (to -16 per mil) reported for plagioclase in meta-igneous rocks and indicate high-temperature (T > 500 degrees C) isotopic exchange between plagioclase and nearly pristine meteoric fluid. Retrograde reaction-enhanced permeability assisted influx of meteoric-hydrothermal fluids into the deep-seated anorthosite. Isotopic gradients of about 14 per mil over 600 micrometers in single crystals require short-lived (about 10(4) years) diffusional exchange of oxygen and locally large effective water:rock ratios, followed by rapid loss of water and cessation of oxygen diffusion in the anorthosite. PMID:10600738

  13. Geologic setting and petrology of Apollo 15 anorthosite /15415/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilshire, H. G.; Schaber, G. G.; Jackson, E. D.; Silver, L. T.; Phinney, W. C.

    1972-01-01

    The geological setting, petrography and history of this Apollo 15 lunar rock sample are discussed, characterizing the sample as coarse-grained anorthosite composed largely of calcic plagioclase with small amounts of three pyroxene phases. The presence of shattered and granulated minerals in the texture of the rock is traced to two or more fragmentation events, and the presence of irregular bands of coarsely recrystallized plagioclase and minor pyroxene crossing larger plagioclase grains is traced to an earlier thermal metamorphic event. It is pointed out that any of these events may have affected apparent radiometric ages of elements in this rock. A comparative summarization of data suggests that this rock is the least-deformed member of a suite of similar rocks ejected from beneath the regolith at Spur crater.

  14. Groundmass crystallisation and cooling rates of lava-like ignimbrites: the Grey's Landing ignimbrite, southern Idaho, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, B. S.; Cordonnier, B.; Rowe, M. C.; Szymanowski, D.; Bachmann, O.; Andrews, G. D. M.

    2015-10-01

    Constraining magmatic and eruptive processes is key to understanding how volcanoes operate. However, reconstructing eruptive and pre-eruptive processes requires the ability to see through any post-eruptive modification of the deposit. The well-preserved Grey's Landing ignimbrite from the central Snake River Plain provides an opportunity to systematically investigate the post-eruptive processes occurring through a single deposit sheet. Despite overall compositional homogeneity in both bulk and glass compositions, the Grey's Landing ignimbrite does preserve differences in the abundance of Li in plagioclase crystals which are strongly associated with the host lithology. Li abundances in plagioclase from the quickly cooled upper and basal vitrophyres are typically low (average 5 ppm, n = 262) while plagioclase from the microcrystalline interior of the deposit has higher Li contents (average 33 ppm, n = 773). Given that no other trace elemental parameter in plagioclase varies, we interpret the variability in Li to reflect a post-depositional process. Groundmass crystallisation of a rhyolite like Grey's Landing requires ˜50 % crystallisation of sanidine and variable amounts of a silica-rich phase (quartz, tridymite, cristobalite) and plagioclase to satisfy mass balance. We suggest the low affinity of Li for sanidine causes migration of groundmass Li into plagioclase during crystallisation. Even within the microcrystalline interior of the deposit, the morphology of the groundmass varies. The more marginal, finer-grained regions are dominated by cristobalite as the SiO2-rich phase while tridymite and quartz are additionally found in the more slowly cooled, coarser-grained portions of thick sections of the ignimbrite. Numerical models of cooling and crystallisation tested against field observations indicate that the groundmass crystallisation occurred relatively rapidly following emplacement (a maximum of a few years where the ignimbrite is thickest). These numerical

  15. Petrographic and geochemical comparisons between the lower crystalline basement-derived section and the granite megablock and amphibolite megablock of the Eyreville B core, Chesapeake Bay impact structure, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Townsend, G.N.; Gibson, R.L.; Horton, J.W., Jr.; Reimold, W.U.; Schmitt, R.T.; Bartosova, K.

    2009-01-01

    The Eyreville B core from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure, Virginia, USA, contains a lower basement-derived section (1551.19 m to 1766.32 m deep) and two megablocks of dominantly (1) amphibolite (1376.38 m to 1389.35 m deep) and (2) granite (1095.74 m to 1371.11 m deep), which are separated by an impactite succession. Metasedimentary rocks (muscovite-quartz-plagioclase-biotite-graphite ?? fibrolite ?? garnet ?? tourmaline ?? pyrite ?? rutile ?? pyrrhotite mica schist, hornblende-plagioclase-epidote-biotite- K-feldspar-quartz-titanite-calcite amphibolite, and vesuvianite-plagioclase- quartz-epidote calc-silicate rock) are dominant in the upper part of the lower basement-derived section, and they are intruded by pegmatitic to coarse-grained granite (K-feldspar-plagioclase-quartz-muscovite ?? biotite ?? garnet) that increases in volume proportion downward. The granite megablock contains both gneissic and weakly or nonfoliated biotite granite varieties (K-feldspar-quartz-plagioclase-biotite ?? muscovite ?? pyrite), with small schist xenoliths consisting of biotite-plagioclase-quartz ?? epidote ?? amphibole. The lower basement-derived section and both megablocks exhibit similar middleto upper-amphibolite-facies metamorphic grades that suggest they might represent parts of a single terrane. However, the mica schists in the lower basement-derived sequence and in the megablock xenoliths show differences in both mineralogy and whole-rock chemistry that suggest a more mafi c source for the xenoliths. Similarly, the mineralogy of the amphibolite in the lower basement-derived section and its association with calc-silicate rock suggest a sedimentary protolith, whereas the bulk-rock and mineral chemistry of the megablock amphibolite indicate an igneous protolith. The lower basement-derived granite also shows bulk chemical and mineralogical differences from the megablock gneissic and biotite granites. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  16. Petrographic and geochemical comparisons between the lower crystalline basement-derived section and the granite megablock and amphibolite megablock of the Eyreville-B core, Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Townsend, Gabrielle N.; Gibson, Roger L.; Horton, J. Wright, Jr.; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Schmitt, Ralf T.; Bartosova, Katerina

    2009-01-01

    The Eyreville B core from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure, Virginia, USA, contains a lower basement-derived section (1551.19 m to 1766.32 m deep) and two megablocks of dominantly (1) amphibolite (1376.38 m to 1389.35 m deep) and (2) granite (1095.74 m to 1371.11 m deep), which are separated by an impactite succession. Metasedimentary rocks (muscovite-quartz-plagioclase-biotite-graphite ± fibrolite ± garnet ± tourmaline ± pyrite ± rutile ± pyrrhotite mica schist, hornblende-plagioclase-epidote-biotite-K-feldspar-quartz-titanite-calcite amphibolite, and vesuvianite-plagioclase-quartz-epidote calc-silicate rock) are dominant in the upper part of the lower basement-derived section, and they are intruded by pegmatitic to coarse-grained granite (K-feldspar-plagioclase-quartz-muscovite ± biotite ± garnet) that increases in volume proportion downward. The granite megablock contains both gneissic and weakly or nonfoliated biotite granite varieties (K-feldspar-quartz-plagioclase-biotite ± muscovite ± pyrite), with small schist xenoliths consisting of biotite-plagioclase-quartz ± epidote ± amphibole. The lower basement-derived section and both megablocks exhibit similar middle- to upper-amphibolite-facies metamorphic grades that suggest they might represent parts of a single terrane. However, the mica schists in the lower basement-derived sequence and in the megablock xenoliths show differences in both mineralogy and whole-rock chemistry that suggest a more mafic source for the xenoliths. Similarly, the mineralogy of the amphibolite in the lower basement-derived section and its association with calc-silicate rock suggest a sedimentary protolith, whereas the bulk-rock and mineral chemistry of the megablock amphibolite indicate an igneous protolith. The lower basement-derived granite also shows bulk chemical and mineralogical differences from the megablock gneissic and biotite granites.

  17. Crystal-poor, multiply saturated rhyolites (obsidians) from the Cascade and Mexican arcs: evidence of degassing-induced crystallization of phenocrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Laura E.; Lange, Rebecca A.

    2013-09-01

    A detailed petrological study is presented for six phenocryst-poor obsidian samples (73-75 wt% SiO2) erupted as small volume, monogenetic domes in the Mexican and Cascade arcs. Despite low phenocryst (+microphenocryst) abundances (2-6 %), these rhyolites are each multiply saturated with five to eight mineral phases (plagioclase + orthopyroxene + titanomagnetite + ilmenite + apatite ± zircon ± hornblende ± clinopyroxene ± sanidine ± pyrrhotite). Plagioclase and orthopyroxene phenocrysts (identified using phase-equilibrium constraints) span ≤30 mol % An and ≤15 % Mg#, respectively. Eruptive temperatures (±1 σ), on the basis of Fe-Ti two oxide thermometry, range from 779 (±25) to 940 (±18) °C. Oxygen fugacities (±1 σ) range from -0.4 to 1.4 (±0.1) log units relative to those along the Ni-NiO buffer. With temperature known, the plagioclase-liquid hygrometer was applied; maximum water concentrations calculated for the most calcic plagioclase phenocryst in each sample range from 2.6 to 6.5 wt%. This requires that the rhyolites were fluid-saturated at depths ≥2-7 km. It is proposed that the wide compositional range in plagioclase and orthopyroxene phenocrysts, despite their low abundance, can be attributed to changing melt water concentrations owing to degassing during magma ascent. Phase-equilibrium experiments from the literature show that higher dissolved water concentrations lead to more Fe-rich orthopyroxene, as well as more calcic plagioclase. Loss of dissolved water leads to a progressive increase in melt viscosity, and phenocrysts often display diffusion-limited growth textures (e.g., dendritic and vermiform), consistent with large undercoolings caused by degassing. A kinetic barrier to microlite crystallization occurred at viscosities from 4.5 to 5.0 log10 Pa s for these rhyolites, presumably because the rate at which melt viscosity changed was high owing to rapid loss of dissolved water during magma ascent.

  18. Disequilibrium dihedral angles in dolerite sills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holness, Marian B.; Richardson, Chris; Helz, Rosalind T.

    2012-01-01

    The geometry of clinopyroxene-plagioclase-plagioclase junctions in mafic rocks, measured by the median dihedral angle Θcpp, is created during solidification. In the solidifying Kilauea Iki (Hawaii) lava lake, the wider junctions between plagioclase grains are the first to be filled by pyroxene, followed by the narrower junctions. The final Θcpp, attained when all clinopyroxene-plagioclase-plagioclase junctions are formed, is 78° in the upper crust of the lake, and 85° in the lower solidification front. Θcpp in the 3.5-m-thick Traigh Bhàn na Sgùrra sill (Inner Hebrides) is everywhere 78°. In the Whin Sill (northern England, 38 m thick) and the Portal Peak sill (Antarctica, 129 m thick), Θcpp varies symmetrically, with the lowest values at the margins. The 266-m-thick Basement Sill (Antarctica) has asymmetric variation of Θcpp, attributed to a complex filling history. The chilled margins of the Basement Sill are partially texturally equilibrated, with high Θcpp. The plagioclase grain size in the two widest sills varies asymmetrically, with the coarsest rocks found in the upper third. Both Θcpp and average grain size are functions of model crystallization times. Θcpp increases from 78° to a maximum of ∼100° as the crystallization time increases from 1 to 500 yr. Because the use of grain size as a measure of crystallization time is dependent on an estimate of crystal growth rates, dihedral angles provide a more direct proxy for cooling rates in dolerites.

  19. Melt/peridotite interaction in the Southern Lanzo peridotite: Field, textural and geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardo, G. B.; Zanetti, A.; Müntener, O.

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents field, petrographic-structural and geochemical data on spinel and plagioclase peridotites from the southern domain of the Lanzo ophiolitic peridotite massif (Western Alps). Spinel lherzolites, harzburgites and dunites crop out at Mt. Arpone and Mt. Musinè. Field evidence indicates that pristine porphyroclastic spinel lherzolites are transformed to coarse granular spinel harzburgites, which are in turn overprinted by plagioclase peridotites, while strongly depleted spinel harzburgite and dunite bands and bodies replace the plagioclase peridotites. On the northern flank of Mt. Arpone, deformed, porphyroclastic (lithospheric) lherzolites, with diffuse pyroxenite banding, represent the oldest spinel-facies rocks. They show microstructures of a composite subsolidus evolution, suggesting provenance from deeper (asthenospheric) mantle levels and accretion to the lithosphere. These protoliths are locally transformed to coarse granular (reactive) spinel harzburgites and dunites, which show textures reminiscent of melt/rock reaction and geochemical characteristics suggesting that they are products of peridotite interaction with reactively percolating melts. Geochemical data and modelling suggest that <1-5% fractional melting of spinel-facies DMM produced the injected melts. Plagioclase peridotites are hybrid rocks resulting from pre-existing spinel peridotites and variable enrichment of plagioclase and micro-gabbroic material by percolating melts. The impregnating melts attained silica-saturation, as testified by widespread orthopyroxene replacement of olivine, during open system migration in the lithosphere. At Mt. Musinè, coarse granular spinel harzburgite and dunite bodies replace the plagioclase peridotites. Most of these replacive, refractory peridotites have interstitial magmatic clinopyroxene with trace element compositions in equilibrium with MORB, while some Cpx have REE-depleted patterns suggesting transient geochemical features of the

  20. Maskelynite: Formation by Explosive Shock.

    PubMed

    Milton, D J; de Carli, P S

    1963-05-10

    When high pressure (250 to 300 kilobars) was applied suddenly (shock-loading) to gabbro, the plagioclase was transformed to a noncrystalline phase (maskelynite) by a solid-state reaction at a low temperature, while the proxene remained crystalline. The shock-loaded gabbro resembles meteorites of the shergottite class; this suggests that the latter formed as a result of shock. The shock-loading of gabbro at 600 to 800 kilobars raised the temperature above the melting range of the plagioclase. PMID:17737107

  1. Activity composition relationships in silicate melts

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F.

    1990-01-01

    Equipment progress include furnace construction and electron microprobe installation. The following studies are underway: phase equilibria along basalt-rhyolite mixing line (olivine crystallization from natural silicic andensites, distribution of Fe and Mg between olivine and liquid, dist. of Ca and Na between plagioclase and liquid), enthalpy-composition relations in magmas (bulk heat capacity of alkali basalt), density model for magma ascent and contamination, thermobarometry in igneous systems (olivine/plagioclase phenocryst growth in Quat. basalt), high-pressure phase equilibria of alkali basalt, basalt-quartz mixing experiments, phase equilibria of East African basalts, and granitic minerals in mafic magma. (DLC)

  2. Activity composition relationships in silicate melts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F.

    1990-12-31

    Equipment progress include furnace construction and electron microprobe installation. The following studies are underway: phase equilibria along basalt-rhyolite mixing line (olivine crystallization from natural silicic andensites, distribution of Fe and Mg between olivine and liquid, dist. of Ca and Na between plagioclase and liquid), enthalpy-composition relations in magmas (bulk heat capacity of alkali basalt), density model for magma ascent and contamination, thermobarometry in igneous systems (olivine/plagioclase phenocryst growth in Quat. basalt), high-pressure phase equilibria of alkali basalt, basalt-quartz mixing experiments, phase equilibria of East African basalts, and granitic minerals in mafic magma. (DLC)

  3. The Maryville meteorite - A 1983 fall of an L6 chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Taylor, L. A.; Cirlin, E.-H.; Jarosewich, E.; Laul, J. C.

    1986-03-01

    The Maryville chondrite fell on January 28, 1983 in eastern Tennessee. Compositions of olivine (Fa 24.5), orthopyroxene (Fs 20.8), plagioclase (An 10.6), along with the bulk composition and siderophile concentrations, indicate L-group classification. The presence of highly equilibrated minerals, strongly recrystallized matrix, and the development of large, clear plagioclase grains suggest petrologic type 6 classification. Subsequent to metamorphism the meteorite was subjected to high transient pressures that converted some feldspar to glass, deformed the silicates, and caused small amounts of melting to occur. The effects of this shock event correspond to shock facies 'd' or 'e'.

  4. Pb isotopes in anorthositic breccias 67075 and 62237 - A search for primitive lunar lead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premo, W. R.; Tatsumoto, M.; Wang, J.-W.

    1989-01-01

    The lunar Pb isotopic evolution is explored based on an investigation of the U-Th-Pb systematics of the primitive Apollo 16 anorthositic breccias 76075 and 62237. The isotope data for acid-leached residues from 67075 lie within or on a triangle formed by plagioclase, opaques, and a pyroxen-olivine mixture, and the isotope data for 62237 lie within or on a triangle formed by plagioclase, olivine, and pyroxene. The results suggest that the moon had high first-stage values for the Pb evolution equations from the onset.

  5. Petrologic characteristics of the 1982 and pre-1982 eruptive products of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, J.J.; Tilling, R.I.; Duffield, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    Studies on a suite of rocks from this volcano indicate that the juvenile materials of the 1982 and pre-1982 eruptions of the volcano have essentially the same mineralogy and chemistry. Data suggest that chemical composition changed little over the 0.3 m.y. sample period. Modally, plagioclase is the dominant phenocryst, followed by amphibole, clinopyroxene and minor phases including anhydrite. Plagioclase phenocrysts show complex zoning: the anorthite-rich zones are probably the result of changing volatile P on the magma and may reflect the changes in the volcano's magma reservoir in response to repetitive, explosive eruptive activity.-R.E.S.

  6. Timing and tectonic setting of the Sijiaying banded iron deposit in the eastern Hebei province, North China Craton: Constraints from geochemistry and SIMS zircon U-Pb dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Minli; Zhang, Lianchang; Wu, Huaying; Xu, Yingxia; Li, Wenjun

    2014-11-01

    The North China Craton (NCC), one of the oldest continental blocks in Asia, has a complicated evolutionary history with the age of the old crust up to 3.8 Ga and records the important geological events of the Earth. The Sijiaying BIF, the largest banded iron formation located in eastern Hebei province, in the east part of NCC, records an important thermo-tectonic event; Previous studies focused on the geological description, but the timing and tectonic setting have been unclear so far. The Sijiaying BIF is hosted in Neoarchean metamorphic rocks, which includes biotite-leptynite, hornblende plagioclase-gneiss and biotite plagioclase-gneiss. Using major element contents and ratios of the host rocks, the protoliths of the hornblende plagioclase-gneiss and biotite plagioclase-gneiss are shown to be dacite, whereas those of the biotite-leptynites are sedimentary rocks. Based on geology and geochemistry of the host rocks, we infer that the Sijiaying BIF is an Algoma type deposit. SIMS zircon U-Pb dating shows: igneous zircons from the biotite plagioclase-gneiss and hornblende plagioclase-gneiss have U-Pb ages of 2535 ± 8 Ma and 2543 ± 14 Ma, respectively; zircons from the biotite-leptynite have an age of 2537 ± 13 Ma. We infer that the ages of 2543-2535 Ma represent the time of the Sijiaying BIF. PAAS-normalized REY profiles of the ore samples are characterized by LREE depletion and HREE enrichment, positive La and Eu anomalies and an average Y/Ho weight ratio of 32, indicating a mixture of submarine hydrothermal fluids and deep seawater. REE data was combined with the δ18O analyzed by previous researcher of the ore from individual magnetite bands to infer that the Sijiaying BIF precipitated from hydrothermal fluids discharging on the sea floor. The hornblende plagioclase-gneiss and biotite plagioclase-gneiss that are enriched in LILE and LREE and depleted in high field strength elements (HFSE) Nb, Ta and Ti, have geochemical signatures that are similar to those of

  7. Determination of Planetary Basalt Parentage: A Simple Technique Using the Electron Microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papike, J. J.; Karner, J. M.; Shearer, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of major and minor elements in silicate phases to understand differences among basaltic systems and the influence of different planetary environments on basalt chemistry (e.g., Papike [1]). Intriguing data displays presented by Papike [1] include a plot of Mn vs. Fe (atoms per formula unit, afu) for pyroxene and olivine and a plot showing the anorthite content of plagioclase from different planetary basalts. Here we combine portions of these plots (Fig. 4) and provide all new data for olivine and plagioclase.

  8. Differential rates of feldspar weathering in granitic regoliths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Bullen, T.D.; Schulz, M.S.; Blum, A.E.; Huntington, T.G.; Peters, N.E.

    2001-01-01

    Differential rates of plagioclase and K-feldspar weathering commonly observed in bedrock and soil environments are examined in terms of chemical kinetic and solubility controls and hydrologic permeability. For the Panola regolith, in the Georgia Piedmont Province of southeastern United States, petrographic observations, coupled with elemental balances and 87Sr/86Sr ratios, indicate that plagioclase is being converted to kaolinite at depths > 6 m in the granitic bedrock. K-feldspar remains pristine in the bedrock but subsequently weathers to kaolinite at the overlying saprolite. In contrast, both plagioclase and K-feldspar remain stable in granitic bedrocks elsewhere in Piedmont Province, such as Davis Run, Virginia, where feldspars weather concurrently in an overlying thick saprolite sequence. Kinetic rate constants, mineral surface areas, and secondary hydraulic conductivities are fitted to feldspar losses with depth in the Panola and Davis Run regoliths using a time-depth computer spreadsheet model. The primary hydraulic conductivities, describing the rates of meteoric water penetration into the pristine granites, are assumed to be equal to the propagation rates of weathering fronts, which, based on cosmogenic isotope dating, are 7 m/106 yr for the Panola regolith and 4 m/106 yr for the Davis Run regolith. Best fits in the calculations indicate that the kinetic rate constants for plagioclase in both regoliths are factors of two to three times faster than K-feldspar, which is in agreement with experimental findings. However, the range for plagioclase and K-feldspar rates (kr = 1.5 x 10-17 to 2.8 x 10-16 mol m-2 s-1) is three to four orders of magnitude lower than for that for experimental feldspar dissolution rates and are among the slowest yet recorded for natural feldspar weathering. Such slow rates are attributed to the relatively old geomorphic ages of the Panola and Davis Run regoliths, implying that mineral surface reactivity decreases significantly with

  9. Kinetics of crystal evolution as a probe to magmatism at Stromboli (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, C.; Fortunati, A.; Arzilli, F.; Landi, P.; Carroll, M. R.

    2013-06-01

    The kinetics of hydrated basaltic melts erupted during the present activity at Stromboli have been studied to estimate the growth and dissolution rate of plagioclase. Specifically, a high-K basalt composition (PST-9) has been studied to investigate magma and eruption dynamics at Stromboli volcano by combining crystallization kinetics of plagioclase and CSD measurements on natural samples from literature (Armienti et al., 2007; Fornaciai et al., 2009). A series of water-saturated decompression experiments over a range of final water pressure (Pf = 75-5 MPa) at constant temperature (1075 °C) show that plagioclase is systematically present from 50 to 5 MPa at water saturated conditions. Moreover, these experiments show that anorthite (An) content decreases with decreasing PO, reaching the same composition as the natural plagioclase in Stromboli scoria at pressure below ˜20 MPa and that the plagioclase crystal fraction increases as the experimental conditions tend to lower final pressure. Plagioclase growth rate (GL) is observed to increase with undercooling for the Pf investigated during decompression experiments, except for the 75 MPa Pf serie that only has two samples with the presence of plagioclase crystals. The values of GL vary from 10-7 to 10-8 cm/s for Pf from 75 to 25 MPa, while at Pf from 10 to 5 MPa growth rates are approximately of 10-6 cm/s. A series of dissolution experiments at atmospheric pressure and over a range of temperature has been done for plagioclase (T range of 1220-1240 °C). Dissolution rate (G-) for plagioclase (10-7 cm/s) tends to be slightly higher at higher temperature in the range of 1220-1240 °C and appears to be time independent for the experimental durations investigated (10-30 h). These trends could be related to development of a diffusion-limited boundary layer adjacent to the dissolving crystal. By comparison of the experimental data on plagioclase composition, growth rates and dissolution in Stromboli basalt, it is possible to

  10. Mineral chemical compositions of late Cretaceous volcanic rocks in the Giresun area, NE Turkey: Implications for the crystallization conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oǧuz, Simge; Aydin, Faruk; Uysal, İbrahim; Şen, Cüneyt

    2016-04-01

    This contribution contains phenocryst assemblages and mineral chemical data of late Cretaceous volcanic (LCV) rocks from the south of Görele and Tirebolu areas (Giresun, NE Turkey) in order to investigate their crystallization conditions. The LCV rocks in the study area occur in two different periods (Coniasiyen-Early Santonian and Early-Middle Campanian), which generally consist of alternation of mafic-intermediate (basaltic to andesitic) and felsic rock series (dacitic and rhyolitic) within each period. The basaltic and andesitic rocks in both periods generally exhibit porphyritic to hyalo-microlitic porphyritic texture, and contain phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxene, whereas the dacitic and rhyolitic rocks of the volcanic sequence usually show a vitrophyric texture with predominant plagioclase, K-feldspar, quartz and lesser amphibole-biotite phenocrysts. Zoned plagioclase crystals of the mafic and felsic rocks in different volcanic periods are basically different in composition. The compositions of plagioclase in the first-stage mafic rocks range from An52 to An78 whereas those of plagioclase from the first-stage felsic rocks have lower An content varying from An38 to An50. Rim to core profile for the zoned plagioclase of the first-stage mafic rocks show quite abrupt and notable compositional variations whereas that of the first-stage felsic rocks show slight compositional variation, although some of the grains may display reverse zoning. On the other hand, although no zoned plagioclase phenocryst observed in the second-stage mafic rocks, the compositions of microlitic plagioclase show wide range of compositional variation (An45‑80). The compositions of zoned plagioclase in the second-stage felsic rocks are more calcic (An65‑81) than those of the first-stage felsic rocks, and their rim to core profile display considerable oscillatory zoning. The compositions of pyroxenes in the first- and second-stage mafic-intermediate rocks vary over a wide range

  11. Magma storage and plumbing of adakite-type post-ophiolite intrusions in the Sabzevar ophiolitic zone, NE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidi, K.; Ghasemi, H.; Troll, V. R.; Sadeghian, M.; Dahren, B.

    2014-08-01

    Subduction-related adakite-type intrusive rocks emplaced into the late Cretaceous-Paleocene Sabzevar ophiolite zone, NE Iran, range from Mg-andesite to rhyodacite in composition. Here we investigate the magma supply system to these subvolcanic intrusive rocks by applying thermobarometric mineral and mineral-melt equilibrium models, including amphibole thermobarometry, plagioclase-melt thermobarometry and clinopyroxene-melt barometry. Based on the results of these thermobarometric models, plagioclase crystallized dominantly at pressures of ~ 350 (468-130) MPa, while amphiboles record both low pressures (~ 300 MPa) and very high pressures (> 700 MPa) of crystallization. The latter is supported by the calculated pressures for clinopyroxene crystallization (550 to 730 MPa). The association of amphibole with clinopyroxene and no plagioclase in the most primitive samples (Mg-andesites) is consistent with amphibole fractionation from very hydrous magmas at deep crustal levels of the plumbing system, which may have been a key process to intensify adakite-type affinities in this rock suite. Barometry, combined with frequent disequilibrium features, such as oscillatory-zoned and sieve-textured plagioclase crystals with An-rich overgrowths in more evolved samples, imply final magma differentiation occurred in an open upper crustal magma system that developed progressively stronger compositional modifications during high-level magma storage.

  12. Magma storage and plumbing of adakite-type post-ophiolite intrusions in the Sabzevar ophiolitic zone, northeast Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidi, K.; Ghasemi, H.; Troll, V. R.; Sadeghian, M.; Dahren, B.

    2015-01-01

    Subduction-related adakite-type intrusive rocks emplaced into the late Cretaceous-Paleocene Sabzevar ophiolite zone, northeast Iran, range from Mg-andesite to rhyodacite in composition. Here we investigate the magma supply system to these subvolcanic intrusive rocks by applying thermobarometric mineral and mineral-melt equilibrium models, including amphibole thermobarometry, plagioclase-melt thermobarometry and clinopyroxene-melt barometry. Based on the results of these thermobarometric models, plagioclase crystallized dominantly at pressures of ~350 (130 to 468) MPa, while amphiboles record both low pressures (~300 MPa) and very high pressures (>700 MPa) of crystallization. The latter is supported by the calculated pressures for clinopyroxene crystallization (550 to 730 MPa). The association of amphibole with clinopyroxene and no plagioclase in the most primitive samples (Mg-andesites) is consistent with amphibole fractionation from very hydrous magmas at deep crustal levels of the plumbing system, which may have been a key process in intensifying adakite-type affinities in this rock suite. Barometry, combined with frequent disequilibrium features such as oscillatory-zoned and sieve-textured plagioclase crystals with An-rich overgrowths in more evolved samples, implies that final magma differentiation occurred in an open upper crustal magma system that developed progressively stronger compositional modifications during high-level magma storage.

  13. Regolith breccia consisting of H and LL chondrite mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanai, Keizo; Kojima, Hideyasu

    1993-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite Yamato-8424 (Y-8424) is a regolith breccia that is homogenized mixture of H and LL chondrite components. The breccia consists mainly of a fine-grained material with mineral fragments of olivine, pyroxene, and Fe-Ni metal with traces of plagioclase.

  14. The infrared spectrum of asteroid 433 Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, H. P.; Fink, U.; Treffers, R. R.; Gautier, T. N., III

    1976-01-01

    The mineralogical composition of asteroid Eros has been determined from its infrared spectrum (0.9-2.7 micrometers; 28/cm resolution). Major minerals include metallic Ni-Fe and pyroxene; no spectroscopic evidence for olivine or plagioclase feldspar was found. The IR spectrum of Eros is most consistent with a stony-iron composition.

  15. Ar40-Ar39 systematics in rocks and separated minerals from Apollo 14.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, G.; Huneke, J. C.; Podosek, F. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    The Ar40-Ar39 dating technique has been applied to separated minerals (plagioclase, pyroxene, quintessence and an 'ilmenite' concentrate), and whole rock samples of Apollo 14 rocks 14310 and 14073. Plagioclase shows the best gas retention characteristics, with no evidence of anomalous behavior and only a small amount of gas loss in the initial release. Ages determined from the plagioclase of 14310 and 14073 are (3.87 plus or minus 0.05) and (3.88 plus or minus 0.05) AE respectively. Low apparent ages at low release temperatures, which are frequently observed in whole rock Ar40-Ar39 experiments on lunar basalts, are shown to be principally due to gas loss in the high-K interstitial glass (quintessence) phase, confirming earlier suggestions. The decrease in apparent ages in the high-temperature release previously observed in several total rock samples of Apollo 14 basalts has been identified with the pyroxene. Plagioclase is also found to be the most suitable mineral for the determination of cosmic ray exposure ages, and exposure ages of 280 and 113 m.y. are found for 14310 and 14073, respectively, indicating that these rocks, which are very similar in many respects, have different exposure histories.

  16. ALHA 81011 -- an eucritic impact melt breccia formed 350 m.y. ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, K.; Bobe, K. D.; Kunz, J.; Palme, H.; Spettel, B.; Stoeffler, D.

    1994-07-01

    The ALHA 81011 meteorite has been described as a eucritic breccia consisting of mineral and lithic clasts embedded in a vesicular, dark glassy matrix. Lithic clasts are equilibrated and dominated by subophitic and granulitic texture, frequently with gradual textural transitions in a given clast. Both mineral and lithic clasts were shocked in excess of approximately 30 GPa, transforming plagioclase into maskelynite, followed by thermally induced recrystallization. The observation that plagioclase fragments are 'swirled' into the dark matrix leaving pyroxene fragments unaffected, indicates that the plagioclase fragments were transformed into maskelynite prior to admixing as well. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) investigations revealed that the dark matrix represents a quenched melt with eutectic fabric consisting of parallel intergrowths of pyroxene and plagioclase crystals, interspersed with small vesicles and larger subangular cavities up to 0.6 cm. One basalt clast with a partly granulitic texture and a portion of the dark crystallized matrix were separated and analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). We performed age determinations on the separated lithologies by applying the Ar-40/AR-39 method. ALHA 81011 represents a clast-rich eucritic impact melt breccia not older than 350 Ma. It was either part of a rapidly cooled larger impact melt formation or represents a melt 'bomb' that originates from a suevitic ejecta blanket formed by a large-scale impact on the Howardite Eucritic and Diogenite (HED) parent body surface.

  17. REE Partitioning in Lunar Minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, J. F.; Lapen, T. J.; Draper, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are an extremely useful tool in modeling lunar magmatic processes. Here we present the first experimentally derived plagioclase/melt partition coefficients in lunar compositions covering the entire suite of REE. Positive europium anomalies are ubiquitous in the plagioclase-rich rocks of the lunar highlands, and complementary negative Eu anomalies are found in most lunar basalts. These features are taken as evidence of a large-scale differentiation event, with crystallization of a global-scale lunar magma ocean (LMO) resulting in a plagioclase flotation crust and a mafic lunar interior from which mare basalts were subsequently derived. However, the extent of the Eu anomaly in lunar rocks is variable. Fagan and Neal [1] reported highly anorthitic plagioclase grains in lunar impact melt rock 60635,19 that displayed negative Eu anomalies as well as the more usual positive anomalies. Indeed some grains in the sample are reported to display both positive and negative anomalies. Judging from cathodoluminescence images, these anomalies do not appear to be associated with crystal overgrowths or zones.

  18. Crystals stirred up: 2. Numerical insights into the formation of the earliest crust on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suckale, Jenny; Elkins-Tanton, Linda T.; Sethian, James A.

    2012-08-01

    This is the second paper in a two-part series examining the fluid dynamics of crystal settling and flotation in the lunar magma ocean. In the first paper, we develop a direct numerical method for resolving the hydrodynamic interactions between crystals and their feedback on the flow field in magmatic liquid. In this paper, we use this computational technique to test the leading model for the formation of the earliest crust on the Moon. The anorthositic lithology of the lunar crust is thought to have been formed by the flotation of buoyant plagioclase crystals at a time when the lunar mantle was still wholly or largely molten. This model is appealing from an observational point of view, but its fluid dynamical validity is not obvious, because (1) plagioclase probably started crystallizing very late (i.e., when the magma ocean was already 80% solidified) and (2) a significant portion of the shallow lunar crust consists of almost pure plagioclase (>90 vol. %), requiring very efficient plagioclase segregation. The goal of this study is to better understand the fluid dynamical conditions that hinder or facilitate crystal settling or flotation. Our approach complements earlier studies by explicitly linking the petrological and fluid dynamical evolution and by focusing on the effect of increasing crystal fraction. We find that crystal settling was probably possible throughout the entire solidification history of the lunar magma ocean as long as crystal sizes were sufficiently large (r > 1 mm) and crystal fraction sufficiently low (ϕ < 13%).

  19. Trace Element Distribution in an Al-rich Chondrule from the Mokoia CV3 Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. H.; Shearer, C. K.; Schilk, A. J.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied an Al-rich chondrule from Mokoia. SIMS analyses of plagioclase and pyroxene show that the bulk chondrule REE pattern was originally like group II CAIs. The chondrule must have had precursor material that was a condensation product. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Mantle Origin of Olivine-rich Troctolites in a Rift Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faul, U.; Garapic, G.; Michibayashi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Olivine-rich troctolites from Krivaja-Konjuh massif in the Dinarides (Bosnia and Herzegovina) represent a unique natural laboratory to study melt segregation and retention in originally fertile rift-related mantle rocks. Petrographic and chemical analyses of coexisting minerals (olivine and interstitial clinopyroxene, spinel and plagioclase) show that olivine and spinel are of mantle origin, and interstitial clinopyroxene and plagioclase are products of crystallization of trapped melt. Geochemical and microstructural observations (dissolution of pyroxene) indicate that this trapped melt started off at larger depth and that it was silica undersaturated when it reached the plagioclase stability field. The original mantle olivine remained and texturally equilibrated with the melt, which is evident from the high Ni content and euhedral crystal habit in thin sections. This suggests that the melt that crystallized the interstitial phases, clinopyroxene and plagioclase, was saturated in olivine and probably similar to MORB-type melt. The interstitial phases show no sign of deformation. A mantle origin of olivine is corroborated by EBSD data that show a progressive misorientation across individual olivine grains due to previous episodes of deformation within the mantle. By contrast, grains originating from cumulate crystallization should show little internal deformation. Therefore we suggest that olivine-rich troctolites are not crystallization products, but rather products of reaction of melt with the lherzolitic mantle. The evidence of trapped melt in those rocks provides a new insight into the crust-mantle transition at slow spreading ridges and continental rifts where olivine-rich troctolites have been observed.

  1. Petrology and crystal chemistry of poikilitic anorthositic gabbro 77017. [lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, I. S.; Mathez, E. A.; Okamura, F. P.; Ghose, S.

    1974-01-01

    Aspects of mineralogy are considered, taking into account the occurrence and the characteristics of plagioclase, pyroxene, and olivine. Attention is also given to oxides, opaque minerals, and glass components. Questions regarding the temperature of formation and the origin of the considered lunar poikilitic rocks are discussed. It is pointed out that the presented hypothesis may not be applicable to other poikilitic lunar rocks.

  2. Formation of anorthosite-Gabbro rhythmic phase layering: an example at North Arm Mountain, Bay of Isands ophiolite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Komor, S.C.; Elthon, D.

    1990-01-01

    Rhythmically layered anorthosite and gabbro are exposed in a 4-10-m thick interval at the base of the layered gabbro unit on North Arm Mountain, one of four massifs that compose the Bay of Islands ophiolite, Newfoundland. The rhythmically layered interval is sandwiched between thick layers of adcumulate to orthocumulate uniform gabbro. Calculated fractional crystallization paths and correlated cryptic variation patterns suggest that uniform and rhythmically layered gabbros represent 20-30% in situ crystallization of two distinct magma batches, one more evolved and the other more primitive. When the more primitive magma entered the crystallization site of the NA300-301 gabbros, it is estimated to have been ~40??C hotter than the resident evolved magma, and may have been chilled by contact with a magma chamber margin composed of uniform gabbro. In this model, chilling caused the liquid to become supercooled with respect to plagioclase nucleation temperatures, resulting in crystallization of gabbro deficient in plagioclase relative to equilibrium cotectic proportions. Subtraction of a plagioclase-poor melagabbro enriched the liquid in normative plagioclase, which in turn led to crystallization of an anorthosite layer. -from Authors

  3. Evidence for the compaction of feldspar-rich cumulates in the Pleasant Bay layered intrusion, coastal Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Horrigan, E.K. )

    1993-03-01

    The Pleasant Bay intrusion is roughly 12 km by 20 km. It consists of prominent rhythmic layers, up to 100 m thick, that grade from chilled gabbro on the base, to coarse-grained gabbroic, dioritic, or granitic rocks on the top. These layers were formed by multiple injections of basalt into a large chamber of silicic magma. The focus of this study is on one layer that is about 100 m thick, and is overlain by another basally chilled gabbroic layer at least 50 m thick. Silicic pipes and veins extend upward into the overlying gabbroic chill. The lower part of the layer has dominant calcic plagioclase, An60, augite, and olivine, with subordinate hornblende and biotite. The uppermost part has dominant sodic plagioclase, An20, and two pyroxenes with subordinate quartz, K-feldspar and hornblende. SiO[sub 2] and MgO vary from 49% and 5% at the base to 58% and 1% at the top, respectively. The top 7 m of this layer are characterized by variably deformed minerals. The deformation grades from bent biotite and plagioclase near the bottom to sutured plagioclase at the top. Pockets of undeformed quartz and K-feldspar in the uppermost rocks demonstrate that interstitial liquid was present during a after compaction. The pipes and veins probably represent trapped liquid and some crystals that were expelled into the overlying gabbroic chill.

  4. Quantitative textural investigation of trachyandesites of Damavand volcano (N Iran): Insights into the magmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadsaleh, Mohsen; Pourkhorsandi, Hamed

    2016-08-01

    Damavand volcano is a dormant stratovolcano in northern Iran in the middle of the Alborz Mountains. Investigation of the magmatic processes responsible for the eruption of the volcano and the conditions of the magma chamber is important in order to understand the volcanism of this system. Owing to their higher abundance and younger age, trachyandesitic rocks are the main components of this volcano. To get insights into the crystallization of these rocks, we carried out a quantitative and qualitative petrographic study of three main volcanic units erupted between 63 and 66.5 years ago. Crystal Size Distribution (CSD) studies can reveal details about magmatic processes. Measuring 4732 individual plagioclase crystals and conducting a CSD study, revealed a non-straight and concave-up CSD curve for nearly all of the studied volcanic units which suggests the occurrence of similar physico-chemical processes responsible for their magmatism. Plagioclase crystals occur as microlites and phenocrysts; the phenocrysts show either oscillatory zoning or sieve textures. Each segment of the CSD curves are consistent with a particular plagioclase texture in all the studied volcanic units. The presence of different plagioclase textures and the concave-up shape of the CSD curves suggests the variation of the physico-chemical conditions of the magma chamber during the magmatism of the Damavand in this time period. Mixing of magmas with different crystal populations can be an alternative for this phenomena.

  5. The distribution and purity of anorthosite across the Orientale basin: New perspectives from Moon Mineralogy Mapper data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheek, L. C.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Head, J. W.; Whitten, J. L.

    2013-09-01

    The Orientale basin is a multiring impact structure on the western limb of the Moon that provides a clear view of the primary lunar crust exposed during basin formation. Previously, near-infrared reflectance spectra suggested that Orientale's Inner Rook Ring (IRR) is very poor in mafic minerals and may represent anorthosite excavated from the Moon's upper crust. However, detailed assessment of the mineralogy of these anorthosites was prohibited because the available spectroscopic data sets did not identify the diagnostic plagioclase absorption feature near 1250 nm. Recently, however, this absorption has been identified in several spectroscopic data sets, including the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3), enabling the unique identification of a plagioclase-dominated lithology at Orientale for the first time. Here we present the first in-depth characterization of the Orientale anorthosites based on direct measurement of their plagioclase component. In addition, detailed geologic context of the exposures is discussed based on analysis of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Narrow Angle Camera images for selected anorthosite identifications. The results confirm that anorthosite is overwhelmingly concentrated in the IRR. Comparison with nonlinear spectral mixing models suggests that the anorthosite is exceedingly pure, containing >95 vol % plagioclase in most areas and commonly ~99-100 vol %. These new data place important constraints on magma ocean crystallization scenarios, which must produce a zone of highly pure anorthosite spanning the entire lateral extent of the 430 km diameter IRR.

  6. The Linum chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthes, J.; Adam, K.

    1988-12-01

    Based on optical microscopy and electron microprobe analysis, the Linum (East Germany) chondrite is classified as an L6b chondrite that contains olivine (Fa24), orthopyroxene (Fs20), clinopyroxene (Wo45En47Fs8), plagioclase (An10Ab84Or6), nickel-iron, troilite, chromite and accessory amounts of chlorapatite and whitlockite.

  7. Occurrence and Mineral Chemistry of High Pressure Phases, Potrillo Basalt, Southcentral New Mexico. M.S. Thesis Final Technical Report, 1 Jun. 1980 - 31 May 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffield, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of an older plagioclase-rich basalt and a younger olivine-rich basalt were confirmed by modal and chemical analysis. Chemical analysis also confirmed the presence of flows that are tholeiitic in composition and could be remnants of an original tholeittic parent magma. Eruptions from different levels of a differentiated magma chamber are proposed to account for the two members.

  8. Expected Storage of Nanobacteria Fossils in the Lunar Interior Transported from Old Planets by Giant Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yas.

    2010-04-01

    1) The Moon has impact remnants from planetary giant impact of Ca-rich plagioclases, C and Cl-bearing breccias, and probable CO2 fluids in the lunar interior. 2) There will be nano-fossils stored in the lunar crust of separated blocks of old planets.

  9. Origin of mineralogical zoning in an intermediate subvolcanic pluton by crystal settling and conductive cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The Rainy Lake Intrusive Complex is one of nine sheet-like intermediate plutons that are compositionally, temporally, and spatially linked to andesitic stratovolcanoes in the western Great Bear Magmatic Zone, an early Proterozoic continental magmatic arc. The pluton, exposed in oblique cross section, has a flat roof and is 1.5 km thick by 12 km long. The observed distribution of plagioclase phenocrysts in the body closely resembles the sinusoidal olivine distribution patterns found in lava lakes and some mafic sills. The shape of the curve indicates that the volume fraction plagioclase phenocrysts in the pluton at the time of intrusion ranged for 10% near the roof to 50% near the base. Calculations indicate that the plagioclase phenocrysts were denser than the surrounding melt. The effects of different crystal concentrations on the viscosity, and hence settling velocities, were computed as a function of height in the pluton; settling velocities ranged, at the time of intrusion, from 160 meters per year near the top to less than 1 meter per year near the base. The observed sinusoidal distribution curve for plagioclase can be explained by the interplay between crystal settling and the solidification of the pluton from the top downwards and the bottom upwards. This suggests that whole body convection did not play a major role in the cooling of the pluton.

  10. Geochemistry and Ar-Ar muscovite ages of the Daraban Leucogranite, Mawat Ophiolite, northeastern Iraq: Implications for Arabia-Eurasia continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Yousif O.; Cornell, David H.; Qaradaghi, Jabbar H.; Mohammad, Fahmy O.

    2014-06-01

    Daraban Leucogranite dykes intruded discordantly into the basal serpentinized harzburgite of the Mawat Ophiolite, Kurdistan region, NE Iraq. These coarse grained muscovite-tourmaline leucogranites are the first leucogranite dykes identified within the Mawat Ophiolite. They are mainly composed of quartz, K-feldspar, plagioclase, tourmaline, muscovite, and secondary phologopite, while zircon, xenotime, corundum, mangano-ilemnite and cassiterite occur as accessories.

  11. 40Ar/39Ar dating of Quaternary feldspar: examples from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pringle, M.S.; McWilliams, M.; Houghton, B.F.; Lanphere, M.A.; Wilson, C.J.N.

    1992-01-01

    Using a continuous laser and resistance furnace, we have measured ages on Quaternary plagioclase with an absolute precision of about ??30 ka and on Quaternary sanidine with a relative precision of better than 1%. Such precision was achieved by using low-temperature heating steps to remove much of the nonradiogenic argon contamination. Plagioclase is one of the most common mineral phases in volcanic rocks; thus, these procedures will be widely applicable to many problems for which precise radiometric age control has not been available. We studied plagioclase and plagioclase-sanidine concentrates from the oldest and the three largest silicic ash-flow deposits of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, one of the world's largest and most active volcanic systems. The results are in close agreement with new magnetostratigraphic data, suggesting that existing fission-track age determinations significantly underestimate the age of older units, and shift the inception of Taupo Vaolcanic Zone volcanism back to at least 1600 ka. -from Authors

  12. Estimation of trace element concentrations in the lunar magma ocean using mineral- and metal-silicate melt partition coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Miriam; Righter, Kevin; Walker, Richard J.

    2015-04-01

    This study uses experimentally determined plagioclase-melt D values to estimate the trace element concentrations of Sr, Hf, Ga, W, Mo, Ru, Pd, Au, Ni, and Co in a crystallizing lunar magma ocean at the point of plagioclase flotation. Similarly, experimentally determined metal-silicate partition experiments combined with a composition model for the Moon are used to constrain the concentrations of W, Mo, Ru, Pd, Au, Ni, and Co in the lunar magma ocean at the time of core formation. The metal-silicate derived lunar mantle estimates are generally consistent with previous estimates for the concentration of these elements in the lunar mantle. Plagioclase-melt derived concentrations for Sr, Ga, Ru, Pd, Au, Ni, and Co are also consistent with prior estimates. Estimates for Hf, W, and Mo, however, are higher. These elements may be concentrated in the residual liquid during fractional crystallization due to their incompatibility. Alternatively, the apparent enrichment could reflect the inappropriate use of bulk anorthosite data, rather than data for plagioclase separates.

  13. Controls on variation of calcite content in arkose beds of the Sangre de Cristo Formation, (Pennsylvanian-Permian) Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Wysong, J.R.; Bain, R.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-04-01

    Arkosic conglomerates and sandstones of the Pennsylvanian-Permian Sangre de Cristo Formation of south-central Colorado were deposited on alluvial plains and nearshore marine shelves adjacent to the highlands of the Ancestral Rocky Mountains. Thin limestone units occur locally, however calcite content of arkoses varies independent of these limestones. The thinly bedded to laminated arkoses contain abundant detrital orthoclase and plagioclase feldspars, micas and quartz. Authigenic clay (kaolinite) and calcite occur both as void-filling cement and replacement of feldspars. Fine-grained arkoses possess more calcite and authigenic clay than their coarse-grained counterparts. Calcite occurs as plagioclase replacement in fine-grained samples whereas in coarse-grained rocks it fills interstitial voids. Calcite content in fine-grained arkoses is low where laminae are preserved and increases with the presence of bioturbation. Diagenetic processes responsible for calcite and clay content of these arkoses were controlled by several factors including original sediment texture, composition, and grain orientation. Plagioclase has been altered to produce calcite and clay more than orthoclase. Permeability of coarse-grained rocks was higher and resulted in primarily void-filling cement. In fine-grained arkoses, permeability was less and water remained in contact with grains longer thereby altering plagioclase. Aligned mica grains of laminae retarded flow and impeded diagenetic alteration whereas bioturbation disrupted grain orientation thereby enhancing diagenesis.

  14. Spatially-Correlated Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Microbe-Mineral Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jill R. Scott; Beizhan Yan; Daphne L. Stoner

    2006-11-01

    A new methodology for examining the interactions of microbes with heterogeneous minerals is presented. Imaging laser-desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometry was used to examine the colonization patterns of Burkholderia vietnamiensis (Burkholderia cepacia) G4 on a heterogeneous basalt sample. Depth-profile imaging found that the bacterium preferentially colonized the plagioclase mineral phases within the basalt.

  15. Fluid induced metamorphism and strength of the middle to lower continental crust - field and textural examples from Bergen Arcs, Western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austrheim, H.; Putnis, A.; Putnis, C. V.

    2011-12-01

    Fluids may change the rheology of the lithosphere both by changing the deformation mechanism of minerals and by inducing metamorphic reactions. In the present account the influence of fluid-induced metamorphic reactions on the mineralogical and structural evolution of a thickened continental crust is described from anorthositic granulites in the Lindås Nappe, Bergen Arcs, Norway, where the Grenvillian age (~930 My) granulites (T 800°C, P≤10kbar) are transformed to Caledonian age (~420My) eclogite (~650°C and ≤ 20kbar) and amphibolite facies assemblages. The anorthosite complex ranges in composition from pure anorthosite via gabbroic anorthosite to gabbro with lenses of peridotite and pyroxenites which allow us to study the mineral reactions and assess relative rock strength in a wide range of compositions. The complex is locally banded with up to meter thick garnet-pyroxene rich layers alternating with plagioclase rich layers. In other localities the granulite facies structure is defined by oriented disc-shaped corona textures in a plagioclase rich matrix. The eclogites (garnet, omphacite, amphibole, kyanite, white micas ± plagioclase) and amphibolites (plagioclase, hornblende, kyanite, and white micas) are formed along fluid pathways such as fractures and shear zones. Breccias, where rotated blocks of granulites are surrounded by anastamosing eclogite- and amphibolite facies shear zones, outcrop over areas of km2. Pseudotachylytes are developed in the granulites while the hydrated rocks in the shear zone respond by ductile deformation. A hierachy of rock strength can be inferred from these field observations. Notably the relict granulites form rotated angular blocks within the shear zones suggesting that granulites, independent of composition, are stronger than hydrous eclogitites and amphibolites. The garnet pyroxenite layer forms rigid blocks in eclogites suggesting that the mafic parts of the granulite complex must have been stronger than the

  16. Hydrothermal alteration and mass exchange in the hornblende latite porphyry, Rico, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Peter B.; Cunningham, Charles G.; Naeser, Charles W.

    1994-03-01

    The Rico paleothermal anomaly, southwestern Colorado, records the effects of a large hydrothermal system that was active at 4 Ma. This hydrothermal system produced the deep Silver Creek stockwork Mo deposit, which formed above the anomaly's heat source, and shallower base and precious-metal vein and replacement deposits. A 65 Ma hornblende latite porphyry is present as widespread sills throughout the area and provided a homogenous material that recorded the effects of the hydrothermal system up to 8 km from the center. Hydrothermal alteration in the latite can be divided into a proximal facies which consists of two assemblages, quartz-illite-calcite and chlorite-epidote, and a distal facies which consists of a distinct propylitic assemblage. Temperatures were gradational vertically and laterally in the anomaly, and decreased away from the centra heat source. A convective hydrothermal plume, 3 km wide and at least 2 km high, was present above the stock-work molybdenum deposit and consisted of upwelling, high-temperature fluids that produced the proximal alteration facies. Distal facies alteration was produced by shallower cooler fluids. The most important shallow base and precious-metal vein deposits in the Rico district are at or close to the boundary of the thermal plume. Latite within the plume had a large loss of Na2O, large addition of CaO, and variable SiO2 exchante. Distal propylitized latite samples lost small amounts of Na2O and CaO and exchanged minor variable amounts of SiO2. The edge of the plume is marked by steep Na2O exchange gradients. Na2O exchange throughout the paleothermal anomaly was controlled by the reaction of the albite components in primary plagioclase and alkali feldspars. Initial feldspar alteration in the distal facies was dominated by reaction of the plagioclase, and the initial molar ratio of reactants (alkali feldspar albite component to plagioclase albite component) was 0.35. This ratio of the moles of plagioclase to alkali feldspar

  17. The origin of layered gabbros from the mid lower ocean crust, Hess Deep, East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheadle, M. J.; Brown, T. C.; Ceuleneer, G.; Meyer, R.

    2014-12-01

    IODP Exp. 345 Holes U1415 I & J cored a ~30m thick unit of conspicuously layered gabbroic rocks from the lower plutonic crust at Hess Deep. These rocks likely come from >1500m below the dike gabbro transition and thus provide an unique opportunity to study the origin of layering and the formation of relatively deep, fast spread plutonic crust formed at the EPR. Here we report the initial results of a comprehensive high-resolution petrologic, geochemical and petrographic study of this unit, which focuses on a fairly continuous 1.5m long section recovered at Hole I. The rocks consist of opx-bearing olivine gabbro, olivine gabbro and gabbro and exhibit 1-10cm scale modal layering. Some layers host spectacular 2-3 cm diameter cpx oikocrysts encapsulating partially resorbed plagioclase laths. Downhole variations in mineral chemistry are complicated. Olivine, cpx and opx Mg#'s partly reflect equilibration and show a subtle metre-scale variation (1-2 Mg#), whereas, for example, plagioclase anorthite, and cpx TiO2 contents reveal a more complicated 10-20 cm-scale variation (2-4 An, and 0.2 TiO2). Mineral zonation, for all but Mg# in equilibrated olivine, is of higher magnitude than downhole variations in average mineral compositions. Trace element geochemistry reveals rather homogeneous plagioclase and opx compositions; however cpx exhibits variation at the mineral scale. Cpx shows an increased range of, and highest REE concentrations, in the more olivine rich, near cotectic, composition gabbros, whereas the more plagioclase rich, cumulates show no variation of, and low REE, concentrations.Plagioclase fabrics are moderate to weak and partially modally controlled, but the strength of the plagioclase crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) varies dramatically, within the 1.5m core showing a significant part of the variation recorded by Oman ophiolite plutonic crust. Plagioclase shape preferred orientation and CPO match well suggesting that diffusion enabled compaction

  18. Increasing Interaction of Alkaline Magmas with Lower Crustal Gabbroic Cumulates over the Evolution of Mt. Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Crumpler, L. S.; Schrader, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field at the southeastern edge of the Colorado Plateau, New Mexico erupted diverse alkaline magmas from ~3.8 to 1.5 Ma (Crumpler, 1980; Perry et al., 1990). The earliest eruptions include high silica topaz rhyolites of Grants Ridge (plagioclase, quartz, biotite) and Si-under saturated basanites and trachytes at Mt Taylor stratovolcano. Mt. Taylor was later constructed of stacks of thick, trachyandesitic to rhyolitic lava flows that were subsequently eroded into a ~4-km across amphitheatre opening toward the southeast. Early Mt. Taylor rhyolitic lavas exposed within the amphitheatre contain quartz, plagioclase, hornblende, and biotite (± sanidine) phenocrysts. Later cone-building trachydacite to trachyandesite lavas are crystal-rich with plagioclase and augite megacrysts (± hornblende, ± quartz) and record an overall trend of decreasing SiO2 with time. The last eruptions ~1.5 Ma from the stratovolcano (Perry et al. 1990) produced thick (>70 m), viscous lava flows that contain up to 50% zoned plagioclase phenocrysts. While SiO2 decreased among the silicic magmas, the degree of silica saturation increased among peripheral basaltic magmas from basanite to ne-normative hawaiite to hy-normative basalts. Evidence of increasing crustal contamination within the basalts includes zoned plagioclase megacrysts, augite and plagioclase cumulate texture xenoliths with accompanying xenocrysts. These textures within the basalts combined with abundant, complex plagioclase among the cone-building silicic magmas imply interaction and mixing with gabbroic cumulate mush in the lower crust beneath Mt. Taylor Volcano. Contemporaneous basanitic to trachytitc volcanism in the northern part of the volcanic field at Mesa Chivato (Crumpler, 1980) was more widely distributed, smaller volume, and produced mainly aphyric magmas. The lower crustal gabbroic cumulates either do not extend northward beneath Mesa Chivato, or they were not accessed by lower magma flux rate

  19. Eruption styles of Quaternary basalt in the southern Sierra Nevada Kern Plateau recorded in outcrop and mineral-scale stratigraphies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, B. L.; Becerra, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Kern River Plateau in the southern Sierra Nevada contains Quaternary basalt (~0.1 km3) and rhyolite (~2 km3) that ascended through ~30 km of Mesozoic granitic crust. Basaltic vents include from oldest to youngest: Little Whitney Cone, Tunnel and South Fork Cones, and unglaciated Groundhog Cone. Little Whitney Cone is a 120-m-high pile of olivine-CPX-phyric scoria overlying two columnar jointed lava flows extending to the south and east. Tunnel Cone formed through a Hawaiian style eruption along a 400-m-long north-south trending fissure that excavated at least three 25-65-m-wide craters. Crater walls up to 12 meters high are composed of plagioclase-olivine-phyric spatter-fed flows that dip radially away from the crater center and crumble to form steep unconsolidated flanks. South Fork Cone is a 170-m-tall pile of plagioclase-olivine-phyric scoria that formed as a result of Strombolian to violent Strombolian eruptions. It overlies the South Fork Cone lava, the largest lava flow of the Kern Plateau (~0.05 km3), which flowed 7.5 km west into the Kern River Canyon. Scoria and ash fall deposits originating from South Fork Cone are found up to 2 km from the vent. Groundhog Cone is a 140-m-tall cinder and spatter cone breached on the north flank by a 0.03 km3 lava flow that partially buried the South Fork Cone lava and extends 5 km west to Kern River Canyon. Trends in mineral assemblage, texture, composition, and xenocryst abundance exist as a function of eruption style. Scoria and spatter deposits typically have (1) elevated olivine/plagioclase ratios, (2) oscillatory zoned (An63-An72) plagioclase phenocrysts surrounded by unzoned rims and (3) abundant xenocrysts, where up to 20% of plagioclase >200 micron diameter in some samples are granitoid xenocrysts with resorbed and/or reacted textures overprinted by abrupt compositional changes. In contrast, lava flow samples have (1) reduced olivine/plagioclase ratios and (2) plagioclase aggregates with oscillatory zoned

  20. Textural analysis of obsidian lava flow in Shirataki, Northern Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, K.; Toramaru, A.; Wada, K.

    2013-12-01

    Formation process of obsidian is poorly understood and it is thought that gas loss (outgassing) plays an important role. Glass formation needs the high-effective undercooling resulted from a high ascent and decompression rates, which process increases magma viscosity. The vesiculation, crystallization, and outgassing processes of such a highly viscous magma is also unclear. In this study, we conducted textural and chemical analyses for Tokachi-Ishizawa (TI) obsidian lava one of Shirataki rhyolite lava, Hokkaido, northern part of Japan, in order to elucidate the magma ascent process. At TI lava, the interior structure of the lava can be observed, right from the outer obsidian layer to the inner rhyolite layer. That is, TI lava is an appropriate subject for textural analysis focused on the interior of obsidian lavas In Shirataki rhyolite lava area there are monogenetic volcanoes composed of 10 obsidian lava flow units, which were erupted at 2.2Ma. The TI lava is about 50 m in height and stratigraphic sequence from the bottom is a brecciated perlite layer, obsidian layer (7m), banded obsidian layer, and rhyolite layer. In this study, we define the obsidian and rhyolite based on the difference in appearance of specimen and rock texture, especially crystallinity. Rhyolite has perlitic cracks on glass, and contains the crystalline materials (i.e. spherulite and lithophysae). Banded obsidian layer, which is located between the obsidian and rhyolite layer, is composed of obsidian and rhyolite. In this study, we focused on the texture of flow bands and plagioclase microlites in glassy part of obsidian and rhyolite layers. The flow bands can be identified based on the color of glass (dark and clear), and have a contrast in abundance of oxide and transparent tiny crystals, which are plagioclase nanolites (<15μm) and micro-spherulites (<20μm). We newly defined micro-spherulite, which shows radial growth of crystals like a spherulite. The plagioclase nanolites were identified

  1. TRM Anisotropy in Silicate-Hosted Magnetite Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Scott, G. R.

    2006-05-01

    Currently there is a need for rock magnetic recorders that will allow researchers to examine the direction and intensity of the Earth's Precambrian magnetic field. Silicate-hosted magnetic inclusions (both exsolved and occluded) are uniquely suited to this task because (1) they are physically and chemically isolated from altering fluids, (2) they are at chemical equilibrium with their silicate hosts, (3) they have long relaxation times due to enhanced coercivity, and (4) they are common in mafic intrusive rocks, which are frequently found in Precambrian-aged terranes. Cretaceous-aged gabbros containing exsolved, crystallographically oriented, magnetite inclusions in clinopyroxene and plagioclase accurately record expected magnetic directions and intensities. Here we present new rock magnetic data on the anisotropy of thermal remanent magnetization (aTRM) for single crystals of clinopyroxene and plagioclase containing exsolved inclusions. For clinopyroxene with two arrays of needle-shaped magnetite inclusions, the aTRM is strongly planar, showing two sets of antipodal direction clusters. The component of magnetization perpendicular to the applied TRM (transverse remanence) exceeds the parallel remanence in some crystallographic directions. For triclinic plagioclase with >4 arrays of needle shaped inclusions, the aTRM is subspherical with numerous minor clusters of directions. Transverse remanence is less important than parallel remanence in plagioclase. Thus, the greater number of inclusion arrays in plagioclase decreases the severity of the TRM anisotropy relative to the two arrays in pyroxene. Single crystals containing exsolved inclusions hold enormous potential as recorders of the Earth's magnetic direction and intensity. A statistical approach that combines remanence data from oriented single crystals successfully constrains the orientation and intensity of the ancient magnetic field.

  2. Constraining the deformation and exhumation history of the Ronda Massif, Southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myall, Jack; Donaldson, Colin

    2016-04-01

    The Ronda peridotite, southern Spain is comprised of four peridotite units hosted within metasedimentary units of the Betic Cordillera, Western Alps. These four areas of differing mineral facies are termed: the Garnet Mylonite , the Foliated Spinel Peridotite, the Granular Spinel Peridotite and the Foliated Plagioclase Peridotite. Whilst two of these units show a strong NE-SW foliation, the granular unit has no foliation and the Plagioclase facies shows a NW-SE foliation. The massif is separated from the metasedimentary host through a mylonite shear zone to the NW and thrust faults to the SE. The Garnets contain rims of Kelyphite which when combined with the rims of Spinel on the Plagioclase crystals illustrate the complicated exhumation of this massif. The Kelyphite shows the breakdown of garnet back to spinel and pyroxene showing the deeper high pressure high temperature mineral is under shallowing conditions whereas in contrast to this the low pressure low temperature plagioclase crystals have spinel rims showing that they have been moved into deeper conditions. The P-T-t pathway of the massif suggests slow exhumation to allow for partial recrystallisation of not only the garnets and plagioclases but of a 100m band of peridotite between the Foliated Spinel Peridotite and the Granular Spinel Peridotite facies. The tectonic model for the Ronda Peridotite that best describes the field data and subsequent lab work of this study is Mantle Core complex and slab roll back models. These models support mantle uprising during an extensional event that whereby slab roll back of the subducting lithosphere provides uplift into a void and emplacement into the crust. Further extension and final exhumation causes rotation of a mantle wedge into its present day position.

  3. A generalized garnet-forming reaction for metaigneous rocks in the Adirondacks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLelland, J.M.; Whitney, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    A generalized reaction is presented to account for garnet formation in a variety of Adirondack metaigneous rocks. This reaction, which is the sum of five partial reactions written in aluminum-fixed frames of reference, is given by: 4(y+1+w)Anorthite+4 k(y+1+2 w)Olivine +4(1-k)(y+1+2 w)Fe-oxide+(8(y+1) -4 k(y+1+2 w))Orthopyroxene = 2(y+1)Garnet +2(y+1+2 w)Clinopyroxene+4 wSpinel where y is a function of plagioclase composition, k refers to the relative amounts of olivine and Fe-oxide participating in the reaction, and w is a measure of silicon mobility. When mass balanced for Mg and Fe, this reaction is found to be consistent with analyzed mineral compositions in a wide range of Adirondack metaigneous rocks. The reaction applies equally well whether the garnets were formed directly from the rectants given above or went through an intermadiate stage involving the formation of spinel, orthopyroxene, and clinopyroxene. The actual reactions which have produced garnet in both undersaturated and quartz-bearing rocks are special cases of the above general reaction. The most important special cases appear to be those in which the reactants include either olivine alone (k=1) or Fe-oxide alone (k=0). Silicon is relatively immobile (w =2) in olivine bearing, magnesium-rich rocks (k???1), and this correlates with the increased intensity in spinel clouding of plagioclase in these rocks. Silicon mobility apparently increases in the more iron-rich rocks, which also tend to contain clear or lightly clouded plagioclase. In all the rocks studied the most common composition of metamorphic plagioclase is close to An33 (i.e., y=1). Plagioclase of lower anorthite content may be too sodic to participate in garnet formation at the P-T conditions involved. ?? 1980 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Mineralogy of new Antarctic achondrites with affinity to Lodran and a model of their evolution in an asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Mori, Hiroshi; Hiroi, Takahiro; Saito, Jun

    1994-01-01

    We studied five new Antartic achondrites, MacAlpine Hills (MAC) 88177, Yamato (Y)74357, Y75274, Y791491 and Elephant Moraine (EET)84302 by mineralogical techniques to gain a better understanding of the mineral assemblages of a group of meteorites with an affinity to Lodran (stony-iron meteorite) and their formation processes. This group is being called lodranites. These meteorites contain major coarse-grained orthopyroxene (Opx) and olivine as in Lodran and variable amounts of FeNi metal and troilite etc. MAC88177 has more augite and less FeNi than Lodran; Y74357 has more olivine and contains minor augite; Y791491 contains in addition plagioclase. EET84302 has an Acapulco-like chondritic mineral assembladge and is enriched in FeNi metal and plagioclase, but one part is enriched in Opx and chromite. The EET84302 and MAC88177 Opx crystals have dusty cores as in Acapulco. EET84302 and Y75274 are more Mg-rich than other members of the lodranite group, and Y74357 is intermediate. Since these meteorites all have coarse-grained textures, similar major mineral assemblages, variable amounts of augite, plagioclase, FeNi metal, chromite and olivine, we suggest that they are related and are linked to a parent body with modified chondritic compositions. The variability of the abundances of these minerals are in line with a proposed model of the surface mineral assemblages of the S asteroids. The mineral assemblages can best be explained by differing degrees of loss or movements of lower temperature partial melts and recrystallization, and reduction. A portion of EET84302 rich in metal and plagioclase may represent a type of component removed from the lodranite group meteorites. Y791058 and Caddo County, which were studied for comparison, are plagioclase-rich silicate inclusions in IAB iron meteorites and may have been derived by similar process but in a different body.

  5. Megacrystic pyroxene basalts sample deep crustal gabbroic cumulates beneath the Mount Taylor volcanic field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Mariek E.; Schrader, Christian M.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Rowe, Michael C.; Wolff, John A.; Boroughs, Scott P.

    2016-04-01

    Distributed over the ~ 2.3 m.y. history of the alkaline and compositionally diverse Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF), New Mexico is a widespread texturally distinct family of differentiated basalts that contain resorbed megacrysts (up to 3 cm) of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and olivine ± Ti-magnetite ± ilmenite ± orthopyroxene. These lavas have gabbroic cumulate inclusions with mineral compositions similar to the megacrysts, suggesting a common origin. Gabbroic and megacrystic clinopyroxenes form positive linear arrays in TiO2 (0.2-2.3 wt.%) with respect to Al2O3 (0.7-9.3 wt.%). Plagioclase (An41-80) from representative thin sections analyzed for 87Sr/86Sr by laser ablation ICP-MS range from 0.7036 to 0.7048. The low 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7036 to 0.7037) are associated with high Ti-Al clinopyroxenes. Likewise, the higher 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7043 to 0.7047) are associated with the low-Al clinopyroxenes. Taken together, the pyroxene and plagioclase megacrysts appear to track the differentiation of a gabbroic pluton (or related plutons) from alkaline to Si-saturated conditions by fractional crystallization and crustal assimilation. Clinopyroxene-liquid geobarometry calculations suggest that crystallization occurred near the crust-mantle transition at an average of ~ 1200 °C and 12-13 kbar. The distribution of the megacrystic pyroxene basalts suggests that a gabbroic intrusive body underlies subregions of the MTVF that have generated silicic magmas. The gabbro is interpreted to be a significant heat and mass input into the lower crust that is capable of driving the petrogenesis of diverse silicic compositions (through fractionation and crustal assimilation), including mugearites, trachytes, trachy-andesites and dacites, high-Si rhyolites, and topaz rhyolites of the MTVF.

  6. Heterogeneous Shock Effects in NWA 8159: a Unique new Martian Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, T. G.; Walton, E. L.; Hu, J.; Agee, C. B.

    2014-12-01

    NWA 8159 is a olivine-bearing, fine-grained augite basalt from Mars with SNC-like oxygen isotopes and Fe/Mn values. The sample consists of augite, plagioclase (An50-65), olivine (Fa61-76), magnetite and minor orthopyroxene. NWA 8159 has several mm-thick shock-melt veins that have crystallized to a fine-grained granular mixture of silicate and sulfide with a texture unlike that seen in other shocked meteorites. Raman spectra from the veins suggest a Ca-rich garnet in the veins. Although the shock effects in this sample are similar to those of other Martian meteorites, the plagioclase remains anisotropic (crystalline) with polysynthetic twinning and fractures throughout much of the sample. In the vicinity of shock veins, the plagioclase is isotropic and stoichiometric with undisturbed grain boundaries and no fractures. Some plagioclase in contact with shock melt has transformed to tissintite (Ca-jadelite like pyroxene). Fayalitic olivine is partially transformed to ahrensite (spinel) in contact with shock melt. As in several other shocked Martian meteorites, olivine is also transformed into a nanometer-scale mixture of oxide and silicate. Raman spectra from these areas are consistent with the presence of magnetite, rather than magnesiowüstite, as seen in other samples. Minor quartz grains have radiating fractures through the surrounding minerals indicative of partial back transformation from a high-density phase. Raman spectra from this material indicates stishovite and coesite. The coexistence of crystalline plagioclase and maskelynite suggests a moderate shock pressure of 16 - 23 GPa. However, the association of maskelynite and other transformation features with shock veins indicates the importance of high temperatures in creating heterogeneous shock features. Nanometer-scale mineralogy and transformation nano-structures will be investigated in FIB sections with analytical TEM to better constrain the mineralogy, transformation mechanisms and shock conditions.

  7. Partial melting and fractionation in the Mesa Chivato alkali basalt-trachyte series, Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, C. M.; Schmidt, M. E.; Crumpler, L. S.; Wolff, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mesa Chivato comprises a series of alkaline cones, flows, and domes within the Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF) in northwest New Mexico. Compositions range from alkali basalt to trachyte. Intermediate magmas are less well represented than mafic and felsic rocks, but benmoreites and transitional benmoreite-trachytes provide a window into the differentiation processes. Major element, trace element, and isotopic data suggest that petrogenesis of benmoreite proceeded by fractional crystallization of mafic liquids and magma mixing with partially melted mafic rocks. Major element mass balance models permit the derivation of transitional benmoreite/trachyte from the benmoreite by 20-25% crystallization of microphenocryst phases (olivine, plagioclase, Ti-magnetite, and apatite) and further fractionation to trachyte by 10-15% crystallization of olivine, plagioclase and alkali feldspar, Fe-Ti oxide, and apatite. These models are supported by SiO2-Sr and -Ba systematics. However, the hawaiite to benmoreite gap cannot be crossed by fractional crystallization alone. While major element models permit the mafic lavas to yield the benmoreite, they require extensive fractionation of clinopyroxene and plagioclase - this is unsupported by petrography (clinopyroxene phenocrysts are rare in the mafic rocks and lacking in the intermediate rocks) and cannot explain the benmoreite's very high Sr contents (>1800 ppm), which would have been depleted by plagioclase fractionation. From LA-ICPMS analysis of plagioclase: 87Sr/86Sr of early alkali basalt (0.70285-0.70300) and late hawaiite (0.70406-0.70421) bracket the 87Sr/86Sr of the benmoreite (0.70361-0.70406). Thus, either could represent the fractionated liquid parental to the benmoreite and the other the partially melted source.

  8. A first find of retrogressed eclogites in the Odenwald Crystalline Complex, Mid-German Crystalline Rise, Germany: evidence for a so far unrecognised high-pressure metamorphism in the Central Variscides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Thomas M.; Schmädicke, Esther

    2001-11-01

    Metabasic rocks were recently found in the Böllsteiner Odenwald, being part of the Variscan Mid-German Crystalline Rise (MGCR), that give evidence of a so far unrecognised eclogite-facies metamorphic event and testify, for the first time, to high-pressure metamorphism in the MGCR, the assumed suture zone of the European Variscides. Eclogite-facies metamorphism is indicated by both widespread clinopyroxene-plagioclase symplectites—interpreted as breakdown products of omphacite—and the composition of symplectitic clinopyroxene with measured jadeite contents of up to 27 mol%, extending into the omphacite field. Reintegration of numerous clinopyroxene-plagioclase symplectites implies minimum jadeite contents of the former omphacite of at least 38 mol%. For the eclogite stage, the four-phase assemblage omphacite-garnet-quartz-rutile can be reconstructed. A post-eclogitic overprint led to the formation of symplectitic intergrowths of clinopyroxene and plagioclase, amphibole-plagioclase coronas around garnet and domains with recrystallised amphibole and plagioclase. Preliminary P- T estimates for the eclogite-facies metamorphism indicate minimum pressures of some 16-17 kbar and temperatures of approximately 700±50 °C. Geothermobarometry for the subsequent symplectitic breakdown of omphacite yields some 14 kbar and 700 °C. P- T estimates on retrograde amphibolite-facies domains and on prograde mineral assemblages preserved in garnet cores point to a clockwise P- T path experienced by these rocks. The eclogites formed from a tholeiitic protolith, that may have been genetically linked to a continental extension zone or a young oceanic ridge or back-arc environment.

  9. Modelling the heat pulses generated on a fault plane during coseismic slip: Inferences from the pseudotachylites of the Copanello cliffs (Calabria, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caggianelli, A.; de Lorenzo, S.; Prosser, G.

    2005-08-01

    A pseudotachylite vein network crosscutting late Hercynian foliated tonalites can be observed along the Copanello cliffs (Calabria, Southern Italy). Pseudotachylites formed during the Oligocene-Miocene at intermediate crustal levels (ca. 10 km). They show variable thickness ranging from few mm up to 10 cm, as observed in injection veins branching from the fault plane. Microscopic observations indicate that pseudotachylite matrix mainly consists of plagioclase (An 46-An 58) and biotite microlites. Rounded clasts of quartz, plagioclase or of plagioclase-quartz lithic fragments are disseminated in the matrix. Intergranular, flow and spherulitic textures are commonly observed. Microstructural features are consistent with rapid crystallisation from melt. EDS analyses of rare and tiny glass veins indicated a trachyandesite or An 50 plagioclase melt composition. The conditions for pseudotachylite formation were reproduced by an analytical model taking into account the heat released by friction along a horizontal fault plane during a seismic event. The model is based on a three-stage rupture history that includes nucleation, propagation and stopping. In addition, by means of a numerical approach, the model reproduces cooling that follows the stopping stage. According to previous studies, the thermal perturbation induced by fault displacement is very intense. In fact, temperatures exceeding the tonalite and even An 50 plagioclase liquidus (1470 °C) are reproduced by small amount of slip (≤ 6 cm) in suprahydrostatic regime. On the other hand, the thermal perturbation is strongly localised and of short duration. Peak temperatures abruptly decrease at a short distance from the fault plane (typically in few millimetres). In these conditions a thin film of melt can be produced. Therefore, the presence of cm-scale pseudotachylite veins can be only explained assuming an efficient and fast melt migration towards dilatant sites, such as pull-apart structures and injections veins

  10. Origin of the giant Allard Lake ilmenite ore deposit (Canada) by fractional crystallization, multiple magma pulses and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlier, Bernard; Namur, Olivier; Malpas, Simon; de Marneffe, Cédric; Duchesne, Jean-Clair; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline; Bolle, Olivier

    2010-06-01

    The late-Proterozoic Allard Lake ilmenite deposit is located in the Havre-Saint-Pierre anorthosite complex, part of the allochtonous polycyclic belt of the Grenville Province. Presently the world's largest Fe-Ti oxide deposit, it had a pre-mining amount in excess of 200 Mt at grades over 60 wt.% hemo-ilmenite. The main ore body is a funnel-shaped intrusion, measuring 1.03 × 1.10 km and 100-300 m-thick. Two smaller bodies are separated by faults and anorthosite. The ore is an ilmenite-rich norite (or ilmenitite) made up of hemo-ilmenite (Hem 22.6-29.4, 66.2 wt.% on average), andesine plagioclase (An 45-50), aluminous spinel and locally orthopyroxene. Whole-rock chemical compositions are controlled by the proportions of ilmenite and plagioclase ± orthopyroxene which supports the cumulate origin of the deposit. Ore-forming processes are further constrained by normal and reverse fractionation trends of Cr concentration in cumulus ilmenite that reveal multiple magma emplacements and alternating periods of fractional crystallization and magma mixing. Mixing of magmas produced hybrids located in the stability field of ilmenite resulted in periodic crystallization of ilmenite alone. The unsystematic differentiation trends in the Allard Lake deposit, arising from a succession of magma pulses, hybridisation, and the fractionation of hemo-ilmenite alone or together with plagioclase suggest that the deposit formed within a magma conduit. This dynamic emplacement mechanism associated with continuous gravity driven accumulation of Fe-Ti oxides and possibly plagioclase buoyancy in a fractionating ferrobasalt explains the huge concentration of hemo-ilmenite. The occurrence of sapphirine associated with aluminous spinel and high-alumina orthopyroxene (7.6-9.1 wt.% Al 2O 3) lacking exsolved plagioclase supports the involvement of a metamorphic overprint during the synchronous Ottawan orogeny, which is also responsible for strong textural equilibration and external granule of

  11. Experimental petrology constraints on the recycling of mafic cumulate: a focus on Cr-spinel from the Rum Eastern Layered Intrusion, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuthold, Julien; Blundy, Jonathan D.; Brooker, Richard A.

    2015-08-01

    Reactive liquid flow is a common process in layered intrusions and more generally in episodically refilled magma chambers. Interaction between newly injected melt and cumulates, or crystal mushes, perturbs the liquid line of descent of the melt and modifies mineral chemistry and texture. We present insights into the effects of assimilation of mafic cumulate rocks (gabbro, troctolite) by cogenetic Mg-rich basalt liquid using one-atmosphere, controlled fO2 phase equilibrium experiments on picritic parental liquid to the Rum layered intrusion, Scotland. For picrite-only experiments at fO2 = QFM, Cr-spinel (Cr# = Cr/[Cr + Al + Fe3+] = 0.43; Fe# = Fe2+/[Mg + Fe2+] = 0.32) saturates at 1320 °C, olivine (Fo88) at ~1290 °C, plagioclase (An77) at 1200 °C, and clinopyroxene (Mg#: 0.81) at 1180 °C. In melting experiments on picrite + gabbro mixtures, plagioclase (1230 °C, An80) and clinopyroxene (1200 °C, Mg#: 0.85) saturation temperature and mode are increased significantly. Cr-spinel in these experiments has a distinctive, low Fe#. In melting experiments on picrite + troctolite mixtures, plagioclase (An86) saturates at 1240 °C and clinopyroxene (Mg#: 0.81) at 1170 °C. Al-rich spinel crystallizes at high temperature (>1220 °C) and becomes more Cr-rich upon cooling, reaching the highest Cr# = 0.47 at 1180 °C (0.54 at QFM-1.2). The experimental results confirm that plagioclase and clinopyroxene stability plays a major role in determining the composition of coexisting spinel. Comparing our experimental results to the Rum Eastern Layered Intrusion, we propose a model for the precipitation of spinel from picrite-troctolite hybrid melt that is compatible with the observed olivine, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene chemistry.

  12. Evidence for pervasive melt-rock reaction within the uppermost mantle at Hess Deep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shejwalkar, A. S.; Coogan, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    A suite of spinel harzburgites from ODP Site 895 at Hess Deep have been analysed for the major and trace element compositions of the major mineral phases and of the bulk rock to investigate the effect of melt rock reaction on mineral and bulk rock geochemistry. The harzburgites are at the depleted end of the global array of abyssal peridotite compositions in terms of moderately incompatible elements such as Al2O3, CaO, V and Sc. The whole-rock HREE abundances can be modeled as the residues of 15-25% near fractional melting of DMM however the LREE have much higher concentrations than predicted by this model and the samples show a significant positive Eu anomaly. The data can be fit well by a model of near-fractional melting followed by 0.5 to 2% precipitation of plagioclase that has a trace element composition in equilibrium with MORB. Plagioclase impregnation is common in the mantle section drilled at Site 895 although plagioclase is not observed petrographically in the samples studied here. The rocks are 20-70% altered and we hypothesize that plagioclase was entirely replaced during this alteration. The LREE-enrichment, relative to a melting residue, observed in the bulk-rock is not observed in clinopyroxene compositions. One explanation for this could be that the rocks were relatively cool when plagioclase impregnation occurred meaning diffusion was inefficient at modifying the clinopyroxene compositions [e.g. 1]. Whether melt-rock reaction occurs on- or off-axis is currently being investigated. Refs: [1] Niu, 2004. Journal of Petrology. Volume 45 (12), 2423-2458.

  13. Europium mass balance in polymict samples and implications for plutonic rocks of the lunar crust

    SciTech Connect

    Korotev, R.L.; Haskin, L.A. )

    1988-07-01

    From correlations of SM concentration and Sm/Eu ratio with Th concentration for a large number of polymict samples from various locations in the lunar highlands and the value of 0.91 {mu}g/g for the mean Th concentration of the highlands surface crust obtained by the orbiting gamma-ray experiments. The authors estimate the mean concentrations of Sm and Eu in the lunar surface crust to be between 2 and 3 {mu}g/g Sm and 0.7 and 1.2 {mu}g/g Eu. The compositional trends indicate that there is no significant enrichment or depletion of Eu, on the average, compared to Sm relative to chondritic abundances, i.e., there is no significant Eu anomaly in average upper crust. Although rich in plagioclase ({approximately}70%), the upper crust does not offer evidence for a gross vertical separation of plagioclase from the final liquid from which it crystallized. This and the chondritic ratio of Eu/Al in average highlands material imply that the net effect of the processes that led to formation of the lunar crust was to put most of the Al and incompatible elements in the crust. Among plutonic rocks, only plagioclase in rocks from the magnesian suite can supply the excess Eu in the polymict rocks. Owing to the intermediate value of the mean Mg/Fe ratio of the crust, a significant fraction of the mafic rocks of the lunar highlands must have lower Mg/Fe ratios than the norites and troctolites of the magnesian-suite of plutonic rocks. A large fraction of the plagioclase in the lunar crust is associated not with ferroan anorthosite, but with more mafic rocks. There is little evidence in the Eu data that the lunar crust ever consisted of a thick shell of nearly pure plagioclase, as envisioned in some formulations of the magma ocean model of its formation.

  14. Evidence for a lower crustal origin of high-Al orthopyroxene megacrysts in Proterozoic anorthosites

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Nodules and xenocrysts dominated by high-Al orthopyroxene (HAO) occur in strongly chilled Proterozoic basaltic dikes which cut the Nain anorthosite complex, Labrador. HAO (En 73-68, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ = 6.5-4.5) lacks exsolution; it occurs both as anhedral xenocrysts up to 10 cm in diameter and with euhedral plagioclase (An55) in ophitic nodules. Rarely, olivine occurs with HAO and Al-spinel with plagioclase. Scarce Fe-rich nodules contain: (1) opx + pig, (2) aug + pig, and (3) coarsely exsolved ulvospinel. Pyroxene pairs yield T's of 1250 to 1170/degree/C, whereas coexisting lamellae in exsolved ulvospinel yield T's between 1145 and 1120/degree/C, with fO/sub 2/ near the WM buffer. If all nodules came from a similar depth, the rare occurrence of olivine with plagioclase suggests a maximum pressure of about 11 kb. The high subsolidus T's of the nodules contrasts with the low T of the host anorthosites at the time of dike emplacement and hence indicates a deep source for the nodules. HAO is nearly identical in composition to the high-Al orthopyroxene megacrysts with exsolved plagioclase (HAOM) found in most Proterozoic anorthosites. Many nodules of plagioclase and HAO also have textures comparable to ophitic occurrences of HAOM in anorthosite. Rafting of cotectic nodules from the lower crust could explain occurrences of HAOM in shallow-level anorthosites. The nodules and xenocrysts are samples of lower crustal cumulates. Their compositions suggest that they were produced by magmas similar to those that were parental to the anorthosites. They lend support to models which derive anorthosites by fractional crystallization of basaltic magma.

  15. Occurrence of chromian, hercynitic spinel ("pleonaste") in Apollo-14 samples and its petrologic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1972-01-01

    Many isolated grains of a reddish pleonaste-type spinel occur in fines and metabreccia samples, particularly 14 319. Electron microprobe analyses (104) of spinels and their associated phases include 58 of pleonaste which show Mg/(Mg + Fe) 0.44-0.62 and Cr/(Cr + Al) 0.017-0.134 (atomic), plus minor amounts of other ions, and differ greatly from almost all previously recorded lunar spinels; almost no spinels of intermediate composition were found. Two types of compositional zoning exist: a diffuse primary one with cores lower in Ti, and a narrow secondary one from reaction with matrix yielding rims higher in Cr, Ti, and Mn. At contacts with breccia matrix there is a narrow corona of almost pure plagioclase (An80-An94), free of opaque minerals and pyroxene. Two types of solid inclusions found in the pleonaste are calcic plagioclase, and tiny spherical masses of nickel-rich sulfide. Similar pleonaste occurs in crystalline rock clasts, mainly with plagioclase; one clast (A) consists only of coarse olivine, plagioclase, and pleonaste, with granulated grain boundaries suggestive of deformation. From composition and texture, this clast is one possible candidate for the mafic cumulate counterpart of the "anorthositic" crust. Another clast (B), also made solely of olivine, plagioclase and pleonaste, is itself a breccia. These data suggest a two-stage brecciation process: 1) disruption (probably pre-Imbrian) of a deep-seated pleonaste-bearing source rock like A and reconsolidation to form a breccia without addition of pyroxene, ilmenite or other minerals; and 2) disruption of this breccia to yield breccia clast B which was then incorporated into the Fra Mauro formation. ?? 1972.

  16. The Jelly Sandwich Bites Back: A Case Study of the Viscosity Contrast Between the Lower Crust and Upper Mantle From the Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homburg, J. M.; Hirth, G.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2008-12-01

    The viscosity contrast between the lower crust and upper mantle controls key tectonic processes such as lithospheric coupling between the crust and mantle and the origin and transmission of plate driving forces. Recent reviews have emphasized data that suggest a strong, mafic lower crust overlies a relatively weak, peridotite upper mantle in continental plates, in contrast to the "Jelly Sandwich" concept in which weak lower crust is underlain by a relatively strong shallow mantle. While experimental data provide a basis to predict viscosity contrast, this involves substantial extrapolation from laboratory to natural conditions. Pertinent geologic observations of synchronously deformed gabbro and peridotite are not well documented. We analyzed microstructures in deformed gabbronorite dikes (~10-50 cm thick) and host harzburgite from the Oman ophiolite. Outcrop scale observations demonstrate that deformation is highly localized in 1-50 mm wide mylonitic shear bands formed within portions of the gabbronorite that are plagioclase rich. We constrained the conditions of deformation using pyroxene thermometry, petrology, grain size piezometry and EBSD analyses of lattice preferred orientation (LPO). Syn-deformation temperature ranged from ~600- 800°C, based on Fe-Mg-Ca exchange between recrystallized orthopyroxene-clinopyroxene pairs using QUILF (Andersen et al., 1993) and tremolite/actinolite thermal stability. Pressure was ~300 MPa based on structural thickness of the section. We observe a range of plagioclase grain sizes indicating that strain localized into progressively smaller volumes within the gabbronorite as deformation continued within the finest, most localized plagioclase grain size indicating a stress of ~80 MPa. In contrast, olivine grain size in peridotite corresponds to a stress of ~10 MPa, indicative of earlier, high T, distributed deformation. Plagioclase exhibits a LPO throughout the analyzed samples, though variations in orientation and strength of

  17. An FTIR Calibration for Structural Hydrogen in Feldspars Using 1H MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. A.; Rossman, G. R.

    2002-05-01

    It is important to know how to determine the speciation and concentration of H in feldspars because this information could be used to determine primary magmatic water activity or to estimate the degree of hydrothermal alteration in igneous rocks. FTIR spectroscopy is sensitive to changes in speciation of hydrogen, and can be calibrated for quantitative determination of H concentration using 1H MAS (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy. Three pegmatitic albites, one metamorphic albite, three volcanic plagioclases (albite, andesine, and anorthite) and one pegmatite oligoclase were used in this study to provide a range of plagioclase compositions. Two pegmatitic microclines and one sanidine were also studied. Polarized infrared spectra were obtained in the three principal optical directions for each specimen. Samples were prepared for 1H MAS NMR experiments at 12 kHz spinning speed in a dry box, without the use of a liquid grinding aid. A spectrum from anhydrous synthetic corundum was used as a baseline for feldspar NMR spectra. The pegmatitic and metamorphic albites are transparent, but contain submicroscopic fluid inclusions as evidenced by a broad band at 3400 cm-1 and an asymmetric band at 5200 cm-1 in the IR spectra that shift to bands characteristic of ice upon cooling to 77 K. These albites have a very sharp band at 4.7 ppm (relative to TMS) in their NMR spectra consistent with fluid inclusion water. In addition to the broad fluid inclusion band, the pegmatitic albites have sharp bands in the mid-IR similar the OH bands found in quartz. All other plagioclases have broad, anisotropic bands around 3200 cm-1 in the mid-IR and MOH combination stretch-bend bands near 4500 cm-1 in the near-IR, indicative of structural OH. The NMR spectra of these plagioclases have a broad band at 4.7 to 4.9 ppm TMS. The OH vector in plagioclases is preferentially aligned parallel to the a crystallographic axis. The concentration of structural OH in the plagioclases ranges from 50

  18. Mineralogy of Meteorite Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    1997-01-01

    Approximately 275 mineral species have been identified in meteorites, reflecting diverse redox environments, and, in some cases, unusual nebular formation conditions. Anhydrous ordinary, carbonaceous and R chondrites contain major olivine, pyroxene and plagioclase; major opaque phases include metallic Fe-Ni, troilite and chromite. Primitive achondrites are mineralogically similar. The highly reduced enstatite chondrites and achondrites contain major enstatite, plagioclase, free silica and kamacite as well as nitrides, a silicide and Ca-, Mg-, Mn-, Na-, Cr-, K- and Ti-rich sulfides. Aqueously altered carbonaceous chondrites contain major amounts of hydrous phyllosilicates, complex organic compounds, magnetite, various sulfates and sulfides, and carbonates. In addition to kamacite and taenite, iron meteorites contain carbides, elemental C, nitrides, phosphates, phosphides, chromite and sulfides. Silicate inclusions in IAB/IIICD and lIE iron meteorites consist of mafic silicates, plagioclase and various sulfides, oxides and phosphates. Eucrites, howardites and diogenites have basaltic to orthopyroxenitic compositions and consist of major pyroxene and calcic plagioclase and several accessory oxides. Ureilttes .are made up mainly of calcic, chromian olivine and low-Ca clinopyroxene embedded in a carbonaceous matrix; accessory phases include the C polymorphs graphite, diamond, lonsdaleite and chaoite as well as metallic Fe-Ni, troilite and halides. Angrites are achondrites rich in fassaitic pyroxene (i.e. , AI-Ti diopside); minor olivine with included magnesian kirschsteinite is also present. Martian meteorites comprise basalts, Iherzolites, a dunite and an orthopyroxenite. Major phases include various pyroxenes and olivine; minor to accessory phases include various sulfides, magnetite, chromite and Ca-phosphates. Lunar meteorites comprise mare basalts with major augite and calcic plagioclase and anorthositic breccias with major calcic plagioclase. Several meteoritic

  19. Model VNIR optical constants of silicates mixtures analogues to igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, C.; Ciarniello, M.; Serventi, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Sgavetti, M.

    2011-12-01

    Remote-sensing studies have revealed that most of the inner planets surfaces are composed of silicate bearing rocks with variable relative mineral abundances and compositions that could be indicative of genetically related rocks. Quantifying and modeling those phases in mineral mixtures is an important task to characterize the surface compositions and to understand the evolution of the crust. One approach to reach this aim is to invert the bidirectional reflectance equation(Hapke,1993), to derive optical constants of powdered materials. This approach has been applied with positive results to obtain the optical constants of mafic silicates, e.g., olivine and pyroxene, and plagioclase taking into account the effects of composition and grain-size variations. Mixtures of those mineral phases were modeled successfully starting from the optical constants of each end-member, but only few works modeled spectra of mixtures where some of the end-members could not be individually characterized. Here we present preliminary results on the determination of the optical constants of complex silicates mixtures obtained applying the Hapke's radiative transfer model to visible-near infrared reflectance spectra. The bidirectional reflectance spectra are acquired at the SLAB (Spectroscopy Laboratory, Iasf-INAF, Roma) in the wavelength range 0.35- 2.50 μm. We prepared mixtures starting from three different plagioclases with variable amount of FeO and two different mafic end-members, mixtures of pyroxenes and pyroxenes + olivine, respectively. For each plagioclase composition, mixtures varying from 20 to 90 wt.% plagioclase and multimineral mafic grains were prepared, in two grain size classes (63-125 μm and 125-250 μm), for a total of 64 samples. Moreover, to optimize the calculation of the optical constant, we have acquired spectra of the end-members in other two different grain size classes (50-75 μm and 100-125 μm). We have retrieved the single scattering albedo (w) for each

  20. Mechanisms of differentiation in shallow mafic alkaline intrusions, as illustrated in the Big Bend area, western Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carman, Max F.

    1994-06-01

    Syenitic bodies are a common feature in alkaline sills and laccoliths that range in composition from syenogabbroic to syenodioritic. The syenitic bodies are generally accepted to be the result of in-situ differentiation. Such bodies are usually called segregations, but relatively little discussion is given to the actual ways they may form. Subhorizontal sheets or layers are most common, although rounded ocelli and vertically elongated cylindroidal forms are also common. These are all systematically arranged in the intrusions. Such features are found in at least ten sills in the Big Bend area of Texas, and are reported as well in Montana, Utah, Australia, Sakhalin, Scotland and New Zealand. Detailed chemical and mineralogical analyses demonstrate crystal fractionation very convincingly for the generation of syenitic liquids that form the bodies. The analyses also allow the calculation of viscosities, cooling time and mineral settling rates in the sill studied most thoroughly. These factors indicate, or are compatible with, proposed mechanisms for the formation of syenite bodies. In many intrusions there is a bimodal distribution of syenite compositions; one type is relatively plagioclase rich and the other type is plagioclase poor. Mass balance calculations on several intrusions show that a residual liquid of plagioclase-rich composition will form after about 30% of the parent magma has crystallized, whereas a residual liquid of plagioclase-poor composition will form only after about 50% of the original magma has crystallized. The several mechanisms by which plagioclase-rich residual liquids are aggregated into the different forms of syenite bodies include localized crystal settling and sagging of a crystaline framework on a scale of tens of centimeters to a meter, within an upper solidification front; formation of cylindroidal columns of syenitic differentiate in a crystal mush within a lower solidification front, and diapiric rise of such masses. After the amount

  1. Can cathodoluminescence of feldspar be used as provenance indicator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholonek, Christiane; Augustsson, Carita

    2016-05-01

    We have studied feldspar from crystalline rocks for its textural and spectral cathodoluminescence (CL) characteristics with the aim to reveal their provenance potential. We analyzed ca. 60 rock samples of plutonic, volcanic, metamorphic, and pegmatitic origin from different continents and of 16 Ma to 2 Ga age for their feldspar CL textures and ca. 1200 feldspar crystals from these rocks for their CL color spectra. Among the analyzed rocks, igneous feldspar is most commonly zoned, whereby oscillatory zoning can be confirmed to be typical for volcanic plagioclase. The volcanic plagioclase also less commonly contains twin lamellae that are visible in CL light than crystals from other rock types. Alkali feldspar, particularly from igneous and pegmatitic rocks, was noted to be most affected by alteration features, visible as dark spots, lines and irregular areas. The size of all textural features of up to ca. 150 μm, in combination with possible alteration in both the source area and the sedimentary system, makes the CL textures of feldspar possible to use for qualitative provenance research only. We observed alkali feldspar mostly to luminesce in a bluish color and sometimes in red, and plagioclase in green to yellow. The corresponding CL spectra are dominated by three apparent intensity peaks at 440-520 nm (mainly blue), 540-620 nm (mainly green) and 680-740 nm (red to infrared). A dominance of the peak in the green wavelength interval over the blue one for plagioclase makes CL particularly useful for the differentiation of plagioclase from alkali feldspar. An apparent peak position in red to infrared at < 710 nm for plagioclase mainly is present in mafic rocks. Present-day coastal sand from Peru containing feldspar with the red to infrared peak position mainly exceeding 725 nm for northern Peruvian sand and a larger variety for sand from southern Peru illustrates a discriminative effect of different source areas. We conclude that the provenance application

  2. 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar dating of low grade metamorphism: examples on metabasites from Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, L.; Feraud, G.; Fuentes, F.; Delbar, M.; Morata, D.

    2003-04-01

    Dating low to very low-grade burial metamorphic assemblages is often difficult because of (1) few mineral phases compositionally suitable to apply the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar methods, and (2) small amount in which these phases are commonly found. K-feldspar adularia, sericitic mica, and celadonite are the best known K-bearing secondary minerals. We present some successful attempts to analyse two distinct secondary phases from a same volcanic formation that allow to test the validity of the measured ages. These ages have been also compared with the crystallisation age of the volcanic rocks in which the secondary phases were lately developed. Adularia and sericite were selected from basic lava flows from a 3 to 13 km thick Cretaceous sequence from the Coastal Range of central Chile, at two different locations: the Bustamante Hill (west from Santiago), and the Cordón de Chacana, c. 80 km further north. Adularia came from a low-variance assemblage with pumpellyite, chlorite and low-albite contained in amygdules whereas sericite was present in milky-white strongly sericitized plagioclase crystals. While small clusters of rare fresh plagioclase grains from lava flows from Bustamante and Chacana displayed concordant plateau ages 119.4 ± 2.4 (2 sigma) and 118.7 ± 0.6 Ma, respectively, the adularia from the same formations gave sensibly younger ages around 94 Ma (high temperature steps), and 96.8 ± 0.2 Ma (plateau age) in Bustamante and Chacana, respectively. Sericite ages were measured in situ into single crystals of strongly transformed plagioclases. The relative proportion of sericite and plagioclase corresponding to each degasing step was monitored by measuring the Ca/K ratio (deduced from 37ArCa/39Ar_K). While intermediate ages were measured on some sericite of both sites (corresponding to a variable but permanent contribution of plagioclase on each step), a plateau age of 97.0 ± 1.6 Ma (concordant with adularia) could be obtained on a strongly sericitized plagioclase

  3. Gabbroic and Peridotitic Enclaves from the 2008 Kasatochi Eruption, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentner, A.; Nadin, E. S.; Izbekov, P. E.; Nye, C. J.; Neill, O. K.

    2012-12-01

    Kasatochi volcano of the Andreanof Islands in the western Aleutian Arc violently erupted over a two day period from August 7-8, 2008. The eruption involved multiple explosive events generating pyroclastic flows, which included abundant mafic and ultramafic enclaves that have since weathered out and accumulated in talus along the coast. These and other mafic enclaves sampled by modern island arc lavas provide insight into subduction magmatism because they emerge from a section of the subduction system that is less likely than shallower zones to be modified by magmatic processes such as mixing, assimilation, or fractionation. We present new whole rock, clinopyroxene, amphibole, plagioclase, and melt compositions from Kasatochi enclaves of the 2008 eruption. The highly crystalline (~40 vol. % phenocryst content), medium-K basaltic andesite host rock contains ~52-55 wt. % SiO2 and 0.6-0.9 wt. % K2O, and is composed of plagioclase, ortho- and clinopyroxene, amphibole, and Ti-magnetite in a microlite-rich groundmass. Upon eruption, this magma sampled two distinct enclave populations: gabbro and peridotite. The gabbro has abundant amphibole (mostly magnesio-hastingsite) and plagioclase with minor clinopyroxene, olivine, and magnetite, while the peridotite is composed of olivine with minor amounts of clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene. There is little textural variation amongst the peridotitic samples collected, but the gabbroic samples vary from layered to massive and cover a range in grain size from fine-grained to pegmatitic. The layered gabbros display centimeter-scale bands of alternating plagioclase- and amphibole-rich layers, with a strong preferential alignment of the amphibole grains. The coarser-grained samples are very friable, with ~10% pore space; disaggregation of these upon host-magma ascent likely formed the amphibole and plagioclase xenocrysts in the andesitic host. Based on the textural and compositional differences, we divide the enclaves into four groups

  4. Composition and petrogenesis of oxide-, apatite-rich gabbronorites associated with Proterozoic anorthosite massifs: examples from the Adirondack Mountains, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLelland, James; Ashwal, Lewis; Moore, Laura

    1994-03-01

    Mafic dikes and sheets rich in Fe, Ti-oxides and apatite are commonly associated with Proterozoic massif anorthosites and are referred to as oxide-apatite gabbronorites (OAGN). Within the Adirondacks, field evidence indicates that during middle to late stages of anorthositic evolution, these bodies were emplaced as magmas with unspecified liquid-crystal ratios. Sixty whole rock analyses of Adirondack OAGN and related rocks define continuous oxide trends on Harker variation diagrams (SiO2=37 54%). Similar trends exist for Sr, Y, Nb, Zr, and REE and together suggest a common origin via fractional crystallization. A representative parental magma (plagioclase-rich crystal mush) has been chosen from this suite, and successive daughter magmas have been produced by removal of minerals with compositions corresponding to those determined in actual rocks. Least squares, mass balance calculations of major element trends indicate that removal of intermediate plagioclase (˜An40 50) plus lesser amounts of pyroxene account for the compositional variation of this suite and produce very low sums of the squares of the residuals (R2 s>0.25). The extracted mineral phases correspond volumetrically and compositionally to those of the anorthositic suite, and the model succeeds in accounting for the observed OAGN trends. The major element model is utilized to calculate trace elejent concentrations for successive magmas, and these agree closely with observation. We conclude that, beginning with a plagioclase-rich crystal mush, the extraction of intermediate plagioclase (˜An40 50) drives residual magmas to increasingly Fe-, Ti-, and P-rich and SiO2-poor conditions characteristic of Fenner-type fractionation. The crystallization sequence is plagioclase→plagioclase+orthopyroxene→plagioclase+orthopyroxene (pigeonite)+augite. Fe, Ti-oxides begin to crystallize near the end of the sequence and are followed by apatite and fayalitic olivine which appears in place of pigeonite. Augitic

  5. Hyperextension of continental to oceanic-like lithosphere: The record of late gabbros in the shallow subcontinental lithospheric mantle of the westernmost Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidas, Károly; Varas-Reus, Maria Isabel; Garrido, Carlos J.; Marchesi, Claudio; Acosta-Vigil, Antonio; Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Targuisti, Kamal; Konc, Zoltán

    2015-05-01

    We report gabbroic dikes in the plagioclase tectonite domains of the Ojén and Ronda massifs (Betic Cordillera, southern Spain), which record crystallization at low-pressure syn-, or slightly postkinematic to the late ductile history of the Betic Peridotite in the westernmost Mediterranean. We present mineral major and trace element compositional data of discordant gabbroic dikes in the Ojén massif and gabbroic patches in the Ronda massif, complemented by the whole rock and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) data of the Ojén occurrence. In the Ojén massif, gabbro occurs as 1-3 centimeter wide discordant dikes that crosscut the plagioclase tectonite foliation at high angle. These dikes are composed of cm-scale igneous plagioclase and clinopyroxene crystals that show shape preferred orientations subparallel to the lineation of the host peridotite and oblique to the trend of the dike. Intrusion of Ojén gabbro dikes is coherent with the stress field that formed the high temperature, ductile plagioclase tectonite foliation and then attests for a mantle igneous event prior to the intracrustal emplacement of the massif. In the Ronda massif, gabbroic rocks crystallized in subcentimeter wide anastomozing veins, or as interstitial patches in the host dunite. They are mostly composed of plagioclase and clinopyroxene. Plagioclase composition is bytownitic in the Ojén, and andesinic in the Ronda massif. Clinopyroxene in both places shows identical, light Rare-Earth Element (LREE) depleted trace element patterns. The calculated trace element composition of melts in exchange equilibrium with the studied igneous clinopyroxenes reflects LREE-enriched character coupled with negative Eu anomaly, and indicates that gabbro-forming melts in Ronda and Ojén share a common melt source with an island arc tholeiitic affinity. Geothermobarometric data and liquidus mineralogy indicate that gabbro crystallization occurred at shallow depths (0.2-0.5 GPa) in a 7-16 km thick

  6. Interaction between felsic and mafic magmas in the Salmas intrusive complex, Northwestern Iran: Constraints from petrography and geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, Mitra; Rashidnejad-Omran, Nematollah; Dabiri, Rahim; Santos, José Francisco; Mata, João; Buchs, David; McDonald, Iain; Appel, Peter; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2015-11-01

    The Salmas plutonic complex, in the northernmost part of Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone of Iran, provides evidence for magma interaction processes. The complex contains mafic-intermediate, hybrid and felsic rocks which intruded into the Paleozoic metamorphic complex. They show typical relationships described in many mafic-felsic mingling and mixing zones worldwide, such as mafic microgranular enclaves (in felsic and hybrid rocks), mafic sheets, and hybrid rocks. The mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) are characterized by fine-grained, equigranular and hypidiomorphic texture and some special types of microscopic textures, e.g., quartz xenocrysts, oscillatory-zoned plagioclase, small lath-shaped plagioclase in large plagioclase, spike zones in plagioclase and spongy-cellular plagioclase textures, rounded plagioclase megacrysts blade-shaped biotite, acicular apatite. The mafic sheets and MMEs in granites (MME-Gr), which indicated magma mingling structures, show ISr values and εNd(i) similar to diorites. The hybrid rocks and their mafic enclaves (MME-H) show isotope signatures similar to each other. Granites have isotope signatures [higher 87Sr/86Sr(i) (0.70788-0.71075) and lower εNd(i) (-2.4 to -4.2)] distinct to those of the all rock types and MMEs. Major, trace and REE modeling show that hybrid rocks are generated via 40-60% mixing of mafic (dioritic) and felsic (granitic) end-members. All the geochemical data suggest that underplating of dioritic magma, which has been produced by fractional crystallization of gabbros, under the lower crust caused its melting to make felsic (granitic) magma. Injection of dioritic magma into the base of the felsic magma chamber and a limited mixing of two end-members, the lower crust-derived magma and mantle-derived melts, formed hybrid magma and their enclaves. Injections of new mafic magma pulses into hybrid magma generated mafic enclaves into them. The injections of denser dioritic magma pulses into a felsic magma chamber and spreading

  7. The magmatic plumbing of the submarine Hachijo NW volcanic chain, Hachijojima, Japan: long distance lateral magma transport?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, O.; Geshi, N.; Itoh, J.; Kawanabe, Y.; Tsujino, T.

    2005-12-01

    Recent geophysical observations on basaltic composite volcanoes in Izu-Bonin arc reveal the process of long distance lateral magma transport within the shallow middle crust. Such intrusion events sometimes caused flank fissure eruption and also triggered a formation of collapsed caldera (Miyakejima 2000). To clarify a long-distance magma transport system of the basaltic composite volcano in volcanic arc from geological and petrological aspects, we investigated a submarine volcanic chain (Hachijo NW chain) nested Hachijo Nishiyama volcano, a frontal composite volcano in the northern Izu arc. The volcanic chain extends 15 km from Hachijo-Nishiyama volcano and is composed of ridges and many small cones with basal diameters generally less than 2km. Dredge sampling recovered basaltic lavas and spatters. A diving survey using a ROV (Hyper Dolphin) revealed pillow lava flows on steep slopes and accumulation of spatters and agglutinates near the eruption center. Basalts from the Hachijo NW chain generally have more primitive composition (up to nearly 7% of MgO) compared to the basaltic rocks from the Nishiyama. The bulk magma composition of Hachijo NW chain is controlled by fractionation of clinopyroxene, olivine and plagioclase while plagioclase accumulation was indicated by aluminum-rich character of the Nishiyama volcano and its subaerial satellite cones. Trace element ratios unaffected by melting or crystal fractionation (e.g., Nb/Zr) are not significantly different between the Nishiyama and the Hachijo NW chain. This implies that the sources of magma for these volcanic systems are basically identical. However, ratios affected by melting process are significantly different between the two. Hachijo NW chain shows lower LREE/HREE and Zr/Y, implying difference in degree of partial melting of the source. Other possible processes for producing these differences in trace element characteristics include crustal assimilation. These results obtained so far appear to

  8. Dynamic deformation of volcanic ejecta from the Toba caldera: possible relevance to Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, N.L.; Officer, C.B.; Chesner, C.A.; Rose, W.I.

    1986-05-01

    Plagioclase and biotite phenocrysts in ignimbrites erupted from the Toba caldera, Sumatra, show microstructures and textures indicative of shock stress levels higher than 10 GPa. Strong dynamic deformation has resulted in intense kinking in biotite and, with increasing shock intensity, the development of plagioclase of planar features, shock mosaicism, incipient recrystallization, and possible partial melting. Microstructures in quartz indicative of strong shock deformation are rare, however, and many shock lamellae, if formed, may have healed during post-shock residence in the hot ignimbrite; they might be preserved in ash falls. Peak shock stresses from explosive silicic volcanism and other endogenous processes may be high and if so would obviate the need for extraterrestrial impacts to produce all dynamically deformed structures, possibly including shock features observed near the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary. 38 references, 3 figures.

  9. Direct measurement of the combined effects of lichen, rainfall, and temperature on silicate weathering

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, P.V.; Dorn, R.I.; Brazel, A.J.; Clark, J.; Moore, R.B.; Glidewell, T.

    1999-10-01

    A key uncertainty in models of the global carbonate-silicate cycle and long-term climate is the way that silicates weather under different climatologic conditions, and in the presence or absence of organic activity. Digital imaging of basalts in Hawaii resolves the coupling between temperature, rainfall, and weathering in the presence and absence of lichens. Activation energies for abiotic dissolution of plagioclase (23.1 {+-} 2.5 kcal/mol) and olivine (21.3 {+-} 2.7 kcal/mol) are similar to those measured in the laboratory, and are roughly double those measured from samples taken underneath lichen. Abiotic weathering rates appear to be proportional to rainfall. Dissolution of plagioclase and olivine underneath lichen is far more sensitive to rainfall.

  10. AR-39-AR-40 "Age" of Basaltic Shergottite NWA-3171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2007-01-01

    North-West-Africa 3171 is a 506 g, relatively fresh appearing, basaltic shergottite with similarities to Zagami and Shergotty, but not obviously paired with any of the other known African basaltic shergottites. Its exposure age has the range of 2.5-3.1 Myr , similar to those of Zagami and Shergotty. We made AR-39-AR-40 analyses of a "plagioclase" (now shock-converted to maskelynite) separate and of a glass hand-picked from a vein connected to shock melt pockets.. Plagioclase was separated using its low magnetic susceptibility and then heavy liquid with density of <2.85 g/cm(exp 3). The AR-39-AR-40 age spectrum of NWA-317 1 plag displays a rise in age over 20-100% of the 39Ar release, from 0.24 Gyr to 0.27 Gy.

  11. Composition and maturity of the 60013/14 core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotev, Randy L.; Morris, Richard V.; Lauer, Howard V., Jr.

    1993-03-01

    The 60013/14 double drive tube (62 cm deep) is one of three regolith cores taken 35-40 m apart in a triangular array on the Cayley plains at station 10' (LM/ALSEP), Apollo 16. This trio, which includes double drive tube 60009/10 (59 cm deep) and deep drill core 60001-7 (220 cm), is the only such array of cores returned from the Moon. The top 45 cm of 60013/14 is mature, as is surface reference soil 60601 taken nearby. Maturity generally decreases with depth, with soil below 45 cm being submature. The zone of lowest maturity (34 is less than or equal to Is/FeO is less than 50) extends from 46 to 58 cm depth, and corresponds to the distinct region of light-colored soil observed during core processing. In the other two cores, most of the compositional variation results from mixing between fine-grained, mature soil with 10-11 micro-g/g Sc and coarse-grained ferroan anorthosite consisting of greater than 99% plagioclase with less than 0.5 micro-g/g Sc. This is most evident in 60009/10 which contains a high abundance of plagioclase at about 54 cm depth (minimum Sc: 3-4 micro-g/g); a similar zone occurs in 60001-7 at 17-22 cm (MPU-C), although it is not as rich in plagioclase (minimum Sc: 6-7 micro-g/g). Compositional variations are less in 60013/14 than in the other two cores (range: 7.9-10.0 micro-g/g Sc), but are generally consistent with the 'plagioclase dilution' effect seen in 60009/10, i.e., most 60013/14 samples plot along the mixing line of 60009/10. However, a plagioclase component is not the cause of the lower maturity and lighter color of the unit at 46-58 cm depth in 60013/14. Many of the samples in this zone have distinctly lower Sm/Sc ratios than typical LM-area soils and plot off the mixing trend defined by 60009/10. This requires a component with moderately high Sc, but low-Sm/Sc, such as feldspathic fragmental breccia (FFB) or granulitic breccia. A component of Descartes regolith, such as occurs at North Ray Crater (NRC) and which is rich in FFB, could

  12. Composition and maturity of the 60013/14 core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotev, Randy L.; Morris, Richard V.; Lauer, Howard V., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The 60013/14 double drive tube (62 cm deep) is one of three regolith cores taken 35-40 m apart in a triangular array on the Cayley plains at station 10' (LM/ALSEP), Apollo 16. This trio, which includes double drive tube 60009/10 (59 cm deep) and deep drill core 60001-7 (220 cm), is the only such array of cores returned from the Moon. The top 45 cm of 60013/14 is mature, as is surface reference soil 60601 taken nearby. Maturity generally decreases with depth, with soil below 45 cm being submature. The zone of lowest maturity (34 is less than or equal to I(sub s)/FeO is less than 50) extends from 46 to 58 cm depth, and corresponds to the distinct region of light-colored soil observed during core processing. In the other two cores, most of the compositional variation results from mixing between fine-grained, mature soil with 10-11 micro-g/g Sc and coarse-grained ferroan anorthosite consisting of greater than 99% plagioclase with less than 0.5 micro-g/g Sc. This is most evident in 60009/10 which contains a high abundance of plagioclase at about 54 cm depth (minimum Sc: 3-4 micro-g/g); a similar zone occurs in 60001-7 at 17-22 cm (MPU-C), although it is not as rich in plagioclase (minimum Sc: 6-7 micro-g/g). Compositional variations are less in 60013/14 than in the other two cores (range: 7.9-10.0 micro-g/g Sc), but are generally consistent with the 'plagioclase dilution' effect seen in 60009/10, i.e., most 60013/14 samples plot along the mixing line of 60009/10. However, a plagioclase component is not the cause of the lower maturity and lighter color of the unit at 46-58 cm depth in 60013/14. Many of the samples in this zone have distinctly lower Sm/Sc ratios than typical LM-area soils and plot off the mixing trend defined by 60009/10. This requires a component with moderately high Sc, but low-Sm/Sc, such as feldspathic fragmental breccia (FFB) or granulitic breccia. A component of Descartes regolith, such as occurs at North Ray Crater (NRC) and which is rich in FFB

  13. Petrology and geochemistry of alkali gabbronorites from lunar breccia 67975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Odette B.; Flohr, Marta K.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed results of petrologic and compositional studies of three clasts found in thin sections of the Apollo 16 lunar breccia 67975 and of four clasts extracted from the breccia (for instrumental neutron activation analysis) prior to thin sectioning are reported. The alkali gabbronorites of the breccia form two distinct subgroups, magnesian and ferroan. The magnesian gabbronorites are composed of bytownitic plagioclase, hypersthene, augite, a silica mineral, and trace Ba-rich K-feldspar. The ferroan gabbronorites are composed of ternary plagioclase, pigeonite, augite, Ba-rich K-feldspar, and a silica mineral. Trace minerals in both subgroups are apatite, REE-rich whitlockite, and zircon. The magnesian and ferroan alkali gabbronorites appear to have formed by progressive differentiation of the same, or closely related, parent REE-rich magmas.

  14. Origin of Miocene andesite and dacite in the Goldfield-Superstition volcanic province, central Arizona: Hybrids of mafic and silicic magma mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, R. V.; Johnson, Kelly G.

    2016-07-01

    The Miocene Goldfield-Superstition volcanic province (G-SVP), ∼8000 km2 in central Arizona, is composed largely of silicic pyroclastic rocks and lavas, and smaller volumes of alkalic basalt and intermediate-composition lavas. Volcanism began ∼20.5 Ma as sparse rhyolitic and mainly basaltic lavas followed by intermediate lavas, lasting until ∼19 Ma. At that time, ∼1 m.y. of silicic eruptions began, creating most of the G-SVP. Petrologic studies are available for basalts and some for silicic rocks, but petrologic/geochemical information is sparse for intermediate-composition lavas. These latter, andesites and dacites, are the focus of this study, in which we present the processes and sources responsible for their origins. Goldfield-Superstition andesites and dacites have SiO2 ∼56-70 wt.% and Na2O + K2O that qualifies some as trachy-andesite and -dacite. A prominent petrographic feature is plagioclase-phyric texture (∼11-30 vol% plagioclase), where oligoclase-andesine phenocrysts have cores surrounded by corroded, or reacted, zones, mantled by higher An% plagioclase. Where corroded zones are absent, margins are etched, curved, or embayed. Groundmass plagioclase is labradorite, also more calcic than the phenocrysts. Other minerals are quartz (subrounded; embayed), clinopyroxene, amphibole, biotite, and rare titanite and zircon. A salient compositional characteristic that provides insight to andesite-dacite origins with respect to other G-SVP rocks is revealed when using SiO2 as an index. Namely, abundances of many incompatible elements, mainly HFSE and REE, decrease over the low to high SiO2 range (i.e., abundances are lower in dacites than in co-eruptive andesites and underlying alkalic basalts). As examples: G-SVP basalts have ∼50-70 ppm La, and andesites-dacites have ∼59-22 ppm La; for Zr, basalts have ∼225-170 ppm, but most andesites-dacites have ∼180-50; for Y, basalts >20 ppm, andesites-dacites ∼18-9 ppm. To understand these trends of lower

  15. Rare earth elements in minerals of the ALHA77005 shergottite and implications for its parent magma and crystallization history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundberg, Laura L.; Crozaz, Ghislaine; Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of mineral REE and selected minor and trace elements were carried out on individual grains of pyroxenes, whitlockite, maskelynite, and olivine of the Antarctic shergottite ALHA77005, and the results are used to interpret its parent magma and crystallization history. The results of mineral compositions and textural observations suggest that ALHA77005 is a cumulate with about half cumulus material (olivine + chromite) and half postcumulus phases. Most of the REEs in ALHA77005 reside in whitlockite whose modal concentration is about 1 percent. Mineral REE data support previous suggestions that plagioclase and whitlockite crystallized late, and that low-Ca pyroxene initiated crystallization before high-Ca pyroxene. The REE patterns for the intercumulus liquid, calculated from distribution coefficients for ALHA77005 pyroxene, plagioclase, and whitlockite, are in very good agreement and are similar to that of Shergotty.

  16. Rates and processes of crystal growth in the system anorthite-albite. [magmatic liquids in igneous rock formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, R. J.; Klein, L.; Uhlmann, D. R.; Hays, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The growth rates and interface morphologies of crystals of synthetic compositions in the anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8)-albite (NaAlSi3O8) plagioclase feldspar system are measured in an investigation of the crystallization of igneous rocks. Mixed plagioclase glasses with compositions of 75% and 50% anorthite were observed using the microscope heating technique as they crystallized at temperatures near the liquidus, and 75%, 50% and 20% anorthite crystals were treated by resistance heating and observed at greater degrees of undercooling. Growth rates were found to be independent of time and to decrease with increasing albite content, ranging from 0.5 to 2 x 10 to the -5th cm/min. The crystal morphologies for all compositions are faceted near the liquidus and become progressively skeletal, dendritic and fibrillar with increasing undercooling.

  17. Igneous history of the aubrite parent asteroid - Evidence from the Norton County enstatite achondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okada, Akihiko; Keil, Klaus; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Newsom, Horton

    1988-01-01

    Numerous specimens of the Norton County enstatite achondrite (aubrite) were studied by optical microscopy, electron microprobe, and neutron-activation analysis. Norton County is found to be a fragmental impact breccia, consisting of a clastic matrix made mostly of crushed enstatite, into which are embedded a variety of mineral and lithic clasts of both igneous and impact melt origin. The Norton County precursor materials were igneous rocks, mostly plutonic orthopyroxenites, not grains formed by condensation from the solar nebula. The Mg-silicate-rich aubrite parent body experienced extensive melting and igneous differentiation, causing formation of diverse lithologies including dunites, plutonic orthopyroxenites, plutonic pyroxenites, and plagioclase-silica rocks. The presence of impact melt breccias (the microporphyritic clasts and the diopside-plagioclase-silica clast) of still different compositions further attests to the lithologic diversity of the aubrite parent body.

  18. Magmatic epidote and its petrologic significance.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zen, E.-A.; Hammarstrom, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three epidote-bearing tonalitic plutons from the North American Cordillera were studied in detail. These three plutons have close petrographic and chemical similarities. Epidote is always euhedral against biotite but shows highly embayed, vermiform contacts with plagioclase and quartz. Rounded to highly embayed hornblendes are enclosed in epidote as well as in magmatic plagioclase. The pistacite content of epidote, atomic Fe3+/(Fe3+ + Al), is approx 23-27%. These and other textural relations, the lack of alteration of minerals, and the involvement of epidote in flow banding show that the epidote is magmatic, crystallized later through reaction with hornblende in the presence of a melt phase. The observed relations agree with experimental data on crystallization of epidote from synthetic granodiorite at 8 kbar total P. Plutonic rocks bearing magmatic epidote must have formed under moderately high P, corresponding with lower crustal depth, under fairly oxidizing conditions.-L.di H.

  19. Evolution of major mineral compositions and trace element abundances during fractional crystallization of a model lunar composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    The evolution of major mineral compositions and trace element abundances during perfect fractional crystallization of a model lunar magma ocean was calculated. The minerals in the model lunar composition were olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and plagioclase. Lunar bulk composition data, major mineral/melt equilibria data, and trace element partition data were taken from published sources. The results show olivine beginning to crystallize at 1380 C. Approximately 50% of the system crystallizes as olivine. From 50 to 60% solidification, orthopyroxene crystallizes alone. During the final 40% solidification, Ca-rich clinopyroxene and plagioclase crystallize together. Various changes in composition of all these minerals are also noted during the process. Concomitant evolution of major element abundances in the melt is followed along with that of trace element abundances. Consequences of the results for constraints on some aspects of the composition of the lunar magma ocean and of the primitive moon are discussed.

  20. Mineralogic and petrologic investigation of pre-test core samples from the spent fuel test-climax

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F.J.; Qualheim, B.J.

    1983-12-01

    Pre-test samples obtained from just inside the perimeter of the canister emplacement holes of the Spent Fuel Test-Climax have been characterized by petrographic and microanalytical techniques. The primary quartz monzonite has undergone various degrees of hydrothermal alteration as a result of natural processes. Alteration is most apparent on primary plagioclase and biotite. The most common secondary phases on plagioclase are muscovite and calcite, while the most common secondary phases on biotite are epidote and chlorite. The major alteration zones encountered are localized along filled fractures, i.e. veins. The thickness and mineralogy of the alteration zones can be correlated with the vein mineralogy, becoming wider and more complex mineralogically when the veins contain calcite. 7 references, 10 figures, 4 tables.

  1. Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectra of Apollo 15 impact melt rocks by laser step-heating and their bearing on the history of lunar basin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalrymple, G. B.; Ryder, G.

    1993-07-01

    Results are reported on 26 high-resolution (16-51 steps) Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectra obtained on 12 Apollo-15 melt rocks of different composition using a continuous laser system on submg fragments of recrystallized melt and single-crystal plagioclase clasts from impact melt rocks collected at the Apennine Front where the Imbrium and Serenitatis basins intersect. A table is presented with the summary of the Ar-40/Ar-39 spectrum data, which represent 891 individual temperature step analyses. Also presented are 20 of the 26 age spectra along with their respective K/Ca plots. Melt rock fragments and plagioclase clasts from seven of the 12 samples analyzed yielded reproducible, intermediate-T Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum plateaus, which were interpreted as crystallization ages that represent the times of impact of bolides onto the lunar surface.

  2. On compositional variations among lunar anorthosites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, L. A.; Lindstrom, M. M.; Salpas, P. A.; Lindstrom, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Ferroan anorthosite (FAN) is the most abundant 'pristine' highlands igneous rock in the Apollo sample collection. The presence of substantial FAN in the lunar crust is one argument used in favor of a global magma ocean on which crystallizing plagioclase could float. Information about the composition of the proposed magma ocean or whatever liquids might have been parental to FAN is sparse. As a first step toward learning about the nature of the FAN parent and the processes by which FAN attained its compositional characteristics, attention is given to the concentrations for a number of major and trace elements whose behavior during magmatic processes is somewhat understood. Serious difficulties are found with both FAN and the Marcy anorthosite in interpreting incompatible trace element concentrations in the plagioclases or the whole rocks in terms of residues from parent liquids. A description is presented of the nature of these difficulties.

  3. Construction of Layered Mafic Intrusions by Repeated Emplacement of Crystal Mushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwal, Lewis

    2013-04-01

    A widely accepted physical model for the origin of Proterozoic massif type anorthosites (e.g. Nain, Rogaland, Adirondacks) involves emplacement of plagioclase-rich mushes that ascended to shallow crustal emplacement sites from deep (~Moho) staging chambers in which ~An50 crystals floated due to density relations at high pressure. Supporting evidence includes large (up to ~1 m) grain size, compositional homogeneity of plagioclase with variable Mg# (caused by trapped liquid effects), and protoclastic textures. Isotopic disequilibrium (Sr, Nd, Pb) between cumulus plagioclase and post-cumulus pyroxene result from progressive contamination with continental components. This is dramatically demonstrated at Nain (Labrador), where the anorthositic crystal mushes (~1.3 Ga) were emplaced into early Archean (~3.8 Ga) country rocks. High-Al, high-pressure orthopyroxene megacrysts are commonly dragged upward in feldspathic mushes to shallow emplacement sites, where they exsolved plagioclase lamellae. Can a similar model be applied to layered mafic intrusions (LMI)? Many LMI (e.g. Bushveld, Stillwater, Dufek, Duluth) contain thick horizons of anorthosite with compositionally uniform plagioclase, in some cases throughout >1000 m of stratigraphy. This is best interpreted as representing repeated emplacement of plagioclase-rich mushes from one or more deeper crystallizing magma chambers, although the depths of these sub-chambers in the lithosphere are as yet uncertain. In the Bushveld Complex (South Africa), where deep drill cores have allowed near-continuous measurements of mineral compositions and geophysical properties, the results reveal a subtle cyclicity, invisible in outcrops, over scales of 50 - 100 m, commonly associated with broad reversals in mineral compositional trends. Each of these can be interpreted as a blending zone involving a new addition of crystal-laden magma. Much of Bushveld stratigraphy, and that of other LMI contains plagioclase : pyroxene demonstrably

  4. Mush!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwal, L. D.

    2012-12-01

    Evidence for emplacement as crystal-laden mushes is abundant in mafic magma systems (i.e. products of broadly basaltic magmatism), including anorthosite complexes, layered mafic intrusions and a variety of sills and dikes. Some of the best examples involve the way feldspar becomes concentrated into anorthositic rocks. Proterozoic anorthosite massifs (e.g. Nain, Rogaland, Adirondacks), whose bulk compositions are characteristically hyperfeldspathic, are best interpreted as resulting from emplacement of plagioclase-rich mushes that ascended to shallow crustal emplacement sites from deep (~Moho) staging chambers in which ~An50 crystals floated due to density relations at high pressure. Supporting evidence includes large (up to ~1 m) grain size, compositional homogeneity of plagioclase with variable Mg# (caused by trapped liquid effects), and protoclastic textures. Isotopic disequilibrium between cumulus plagioclase and post-cumulus pyroxene result from progressive contamination with continental components. This is dramatically demonstrated at Nain (Labrador), where the anorthositic crystal mushes (~1.3 Ga) were emplaced into early Archean (~3.8 Ga) country rocks. High-Al, high-pressure orthopyroxene megacrysts are commonly dragged upward in feldspathic mushes to shallow emplacement sites, where they exsolved plagioclase lamellae (Bybee & Ashwal, this meeting). Archean calcic anorthosites (e.g. Fiskenaesset, W Greenland) and related sills, dikes and flows that contain homogeneous megacrysts up to 10s of cm across of ~An80 also must have formed by mush emplacement, although probably from shallower staging chambers in oceanic rather than continental crust. Many layered mafic intrusions (e.g. Bushveld, Stillwater, Dufek, Duluth) contain thick horizons of anorthosite in which plagioclase compositions are uniform, in some cases throughout >1000 m of stratigraphy. This is best interpreted as representing repeated emplacement of plagioclase-rich mushes from one or more deeper

  5. Quantification of Melt Inclusion Chemistry by LA-ICP-MS, EMP and SIMS: Advantages and Possible Limitations of Either Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettke, T.; Halter, W. E.; Aigner-Torres, M.; Heinrich, C. A.

    2002-05-01

    Laser-ablation inductively-coupled-plasma mass-spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) has unique advantages for chemical analysis of melt inclusions (MI), because it allows bulk compositional reconstitution of heterogeneous (crystallized) MI without prior thermal homogenization. Quantification is possible even if chemically complex minerals such as plagioclase or amphibole host the MI. We have analyzed glassy MI in plagioclase in one sample using EMP, SIMS (exposed MI) and 193 nm ArF Excimer LA-ICP-MS (unexposed MI), and rigorously compared the results in order to test the analytical accuracy of the data obtained by the various methods. We used a basalt sample, ALV-3352-7 (MORB from the East Pacific Rise, 17 - 19° S, STOWA cruise) with plagioclase phenocrysts ( ~10 vol-%, An82) in a glassy matrix. Plagioclase contains abundant glassy MI (10 - 300 μ m) some of which show a shrinkage bubble. The plagioclase phenocrysts, the matrix glass and the MI are chemically uniform. For the matrix glass, major element analyses by EMP ( ~0.1 to 50 wt-%) and trace-element analyses by SIMS ( ~2 to 100 ppm) are in excellent agreement (+/- 3% RSD on average) with LA-ICP-MS results obtained with a single 40-element menu. This demonstrates analytical accuracy of the three methods. Using MgO or FeO analyses from EMP of exposed MI as an internal standard for the quantification of LA-ICP-MS data of unexposed MI provides identical composition, hence the numerical re-integration of inlcusion compositions (Halter et al., 2002, Chem. Geol. 183, 63-86) is also accurate. Careful evaluation of the EMP data of exposed MI and matrix glass demonstrates significant chemical differences between the two; the glass in the MI apparently fractionated more plagioclase than did the matrix glass. Using MgO of the matrix glass as an internal standard for the quantification of MI analyzed by LA-ICP-MS (i.e., assuming that the MI and the matrix glass originally contained the same MgO concentration) indicates that

  6. Chemical aspects of agglutinate formation - Relationships between agglutinate composition and the composition of the bulk soil. [lunar surface composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Via, W. N.; Taylor, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    Attention is centered on the nature and intensity of geochemical fractionation accompanying agglutination of several size fractions of the immature Apollo-16 soil sample 67460, from North Ray Crater. The soil features coarse mean grain size about 150 microns, low (20 wt.%) magnetic agglutinate content, and a bimodal grain size distribution. The magnetic fraction included both agglutinates and magnetic non-agglutinates (glass-free microbreccias with 30-60 micron native FeNi grains hosted in a matrix of pyroxene, ilmenite, and olivine). The separation process residue contained nonmagnetic agglutinates with compositions near pure plagioclase. The magnetic agglutinate fraction appears selectively enriched in ferromagnesian elements to the partial exclusion of plagioclase elements. Agglutinate glass chemistry based solely on magnetic separation is deprecated on the basis of the results.

  7. Modal petrology of six soils from Apollo 16 double drive tube core 64002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, K. J.

    1982-01-01

    Petrographic data form six size fractions for six samples of Apollo 16 drive tube section 64002 show source rocks similar to those of core 60009. Analysis of modal data from the 64002 core show that the upper three and lowest core soils are mature and have similar maturation histories, while the two middle soils are submature and have histories that are similar to each other but unlike those from the aforementioned soils. In all of these soils, mixing has dominated over reworking, and appears to involve two mature soils distinguished by differing source rocks and an immature, plagioclase-rich soil which is correlated with larger clasts of chalky, friable breccia. These breccias and the plagioclase-rich soil are tentatively associated with the Descartes Formation.

  8. Experimental petrology and origin of rocks from the Descartes Highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Longhi, J.; Grove, T. L.; Stolper, E.; Hays, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Petrographic studies of Apollo 16 samples indicate that rocks 62295 and 68415 are crystallization products of highly aluminous melts. 60025 is a shocked, crushed and partially annealed plagioclase cumulate. 60315 is a recrystallized noritic breccia of disputed origin. 60335 is a feldspathic basalt filled with xenoliths and xenocrysts of anorthosite, breccia, and anorthite. The Fe/(Fe+Mg) of plagioclase appears to be a relative crystallization index. Low pressure melting experiments with controlled Po2 indicate that the igneous samples crystallized at oxygen fugacities well below the Fe/FeO buffer. Crystallization experiments at various pressures suggest that the 62295 and 68415 compositions were produced by partial or complete melting of lunar crustal materials, and not by partial melting of the deep lunar interior.

  9. Lunar ferroan anorthosites and mare basalt sources - The mixed connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, Graham

    1991-11-01

    Global overturn of a hot, gravitationally unstable lunar mantle immediately following the solidification of a magma ocean explains several characteristics of lunar petrology. Lunar mare basalt sources are inferred to be depleted in europium and alumina. These depletions are consensually attributed to complementary plagioclase floating from a magma ocean. However, in contrast to the mare basalt source parent magma, the ferroan anorthosite parent magma was more evolved by virtue of its lower Mg/Fe ratio and Ni abundances, although less evolved in its poverty of clinopyroxene constituents, flat rare earth pattern, and lower incompatible element abundances. The europium anomaly in mare sources is inferred to be present at 400 km depth, too deep to have been directly influenced by plagioclase crystallization. Massive overturning of the post-magma ocean mantle would have carried down clinopyroxene, ilmenite, and phases containing fractionated rare earths, europium anomalies, and some heat-producing radionuclides.

  10. Lunar ferroan anorthosites and mare basalt sources - The mixed connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham

    1991-01-01

    Global overturn of a hot, gravitationally unstable lunar mantle immediately following the solidification of a magma ocean explains several characteristics of lunar petrology. Lunar mare basalt sources are inferred to be depleted in europium and alumina. These depletions are consensually attributed to complementary plagioclase floating from a magma ocean. However, in contrast to the mare basalt source parent magma, the ferroan anorthosite parent magma was more evolved by virtue of its lower Mg/Fe ratio and Ni abundances, although less evolved in its poverty of clinopyroxene constituents, flat rare earth pattern, and lower incompatible element abundances. The europium anomaly in mare sources is inferred to be present at 400 km depth, too deep to have been directly influenced by plagioclase crystallization. Massive overturning of the post-magma ocean mantle would have carried down clinopyroxene, ilmenite, and phases containing fractionated rare earths, europium anomalies, and some heat-producing radionuclides.

  11. Mineralogical transformations in soils derived from mafic rocks in the North Carolina Piedmont

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, T. J. J.

    The chemical, morphological, and mineralogical properties of two Enon sandy loam (fine, mixed, thermic Ultic Hapludalfs) soil-saprolite profiles in the North Carolina Piedmont were characterized. The mineralogical transformations from the primary minerals in the unaltered parent rocks to secondary minerals in the saprolite and overlying soil were determined. The parent rock from the Enon profile near Albemarle, Stanly County, North Carolina was a medium-grained metagabbro with chlorite, hornblende, quartz, and calcic plagioclase feldspar as the dominant primary minerals. Chlorite weathered to regularly interstratified chlorite-vermiculite and regularly interstratified chloritesmectite. The regularly interstratified chloride-smectite alters to smectite and randomly interstratified chlorite-smectite. Particle size decreases with each mineral alteration. Hornblende weathers to smectite and goethite. Calcic plagioclase feldspar transforms to kaolinite in the saprolite and soil horizons. Quartz is relatively resistant to chemical weathering.

  12. Direct measurement of the combined effects of lichen, rainfall, and temperature onsilicate weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brady, P.V.; Dorn, R.I.; Brazel, A.J.; Clark, J.; Moore, R.B.; Glidewell, T.

    1999-01-01

    A key uncertainty in models of the global carbonate-silicate cycle and long-term climate is the way that silicates weather under different climatologic conditions, and in the presence or absence of organic activity. Digital imaging of basalts in Hawaii resolves the coupling between temperature, rainfall, and weathering in the presence and absence of lichens. Activation energies for abiotic dissolution of plagioclase (23.1 ?? 2.5 kcal/mol) and olivine (21.3 ?? 2.7 kcal/mol) are similar to those measured in the laboratory, and are roughly double those measured from samples taken underneath lichen. Abiotic weathering rates appear to be proportional to rainfall. Dissolution of plagioclase and olivine underneath lichen is far more sensitive to rainfall.

  13. Origin of Carbonate in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Krot, A. N.

    1998-01-01

    A significant argument advanced by McKay et al., in favor of a biogenic origin of the carbonates in ALH 84001 was that abiogenic origins - both low and high temperature - appeared to be less plausible. However, subsequent shock studies have suggested that impact heating may have modified carbonates. We inferred that plagioclase glass and rare silica grains formed from impact melts, and Raman spectroscopy confirmed that plagiociase had been melted at greater than 1200C, suggesting shock pressures exceeded 35-45 GPa. Morphological similarities between grains of plagioclase glass and irregularly shaped carbonates in fractures and the occurrence of intermixed grains in fractures suggested that carbonates may also have been shock heated so that a CO2-rich fluid was injected into cooler-fractured pyroxene during shock decompression causing crystallization in seconds.

  14. Rhyolite magma storage and ascent at Chaiten volcano: clues from pyroclast textures, mineralogy, and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, J. M.; Dingwell, D. B.; Fehr, T.

    2008-12-01

    We measured the composition, mineralogy, and textures of pyroclasts erupted in May 2008 from Chaitén volcano, Chile. We sampled a 20-cm-thick air-fall deposit located approximately 12 km ESE of the volcano. The deposit is a bedded mixture of fine ash to lapilli-sized (<5 cm) particles. The juvenile products consist of pumice, obsidian, and dense microcrystalline rock fragments. We analyzed the major element composition of the glass in the pumice and obsidian by EPMA. These analyses indicate that the juvenile material is a high-silica rhyolite containing about (in wt.%): 75.8 SiO2, 13.8 Al2O3; 0.1 TiO2; 1.3 Fe2O3; 0.3 MgO; 0.1 MnO; 1.4 CaO; 4.0 Na2O; 3.0 K2O. Pyroclasts contain plagioclase feldspar, biotite, magnetite, pyroxene, and rare hornblende. The total abundance of these phases is low (<1 vol%) and they can be divided into microlites (<20 μm) and microphenocrysts (~100-500 μm). Plagioclase microlites and microphenocrysts have distinct morphologies and compositions. The microlites are dominantly oligoclase ~An20-28, although some crystals are ternary feldspars (<10 mol% Or). The plagioclase microlites are unzoned and euhedral, with tablet- shaped morphologies. Plagioclase microphenocrysts are subhedral to anhedral, simply twinned, and reversely zoned with rims up to An55 and cores of about An40. These microphenocrysts have rounded edges suggesting resorption within the rhyolitic melt. The magnetite and hornblende occur solely in the microphenocryst population as separate euhedral crystals or in contact with the plagioclase microphenocrysts. Biotite occurs only in the microlite population, however it is ubiquitous, and its composition is intermediate to the annite and phlogopite endmembers. The crystal compositional and textural characteristics suggest that the microlite and microphenocryst assemblages formed under disparate conditions, ones that spanned magma storage and ascent to the fragmentation level. Experimental phase equilibrium studies show that at

  15. Magnetic beneficiation of highland and hi-Ti mare soils - Rock, mineral, and glassy components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Oder, Robin R.

    1990-01-01

    The exploitation of lunar soil can provide valuable raw materials for in situ resource utilization at a lunar base. A study of magnetic characterization was undertaken of three mare and two highland soils obtained from NASA. Beneficiation of mare and highland soils by sizing and magnetic separation can effectively concentrate the important components of the soils (e.g., ilmenite, native Fe, plagioclase, and aggluminates). As a soil matures and the impact melts consume additional minerals and rocks, the modal percentage of the minerals will decrease. The 'normative' percentage will become much greater than the modal percentage. Therefore, greater efficiency of separation can be realized with the proper selection of maturity of the soil, as well as by secondary grinding to further liberate specific minerals from lithic fragments (e.g., ilmenite and plagioclase).

  16. Effect of water on the composition of partial melts of greenstone and amphibolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, James S.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    1989-01-01

    Closed-system partial melts of hydrated, metamorphosed arc basalts and andesites (greenstones and amphibolites), where only water structurally bound in metamorphic minerals is available for melting (dehydration melting), are generally water-undersaturated, coexist with plagioclase-rich, anhydrous restites, and have compositions like island arc tonalites. In contrast, water-saturated melting at water pressures of 3 kilobars yields strongly peraluminous, low iron melts that coexist with an amphibole-bearing, plagioclase-poor restite. These melt compositions are unlike those of most natural silicic rocks. Thus, dehydration melting over a range of pressures in the crust of island arcs is a plausible mechanism for the petrogenesis of islands arc tonalite, whereas water-saturated melting at pressure of 3 kilobars and above is not.

  17. Origin of high-alumina basalt, andesite, and dacite magmas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, W.

    1964-01-01

    The typical volcanic rocks of most island arcs and eugeosynclines, and of some continental environments, are basalt, andesite, and dacite, of high alumina content. The high-alumina basalt differs from tholeiitic basalt primarily in having a greater content of the components of calcic plagioclase. Laboratory data indicate that in the upper mantle, below the level at which the basaltic component of mantle rock is transformed by pressure to eclogite or pyroxenite, the entire basaltic portion probably is melted within a narrow temperature range, but that above the level of that transformation plagioclase is melted selectively before pyroxene over a wide temperature range. The broad spectrum of high-alumina magmas may represent widely varying degrees of partial melting above the transformation level, whereas narrow-spectrum tholeiite magma may represent more complete melting beneath it.

  18. Origin of High-Alumina Basalt, Andesite, and Dacite Magmas.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, W

    1964-10-30

    The typical volcanic rocks of most island arcs and eugeosynclines, and of some continental environments, are basalt, andesite, and dacite, of high alumina content. The high-alumina basalt differs from tholeiitic basalt primarily in having a greater content of the components of calcic plagioclase. Laboratory data indicate that in the upper mantle, below the level at which the basaltic component of mantle rock is transformed by pressure to eclogite or pyroxenite, the entire basaltic portion probably is melted within a narrow temperature range, but that above the level of that transformation plagioclase is melted selectively before pyroxene over a wide temperature range. The broad spectrum of high-alumina magmas may represent widely varying degrees of partial melting above the transformation level, whereas narrow-spectrum tholeiite magma may represent more complete melting beneath it. PMID:17794034

  19. Origin of Miocene andesite and dacite in the Goldfield-Superstition volcanic province, central Arizona: Hybrids of mafic and silicic magma mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, R. V.; Johnson, Kelly G.

    2016-07-01

    The Miocene Goldfield-Superstition volcanic province (G-SVP), ∼8000 km2 in central Arizona, is composed largely of silicic pyroclastic rocks and lavas, and smaller volumes of alkalic basalt and intermediate-composition lavas. Volcanism began ∼20.5 Ma as sparse rhyolitic and mainly basaltic lavas followed by intermediate lavas, lasting until ∼19 Ma. At that time, ∼1 m.y. of silicic eruptions began, creating most of the G-SVP. Petrologic studies are available for basalts and some for silicic rocks, but petrologic/geochemical information is sparse for intermediate-composition lavas. These latter, andesites and dacites, are the focus of this study, in which we present the processes and sources responsible for their origins. Goldfield-Superstition andesites and dacites have SiO2 ∼56-70 wt.% and Na2O + K2O that qualifies some as trachy-andesite and -dacite. A prominent petrographic feature is plagioclase-phyric texture (∼11-30 vol% plagioclase), where oligoclase-andesine phenocrysts have cores surrounded by corroded, or reacted, zones, mantled by higher An% plagioclase. Where corroded zones are absent, margins are etched, curved, or embayed. Groundmass plagioclase is labradorite, also more calcic than the phenocrysts. Other minerals are quartz (subrounded; embayed), clinopyroxene, amphibole, biotite, and rare titanite and zircon. A salient compositional characteristic that provides insight to andesite-dacite origins with respect to other G-SVP rocks is revealed when using SiO2 as an index. Namely, abundances of many incompatible elements, mainly HFSE and REE, decrease over the low to high SiO2 range (i.e., abundances are lower in dacites than in co-eruptive andesites and underlying alkalic basalts). As examples: G-SVP basalts have ∼50-70 ppm La, and andesites-dacites have ∼59-22 ppm La; for Zr, basalts have ∼225-170 ppm, but most andesites-dacites have ∼180-50; for Y, basalts >20 ppm, andesites-dacites ∼18-9 ppm. To understand these trends of lower

  20. Petrology and geochemistry of mafic and ultramafic cumulates occurring as xenoliths in volcanic rocks from Polish part of Central European Volcanic Province.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajek, Michał; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2015-04-01

    Mafic xenoliths coexisting with the peridotitic ones in rocks from Polish part of Cenozoic European Volcanic Province have been scarcely examined. (Bakun-Czubarow and Białowolska, 2003, Mineralogical Society of Poland- Spec. Pap. and references therein; Matusiak, 2006, Min. Polonica- Spec. Pap.; Puziewicz et al., 2011, JoP). In this study we present new results on mafic and ultramafic xenolithic rocks from the Wilcza Góra, Winna Góra, Góra Świątek, Mnisia Górka and Grodziec volcanic rocks in the Złotoryja-Jawor Volcanic Complex. The studied xenoliths are either plagioclase-free (clinopyroxenite, websterite) or plagioclase-bearing (anorthosite, gabbro, olivine-bearing gabbro and norite). Both the types may occur in the same volcanic rock. The cumulative xenoliths are smaller than peridotitic ones, blackish and show clear cumulative, coarse grained textures. Beside the rock-forming phases, the xenoliths occasionally contain spinel, sulfides and amphibole. Usually clinopyroxene grains occurring in gabbros are strongly corroded or disintegrated, while other phases are well-preserved. Contacts between xenolith and host volcanic rock are usually sharp with subhedral crystals of clinopyroxene growing at the xenolith surface. The mineral grains are usually zoned and chemical equilibrium between phases is scarce. Clinopyroxene in plagioclase-free rocks has composition of diopside with occasionally elevated Al, Ti and Cr contents. It's mg# varies from 0.89 to 0.79. It is slightly to moderately enriched in LREE; the REE patterns are concave, and the normalized values vary significantly between localities. It shows negative Sr anomaly, depth of Ti anomaly is variable. Orthopyroxene is Al-rich enstatite with mg# varying from 0.85 down to 0.75. Orthopyroxene in websterites is LREE depleted and show strong positive Ti and Zr-Hf anomalies. Opaques are ilmenite - Ti-magnetite solid solution and/or sulfides Clinopyroxene forming plagioclase-bearing rocks also has composition

  1. In situ laser ablation ICP-MS analyses of dimict diogenites: Further evidence for harzburgitic and orthopyroxenitic lithologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Andrew W.; McSween, Harry Y.; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2013-06-01

    Trace element concentrations in pyroxene, plagioclase, and olivine were measured in five diogenite breccias previously identified as containing distinct harzburgitic (ol+opx) and orthopyroxenitic (opx) lithologies (dimict). Three samples show two distinct populations of pyroxene trace element abundances, supporting their classification as dimict. These three meteorites show increases in Y, Yb, and HREE concentrations from harzburgitic to orthopyroxenitic pyroxenes, supporting the hypothesis that the lithologies are related through fractional crystallization whereby harzburgite olivine and pyroxene crystallized from the magma first followed by orthopyroxenite pyroxene. Depletions in LREE and Eu concentrations in the orthopyroxenitic lithology are most likely due to equilibration with LREE and Eu-rich phases, likely plagioclase, which is found primarily in that lithology. Two samples do not show evidence supporting a dimict classification. Large pyroxene trace element variation in one sample indicates that it is polymict, while uniform trace element distribution in the other suggests that it may be a monomict breccia.

  2. On the chondrite-achondrite transition - Mineralogy and chemistry of Yamato 74160 (LL7)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, H.; Huston, T. J.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Petrology, mineralogic properties and contents of major elements and trace elements Ag, Au, Bi, Cd, Co, Cs, Ga, In, Rb, Se, Te, Tl, U and Zn are reported (determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis) in Yamato 74160, interpreted as an LL7 chondrite. All properties are consistent with this meteorite having been recrystallized and partially melted locally once at temperatures well above 1090 C under conditions such that some minerals (e.g. plagioclase, euhedral pyroxene, tetrataenite) grew from melt pockets and siderophilic and chalcophilic elements were lost by extraction into eutectic melt that drained away. Inhomogeneous plagioclase compositions and mobile element loss suggest shock as the most likely heat source. Yamato 74160, while inferentially chondritic, is a larval achondrite: even higher temperatures and longer times would have been required to cause the separations necessary to transform it to an identifiable achondrite type.

  3. Role of replacement in the genesis of anorthosite in the Boehls Butte area, Idaho.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hietanen, A.

    1986-01-01

    In this area in N Idaho, three large and numerous small lenses of layered to massive anorthosite consisting of two, and locally three, types of plagioclase with minor hornblende and mica occur in aluminium silicate-rich garnet mica schist. In most of this anorthosite, megacrysts of andesine with bytownite inclusions are embedded in a fine-grained groundmass of bytownite or anorthite; locally, labradorite occurs rather than andesine. Some labradorite laths show Carlsbad twinning and rims of andesine around anorthite inclusions. Along the contacts, lenses of fine-grained bytownite anorthosite with some hornblende or garnet and quartz are common. These lenses could represent calcic parent rocks converted to two-plagioclase rocks by partial replacement of bytownite by andesine. -R.A.H.

  4. Rare earth element evidence for the petrogenesis of the banded series of the Stillwater Complex, Montana, and its anorthosites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loferski, P.J.; Arculus, R.J.; Czamanske, G.K.

    1994-01-01

    A rare earth element (REE) study was made by isotope-dilution mass spectrometry of plagioclase separates from a variety of cumulates stratigraphically spanning the Banded series of the Stillwater Complex, Montana. Evaluation of parent liquid REE patterns, calculated on the basis of published plagioclase-liquid partition coefficients, shows that the range of REE ratios is too large to be attributable to fractionation of a single magma type. At least two different parental melts were present throughout the Banded series. This finding supports hypotheses of previous workers that the Stillwater Complex formed from two different parent magma types, designated the anorthosite- or A-type liquid and the ultramafic- or U-type liquid. -from Authors

  5. Feldspathic rocks on Mars: Compositional constraints from infrared spectroscopy and possible formation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, A. Deanne; Nekvasil, Hanna

    2015-04-01

    Rare feldspar-dominated surfaces on Mars were previously reported based on near-infrared (NIR) spectral data and were interpreted to consist of anorthosite or felsic rocks. Using thermal infrared (TIR) data over the feldspar detections with the largest areal extent in Nili Patera and Noachis Terra, we rule out felsic interpretations. Basaltic or anorthositic compositions are consistent with TIR measurements, but the geologic contexts for these regions do not support a plutonic origin. Laboratory NIR spectral measurements demonstrate that large plagioclase crystals (>~840 µm) can be detected in mixtures with as much as 50 vol % mafics, which is higher than the previously stated requirement of no more than 15% mafics. Thus, anorthositic or felsic interpretations need not be invoked for all NIR-based feldspar detections. Plagioclase-enriched basaltic eruptive products can be formed from Martian basalts through partial crystallization at the base of a thick crust, followed by low-pressure crystallization of the residual liquids.

  6. Lunar ferroan anorthosite 60025 - Petrology and chemistry of mafic lithologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, O. B.; Mcgee, J. J.; Lindstrom, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    Eleven splits from the mafic-mineral-rich part of anorthosite 60025 were studied in order to establish the exact nature and causes of compositional variations in the minerals of lunar ferroan anorthosites. All splits were analyzed by INAA, and five were studied intensively by petrologic techniques. All splits were found to have similar cataclastic textures and show textural evidence of at least two episodes of deformation. The whole-rock split contains mafic minerals having a wide range of compositions and is probably polymict. It is suggested that the rare-earth patterns for all splits can be duplicated safactorily, assuming that the equilibrium liquids had flat, or nearly flat, chondrite-normalized rare-earth patterns. The plagioclases in all splits were found to be identical. Data obtained indicate that in ferroan anorthosites An content in plagioclase and mg' of associated mafic minerals are not strongly correlated.

  7. Flow vorticity in Zhangbaling transpressional attachment zone, SE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Teyssier, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Plagioclase porphyroclasts with well-preserved idiomorphic shapes and zoning, and showing limited clast interaction, are ubiquitous in the flat-lying Zhangbaling schist that is exposed east of the Tan-Lu fault in southeast China. Plagioclase porphyroclasts define rigid particles whose distribution be related to the kinematic vorticity of the schist using the methods of porphyroclast hyperbolic distribution (PHD) and modified Rf/ϕ (Passchier/Wallis plot). The kinematic vorticity numbers calculated from this approach range from Wk = 0.72 to 0.82, increasing progressively from south to north along the Zhangbaling belt. Such a Wk distribution indicates that the Zhangbaling schist was deformed uniformly under simple-shear dominated general shear, and that the Zhangbaling ductile crust experienced relatively even crustal thinning deformation. The subhorizontal Zhangbaling schist is considered a mid-crustal attachment zone that coupled the rigid upper crust to a subvertical, wrench shear zone in the lower crust.

  8. The lunar magma ocean - A transient lunar phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minear, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    The time required for the solidification of a lunar magma ocean is considered. In the absence of a thermal boundary crust, heat loss is by radiation and the ocean will solidify in a few decades. However, only a few millimeters of crust would effectively limit radiation. The current investigation has the objective to present estimates of conduction boundary (crust) thickness based on several models of the mechanism of crustal formation. Three different models for estimating conduction boundary layer thickness are discussed. They are based on the formation of a chill margin, a plagioclase flotation layer, and a layer which is continually destroyed by meteorite impacts and regrows by conductive heat loss. Based on these models, the maximum solidification time for a 200 km thick ocean is about 100 million years. A more probable solidification time based on a plagioclase flotation crust model is about 60 million years.

  9. Compositional evolution of nepheline in alkaline rocks from Messum Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blancher, Simon; D'Arco, Philippe; Fonteilles, Michel; Pascal, Marie-Lola

    2010-05-01

    Nepheline can be described as a four end-member solid solution between Ne (NaAlSiO4), Ks (KAlSiO4), An (Ca1/2□1/2AlSiO4) and Qz (□Si2O4), where □ is a vacancy in the structure. Few studies have explored its compositional variations, considered by most authors to be small and hardly related to magmatic evolution. In the Messum complex, an alkaline silica-undersaturated series is well exposed from theralites to nepheline-diorites, nepheline-monzonites and nepheline-syenites. This wide range of nepheline-rocks allows to follow an evolution of nepheline composition through the evolution of parageneses. In theralites, olivine, titanaugite and plagioclase are cumulus phases on which pargasite grows. Then, nepheline and diopside appear at the expense of plagioclase and pargasite. In nepheline-diorites, pargasite replaces olivine and titanaugite, and plagioclase becomes more sodic. Next, in nepheline-syenites, alkali feldspar appears, plagioclase then pargasite disappear, and diopside becomes enriched in acmite-content up to 15%. Nepheline is present at all stages of this magmatic evolution. Its own evolution can be correlated with that of feldspars. In theralites, nephelines in equilibrium with a calcic plagioclase are calcic (15% An). The An-content decreases progressively with the An-content of plagioclase, down to 2% in plagioclase-free rocks. Variations in the Ks end-member are small, in the range 10 to 16%, first increasing until alkali feldspar appears, then decreasing as the alkali feldspar evolves towards albite. Qz and Ne contents increase regularly from theralites (3 and 68%, respectively ) to syenites (7 and 75%). This nepheline-series is crosscutted by more alkaline dykes, nephelinites and peralkaline syenites. In nephelinites, the paragenesis resembles that of theralites, except for the absence of plagioclase. Peralkaline syenites contain acmite and unmixed alkali-feldspar. These chemical/mineralogical differences are accompanied by differences in the

  10. Mafic granulite rheology: Implications for a weak continental lower crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. F.; Zhang, J. F.; Jin, Z. M.; Green, H. W.

    2012-11-01

    The “jelly sandwich” model of continental rheology, long the consensus model, has recently been challenged. The controversy is based on the rheology of mafic granulite that is thought to make up most of the lower continental crust. However, because of technical issues in experimental rock deformation, there are very few data on this problem. Here we report the rheology and fabrics of a reconstituted, fine-grained nominally dry (i.e., no hydrous mineral) mafic granulite (57% plagioclase+24% clinopyroxene+14% orthopyroxene+5% opaque minerals, 0.16-0.28 wt% H2O) deformed at 1.1-1.2 GPa pressure in a modified Griggs-type deformation apparatus. The rheology of this mafic granulite can be described by the constitutive equation of ε˙=Aσexp(-(244±35 kJ/mol)/RT) where ε˙ is in s-1, σ in MPa, T in Kelvin and A=10-2.0±1.6 MPa-3.2 s-1. Our results provide new experimental evidence in support of the “jelly sandwich” lithosphere strength model and imply that mafic granulite with a moderate amount of water (>0.05-0.08 wt% H2O) is likely to be a weak layer in the lithosphere. Both pyroxenes and plagioclase develop pronounced fabrics in responding to axial deformation. The deformation mechanism is dislocation creep with (100)[001], and (001)[100]/(010)[100] being the dominant slip systems for pyroxenes and plagioclase, respectively. The low strength of mafic granulite is ascribed largely to the significant weakening effect of dissolved water in pyroxenes and plagioclase. A weak continental lower crust has many important implications for geodynamics of crust-mantle interactions, such as lower crust channel flow and delamination.

  11. Kinetic and mineralogic controls on the evolution of groundwater chemistry and 87Sr/86Sr in a sandy silicate aquifer, northern Wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullen, T.D.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Kendall, C.

    1996-01-01

    Substantial flowpath-related variability of 87Sr/86Sr is observed in groundwaters collected from the Trout Lake watershed of northern Wisconsin. In the extensive shallow aquifer composed of sandy glacial outwash, groundwater is recharged either by seepage from lakes or by precipitation that infiltrates the inter-lake uplands. 87Sr/86Sr of groundwater derived mainly as seepage from a precipitation-dominated lake near the head of the watershed decreases with progressive water chemical evolution along its flowpath due primarily to enhanced dissolution of relatively unradiogenic plagioclase. In contrast, 87Sr/86Sr of groundwater derived mainly from precipitation that infiltrates upland areas is substantially greater than that of precipitation collected from the watershed, due to suppression of plagioclase dissolution together with preferential leaching of Sr from radiogenic phases such as K-feldspar and biotite. The results of a column experiment that simulated the effects of changing residence time of water in the aquifer sand indicate that mobile waters obtain relatively unradiogenic Sr, whereas stagnant waters obtain relatively radiogenic Sr. Nearly the entire range of strontium-isotope composition observed in groundwaters from the watershed was measured in the experimental product waters. The constant mobility of water along groundwater recharge flowpaths emanating from the lakes promotes the dissolution of relatively unradiogenic plagioclase, perhaps due to effective dispersal of clay mineral nuclei resulting from dissolution reactions. In contrast, episodic stagnation in the unsaturated zone along the upland recharge flowpaths suppresses plagioclase dissolution, perhaps due to accumulation of clay mineral nuclei on its reactive surfaces. Differences in redox conditions along these contrasting flowpaths probably enhance the observed differences in strontium isotope behavior. This study demonstrates that factors other than the calculated state of mineral saturation

  12. Isotopic composition of surface-correlated chromium in Apollo 16 lunar soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitts, B. Kathleen; Podosek, Frank A.; Nichols, Robert H.; Brannon, Joyce C.; Ramezani, Jahan; Korotev, Randy L.; Jolliff, Brad L.

    2003-12-01

    We have analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) the isotopic composition of Cr in five progressive etches of size-sorted plagioclase grains separated from lunar soils 60601 and 62281. Aliquots of the etch solutions were spiked for isotopic dilution (ID) analysis of Cr and Ca. The Ca ID data indicate that the initial etch steps represent dissolution of an average 0.1 to 0.2 μm depth from the grain surfaces, the approximate depth expected for implanted solar wind. The Cr/Ca ratio in the initial etches is several fold higher than that expected for bulk plagioclase composition, but in subsequent etches decreases to approach the bulk value. This indicates a source of Cr extrinsic to the plagioclase grains, surface-correlated and resident in the outermost fraction of a μm, which we provisionally identify as solar wind Cr. The surface-correlated Cr is isotopically anomalous and by conventional TIMS data reduction has approximately 1 permil excess 54Cr and half as great excess 53Cr. In successive etches, as the Cr/Ca ratio decreases and approaches the bulk plagioclase value, the magnitude of the apparent anomalies decreases approaching normal composition. If these results do indeed characterize the solar wind, then either the solar wind is enriched in Cr due to spallation in the solar atmosphere, or the Earth and the various parent bodies of the meteorites are isotopically distinct from the Sun and must have formed from slightly different mixes of presolar materials. Alternative interpretations include the possibility that the anomalous Cr is meteoritic rather than solar or that the observed (solar) Cr is normal except for a small admixture of spallation Cr generated on the Moon. We consider these latter possibilities less likely than the solar wind interpretation. However, they cannot be eliminated and remain working hypotheses.

  13. Textural history of recent basaltic-andesites and plutonic inclusions from Merapi volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zwan, Froukje M.; Chadwick, Jane P.; Troll, Valentin R.

    2013-07-01

    Mt. Merapi in Central Java is one of the most active stratovolcanoes on Earth and is underlain by a multistage plumbing system. Crystal size distribution analyses (CSD) were carried out on recent Merapi basaltic-andesites and co-eruptive magmatic and plutonic inclusions to characterise the crystallisation processes that operate during storage and ascent and to obtain information on respective time scales. The basaltic-andesites exhibit log-linear, kinked-upwards CSD curves for plagioclase and clinopyroxene that can be separated into two main textural populations. Large plagioclase phenocrysts (≥1.6 mm) make up one population, but correspond to crystals with variable geochemical composition and reflect a period of crystal growth at deep to mid-crustal levels. This population was subsequently influenced by crystal accumulation and the onset of crustal assimilation, including the incorporation of high-Ca skarn-derived xenocrysts. Textural re-equilibration is required for these crystals to form a single population in CSD. A second episode of crystal growth at shallower levels is represented by chemically homogenous plagioclase crystals <1.6 mm in size. Crustal assimilation is indicated by, for example, oxygen isotopes and based on the CSD data, crystallisation combined with contamination is likely semi-continuous in these upper crustal storage chambers. The CSD data observed in the basaltic-andesite samples are remarkably consistent and require a large-volume steady state magmatic system beneath Merapi in which late textural equilibration plays a significant role. Plagioclase CSDs of co-eruptive magmatic and plutonic inclusions may contain a third crystal population (<1 mm) not found in the lavas. This third population has probably formed from enhanced degassing of portions of basaltic-andesite magma at shallow crustal levels which resulted in increased crystallinity and basaltic-andesite mush inclusions. A suite of coarse plutonic inclusions is also present that

  14. Experimental constraints on the origin of pahoehoe "cicirara" lavas at Mt. Etna Volcano (Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetere, F.; Mollo, S.; Giacomoni, P. P.; Iezzi, G.; Coltorti, M.; Ferlito, C.; Holtz, F.; Perugini, D.; Scarlato, P.

    2015-05-01

    We present results from phase equilibria experiments conducted on the most primitive pahoehoe "cicirara" trachybasaltic lava flow ever erupted at Mt. Etna Volcano. This lava is characterized by a pahoehoe morphology in spite of its high content of phenocrysts and microphenocrysts (>40 vol%) with the occurrence of centimetre-sized plagioclases (locally named cicirara for their chick-pea-like appearance). Our experiments have been performed at 400 MPa, 1100-1150 °C and using H2O and CO2 concentrations corresponding to the water-undersaturated crystallization conditions of Etnean magmas. Results show that olivine does not crystallize from the melt, whereas titanomagnetite is the liquidus phase followed by clinopyroxene or plagioclase as a function of melt-water concentration. This mineralogical feature contrasts with the petrography of pahoehoe cicirara lavas suggesting early crystallization of olivine and late formation of titanomagnetite after plagioclase and/or in close association with clinopyroxene. The lack of olivine produces MgO-rich melt compositions that do not correspond to the evolutionary behaviour of cicirara magmas. Moreover, in a restricted thermal path of 50 °C and over the effect of decreasing water concentrations, we observe abundant plagioclase and clinopyroxene crystallization leading to trace element enrichments unlikely for natural products. At the same time, the equilibrium compositions of our mineral phases are rather different from those of natural cicirara phenocrysts and microphenocrysts. The comparison between our water-undersaturated data and those from previous degassing experiments conducted on a similar Etnean trachybasaltic composition demonstrates that pahoehoe cicirara lavas originate from crystal-poor, volatile-rich magmas undergoing abundant degassing and cooling in the uppermost part of the plumbing system and at subaerial conditions where most of the crystallization occurs after the development of pahoehoe surface crusts.

  15. The Effects of Oxygen Fugacity on the Crystallization Sequence and Cr Partitioning of an Analog Y-98 Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, A. S.; Burger, P. V.; Le, Loan; Papike, J. J.; Jones, J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2013-01-01

    Interpreting the relationship between "enriched" olivine-phyric shergottites (e.g. NWA 1068/1110) and the "enriched" pyroxene-plagioclase shergottites (e.g. Shergotty, Los Angeles) is problematic. Symes et al. [1] and Shearer et al. [2]) proposed that the basaltic magma that crystallized to produce olivine-phyric shergottite NWA 1068/1110 could produce pyroxene-plagioclase shergottites with additional fractional crystallization. However, additional observations indicate that the relationship among the enriched shergottites may be more complex [1-3]. For example, Herd [3] concluded that some portion of the olivine megacrysts in this meteorite was xenocrystic in origin, seemingly derived from more reduced basaltic liquids. This conclusion may imply that a variety of complex processes such as magma mixing, entrainment, and assimilation may play important roles in the petrologic history of these meteorites. It is therefore possible that these processes have obscured the petrogenetic linkages between the enriched olivine-phyric shergottites and the pyroxene-plagioclase shergottites. As a first order step in attempting to unravel these petrologic complexities, this study focuses upon exploring the effect of fO2 on the crystallization history for an analog primitive shergottite liquid composition (Y98). Results from this work will provide a basis for reconstructing the record of fO2 in shergottites, its effect on both mineral chemistries and valence state partitioning, and a means for examining the role of crystallization on the petrologic linkages between olivine-phyric and pyroxene-plagioclase shergottites. A companion abstract [4] explores the behavior of V over this range of fO2.

  16. Microelectrophoresis of selected mineral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, B. J.; Tipps, R. W.; Alexander, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Particle mobilities of ilmenite, labradorite plagioclase, enstatite pyroxene, and olivine were measured with a Rank microelectrophoresis system to evaluate indicated mineral separability. Sodium bicarbonate buffer suspension media with and without additives (0.0001 M DTAB and 5 percent v/v ethylene glycol) were used to determine differential adsorption by mineral particles and modification of relative mobilities. Good separability between some minerals was indicated; additives did not enhance separability.

  17. Rare Earth Element Partitioning in Lunar Minerals: An Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McIntosh, E. C.; Rapp, J. F.; Draper, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    The partitioning behavior of rare earth elements (REE) between minerals and melts is widely used to interpret the petrogenesis and geologic context of terrestrial and extra-terrestrial samples. REE are important tools for modelling the evolution of the lunar interior. The ubiquitous negative Eu anomaly in lunar basalts is one of the main lines of evidence to support the lunar magma ocean (LMO) hypothesis, by which the plagioclase-rich lunar highlands were formed as a flotation crust during differentiation of a global-scale magma ocean. The separation of plagioclase from the mafic cumulates is thought to be the source of the Eu depletion, as Eu is very compatible in plagioclase. Lunar basalts and volcanic glasses are commonly depleted in light REEs (LREE), and more enriched in heavy REEs (HREE). However, there is very little experimental data available on REE partitioning between lunar minerals and melts. In order to interpret the source of these distinctive REE patterns, and to model lunar petrogenetic processes, REE partition coefficients (D) between lunar minerals and melts are needed at conditions relevant to lunar processes. New data on D(sub REE) for plagioclase, and pyroxenes are now available, but there is limited available data for olivine/melt D(sub REE), particularly at pressures higher than 1 bar, and in Fe-rich and reduced compositions - all conditions relevant to the lunar mantle. Based on terrestrial data, REE are highly incompatible in olivine (i.e. D much less than 1), however olivine is the predominant mineral in the lunar interior, so it is important to understand whether it is capable of storing even small amounts of REE, and how the REEs might be fractionatied, in order to understand the trace element budget of the lunar interior. This abstract presents results from high-pressure and temperature experiments investigating REE partitioning between olivine and melt in a composition relevant to lunar magmatism.

  18. Geology, age, and tectonic setting of the Cretaceous Sliderock Mountain Volcano, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Bray, E.A.; Harlan, Stephen S.

    1998-01-01

    The Sliderock Mountain stratovolcano, part of the Upper Cretaceous continental magmatic arc in southwestern Montana, consists of volcaniclastic strata and basaltic andesite lava flows. An intrusive complex represents the volcano's solidified magma chamber. Compositional diversity within components of the volcano appears to reflect evolution via about 50 percent fractional crystallization involving clinopyroxene and plagioclase. 40Ar/39Ar indicate that the volcano was active about 78?1 Ma.

  19. Pb isotopic heterogeneity in basaltic phenocrysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, Julia G.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2002-06-01

    The Pb isotopic compositions of phenocrystic phases in young basaltic lavas have been investigated using the Getty-DePaolo method (Getty S. J. and DePaolo D. J. [1995] Quaternary geochronology by the U-Th-Pb method. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 59, 3267 3272), which allows for the resolution of small isotopic differences. Phenocryst, matrix, and whole rock analyses were made on samples from the 17 Myr-old Imnaha basalts of the Columbia River Group, a zero-age MORB from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and a ca. 260 kyr-old tholeiite from Mount Etna. Plagioclase feldspar phenocrysts have low-(U, Th)/Pb, and in each sample the plagioclase has significantly lower 206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb values than whole rock, matrix, and magnetite-rich separates. The Pb isotopic contrast between plagioclase and matrix/whole rock is found in three samples with varying grain sizes (0.5 2 cm for the Imnaha basalt and MORB and <1 mm for the Etna sample) from different tectonic settings, suggesting that these results are not unique. The isotopic contrasts are only slightly smaller in magnitude than the variations exhibited by whole rock samples from the region. The Imnaha basalts also have Sr isotopic heterogeneity evident only in plagioclase phenocrysts, but the MORB and Etna lavas do not. The isotopic heterogeneities reflect magma mixing, and indicate that isotopically diverse magmas were mixed together just prior to eruption. The results reinforce indications from melt inclusion studies that magma source region isotopic heterogeneities have large amplitudes at short length scales, and that the isotopic variations imparted to the magmas are not entirely homogenized during segregation and transport processes.

  20. Genesis of highland basalt breccias - A view from 66095

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, J. R., Jr.; Taylor, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe and defocused beam analyses of the lunar highland breccia sample 66095 show it consists of a fine-grained subophitic matrix containing a variety of mineral and lithic clasts, such as intergranular and cataclastic ANT, shocked and unshocked plagioclase, and basalts. Consideration of the chemistries of both matrix and clasts provides a basis for a qualitative three-component mixing model consisting of an ANT plutonic complex, a Fra Mauro basalt, and minor meteoric material.

  1. Minor and trace elements in some meteoritic minerals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. O., Jr.; Mason, B.

    1973-01-01

    Despite the information available (Mason, 1971) on trace elements in different types of meteorites, relatively little is known about the distribution of these elements among the individual mineral phases. The mineral phases including olivine, orthopyroxene, clinipyroxene, troilite, nickel-iron, plagioclase, chromite, and the phosphates were separated from several meteorites. The purified minerals were analyzed for trace and minor elements by spark source mass spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis. The elements are classified as siderophile, lithophile, and chalcophile.

  2. Mantle rock exposures at oceanic core complexes along mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciazela, Jakub; Koepke, Juergen; Dick, Henry J. B.; Muszynski, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    The mantle is the most voluminous part of the Earth. However, mantle petrologists usually have to rely on indirect geophysical methods or on material found ex situ. In this review paper, we point out the in-situ existence of oceanic core complexes (OCCs), which provide large exposures of mantle and lower crustal rocks on the seafloor on detachment fault footwalls at slow-spreading ridges. OCCs are a common structure in oceanic crust architecture of slow-spreading ridges. At least 172 OCCs have been identified so far and we can expect to discover hundreds of new OCCs as more detailed mapping takes place. Thirty-two of the thirty-nine OCCs that have been sampled to date contain peridotites. Moreover, peridotites dominate in the plutonic footwall of 77% of OCCs. Massive OCC peridotites come from the very top of the melting column beneath ocean ridges. They are typically spinel harzburgites and show 11.3-18.3% partial melting, generally representing a maximum degree of melting along a segment. Another key feature is the lower frequency of plagioclase-bearing peridotites in the mantle rocks and the lower abundance of plagioclase in the plagioclase-bearing peridotites in comparison to transform peridotites. The presence of plagioclase is usually linked to impregnation with late-stage melt. Based on the above, OCC peridotites away from segment ends and transforms can be treated as a new class of abyssal peridotites that differ from transform peridotites by a higher degree of partial melting and lower interaction with subsequent transient melt.

  3. Shoshonitic volcanism in the Northern Mariana Arc: 1. Mineralogic and major and trace element characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomer, Sherman H.; Stern, Robert J.; Fisk, Elisha; Geschwind, C. H.

    1989-04-01

    Petrographic and geochemical characteristics of samples dredged from 23 submarine volcanic edifices in the northern Mariana and southern Volcano arcs define two distinct rock series. The central and northern Mariana Arc (to 23°N) and the northern Volcano Arc (north of Iwo Jima) are characterized by plagioclase-clinopyroxene-orthopyroxene-titantomagnetite bearing subalkaline rocks, including both low-K and medium-K series. The northern Mariana Arc and southern Volcano Arc, from 23°N to Iwo Jima, are erupting rocks of a shoshonitic series with phenocrysts of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, olivine, and biotite. These rocks are less saturated than those of the subalkaline provinces and are substantially enriched in Ba (400-900 ppm), Sr (600-1000 ppm), K2O (1-4.5%), and K2O/Na2O (0.4-1.2) relative to the subalkaline lavas. Ba/Y and Ba/Zr increase by a factor of 3 to 4 in the shoshonitic rocks, but K/Rb, Ba/Sr, and K/Ba are relatively constant throughout the arc. There is no relationship between degree of enrichment and volcano volume or degree of fractionation: seamounts and islands within each province have the same range of compositions. Much of the intra-edifice variation in lava composition can be modeled by 10-70% crystallization of plagioclase and clinopyroxene, with smaller amounts of olivine, orthopyroxene, and titanomagnetite, or by accumulation of 10-40% phenocrysts, dominantly plagioclase. The differences between parental lavas in the alkalic and subalkalic provinces require melting of two distinct mantle sources. The occurrence of this enriched mantle in the northern Marianas may be a consequence of the propagation of the Mariana Trough spreading center into the Volcano Arc.

  4. Explosive volcanism and the graphite-oxygen fugacity buffer on the parent asteroid(s) of the ureilite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Paul H.; Kallemeyn, Gregory W.

    1992-01-01

    A new model of the production of the uniformly low plagioclase and Al contents of ureilites is proposed. It is argued that those contents are consequences of widespread explosive volcanism during the evolution of the parent asteroid(s). It is noted that the great abundance of graphite on the ureilite asteroid(s) made them ideal sites for explosive volcanism driven by oxidation of graphite in partial melts ascending within the asteroid(s).

  5. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Isotope Systematics of Shergottite NWA 856: Crystallization Age and Implications for Alteration of Hot Desert SNC Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, A. D.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wiesmann, H.

    2004-01-01

    Nakhlite NWA 998 was discovered in Algeria in 2001, and is unique among the six known members of this group of Martian meteorites in containing significant modal orthopyroxene. Initial petrologic and isotopic data were reported by Irving et al. This 456 gram stone consists mainly of sub-calcic augite with subordinate olivine and minor orthopyroxene, titanomagnetite, pyrrhotite, chlorapatite, and intercumulus An(sub 35) plagioclase. We report here preliminary results of radiogenic isotopic analyses conducted on fragmental material from the main mass.

  6. Lava Textures, Magma Crystallization History, and the Dynamics of Merapi and Aleutian Mush Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Del Marmol, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The subsurface dynamics of magma in mush columns beneath arc volcanoes is recorded in the textures of the basic lavas. A detailed comparison of lava textures from large mature volcanoes in Indonesia (Merapi) and the Aleutian Islands (Adak and Atka), shows remarkably similar, often indistinguishable, textures of high alumina basalts (HAB) and basaltic andesites (BA). We suggest a systematic characterization of these distinctive textures into a few simple categories reflecting the subsurface history of crystallization within solidification fronts (SFs) and subsequent transport dynamics. The HABs are strongly plagioclase-phyric and of two main groups: A1 consists of large, idiomorphic, mildly zoned, plagioclase (20-30 vol.%) with small amounts of olivine (2-8%) set in a finely crystalline groundmass of these same phases; A2 is similar, but contains an additional pervasive population of large 'old' plagioclase, rounded, often highly zoned, and sometimes broken; A1+ is a subclass of A1 where traces of 'old' plagioclase are present. Similar categories exist in the BA lavas except overall crystallinity is higher and olivine is replaced by large clinopyroxenes containing or mantled with magnetite. In a temporal stratigraphic sense, the early lavas are generally HAB A1 types and transition into, sometimes alternating, HAB A2 types followed by BA types. The initial establishment of the mush column is by hot, highly mobile primary magmas, followed by increasingly more thermally mature magmas containing debris from disrupted SFs. The detailed nature of this debris, its variation in time, and the volumes give important insights on the size and vigor of the mush column staging chambers.

  7. Metamorphosed oceanic lithosphere from the Chunky Gal Mountain complex, Blue Ridge province, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Ranson, W.A.; Garihan, J.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Closely associated dunite and layered troctolite, gabbro, and anorthosite from the Chunky Gal Mountain mafic-ultramafic complex suggest a related ocean floor origin for these lithologies, with regional emplacement by the pre-metamorphic Hayesville-Fries thrust of Taconic age. Anhydrous mineral assemblages of dunitic and troctolitic rocks were more resistant to granulite and upper amphibolite metamorphic episodes, retaining much of their original mineralogy. Dunite consists of fresh polycrystalline olivine with local development of anthophyllite, serpentine, and talc along fractures. Dunite adjacent to mafic amphibolites of the complex contains distinctive cm-scale bands or layers of recrystallized plagioclase( ) of uncertain affinity, possibly veins or rhythmic layers. Troctolitic rocks display reaction textures around fresh olivine and plagioclase. Orthopyroxene growing normal to olivine grain boundaries forms an inner corona, in turn surrounded by a complex symplectite of Cpx + Plag [+-] Grt [+-] Spl. Gabbroic rocks show nearly complete replacement of original mafic minerals. Orthopyroxene survives in a few gabbros but mostly has been replaced by emerald green alumino-magnesio-hornblende. Calcic plagioclase is abundant as subhedral crystals or as oval, polycrystalline clots and pink corundum constitutes an accessory phase. A possible reaction resulting in the observed aluminous assemblage is: Na-Plag + Opx + Di + Spl + fluid = Mg-Hbl + Crn + Ca-Plag. Anorthosites occur as layers 10--50 cm in width within layered troctolites and consist of beautifully recrystallized plagioclase with seriate texture and minor amounts of alumino-magnesio hornblende occurring as fine-grained clots. Contacts between anorthosite and troctolite display the same sort of symplectite formed as an outer corona around olivine in the troctolite.

  8. Basaltic melt evolution of the Hengill volcanic system, SW Iceland, and evidence for clinopyroxene assimilation in primitive tholeiitic magmas

    SciTech Connect

    Troennes, R.G. )

    1990-09-10

    The thick oceanic crust of Iceland is formed by tholeiitic central volcanoes arranged in en echelon patterns along the 40-50 km wide rift zones. The Hengill central volcano in the southwestern rift zone has produced 25-30 km{sup 3} of hyaloclastites and lava during the last 0.11 m.y., with maximum productivity during the isostatic rebound following the degalciations 0.13 and 0.01 m.y. ago. The petrographic relations of pillow rim and hyaloclastite glass indicate that the basaltic melts were saturated with olivine and plagioclase, except for the most primitive ones that were undersaturated with plagioclase. Saturation with clinopyroxene was reached in some of the intermediate and evolved basaltic melts. Corroded and partly resorbed crystals of clinopyroxene and partly disintegrated gabbro nodules with resorbed clinopyroxene indicate that selective assimilation contributed to the evolution of the most primitive melts. The intermediate and evolved basaltic glass compositions fall along the low-pressure cotectic for mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) compositions saturated with olivine, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene, but the primitive glasses fall well inside the low-pressure olivine + plagioclase primary phase volume. The dense picritic magmas were driven to the surface by magmatic overpressure in the mantle at an early deglaciation stage characterized by the absence of large, trapping magma chambers in the lower crust. The assimilation of clinopyroxene in these melts could proceed by direct contact with the solidified cumulate sequences and gabbro intrusions. Clinopyroxene assimilation in combination with olivine fractionation may also contribute to the chemical evolution of some of the most primitive MORB magmas.

  9. Partial eclogitization of the Ambolten gabbro-norite, north-east Greenland Caledonides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilotti, J.A.; Elvevold, S.

    1998-01-01

    Partially eclogitized igneous bodies composed of gabbro, leucogabbro, anorthosite and cross-cutting diabase dikes are well represented in the North-East Greenland Eclogite Province. A 200 x 100 meter intrusive body on Ambolten Island (78?? 20' N, 19?? 15' W) records a prograde transition from gabbro-norite to eclogite facies coronitic metagabro-norite surrounded by hydrated margins of undeformed to strongly foliated amphibolite. Igneous plagioclase + olivine + enstatite + augite + oxides convert to eclogite facies assemblages consisting of garnet, omphacite, diopside, enstatite, kyanite, zoisite, rutile and pargasitic amphibole through several coronitic reactions. Relict cumulus plagioclase laths are replaced by an outer corona of garnet, an inner corona of omphacite and an internal region of sodic plagioclase, garnet, kyanite, omphacite and zoisite. Olivine and intercumulus pyroxene are partly replaced by metamorphic pyroxenes and amphibole. The corona structures, zoning patterns, diversity of mineral compositions in a single thin section, and preservation of metastable asemblages are characteristic of diffusion-controlled metamorphism. The most extreme disequilibrium is found in static amphibolites, where igneous pyroxenes, plagioclase domains with eclogite facies, assemblages, and matrix amphibole coexist. Complete eclogitization was not attained at Ambolten due to a lack of fluids needed to drive diffusion during prograde and retrograde metamorphism. The P-T conditions of the high-pressure metamorphism are estimated at ??? 750??C and > 18 kbar. Well-equilibrated, foliated amphibolites from the margin of the gabbro-norite supports our contention that the entire North-East Greenland Eclogite Province experienced Caledonian high-pressure metamorphism, even though no eclogite facies assemblages have been found in the quartzofeldspathic host gneisses to date.

  10. Glass and ceramics. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of glasses and ceramics can be produced from bulk lunar materials or from separated components. Glassy products include sintered regolith, quenched molten basalt, and transparent glass formed from fused plagioclase. No research has been carried out on lunar material or close simulants, so properties are not known in detail; however, common glass technologies such as molding and spinning seem feasible. Possible methods for producing glass and ceramic materials are discussed along with some potential uses of the resulting products.

  11. Brief review of thermoluminescence studies in lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. P., Jr.; Walker, R. M.; Miyajima, M.

    1971-01-01

    A weak thermoluminescence, due primarily to plagioclase feldspar, is found to exist in Apollo 11 and 12 lunar rock and topsoil samples. This effect increases with depth to about 10 cm below the surface and becomes relatively even in greater depth. The penetration of the diurnal temperature wave is traced to the rock thermoluminescence. Evidence is also found for the thermal draining of the surface rock.

  12. Luna 16 sample G36 - Another crystalline product of an extremely mafic magma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollister, L. S.; Kulick, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    Luna 16 sample G36 is a microbasalt containing skeletal olivine, plagioclase, ilmenite, and interstitial pyroxene. It apparently resulted from very rapid crystallization of a highly fractionated, totally liquid mafic magma. Although different in many details, G36 is generally similar to the ferromagnesian-rich Apollo 11 and 12 basalts. In this respect, it emphasizes the continuing problem of identifying a process on the moon which generated highly mafic magmas.

  13. Shocked basalt from Lonar Impact Crater, India, and experimental analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieffer, S. W.; Schaal, R. B.; Gibbons, R.; Horz, F.; Milton, D. J.; Dube, A.

    1976-01-01

    Samples of Lonar basalts were experimentally shocked in vacuum to pressures between 200 and 650 kbar by a 20 mm, high-velocity gun. Plagioclase and palagonite in experimentally shocked samples show deformation similar to that in the naturally shocked rocks, but pyroxene does not show optically resolvable edge melting. It is estimated that pressures in excess of 800-1000 kbar are required for the formation of totally shock-melted rocks from nonporous basalt.

  14. Phase relations of a simulated lunar basalt as a function of oxygen fugacity, and their bearing on the petrogenesis of the Apollo 11 basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuthill, R.L.; Sato, M.

    1970-01-01

    A glass of Apollo 11 basalt composition crystallizing at 1 atm at low f{hook}02 showed the following crystallization sequence; ferropseudobrookite at 1210??C, olivine at 1200??C, ilmenite and plagioclase at 1140??C, clinopyroxene at 1113??C. Ferropseudobrookite and olivine have a reaction relation to the melt. This sequence agrees with that assumed on textural grounds for some Apollo 11 basalts. It also indicates that the Apollo 11 basalts cannot have been modified by low-pressure fractionation. ?? 1970.

  15. Thermal history of caldera-forming magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, R. W.; Kent, A. J.; Cooper, K. M.; Huber, C.

    2015-12-01

    Large, caldera-forming silicic eruptions require the assembly and storage of a large volume of magma, and are though to result from either (1) rare high magma flux events needed to maintain melt-rich (eruptible) magma for extended timescales, or (2) magma accumulation at lower magma fluxes, storage for extended timescales as low temperature crystal mushes and rapid rejuvenation prior to eruption. The thermal history of these magmas prior to eruption thus provides an important clue into the processes that lead to eruption, but has been difficult to quantify. However in-situ measurement of Sr and other trace elements in plagioclase, coupled with diffusion models, can be used to constrain the time magmas spend at different temperatures. Progressive differentiation of plagioclase from a silicic magma produces plagioclase with lower Sr at low An—producing a positive correlation between Sr and An, which is the opposite of what is predicted by equilibrium partitioning. Forward modeling of the temperature-dependent diffusion of Sr from this initial disequilibrium condition toward equilibrium concentrations, based on partitioning relationships of An and Sr, gives an estimate of the time individual crystals spend at specific temperatures. Preliminary high spatial resolution LA-ICP-MS analysis of Sr in plagioclase from five caldera-forming eruptions show overall positive correlations of Sr and An, suggesting that little diffusive re-equilibration has occurred. Thus, over the lifetime that these magmas reside in the upper crust (>10 k.y.) they likely spend less than a few thousand years at temperatures above 750 °C (the approximate temperature of rheological lockup). These results suggest that the magmas that feed many large caldera-forming eruptions are kept in cold storage for long timescales, and that rapid rejuvenation of mush occurs without extended thermal conditioning prior to eruption.

  16. Magma mixing/mingling in the Eocene Horoz (Nigde) granitoids, Central southern Turkey: evidence from mafic microgranular enclaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocak, Kerim; Zedef, Veysel; Kansun, Gursel

    2011-11-01

    Mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) are widespread in the Horoz pluton with granodiorite and granite units. Rounded to elliptical MMEs have variable size (from a few centimetres up to metres) and are generally fine-grained with typical magmatic textures. The plagioclase compositions of the MMEs range from An18-An64 in the cores to An17-An29 in the rims, while that of the host rocks varies from An17 to An55 in the cores to An07 to An33 in the rims. The biotite is mostly eastonitic, and the calcic-amphibole is magnesio-hornblende and edenite. Oxygen fugacity estimates from both groups' biotites suggest that the Horoz magma possibly crystallised at fO2 conditions above the nickel-nickel oxide (NNO) buffer. The significance of magma mixing in their genesis is highlighted by various petrographic and mineralogical characteristics such as resorption surfaces in plagioclases and amphibole; quartz ocelli rimmed by biotite and amphibole; sieve and boxy cellular textures, and sharp zoning discontinuities in plagioclase. The importance of magma mixing is also evident in the amphiboles of the host rocks, which are slightly richer in Si, Fe3+ and Mg in comparison with the amphiboles of MMEs. However, the compositional similarity of the plagioclase and biotite phenocrysts from MMEs and their host rocks suggests that the MMEs were predominantly equilibrated with their hosts. Evidence from petrography and mineral chemistry suggests that the adakitic Horoz MMEs could be developed from a mantle-derived, water-rich magma (>3 mass%) affected by a mixing of felsic melt at P >2.3 kbar, T >730°C.

  17. Differentiation in the cumulates from a Mauna Loa, Hawaii magma chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Schwindinger, K.R.; Anderson, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The interstitial glass in cognate nodules from Mauna Loa, has by chemical diffusion or convective fluid transport, remained in equilibrium with the overlying magma. The glass bearing nodules were collected from Damona Cone on the southwest rift zone of Mauna Loas. The nodules have approximately 15% olivine, 40% orthopyroxene plus clinopyroxene (3-20%), and 85% plagioclase plus vescicular glass (2-25%). Olivine norites have anhedral olivine mantled with anhedral orthopyroxene, subhedral to euhedral pyroxene, anhedral plagioclase, and 20 to 25% glass. Olivine gabbros have anhedral olivine, subequant, anhedral to subhedral pyroxene and plagioclase and less than 10% glass. The bulk composition of greater than 15%, MgO, with the textures, indicate the nodules are an accumulative origin. Thus these nodules are partially solidified pieces of crystal/liquid accumulative mush. The compositions of the olivines are Fa 18 to 25 mole percent, of the plagioclases are An 70 to 80 mole percent. The composition of the orthopyroxene is En76 Fs19 Wo5, and of the clinopyroxene is En50 Fall Wo30. The composition of the interstitial glasses is: SiO2 52.54, TiO2 2.04, Al2O3 14.39, FeO 11.47, MgO 7.15, CaO 10.28, Na20 1.42, K2O 0.39, P2O5 0.21. The low Na2O is from two nodules that may have experienced high temperature alteration. The uniformity of the glass composition, in contrast to its large variation in the mode, suggests the interstitial liquid in the mush has remained in equilibrium with some large reservoir of MgO rich liquid, such as the magma above the mush. Two possible mechanisms of cation exchange between the magma and the interstitial liquid of the mush are chemical diffusion and convective fluid transport.

  18. Spade: An H Chondrite Impact-melt Breccia that Experienced Post-shock Annealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.; Jones, Rhian H.

    2006-01-01

    The low modal abundances of relict chondrules (1.8 Vol%) and of coarse (i.e. >= 2200 micron-size) isolated mafic silicate grains (1.8 Vol%) in Spade relative to mean H6 chondrites (11.4 and 9.8 vol%, respectively) show Spade to be a rock that has experienced a significant degree of melting. Various petrographic features (e.g., chromite-plagioclase assemblages, chromite veinlets, silicate darkening) indicate that melting was caused by shock. Plagioclase was melted during the shock event and flowed so that it partially to completely surrounded nearby mafic silicate grains. During crystallization, plagioclase developed igneous zoning. Low-Ca pyroxene that crystallized from the melt (or equilibrated with the melt at high temperatures) acquired relatively high amounts of CaO. Metallic Fe-Ni cooled rapidly below the Fe-Ni solws and transformed into martensite. Subsequent reheating of the rock caused transformation of martensite into abundant duplex plessite. Ambiguities exist in the shock stage assignment of Spade. The extensive silicate darkening, the occurrence of chromite-plagioclase assemblages, and the impact-melted characteristics of Spade are consistent with shock stage S6. Low shock (stage S2) is indicated by the undulose extinction and lack of planar fractures in olivine. This suggests that Spade reached a maximum prior shock level equivalent to stage S6 and then experienced post-shock annealing (probably to stage Sl). These events were followed by a less intense impact that produced the undulose extinction in the olivine, characteristic of shock stage S2. Annealing could have occurred if Spade were emplaced near impact melts beneath the crater floor or deposited in close proximity to hot debris within an ejecta blanket. Spade firmly establishes the case for post-shock annealing. This may have been a common process on ordinary chondrites (OC) asteroids.

  19. Distribution of Water in Nominally Anhydrous Minerals during Metamorphic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Lankvelt, A.; Seaman, S. J.; Williams, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    Nominally anhydrous minerals are a reservoir for water in otherwise dry rocks. This water may play a role in facilitating metamorphic reactions and enhancing deformation. In this study, we examined orthopyroxene-bearing granites from the Athabasca Granulite terrane in northern Saskatchewan. These rocks intruded the lower crust (pressures of 1 GPa) at circa 2.6 Ga at temperatures of > 900 ºC and were subsequently metamorphosed at granulite facies conditions (700 ºC and 1 GPa) in the Paleoproterozoic (Williams et al., 2000). One of the primary reactions recorded by these rocks is locally known as the "Mary" reaction and involves the anhydrous reaction: orthopyroxene + Ca-plagioclase = clinopyroxene + garnet + Na-plagioclase. Measurements of water concentrations in both product and reactant assemblages were performed using a Bruker Vertex 70 Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and revealed that there is a slight excess of water in product minerals over reactant minerals. There are two possible explanations for this. The first is that water was derived from an external source, possibly hydrous, likely contemporaneous, mafic dikes. This interpretation is supported by higher concentrations of K, which is essentially absent from the reactant minerals, in the Na-rich rims of plagioclase. However, only modest amounts of external fluids could have been introduced, or amphiboles would have been stabilized at the expense of clinopyroxene (Moore & Carmichael, 1998). An alternative interpretation is that slightly more water-rich minerals reacted more readily, releasing water that was then incorporated into their products, whereas the water-poorer minerals failed to react. Support for this interpretation comes from very low water concentrations in orthopyroxene and plagioclase from an unreacted and undeformed sample. This interpretation suggests that water in anhydrous minerals may catalyze metamorphic reactions, and a lack of water may be critical for preserving metastable

  20. Geology of the Hog Mountain tonalite and associated lode gold deposits, Northern Alabama Piedmont: Final report for the 1986-1987 project year

    SciTech Connect

    Green, N.L.; Lesher, C.M.

    1988-02-01

    The Hog Mountain tonalite intrudes lower Paleozoic graphitic phyllites of the Wedowee formation and is transgressed by a series of planar, en echelon, bifurcating, auriferous quartz-sulfide veins with well-defined sericite-sulfide alteration envelopes. Least-altered tonalite is white, medium-grained, and weakly to non-foliated. It is characterized by moderately uniform distributions of quartz and oscillatory-normal zoned plagioclase (An/sub 7-41/), with minor amounts of biotite, muscovite, ilmenite, apatite, zircon and corroded garnet; K-feldspar is rare. Least-altered granitoids are peraluminous (A/CNK > 1.15), exhibit significant major- and trace-element variations, are characterized by relatively low REE contents, and have moderately high /delta//sup 18/O (+9.7 to +11.2 %) and uniform /delta/D (-82 to -78 %) values. Biotite log (X/sub Mg//X/sub Fe/)-log(X/sub F//X/sub OH/) relations suggest contamination of an I-type granitic melt by graphitic metapelites. Corroded garnets (Pyr/sub 3/Alm/sub 55/Spess/sub 17/Gross/sub 25/) within the granitoids are chemically-similar to euhedral garnets in adjacent schists and in fine-grained, foliated plagioclase-biotite-muscovite-ilmenite xenoliths, and were probably derived from the metasedimentary host rocks. Equilibration conditions of the xenolith mineral assemblages (465-510/degree/C at ca. 6 kb), calculated using garnet-biotite-muscovite-plagioclase thermobarometry, are similar to inferred metamorphic P-T conditions of underthrusting of Wedowee metasediments to mid-crustal levels during Paleozoic crustal thickening. Observed chemical variations may be modeled by plagioclase/biotite-controlled fractionation of a peraluminous tonalitic melt, accompanied by local cumulus mineral-intercumulus liquid segregation and graphitic metapelite contamination during emplacement. 70 refs., 20 figs.

  1. Origin of howardites, diogenites and eucrites - A mass balance constraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Two petrogenetic models for the noncumulate-basaltic parts of howardite meteorites are discussed. A mass balance constraint is developed which indicates that more than half of the basaltic components in howardites formed as residual liquids from fractional crystallization of melts that had earlier produced diogentelike pyroxene cumulate components. Other model constriants involving scandium trends, clustering near olivine-pyroxene-plagioclase peritectic, and MgO/(MgO + FeO) ratios are discussed.

  2. Unit-cell dimensions of natural and synthetic scapolites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eugster, H.P.; Prostka, H.J.; Appleman, D.E.

    1962-01-01

    In natural scapolites the cell dimension a shows a regular increase from marialite to meionite composition, while c remains constant. Both a and c of synthetic meionite are larger than the corresponding dimensions of synthetic marialite. The cell volume of both natural and synthetic scapolites is a nearly linear function of composition. Variations in cell dimensions of scapolites may be caused by differences in structural state similar to those in plagioclase feldspars.

  3. How do olivines record magmatic events? Insights from major and trace element zoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Maisonneuve, C. Bouvet; Costa, F.; Huber, C.; Vonlanthen, P.; Bachmann, O.; Dungan, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Reconciling the diverse records of magmatic events preserved by multiple crystals and minerals in the same sample is often challenging. In the case of basaltic-andesites from Volcán Llaima (Chile), Mg zoning in olivine is always simpler than Ca zoning in plagioclase. A model that explains a number of chemical patterns is that Llaima magmas stall in the upper crust, where they undergo decompression crystallization and form crystal-mush bodies. Frequent magma inputs from deeper reservoirs provide the potential for remobilization and eruption. The records of multiple recharge events in Llaima plagioclase versus an apparent maximum of one such event in coexisting olivine are addressed by using trace element zoning in olivine phenocrysts. We have integrated elements that (1) respond to changes in magma composition due to recharge or mixing (Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, ±Ca), with (2) elements that are incorporated during rapid, disequilibrium crystal growth (P, Ti, Sc, V, Al). A more complex history is obtained when these elements are evaluated considering their partition coefficients, diffusivities, and crystal growth rates. The olivine archive can then be reconciled with the plagioclase archive of magma reservoir processes. Olivine (and plagioclase) phenocrysts may experience up to three or more recharge events between nucleation and eruption. Diffusion modeling of major and trace element zoning in two dimensions using a new lattice Boltzmann model suggests that recharge events occur on the order of months to a couple of years prior to eruption, whereas crystal residence times are more likely to be on the order of a few years to decades.

  4. The effect of mantle composition on density in the extending lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Nina S. C.; Podladchikov, Yuri Yu.

    2008-07-01

    The density distribution of the lithosphere is non-linear and discontinuous due to complex mineralogy and, most importantly, phase transitions. We evaluate the influence of changes in mantle composition on lithospheric density and its evolution during horizontal stretching, using thermodynamic calculations of the density as a function of pressure, temperature and composition. We also develop a simple parameterization based on end-member mineral reactions and geometric relationships between the geotherm and the phase boundary for comparison. The garnet-spinel peridotite transition leads to a moderate decrease in density of the mantle part of the lithospheric column at the initial stages of stretching. When the crust is sufficiently thinned and temperature is relatively high, plagioclase peridotite becomes stable in the upper part of the mantle. The density reduction due to the plagioclase-in reaction is controlled by bulk Al 2O 3 in the mantle and by the depth of the plagioclase-in reaction, which is mainly governed by the Na 2O/Al 2O 3 ratio. Since Na 2O and Al 2O 3 increase with the fertility of the mantle the phase transition effect is most pronounced for relatively fertile mantle (and strong extension) and can lead to 2.3% density reduction. This is equivalent to heating the entire lithosphere by 700 °C if only the effect of thermal expansion on density is taken into account. The formation of plagioclase peridotite can explain syn-rift uplift in sedimentary basins that experienced large mantle stretching without invoking an unrealistically strong increase in temperature. It might also be responsible for the break-up unconformity observed at continental margins.

  5. Mineralogy and petrology of basaltic fragments from the Luna 24 drill core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coish, R. A.; Taylor, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    The petrology of rock fragments and monomineralic grains from Luna 24 samples is described, and a petrogenetic scheme for the derivation of Mare Crisium basalts is presented. Components of the rock fragments include subophitic basalts, metabasalts, late-stage fragments, olivine vitrophyres, and non-mare lithic fragments of possible cumulate origin. Among the monomineralic grains (which are much more abundant than the rock fragments) are pyroxene, plagioclase, olivine, ilmenite and native Fe.

  6. Petrographic and crystallographic study of silicate minerals in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, I. S. E.; Turner, F. J.; Wenk, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    Optical U-stage measurements, chemical microprobe data, and X-ray procession photographs of a bytownite twin group from rock 12032,44 are compared. Sharp but weak b and no c-reflections were observed for this An89 bytownite indicating a partly disordered structure. Euler angles, used to characterize the orientation of the optical indicatrix, compare better with values for plutonic than for volcanic plagioclase. This indicates that structural and optical properties cannot be directly correlated.

  7. Lead isotope systematics of three Apollo 17 mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, G. R.; Chen, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with new and more accurate determinations of uranium, thorium, and isotopic lead data for five bulk samples and separate pyroxene, ilmenite, and plagioclase from basalt 71055. In a concordia diagram, the samples suggest a postcrystallization disturbance of the U-Pb systems of the rock. There is no compelling reason, from U-Pb data, to believe that the moon is younger than 4.55 AE.

  8. Geochemical heterogeneities in magma beneath Mount Etna recorded by 2001-2006 melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavi, Federica; Rosciglione, Alberto; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Katsura; Nakamura, Eizo; Nuccio, Pasquale Mario; Ottolini, Luisa; Paonita, Antonio; Vannucci, Riccardo

    2015-07-01

    We present a geochemical study on olivine and clinopyroxene-hosted melt inclusions (MIs) from 2001 to 2006 Etna basaltic lavas and pyroclastites. Three MI suites are distinguished on the basis of trace element fingerprinting. Type-1 MIs (from 2001 Upper South and 2002 Northeast vents) share their trace element signature with low-K lavas erupted before 1971. Critical trace element ratios (e.g., K/La, Ba/Nb), along with Pb isotope data of Type-1 MIs provide evidence for a heterogeneous mantle source resulting from mixing of three end-members with geochemical and isotopic characteristics of EM2, DMM, and HIMU components. Type-1 MIs composition does not support involvement of subduction-related components. Type-2 (from 2001 Lower and 2002 South vents) and Type-3 (2004 eruption) MIs reveal "ghost plagioclase signatures," namely lower concentrations in strongly incompatible elements, and positive Sr, Ba, and Eu anomalies. Both Type-1 and Type-2 MIs occur in 2006 olivines, which highlight the occurrence of mixing between Type-1 and Type-2 end-members. Type-2/Type-3 MIs testify to en route processes (plagioclase assimilation and volatile fluxing) peculiar for "deep dike fed" eruptions. The latter are strongly controlled by tectonics or flank instability that occasionally promote upraise of undegassed, more radiogenic primitive magma, which may interact with plagioclase-rich crystal mush/cumulates before erupting. Type-2/Type-3 MIs approach the less radiogenic Pb isotopic composition of plagioclase from prehistoric lavas, thus suggesting geochemical overprinting of present-day melts by older products released from distinct mantle sources. Our study emphasizes that MIs microanalysis offers new insights on both source characteristics and en route processes, allowing to a link between melt composition and magma dynamics.

  9. Fluorine in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. O., Jr.; Clark, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    Microanalysis using a resonant nuclear reaction was used to measure F concentrations in USGS standard rocks and 21 meteorites. The F appears to be a moderately depleted element, but there were significant variations within each sample. Measurements on separated metal phases suggest that about 20% of meteoritic F is in the metal or in a phase closely associated with it. Simultaneous measurements of F, Mg, Na, Al and Si in the nonmagnetic fractions of meteorites suggest plagioclase as a F containing phase.

  10. Geological and petrological evidences for mingling and mixing of magmas in the Me-akan and Taisetsu volcanoes, eastern and central Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Keiji; Sato, Eiichi; Anzai, Keisuke; Baba, Hikaru

    2015-04-01

    Both the Me-akan volcano, eastern Hokkaido, and the Taisetsu volcano, central Hokkaido, are exactly the clear fields showing geological evidences for magma mingling and magma mixing, such as coexistence of basaltic andesite scoria and dacite pumice in plinian fall deposit, heterogeneous juvenile ejecta (banded pumice, etc.) in pyroclastic flow, mafic inclusions in lavas, and banded structure in lavas. Throughout the eruption history of Me-Akan volcano, the largest eruptions occurred about 12000-13000 years ago. The main eruptions of this stage were continuously eruptive sequence of pumice-scoria pyroclastic flows and pumice-scoria plinian fallout, which show the multi-stage processes of magma mixing and mingling in the magma plumbing system through mineralogical and petrological analyses of the juvenile products. Each deposit contains pumice (SiO2=63wt.%), scoria (SiO2=55wt.%) and heterogeneous scoria. The core composition of plagioclase phenocrysts of these scoria and pumice shows a same bimodal distribution of low-An plagioclase (An=59) and high-An plagioclase (An>70). These indicate that heterogeneous ejecta such as banded pumice were exactly mingling products of both mixed mafic and felsic magmas, which were derived from continuous magma mixing of felsic and mafic end-member magmas in a zoned magma chamber. The lavas in Taisetsu volcano frequently show the banded structure of andesite and dacite magmas, and are characterized by containing a number of mafic inclusions with coarse- and fine-grained types. These inclusions were originated from two kinds of mafic end-member magmas and have different resident times in magma chamber. Some coarse-type inclusion was probably brought out from dacite crystal mush layer. The plagioclase phenocrysts in the host lava show trimodal An-content distributions (

  11. The age and constitution of Cerro Campanario, a mafic stratovolcano in the Andes of central Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, W.; Singer, B.; Godoy, E.; Munizaga, F.

    1998-01-01

    Cerro Campanario, a towering landmark on the continental divide near Paso Pehuenche, is a glacially eroded remnant of a mafic stratovolcano that is much younger than previously supposed. Consisting of fairly uniform basaltic andesite, rich in olivine and plagioclase, the 10-15 km3 edifice grew rapidly near the end of the middle Pleistocene, about 150-160 ka, as indicated by 40Ar/39Ar and unspiked K-Ar analyses of its lavas.

  12. Petrology and geochemistry of mantle xenoliths from the Kapsiki Plateau (Cameroon Volcanic Line): Implications for lithospheric upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamen, Jules; Nkoumbou, Charles; Reusser, Eric; Tchoua, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Mantle xenoliths hosted by Oligocene alkaline basalts of the Kapsiki Plateau, northern end of the Cameroon Volcanic Line consist of group I spinel and plagioclase peridotites, mainly protogranular and accessorily porphyroclastic. The sub-continental lithospheric mantle here is heterogeneous and encloses both depleted and fertile components. Minerals exhibit wide range major element compositions compared to Nyos and Kumba grabens equivalent rocks. Spinel occurs as homogeneous brown crystals or as composite (brown-core-dark-rim) crystals when in contact with diopside or swatted in melt pools. Clinopyroxene crystals are either spinel exsolution-bearing or exsolution-free, the latter being often skeletal or frameworked and riddled with intracrystalline melt pools. Intraxenolith melt pockets and veinlets are always associated to plagioclase-bearing samples. Feldspars depict two distinctive compositions (An37-66Ab57-32Or6-2 and An3-7Ab52-62Or31-48) partly attributed to host xenolith type and to the involvement in the spinel and/or diopside melting reaction of an infiltrating alkali and carbonate-rich liquid. Petrographic and geochemical data discriminate melt pockets from their host basalts, excluding thus infiltration of basaltic melt as prospective origin. Thermo-barometric estimates reveal that prior to their entrainment the Kapsiki mantle xenoliths experienced two P-T equilibrium stages resulting in subsolidus re-equilibration from spinel- to plagioclase-facies conditions. Furthermore mineral textural relations show that the occurrence of plagioclase and melts inclusions is linked to spinel and/or diopside breakdown, likely subsequent to decompression and/or metasomatic induced melting events predating Oligo-Miocene volcanism.

  13. La/Sm ratios in mare basalts as a consequence of mafic cumulate fractionation from an initial lunar magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, E. E.; Brophy, J. G.; Basu, A.

    1991-01-01

    A model is constructed for the La/Sm ratio and the abundance of chrondrite-normalized La in different proportions of partial melts of a mafic cumulate source that might have settled to the bottom of an initial lunar magma ocean prior to any plagioclase separation. It is proposed that La/Sm ratios and chrondrite-normalized La abundances of common mare basalts are found in partial melts only if: the mafic cumulate consists mostly of clinopyroxene, a very low fraction of the cumulate melts, and the cumulate represents a moderate to high proportion of the crystallization of the initial magma ocean. Only if the partitioning of clinopyroxene is forced to mimic plagioclase (DLa is greater than DSm) do the present modeling results become compatible with the scenario for producing appropriate parent melts of mare basalts from mafic cumulates. It is found unlikely that parent melts of mare basalts were produced from mafic cumulates of an initial lunar magma ocean that had not had any plagioclase crystallization.

  14. FUN with PANURGE - High mass resolution ion microprobe measurements of MG in Allende inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneke, J. C.; Armstrong, J. T.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1983-09-01

    Isotopic ratios have been determined, at a precision level approaching that of counting statistics using beam switching, by employing PANURGE, a modified CAMECA IMS3F ion microprobe at a mass resolving power of 5000. This technique is used to determine the isotopic composition of Mg and Si and the atomic ratio of Al/Mg in minerals from the Allende inclusion WA and the Allende FUN inclusion C1. Results show enrichment in Mg-26 of up to 260 percent. Results of Mg and Al/Mg measurements on cogenetic spinel inclusion and host plagiclase crystals show Mg-Al isochrons in excellent agreement with precise mineral isochrons determined by thermal emission mass spectrometry. The measurements are found to confirm the presence of substantial excess Mg-26 in WA and its near absence in C1. Data is obtained which indicates a metamorphic reequilibrium of Mg in Allende plagioclase at least 0.6 my after WA formation. Ion probe measurements are obtained which confirm that the Mg composition in Allende C1 is highly fractionated and is uniform among pyroxene, melilite, plagioclase, spinel crystals, and spinel included in melilite and plagioclase crystals.

  15. Grosnaja ABCs: Magnesium isotope compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, J. N.; Srinivasan, G.; Ulyanov, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    Three CAI's from the Grosnaja CV3 chondrite were analyzed for their magnesium isotopic compositions by the ion microprobe. The selected CAI's represent three distinct types: GR4(compact Type A), GR7(Type B) and GR2(Type C). Petrographic studies indicate that all three Grosnaja inclusions were subjected to secondary alterations. The Type A CAI GR4 is primarily composed of melilite with spinel and pyroxene occurring as minor phases. The rim of the inclusion does not exhibit distinct layered structure and secondary alteration products (garnet, Fe-rich olivine and Na-rich plagioclase) are present in some localized areas near the rim region. The average major element compositions of different mineral phases in GR4 are given. Preliminary REE data suggest a depletion of HREE relative to LREE by about a factor of 3 without any clear indication of interelement fractionation. The CAI GR7 has textural and minerological characteristics similar to Type B inclusions. The REE data show a pattern that is similar to Group 6 with enrichment in Eu and Yb. In addition, a depletion of HREE compared to LREE is also evident in this object. Melilite composition shows a broad range of akermanite content (Ak(sub 15-55)). Detailed petrographic study is in progress. GR2 is a anorthite-rich Type C inclusion with large plagioclase laths intergrown with Ti-rich pyroxene. The average plagioclase composition is close to pure anorthite (An99).

  16. Abundance and distribution of boron in the Hauzenberg (Bavaria) granite complex

    SciTech Connect

    Sauerer, A.; Troll, G. )

    1990-01-01

    Hercynian S-type granites from the Hauzenberg igneous complex show a range of boron concentration from 1 to 12 ppm. The whole-rock boron data are not significantly correlated with concentrations of other trace elements (Zr, Rb, Ba, Sr, Ni, V, Co, Cu, Zn, F); neither is boron correlated with the major elements (except with sodium) or with the differentiation index (DI). The boron budget in the rock-forming minerals (plagioclase, alkali feldspar, quartz, biotite, muscovite) of the tourmaline-free granites reveals that the highest concentrations of boron occur in muscovite, whereas the greatest amount of boron is incorporated in plagioclase (57-69%) due to its high modal amount. Boron in plagioclase increases with the extent of of sericitization (obtained by X-ray diffractometry). Muscovite in a pegmatite contains more than 50% of the total boron. The areal distribution of boron within the complex is neither uniform nor random; an increase of boron concentrations from granodioritic to granitic rocks is indicated, whereas the late differentiates are depleted in boron.

  17. Origin of minor and trace element compositional diversity in anorthitic feldspar phenocrysts and melt inclusions from the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, David T.; Nielsen, Roger L.; Kent, Adam J.R.; Tepley, Frank J., III

    2011-01-01

    Melt inclusions trapped in phenocryst phases are important primarily due to their potential of preserving a significant proportion of the diversity of magma composition prior to modification of the parent magma array during transport through the crust. The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the impact of formational and post-entrapment processes on the composition of melt inclusions hosted in high anorthite plagioclase in MORB. Our observations from three plagioclase ultra-phyric lavas from the Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge document a narrow range of major elements and a dramatically greater range of minor and trace elements within most host plagioclase crystals. Observed host/inclusion partition coefficients for Ti are consistent with experimental determinations. In addition, observed values of DTi are independent of inclusion size and inclusion TiO2 content of the melt inclusion. These observations preclude significant effects from the re-homogenization process, entrapment of incompatible element boundary layers or dissolution/precipitation. The observed wide range of TiO2 contents in the host feldspar, and between bands of melt inclusions within individual crystals rule out modification of TiO contents by diffusion, either pre-eruption or due to re-homogenization. However, we do observe comparatively small ranges for values of K2O and Sr compared to P2O5 and TiO2 in both inclusions and crystals that can be attributed to diffusive processes that occurred prior to eruption.

  18. Cathodoluminescence Characterization of Maskelynite and Alkali Feldspar in Shergottite (Dhofar 019)

    SciTech Connect

    Kayama, M.; Nakazato, T.; Nishido, H.; Ninagawa, K.; Gucsik, A.

    2009-08-17

    Dhofar 019 is classified as an olivine-bearing basaltic shergottite and consists of subhedral grains of pyroxene, olivine, feldspar mostly converted to maskelynite and minor alkali feldspar. The CL spectrum of its maskelynite exhibits an emission band at around 380 nm. Similar UV-blue emission has been observed in the plagioclase experimentally shocked at 30 and 40 GPa, but not in terrestrial plagioclase. This UV-blue emission is a notable characteristic of maskelynite. CL spectrum of alkali feldspar in Dhofar 019 has an emission bands at around 420 nm with no red emission. Terrestrial alkali feldspar actually consists of blue and red emission at 420 and 710 nm assigned to Al-O{sup -}-Al and Fe{sup 3+} centers, respectively. Maskelynite shows weak and broad Raman spectral peaks at around 500 and 580 cm{sup -1}. The Raman spectrum of alkali feldspar has a weak peak at 520 cm{sup -1}, whereas terrestrial counterpart shows the emission bands at 280, 400, 470, 520 and 1120 cm{sup -1}. Shock pressure on this meteorite transformed plagioclase and alkali feldspar into maskelynite and almost glass phase, respectively. It eliminates their luminescence centers, responsible for disappearance of yellow and/or red emission in CL of maskelynite and alkali feldspar. The absence of the red emission band in alkali feldspar can also be due to the lack of Fe{sup 3+} in the feldspar as it was reported for some lunar feldspars.

  19. Some textures in Apollo 12 lunar igneous rocks and in terrestrial analogs.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drever, H. I.; Johnston, R.; Butler, P., Jr.; Gibb, F. G. F.

    1972-01-01

    The interpretation of immature crystallization and some lunar textures characterized by it are the principal objectives of this investigation. A comparative and selective approach is adopted, and particular reference is made to the form and textural relations of olivine in 12009 and of pyroxenes and plagioclase in 12021, and to terrestrial analogs. The optic orientation of the olivines in 12009 is determined, and their skeletal crystallization is illustrated and evaluated. Microprobe and optical data are associated in a textural analysis of an analog from the upper contact of a minor intrusion in Skye. The optic orientation of pyroxene enclosed in plagioclase cores is determined, and the results are plotted stereographically. The need for greater precision in the use of textural terms is stressed, and a new term - intrafasciculate - is introduced for textures in which pyroxene has crystallized within hollow, skeletal plagioclase. Apollo 12 pyroxene-phyric basalts are texturally reviewed, and the crystallization of the phenocrysts is discussed, emphasis being placed on size-independence of skeletal growth.

  20. Mineralogy and possible origin of an unusual Cr-rich inclusion in the Los Martinez (L6) chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brearley, Adrian J.; Casanova, Ignacio; Miller, Mark L.; Keil, Klaus

    1991-01-01

    During a petrological study of the previously unclassified ordinary chondrite Los Martinez a highly unusual Cr-rich inclusion is found which is unique in both extraterrestrial and terrestrial mineralogy. Detailed SEM and TEM studies show that the inclusion consists of a highly zoned single crystal of plagioclase intergrown with chromium-rich spinel which indicates that it is the product of exsolution. The Cr-rich precursors of the inclusion probably have close affinities to the chronite-plagioclase chrondrules observed by Ramdohr (1967) in several ordinary chondrites. Based on the zoning in the inclusion it is suggested that it is the product of fractional crystallization from a melt, which may have formed as a liquid condensate, or by melting of solid condensates, in the solar nebula. Subsequent cooling of this melt condensate resulted in crystallization of the unidentified phase. After crystallization, the inclusion was probably incorporated into a parent body where it underwent metamorphism and was probably shocked to some degree. During this period of parent body metamorphism, exsolution and decomposition of the unknown precursor occurred to produce the observed intergrowth of plagioclase and chromite. Los Martinez is classified as an L6 ordinary chondrite breccia.

  1. Effects of fractional crystallization and cumulus processes on mineral composition trends of some lunar and terrestrial rock series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, J.

    1982-01-01

    A plot of Mg of mafic minerals versus An of plagioclase in cumulate rocks from various lunar and terrestrial rock series shows each series to have a distinct curvilinear trend. The slopes of these trends vary from nearly vertical in the case of lunar anorthosites and Mg-norites to nearly horizontal in the case of gabbros from the mid-Atlantic ridge. Calculations based upon known major element partitioning between mafic minerals, plagioclase and subalkaline basaltic liquids indicate that fractional crystallization coupled with cotectic accumulation of mafic minerals and plagioclase will produce mineral composition trends on the Mg versus An diagram with slopes greater than 1 for cases where An is approximately greater than Mg. Furthermore, fractional crystallization of basaltic magmas with alkali concentrations approaching zero will produce near vertical Mg versus An trends. Therefore, the steep slopes of the lunar rock series are consistent with relatively simple fractionation processes. The relatively flat slope of mineral compositions from gabbros collected from the mid-Atlantic ridge at 26 deg N is inconsistent with simple fractionation processes, and calculations show that periodic refilling of a fractionating magma chamber with picritic magma cannot simply explain this flat slope either.

  2. Dissolution and Replacement Creep:A Significant Deformation Mechanism in Mid-crustal Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintsch, R. P.

    2001-12-01

    Zoning patterns and zoning truncations in metamorphic minerals in a granodioritic orthogneiss from the Bronson Hill terrane, New England indicate that strain and S-C fabrics in these rocks were produced by dissolution, precipitation, and replacement processes, even at epidote-amphibolite facies metamorphic conditions. The metamorphic fabric is defined by alternating layers and folia dominated by quartz, feldspars, and biotite + epidote. Zoning patterns in most metamorphic plagioclase, orthoclase, epidote, and sphene are truncated at boundaries normal to the shortening direction, suggesting dissolution. Interfaces of relict igneous orthoclase phenocrysts that face the shortening direction are embayed and replaced by biotite, epidote and myrmekitic intergrowths of plagioclase and quartz. Metamorphic plagioclase grains are also replaced by epidote. We interpret these microstructures to reflect strain-enhanced dissolution. The cores of many grains show asymmetric overgrowths with at least two generations of beards, all oriented on the ends of grains that face the extension direction. We interpret these textures to reflect precipitation of components dissolved by deformation enhanced dissolution. While biotite and quartz probably deformed by dislocation creep, the overall deformation was accommodated by dissolution perpendicular to the shortening direction, and precipitation parallel to it. These chemical processes must have been activated at lower stresses than the dislocation creep predicted from extrapolations of data from experiments in dry rocks. Thus wet crust is likely to be weaker than calculated from these experimental studies. Where such processes dominate, stress may not be high enough to reach brittle failure.

  3. Dissolution and replacement creep: a significant deformation mechanism in mid-crustal rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintsch, R. P.; Yi, Keewook

    2002-07-01

    Zoning patterns and zoning truncations in metamorphic minerals in a granodioritic orthogneiss indicate that strain and S- C fabrics in these rocks were produced by dissolution, precipitation, and replacement processes, even at epidote-amphibolite facies metamorphic conditions. The metamorphic fabric is defined by alternating layers and folia dominated by quartz, feldspars, and biotite+epidote. Zoning patterns in most metamorphic plagioclase, orthoclase, epidote, and sphene are truncated at boundaries normal to the shortening direction, suggesting dissolution. Interfaces of relict igneous orthoclase phenocrysts that face the shortening direction are embayed and replaced by biotite, epidote, and myrmekitic intergrowths of plagioclase and quartz. Metamorphic plagioclase grains are also replaced by epidote. We interpret these microstructures to reflect strain-enhanced dissolution. The cores of many grains show asymmetric overgrowths with at least two generations of beards, all oriented on the ends of grains that face the extension direction. We interpret these textures to reflect precipitation of components dissolved by deformation-enhanced dissolution. While biotite and quartz probably deformed by dislocation creep, the overall deformation was accommodated by dissolution perpendicular to the shortening direction, and precipitation parallel to it. These chemical processes must have been activated at lower stresses than the dislocation creep predicted from extrapolations of data from experiments in dry rocks. Thus wet crust is likely to be weaker than calculated from these experimental studies.

  4. An exsolution silica-pump model for the origin of myrmekite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castle, R.O.; Lindsley, D.H.

    1993-01-01

    Myrmekite, as defined here, is the microscopic intergrowth between vermicular quartz and modestly anorthitic plagioclase (calcic albite-oligoclase), intimately associated with potassium feldspar in plutonic rocks of granitic composition. Hypotheses previously invoked in explanation of myrmekite include: (1) direct crystallization; (2) replacement; (3) exsolution. The occurrence of myrmekite in paragneisses and its absence in rocks devold of discrete grains of potassium feldspar challenge those hypotheses based on direct crystallization or replacement. However, several lines of evidence indicate that myrmekite may in fact originate in response to kinetic effects associated with the exsolution of calcic alkali feldspar into discrete potassium feldspar and plagioclase phases. Exsolution of potassium feldspar system projected from [AlSi2O8] involves the exchange CaAlK-1Si-1, in which the AlSi-1 tetrahedral couple is resistant to intracrystalline diffusion. By contrast, diffusion of octahedral K proceeds relatively easily where it remains uncoupled to the tetrahedral exchange. We suggest here that where the ternary feldspar system is open to excess silica, the exchange reaction that produces potassium feldspar in the ternary plane is aided by the net-transfer reaction K+Si=Orthoclase, leaving behind indigenous Si that reports as modal quartz in the evolving plagioclase as the CaAl component is concomitantly incorporated in this same phase. Thus silica is "pumped" into the reaction volume from a "silica reservoir", a process that enhances redistribution of both Si and Al through the exsolving ternary feldspar. ?? 1993 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Comparative petrogenesis of anorthositic and troctolitic series rocks of the Duluth Complex, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D. Jr.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    Results of new mapping in the NW part of the Middle Proterozoic Duluth Complex in NE Minnesota reinforces the view that the Complex consists dominantly of two major lithostratigraphic units: an Anorthositic Series (AS) and a Troctolitic Series (TS) dominated by troctolite and olivine gabbro. Consistent intrusive and inclusive relationships confirm that AS rocks are older than TS. Interpretations of field, petrographic, and petrochemical data imply that the petrogenesis of the two rock series differed in at least four significant ways: 1) While parent magmas to both rock series could have been derived from high-Al olivine tholeiite primary magmas by fractional crystallization of Pl+Ol+Cpx+Sp in lower to intermediate crustal (40-15 km) chambers, AS parent magmas were generally more evolved than TS magmas upon their introduction into the Duluth Complex. 2) As magmas were intruded as plagioclase crystal muses (less than or equal to50% crystals), whereas later TS intrusions contained rare or minor intratelluric plagioclase and olivine. Periodic intrusions of viscous AS mushes probably caused much of the structural complexity ubiquitous to these rocks. 3) Although parent magmas to both rock series were saturated in plagioclase upon intrusion, AS magmas were less often saturated in olivine than were TS magmas. 4) TS rocks record fractional crystallization within Duluth Complex chambers; however, the extent and pattern of differentiation often reflects repeated replenishment of more primitive magmas.

  6. Magma mixing and mingling on Deer, Niblack, and Etolin Islands, southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Lindline, J.; Crawford, W.A.; Crawford, M.L. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Intimately associated 20 m.a. hornblende-biotite granites and olivine gabbro norites occur on Etolin, Niblack and Deer Islands, southwest of Wrangell, Alaska. The field relationships suggest multiple injections of mafic and felsic phases within this igneous complex. Ellipsoidal to angular mafic magmatic enclaves occur in the granite, ranging in number from sparse to tightly packed swarms. Slightly curved decimeter sized rafts of fine grained mafic enclaves comprise a frozen fountain of mafic magma in the felsic host. Course-grained felsic dikes containing gabbroic zenoliths and ubiquitous fine-grained mafic pillows exhibiting sharp and sutured chilled borders intrude the layered gabbro. Synplutonic northeast trending fine-grained mafic and fine-grained felsic dikes mutually cross-cut the felsic pillow-bearing dikes. The granite consists of green hornblende, dark brown biotite, plagioclase and quartz. The mafic mineral assemblage changes from olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and plagioclase in the gabbro through intermediate-grained phases containing altered clinopyroxene, brown hornblende, red-brown biotite, plagioclase and quartz. The increase in proportion of hydrous mafic minerals from the gabbro to the fine-grained mafic enclaves and changes in pleochroic colors of biotite and hornblende from the intermediate-grained phases to the fine-grained mafic enclaves suggest chemical interaction between the mafic enclaves and their felsic host.

  7. Formation of a Martian Pyroxenite: A Comparative Study of the Nakhlite Meteorites and Theo's Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R. C.; Taylor, G. J.; Treiman, A. H.

    1999-01-01

    The unusual composition of the nakhlites, a group of pyroxenitic martian meteorites with young ages, presents an opportunity to learn about nonbasaltic magmatic activity on another planet. However, the limited number of these meteorites makes unraveling their history difficult. A promising terrestrial analog for the formation of the nakhlites is Theo's Flow in Ontario, Canada. This atypical, 120 m-thick flow differentiated in place, forming distinct layered lithologies of peridotite, pyroxenite, and gabbro. Theo's pyroxenite and the nakhlites share strikingly similar petrographies, with concentrated euhedral to subhedral augite grains set in a plagioclase-rich matrix. These two suites of rocks also share specific petrologic features, mineral and whole-rock compositional features, and size and spatial distributions of cumulus grains. The numerous similarities suggest that the nakhlites formed by a similar mechanism in a surface lava flow or shallow intrusion. Their formation could have involved settling of crystals in a phenocryst-laden flow or in situ nucleation and growth of pyroxenes in an ultramafic lava flow. The latter case is more likely and requires steady-state nucleation and growth of clusters of pyroxene grains (and olivine in the nakhlites), circulating in a strongly convecting melt pool, followed by settling and continued growth in a thickening cumulate pile. Trapped pockets of intercumulus liquid in the pile gradually evolved, finally growing Fe-enriched rims on cumulus grains. With sufficient evolution, the melt reached plagioclase supersaturation, causing rapid growth of plagioclase sprays and late-stage mesostasis growth.

  8. Quartz diorite veins in a peridotite xenolith from Tallante, Spain: implications for reaction and survival of slab-derived SiO2-oversaturated melt in the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, S.; Shimizu, Y.; Gervilla, F.

    We found quartz diorite veins (up to 5 mm thick), composed mainly of plagioclase and quartz, in a plagioclase-bearing spinel lherzolite xenolith in alkali basalt from Tallante, Southern Spain. The quartz diorite veins are coarse-grained, the average grain size being 0.5 mm, and have thin orthopyroxenite rim along olivine wall. Thinner veins free of quartz and composed solely of plagioclase with orthopyroxene selvage are much more common in other xenoliths from Tallante. The involved melt was strongly reactive with olivine to form orthopyroxene, which can protect against further reaction. This suggests how the silica-oversaturated melts, after supplied from downgoing slabs, can move through peridotite and reach the shallow mantle with preserving the silica-oversaturated character. The armor of orthopyroxenite is of vital importance for the melt to keep its silica-oversaturated character within peridotite. Precipitation of orthopyroxene combined with olivine consumption somewhat controls the general chemical trend of adakite. Orthopyroxenite vein network at the expense of olivine is expected to be common as fossil conduits within the mantle wedge. This kind of orthopyroxenite has contributed to Si-enrichment of the mantle wedge.

  9. Influence of water on rheology and strain localization in the lower continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getsinger, A. J.; Hirth, G.; Stünitz, H.; Goergen, E. T.

    2013-07-01

    We investigated deformation processes within a lower crustal shear zone exposed in gabbros from Arnøya, Norway. Over a distance of ˜1 m, the gabbro progresses from nominally undeformed to highly sheared where it is adjacent to a hydrous pegmatite. With increasing proximity to the pegmatite, there is a significant increase in the abundance of amphibole and zoisite (which form at the expense of pyroxene and calcic plagioclase) and a slight increase in the strength of plagioclase lattice-preferred orientation, but there is little change in recrystallized plagioclase grain size. Phase diagrams, the presence of hydrous reaction products, and deformation mechanism maps all indicate that the water activity (aH2O) during deformation must have been high (˜1) in the sheared gabbro compared with the nonhydrated, surrounding host gabbro. These observations indicate that fluid intrusion into mafic lower crust initiates syn-deformational, water-consuming reactions, creating a rheological contrast between wet and dry lithologies that promote strain localization. Thus, deformation of lower continental crust can be accommodated in highly localized zones of enhanced fluid infiltration. These results provide an example of how fluid weakens lower continental crust lithologies at high pressures and temperatures.

  10. A lunar differentiation model in light of new chemical data on Luna 20 and Apollo 16 soils.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nava, D. F.; Philpotts, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Fines from a Luna 20 soil sample and from three Apollo 16 deep drill core samples have been analyzed for major-minor element abundances by a combined, semi-micro atomic absorption spectrophotometric and colorimetric method. Both the major element and large ion lithophile trace element abundances in these soils, the first from interior highland sites, are greatly influenced by the very high normative plagioclase content, being distinctly richer in Al and Ca, and poorer in K, P, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Ti, than most bulk soil samples from previous lunar missions. The relatively large compositional variations in the Apollo 16 core can be ascribed almost entirely to decreasing plagioclase with increasing depth. The chemical composition of the Luna 20 soil indicates less plagioclase and less KREEP than in the Apollo 16 soils. A lunar differentiation model is presented in which is made the suggestion that KREEP is the result of a second fusion event in a lunar crust consisting of early feldspathic cumulates and primary aluminous 'liquid.'

  11. The role of subgrain boundaries in partial melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Jamie S. F.; Mosher, Sharon; Rahl, Jeffrey M.

    2016-08-01

    Evidence for partial melting along subgrain boundaries in quartz and plagioclase is documented for rocks from the Lost Creek Gneiss of the Llano Uplift, central Texas, the Wet Mountains of central Colorado, and the Albany-Fraser Orogen, southwestern Australia. Domains of quartz or plagioclase crystals along subgrain boundaries are preferentially involved in partial melting over unstrained domains of these minerals. Material along subgrain boundaries in quartz and plagioclase has the same morphology as melt pseudomorphs present along grain boundaries and is commonly laterally continuous with this former grain boundary melt, indicating the material along subgrain boundaries can also be categorized as a melt pseudomorph. Subgrain boundaries consist of arrays of dislocations within a crystal lattice, and unlike fractures would not act as conduits for melt migration. Instead, the presence of former melt along subgrain boundaries requires that partial melting occurred in these locations because it is kinetically more favorable for melting reactions to occur there. Preferential melting in high strain locations may be attributed to strain energy, which provides a minor energetic contribution to the reaction and leads to preferential melting in locations with weakened bonds, and/or the presence of small quantities of water associated with dislocations, which may enhance diffusion rates or locally lower the temperature needed for partial melting.

  12. Petrogenesis of tholeiitic basalts from the Central Atlantic magmatic province as revealed by mineral major and trace elements and Sr isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzoli, Andrea; Jourdan, Fred; Bussy, François; Chiaradia, Massimo; Costa, Fidel

    2014-02-01

    The petrogenesis of the Kerforne dyke tholeiitic basalts (Brittany, France), the northernmost outcrop of the 200 Ma Central Atlantic magmatic province (CAMP), is constrained by its zoned augite and plagioclase crystals. Augite cores with high Mg/Fe and Cr suggest crystallization from near-primary magmas, with slightly enriched Rare Earth element (REE) patterns. Plagioclase crystals with high-An (An85) rounded cores are MgO- and K-rich, REE-poor, and display 87Sr/86Sr200Ma (0.7058) significantly higher than those of the surrounding ground-mass (0.7052-0.7053) suggesting open-system evolution processes. We propose a differentiation process involving mixing of different mafic magmas which occurred in less than a few hundred years judging from the lack of diffusive re-equilibration of major and trace elements in augite and of 87Sr/86Sr200Ma in plagioclase cores. The relatively large range of incompatible element contents and ratios of observed and calculated magmas are possibly due to fractional crystallization and to moderate amounts of crustal contamination which affected the more primitive magmas in particular. The calculated magmas reach near-primitive compositions and suggest that they originated from melting of a spinel peridotite slightly enriched in LREE vs. HREE.

  13. On the origin of rhythmic layering in layered gabbros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rhythmic layering of silicates (plagioclase, pyroxene and olivine), ilmenite and magnitite is a common feature in mafic-ultramafic intrusions. The origin of rhythmic layering has been hotly debated in the literatures. Proposed mechanisms include gravity differentiation, double-diffusive convection, oscillatory crystallization of magma, repeated injection and supplement of magma, etc. Here we provide detailed FTIR and EBSD studies on the water content and deformation microstructure of gabbros from the Panzhihua intrusion and experimentally deformed synthetic gabrros and magnetite aggregates with a volume ratio of 6:4. The FTIR analyses revealed a significant amount of hydroxyls in both clinopyroxene (411-775 ppm) and plagioclase (328-716 ppm), suggesting a high water content mantle plume source. The EBSD analyses show similar fabrics in constitutent minerals of natural and experimental specimens: a weak clinopyroxene fabric of (100) parallel to foliation and [001] parallel to lineation; a strong plagioclase fabric of (010) parallel to foliation and [100] parallel to lineation, a weak ilmenite fabric of (001) parallel to foliation and [hk0] parallel to lieantion; and a near random magnitite fabric. There is an obvious rhythmic layering in sheared gabrros and magnetite aggregates similar to natural observations. Our results revealed strong layer-parallel shearing deformation during the formation of the Panxi layered intructions. There is a significant strength contrast between gabbro and Fe-Ti oxides. We propose that the formation of the rhythmic layering in mafic-ultramafic intrusions is caused mainly by rheological stratification of Fe-Ti oxides and gabbros.

  14. Geochemical characteristics of hydrous basaltic magmas due to assimilation and fractional crystallization: the Ikoma gabbroic complex, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, N.; Okudaira, T.; Ogawa, D.; Yamashita, K.; Suda, Y.

    2016-02-01

    To clarify the processes that occur in hydrous basaltic magma chambers, we have undertaken detailed petrological and geochemical analyses of mafic and intermediate rocks from the Ikoma gabbroic complex, southwest Japan. The complex consists mainly of hornblende gabbros, hornblende gabbronorites, and hornblende leucogabbros. The hornblende leucogabbros are characterized by low TiO2 and high CaO contents, whereas the hornblende gabbronorites have high TiO2 and low CaO contents. The initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (SrI) of the hornblende gabbronorites and hornblende gabbros are higher than those of the hornblende leucogabbros and plagioclase, and they may have resulted from a higher degree of assimilation of metasediments. The geochemical features of the hornblende leucogabbros and hornblende gabbronorites can be explained by accumulation of plagioclase and ilmenite, respectively, in a hybrid magma that formed by chemical interaction between mafic magma and metasediment, whereas the hornblende gabbros were produced by a high degree of crustal assimilation and fractional crystallization of this hybrid magma. As a result of the density differences between crystals and melt, the Ikoma gabbroic rocks formed by the accumulation of plagioclase in the middle of the magma chamber and by the accumulation of ilmenite in the bottom of the chamber. Taking into account the subsequent assimilation and fractional crystallization, our observations suggest an enriched mantle (SrI = ~0.7071) as the source material for the Ikoma gabbros.

  15. Oxygen isotope constraints on the petrogenesis of Aleutian arc magmas

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, B.S.; O'Neil, J.R. ); Brophy, J.G. )

    1992-04-01

    The first measurement of {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O ratios of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, and titanomagnetite phenocrysts from modern Aleutian island-arc lavas provides new insight and independent constraints on magma sources and intracrustal processes. Basalts are heterogeneous on the scale of the entire arc and individual volcanic centers. Combined with Sr isotope and trace element data {delta}{sup 18}O{sub plag} values suggest a variable magma source characterized by differences in the mantle wedge or the subducted sediment component along the volcanic front. Seven tholeiitic basalt to rhyodacite lavas from the Seguam volcanic center have nearly identical {delta}{sup 18}O{sub plag} values of 6.0{per thousand} {plus minus} 0.2{per thousand}, reflecting extensive closed-system plagioclase-dominated crystal fractionation. Oxygen isotope thermometry and pyroxene and oxide equilibria indicate that differentiation occurred between 1,150 {plus minus} 100C (basalt) and 950 {plus minus} 100C (rhyodacite). In contrast, {delta}{sup 18}O{sub plag} values of 12 calc-alkalic basaltic andesites and andesites from the smaller Kanaga volcanic center span a broader range of 5.9{per thousand}-6.6{per thousand}, and consist of mostly higher values. Isotopic disequilibrium in the Kanaga system is manifest in two ways: two types of basaltic inclusions with contrasting {delta}{sup 18}O values occur in one andesite, and in two other andesites plagioclase-titanomagnetite and clinopyroxene-titanomagnetite oxygen isotope temperatures are inconsistent.

  16. Latest quaternary volcanism in the St. George Basin, southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Millings, V.T. III; Green, J.D.; Nusbaum, R.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The St. George Basin was the site of mafic volcanism from about 6 Ma to 1 ka. The nature of latest Quaternary volcanism is of interest because the Basin is recognized as a low temperature (< 90C) geothermal resource area and it is part of the transition zone between the Basin and Range Province and the Colorado Plateau. The authors have studied the geochemistry, mineralogy, and aerial distribution of two of the youngest eruptions centers: (1) Veyo Volcano; and (2) the Diamond Valley scoria cones (DVSC). Veyo Volcano erupted basaltic andesite, beginning with an explosive stage marked by a 0.5 m basal Plinian layer. Later eruptions alternated between quiescent and Strombolian-styles. Phenocrysts include clear plagioclase, sieve-texture plagioclase, olivine and rare augite. The DVSC and associated Santa Clara lava flow are tholeiitic basalt, consisting of olivine phenocrysts, and rare plagioclase phenocrysts. Based on preliminary geochemical data, Diamond Valley rocks exhibit lower incompatible element ratios compared to mafic rocks on the Markagunt Plateau and transition zone rocks. In contrast, Veyo Volcano rocks are similar to transition zone mafic rocks with regard to incompatible element abundances.

  17. Ar-40-Ar-39 microanalysis of single 74220 glass balls and 72435 breccia clasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huneke, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Ar-40-Ar-39 age measurements on single orange glass balls from the Apollo 17 soil 74220 and individual clasts from the Apollo 17 highland breccia 72435 are reported. The measurements required the use of newly established microanalytical techniques to obtain high quality analyses on about 0.5 mg particles with only a few hundred ppm K. An age of 3.60 plus or minus 0.04 b.y. is determined for the orange glass. No corrections for a trapped Ar-40 component were required. The glass forming event occurred at the very end of or after the extrusion of the mare basalts at the Apollo 17 site. An extremely well defined age plateau at 3.86 plus or minus 0.04 b.y. was determined for a 72435 plagioclase clast with attached matrix. A second large plagioclase crystal yielded significantly older ages over the last 60% of Ar release at high temperatures and is a relict clast incompletely degassed at the time of breccia formation. 72435 also contains plagioclase clasts with primitive Sr and a 4.55 AE old dunite clast. The Ar results provide additional evidence for the association of chemically unequilibrated, relict clasts with both primitive Sr and older K/Ar ages.

  18. Chemical trends in the Ice Springs basalt, Black Rock Desert, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, W.C.; Nash, W.P.

    1980-06-01

    The Holocene Ice Springs volcanic field of west-central Utah consists of 0.53 km/sup 3/ of tholeiitic basalts erupted as a sequence of nested cinder cones and associated lava flows. Whole rock x-ray fluorescence and atomic absorption analysis of ninety-six samples of known relative age document statistically significant inter- and intra-eruption chemical variations. Elemental trends include increases in Ti, Fe, Ca, P, and Sr and decreases in Si, K, Rb, Ni, Cr, and Zr with decreasing age. Microprobe analyses of microphenocrysts of olivine, plagioclase, and Fe-Ti oxides and of groundmass olivine, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene indicate limited chemical variation between mineral assemblages of the eruptive events. Petrographic analyses have identified the presence of minor amounts of silicic xenoliths, orthopyroxene megacrysts, and plagioclase xenocrysts. Potassium-argon determinations establish the existence of excess argon in the basaltic cinder (30.05 x 10/sup -12/ moles/gm) and in distal lava flows (8.29 x 10/sup -12/ moles/gm) which suggest apparent ages of 16 and 4.3 million years respectively. Strontium isotopic data (Puskar and Condie, 1973) show systematic variations from oldest eruptions (87Sr/86Sr=0.7052) to youngest eruptions (87Sr/86Sr=0.7059).

  19. Mercury's core fraction and ancient crustal composition: Predictions from planetary formation under extremely reducing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. M.; Elkins-Tanton, L.

    2007-12-01

    Several hypotheses have been suggested to explain the paradox of Mercury's large core, which is on the order of sixty percent of the mass of the planet and recently demonstrated to be at least partially molten. Here we suggest that extremely reducing conditions in the earliest stages of planetary accretion nearest to the Sun may have produced the unusual metallic iron fraction by reducing iron otherwise bound into silicates. We demonstrate the formation conditions necessary for various meteoritic bulk compositions to produce the core/mantle ratio of Mercury. During this hypothetical core formation, we assume the remaining silicate fraction of Mercury (now largely lacking iron) has been heated to produce a magma ocean. The resulting cumulate mantle composition is calculated in a Matlab simulation of magma ocean solidification using a CMAS system adapted for Mercury. Plagioclase flotation, frequently cited as the necessary signature of a magma ocean, is highly dependent upon initial bulk composition. We demonstrate the initial silicate iron content of the magma ocean necessary to make plagioclase buoyant and thus produce a plagioclase flotation crust as seen on the Moon. In addition, over a range of bulk compositions the solidified mantle cumulates are unstable to gravitational overturn. During overturn hot cumulates rise from depth and may cross their solidi and melt, producing an earliest planetary crust. This crust may still exist on Mercury. With the first flyby results of the MESSENGER mission coming this winter, predictions from these models can be compared with initial ground measurements.

  20. FUN with PANURGE - High mass resolution ion microprobe measurements of Mg in Allende inclusions. [meteoritic composition isotope analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huneke, J. C.; Armstrong, J. T.; Wassserburg, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Isotopic ratios have been determined, at a precision level approaching that of counting statistics using beam switching, by employing PANURGE, a modified CAMECA IMS3F ion microprobe at a mass resolving power of 5000. This technique is used to determine the isotopic composition of Mg and Si and the atomic ratio of Al/Mg in minerals from the Allende inclusion WA and the Allende FUN inclusion C1. Results show enrichment in Mg-26 of up to 260 percent. Results of Mg and Al/Mg measurements on cogenetic spinel inclusion and host plagiclase crystals show Mg-Al isochrons in excellent agreement with precise mineral isochrons determined by thermal emission mass spectrometry. The measurements are found to confirm the presence of substantial excess Mg-26 in WA and its near absence in C1. Data is obtained which indicates a metamorphic reequilibrium of Mg in Allende plagioclase at least 0.6 my after WA formation. Ion probe measurements are obtained which confirm that the Mg composition in Allende C1 is highly fractionated and is uniform among pyroxene, melilite, plagioclase, spinel crystals, and spinel included in melilite and plagioclase crystals.

  1. Important role of magma mixing in generating the Mesozoic monzodioritic-granodioritic intrusions related to Cu mineralization, Tongling, East China: Evidence from petrological and in situ Sr-Hf isotopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. J.; Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Wang, Z. Q.

    2016-04-01

    The Mesozoic ore-bearing high-Mg monzodioritic-granodioritic rocks in the Tongling mining district (East China) have been described as having adakitic affinities, and their origin has been attributed to partial melting of delaminated eclogite at depth in the mantle, followed by interaction of the resultant granitic magma with mantle peridotite. Here we present petrological data and in situ Sr isotopic data for zoned plagioclase that are inconsistent with the eclogite-derived model and instead propose a model that involves magma mixing of siliceous crustal melts and basaltic magma that was derived from metasomatized mantle in a back-arc extensional regime. The principal geochemical signatures of these Mesozoic rocks include a high-K calc-alkaline affinity, high values of Mg#, high Sr-Ba abundances, high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, εNd(t) = - 13.1 to - 9.0, and ISr = 0.70707-0.70824. The magma mixing model is supported by (1) the common existence of mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) and the disequilibrium textures of plagioclase and amphibole, (2) the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of embayed high-Ca cores of plagioclase that are distinctly lower than in the euhedral low-Ca overgrowth rims, (3) the negative correlations between whole-rock Nd and Sr isotopic ratios, and (4) the significant differences in the values of εHf(t) (- 9.5 to - 26) within different zircons from the same intrusion.

  2. Mare basalt magma source region and mare basalt magma genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, A.B.

    1982-11-15

    Given the available data, we find that the wide range of mare basaltic material characteristics can be explained by a model in which: (1) The mare basalt magma source region lies between the crust-mantle boundary and a maximum depth of 200 km and consists of a relatively uniform peridotite containing 73--80% olivine, 11--14% pyroxene, 4--8% plagioclase, 0.2--9% ilmenite and 1--1.5% chromite. (2) The source region consists of two or more density-graded rhythmic bands, whose compositions grade from that of the very low TiO/sub 2/ magma source regions (0.2% ilmenite) to that of the very high TiO/sub 2/ magma source regions (9% ilmenite). These density-graded bands are proposed to have formed as co-crystallizing olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase, ilmenite, and chromite settled out of a convecting magma (which was also parental to the crust) in which these crystals were suspended. Since the settling rates of the different minerals were governed by Stoke's law, the heavier minerals settled out more rapidly and therefore earlier than the lighter minerals. Thus the crystal assemblages deposited nearest the descending side of each convection cell were enriched in heavy ilmenite and chromite with respect to lighter olivine and pyroxene and very much lighter plagioclase. The reverse being the case for those units deposited near the ascending sides of the convection cells.

  3. A Nd and Sr isotopic study of the Trinity peridotite Implications for mantle evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, S. B.; Quick, J. E.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    Field evidence is reported which indicates that the Trinity peridotite in Northern California was partially melted during its rise as part of the upwelling convecting mantle at a spreading center. A Sm-Nd mineral isochron for a plagioclase Iherzolite yielded an age of about 427 Ma which is significantly higher than that expected for depleted mantle during this period. The age is interpreted as the time of crystallization of trapped melt in the plagioclase Iherzolite P-T field, and probably represents the time when the massif was incorporated as a part of the oceanic lithosphere. The Sm-Nd model age of the plagioclase Iherzolite total rock is 3.4 AE. This suggests that the peridotite was derived from a mantle that was depleted early in earth history. Although most available data indicate that the depleted upper mantle has been relatively well stirred through time, the Trinity data suggest that very ancient Nd isotropic values are preserved and chemical and physical heterogeneities are sometimes preserved in the depleted source of midocean ridge basalts as well as the oceanic lithosphere which they intrude.

  4. An exsolution silica-pump model for the origin of myrmekite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castle, Robert O.; Lindsley, Donald H.

    1993-03-01

    Myrmekite, as defined here, is the microscopic intergrowth between vermicular quartz and modestly anorthitic plagioclase (calcic albite-oligoclase), intimately associated with potassium feldspar in plutonic rocks of granitic composition. Hypotheses previously invoked in explanation of myrmekite include: (1) direct crystallization; (2) replacement; (3) exsolution. The occurrence of myrmekite in paragneisses and its absence in rocks devold of discrete grains of potassium feldspar challenge those hypotheses based on direct crystallization or replacement. However, several lines of evidence indicate that myrmekite may in fact originate in response to kinetic effects associated with the exsolution of calcic alkali feldspar into discrete potassium feldspar and plagioclase phases. Exsolution of potassium feldspar system projected from [AlSi2O8] involves the exchange CaAlK-1Si-1, in which the AlSi-1 tetrahedral couple is resistant to intracrystalline diffusion. By contrast, diffusion of octahedral K proceeds relatively easily where it remains uncoupled to the tetrahedral exchange. We suggest here that where the ternary feldspar system is open to excess silica, the exchange reaction that produces potassium feldspar in the ternary plane is aided by the net-transfer reaction K+Si=Orthoclase, leaving behind indigenous Si that reports as modal quartz in the evolving plagioclase as the CaAl component is concomitantly incorporated in this same phase. Thus silica is “pumped” into the reaction volume from a “silica reservoir”, a process that enhances redistribution of both Si and Al through the exsolving ternary feldspar.

  5. Texture and elastic anisotropy of a mylonitic anorthosite from the Morin Shear Zone (Quebec, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Barreiro, Juan; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Vogel, Sven

    2015-02-01

    A sample of anorthosite from the granulite facies Morin Shear Zone (Quebec, Canada) was investigated for crystal preferred orientation and elastic anisotropy. Time-of-flight neutron diffraction data obtained with the HIPPO diffractometer at LANSCE were analyzed with the Rietveld method to obtain orientation distribution functions of the principal phases (plagioclase, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene). Texture and microstructures are compatible with the plastic deformation of the aggregate under high-T conditions. All mineral phases depict a significant preferred orientation that could be related to the general top-to-the north shearing history of the Morin Shear Zone. Texture patterns suggest that (010)[001] in plagioclase and (110)[001] in clinopyroxene are likely dominant slip systems. Using preferred orientation data P- and S-waves velocities and elastic anisotropy were calculated and compared with previous studies to explore elastic properties of rocks with different pyroxene-plagioclase mixtures. P-wave velocity, S-wave splitting and anisotropy increase with clinopyroxene content. Seismic anisotropy is linked to the texture symmetry which can lead to large deviations between actual anisotropy and that measured along Cartesian XYZ sample directions (lineation/foliation reference frame). This is significant for the prediction and interpretation of seismic data, particularly for monoclinic or triclinic texture symmetries.

  6. Anorthosite assimilation and the origin of the Mg/Fe-related bimodality of pristine moon rocks - Support for the magmasphere hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, P. H.

    1986-01-01

    The geochemical bimodality of pristine rocks led to proposals that a major fraction of the crust (the Mg rich suite) formed in cumulates in numerous intrusions slightly younger than the magmasphere. It is suggested that assimilation helped to engender the bimodal patterns. Mass/energy balance calculations indicate that large proportions of plagioclase were probably assimilated from the older (Magmasphere-generated) ferroan anorthosite crust by most of the Mg-rich intrusive melts. The magmasphere, in the absence of assimilation probably did not yield appreciable plagioclase until fractional crystallization of mafic silicates had diminished the melt mg ratio to about 0.42. However, assuming identical melt composition, an Mg-rich intrusion assimilating ferroan anorthosite would have reached plagioclase saturation at a much higher mg, about 0.66. It is suggested that the current version of the magmasphere hypothesis (ferroan anorthosites = magmasphere flotation cumulates; Mg-rich rocks = products of younger, localized intrusions) is the only plausable mechanism for engendering the Mg/Fe-relate bimodality.

  7. Lunar anorthosite 60025, the petrogenesis of lunar anorthosites, and the composition of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, G.

    1982-01-01

    The mineral chemistry of the lunar anorthosite 60025 is investigated, and a model for the differentiation of the moon is proposed based on these findings. Among other results, it is concluded that 60025 is a mixture of pieces from a related sequence of anorthosites, and that this sequence was generated by near-perfect accumulate growth during strong fractional crystallization. The parent liquid of the most primitive anorthosite was saturated with olivine, plagioclase, pigeonite, and chromite, and evolved to one saturated with plagioclase, pigeonite, high-Ca clinopyroxene, and ilmenite. The steep slope of anorthosites on an Mg (mafics) vs. Ab (plagioclase) diagram is a result of the very low alkali content of the magma and of the original magma ocean. The bulk moon had low Al2O3, a sub-chondritic Ca/Al ratio, and REE abundances and patterns which were probably close to chondritic. In addition, mare basalt sources were found to be too magnesian and some contain too much high Ca clinopyroxene to be directly or simply complementary to a floated anorthosite crust.

  8. T-XCO2 stability relations and phase equilibria of a calcic carbonate scapolite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aitken, B.G.

    1983-01-01

    At a total pressure of 5 kb, calcic, Cl-free scapolite (Me83) is stable relative to plagioclase-bearing assemblages at T ??? 625??C, XCO2 ??? 0.12. With decreasing temperature, scapolite breaks down to plagioclase + calcite. Scapolite is replaced by plagioclase + grossular + cancrinite + CO2 in the presence of H2O-rich fluids. The stable coexistence of scapolite and calcite, an assemblage typical of most natural occurrences of calcic scapolite, is limited by the reaction: scapolite + calcite ??? grossular + cancrinite + CO2, which occurs at 750??C, XCO2 = 0.46; 700??C, XCO2 = 0.33; 650??C, XCO2 = 0.18, for the chosen bulk composition. Generalization of the experimental results to encompass the complete range of fully carbonated scapolite compositions indicates that mizzonite (Me75) has the largest T-XCO2 stability field. For scapolite more calcic than mizzonite, stable growth is restricted to conditions of increasingly higher temperature and XCO2. The experimental results are consistent with various petrologic features of scapolite-bearing rocks, particularly scapolite-clinopyroxene granulites, and indicate that such rocks were formed in the presence of CO2-rich fluids. ?? 1983.

  9. Solute profiles in soils, weathering gradients and exchange equilibrium/disequilibrium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Schulz, M.S.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Vivit, D.V.; Fitzpatrick, J.; Bullen, T.

    2008-01-01

    The spatial and temporal changes in hydrology and pore water elemental and 87/86Sr compositions were used to determine contemporary weathering rates in a 65 to 226 ky old soil chronosequence formed from granitic sediments deposited on marine terraces along coastal California. Cl-corrected Na, K and Si increased with depth denoting inputs from the weathering of plagioclase and K-feldspar. Solute 87/86Sr exhibited progressive mixing of sea water-dominated precipitation with inputs from less radiogenic plagioclase. Linear approximations to these weathering gradients were used to determine plagioclase weathering rates of between 0.38 and 8.9 ?? 10-15 moles m-2 s-1. The lack of corresponding weathering gradients for Ca and Sr indicated short-term equilibrium with the clay ion exchange pool which requires periodic resetting by natural perturbations to maintain continuity, in spite of soil composition changes reflecting the effects of long-term weathering. ?? 2008 The Mineralogical Society.

  10. Diagenesis Along Fractures in an Eolian Sandstone, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Yen, A. S.; Rampe, E. B.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Blake, D. F.; Bristow, T. F.; Chipera, S. J.; Downs, R.; Morris, R. V.; Morrison, S. M.; Vaniman, D. T.; Gellert, R.; Sutter, B.; Treiman, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity has been exploring sedimentary deposits in Gale crater since August 2012. The rover has traversed up section through approx.100 m of sedimentary rocks deposited in fluvial, deltaic, lacustrine, and eolian environments (Bradbury group and overlying Mount Sharp group). The Stimson formation lies unconformable over a lacustrine mudstone at the base of the Mount Sharp group and has been interpreted to be a cross-bedded sandstone of lithified eolian dunes. Mineralogy of the unaltered Stimson sandstone consists of plagioclase feldspar, pyroxenes, and magnetite with minor abundances of hematite, and Ca-sulfates (anhydrite, bassanite). Unaltered sandstone has a composition similar to the average Mars crustal composition. Alteration "halos" occur adjacent to fractures in the Stimson. Fluids passing through these fractures have altered the chemistry and mineralogy of the sandstone. Silicon and S enrichments and depletions in Al, Fe, Mg, Na, K, Ni and Mn suggest aqueous alteration in an open hydrologic system. Mineralogy of the altered Stimson is dominated by Ca-sulfates, Si-rich X-ray amorphous materials along with plagioclase feldspar, magnetite, and pyroxenes, but less abundant in the altered compared to the unaltered Stimson sandstone and lower pyroxene/plagioclase feldspar. The mineralogy and geochemistry of the altered sandstone suggest a complicated history with several (many?) episodes of aqueous alteration under a variety of environmental conditions (e.g., acidic, alkaline).

  11. Geochronology and geochemistry of leucosomes in the North Dabie Terrane, East China: implication for post-UHPM crustal melting during exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shui-Jiong; Li, Shu-Guang; Chen, Li-Juan; He, Yong-Sheng; An, Shi-Chao; Shen, Ji

    2013-05-01

    Migmatites are widespread in the North Dabie ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic terrane (NDT) of Dabie orogen, East China. Idiomorphic and poikilitic amphibole grains in both leucosome and melanosome contain inclusions of plagioclase, quartz and biotite, suggesting formation of leucosome by fluid-present melting of biotite + plagioclase + quartz-bearing protoliths at P = 5-7 kbar, T = 700-800 °C. Precise SIMS zircon U-Pb dating indicates that migmatization of Dabie orogen initiated at ~140 Ma and lasted for ~10 Ma, coeval with the formation of low-Mg# adakitic intrusions in Dabie orogen. Based on mineralogical, petrographic and geochemical data, leucosomes in NDT can be subdivided into three groups. (1) High La/Yb(N)-Medium Sr/Y group (Group I), whose high Dy/Yb(N) but medium Sr/Y ratios are caused by amphibole and plagioclase residual during partial melting of dioritic to granodioritic gneisses. (2) Low La/Yb(N)-Low Sr/Y group (Group II), whose flat HREE patterns are produced by entrainment of peritectic amphiboles into melts derived from partial melting of dioritic gneiss. (3) High La/Yb(N)-High Sr/Y and Eu# group (Group III), whose extremely high Sr and Eu but low other REE concentrations are caused by accumulation of plagioclase and quartz. Although Group I and III fall in the adakitic fields on La/Yb(N)-Yb(N) and Sr/Y-Y diagrams, they are chemically distinct from contemporary high-pressure adakitic intrusions in Dabie orogen in a series of geochemical indexes, for example, lower Dy/Yb(N) and/or Sr/Y ratios at given La/Yb(N) ratio, lower Sr/CaO ratios, lower Rb concentration but higher K/Rb ratios. Therefore, leucosomes are produced by anatexis of the exhumed ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks at middle crustal level, instead of partial melting of thickened lower crust with garnet-rich and plagioclase-poor residual. The coeval occurrence of migmatites and high-pressure adakitic intrusions in Dabie orogen indicates large-scale partial melting of middle to

  12. Anisotropy of Silicate-Hosted Magnetite Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, G. R.; Feinberg, J. M.; Renne, P. R.

    2004-12-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic properties is a hallmark of silicate crystals with oriented iron-oxide inclusions. Strongly magnetic magnetite-bearing silicates (10-1 A m-1) are common components of gabbros and layered intrusions, contributing to local and regional magnetic anomalies. Additionally, these iron-oxide silicates hold the promise of being exceptional paleomagnetic recorders owing to their features of: physical/chemical isolation from altering fluids, chemical equilibrium with their silicate host, and long relaxation times (enhanced coercivity). However, anisotropy of remanence must be understood before these advantageous features can be utilized. Measurements of single crystals of clinopyroxene and plagioclase (10-4 g) show anisotropy in direction and intensity that directly reflect the crystallography of the silicate host. The host controls both the crystallographic orientation of the magnetite (magnetocrystalline anisotropy) and the elongation direction of the magnetite inclusion (shape anisotropy). We have found another source of anisotropy that involves an internal exsolution of ulvöspinel within titanomagnetite inclusions. This also reflects a host control as this second exsolution occurs along the magnetite \\{100\\}. This fixed wall shape anisotropy creates an array of interacting single domain magnetite parallelepipeds, parallel to \\{100\\}. Each of these anisotropies contributes to enhanced coercivity of remanence, which significantly exceeds the IRM saturation magnetization for magnetite (300 mT). The anisotropy of IRM (aIRM@ 1.1 T) of magnetite-bearing clinopyroxene and plagioclase shows clustering of directions, reflecting the mixture of variables that include: inclusion elongation direction and abundance, orientation of magnetite easy axes relative to the applied field, inclusion aspect ratio and diameter, and pre-existing magnetic domain structure. For pyroxene (monoclinic) with two arrays of needle-shaped magnetite inclusions, the aIRM is

  13. The Effect of Variable Greenschist Alteration on the Offset Zone of the Lac Des Iles Pd Deposit, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreau, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    The recently discovered Offset zone of the Mine Block Intrusion of the Lac des Iles Complex hosts Pd deposits with unusually high Pd/Pt and Pd/Ir ratios in rocks that range from relatively unaltered mineralized norite to chlorite-actinolite-talc schist. Questions remain as to the degree the deposit is magmatic or has been upgraded by later fluid activity. Quantitative assessment of the effect of progressive alteration using mineral modes was done using total silicate H2O as a monitor of reaction progress (ξ = moles H2O added to form alteration minerals). Major mineral modal variations define three reaction regions: (1) ξ = 0.00 - 0.03, characterized by epidote/clinozoisite formation and some amphibole, (2) ξ = 0.03 - 0.23, characterized by precipitation of chlorite, amphibole, quartz muscovite/sericite and calcite after plagioclase + pyroxene and (3) ξ = 0.23 - 0.28, characterized by the production of talc after earlier formed amphibole. Epidote occurs as an incongruent product from the destruction of plagioclase that is itself lost as the reaction proceeds. Pyroxene is altered at about twice the rate of plagioclase, resulting in pyroxene-rich protoliths to be more altered than those relatively enriched in plagioclase. Major elements variations largely reflect variations in the plagioclase/pyroxene ratio of the protolith but suggest mainly a loss of Na with reaction progress. Base metal sulfides chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite and pentlandite show decreasing abundance with reaction progress, dissolving incongruently to pyrite and magnetite as intermediate reaction products. Millerite is overall low but increase slightly. A more limited data set on the platinum-group minerals suggests that PGE-arsenides increase whereas PGE-sulfides and PGE-Bi-tellurides decrease with reaction progress. Assuming ore element concentrations in the protolith were constant and similar to relatively fresh norites, Pd increases modestly, by 5%, whereas Pt decreases by about 65% in the most

  14. The Lac Des Iles Palladium Deposit, Ontario, Canada part I. The effect of variable alteration on the Offset Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreau, Alan; Djon, Lionnel; Tchalikian, Arnaud; Corkery, John

    2014-06-01

    The recently discovered Offset Zone of the Mine Block Intrusion of the Lac des Iles Complex hosts palladium mineralization with unusually high Pd/Pt and Pd/Ir ratios in rocks that range from relatively unaltered norite to amphibolites and chlorite-actinolite-talc schist. Quantitative assessment of the effect of progressive alteration using mineral modes was done using total silicate H2O as a monitor of reaction progress ( ξ = moles H2O added to form alteration minerals per 100 g of rock). Major mineral modal variations define three reaction regions: (1) ξ = 0.00-0.03, characterized by epidote/clinozoisite formation and some amphibole; (2) ξ = 0.03-0.23, characterized by formation of chlorite, amphibole, quartz muscovite/sericite, and calcite after plagioclase + pyroxene; and (3) ξ = 0.23-0.28, characterized by the formation of talc after earlier formed amphibole. Epidote occurs as an incongruent product from the destruction of plagioclase that is itself lost as the reaction proceeds. Pyroxene is altered at about twice the rate of plagioclase, resulting in pyroxene-rich protoliths to be more altered than those relatively enriched in plagioclase. Major elements variations largely reflect variations in the plagioclase/pyroxene ratio of the protolith, but compositional trends suggest a loss of Na with reaction progress. The base metal sulfides chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and pentlandite show decreasing abundance with reaction progress, forming pyrite (± magnetite) as an intermediate reaction product that also is lost as the reaction proceeds. Millerite is overall low but increases slightly. A more limited data set on the platinum-group minerals suggests that platinum-group element (PGE)-arsenides increase whereas PGE-sulfides and PGE-Bi-tellurides decrease with reaction progress. Assuming ore element concentrations in the protolith were constant and similar to relatively fresh norites, Pd increases modestly, by 5 %, whereas Pt decreases by about 65 % in the most

  15. Melt segregation evidence from a young pluton, Takidani Granodiorite (Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, Eva; Caricchi, Luca; Floess, David; Wallis, Simon; Harayama, Satoru; Chiaradia, Massimo; Kouzmanov, Kalin

    2016-04-01

    We are presenting new petrological data from one of the youngest exposed plutons in the world, the Takidani Granodiorite (Japan), which has been suggested as a source for large volume ignimbrites (> 300km3). Takidani Granodiorite (1.54 Ma ± 0.23 Ma) is located within the active Norikura Volcanic Chain in the Northen Japan Alps and has been previously linked to large andesitic (1.76 Ma ± 0.17 Ma) and rhyolitic eruptions (1.75 Ma ± 0.17 Ma). The pluton is vertically zoned and consists of granites (67 to 68 wt.% SiO2) in the lower section, granodiorites (65 to 66 wt.% SiO2) in the middle section, a chemically more evolved fine-grained porphyritic unit (67 to 71 wt.% SiO2) near the roof and a marginal granodiorite at the roof (67 to 68 wt.% SiO2). The porphyritic texture of the more evolved unit near the roof indicates rapid crystallisation, which could be the result of the late intrusion of this unit at the roof of the magmatic system. However, no sharp contact is found between the underlying granodiorite and the porphyritic unit. Instead, a gradual change in rock fabric, whole-rock chemistry and mineralogy is observed suggesting that melt was extracted from the granodiorite. Electron microprobe analyses of plagioclases show three main crystal populations (Type I, II and III) with distinct anorthite and Fe contents. Type I plagioclase (An30‑40) occurs dominantly within the marginal granodiorite at the roof. Type II plagioclase (An40‑45) are common in the granodiorite and porphyritic unit. Type III plagioclase (An45‑50) is predominantly present in the granite. All plagioclase populations share a common sodic rim (An22) across the different units. Takidani Granodiorite rocks are compared to crystallisation experiments from similar magmatic suites. Emplacement conditions of the Takidani Granodiorite are obtained from the latter as well as barometry, thermometry and hygrometry indicating that magmas were ultimately emplaced at around 200 MPa, 850° C to 875° C

  16. Timescales of Magmatic Processes Preceding Eruption in a Large, Extraordinarily Restless, Silicic Magma System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, N.; Costa Rodriguez, F.; Singer, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    Recent investigations of the Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field, central Chile, suggest the presence of a large, shallow, and active rhyolitic magma reservoir. Modest (up to ~1.2 km3) rhyolitic eruptions over the last 20 kyr encircle an area inflating at an average rate of 25 cm/yr since 2007. 40Ar/39Ar, 14C, and tephra stratigraphy indicate that the majority of rhyolitic volcanism was concentrated in two phases (phase 1 and 2) separated by 9 kyr of repose. Here we report new petrological and geochemical results in order to determine if LdM rhyolites were issued from the same reservoir, identify the nature and timescales of processes leading to their eruption, and begin to relate the spectacular signs of unrest to magmatic processes. All LdM rhyolites are crystal-poor and contain phenocrysts of plagioclase, biotite and rare quartz. Major and trace element contents indicate most plagioclase crystallized in equilibrium with the erupted rhyolitic magma. Incompatible trace element contents (e.g. Ce) delineate distinct crystal populations erupted during phases 1 and 2. Thus, the two magma reservoirs experienced limited physical interaction. A subset of crystal domains from both eruptive phases record melts inconsistent with the whole rock and glass, crystallization-dominated differentiation trend. Plagioclase erupted in the Early Espejos Tephra (phase 1), the largest recent explosive eruption, display the highest An and Mg contents and depletion of Ba and Sr. In contrast, early phase 2 plagioclase contain zones of Ba enrichment. This Mg and Ba enrichment records contrasting responses to the intrusion of mafic magma. The high Mg zones are consistent with an intermediate magma resulting from rhyolite and basalt mixing whereas the Ba enrichment results from melting of Ba-rich phases such as biotite and K-feldspar. Modeling of Mg, Sr, and Ba diffusion indicates that mixing between these Mg and Ba rich melts and the erupted magma body occurred within a year of eruption

  17. Pliocene to late Pleistocene magmatism in the Aurora Volcanic Field, Nevada and California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingdon, S.; Cousens, B.; John, D. A.; du Bray, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The 3.9- 0.1 Ma Aurora Volcanic Field (AVF) covers 325 km2 east and southeast of the Bodie Hills, north of Mono Lake, California, USA. The AVF is located immediately northwest of the Long Valley magmatic system and adjacent and overlapping the Miocene Bodie Hills Volcanic Field (BHVF). Rock types range from trachybasalt to trachydacite, and high-silica rhyolite. The trachybasalts to trachydacites are weakly to moderately porphyritic (1-30%) with variable phenocryst assemblages that are some combination of plagioclase, hornblende, clinopyroxene, and lesser orthopyroxene, olivine, and/or biotite. Microphenocrysts are dominated by plagioclase, and include opaque oxides, clinopyroxene, and apatite. These rocks are weakly to strongly devitrified. The high-silica rhyolites are sparsely porphyritic with trace to 10% phenocrysts of quartz, sanidine, plagioclase, biotite, (+/- hornblende), accessory opaque oxide minerals, titanite, allanite, (+/-apatite, zircon), and have glassy groundmasses. Rocks in the AVF are less strongly porphyritic than those of BHVF. Plagioclase phenocrysts are often oscillatory zoned and many have sieve texture. Amphiboles have distinct black opaque rims. Xenocrystic quartz and plagioclase are rare. AVF lavas have bimodal SiO2 compositions, ranging from 49 to 78 wt%, with a gap between 65 and 75 wt%. They are high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic in composition, and are metaluminous to weakly peraluminous. They are enriched in rare earth elements (REE), especially light REEs, compared to the Miocene BHVF rocks. Primordial mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns show arc- or subduction-related signatures, with enrichment in Ba and Pb, and depletion in Nb and Ta. Enrichment in K and Sr and depletion in Ti are less pronounced than in the BHVF rocks. There is no correlation between lead isotope ratios and silica (initial 206Pb/204Pb ratios range from 18.974 to 19.151). Neodymium isotope ratios show a moderate negative correlation with silica

  18. Water-saturated phase-equilibrium experiments on rhyolite and dacite obsidians: the effect of variable melt water concentration on the composition of phenocrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, L.; Lange, R. A.; Andrews, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    Results of water-saturated phase equilibrium experiments on three obsidians ranging in composition from dacite to rhyolite (67-74 wt% SiO2) are presented and demonstrate the effect of changing melt water concentrations on the composition of plagioclase and orthopyroxene phenocrysts. Experiments were conducted in a cold-seal Ni-rich pressure vessel (Waspaloy) with Ni filler rod, so that experiments were buffered at ΔNNO +1 (± 0.5) (Gershwind & Rutherford, 1992) and pressurized with H2O (where Ptotal= PH2O). Temperatures ranged from 750-900°C and pressures ranged from 100-300 MPa. Prior to the experiments, detailed petrologic studies were first conducted on the three obsidian samples, which are from Cascade and Mexican arcs. Overall phenocryst abundances in all three samples are low (<2.3%), with little to no microlite crystallization. Despite low phenocryst abundances, the obsidians are saturated in five to seven mineral phases: plagioclase + orthopyroxene + ilmenite + magnetite + apatite ± clinopyroxene ± biotite. Eruptive temperatures (±1σ), on the basis of Fe-Ti two oxide thermometry (Ghiorso & Evans, 2008), range from 760 ± 18°C to 943 ± 20°C; corresponding ΔNNO values (±1σ) range from -0.9 ± 0.1 and 0.7 ± 0.1. Plagioclase compositions span a wide range in each sample (e.g., 9-40 and 30-54 mol% An), despite low phenocryst abundances. Orthopyroxene compositions also span a wide range (≤ 15 mol% En), which correspond to Fe-MgKD(opx-liq) values that range from 0.18-0.46. Given the low crystallinity, absence of evidence for mixing of magmas, and no apparent change in oxygen fugacity recorded by iron oxides, the progressive loss of water from a melt, through degassing during rapid magma ascent, is a plausible hypothesis to explain the observed variation in phenocryst compositions. This hypothesis is evaluated with the run products from the water-saturated phase equilibrium experiments on the three obsidian samples. The experimental results indicate

  19. Brittle-viscous transition in granulite-facies perthites: implications for lower crustal strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegon, L.; Stünitz, H.; Nasipuri, P.; Heilbronner, R.; Svahnberg, H.

    2012-04-01

    Deformation in granulite facies rocks of the mangerite-charnockites in Lofoten (Norway) is localized in shear zones, which have formed at P=0.65-0.8 GPa, T=710-725° C. In the shear zones, recrystallization of perthites is localized along intracrystalline bands. The bands are parallel to shear microcracks and to trails of amphibole and biotite, interpreted as healed microcracks. Fracturing preferentially occurred (but non necessarily) along the excellent cleavage planes (010) and (001). EBSD analysis of perthite porphyroclasts indicates a very low degree of internal misorientation (within 5°) and the lack of recovery features. Recrystallized grains show coarsening with increasing width of the bands, and chemical changes with respect to the host grains (e.g. An14 in the recrystallized grains vs. An22 in the hosting perthites). Crystallographic orientation of the new grains does not show a host-control relation to the parent perthite grains. In summary, there is no evidence for dominant dislocation creep deformation, and the microstructure and CPO data consistently indicate an intragranular recrystallization of perthite by nucleation and growth processes along microcracks. Perthite porphyroclasts are surrounded by a matrix of recrystallized plagioclase + K-feldspar (average grain size of 25 μm) ± amphibole. Amphibole and K-feldspar commonly occur at triple and quadruple junctions between plagioclase grains. There is extensive evidence of phase boundary migration in the matrix, with plagioclase grains forming bulges and protrusions towards K-feldspar. The phase boundaries between K-feldspar and plagioclase are more frequent than grain boundaries, indicating that feldspars are well intermixed in the matrix. Phase boundaries occur with a high density in a C'-type shear band orientation. These observations are consistent with diffusion creep as the dominant deformation mechanism in the matrix, associated with grain boundary sliding and syndeformational nucleation of

  20. Potassium Feldspar Megacrysts in Granites: Passive Markers of Magma Dynamics or Products of Textural Coarsening?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. R.; Glazner, A. F.; Coleman, D. S.

    2006-12-01

    Megacrysts of potassium feldspar (K-spar) in granitic rocks are commonly interpreted as early-crystallizing phases whose textural relationships record flow, settling, and diapirism within evolving magma chambers. However, experimental studies on granitic magmas show that K-spar does not begin to nucleate until the system is at least 30% crystalline, and that much of the final crystallization history records co-crystallization of K-spar, quartz, and sodic plagioclase. These data require that the megacrysts cannot have reached large sizes until the magma was largely crystallized and incapable of flow. We have made chemical and textural observations of K-spar megacrysts from the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite (TIS), California. Cathodoluminescence images show sawtooth oscillatory zoning in K-spars, albite-rich rims on plagioclase, reaction zones at boundaries between plagioclase and K-spar, and almost no perthite. Electron microprobe analyses of the sawtooth zones reveal a sharp outward increase in Ba concentration at each zone boundary. Plagioclase core compositions follow whole-rock compositions, becoming increasingly albitic toward the center of the TIS, but K-spar in all units is highly potassic (Or80-95). A three-feldspar assemblage (An15-35, An1-7, and Or80-95) occurs in several megacrystic samples. Stained rock slabs reveal tentacles of interstitial K-spar radiating from megacryst edges far into the adjacent matrix, and a deficit of smaller K-spar crystals in megacrystic units. K-spar size measurements across the contacts of the TIS from the 10 largest crystals within a 1 m2 area show a steady increase in the average megacryst area from 0.2 to 30 cm2. In contrast, bulk rock K2O and K-spar mode (vol%) are constant across this same transect (at 3.7± 0.5 wt% and 22± 5 vol% respectively). Extreme feldspar compositions, phase equilibria, and textural observations argue for late development of K- spar megacrysts during the prolonged and probably cyclic cooling history of

  1. Metamorphic reactions, grain size reduction and deformation of mafic lower crustal rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degli Alessandrini, Giulia; Menegon, Luca; Beltrando, Marco; Dijkstra, Arjan; Anderson, Mark

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates grain-scale deformation mechanisms associated with strain localization in the mafic continental lower crust, with particular focus on the role of syn-kinematic metamorphic reactions and their product - symplectites - in promoting grain size reduction and phase mixing. The investigated shear zone is hosted in the Finero mafic-ultramafic complex in the Italian Southern Alps. Shearing occurred at T ≥ 650° C and P ≥ 0.4-0.6 GPa. The shear zone reworks both mafic and ultramafic lithologies and displays anastomosing patterns of (ultra)mylonitic high strain zones wrapping less foliated, weakly deformed low strain domains. Field and microstructural observations indicate that different compositional layers of the shear zone responded differently to deformation, resulting in strain partitioning. Four distinct microstructural domains have been identified: (1) an ultramylonitic domain characterized by an amph + pl matrix (grain size < 30μm) with large amphibole porphyroclasts (grain size between 200μm and 5000μm) and rare garnets; (2) a domain rich in garnet porphyroclasts embedded in a matrix of monomineralic plagioclase displaying a core and mantle structure (average grain size 45μm) (3) a metagabbroic domain with porphyroclasts of clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and garnets (200μm average grain size) wrapped by monomineralic ribbons of recrystallized plagioclase and (4) a garnet-free ultramylonitic domain composed of an intermixed amph + cpx + opx + pl matrix (6μm average grain size). In these domains, each porphyroclastic mineral responds differently to deformation: amphibole readily breaks down to symplectitic intergrowths of amph + pl or opx + pl. Garnet undergoes fracturing (in domain 2) or reacts to give symplectites of pl + opx (in domain 3). Plagioclase dynamically recrystallizes in mono-phase aggregates, whereas clinopyroxene undergoes fracturing and orthopyroxene undergoes plastic deformation. The behaviour of the different phases

  2. Magma chamber processes under Quizapu Volcano, Chile: Models derived from chemical and textural analyses of the 1846-47 andesite-dacite flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Michael D.; Voos, Stéphanie; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline

    2014-05-01

    In 1846-47 five cubic km of andesite and dacite lavas (?) were rapidly erupted from Quizapu Volcano. The lavas are quite uniform in the field, with andesite enclaves up to 10 cm in diameter making up 2-17% of the rock. Enclaves were separated physically from the samples before analysis. The resulting analyses have a wide range in major and trace element composition (e.g. 59-68% SiO2) most of which accords with a model based on simple mixing of dacite and andesite end-members. The andesite enclaves have a slightly lower SiO2 content (57 wt. %) than the bulk-rock andesite (59), indicating a proportion of 0-80% andesite along the mixing line, which is much more than the amount of enclaves. Hence, andesite must have been injected into the dacite at least twice with perfect mixing during the first event and only mingling during the second event. Also, the second event of injection may have caused eruption which itself may have precluded perfect mixing between the two magmas. Quantitative analysis of the textures shows an even more complex story. The dominant phase is plagioclase, with 4-15% macrocrysts up to 1 mm long. Plagioclase crystals in 13 samples were classified into five groups on the basis of colour in cold-cathode cathodoluminescence images and zonation in visible light. The textures of each population were quantified in terms of total volumetric abundance and crystal size distribution (CSD), where there were sufficient crystals. All populations of plagioclase macrocrysts have CSDs characteristic of coarsening, although each different population was slightly different. A model of cycles of coarsening and kinetic growth is favoured, similar to that proposed for Montserrat volcano. The abundances of the plagioclase populations were compared to the overall SiO2 content of the lavas: One population correlated with SiO2 content, suggesting that it is associated with the dacite end-member, whereas another population can be correlated with the andesite end

  3. Hyperextension of continental lithospheric mantle to oceanic-like lithosphere: the record of late gabbros in the Ronda subcontinental lithospheric mantle section (Betic Cordillera, S-Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidas, Karoly; Garrido, Carlos; Targuisti, Kamal; Padron-Navarta, Jose Alberto; Tommasi, Andrea; Marchesi, Claudio; Konc, Zoltan; Varas-Reus, Maria Isabel; Acosta Vigil, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Rupturing continents is a primary player in plate tectonic cycle thus longevity, stability, evolution and breakup of subcontinental lithosphere belongs for a long time to a class of basic geological problems among processes that shape the view of our Earth. An emerging body of evidences - based on mainly geophysical and structural studies - demonstrates that the western Mediterranean and its back-arc basins, such as the Alborán Domain, are hyperextended to an oceanic-like lithosphere. Formation of gabbroic melts in the late ductile history of the Ronda Peridotite (S-Spain) - the largest (ca. 300 km2) outcrop of subcontinental lithospheric mantle massifs on Earth - also attests for the extreme thinning of the continental lithosphere that started in early Miocene times. In the Ronda Peridotite, discordant gabbroic veins and their host plagioclase lherzolite, as well as gabbroic patches in dunite were collected in the youngest plagioclase tectonite domains of the Ojén and Ronda massifs, respectively. In Ojén, gabbro occurs as 1-3 centimeter wide discordant veins and dikes that crosscut the plagioclase tectonite foliation at high angle (60°). Within the veins cm-scale igneous plagioclase and clinopyroxene grains show a shape preferred orientation and grow oriented, subparallel to the trace of high temperature host peridotite foliation and oblique to the trend of the vein. In contrast to Ojén, mafic melts in the Ronda massif crystallized along subcentimeter wide anastomozing veins and they often form segregated interstitial melt accumulations in the host dunite composed of plagioclase, clinopyroxene and amphibole. Despite the differences in petrography and major element composition, the identical shape of calculated REE patterns of liquid in equilibrium with clinopyroxenes indicates that the percolating melt in Ronda and Ojén shares a common source. However, unlike gabbros from the oceanic lithosphere that shows clinopyroxene in equilibrium with LREE-depleted MORB

  4. Re-examination of crystal ages in recent Mount St. Helens lavas: implications for magma reservoir processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Kari M.; Reid, Mary R.

    2003-08-01

    U-series data for recent Mount St. Helens lavas suggest that crystallization preceded eruption by more than 0.5 ka but are complicated by possible evidence of crystal recycling and/or addition of radium to the liquid after crystallization. We report new ion and electron microprobe trace- and major-element data for plagioclase and pyroxene in these recent Mount St. Helens lavas and use these data to reassess 226Ra-230Th crystal ages by taking into account differences in the partitioning behavior of radium and barium and the effects of impurities in mineral separates. Revised 226Ra-230Th model crystallization ages are ∼2-4 ka for plagioclase (with the exception of the 1982 dacite) and ∼0.15-5.7 ka for pyroxene. In contrast to previous interpretations, no late-stage addition of Ra to the liquid after precipitation of the minerals is required. The variability of Ba concentrations measured in plagioclase is too large to be consistent with progressive crystallization from the same liquid or with diffusive re-equilibration of xenocrysts with a new host liquid. Ba heterogeneity limits the residence time of the crystals in a magma at high temperatures and also suggests that in most cases Ra-Th ages have not been significantly modified by Ra diffusion into or out of the crystals. High (226Ra)/Ba in plagioclase in the 1982 dacite relative to the host liquid likely reflects crystallization processes that precluded bulk crystal-liquid chemical equilibrium. One possibility is that of growth entrapment of surface enrichments during rapid crystallization, which could lead to less discrimination between Ra and Ba than predicted by calculated bulk partition coefficients. 226Ra-230Th crystal ages for the Castle Creek andesite and basalt that are younger than 230Th-238U ages of the same crystals could be explained by mixing of crystals into melts with different 230Th/232Th ratios, by combinations of older and younger crystal growth within the same magma, or, for the basalt, by

  5. Melt Inclusions from the Galápagos Plume: Clues to the Origin of ‘Ghost Plagioclase’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, K.; Saal, A.; Koleszar, A. M.; Hauri, E. H.; Liang, Y.; Cooper, R. F.

    2009-12-01

    Melt inclusions are an invaluable tool to characterize the composition of lavas prior to differentiation and mixing in magma chambers. They provide an advantage over erupted magmas because they are samples of very small amounts of melt commonly trapped at pressures exceeding the pressure of eruption, and their chemical compositions have remained unchanged since entrapment. We have analyzed major, trace element, and volatile contents in more than 100 olivine-hosted (Fo81-87) melt inclusions in submarine and subaerial lavas from the Galapagos Islands of Fernandina and Santiago respectively. Our results indicate that enriched and ultra-depleted melt compositions coexist in the magmatic plumbing system beneath Galapagos volcanoes. Furthermore, the trace element compositional variations found in melt inclusions from a single sample reproduce the total geochemical variation defined by the whole rock data for the Galapagos lavas. Establishing the processes responsible for such variations will therefore have direct implications on the origin of the compositional variation of basalts throughout the Archipelago. The entrapment pressure of ~1 kbar calculated from the CO2-H2O data indicates the presence of a magma chamber corresponding to a depth of ~3 km. A subgroup of inclusions is characterized by significant depletion in incompatible trace elements with unusual (Sr/Nd)PM and (Ba/Th)PM ratios greater than unity, without significant modification of the major elements, giving rise to the ‘ghost plagioclase’ signature [1]. Two main origins have been proposed for this unusual melt inclusion composition: 1) recycling, through tectonics, of plagioclase cumulate within the ancient oceanic crust back into the mantle where it is later remelted [1] or 2) the interaction of melts with a plagioclase-rich cumulate during melt percolation within the oceanic lithosphere [2,3]. With an interest in discriminating the validity of each hypothesis, we will model plagioclase dissolution in

  6. Magmatic controls on eruption dynamics of the 1950 yr B.P. eruption of San Antonio Volcano, Tacaná Volcanic Complex, Mexico-Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Juan Carlos; Gardner, James Edward; Macías, José Luis; Meriggi, Lorenzo; Santo, Alba Patrizia

    2013-07-01

    San Antonio Volcano, in the Tacaná Volcanic Complex, erupted ~ 1950 yr. B.P., with a Pelean type eruption that produced andesitic pyroclastic surges and block-and-ash flows destroying part of the volcano summit and producing a horse-shoe shaped crater open to the SW. Between 1950 and 800 yr B.P. the eruption continued with effusive andesites followed by a dacite lava flow and a summit dome, all from a single magma batch. All products consist of phenocrysts and microphenocrysts of zoned plagioclase, amphibole, pyroxene, magnetite ± ilmenite, set in partially crystallized groundmass of glass and microlites of the same mineral phases, except for the lack of amphibole. Included in the andesitic blocks of the block-and-ash flow deposit are basaltic andesite enclaves with elongated and ellipsoidal forms and chilled margins. The enclaves have intersertal textures with brown glass between microphenocrysts of plagioclase, hornblende, pyroxene, and olivine, and minor proportions of phenocrysts of plagioclase, hornblende, and pyroxene. A compositional range obtained of blocks and enclaves resulted from mixing between andesite (866 °C ± 22) and basaltic andesite (enclaves, 932 °C ± 22), which may have triggered the explosive Pelean eruption. Vestiges of that mixing are preserved as complex compositional zones in plagioclase and clinopyroxene-rich reaction rims in amphibole in the andesite. Whole-rock chemistry, geothermometry, experimental petrology and modeling results suggest that after the mixing event the eruption tapped hybrid andesitic magma (≤ 900 °C) and ended with effusive dacitic magma (~ 825 °C), all of which were stored at ~ 200 MPa water pressure. A complex open-system evolution that involved crustal end-members best explains the generation of effusive dacite from the hybrid andesite. Amphibole in the dacite is rimmed by reaction products of plagioclase, orthopyroxene, and Fe-Ti oxides produced by decompression during ascent. Amphibole in the andesite

  7. Silurian/Ordovician asymmetrical sill-like bodies from La Codosera syncline, W Spain: A case of tholeiitic partial melts emplaced in a single magma pulse and derived from a metasomatized mantle source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Moro, F. J.; Murciego, A.; López-Plaza, M.

    2007-07-01

    A Silurian/Ordovician extensional event in the southernmost sectors of the Central Iberian Zone is inferred from the Sm/Nd isochron obtained (436 ± 17 Ma) after the diabase sills from the La Codosera syncline. From the geochemical and mineralogical points of view, the diabase sills are subalkaline and range between high-Mg tholeiite diabases to tholeiite andesites. LREE enrichment, an Nb negative anomaly, the absence of a Ta trough and a high Nd isotope signature ( ɛNd t = + 6) are the most relevant geochemical features. The diabase bodies are up to 330 m in thickness and were sampled from bottom to top along several different sections, permitting the definition of an accumulation of clinopyroxene, olivine and plagioclase close to chilled margins at the bottom, and abundant pegmatoid layers at the top. Chemical profiles and mass-balance modelling suggest that the bulk rock and chilled margin compositions are not dissimilar, defining an unusual S-type vertical compositional profile for large (> 50 m thick) sills, which in turn strongly suggests a single magma pulse and a probable gravitational settling. Assuming chilled margin samples as the parental magma, as well as Cr-enriched samples as cumulate layers, a two-stage liquid line of descent has been established, the first one consisting of a clinopyroxene-plagioclase-olivine cumulate assemblage. A second stage in relation to the depletion in Ti, Fe and V is accounted for by ilmenite fractionation, along with that of clinopyroxene, plagioclase and olivine fractionation. Thermobarometric estimations reveal that the clinopyroxene (around 1100 °C and 197 MPa) was a late mineral phase, whereas the plagioclase (around 1200 °C) was pre- to syn-emplacement, in agreement with the presence only of plagioclase phenocrysts in the chilled margins and the very abundant positive Eu anomaly. The energy constraint modelling is consistent with the lack of a significant assimilation process owing to the high temperature contrast

  8. Variable mineral composition of metamorphic rocks from a single quarry compared to their ASR potential (Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stastna, Aneta; Sachlova, Sarka; Pertold, Zdenek; Nekvasilova, Zuzana; Prikryl, Richard

    2013-04-01

    The alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is one of the most damaging factors for concrete structures. ASR originates due to the presence of reactive silica (SiO2) that reacts with alkaline ions under wet conditions. The reaction mechanism consists of four different steps: initial attack of OH- compounds on SiO2 at aggregate-cement paste boundary; formation of silanol groups at SiO2 surface; formation of siloxane groups and their polymerization; adsorption of alkaline and Ca2+ ions and formation of alkali-silica gels. Alkali-silica gels tend to absorb water molecules and swell causing increasing internal pressures in concrete and microcracking. The most reactive aggregates are mainly composed of amorphous and/or fine-grained SiO2-rich phases. In the Czech Republic, ASR was observed in deteriorating concrete structures containing very fine-grained quartz (quartz in tuffaceous sandstones and greywackes), as well as quartz indicating variable degree of deformation (quartz in quartzite, granodiorite and various metamorphic rock types). In this study, mineralogical-petrographic methods (polarizing, electron and cathodoluminescence microscopy) were combined with the accelerated mortar bar test (following the standard ASTM C1260), with the aim to quantify the ASR potential, as well as to distinguish reactive mineral phases. Different aggregate varieties from the Těchobuz quarry (Moldanubian Zone, Czech Republic) have been compared. Mineralogical-petrographic characteristics permit a distinction between 1) medium-grained plagioclase quartzite and 2) fine-grained biotite-plagioclase-quartz paragneiss and 3) fine-grained calc-silicate rock. Mineralogical composition of the first type is quartz + Ca-plagioclase + K-feldspar + biotite + chlorite + diopside + pyrite + apatite + titanite ± calcite. The second type has mineral assemblage including quartz + Ca-plagioclase + K-feldspar + biotite + chlorite + pyrite + tourmaline + apatite + titanite ± calcite. The third type contains

  9. P-T evolution of the garnet-amphibolites from the Quanji Massif: Amalgamation of the continental blocks in NW China and Links to assembly of the Columbia supercontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, N.; Mustafa, H. A.; Li, X.; Xia, B.; Wang, Q.; Sun, M.

    2014-12-01

    The garnet-bearing amphibolites from the eastern Quanji Massif, NW China had documented five-stage mineral growth, preserves important records of late Paleoproterozoic metamorphic processes and provide insights into the assembly history of the Quanji Massif with the Tarim Craton and other unknown continental blocks. The stage M1 is presented by assemblage of plagioclase + quartz + hornblende + porphyroblastic garnet core + rutile. P-T conditions for this stage cannot be quantitatively estimated. The stage M2 is represented by the porphyroblastic garnet rim with the matrix quartz, plagioclase, pyroxene, amphibole, rutile and ilmenite. P-T conditions for this stage are estimated to be 1.0-1.2 GPa and 700-750 °C. The stage M3 is shown by symplectitic coronas of hornblende + plagioclase ± ilmenite around the embayed M2 porphyroblastic garnets and yields P-T conditions of 0.6-0.7 GPa and 600-650 °C. The stage M4 is represented by small garnet rings immediately growing on the embayed M2 garnet or around the M2 pyroxene and hornblende, or by assemblage of fine-grain garnet + hornblende + sodium plagioclase growing from the M3 intergrowth of hornblende + Calcium plagioclase. The stage M5 is represented by albite, chlorite, epidote and actinolite growing in greenschist-facies conditions reasonably of 400-500 °C at relatively lower pressures. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating on the metamorphic zircon indicates that the M2 garnet porphyroblast and related assemblage and the M3 coronas grew at ca. 1.95 Ga; the M4 garnet growth occurred at ca. 1.82 Ga with reference to regional geochronological data. Both M2 and M4 garnets and related assemblages are indicative of medium P/T-type metamorphism. Qualitative and quantitative P-T estimates for stages M1, M2 and M3 define a clockwise P-T path. The resulting data suggest two late Paleoproterozoic collisional metamorphic events with important implication for amalgamation of the Quanji Massif with unknown continental blocks in NW China and

  10. Cr-Spinel as an Indicator of Cumulates Partial Melting and Liquid Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuthold, J.; Blundy, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Rum Layered Intrusion (Scotland) was emplaced 60.53 ± 0.08 Ma ago [1], in response to the proto-Iceland plume [2]. The Unit 9 gabbro cumulates were successively intruded by olivine-phyric picritic sills. Reactive liquid flow produced clinopyroxene-poor gabbro, troctolite and dunite restite, and expelled melt crystallized to form gabbro with poikilitic clinopyroxene and Cr-spinel-rich anorthosite [3]. The Cr-spinel origin is strongly debated (e.g. [4]). We have run one atmosphere, fO2-controlled equilibrium experiments of the Rum parental picritic parental liquid [5]. At NNO-0.8 conditions, Cr- spinel saturates from 1360°C, olivine from ~1330°C, plagioclase from 1240°C and clinopyroxene from 1220°C, systematically ~40°C above MELTS calculations. Natural Cr- spinel grains have a higher Cr/(Cr+Al+Fe3+) ratio (~0.51 to 0.03) than grains crystallized along the picrite NNO-0.8 liquid line of descent (0.38 to 0.06). Fe3+-rich spinel is abundant (~1 vol%) at NNO+1, and Al-rich spinel occurs as trace at NNO-3. In picrite-troctolite hybrid experiments, plagioclase (~An86) saturates from 1280°C and clinopyroxene from 1200°C. Al- spinel crystallizes at high temperature, and gets more Cr-rich upon cooling, reaching the highest measured Cr/(Cr+Al+Fe3+) ratio of ~0.44 at 1225°C, falling to 0.09 at 1200°C. Plagioclase and clinopyroxene stability plays a major role in spinel composition. Increasing the pressure or the parental magma water content would delay plagioclase saturation and result in spinel with lower Cr/Al ratio. We deduce that Unit 9 peridotite, troctolite, anorthosite and also gabbro and poikilitic gabbro Cr-rich spinel did not crystallize from the Rum parental picritic liquid. Instead, they crystallized from a hybrid liquid produced by the mixing of invading picritic liquid with a partially molten plagioclase ± clinopyroxene -rich cumulate, leaving an olivine-rich residue/cumulate. [1] Hamilton et al. (1998) Nature 394: 260-263 [2] Saunders et al

  11. Mantle-derived Calc-alkalic vs. Crust-derived Tholeiitic Magmas: A Radical Veiw of Andesite Genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Hirahara, Y.; Miyazaki, T.; Chang, Q.; Kimura, J.; Ban, M.; Sakayori, A.

    2008-12-01

    Two distinctive differentiation trends, tholeiitic and calc-alkalic, are recognized in Zao volcano, which is located immediately behind the volcanic front of the NE Japan arc. The genetic relation between these two magma series is critical to for a better understanding of andesite genesis, because in arc volcanoes they often coexist, in close spatial and temporal proximity in arc volcanoes. Petrographic features indicative of 'disequilibrium', such as reversely zoned pyroxene phenocrysts, the wide and bimodal compositional distribution in Ca/(Ca+Na) of plagioclase phenocrysts, honeycomb textures and dusty zones that these plagioclase phenocrysts often exhibit, and the presence of olivine-pyroxene pairs with different Mg/Fe, are observed exclusively in calc-alkalic rocks. In tholeiitic rocks the Sr isotopic ratios of plagioclase phenocrysts, determined by both micromilling combined with thermal ionization mass spectrometryscopy, and laser- ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry ICP-MS techniques, are constant at 0.7042-0.7044 in tholeiitic rocks. On the other hand, those in calc-alkalic rocks (0.7033-0.7042) show more complex characteristics, which can be best understood if at least three end-member components,; a calc-alkalic basaltic melt, a tholeiitic basaltic melt and a tholeiitic felsic melt, contribute to the production of mixed calc- alkalic magmas. 87Sr/86Sr and trace element compositions of the least-differentiated basalt magmas, which are inferred from the composition of the calcic plagioclase (Ca/(Ca+Na) >0.9), suggest that two types of basaltic magma, calc-alkalic and tholeiitic, exist beneath the volcano. The tholeiitic basalt magma possesses higher 87Sr/86Sr than the calc-alkalic magma (0.7042 vs. 0.7038) and shows characteristic trace element signatures consistent with the presence of plagioclase and amphibole as melting residues. This suggests that the tholeiitic magmas are produced via anatexis of amphibolitic crust caused by

  12. Deep versus shallow melt stagnation in an ultra-slow / ultra-cold ridge segment: the Andrew Bain southern RTI (SWIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganelli, E.; Brunelli, D.; Seyler, M.; Bonatti, E.; Cipriani, A.; Ligi, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Andrew Bain Fracture Zone (ABFZ) represents one of the largest transform faults in the ridge system spanning 750 km in length with a characteristic lens-shape structure. The southern Ridge-Transform Intersection represents the deepest sector of the whole South West Indian Ridge system. During the Italian-Russian expedition S23-AB06, the seafloor in the Southern Ridge Transform Intersection (RTI) has been sampled recovering only ultramafic material in the majority of the dredging sites. The sampled spinel and plagioclase peridotites show hybrid textures, characterized either by deep spinel-field impregnation assemblages (sp+cpx±opx±ol) or by plagioclase-field equilibrated patches and mineral trails (pl+cpx±ol) marked by both crystallization of newly formed plagioclase-field equilibrated trails and formation of plagioclase coronas around spinel. The ones collected from ridge axis show also late gabbroic pockets and veins, variably enriched in clinopyroxene. Overall textures account for important melt percolation/stagnation events occurred in the plagioclase and spinel field. Major and trace element distribution in pyroxenes and spinels from spinel-bearing peridotites overall follow a general melting trend accompanied by a progressive re-equilibration to lower P/T facies at all scales. However, only few samples can be linked to near fractional melting, while the majority of them shows REE pattern and trace element concentrations that cannot be reproduced by fractional melting process. Open-system melting (OSM) better reproduces measured REE patterns. Modeling melting in an open system scenario requires high residual porosity to be accounted for along with generally enriched melts to influx the melting parcel at depth. Melting at high residual porosity suggests a near-batch regime in which enriched melts stagnate in the spinel field. Inhibition of melt segregation during melt/rock interaction asks for a permeability barrier to develop in the region where the

  13. Isotope and chemical microsampling: Constraints on the history of an S-type rhyolite, San Vincenzo, Tuscany, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldstein, S. N.; Halliday, A. N.; Davies, G. R.; Hall, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Fine scale heterogeneities in strontium isotope ratios, 40Ar- 39Ar ages, and chemical composition have been determined for individual mineral grains and enclaves in the rhyolites of San Vincenzo, Italy. The rhyolites are peraluminous with phenocrysts of alkali feldspar, plagioclase, biotite, and cordierite and have previously been divided into two groups on the basis of whole rock major element chemistry. Group B lavas are distinguished from Group A in having higher MgO and CaO contents as well as containing two pyroxenes and chilled latite enclaves. The Group B lavas show textural evidence for disequilibrium, such as resorption and sieve zones in feldspars. Laser fusion 40Ar- 39Ar dating of individual alkali feldspar crystals suggests that the eruption of these rhyolites took place 4.38 ± 0.04 Ma, although small amounts of excess argon are present in subhedral and cloudy crystals. The groundmass in the Group A sample has a higher initial 87Sr /86Sr (0.725) than that of the Group B (0.713). The Sr isotope compositions of chemically and texturally characterized individual grains reveal marked disequilibrium between minerals and the host glass as well as within-grain zonation. The feldspars and coarse-grained biotites have initial 87Sr /86Sr that are intermediate between those of the Group A and B glasses, with alkali feldspar generally having higher initial 87Sr /86Sr ratios than plagioclase. Chilled latite enclaves, which are present in only the Group B lavas, have relatively low initial 87Sr /86Sr ratios in the range 0.7082-0.7088. The mineral chemistry and isotope data indicate that restite does not form a significant portion of the crystalline assemblage and, therefore, cannot be the source of the strontium isotope disequilibrium. Xenocrysts mixed into the rhyolite from a mafic magma were identified as clinopyroxene megacrysts, clinopyroxene-orthopyroxene clots, orthopyroxene-plagioclase clots, and plagioclase with extensive sieve textures. These grains all

  14. Mechanics and Timescales of Magma Mixing Inferred by Texture and Petrology of Basalt Inclusions and Host Andesite From the 2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, M. L.; Browne, B. L.

    2010-12-01

    This study characterizes the texture, mineralogy and phenocryst disequilibrium textures in basaltic inclusions and host andesite lavas and scoria to advance our understanding of the mechanics and timescales of open system magma processes driving the 2006 eruption at Augustine Volcano, Alaska. Inclusions account for approximately 1 volume percent in all andesite lithologies emplaced during the explosive, continuous, and effusive eruption phases. In outcrop, quenched basaltic to andesite inclusions (51.3 to 57.3 weight percent SiO2) hosted by andesite lavas (59.1-62.6 weight percent SiO2) range in diameter from 1 cm to over 9 cm, are dark black and characterized by vesicular interiors, quenched and cuspate margins, and porphyritic texture. Inclusion mineralogy is dominated by phenocryst-sized plagioclase with lesser amounts of hornblende, clinopyroxene and olivine, as well as, microphenocrysts-sized plagioclase, hornblende, clinopryoxene, olivine, magnetite, ilmenite and apatite in a glassy, vesicular and acicular groundmass. Intrusion of a hotter, basaltic magma into a cooler silicic magma followed by inclusion formation through mingling processes is evidenced by (1) plagioclase crystal textures displaying (a) oscillatory zoned interiors surrounded by a dusty sieved layer and enclosed by clear, euhedral overgrowth rims, (b) coarsely-sieved interiors characterized by 0.01 mm -0.02 mm diameter melt inclusions and/or similarly sized inclusions of clinopyroxene, orthopryoxene, or hornblende, (2) Anorthite concentration profiles of engulfed host plagioclase crystals displaying contact with a basaltic magma, (3)Fe-Ti oxides from inclusions and low-silica andesite host recording core to rim temperatures ranging from 908°C to 1100°C, indicative of pre- and post- mixing temperatures, respectively, with oxygen fugacity approximately 2 log units above the nickel-nickel oxide buffer. The closest approximation of the basaltic end-member magma composition involved in magma

  15. The axial melt lens as a processor of evolved melts at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loocke, M. P.; Lissenberg, J. C. J.; MacLeod, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The axial melt lens is a steady-state, generally magma-rich body located at the dyke-gabbro transition at mid-crustal levels beneath intermediate- and fast-spreading ridges. It is widely believed to be the reservoir from which mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) erupts. Using a remotely-operated vehicle, cruise JC21 to the Hess Deep Rift recovered the first comprehensive sample suite of the uppermost plutonics from a fast-spreading ridge. We present the results of a detailed microanalytical investigation of 23 samples (8 dolerites, 14 gabbronorites, and 1 gabbro) recovered by ROV dive 78 from a section traversing the transition from the uppermost gabbros into the sheeted dykes. With the exception of a single olivine-bearing sample (78R-6), dive 78 is dominated by evolved, varitextured (both in hand sample and thin section) oxide gabbronorites. Full thin section quantitative element maps were acquired on serial thin sections from each sample using the analytical scanning electron microscope in the at Cardiff University. The resulting maps were post-processed in MatlabTM to determine the full distribution of plagioclase compositions across entire thin sections (typically 500,000 analyses per sample); an approach we term 'quantitative assessment of compositional distribution' (QACD). By so doing we are able to conduct the first fully rigorous assessment of gabbro compositions, and, by extension, melt compositions present at this level beneath the ridge axis. Critically, we only found 2 grains of high-An plagioclase (An>80) in all of the samples (N = 51). These occur as cores within a sample dominated by lower-An plagioclase. Instead, the vast majority (75%) of plagioclase within the samples have compositions of An65 or lower; compositions too evolved to be in equilibrium with MORB. The most primitive sample, 78R-6, is an olivine-bearing gabbronorite with Fo67 olivine, and plagioclase ranging from An52-77 (median An = 65). These data are difficult to reconcile with models in

  16. The Geology and Petrography of Yücebelen and Surrounding Area, Torul-Gümüşhane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doǧacan, Özcan; Özpınar, Yahya

    2013-04-01

    The study area is located in the tectono-stratigraphic zone named "Eastern Pontide Zone" from the northeastern part of Turkey. Eastern Pontides were formed by the subduction of Tethys Ocean under the Eurasian plate, during the Early Cretaceous - Late Eocene. Eastern Pontide orogenic zone can be divided in two tectono-stratigraphic subgroups as the northern and southern zones. The study area is located very close to border of these two subgroups but located in northern zone. In this project, the first geological map of the study area at the scale 1:5000 was made. Subsequently, detailed geological maps at the scale 1:2000 were made for the areas rich in ores. In the study area, Upper Cretaceous volcanic rocks consisting of basalts and basaltic andesites take place at the bottom of the rock sequence. Basalts and basaltic andesites with hyaloophitic, vitrophiric and microporphyric texture comprise plagioclase +pyroxene +chlorite +calcite ±epidote ±chalcedony ±opaque minerals. They are overlain by concordant pyroclastic and dacitic-rhyodacitic rocks. Quarts + K-feldispar ±plagioclase? ±biotite ±chlorite ±calcite ±chalcedony minerals are determined as a result of microscope investigation on samples taken from these rocks. These rocks are overlain by sedimentary rocks intercalated with pyroclastic rocks. All those units mentioned above, were intruded by granitoids of supposed Upper Cretaceous-Eocene age. Granitoids that crop out in the area were classified in terms of Q-ANOR parameters as granodiorites (Adile Hamlet occurrence - investigated in detail), diorites (Tuzlak Hill occurrence- eastern-part of study area) and quartz monzodiorites (İstavroma Hill occurrence- northern part of study area). Adile Hamlet granodiorites comprise plagioclase +pyroxene +chlorite +calcite ±quarts ±epidote +opaque minerals. A sequence of quarts +orthoclase +plagioclase ±chlorite ±epidote ±calcite ±opaque minerals have been determined after investigation of the rock samples

  17. Reactions of the feldspar surface with metal ions: Sorption of Pb(II), U(VI) and Np(V), and surface analytical studies of reaction with Pb(II) and U(VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chardon, Emmanuelle S.; Bosbach, Dirk; Bryan, Nicholas D.; Lyon, Ian C.; Marquardt, Christian; Römer, Jürgen; Schild, Dieter; Vaughan, David J.; Wincott, Paul L.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Livens, Francis R.

    2008-01-01

    Feldspar minerals are thermodynamically unstable in the near-surface environment and their surfaces are well known to react readily with aqueous solutions, leading to incongruent dissolution at low pH values, but congruent dissolution at neutral and high pH values. Interactions with mineral surfaces are an important control on the environmental transport of trace elements and detrital feldspars are abundant in soils and sediments. However, the interactions of metal ions in solution with the reacting feldspar surface have not been widely explored. The interactions of Pb(II), U(VI) and Np(V) ions with the feldspar surface have therefore been studied. Lead is taken up by the microcline surface at pH 6 and 10, but no uptake could be measured at pH 2. There was measurable uptake of Pb(II) on the plagioclase surface at pH 2, 6 and 10. Uptake always increased with pH. In most conditions, Pb(II) reacts through cation exchange process although, at high pH, a discrete phase, probably hydrocerrusite, is observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) to precipitate on the plagioclase surface. Supersaturation with hydrocerrusite in these conditions is expected from thermodynamic calculations. Uptake of uranyl ion (UO22+), generally through surface complex formation, could only be measured at pH 6 and 10. At pH 6 and an initial U(VI) concentration above 21.0 μM, precipitation of becquerelite (Ca[(UO2)3O2(OH)3]2·8H2O), identified by AFM and characterised by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, is observed on plagioclase. The U(VI) concentration range in which becquerelite precipitation begins (dissolved U(VI) 1-5 μM) is consistent with that predicted from thermodynamic modelling. On plagioclase feldspar, secondary ion mass spectrometry showed diffusion of uranium into the altered surface layer. Uptake of the neptunyl ion (Np(V)) was found at pH 6 and 10 for microcline and at pH 2, 6 and 10 for plagioclase, and was generally lower than uptake of

  18. Polarization of mafic and felsic rocks In the Skaergaard Layered Series (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBirney, A. R.; Johnston, A.; Webster, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    When it became apparent that plagioclase could never sink in a magma as iron rich and dense as that of the Skaergaard Intrusion, we were faced with the problem of explaining the formation of anorthositic layers, foundered blocks, and schlieren that consist almost entirely of plagioclase but were obviously stable on the floor of the intrusion. Sonnenthal (Jour. Pet., 1998, 39: 633-661) found that gabbroic blocks that fell from the roof series were originally more gabbroic and were altered metasomatically to anorthosites after they reached the floor were buried it the advancing front of crystallization. Their mafic components were expelled into the surrounding gabbro and replaced by plagioclase. Similar processes appear to have transformed parts of the Layered and Marginal Border Series into strongly polarized anorthosites and olivine pyroxenites. The studies of Filiberto and Treiman (Chem. Geol. 2009, 263: 50-68) of the effect of chlorine on the liquidus of basalts, together with our on-going experimental investigation of its effect on the system plagioclase-pyroxene, has opened new possibilities that may enable us to explain these enigmatic rocks. When Webster and his co-workers (Geoch Cosmoch. Acta, 2009, 73: 559-581) showed that, unlike water, chlorine is much more soluble in mafic silicate melts than felsic ones, these contrasting properties suggested that the effect of chlorine on the cotectic relations of plagioclase and pyroxene might be the opposite of that of water: it could depress the melting temperature of pyroxene just as water depressed that of plagioclase. Experiments currently underway at the American Museum of Natural History and University of Oregon are showing that this is indeed the case. Consider what might happen if a crystallizing gabbro were infiltrated by a chlorine-rich aqueous fluid of the kind that Larsen and Brooks (Jour. Pet., 1997, 35: 1651-79) have shown permeated the rocks while they were still at a high temperature. Flux melting

  19. The Andesites of the Tancítaro Volcanic Field, Michoacán Mexico: Evidence for their Formation in the Lower Crust.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ownby, S. E.; Lange, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    The Tancítaro Volcanic field (~4000 km2) is located in the state of Michoacán, Mexico and is part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt related to subduction of the Cocos plate beneath North America. Erupted magmas show a continuum in composition from basalt (~51 wt% SiO2) through andesite (63 wt% SiO2); there is no dacite or rhyolite. This study focuses on the andesites (58-63 wt %), which show a considerable variation in eruptive style (cinder cones, shields, fissure-fed flows, and one stratovolcano, Volcán Tancítaro), degree of crystallinity (~3 to 40 vol%), and phenocryst assemblage (two- pyroxene + plagioclase; hornblende + plagioclase; hornblende only, etc.). There is no correlation between crystallinity and/or phenocryst assemblage and composition, although there is with style of eruption. All andesites erupted from the large (~100 km3) stratovolcano are crystal-rich (34-45 vol%), whereas peripheral erupted units in the form of cinder cones, shields, and fissure-fed flows show a lower range of crystallinities from ~3-20 vol%. Electron microprobe analyses have been conducted on 15-25 plagioclase grains in each of several andesite samples. For the crystal-poor varieties, the plagioclase hygrometer of Lange and Frey (2006) was used to calculate their pre-eruptive water concentrations. In one example, there is a variation of > 25 mol% in An content (~An85-60), which corresponds to a variation in water concentration of ~6-3 wt% H2O. Thus the variation in plagioclase composition in this crystal-poor andesite could be a result of degassing upon ascent rather than magma mingling. This is consistent with the textures of these plagioclase grains, which include abundant melt inclusions and evidence of rapid growth. In another crystal-poor example, there is a relatively narrow range (< 10 mol%) in An content (An70-60) among numerous plagioclase grains, corresponding to a water content that clusters near 3 wt% H2O. A combination of several lines of evidence suggests

  20. Differentiation Timescales and Processes for Products From Recent Eruptions of Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica (1968-1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepley, F. J.; Lundstrom, C. C.; Reagan, M. K.; Murrell, M. T.; Goldstein, S. J.; Sampson, D.; Malavassi, E.

    2002-12-01

    Arenal Volcano in Costa Rica has continuously erupted since 1968 exhibiting a variety of eruption behaviors and evolving in a complex interplay between crystal fractionation, magma mixing, degassing, and wall-rock interaction (Reagan et al., 1987; Cigolini, 1998). We performed a pilot study of trace-element variations and U-series disequilibria in five whole rocks and, in three cases, mineral separates over the course of the eruption from 1968 to 1999. Mineral phases (pyroxene, plagioclase, magnetite, and glass fractions) from a 1970 and two freshly collected 1999 rock samples were analyzed for U-Th disequilibria by TIMS and a complete suite of trace elements by ICP-MS. Plagioclase from the 1999 samples was analyzed for 210Pb-210Po disequilibria. (210Pb)/(210Po) activity ratios at the time of collection (9/15/99) are ~2 for both 1999 plagioclase separates. Both samples produce the same calculated date of initial plagioclase crystallization (3/5/99) assuming complete 210Po degassing. The presence of (210Pb)/(210Po) disequilibria in plagioclase either implies that the mm-sized plagioclase crystals grew within a very short time of eruption or that 210Po continuously diffuses out of already formed plagioclase crystals right up until the time of eruption from a Po-degassed magma. The observed 238U-230Th disequilibria are consistent with the differentiation process operating on a timescale much less than that of 230Th decay. All measured (230Th)/(232Th) activity ratios are identical indicating that mineral formation in both early and late eruptions (1970, 1999) is instantaneous with respect to 230Th and that none of the minerals are older than ~104 years (they are not pre-Holocene "xenocrysts" or restites). (234U)/(238U) disequilibria results generally indicate that post-eruptive alteration is not a problem (with the exception of one pyroxene sample). Despite the (230Th)/(232Th) activity ratios remaining constant, Th/U consistently changes from low values in the early

  1. Sphene-centered ocellar texture as a petrological tool to unveil the mechanism facilitating magma mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Bibhuti; Saikia, Ashima; Ahmad, Mansoor

    2015-04-01

    The sphene-centered ocellar texture is a unique magma mixing feature characterized by leucocratic ocelli of sphene enclosed in a biotite/hornblende-rich matrix (Hibbard, 1991). The ocelli usually consist of plagioclase, K-feldspar and quartz with sphene crystals at its centre. Although geochemical and isotopic data provide concrete evidence for the interaction between two compositionally distinct magmas, the exact processes by which mixing takes place is yet uncertain. So, textural analysis can be used to decipher the behaviour of two disparate magmas during mixing. Presented work is being carried out on the sphene ocelli, occurring in hybrid rocks of the Nimchak Granite Pluton (NGP), to understand its formation while two compositionally different magmas come in contact and try to equilibrate. The NGP is ca. 1 km2in extent which has been extensively intruded by number of mafic dykes exhibiting well preserved magma mixing and mingling structures and textures in the Bathani Volcano-Sedimentary Sequence (BVSS) located on the northern fringe of the Proterozoic Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex (CGGC) of eastern Indian Shield. From petrographic and mineral chemical studies we infer that when basaltic magma intruded the crystallizing granite magma chamber, initially the two compositionally different magmas existed as separate entities. The first interaction that took place between the two phases is diffusion of heat from the relatively hotter mafic magma to the colder felsic one followed by diffusion of elemental components like K and incompatible elements from the felsic to the mafic domain. Once thermal equilibrium was attained between the mafic and felsic melts, the rheological contrasts between the two phases were greatly reduced. This allowed the felsic magma to back-vein into the mafic magma. The influx of back-veined felsic melt into the mafic system disrupted the equilibrium conditions in the mafic domain wherein minerals like amphibole, plagioclase and biotite

  2. Petrography and major element geochemistry of the Permo-Triassic sandstones, central India: Implications for provenance in an intracratonic pull-apart basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sampa; Sarkar, Soumen; Ghosh, Parthasarathi

    2012-01-01

    Detrital mode, composition of feldspars and heavy minerals, and major element chemistry of sandstones from the Permo-Triassic succession in the intracratonic Satpura Gondwana basin, central India have been used to investigate provenance. The Talchir Formation, the lowermost unit of the succession, comprises glacio-marine and glacio-fluvial deposits. The rest of the succession (base to top) comprising the Barakar, Motur, Bijori, Pachmarhi and Denwa formations, largely represent variety of fluvial depositional systems with minor fluvio-deltaic and fluvio-lacustrine sedimentation under a variety of climatic conditions including cold, warm, arid, sub-humid and semi-arid. QFL compositions of the sandstones indicate a predominantly continental block provenance and stable cratonic to fault-bounded basement uplift tectonic setting. Compositional maturity of sandstones gradually increases upwards from the Early Permian Talchir to the Middle Triassic Denwa but is punctuated by a sharp peak of increased maturity in the Barakar sandstones. This temporal change in maturity was primarily controlled by temporal variation in fault-induced basement uplift in the craton and was also influenced by climatic factors. Plots of different quartz types suggest plutonic source rocks for the Talchir sandstones and medium-to high-rank metamorphic plus plutonic source rocks for the younger sandstones. Composition of alkali feldspars in the Permo-Triassic sandstones and in different Precambrian rocks suggests sediment derivation from felsic igneous and metasedimentary rocks. Compositions of plagioclase in the Talchir and Bijori sandstones are comparable with those of granite, acid volcanic and metasedimentary rocks of the Precambrian basement suggesting the latter as possible source. Rare presence of high-K plagioclase in the Talchir sandstones, however, indicates minor contribution from volcanic source rock. Exclusively plagioclase-bearing metasedimentary rock, tonalite gneiss and mafic rocks

  3. Open magma chamber processes in the formation of the Permian Baima mafic-ultramafic layered intrusion, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping-Ping; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Wang, Christina Yan; Xing, Chang-Ming; Gao, Jian-Feng

    2014-01-01

    The Baima mafic-ultramafic layered intrusion of the 260-Ma Emeishan Large Igneous Province (ELIP) hosts the second largest Fe-Ti-(V) oxide deposit in the Panxi region, SW China. It is a ~ 1600-m-thick layered body intruded by slightly younger syenitic and granitic plutons. The intrusion includes the Lower and Upper Zones. Troctolite and olivine pyroxenite of the Lower Zone contains conformable oxide ore layers, whereas the Upper Zone consists of olivine gabbro and gabbro with abundant apatite in the higher level. The crystallization order of the silicates in the Baima intrusion is olivine → plagioclase → clinopyroxene. Fe-Ti oxides (titanomagnetite and ilmenite) crystallized after olivine, and possibly plagioclase. The oxide ores in the Lower Zone show slightly LREE enriched patterns with (La/Yb)N values between 2.0 and 6.4, and positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu*) of 1.0 to 2.7. In contrast, olivine gabbros in the Lower Zone display stronger LREE enrichments (La/YbN = 7.7-14.0) and positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 2.8-3.3). Gabbros in the Upper Zone have REE profiles characterized by intermediate LREE enrichments with (La/Yb)N values of 3.2 to 11.2 and positive Eu anomalies of 2.1 to 3.0. Primitive mantle-normalized trace element patterns are characterized by negative La-Ce, Th, Sm and positive Nb-Ta, Ba and Ti anomalies in oxide ores and negative Th-U, Zr-Hf and positive Ba, Sr and Ti anomalies in olivine gabbro and gabbro. Fo of olivine and An of plagioclase remain roughly constant from 0 to ~ 90 m in the Lower Zone, indicating that the magma chamber was continuously filled by compositionally similar magmas during the initial stage. Three magma replenishments occurred afterwards in the upper part of the Lower Zone and the Upper Zone based on compositional reversals of plagioclase, olivine and Sr isotope. Mass balance calculations show that the Baima parental magma can produce all oxide ores under closed system conditions. A wide range of An values of plagioclase

  4. Petrology of pyroxenitic vein in spinel-plagioclas lherzolites from Zabargad island, Red Sea, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerazi, Ingrid; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2014-05-01

    The island of Zabargad (St. John's island), located off the coast of Egypt contains three peridotite bodies, which comprise of Spinel- and Plagioclase-Lherzolithes. The studied rock is a composite peridotite consisting of a pyroxenitic vein with coarse grained augites of approx. 3 cm, originating from the Main Peridotite Hill (MPH) in Zabargad. Information on the nature and formation of this peridotite from