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Sample records for planar microfluidic interconnections

  1. Microfluidic interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature connector for introducing microliter quantities of solutions into microfabricated fluidic devices. The fluidic connector, for example, joins standard high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) tubing to 1 mm diameter holes in silicon or glass, enabling ml-sized volumes of sample solutions to be merged with .mu.l-sized devices. The connector has many features, including ease of connect and disconnect; a small footprint which enables numerous connectors to be located in a small area; low dead volume; helium leak-tight; and tubing does not twist during connection. Thus the connector enables easy and effective change of microfluidic devices and introduction of different solutions in the devices.

  2. Microfluidic interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature connector for introducing microliter quantities of solutions into microfabricated fluidic devices, and which incorporates a molded ring or seal set into a ferrule cartridge, with or without a compression screw. The fluidic connector, for example, joins standard high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) tubing to 1 mm diameter holes in silicon or glass, enabling ml-sized volumes of sample solutions to be merged with .mu.l-sized devices. The connector has many features, including ease of connect and disconnect; a small footprint which enables numerous connectors to be located in a small area; low dead volume; helium leak-tight; and tubing does not twist during connection. Thus the connector enables easy and effective change of microfluidic devices and introduction of different solutions in the devices.

  3. Micro-fluidic interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Galambos, Paul C.; Benavides, Gilbert L.; Hetherington, Dale L.

    2006-02-28

    An apparatus for simultaneously aligning and interconnecting microfluidic ports is presented. Such interconnections are required to utilize microfluidic devices fabricated in Micro-Electromechanical-Systems (MEMS) technologies, that have multiple fluidic access ports (e.g. 100 micron diameter) within a small footprint, (e.g. 3 mm.times.6 mm). Fanout of the small ports of a microfluidic device to a larger diameter (e.g. 500 microns) facilitates packaging and interconnection of the microfluidic device to printed wiring boards, electronics packages, fluidic manifolds etc.

  4. Manufacturing of planar ceramic interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, B.L.; Coffey, G.W.; Meinhardt, K.D.; Armstrong, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    The fabrication of ceramic interconnects for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and separator plates for electrochemical separation devices has been a perennial challenge facing developers. Electrochemical vapor deposition (EVD), plasma spraying, pressing, tape casting and tape calendering are processes that are typically utilized to fabricate separator plates or interconnects for the various SOFC designs and electrochemical separation devices. For sake of brevity and the selection of a planar fuel cell or gas separation device design, pressing will be the only fabrication technique discussed here. This paper reports on the effect of the characteristics of two doped lanthanum manganite powders used in the initial studies as a planar porous separator for a fuel cell cathode and as a dense interconnect for an oxygen generator.

  5. Formation of interconnections to microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Matzke, Carolyn M.; Ashby, Carol I. H.; Griego, Leonardo

    2003-07-29

    A method is disclosed to form external interconnections to a microfluidic device for coupling of a fluid or light or both into a microchannel of the device. This method can be used to form optical or fluidic interconnections to microchannels previously formed on a substrate, or to form both the interconnections and microchannels during the same process steps. The optical and fluidic interconnections are formed parallel to the plane of the substrate, and are fluid tight.

  6. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Tuckerman, D.B.

    1989-03-21

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is planarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration. 6 figs.

  7. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Tuckerman, D.B.

    1985-08-23

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is planarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  8. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Tuckerman, D.B.

    1985-06-24

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is planarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping lase pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  9. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Tuckerman, David B.

    1987-01-01

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is anarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  10. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Tuckerman, David B.

    1989-01-01

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is anarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  11. A low-cost, manufacturable method for fabricating capillary and optical fiber interconnects for microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Daniel M; Nevill, J Tanner; Pettigrew, Kenneth I; Votaw, Gregory; Kung, Pang-Jen; Crenshaw, Hugh C

    2008-04-01

    Microfluidic chips require connections to larger macroscopic components, such as light sources, light detectors, and reagent reservoirs. In this article, we present novel methods for integrating capillaries, optical fibers, and wires with the channels of microfluidic chips. The method consists of forming planar interconnect channels in microfluidic chips and inserting capillaries, optical fibers, or wires into these channels. UV light is manually directed onto the ends of the interconnects using a microscope. UV-curable glue is then allowed to wick to the end of the capillaries, fibers, or wires, where it is cured to form rigid, liquid-tight connections. In a variant of this technique, used with light-guiding capillaries and optical fibers, the UV light is directed into the capillaries or fibers, and the UV-glue is cured by the cone of light emerging from the end of each capillary or fiber. This technique is fully self-aligned, greatly improves both the quality and the manufacturability of the interconnects, and has the potential to enable the fabrication of interconnects in a fully automated fashion. Using these methods, including a semi-automated implementation of the second technique, over 10,000 interconnects have been formed in almost 2000 microfluidic chips made of a variety of rigid materials. The resulting interconnects withstand pressures up to at least 800psi, have unswept volumes estimated to be less than 10 femtoliters, and have dead volumes defined only by the length of the capillary. PMID:18369517

  12. Construction of programmable interconnected 3D microfluidic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Patrick R.; Wolf, Marc P.; Wang, Xueya; Zhang, Bei; Marsch, Stephan; Salieb-Beugelaar, Georgette B.

    2015-02-01

    Microfluidic systems represent a key-enabling platform for novel diagnostic tools for use at the point-of-care in clinical contexts as well as for evolving single cell diagnostics. The design of 3D microfluidic systems is an active field of development, but construction of true interconnected 3D microfluidic networks is still a challenge, in particular when the goal is rapid prototyping, accurate design and flexibility. We report a novel approach for the construction of programmable 3D microfluidic systems consisting of modular 3D template casting of interconnected threads to allow user-programmable flow paths and examine its structural characteristics and its modular function. To overcome problems with thread template casting reported in the literature, low-surface-energy polymer threads were used, that allow solvent-free production. Connected circular channels with excellent roundness and low diameter variability were created. Variable channel termination allowed programming a flow path on-the-fly, thus rendering the resulting 3D microfluidic systems highly customizable even after production. Thus, construction of programmable/reprogrammable fully 3D microfluidic systems by template casting of a network of interconnecting threads is feasible, leads to high-quality and highly reproducible, complex 3D geometries.

  13. In-Plane Biocompatible Microfluidic Interconnects for Implantable Microsystems

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Dean G.; Frisina, Robert D.; Borkholder, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Small mammals, particularly mice, are very useful animal models for biomedical research. Extremely small anatomical dimensions, however, make design of implantable microsystems quite challenging. A method for coupling external fluidic systems to microfluidic channels via in-plane interconnects is presented. Capillary tubing is inserted into channels etched in the surface of a Si wafer with a seal created by Parylene-C deposition. Prediction of Parylene-C deposition into tapered channels based on Knudsen diffusion and deposition characterizations allows for design optimization. Low-volume interconnects using biocompatible, chemical resistant materials have been demonstrated and shown to withstand pressure as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) with an average pull test strength of 2.9 N. Each interconnect consumes less than 0.018 mm3 (18 nL) of volume. The low added volume makes this an ideal interconnect technology for medical applications where implant volume is critical. PMID:21147591

  14. Reusable, adhesiveless and arrayed in-plane microfluidic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, R.; Meng, E.

    2011-05-01

    A reusable, arrayed interconnect capable of providing multiple simultaneous connections to and from a microfluidic device in an in-plane manner without the use of adhesives is presented. This method uses a 'pin-and-socket' design in which an SU-8 anchor houses multiple polydimethysiloxane septa (the socket) that each receive a syringe needle (the pin). A needle array containing multiple commercially available 33G (203 µm outer diameter) needles (up to eight) spaced either 2.54 or 1 mm (center-to-center) pierces the septa to access the microfluidic device interior. Finite element modeling and photoelastic stress experiments were used to determine the stress distribution during needle insertion; these results guided the SU-8 septa housing and septa design. The impact of needle diameter, needle tip style, insertion rate and number of needles on pre-puncture, post-puncture and removal forces was characterized. Pressurized connections to SU-8 channel systems withstood up to 62 kPa of pressurized water and maintained 25 kPa of pressurized water for over 24 h. The successful integration and functionality of the interconnect design with surface micromachined Parylene C microchannels was verified using Rhodamine B dye. Dual septa systems to access a single microchannel were demonstrated. Arrayed interconnects were compatible with integrated microfluidic systems featuring electrochemical sensors and actuators.

  15. Planar microfluidic drop splitting and merging.

    PubMed

    Collignon, Sean; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie

    2015-04-21

    Open droplet microfluidic platforms offer attractive alternatives to closed microchannel devices, including lower fabrication cost and complexity, significantly smaller sample and reagent volumes, reduced surface contact and adsorption, as well as drop scalability, reconfigurability, and individual addressability. For these platforms to be effective, however, they require efficient schemes for planar drop transport and manipulation. While there are many methods that have been reported for drop transport, it is far more difficult to carry out other drop operations such as dispensing, merging and splitting. In this work, we introduce a novel alternative to merge and, more crucially, split drops using laterally-offset modulated surface acoustic waves (SAWs). The energy delivery into the drop is divided into two components: a small modulation amplitude excitation to initiate weak rotational flow within the drop followed by a short burst in energy to induce it to stretch. Upon removal of the SAW energy, capillary forces at the center of the elongated drop cause the liquid in this capillary bridge region to drain towards both ends of the drop, resulting in its collapse and therefore the splitting of the drop. This however occurs only below a critical Ohnesorge number, which is a balance between the viscous forces that retard the drainage and the sufficiently large capillary forces that cause the liquid bridge to pinch. We show the possibility of reliably splitting drops into two equal sized droplets with an average deviation in their volumes of only around 4% and no greater than 10%, which is comparable to the 7% and below splitting deviation obtained with electrowetting drop splitting techniques. In addition, we also show that it is possible to split the drop asymmetrically to controllably and reliably produce droplets of different volumes. Such potential as well as the flexibility in tuning the device to operate on drops of different sizes without requiring electrode

  16. Tuning of the droplet motion in interconnected microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guoqing; Song, Kui; Zhang, Li

    2010-11-01

    The problem of controlling the droplet motions in multiphase flows on the microscale has gained increasing attention because the droplet-based microfluidic devices provide great potentials for chemical/biological applications such as drug discovery, chemical kinetics study, material synthesis, and DNA/cell assays. It is critical to understand the relevant physics on droplet hydrodynamics and thus control the generation, motion, splitting, and coalescence of droplets in complex microfluidic networks. The operation of those applications sometimes requires the arrival of droplets from different branch microchannels at a designated location within a transit time. We propose a simple design for interconnected microfluidic devices that implement the feedback mechanism to synchronize the droplet motion via a passive way. Numerical simulations using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) algorithm are conducted to investigate the time-dependent dynamics of droplets in both gas-liquid and liquid-liquid systems. An analytical mode based on the electronic-hydraulic analogy is also developed to describe the transit behavior of the droplet traffic. Both the numerical and theoretical results agree well with the corresponding experimental results. Furthermore, we optimize the microfluidic networks to control the motion of a series of droplets.

  17. Embedded planar glass waveguide optical interconnect for data centre applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitwon, Richard; Schröder, Henning; Brusberg, Lars; Graham-Jones, Jasper; Wang, Kai

    2013-02-01

    Electro-optical printed circuit boards (EOCB) based on planar multimode polymer channels are limited by dispersion in the step-index waveguide structures and increased optical absorption at the longer telecom wavelengths [1]. We present a promising technology for large panel EOCB based on holohedrally integrated glass foils. The planar multimode glass waveguides patterned into these glass foils have a graded-index structure, thereby giving rise to a larger bandwidthlength product compared to their polymer waveguide counterparts and lower absorbtion at the longer telecom wavelengths. This will allow glass waveguide based EOCBs to support the future bandwidth requirements inherent to large scale data centre and high performance computer subsystems while not incurring the same dispersion driven penalties on interconnect length or loss dependence on wavelength. To this end glass foil structuring technologies have been developed that are compatible with industrial PCB manufacturing processes. Established processes as well as new approaches were analysed for their eligibility and have been applied to the EOCB process. In addition a connector system has been designed, which would allow optical pluggability to glass waveguide EOCBs.

  18. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects by pulsed laser heating

    DOEpatents

    Tuckerman, David B.

    1987-01-01

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is planarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  19. A process chain for integrating microfluidic interconnection elements by micro-overmoulding of thermoplastic elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, U. M.; Alcock, J. R.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a process chain for in-line integration of microfluidic interconnection elements by a variant of micro-injection moulding (µIM). A SEBS-based thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) was moulded over polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) to produce a hybrid microfluidic structure with an aspect ratio of 2. The process chain implemented micro-milling for fabricating micro-structured tool inserts, and µIM and micro-overmoulding was used for replication. A two-plate mould was used for moulding the substrate, whilst a three-plate mould with a replaceable insert was used for TPE overmoulding. The presented application was an interconnect system for a microfluidic device, which enabled direct fitting of standard tubes into microfluidic substrates. A leakage test showed that the interconnection was leak-proof within a range of flow rates between 0.32 and 0.62 ml min-1.

  20. An easy-to-use microfluidic interconnection system to create quick and reversibly interfaced simple microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfreundt, Andrea; Brandt Andersen, Karsten; Dimaki, Maria; Svendsen, Winnie E.

    2015-11-01

    The presented microfluidic interconnection system provides an alternative for the individual interfacing of simple microfluidic devices fabricated in polymers such as polymethylmethacrylate, polycarbonate and cyclic olefin polymer. A modification of the device inlet enables the direct attachment of tubing (such as polytetrafluoroethylene tubing) secured and sealed by using a small plug, without the need for additional assembly, glue or o-rings. This provides a very clean connection that does not require additional, potentially incompatible, materials. The tightly sealed connection can withstand pressures above 250 psi and therefore supports applications with high flow rates or highly viscous fluids. The ease of incorporation, configuration, fabrication and use make this interconnection system ideal for the rapid prototyping of simple microfluidic devices or other integrated systems that require microfluidic interfaces. It provides a valuable addition to the toolbox of individual and small arrays of connectors suitable for micromachined or template-based injection molded devices since it does not require protruding, threaded or glued modifications on the inlet and avoids bulky and expensive fittings.

  1. 96-well format-based microfluidic platform for parallel interconnection of multiple multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Young; Fluri, David A; Kelm, Jens M; Hierlemann, Andreas; Frey, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we present a microfluidic platform, compatible with conventional 96-well formats, that enables facile and parallelized culturing and testing of spherical microtissues in a standard incubator. The platform can accommodate multiple microtissues (up to 66) of different cell types, formed externally by using the hanging-drop method, and enables microtissue interconnection through microfluidic channels for continuous media perfusion or dosage of substances. The platform contains 11 separate channels, and each channel has six tissue compartments. Primary rat liver tissues were cultured over 8 days, and multiple tumor tissues (HCT116) were exposed to various concentrations of 5-fluorouracil for platform characterization. PMID:25524491

  2. Reduction in microparticle adsorption using a lateral interconnection method in a PDMS-based microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do-Hyun; Park, Je-Kyun

    2013-12-01

    Microparticle adsorption on microchannel walls occurs frequently due to nonspecific interactions, decreasing operational performance in pressure-driven microfluidic systems. However, it is essential for delicate manipulation of microparticles or cells to maintain smooth fluid traffic. Here, we report a novel microparticle injection technique, which prevents particle loss, assisted by sample injection along the direction of fluid flow. Sample fluids, including microparticles, mammalian (U937), and green algae (Chlorella vulgaris) cells, were injected directly via a through hole drilled in the lateral direction, resulting in a significant reduction in microparticle attachment. For digital microfluidic application, the proposed regime achieved a twofold enhancement of single-cell encapsulation compared to the conventional encapsulation rate, based on a Poisson distribution, by reducing the number of empty droplets. This novel interconnection method can be straightforwardly integrated as a microparticle or cell injection component in integrated microfluidic systems. PMID:24105848

  3. Guiding neuron development with planar surface gradients of substrate cues deposited using microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Larry J.; Stewart, Matthew E.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.

    2010-01-01

    Wiring the nervous system relies on the interplay of intrinsic and extrinsic signaling molecules that control neurite extension, neuronal polarity, process maturation and experience-dependent refinement. Extrinsic signals establish and enrich neuron-neuron interactions during development. Understanding how such extrinsic cues direct neurons to establish neural connections in vitro will facilitate the development of organised neural networks for investigating the development and function of nervous system networks. Producing ordered networks of neurons with defined connectivity in vitro presents special technical challenges because the results must be compliant with the biological requirements of rewiring neural networks. Here we demonstrate the ability to form stable, instructive surface-bound gradients of laminin that guide postnatal hippocampal neuron development in vitro. Our work uses a three-channel, interconnected microfluidic device that permits the production of adlayers of planar substrates through the combination of laminar flow, diffusion and physisorption. Through simple flow modifications, a variety of patterns and gradients of laminin (LN) and flourescein-conjugated poly-lysine (FITC-PLL) were deposited to present neurons with an instructive substratum to guide neuronal development. We present three variations in substrate design that produce distinct growth regimens for postnatal neurons in dispersed cell cultures. In the first approach, diffusion-mediated gradients of LN were formed on coverslips to guide neurons toward increasing LN concentrations. In the second approach, a combined gradient of LN and FITC-PLL was produced using aspiration-driven laminar flow to restrict neuronal growth to a 15 μm-wide growth zone at the center of the two superimposed gradients. The last approach demonstrates the capacity to combine binary lines of FITC-PLL in conjunction with surface gradients of LN and bovine serum albumin (BSA) to produce substrate adlayers

  4. LaCrO{sub 3}-dispersed Cr for metallic interconnect of planar SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Rak-Hyun; Shin, Dong Ryul; Dokiya, Masayuki

    1996-12-31

    In the planar SOFC, the interconnect materials plays two roles as an electrical connection and as a gas separation plate in a cell stack. The interconnect materials must be chemically stable in reducing and oxidizing environments, and have high electronic conductivity, high thermal conductivity, matching thermal expansion with an electrolyte, high mechanical strength, good fabricability, and gas tightness. Lanthanum chromite so far has been mainly used as interconnect materials in planar SOFC. However, the ceramic materials are very weak in mechanical strength and have poor machining property as compared with metal. Also the metallic materials have high electronic conductivity and high thermal conductivity. Recently some researchers have studied metallic interconnects such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Inconel 600 cermet, Ni-20Cr coated with (LaSr)CoO{sub 3}, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3-} or La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-dispersed Cr alloy. These alloys have still some problems because Ni-based alloys have high thermal expansion, the added Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and La{sub 2}O{sub 3} to metals have no electronic conductivity, and the oxide formed on the surface of Cr alloy has high volatility. To solve these problems, in this study, LaCrO{sub 3}-dispersed Cr for metallic interconnect of planar SOFC was investigated. The LaCrO{sub 3}-dispersed Cr can be one candidate of metallic interconnect because LaCrO{sub 3} possesses electronic conductivity and Cr metal has relatively low thermal expansion. The content of 25 vol.% LaCrO{sub 3} Was selected on the basis of a theoretically calculated thermal expansion. The thermal expansion, electrical and oxidation properties were examined and the results were discussed as related to SOFC requirements.

  5. Operational parameters of an opto-electronic neural network employing fixed planar holographic interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, P.E.; Gmitro, A.F.

    1993-07-01

    A prototype neutral network system of multifaceted, planar interconnection holograms and opto-electronic neurons is analyzed. This analysis shows that a hologram fabricated with electron-beam lithography has the capacity to connect 6700 neuron outputs to 6700 neuron inputs and that the encoded synaptic weights have a precision of approximately 5 bits. Higher interconnection densities can be achieved by accepting a lower synaptic weight accuracy. For systems employing laser diodes at the outputs of the neurons, processing rates in the range of 45 to 720 trillion connections per second can potentially be achieve.

  6. Design methodology of focusing elements for multilevel planar optical systems in optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Hafiz, Md. Abdullah; MacKenzie, Mark R.; Kwok, Chee-Yee

    2009-12-01

    We present a simple technique to determine the design parameters of an optical interconnect system that uses integral planar lenses. The technique is based on the ABCD transformation matrix method. This analysis technique is significantly simpler and more efficient than the previously published methods for finding the design parameters and predicting the coupling efficiency of the system. The proposed method is applied to compute the coupling efficiency of single- and two-level optical systems.

  7. A Planar Microfluidic Mixer Based on Logarithmic Spirals

    PubMed Central

    Scherr, Thomas; Quitadamo, Christian; Tesvich, Preston; Park, Daniel Sang-Won; Tiersch, Terrence; Hayes, Daniel; Choi, Jin-Woo; Nandakumar, Krishnaswamy

    2013-01-01

    A passive, planar micromixer design based on logarithmic spirals is presented. The device was fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane soft photolithography techniques, and mixing performance was characterized via numerical simulation and fluorescent microscopy. Mixing efficiency initially declined as Reynolds number increased, and this trend continued until a Reynolds number of 15 where a minimum was reached at 53%. Mixing efficiency then began to increase reaching a maximum mixing efficiency of 86% at Re = 67. Three-dimensional simulations of fluid mixing in this design were compared to other planar geometries such as the Archimedes spiral and Meandering-S mixers. The implementation of logarithmic curvature offers several unique advantages that enhance mixing, namely a variable cross-sectional area and a logarithmically varying radius of curvature that creates 3-D Dean vortices. These flow phenomena were observed in simulations with multilayered fluid folding and validated with confocal microscopy. This design provides improved mixing performance over a broader range of Reynolds numbers than other reported planar mixers, all while avoiding external force fields, more complicated fabrication processes, and the introduction of flow obstructions or cavities that may unintentionally affect sensitive or particulate-containing samples. Due to the planar design requiring only single-step lithographic features, this compact geometry could be easily implemented into existing micro-total analysis systems requiring effective rapid mixing. PMID:23956497

  8. Multichip module with planar-integrated free-space optical vector-matrix-type interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Even in the semiconductor industry, free-space optical technology is nowadays seen as a prime option for solving the continually aggravating problem with VLSI chips, namely, that the interconnect technology has failed to keep pace with the increase in communication volume. To make free-space optics compatible with established lithography-based design and fabrication techniques the concept of planar integration was proposed approximately a decade ago. Here its evolution into a photonic microsystems engineering concept is described. For demonstration, a multichip module with planar-integrated free-space optical vector-matrix-type interconnects was designed and built. It contains flip-chip-bonded vertical-cavity surface emitting laser arrays and a hybrid chip with an array of multiple-quantum-well p-i-n diodes on top of a standard complementary metal-oxide semiconductor circuit as key optoelectronic hardware components. The optical system is integrated into a handy fused-silica substrate and fabricated with surface-relief diffractive phase elements. It has been optimized for the given geometrical and technological constraints and provides a good interconnection performance, as was verified in computer simulations on the basis of ray tracing and in practical experiments.

  9. Fluorescence particle detection using microfluidics and planar optoelectronic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettlitz, Siegfried W.; Moosmann, Carola; Valouch, Sebastian; Lemmer, Uli

    2014-05-01

    Detection of fluorescent particles is an integral part of flow cytometry for analysis of selectively stained cells. Established flow cytometer designs achieve great sensitivity and throughput but require bulky and expensive components which prohibit mass production of small single-use point-of-care devices. The use of a combination of innovative technologies such as roll-to-roll printed microuidics with integrated optoelectronic components such as printed organic light emitting diodes and printed organic photodiodes enables tremendous opportunities in cost reduction, miniaturization and new application areas. In order to harvest these benefits, the optical setup requires a redesign to eliminate the need for lenses, dichroic mirrors and lasers. We investigate the influence of geometric parameters on the performance of a thin planar design which uses a high power LED as planar light source and a PIN-photodiode as planar detector. Due to the lack of focusing optics and inferior optical filters, the device sensitivity is not yet on par with commercial state of the art flow cytometer setups. From noise measurements, electronic and optical considerations we deduce possible pathways of improving the device performance. We identify that the sensitivity is either limited by dark noise for very short apertures or by noise from background light for long apertures. We calculate the corresponding crossover length. For the device design we conclude that a low device thickness, low particle velocity and short aperture length are necessary to obtain optimal sensitivity.

  10. Integrated optical interconnection for polymeric planar lightwave circuit device using roll-to-roll ultraviolet imprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sang Uk; Kang, Ho Ju; Chang, Sunghwan; Choi, Doo-sun; Kim, Chang-Seok; Jeong, Myung Yung

    2014-08-01

    We propose an integrated structure that combines chip and fiber array blocks for optical interconnection with a polymeric planar lightwave circuit (PLC) device using the roll-to-roll imprint process. The fiber array blocks and PLC chip of the integrated structure are fabricated on the same substrate, and the alignments in the three spatial directions were established with the insertion of an optical fiber. The characteristics of the integrated structure were evaluated by fabricating a 1×2 optical splitter device. The structure had an insertion loss of 3.9 dB, and the optical uniformity of the channel was 0.1 dB, indicating that the same performance for an active alignment can be expected.

  11. Planar lens integrated capillary action microfluidic immunoassay device for the optical detection of troponin I

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Mazher-Iqbal; Desmulliez, Marc P. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Optical based analysis in microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip systems are currently considered the gold standard methodology for the determination of end point reactions for various chemical and biological reaction processes. Typically, assays are performed using bulky ancillary apparatus such as microscopes and complex optical excitation and detection systems. Such instrumentation negates many of the advantages offered by device miniaturisation, particularly with respect to overall portability. In this article, we present a CO2 laser ablation technique for rapidly prototyping on-chip planar lenses, in conjunction with capillary action based autonomous microfluidics, to create a miniaturised and fully integrated optical biosensing platform. The presented self-aligned on-chip optical components offer an efficient means to direct excitation light within microfluidics and to directly couple light from a LED source. The device has been used in conjunction with a miniaturised and bespoke fluorescence detection platform to create a complete, palm sized system (≈60 × 80 × 60 mm) capable of performing fluoro-immunoassays. The system has been applied to the detection of cardiac Troponin I, one of the gold standard biomarkers for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, achieving a lower detection limit of 0.08 ng/ml, which is at the threshold of clinically applicable concentrations. The portable nature of the complete system and the biomarker detection capabilities demonstrate the potential of the devised instrumentation for use as a medical diagnostics device at the point of care. PMID:24396546

  12. Fusion of single proteoliposomes with planar, cushioned bilayers in microfluidic flow cells

    PubMed Central

    Karatekin, Erdem; Rothman, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Many biological processes rely on membrane fusion, therefore assays to study its mechanisms are necessary. Here we report an assay with sensitivity to single-vesicle, even to single-molecule events using fluorescently labeled vesicle-associated v-SNARE liposomes and target-membrane-associated t-SNARE-reconstituted planar, supported bilayers (SBLs). Docking and fusion events can be detected using conventional far-field epifluorescence or total internal reflection fluorsecence microscopy. Unlike most previous attempts, fusion here is dependent on SNAP25, one of the t-SNARE subunits that is required for fusion in vivo. The success of the assay is due to the use of (i) bilayers covered with a thin layer of poly(ethylene glycol) to control bilayer-bilayer and bilayer-substrate interactions, (ii) microfluidic flow channels which presents many advantages such as the removal of non-specifically bound liposomes by flow. The protocol takes 6–8 days to complete. Analysis can take up to two weeks. PMID:22517259

  13. Selection and Evaluation of Heat-Resistant Alloys for Planar SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Weil, K. Scott; Paxton, Dean M.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2002-11-21

    Over the past several years, the steady reduction in SOFC operating temperatures to the intermediate range of 700~850oC [1] has made it feasible for lanthanum chromite to be supplanted by metals or alloys as the interconnect materials. Compared to doped lanthanum chromite, metals or alloys offer significantly lower raw material and fabrication costs. However, to be a durable and reliable, a metal or alloy has to satisfy several functional requirements specific to the interconnect under SOFC operating conditions. Specifically, the interconnect metal or alloy should possess the following properties: (i) Good surface stability (resistance to oxidation, hot corrosion, and carburization) in both cathodic (air) and anodic (fuel) atmospheres; (ii) Thermal expansion matching to the ceramic PEN (positive cathode-electrolyte-negative anode) and seal materials (as least for a rigid seal design); (iii) High electrical conductivity through both the bulk material and in-situ formed oxide scales; (iv) Bulk and interfacial thermal mechanical reliability and durability at the operating temperature; (v) Compatibility with other materials in contact with interconnects such as seals and electrical contact materials.

  14. Electrochemical planarization

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Contolini, R.J.

    1993-10-26

    In a process for fabricating planarized thin film metal interconnects for integrated circuit structures, a planarized metal layer is etched back to the underlying dielectric layer by electropolishing, ion milling or other procedure. Electropolishing reduces processing time from hours to minutes and allows batch processing of multiple wafers. The etched back planarized thin film interconnect is flush with the dielectric layer. 12 figures.

  15. Electrochemical planarization

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Contolini, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    In a process for fabricating planarized thin film metal interconnects for integrated circuit structures, a planarized metal layer is etched back to the underlying dielectric layer by electropolishing, ion milling or other procedure. Electropolishing reduces processing time from hours to minutes and allows batch processing of multiple wafers. The etched back planarized thin film interconnect is flush with the dielectric layer.

  16. Power module packaging with double sided planar interconnection and heat exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Zhenxian; Marlino, Laura D.; Ning, Puqi; Wang, Fei

    2015-05-26

    A double sided cooled power module package having a single phase leg topology includes two IGBT and two diode semiconductor dies. Each IGBT die is spaced apart from a diode semiconductor die, forming a switch unit. Two switch units are placed in a planar face-up and face-down configuration. A pair of DBC or other insulated metallic substrates is affixed to each side of the planar phase leg semiconductor dies to form a sandwich structure. Attachment layers are disposed on outer surfaces of the substrates and two heat exchangers are affixed to the substrates by rigid bond layers. The heat exchangers, made of copper or aluminum, have passages for carrying coolant. The power package is manufactured in a two-step assembly and heating process where direct bonds are formed for all bond layers by soldering, sintering, solid diffusion bonding or transient liquid diffusion bonding, with a specially designed jig and fixture.

  17. Three-dimensional silicone microfluidic interconnection scheme using sacrificial wax filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmatilleke, Saman; Henderson, H. Thurman; Bhansali, Shekhar; Ahn, Chong H.

    2000-08-01

    A very simple room-temperature procedure is presented herein for formation of true three-dimensionality of microplumbing in plastic (silicone elastomer in this case), by molding the plastic to simply encapsulate a pre-formed network of sacrificial wax threads or other connected wax configurations which are ultimately to become micro channels and cavities in the plastic motherboard. When these wax sacrificial areas are etched away with acetone, precise cavities, channels, and capillaries results with direct arbitrary three- dimensionality for the first time. This method leads also to a simple and effective external interconnect scheme where ordinary fused silica tubes may be press-fitted into the surface opening to withstand high pressure. This method may be extended for connection of multiple levels of silicone motherboards together using small sections of fused silica tubing, with no loss of stacking volume because of the lack of any connector lips or bosses. An array of micro channels having circular cross sections with diameters of 100, 150 and 200 microns were molded on silicone elastomer using wax thread. The wax thread was dissolved in acetone after the silicon elastometer became components (motherboards) while being able to control the channel lengths within the stacks as desired. Mixing chambers were also molded in a single silicone elastomer layer, because true three-dimensionality is trivially possible without the complexity of multi stacked lithography.

  18. Planarization effect evaluation of acid and alkaline slurries in the copper interconnect process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hu; Yan, Li; Yuling, Liu; Yangang, He

    2015-03-01

    We observed and analyzed the acid and HEBUT alkaline of Cu chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) slurry to evaluate their effects. Material analysis has shown that the planarity surfaces and the removal rate of alkaline slurry are better than the acid slurry during metal CMP processes. The global surface roughness and the small-scale surface roughness by 10 × 10 μm2 of copper film polished by the SVTC slurry are 1.127 nm and 2.49 nm. However, it is found that the surface roughnesses of copper films polished by the HEBUT slurry are 0.728 nm and 0.215 nm. All other things being equal, the remaining step heights of copper films polished by the SVTC slurry and HEBUT slurry are respectively 150 nm and 50 nm. At the end of the polishing process, the dishing heights of the HEBUT slurry and the SVTC slurry are approximately both 30 nm, the erosion heights of the HEBUT slurry and the SVTC slurry are approximately both 20 nm. The surface states of the copper film after CMP are tested, and the AFM results of two samples are obviously seen. The surface polished by SVTC slurry shows many spikes. This indicates that the HEBUT alkaline slurry is promising for inter-level dielectric (ILD) applications in ultra large-scale integrated circuits (ULSI) technology. Project supported by the Special Project Items No. 2 in National Long-Term Technology Development Plan (No. 2009ZX02308), the Doctoral Program Foundation of Xinjiang Normal University Plan (No. XJNUBS1226), the Key Laboratory of Coal Gasification, Ministry of Education, and the Inorganic Chemistry Key Disciplines of Xinjiang Normal University.

  19. Tribological Effects of Brush Scrubbing in Post Chemical Mechanical Planarization Cleaning on Electrical Characteristics in Novel Non-porous Low-k Dielectric Fluorocarbon on Cu Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xun; Nemoto, Takenao; Tomita, Yugo; Teramoto, Akinobu; Sugawa, Shigetoshi; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    2011-05-01

    Damage reduction during planarization is strongly required to avoid scratch generation and the variation in the electrical properties of low-k dielectrics leading to yield loss in an integrated circuit after the implementation of an ultralow-k dielectric in Cu damascene interconnects. An optimum process condition to reduce damage on brush scrubbing in post-chemical-mechanical-planarization (post-CMP) cleaning was proposed for advanced nonporous organic ultralow-k dielectric fluorocarbon/Cu interconnects. Increasing brush rotation rate by decreasing down pressures results in the improvement in both electric properties and particle removal efficiency. The tribological effects of brush scrubbing in post-CMP cleaning on the electrical characteristics were explored. The brush scrubbing condition of a high brush rotation rate at low down pressures contributes to the suppression of damage generation.

  20. Looking into Living Cell Systems: Planar Waveguide Microfluidic NMR Detector for in Vitro Metabolomics of Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kalfe, Ayten; Telfah, Ahmad; Lambert, Jörg; Hergenröder, Roland

    2015-07-21

    The complex cell metabolism and its link to oncogenic signaling pathways have received huge interest within the last few years. But the lack of advanced analytical tools for the investigation of living cell metabolism is still a challenge to be faced. Therefore, we designed and fabricated a novel miniaturized microslot NMR detector with on-board heater integrated with a microfluidic device as NMR sample holder. For the first time, a tumor spheroid of 500 μm diameter and consisting of 9000 cells has been studied noninvasively and online for 24 h. The dynamic processes of production and degradation of 23 intra- and extracellular metabolites were monitored. Remarkably high concentrations of lactate and alanine were observed, being an indicator for a shift from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism. In summary, this methodical development has proven to be a successful analytical tool for the elucidation of cellular functions and their corresponding biochemical pathways. Additionally, the planar geometry of the microslot NMR detector allows the hyphenation with versatile lab-on-a chip (LOC) technology. This opens a new window for metabolomics studies on living cells and can be implemented into new application fields in biotechnology and life sciences. PMID:26121119

  1. Tandem sulfur chemiluminescence and flame ionization detection with planar microfluidic devices for the characterization of sulfur compounds in hydrocarbon matrices.

    PubMed

    Luong, J; Gras, R; Shellie, R A; Cortes, H J

    2013-07-01

    The detection of sulfur compounds in different hydrocarbon matrices, from light hydrocarbon feedstocks to medium synthetic crude oil feeds provides meaningful information for optimization of refining processes as well as demonstration of compliance with petroleum product specifications. With the incorporation of planar microfluidic devices in a novel chromatographic configuration, sulfur compounds from hydrogen sulfide to alkyl dibenzothiophenes and heavier distributions of sulfur compounds over a wide range of matrices spanning across a boiling point range of more than 650°C can be characterized, using one single analytical configuration in less than 25min. In tandem with a sulfur chemiluminescence detector for sulfur analysis is a flame ionization detector. The flame ionization detector can be used to establish the boiling point range of the sulfur compounds in various hydrocarbon fractions for elemental specific simulated distillation analysis as well as profiling the hydrocarbon matrices for process optimization. Repeatability of less than 3% RSD (n=20) over a range of 0.5-1000 parts per million (v/v) was obtained with a limit of detection of 50 parts per billion and a linear range of 0.5-1000 parts per million with a correlation co-efficient of 0.998. PMID:23726084

  2. Influence of channel position on sample confinement in two-dimensional planar microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Margaret A; Hoffman, Michelle D; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2008-02-01

    We report enhanced sample confinement on microfluidic devices using a combination of electrokinetic flow from adjacent control channels and electric field shaping with an array of channels perpendicular to the sample stream. The basic device design consisted of a single first dimension (1D) channel, intersecting an array of 32 or 96 parallel second dimension (2D) channels. To minimize sample dispersion and leakage into the parallel channels as the sample traversed the sample transfer region, control channels were placed to the left and right of the 1D and waste channels. The electrokinetic flow from the control channels confined the sample stream and acted as a buffer between the sample stream and the 2D channels. To further enhance sample confinement, the electric field was shaped parallel to the sample stream by placing the channel array in close proximity to the sample transfer region. Using COMSOL Multiphysics, initial work focused on simulating the electric fields and fluid flows in various device geometries, and the results guided device design. Following the design phase, we fabricated devices with 40, 80, and 120 microm wide control channels and evaluated the sample stream width as a function of the electric field strength ratio in the control and 1D channels (E(C)/E(1D)). For the 32 channel design, the 40 and 80 microm wide control channels produced the most effective sample confinement with stream widths as narrow as 75 microm, and for the 96 channel design, all three control channel widths generated comparable sample stream widths. Comparison of the 32 and 96 channel designs showed sample confinement scaled easily with the length of the sample transfer region. PMID:18231672

  3. Wettability patterning for high-rate, pumpless fluid transport on open, non-planar microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Aritra; Ganguly, Ranjan; Schutzius, Thomas M; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2014-05-01

    Surface tension driven transport of liquids on open substrates offers an enabling tool for open micro total analysis systems that are becoming increasingly popular for low-cost biomedical diagnostic devices. The present study uses a facile wettability patterning method to produce open microfluidic tracks that - due to their shape, surface texture and chemistry - are capable of transporting a wide range of liquid volumes (~1-500 μL) on-chip, overcoming viscous and other opposing forces (e.g., gravity) at the pertinent length scales. Small volumes are handled as individual droplets, while larger volumes require repeated droplet transport. The concept is developed and demonstrated with coatings based on TiO2 filler particles, which, when present in adequate (~80 wt.%) quantities within a hydrophobic fluoroacrylic polymer matrix, form composites that are intrinsically superhydrophobic. Such composite coatings become superhydrophilic upon exposure to UV light (390 nm). A commercial laser printer-based photo-masking approach is used on the coating for spatially selective wettability conversion from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic. Carefully designed wedge-patterned surface tension confined tracks on the open-air devices move liquid on them without power input, even when acting against gravity. Simple designs of wettability patterning are used on versatile substrates (e.g., metals, polymers, paper) to demonstrate complex droplet handling tasks, e.g., merging, splitting and metered dispensing, some of which occur in 3-D geometries. Fluid transport rates of up to 350 μL s(-1) are attained. Applicability of the design on metal substrates allows these devices to be used also for other microscale engineering applications, e.g., water management in fuel cells. PMID:24622962

  4. Chemiluminescence detector based on a single planar transparent digital microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangyu; Zhang, Kaidi; Pan, Jian; Chen, Guoping; Liu, Ai-Qun; Fan, Shih-Kang; Zhou, Jia

    2013-07-21

    We report on a compact and portable prototype of chemiluminescence detector based on a single planar single polar transparent electrowetting-on-dielectrics (EWOD) device. The coupling ground model was proposed to build the EWOD device, which could be driven under a single polar voltage. Such a design not only simplified the chip construction and control circuit, but also had the potential for the ball-like droplet to focus the fluorescence and enhance the detection sensitivity. Simulations and experiments both confirmed that the greater the contact angle, the stronger the detected optical signal, and thus the higher the sensitivity. The sensitivity of the prototype detector to H2O2 was 5.45 mV (mmol L(-1))(-1) and the detection limit was 0.01 mmol L(-1) when the contact angle of the EWOD surface was 120°. To further increase the sensitivity and decrease the detection limit, the contact angle of the EWOD device could be increased and the dark current of the photomultiplier decreased. The prototype shows potential applications as highly sensitive, cost effective and portable immuno-detectors, especially as a blood glucose monitor. PMID:23674102

  5. Multi-dimensional gas chromatography with a planar microfluidic device for the characterization of volatile oxygenated organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Luong, J; Gras, R; Cortes, H; Shellie, R A

    2012-09-14

    Oxygenated compounds like methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, acetaldehyde, crotonaldehyde, ethylene oxide, tetrahydrofuran, 1,4-dioxane, 1,3-dioxolane, and 2-chloromethyl-1,3-dioxolane are commonly encountered in industrial manufacturing processes. Despite the availability of a variety of column stationary phases for chromatographic separation, it is difficult to separate these solutes from their respective matrices using single dimension gas chromatography. Implemented with a planar microfluidic device, conventional two-dimensional gas chromatography and the employment of chromatographic columns using dissimilar separation mechanisms like that of a selective wall-coated open tubular column and an ionic sorbent column have been successfully applied to resolve twelve industrially significant volatile oxygenated compounds in both gas and aqueous matrices. A Large Volume Gas Injection System (LVGIS) was also employed for sample introduction to enhance system automation and precision. By successfully integrating these concepts, in addition to having the capability to separate all twelve components in one single analysis, features associated with multi-dimensional gas chromatography like dual retention time capability, and the ability to quarantine undesired chromatographic contaminants or matrix components in the first dimension column to enhance overall system cleanliness were realized. With this technique, a complete separation for all the compounds mentioned can be carried out in less than 15 min. The compounds cited can be analyzed over a range of 250 ppm (v/v) to 100 ppm (v/v) with a relative standard deviation of less than 5% (n=20) with high degree of reliability. PMID:22410155

  6. Back-flushing and heart cut capillary gas chromatography using planar microfluidic Deans' switching for the separation of benzene and alkylbenzenes in industrial samples.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Matthew R; Gras, Ronda; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Luong, Jim; Shellie, Robert A

    2015-11-20

    Planar microfluidic devices coupled with modern electronic pressure control have allowed gas chromatography (GC) practitioners to easily manipulate chromatographic systems to achieve heart cut and back-flushing configurations. These planar microfluidic devices have enhanced the connectivity between different components of GC instrumentation and have improved the inertness and minimised system dead volumes compared to classical chromatographic unions and valves. In the present contribution the setup and configuration of two multidimensional GC (MDGC) platforms is described for achieving the separation and quantification of trace level target C6-C8 alkylbenzenes in styrene monomer and Isoparaffin™ solvents, using flame ionisation detection (FID). The performance of these MDGC platforms indicated excellent retention time (0.2% relative standard deviation, RSD) and peak area repeatability (1% RSD) for all analytes of interest. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.8 mg kg(-1) for benzene in styrene monomer, and 2.4-2.8 mg kg(-1) for C6-C8 alkylbenzenes such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene in Isoparaffin™ solvent. PMID:26592465

  7. Three-dimensional focusing of particles using negative dielectrophoretic force in a microfluidic chip with insulating microstructures and dual planar microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Jen, Chun-Ping; Weng, Cheng-Hsin; Huang, Ching-Te

    2011-09-01

    The focusing of biological and synthetic particles in microfluidic devices is a prerequisite for the construction of microstructured materials, as well as for medical applications. In the present study, a microdevice that can effectively focus particles in three dimensions using a combination of insulator-based and metal-electrode dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been designed and fabricated. The DEP force is employed to confine the particles using a negative DEP response. Four insulating microstructures, which form an X-pattern in the microchannel, were employed to distort the electric field between the insulators in a conducting solution, thereby generating regions with a high electric-field gradient. Two strips of microelectrodes on the top and bottom surfaces were placed in the middle of the microchannel and connected to an electric pole. Two sets of dual-planar electrodes connected to the opposite pole were placed at the sides of the microchannel at the top and bottom surfaces. The results of a transient simulation of tracks of polystyrene particles, which was performed using the commercial software package CFD-ACE⁺ (ESI Group, France), demonstrate that the three-dimensional focusing of particles was achieved when the applied voltage was larger than 35 V at a frequency of 1 MHz. Furthermore, the focusing performance increased with the increased strength of the applied electric field and decreased inlet flow rate. Experiments on particle focusing, employing polystyrene particles 10 μm in diameter, were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed design; the results agree with the trend predicted by numerical simulations. PMID:21874653

  8. Lab-on-CMOS Integration of Microfluidics and Electrochemical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yue; Mason, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a CMOS-microfluidics integration scheme for electrochemical microsystems. A CMOS chip was embedded into a micro-machined silicon carrier. By leveling the CMOS chip and carrier surface to within 100 nm, an expanded obstacle-free surface suitable for photolithography was achieved. Thin film metal planar interconnects were microfabricated to bridge CMOS pads to the perimeter of the carrier, leaving a flat and smooth surface for integrating microfluidic structures. A model device containing SU-8 microfluidic mixers and detection channels crossing over microelectrodes on a CMOS integrated circuit was constructed using the chip-carrier assembly scheme. Functional integrity of microfluidic structures and on-CMOS electrodes was verified by a simultaneous sample dilution and electrochemical detection experiment within multi-channel microfluidics. This lab-on-CMOS integration process is capable of high packing density, is suitable for wafer-level batch production, and opens new opportunities to combine the performance benefits of on-CMOS sensors with lab-on-chip platforms. PMID:23939616

  9. Alignability of Optical Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, Russell Scott

    With the continuing drive towards higher speed, density, and functionality in electronics, electrical interconnects become inadequate. Due to optics' high speed and bandwidth, freedom from capacitive loading effects, and freedom from crosstalk, optical interconnects can meet more stringent interconnect requirements. But, an optical interconnect requires additional components, such as an optical source and detector, lenses, holographic elements, etc. Fabrication and assembly of an optical interconnect requires precise alignment of these components. The successful development and deployment of optical interconnects depend on how easily the interconnect components can be aligned and/or how tolerant the interconnect is to misalignments. In this thesis, a method of quantitatively specifying the relative difficulty of properly aligning an optical interconnect is described. Ways of using this theory of alignment to obtain design and packaging guidelines for optical interconnects are examined. The measure of the ease with which an optical interconnect can be aligned, called the alignability, uses the efficiency of power transfer as a measure of alignment quality. The alignability is related to interconnect package design through the overall cost measure, which depends upon various physical parameters of the interconnect, such as the cost of the components and the time required for fabrication and alignment. Through a mutual dependence on detector size, the relationship between an interconnect's alignability and its bandwidth, signal-to-noise ratio, and bit-error -rate is examined. The results indicate that a range of device sizes exists for which given performance threshold values are satisfied. Next, the alignability of integrated planar-optic backplanes is analyzed in detail. The resulting data show that the alignability can be optimized by varying the substrate thickness or the angle of reflection. By including the effects of crosstalk, in a multi-channel backplane, the

  10. Microfluidic fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeang, Erik

    Microfluidic fuel cell architectures are presented in this thesis. This work represents the mechanical and microfluidic portion of a microfluidic biofuel cell project. While the microfluidic fuel cells developed here are targeted to eventual integration with biocatalysts, the contributions of this thesis have more general applicability. The cell architectures are developed and evaluated based on conventional non-biological electrocatalysts. The fuel cells employ co-laminar flow of fuel and oxidant streams that do not require a membrane for physical separation, and comprise carbon or gold electrodes compatible with most enzyme immobilization schemes developed to date. The demonstrated microfluidic fuel cell architectures include the following: a single cell with planar gold electrodes and a grooved channel architecture that accommodates gaseous product evolution while preventing crossover effects; a single cell with planar carbon electrodes based on graphite rods; a three-dimensional hexagonal array cell based on multiple graphite rod electrodes with unique scale-up opportunities; a single cell with porous carbon electrodes that provides enhanced power output mainly attributed to the increased active area; a single cell with flow-through porous carbon electrodes that provides improved performance and overall energy conversion efficiency; and a single cell with flow-through porous gold electrodes with similar capabilities and reduced ohmic resistance. As compared to previous results, the microfluidic fuel cells developed in this work show improved fuel cell performance (both in terms of power density and efficiency). In addition, this dissertation includes the development of an integrated electrochemical velocimetry approach for microfluidic devices, and a computational modeling study of strategic enzyme patterning for microfluidic biofuel cells with consecutive reactions.

  11. A novel low Cr-containing Fe-Cr-Co alloy for metallic interconnects in planar intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenying; Yan, Dong; Yang, Jie; Chen, Jing; Chi, Bo; Pu, Jian; Li, Jian

    2014-12-01

    A newly developed low-Cr containing Fe-Cr-Co alloy, named as FeCro, is evaluated as a candidate material of metallic interconnects for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). This alloy possesses excellent oxidation resistance and adequate electrical conductivity at 750 °C in air, and shows slight Cr deposition in/around La0.72Sr0.18MnO3(LSM) electrode under a harsh accelerating condition of 400 mA cm-2 and 850 °C. The thickness of the oxide scale thermally grown at 750 °C in air for 1000 his less than 1 μm, presenting a double-layered structure with dense (Mn, Cr)3O4 on the top of Cr2O3. The oxidation kinetics at 750 °C obeys the parabolic law with a low rate constant of1.42 × 10-15 g2 cm-4 s-1. The Cr deposition in/around the LSM electrode in the presence of the FeCro alloy is remarkably reduced, compared to the commercial Crofer 22H alloy. The measured area specific resistance (ASR) at 750 °C in air after 1000 h isothermal oxidation is 14 mΩ cm2. It is the unique microstructure of the formed oxide scale that significantly enhances the resistances of the FeCro alloy to oxidation and Cr volatilization.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Interconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and system for fabricating an electrical interconnect capable of supporting very high current densities ( 10(exp 6)-10(exp 10) Amps/sq cm), using an array of one or more carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNT array is grown in a selected spaced apart pattern, preferably with multi-wall CNTs, and a selected insulating material, such as SiOw, or SiuNv is deposited using CVD to encapsulate each CNT in the array. An exposed surface of the insulating material is planarized to provide one or more exposed electrical contacts for one or more CNTs.

  13. Design and fabrication of optical polymer waveguide devices for optical interconnects and integrated optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guomin

    Optical interconnects is a promising technique to boost the speed of electronic systems through replacing high speed electrical data buses using optical ones. Optical coherence tomography is an attractive imaging technique that has been widely used in medical imaging applications with capability of high resolution subsurface cross sectional imaging in living tissues. Both the optical interconnects and the optical coherence tomography imaging may benefit from the use of integrated optics technology in particular polymer waveguides that can be designed and fabricated to improve the device capability, system compactness, and performance reliability. In this dissertation, we first present our innovative design and realization on the polymer waveguides with 45° integrated mirrors for optical interconnects using the vacuum assisted microfluidic (VAM) soft lithography. VAM is a new microfluidic based replication technique which can be utilized to improve the performance of imprinted devices by eliminating the residue planar layer and accomplish complex devices incorporating different materials in the same layer. A prism-assisted inclined UV lithography technique is introduced to increase the slanted angles of the side walls of the microstructures and to fabricate multidirectional slanted microstructures. It is also used to fabricate 45° integrated mirrors in polymer waveguides to support surface normal optical coupling for optical interconnects. A dynamic card-to-backplane optical interconnects system has also been demonstrated based on polymer waveguides with tunable optofluidic couplers. The operation of the tunable optofluidic coupler is accomplished by controlling the position of air bubbles and index matching liquid in the perpendicular microfluidic channel for refractive index modulation. The dynamic activation and deactivation of the backplane optofluidic couplers can save the optical signal power. 10 Gbps eye diagrams of the dynamic optical interconnect link

  14. Suspended microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Casavant, Benjamin P.; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Berthier, Jean; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.; Bischel, Lauren L.; Brakke, Kenneth; Hedman, Curtis J.; Bushman, Wade; Keller, Nancy P.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited. Open microfluidic systems have the potential to lower the barriers to adoption, but the absence of robust design rules has hindered their use. Here, we present an open microfluidic platform, suspended microfluidics, that uses surface tension to fill and maintain a fluid in microscale structures devoid of a ceiling and floor. We developed a simple and ubiquitous model predicting fluid flow in suspended microfluidic systems and show that it encompasses many known capillary phenomena. Suspended microfluidics was used to create arrays of collagen membranes, mico Dots (μDots), in a horizontal plane separating two fluidic chambers, demonstrating a transwell platform able to discern collective or individual cellular invasion. Further, we demonstrated that μDots can also be used as a simple multiplexed 3D cellular growth platform. Using the μDot array, we probed the combined effects of soluble factors and matrix components, finding that laminin mitigates the growth suppression properties of the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. Based on the same fluidic principles, we created a suspended microfluidic metabolite extraction platform using a multilayer biphasic system that leverages the accessibility of open microchannels to retrieve steroids and other metabolites readily from cell culture. Suspended microfluidics brings the high degree of fluidic control and unique functionality of closed microfluidics into the highly accessible and robust platform of open microfluidics. PMID:23729815

  15. Microfluidic electronics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2012-08-21

    Microfluidics, a field that has been well-established for several decades, has seen extensive applications in the areas of biology, chemistry, and medicine. However, it might be very hard to imagine how such soft microfluidic devices would be used in other areas, such as electronics, in which stiff, solid metals, insulators, and semiconductors have previously dominated. Very recently, things have radically changed. Taking advantage of native properties of microfluidics, advances in microfluidics-based electronics have shown great potential in numerous new appealing applications, e.g. bio-inspired devices, body-worn healthcare and medical sensing systems, and ergonomic units, in which conventional rigid, bulky electronics are facing insurmountable obstacles to fulfil the demand on comfortable user experience. Not only would the birth of microfluidic electronics contribute to both the microfluidics and electronics fields, but it may also shape the future of our daily life. Nevertheless, microfluidic electronics are still at a very early stage, and significant efforts in research and development are needed to advance this emerging field. The intention of this article is to review recent research outcomes in the field of microfluidic electronics, and address current technical challenges and issues. The outlook of future development in microfluidic electronic devices and systems, as well as new fabrication techniques, is also discussed. Moreover, the authors would like to inspire both the microfluidics and electronics communities to further exploit this newly-established field. PMID:22711057

  16. Microfluidic device for drug delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  17. Polymer-based platform for microfluidic systems

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William; Krulevitch, Peter; Maghribi, Mariam; Hamilton, Julie; Rose, Klint; Wang, Amy W.

    2009-10-13

    A method of forming a polymer-based microfluidic system platform using network building blocks selected from a set of interconnectable network building blocks, such as wire, pins, blocks, and interconnects. The selected building blocks are interconnectably assembled and fixedly positioned in precise positions in a mold cavity of a mold frame to construct a three-dimensional model construction of a microfluidic flow path network preferably having meso-scale dimensions. A hardenable liquid, such as poly (dimethylsiloxane) is then introduced into the mold cavity and hardened to form a platform structure as well as to mold the microfluidic flow path network having channels, reservoirs and ports. Pre-fabricated elbows, T's and other joints are used to interconnect various building block elements together. After hardening the liquid the building blocks are removed from the platform structure to make available the channels, cavities and ports within the platform structure. Microdevices may be embedded within the cast polymer-based platform, or bonded to the platform structure subsequent to molding, to create an integrated microfluidic system. In this manner, the new microfluidic platform is versatile and capable of quickly generating prototype systems, and could easily be adapted to a manufacturing setting.

  18. Polymer waveguide with tunable optofluidic couplers for card-to-backplane optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guomin; Baig, Sarfaraz; Wang, Michael R.

    2014-03-01

    Polymeric waveguides with tunable optofluidic couplers are fabricated by the vacuum assisted microfluidic technique for card-to-backplane optical interconnect applications. The optofluidic coupler on a backplane consists of polymer waveguides and a perpendicular microfluidic channel with inclined sidewalls. An index matching liquid and air bubbles are located in the microfluidic hollow channel. The activation or deactivation of the surface normal coupling of the optofluidic coupler is accomplished by setting air bubbles or index matching liquid to be in contact with the waveguide mirrors. 10 Gbps eye diagrams of the card-to-backplane optical interconnect link have been demonstrated showing the high performance of the interconnect system.

  19. Acoustically-driven microfluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A W; Benett, W J; Tarte, L R

    2000-06-23

    We have demonstrated a non-contact method of concentrating and mixing particles in a plastic microfluidic chamber employing acoustic radiation pressure. A flaw cell package has also been designed that integrates liquid sample interconnects, electrical contacts and a removable sample chamber. Experiments were performed on 1, 3, 6, and 10 {micro}m polystyrene beads. Increased antibody binding to a solid-phase substrate was observed in the presence of acoustic mixing due to improve mass transport.

  20. Method for making electro-fluidic connections in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Martinez, David; Manginell, Ronald P.; Heller, Edwin J.; Chanchani, Rajen

    2004-08-10

    A method for forming electro-fluidic interconnections in microfluidic devices comprises forming an electrical connection between matching bond pads on a die containing an active electrical element and a microfluidic substrate and forming a fluidic seal ring that circumscribes the active electrical element and a fluidic feedthrough. Preferably, the electrical connection and the seal ring are formed in a single bonding step. The simple method is particularly useful for chemical microanalytical systems wherein a plurality of microanalytical components, such as a chemical preconcentrator, a gas chromatography column, and a surface acoustic wave detector, are fluidically interconnected on a hybrid microfluidic substrate having electrical connection to external support electronics.

  1. Electrical interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Frost, John S.; Brandt, Randolph J.; Hebert, Peter; Al Taher, Omar

    2015-10-06

    An interconnect includes a first set of connector pads, a second set of connector pads, and a continuous central portion. A first plurality of legs extends at a first angle from the continuous central portion. Each leg of the first plurality of legs is connected to a connector pad of a first set of connector pads. A second plurality of legs extends at a second angle from the continuous central portion. Each leg of the second plurality of legs is connected to a connector pad of the second set of connector pads. Gaps are defined between legs. The gaps enable movement of the first set of connector pads relative to the second set of connector pads.

  2. High-pressure microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, K.

    2015-03-01

    When using appropriate materials and microfabrication techniques, with the small dimensions the mechanical stability of microstructured devices allows for processes at high pressures without loss in safety. The largest area of applications has been demonstrated in green chemistry and bioprocesses, where extraction, synthesis and analyses often excel at high densities and high temperatures. This is accessible through high pressures. Capillary chemistry has been used since long but, just like in low-pressure applications, there are several potential advantages in using microfluidic platforms, e.g., planar isothermal set-ups, large local variations in geometries, dense form factors, small dead volumes and precisely positioned microstructures for control of reactions, catalysis, mixing and separation. Other potential applications are in, e.g., microhydraulics, exploration, gas driven vehicles, and high-pressure science. From a review of the state-of-art and frontiers of high pressure microfluidics, the focus will be on different solutions demonstrated for microfluidic handling at high pressures and challenges that remain.

  3. Flexible packaging and integration of CMOS IC with elastomeric microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bowei; Dong, Quan; Korman, Can E.; Li, Zhenyu; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2013-05-01

    We have demonstrated flexible packaging and integration of CMOS IC chips with PDMS microfluidics. Microfluidic channels are used to deliver both liquid samples and liquid metals to the CMOS die. The liquid metals are used to realize electrical interconnects to the CMOS chip. As a demonstration we integrated a CMOS magnetic sensor die and matched PDMS microfluidic channels in a flexible package. The packaged system is fully functional under 3cm bending radius. The flexible integration of CMOS ICs with microfluidics enables previously unavailable flexible CMOS electronic systems with fluidic manipulation capabilities, which hold great potential for wearable health monitoring, point-of-care diagnostics and environmental sensing.

  4. Planar electrochemical device assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson; Craig P. , Visco; Steven J. , De Jonghe; Lutgard C.

    2010-11-09

    A pre-fabricated electrochemical device having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films is bonded to a porous electrically conductive support. A second porous electrically conductive support may be bonded to a counter electrode of the electrochemical device. Multiple electrochemical devices may be bonded in parallel to a single porous support, such as a perforated sheet to provide a planar array. Planar arrays may be arranged in a stacked interconnected array. A method of making a supported electrochemical device is disclosed wherein the method includes a step of bonding a pre-fabricated electrochemical device layer to an existing porous metal or porous metal alloy layer.

  5. Planar electrochemical device assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2007-06-19

    A pre-fabricated electrochemical device having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films is bonded to a porous electrically conductive support. A second porous electrically conductive support may be bonded to a counter electrode of the electrochemical device. Multiple electrochemical devices may be bonded in parallel to a single porous support, such as a perforated sheet to provide a planar array. Planar arrays may be arranged in a stacked interconnected array. A method of making a supported electrochemical device is disclosed wherein the method includes a step of bonding a pre-fabricated electrochemical device layer to an existing porous metal or porous metal alloy layer.

  6. Advanced Interconnect Development

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z.G.; Maupin, G.; Simner, S.; Singh, P.; Stevenson, J.; Xia, G.

    2005-01-27

    The objectives of this project are to develop cost-effective, optimized materials for intermediate temperature SOFC interconnect and interconnect/electrode interface applications and identify and understand degradation processes in interconnects and at their interfaces with electrodes.

  7. Interconnected semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Grimmer, Derrick P.; Paulson, Kenneth R.; Gilbert, James R.

    1990-10-23

    Semiconductor layer and conductive layer formed on a flexible substrate, divided into individual devices and interconnected with one another in series by interconnection layers and penetrating terminals.

  8. Interconnection networks

    DOEpatents

    Faber, V.; Moore, J.W.

    1988-06-20

    A network of interconnected processors is formed from a vertex symmetric graph selected from graphs GAMMA/sub d/(k) with degree d, diameter k, and (d + 1)exclamation/ (d /minus/ k + 1)exclamation processors for each d greater than or equal to k and GAMMA/sub d/(k, /minus/1) with degree d /minus/ 1, diameter k + 1, and (d + 1)exclamation/(d /minus/ k + 1)exclamation processors for each d greater than or equal to k greater than or equal to 4. Each processor has an address formed by one of the permutations from a predetermined sequence of letters chosen a selected number of letters at a time, and an extended address formed by appending to the address the remaining ones of the predetermined sequence of letters. A plurality of transmission channels is provided from each of the processors, where each processor has one less channel than the selected number of letters forming the sequence. Where a network GAMMA/sub d/(k, /minus/1) is provided, no processor has a channel connected to form an edge in a direction delta/sub 1/. Each of the channels has an identification number selected from the sequence of letters and connected from a first processor having a first extended address to a second processor having a second address formed from a second extended address defined by moving to the front of the first extended address the letter found in the position within the first extended address defined by the channel identification number. The second address is then formed by selecting the first elements of the second extended address corresponding to the selected number used to form the address permutations. 9 figs.

  9. Fabrication, Metrology, and Transport Characteristics of Single Polymeric Nanopores in Three-Dimensional Hybrid Microfluidic/Nanofluidic Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Travis L.

    2009-01-01

    The incorporation of nanofluidic elements between microfluidic channels to form hybrid microfluidic/nanofluidic architectures allows the extension of microfluidic systems into the third dimension, thus removing the constraints imposed by planarity. Measuring and understanding the behavior of these devices creates new analytical challenges due to…

  10. Planar micromixer

    DOEpatents

    Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Singh, Anup K.; Wiedenman, Boyd J.

    2008-03-18

    The present embodiment describes a laminar-mixing embodiment that utilizes simple, three-dimensional injection. Also described is the use of the embodiment in combination with wide and shallow sections of channel to affect rapid mixing in microanalytical systems. The shallow channel sections are constructed using all planar micromachining techniques, including those based on isotropic etching. The planar construction enables design using minimum dispersion concepts that, in turn, enable simultaneous mixing and injection into subsequent chromatography channels.

  11. Fabrication of plastic microfluidic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter M.; Matson, Dean W.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Hammerstrom, D. J.

    1998-09-01

    Plastic components have many advantages, including ease of fabrication, low cost, chemical inertness, lightweight, and disposability. We report on the fabrication of three plastics-based microfluidic components: a motherboard, a dialysis unit, and a metal sensor. Microchannels, headers, and interconnects were produced in thin sheets (>=50 microns) of polyimide, PMMA, polyethylene, and polycarbonate using a direct-write excimer laser micromachining system. Machined sheets were laminated by thermal and adhesive bonding to form leak-tight microfluidic components. The microfluidic motherboard borrowed the `functionality on a chip' concept from the electronics industry and was the heart of a complex microfluidic analytical device. The motherboard platform was designed to be tightly integrated and self-contained (i.e., liquid flows are all confined within machined microchannels), reducing the need for tubing with fluid distribution and connectivity. This concept greatly facilitated system integration and miniaturization. As fabricated, the motherboard consisted of three fluid reservoirs connected to micropumps by microchannels. The fluids could either be pumped independently or mixed in microchannels prior to being directed to exterior analytical components via outlet ports. The microdialysis device was intended to separate electrolytic solutes from low volume samples prior to mass spectrometric analysis. The device consisted of a dialysis membrane laminated between opposed serpentine microchannels containing the sample fluid and a buffer solution. The laminated metal sensor consisted of fluid reservoirs, micro-flow channels, micropumps, mixing channels, reaction channels, and detector circuitry.

  12. Compact planar microwave blocking filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A compact planar microwave blocking filter includes a dielectric substrate and a plurality of filter unit elements disposed on the substrate. The filter unit elements are interconnected in a symmetrical series cascade with filter unit elements being organized in the series based on physical size. In the filter, a first filter unit element of the plurality of filter unit elements includes a low impedance open-ended line configured to reduce the shunt capacitance of the filter.

  13. Digital Microfluidic Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alphonsus H C; Li, Bingyu Betty; Chamberlain, M Dean; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    Digital microfluidics (DMF) is a droplet-based liquid-handling technology that has recently become popular for cell culture and analysis. In DMF, picoliter- to microliter-sized droplets are manipulated on a planar surface using electric fields, thus enabling software-reconfigurable operations on individual droplets, such as move, merge, split, and dispense from reservoirs. Using this technique, multistep cell-based processes can be carried out using simple and compact instrumentation, making DMF an attractive platform for eventual integration into routine biology workflows. In this review, we summarize the state-of-the-art in DMF cell culture, and describe design considerations, types of DMF cell culture, and cell-based applications of DMF. PMID:26643019

  14. Microfluidics in amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Pumera, Martin

    2007-07-01

    Microfluidic devices have been widely used to derivatize, separate, and detect amino acids employing many different strategies. Virtually zero-dead volume interconnections and fast mass transfer in small volume microchannels enable dramatic increases in on-chip derivatization reaction speed, while only minute amounts of sample and reagent are needed. Due to short channel path, fast subsecond separations can be carried out. With sophisticated miniaturized detectors, the whole analytical process can be integrated on one platform. This article reviews developments of lab-on-chip technology in amino acid analysis, it shows important design features such as sample preconcentration, precolumn and postcolumn amino acid derivatization, and unlabeled and labeled amino acid detection with focus on advanced designs. The review also describes important biomedical and space exploration applications of amino acid analysis on microfluidic devices. PMID:17542043

  15. Digital Microfluidic Logic Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Xu, Tao; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Microfluidic computing is an emerging application for microfluidics technology. We propose microfluidic logic gates based on digital microfluidics. Using the principle of electrowetting-on-dielectric, AND, OR, NOT and XOR gates are implemented through basic droplet-handling operations such as transporting, merging and splitting. The same input-output interpretation enables the cascading of gates to create nontrivial computing systems. We present a potential application for microfluidic logic gates by implementing microfluidic logic operations for on-chip HIV test.

  16. Micro-Fluidic Device for Drug Delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  17. Integrated Microfluidic Gas Sensors for Water Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L.; Sniadecki, N.; DeVoe, D. L.; Beamesderfer, M.; Semancik, S.; DeVoe, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    A silicon-based microhotplate tin oxide (SnO2) gas sensor integrated into a polymer-based microfluidic system for monitoring of contaminants in water systems is presented. This device is designed to sample a water source, control the sample vapor pressure within a microchannel using integrated resistive heaters, and direct the vapor past the integrated gas sensor for analysis. The sensor platform takes advantage of novel technology allowing direct integration of discrete silicon chips into a larger polymer microfluidic substrate, including seamless fluidic and electrical interconnects between the substrate and silicon chip.

  18. Printed Module Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Stockert, Talysa R.; Fields, Jeremy D.; Pach, Gregory F.; Mauger, Scott A.; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.

    2015-06-14

    Monolithic interconnects in photovoltaic modules connect adjacent cells in series, and are typically formed sequentially involving multiple deposition and scribing steps. Interconnect widths of 500 um every 10 mm result in 5% dead area, which does not contribute to power generation in an interconnected solar panel. This work expands on previous work that introduced an alternative interconnection method capable of producing interconnect widths less than 100 um. The interconnect is added to the module in a single step after deposition of the photovoltaic stack, eliminating the need for scribe alignment. This alternative method can be used for all types of thin film photovoltaic modules. Voltage addition with copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) solar cells using a 2-scribe printed interconnect approach is demonstrated. Additionally, interconnect widths of 250 um are shown.

  19. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  20. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  1. Microfluidic waves.

    PubMed

    Utz, Marcel; Begley, Matthew R; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2011-11-21

    The propagation of pressure waves in fluidic channels with elastic covers is discussed in view of applications to flow control in microfluidic devices. A theory is presented which describes pressure waves in the fluid that are coupled to bending waves in the elastic cover. At low frequencies, the lateral bending of the cover dominates over longitudinal bending, leading to propagating, non-dispersive longitudinal pressure waves in the channel. The theory addresses effects due to both the finite viscosity and compressibility of the fluid. The coupled waves propagate without dispersion, as long as the wave length is larger than the channel width. It is shown that in channels of typical microfluidic dimensions, wave velocities in the range of a few 10 m s(-1) result if the channels are covered by films of a compliant material such as PDMS. The application of this principle to design microfluidic band pass filters based on standing waves is discussed. Characteristic frequencies in the range of a few kHz are readily achieved with quality factors above 30. PMID:21966667

  2. Single-mode and tunable microfluidic dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, A.; Balslev, S.; Gersborg-Hansen, M.; Bilenberg, B.; Rasmussen, T.; Nilsson, D.

    2006-08-01

    We present a technology for miniaturized, chip-based liquid dye lasers, which may be integrated with microfluidic networks and planar waveguides without addition of further process steps. The microfluidic dye lasers consist of a microfluidic channel with an embedded optical resonator. The lasers are operated with Rhodamine 6G laser dye dissolved in a suitable solvent, such as ethanol or ethylene glycol, and optically pumped at 532 nm with a pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. Both vertically and laterally emitting devices are realized. A vertically emitting Fabry-Perot microcavity laser is integrated with a microfluidic mixer, to demonstrate realtime wavelength tunability. Two major challenges of this technology are addressed: lasing threshold and fluidic handling. Low threshold, in-plane emission and integration with polymer waveguides and microfluidic networks is demonstrated with distributed feed-back lasers. The challenge of fluidic handling is addressed by hybridization with mini-dispensers, and by applying capillary filling of the laser devices.

  3. Perforation patterned electrical interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, Jonathan

    2014-01-28

    This disclosure describes systems and methods for increasing the usable surface area of electrical contacts within a device, such as a thin film solid state device, through the implementation of electrically conductive interconnects. Embodiments described herein include the use of a plurality of electrically conductive interconnects that penetrate through a top contact layer, through one or more multiple layers, and into a bottom contact layer. The plurality of conductive interconnects may form horizontal and vertical cross-sectional patterns. The use of lasers to form the plurality of electrically conductive interconnects from reflowed layer material further aids in the manufacturing process of a device.

  4. Bio-functionalized silk hydrogel microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Siwei; Chen, Ying; Partlow, Benjamin P; Golding, Anne S; Tseng, Peter; Coburn, Jeannine; Applegate, Matthew B; Moreau, Jodie E; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; Kaplan, David L

    2016-07-01

    Bio-functionalized microfluidic systems were developed based on a silk protein hydrogel elastomeric materials. A facile multilayer fabrication method using gelatin sacrificial molding and layer-by-layer assembly was implemented to construct interconnected, three dimensional (3D) microchannel networks in silk hydrogels at 100 μm minimum feature resolution. Mechanically activated valves were implemented to demonstrate pneumatic control of microflow. The silk hydrogel microfluidics exhibit controllable mechanical properties, long-term stability in various environmental conditions, tunable in vitro and in vivo degradability in addition to optical transparency, providing unique features for cell/tissue-related applications than conventional polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and existing hydrogel-based microfluidic options. As demonstrated in the work here, the all aqueous-based fabrication process at ambient conditions enabled the incorporation of active biological substances in the bulk phase of these new silk microfluidic systems during device fabrication, including enzymes and living cells, which are able to interact with the fluid flow in the microchannels. These silk hydrogel-based microfluidic systems offer new opportunities in engineering active diagnostic devices, tissues and organs that could be integrated in vivo, and for on-chip cell sensing systems. PMID:27077566

  5. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Mitrovski, Svetlana M.

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  6. Solar cell array interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Carey, P.G.; Thompson, J.B.; Colella, N.J.; Williams, K.A.

    1995-11-14

    Electrical interconnects are disclosed for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value. 4 figs.

  7. Solar cell array interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Colella, Nicolas J.; Williams, Kenneth A.

    1995-01-01

    Electrical interconnects for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value.

  8. Multiphase flows with digital and traditional microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Michael A.

    Multi-phase fluid systems are an important concept in fluid mechanics, seen every day in how fluids interact with solids, gases, and other fluids in many industrial, medical, agricultural, and other regimes. In this thesis, the development of a two-dimensional digital microfluidic device is presented, followed by the development of a two-phase microfluidic diagnostic tool designed to simulate sandstone geometries in oil reservoirs. In both instances, it is possible to take advantage of the physics involved in multiphase flows to affect positive outcomes in both. In order to make an effective droplet-based digital microfluidic device, one must be able to precisely control a number of key processes including droplet positioning, motion, coalescence, mixing, and sorting. For planar or open microfluidic devices, many of these processes have yet to be demonstrated. A suitable platform for an open system is a superhydrophobic surface, as suface characteristics are critical. Great efforts have been spent over the last decade developing hydrophobic surfaces exhibiting very large contact angles with water, and which allow for high droplet mobility. We demonstrate that sanding Teflon can produce superhydrophobic surfaces with advancing contact angles of up to 151° and contact angle hysteresis of less than 4°. We use these surfaces to characterize droplet coalescence, mixing, motion, deflection, positioning, and sorting. This research culminates with the presentation of two digital microfluidic devices: a droplet reactor/analyzer and a droplet sorter. As global energy usage increases, maximizing oil recovery from known reserves becomes a crucial multiphase challenge in order to meet the rising demand. This thesis presents the development of a microfluidic sandstone platform capable of quickly and inexpensively testing the performance of fluids with different rheological properties on the recovery of oil. Specifically, these microfluidic devices are utilized to examine how

  9. Polydimethylsiloxane-based conducting composites and their applications in microfluidic chip fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiuqing; Wen, Weijia

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the design and fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based conducting composites and their applications in microfluidic chip fabrication. Owing to their good electrical conductivity and rubberlike elastic characteristics, these composites can be used variously in soft-touch electronic packaging, planar and three-dimensional electronic circuits, and in-chip electrodes. Several microfluidic components fabricated with PDMS-based composites have been introduced, including a microfluidic mixer, a microheater, a micropump, a microdroplet controller, as well as an all-in-one microfluidic chip. PMID:19693388

  10. Microfluidic sieve valves

    SciTech Connect

    Quake, Stephen R; Marcus, Joshua S; Hansen, Carl L

    2015-01-13

    Sieve valves for use in microfluidic device are provided. The valves are useful for impeding the flow of particles, such as chromatography beads or cells, in a microfluidic channel while allowing liquid solution to pass through the valve. The valves find particular use in making microfluidic chromatography modules.

  11. Rapid fabrication of supercapacitor electrodes using bionanoscaffolds in capillary microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, F.; Chu, S.; Gerasopoulos, K.; Culver, J. N.; Ghodssi, R.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the utilization of capillary microfluidics to rapidly create nanostructure-patterned electrodes for energy storage applications. Using patterned photoresist as open-channel capillary microfluidics, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) bio-nanoscaffolds suspended in solution are autonomously delivered onto planar gold electrodes over a 1 cm2 area. The TMVs assemble on the electrode and form a dense bio-nanoscaffold layer due to enhanced evaporation-assisted assembly in the open-channel capillary microfluidic device within an hour. The TMV structures are coated with Ni/NiO through electroless plating and thermal oxidation to form supercapacitor electrodes. The galvanostatic charge/discharge cycle showed a 3.6-fold increase in areal capacitance for the nanostructured electrode compared to planar structures.

  12. Robust fluidic connections to freestanding microfluidic hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Bradly B.; Larsen, Taylor S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetic scaffolds approaching physiological scale, whose size and large cellular load far exceed the limits of diffusion, require incorporation of a fluidic means to achieve adequate nutrient/metabolite exchange. This need has driven the extension of microfluidic technologies into the area of biomaterials. While construction of perfusable scaffolds is essentially a problem of microfluidic device fabrication, functional implementation of free-standing, thick-tissue constructs depends upon successful integration of external pumping mechanisms through optimized connective assemblies. However, a critical analysis to identify optimal materials/assembly components for hydrogel substrates has received little focus to date. This investigation addresses this issue directly by evaluating the efficacy of a range of adhesive and mechanical fluidic connection methods to gelatin hydrogel constructs based upon both mechanical property analysis and cell compatibility. Results identify a novel bioadhesive, comprised of two enzymatically modified gelatin compounds, for connecting tubing to hydrogel constructs that is both structurally robust and non-cytotoxic. Furthermore, outcomes from this study provide clear evidence that fluidic interconnect success varies with substrate composition (specifically hydrogel versus polydimethylsiloxane), highlighting not only the importance of selecting the appropriately tailored components for fluidic hydrogel systems but also that of encouraging ongoing, targeted exploration of this issue. The optimization of such interconnect systems will ultimately promote exciting scientific and therapeutic developments provided by microfluidic, cell-laden scaffolds. PMID:26045731

  13. Microfab-less Microfluidic Capillary Electrophoresis Devices

    PubMed Central

    Segato, Thiago P.; Bhakta, Samir A.; Gordon, Matthew; Carrilho, Emanuel; Willis, Peter A.; Jiao, Hong; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to conventional bench-top instruments, microfluidic devices possess advantageous characteristics including great portability potential, reduced analysis time (minutes), and relatively inexpensive production, putting them on the forefront of modern analytical chemistry. Fabrication of these devices, however, often involves polymeric materials with less-than-ideal surface properties, specific instrumentation, and cumbersome fabrication procedures. In order to overcome such drawbacks, a new hybrid platform is proposed. The platform is centered on the use of 5 interconnecting microfluidic components that serve as the injector or reservoirs. These plastic units are interconnected using standard capillary tubing, enabling in-channel detection by a wide variety of standard techniques, including capacitively-coupled contactless conductivity detection (C4D). Due to the minimum impact on the separation efficiency, the plastic microfluidic components used for the experiments discussed herein were fabricated using an inexpensive engraving tool and standard Plexiglas. The presented approach (named 52-platform) offers a previously unseen versatility: enabling the assembly of the platform within minutes using capillary tubing that differs in length, diameter, or material. The advantages of the proposed design are demonstrated by performing the analysis of inorganic cations by capillary electrophoresis on soil samples from the Atacama Desert. PMID:23585815

  14. Laser printing of 3D metallic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott A.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) techniques for the printing of functional materials has been demonstrated for numerous applications. The printing gives rise to patterns, which can be used to fabricate planar interconnects. More recently, various groups have demonstrated electrical interconnects from laser-printed 3D structures. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or of pastes containing dispersed metallic particles. However, the generated 3D structures do not posses the same metallic conductivity as a bulk metal interconnect of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. An alternative is to laser transfer entire 3D structures using a technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place is a LIFT process whereby whole components and parts can be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This paper will describe the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding, solid metal foils or beams precisely over the contact pads of discrete devices to interconnect them into fully functional circuits. Furthermore, this paper will also show how the same laser can be used to bend or fold the bulk metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief for the circuits under flexing or during motion from thermal mismatch. These interconnect "ridges" can span wide gaps (on the order of a millimeter) and accommodate height differences of tens of microns between adjacent devices. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented.

  15. LTCC interconnects in microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Cristina; Persson, Katrin; Ottosson, Britta; Billger, Dag

    2006-06-01

    Different microelectromechanical system (MEMS) packaging strategies towards high packaging density of MEMS devices and lower expenditure exist both in the market and in research. For example, electrical interconnections and low stress wafer level packaging are essential for improving device performance. Hybrid integration of low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC) with Si can be a way for an easier packaging system with integrated electrical interconnection, and as well towards lower costs. Our research on LTCC-Si integration is reported in this paper.

  16. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CATHODE-INTERCONNECT INTERFACES IN PLANAR SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Armstrong, Beth L; Trejo, Rosa M; Bai, Jianming; Watkins, Thomas R; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2010-01-01

    The residual stresses in manganese cobaltite, i.e., Mn1.5Co1.5O4, coatings applied onto alloys 441 and Crofer 22 APU were determined by X-Ray Diffraction. The residual stresses were found to be tensile at 800 C for both systems. The residual stress for spinel-coated AL441 relaxed with time and reached a value of 0.16 0.02 GPa after 300 minutes. The stress relaxation process was slower for spinel-coated Crofer and reached a value of 0.23 0.01 GPa after 500 minutes. Four-point bend SENB testing technique was used to evaluate the toughness of the interfaces between LSM10, i.e., (La0.9Sr0.1)0.98MnO3+δ, and spinel-coated AL441 and Crofer. Sandwich test specimens were prepared by sintering the LSM10 layer at 900 C for four hours in air or under PO2 cyclic conditions. The strain energy release rate was found to be 1.52 0.11 J/m2 for regular sintering and 1.47 0.15 J/m2 for sintering with cyclic PO2 treatment. This difference was found to be statistically insignificant.

  17. Zee electrical interconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, Thomas M. (Inventor); Gaddy, Edward M. (Inventor); Herriage, Michael J. (Inventor); Patterson, Robert E. (Inventor); Partin, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An interconnect, having some length, that reliably connects two conductors separated by the length of the interconnect when the connection is made but in which one length if unstressed would change relative to the other in operation. The interconnect comprises a base element an intermediate element and a top element. Each element is rectangular and formed of a conducting material and has opposed ends. The elements are arranged in a generally Z-shape with the base element having one end adapted to be connected to one conductor. The top element has one end adapted to be connected to another conductor and the intermediate element has its ends disposed against the other end of the base and the top element. Brazes mechanically and electrically interconnect the intermediate element to the base and the top elements proximate the corresponding ends of the elements. When the respective ends of the base and the top elements are connected to the conductors, an electrical connection is formed therebetween, and when the conductors are relatively moved or the interconnect elements change length the elements accommodate the changes and the associated compression and tension forces in such a way that the interconnect does not mechanically fatigue.

  18. Microfluidic systems for electrochemical and biological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ackler, H., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    Microfluidic devices with microelectrodes have the potential to enable studies of phenomena at size scales where behavior may be dominated by different mechanisms than at macroscales. Through our work developing microfluidic devices for dielectrophoretic separation and sensing of cells and particles, we have fabricated devices from which general or more specialized research devices may be derived. Fluid channels from 80 {micro}m wide X 20 {micro}m deep to 1 mm wide to 200 {micro}m deep have been fabricated in glass, with lithographically patterned electrodes from 10 to 80 {micro}m wide on one or both sides on the channels and over topographies tens of microns in heights. the devices are designed to easily interface to electronic and fluidic interconnect packages that permit reuse of devices, rather than one-time use, crude glue-based methods. Such devices may be useful for many applications of interest to the electrochemical and biological community.

  19. Discrete elements for 3D microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Krisna C.; Thompson, Bryant; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic systems are rapidly becoming commonplace tools for high-precision materials synthesis, biochemical sample preparation, and biophysical analysis. Typically, microfluidic systems are constructed in monolithic form by means of microfabrication and, increasingly, by additive techniques. These methods restrict the design and assembly of truly complex systems by placing unnecessary emphasis on complete functional integration of operational elements in a planar environment. Here, we present a solution based on discrete elements that liberates designers to build large-scale microfluidic systems in three dimensions that are modular, diverse, and predictable by simple network analysis techniques. We develop a sample library of standardized components and connectors manufactured using stereolithography. We predict and validate the flow characteristics of these individual components to design and construct a tunable concentration gradient generator with a scalable number of parallel outputs. We show that these systems are rapidly reconfigurable by constructing three variations of a device for generating monodisperse microdroplets in two distinct size regimes and in a high-throughput mode by simple replacement of emulsifier subcircuits. Finally, we demonstrate the capability for active process monitoring by constructing an optical sensing element for detecting water droplets in a fluorocarbon stream and quantifying their size and frequency. By moving away from large-scale integration toward standardized discrete elements, we demonstrate the potential to reduce the practice of designing and assembling complex 3D microfluidic circuits to a methodology comparable to that found in the electronics industry. PMID:25246553

  20. SOFC INTERCONNECT DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Diane M. England

    2004-03-16

    An interconnect for an SOFC stack is used to connect fuel cells into a stack. SOFC stacks are expected to run for 40,000 hours and 10 thermal cycles for the stationary application and 10,000 hours and 7000 thermal cycles for the transportation application. The interconnect of a stack must be economical and robust enough to survive the SOFC stack operation temperature of 750 C and must maintain the electrical connection to the fuel cells throughout the lifetime and under thermal cycling conditions. Ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, and nickel-based superalloys were investigated as possible interconnect materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The alloys were thermally cycled in air and in a wet nitrogen-argon-hydrogen (N2-Ar-H2-H2O) atmosphere. Thermogravimetry was used to determine the parabolic oxidation rate constants of the alloys in both atmospheres. The area-specific resistance of the oxide scale and metal substrates were measured using a two-probe technique with platinum contacts. The study identifies two new interconnect designs which can be used with both bonded and compressive stack sealing mechanisms. The new interconnect designs offer a solution to chromium vaporization, which can lead to degradation of some (chromium-sensitive) SOFC cathodes.

  1. Optically interconnected phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Kunath, Richard R.

    1988-01-01

    Phased-array antennas are required for many future NASA missions. They will provide agile electronic beam forming for communications and tracking in the range of 1 to 100 GHz. Such phased arrays are expected to use several hundred GaAs monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs) as transmitting and receiving elements. However, the interconnections of these elements by conventional coaxial cables and waveguides add weight, reduce flexibility, and increase electrical interference. Alternative interconnections based on optical fibers, optical processing, and holography are under evaluation as possible solutions. In this paper, the current status of these techniques is described. Since high-frequency optical components such as photodetectors, lasers, and modulators are key elements in these interconnections, their performance and limitations are discussed.

  2. SOFC INTERCONNECT DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Diane M. England

    2003-06-06

    This report summarizes the interconnect work being performed at Delphi. Materials were chosen for this interconnect project were chosen from ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, and nickel-based superalloys. The alloys are thermally cycled in air and a wet hydrogen atmosphere. The oxide scale adherence, electrical resistance and oxidation resistance are determined after long-term oxidation of each alloy. The oxide scale adherence will be observed using a scanning electron microscope. The electrical resistance of the oxidized alloys will be determined using an electrical resistance measurement apparatus which has been designed and is currently being built. Data from the electrical resistance measurement is expected to be provided in the second quarter.

  3. Central American electrical interconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    A technical cooperation grant of $2.25 million, designed to strengthen the capacity of Central American countries to operate their regional interconnected electrical system, was announced by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The grant, extended from the banks Fund for Special Operations, will help improve the capacity of the regions electric power companies to achieve economical, safe operation of the interconnected electric power systems. The funds will also be used to finance regional studies of the accords, procedures, regulations, and supervisory mechanisms for the system, as well as program development and data bases.

  4. Corrosion Performance of Ferritic Steel for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Jablonski, P.D.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-11-01

    Ferritic stainless steels have been identified as potential candidates for interconnects in planar-type solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) operating below 800ºC. Crofer 22 APU was selected for this study. It was studied under simulated SOFC-interconnect dual environment conditions with humidified air on one side of the sample and humidified hydrogen on the other side at 750ºC. The surfaces of the oxidized samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with microanalytical capabilities. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was also used in this study.

  5. Interconnecting with VIPs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Interconnectedness changes lives. It can even save lives. Recently the author got to witness and be part of something in his role as a teacher of primary science that has changed lives: it may even have saved lives. It involved primary science teaching--and the climate. Robert Collins describes how it is all interconnected. The "Toilet…

  6. Capillary interconnect device

    SciTech Connect

    Renzi, Ronald F

    2013-11-19

    An interconnecting device for connecting a plurality of first fluid-bearing conduits to a corresponding plurality of second fluid-bearing conduits thereby providing fluid communication between the first fluid-bearing conduits and the second fluid-bearing conduits. The device includes a manifold and one or two ferrule plates that are held by compressive axial forces.

  7. Open Systems Interconnection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denenberg, Ray

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the need for standards allowing computer-to-computer communication and gives examples of technical issues. The seven-layer framework of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Reference Model is explained and illustrated. Sidebars feature public data networks and Recommendation X.25, OSI standards, OSI layer functions, and a glossary.…

  8. CAISSON: Interconnect Network Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, Paul L.

    2006-01-01

    Cray response to HPCS initiative. Model future petaflop computer interconnect. Parallel discrete event simulation techniques for large scale network simulation. Built on WarpIV engine. Run on laptop and Altix 3000. Can be sized up to 1000 simulated nodes per host node. Good parallel scaling characteristics. Flexible: multiple injectors, arbitration strategies, queue iterators, network topologies.

  9. SmartBuild-a truly plug-n-play modular microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2008-08-01

    In this Technical Note, for the first time, a truly "plug-n-play" modular microfluidic system (SmartBuild Plug-n-Play Modular Microfluidic System) is presented for designing and building integrated modular microfluidic systems for biological and chemical applications. The modular microfluidic system can be built by connecting multiple microfluidic components together to form a larger integrated system. The SmartBuild System comprises of a motherboard with interconnect channels/grooves, fitting components, microchannel inserts with different configurations and microchips/modules with different functionalities. Also, heaters, micropumps and valving systems can be designed and used in the system. Examples of an integrated mixing system and reaction systems are presented here to demonstrate the versatility of the SmartBuild System. PMID:18651081

  10. Flexible packaging of solid-state integrated circuit chips with elastomeric microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bowei; Dong, Quan; Korman, Can E.; Li, Zhenyu; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2013-01-01

    A flexible technology is proposed to integrate smart electronics and microfluidics all embedded in an elastomer package. The microfluidic channels are used to deliver both liquid samples and liquid metals to the integrated circuits (ICs). The liquid metals are used to realize electrical interconnects to the IC chip. This avoids the traditional IC packaging challenges, such as wire-bonding and flip-chip bonding, which are not compatible with current microfluidic technologies. As a demonstration we integrated a CMOS magnetic sensor chip and associate microfluidic channels on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate that allows precise delivery of small liquid samples to the sensor. Furthermore, the packaged system is fully functional under bending curvature radius of one centimetre and uniaxial strain of 15%. The flexible integration of solid-state ICs with microfluidics enables compact flexible electronic and lab-on-a-chip systems, which hold great potential for wearable health monitoring, point-of-care diagnostics and environmental sensing among many other applications.

  11. Quasi-toric planar microlenses for oblique-incidence light beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hisakazu; Kawai, Shigeru

    1997-02-01

    Novel quasi-toric planar microlenses (PML s) suitable for planar optics are proposed. The PML s have elliptical apertures, and they are astigmatism free for oblique-incidence light beams. A simple PML model is proposed for designing the quasi-toric PML. Fabricated quasi-toric PML s were evaluated to demonstrate their chip-to-chip interconnection probability.

  12. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-04-21

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields-and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such "unconventional" microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline. PMID:23478651

  13. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields—and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such “unconventional” microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline. PMID:23478651

  14. Optical Interconnection Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Keren; Hughes, Gary

    2004-07-01

    In current high-performance computing and communications systems an emerging need for ultra-high-capacity, low-latency interconnection networks has led investigators to consider insertion of optical-domain switching fabrics. The use of optical technology for the physical switching layer within data communication systems is clearly advantageous in providing maximum bandwidth per cable particularly through the exploitation of DWDM. Furthermore, the transparency offered in the optical domain allows potentially wide flexibility in the data encoding and protocols. However, many key challenges remain to the successful implementation of optical packet routing, as optical signals cannot be processed efficiently or buffered for an arbitrary time. Clearly, innovative architectures, switching fabrics, and packet processing subsystems that employ optical technologies in synergetic fashions with powerful electronic techniques would be poised to harvest the immense transmission bandwidth of optics creating the ultimate "unlimited-capacity" interconnection network.

  15. Optical Interconnection Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Keren; Hughes, Gary

    2004-05-01

    In current high-performance computing and communications systems an emerging need for ultra-high-capacity, low-latency interconnection networks has led investigators to consider insertion of optical-domain switching fabrics. The use of optical technology for the physical switching layer within data communication systems is clearly advantageous in providing maximum bandwidth per cable particularly through the exploitation of DWDM. Furthermore, the transparency offered in the optical domain allows potentially wide flexibility in the data encoding and protocols. However, many key challenges remain to the successful implementation of optical packet routing, as optical signals cannot be processed efficiently or buffered for an arbitrary time. Clearly, innovative architectures, switching fabrics, and packet processing subsystems that employ optical technologies in synergetic fashions with powerful electronic techniques would be poised to harvest the immense transmission bandwidth of optics creating the ultimate "unlimited-capacity" interconnection network.

  16. Optical Interconnection Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Keren; Hughes, Gary

    2004-06-01

    In current high-performance computing and communications systems an emerging need for ultra-high-capacity, low-latency interconnection networks has led investigators to consider insertion of optical-domain switching fabrics. The use of optical technology for the physical switching layer within data communication systems is clearly advantageous in providing maximum bandwidth per cable particularly through the exploitation of DWDM. Furthermore, the transparency offered in the optical domain allows potentially wide flexibility in the data encoding and protocols. However, many key challenges remain to the successful implementation of optical packet routing, as optical signals cannot be processed efficiently or buffered for an arbitrary time. Clearly, innovative architectures, switching fabrics, and packet processing subsystems that employ optical technologies in synergetic fashions with powerful electronic techniques would be poised to harvest the immense transmission bandwidth of optics creating the ultimate "unlimited-capacity" interconnection network.

  17. Capillary interconnect device

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, Ronald F.

    2007-12-25

    A manifold for connecting external capillaries to the inlet and/or outlet ports of a microfluidic device for high pressure applications is provided. The fluid connector for coupling at least one fluid conduit to a corresponding port of a substrate that includes: (i) a manifold comprising one or more channels extending therethrough wherein each channel is at least partially threaded, (ii) one or more threaded ferrules each defining a bore extending therethrough with each ferrule supporting a fluid conduit wherein each ferrule is threaded into a channel of the manifold, (iii) a substrate having one or more ports on its upper surface wherein the substrate is positioned below the manifold so that the one or more ports is aligned with the one or more channels of the manifold, and (iv) means for applying an axial compressive force to the substrate to couple the one or more ports of the substrate to a corresponding proximal end of a fluid conduit.

  18. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  19. Using Adhesive Patterning to Construct 3D Paper Microfluidic Devices.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Brent; Tsutsui, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of patterned aerosol adhesives to construct both planar and nonplanar 3D paper microfluidic devices. By spraying an aerosol adhesive through a metal stencil, the overall amount of adhesive used in assembling paper microfluidic devices can be significantly reduced. We show on a simple 4-layer planar paper microfluidic device that the optimal adhesive application technique and device construction style depends heavily on desired performance characteristics. By moderately increasing the overall area of a device, it is possible to dramatically decrease the wicking time and increase device success rates while also reducing the amount of adhesive required to keep the device together. Such adhesive application also causes the adhesive to form semi-permanent bonds instead of permanent bonds between paper layers, enabling single-use devices to be non-destructively disassembled after use. Nonplanar 3D origami devices also benefit from the semi-permanent bonds during folding, as it reduces the likelihood that unrelated faces may accidently stick together. Like planar devices, nonplanar structures see reduced wicking times with patterned adhesive application vs uniformly applied adhesive. PMID:27077551

  20. Electro-Microfluidic Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    BENAVIDES, GILBERT L.; GALAMBOS, PAUL C.

    2002-06-01

    Electro-microfluidics is experiencing explosive growth in new product developments. There are many commercial applications for electro-microfluidic devices such as chemical sensors, biological sensors, and drop ejectors for both printing and chemical analysis. The number of silicon surface micromachined electro-microfluidic products is likely to increase. Manufacturing efficiency and integration of microfluidics with electronics will become important. Surface micromachined microfluidic devices are manufactured with the same tools as IC's (integrated circuits) and their fabrication can be incorporated into the IC fabrication process. In order to realize applications for devices must be developed. An Electro-Microfluidic Dual In-line Package (EMDIP{trademark}) was developed surface micromachined electro-microfluidic devices, a practical method for getting fluid into these to be a standard solution that allows for both the electrical and the fluidic connections needed to operate a great variety of electro-microfluidic devices. The EMDIP{trademark} includes a fan-out manifold that, on one side, mates directly with the 200 micron diameter Bosch etched holes found on the device, and, on the other side, mates to lager 1 mm diameter holes. To minimize cost the EMDIP{trademark} can be injection molded in a great variety of thermoplastics which also serve to optimize fluid compatibility. The EMDIP{trademark} plugs directly into a fluidic printed wiring board using a standard dual in-line package pattern for the electrical connections and having a grid of multiple 1 mm diameter fluidic connections to mate to the underside of the EMDIP{trademark}.

  1. Electrochromatography Methods: Planar Electrochromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chomicki, Adam; Dzido, Tadeusz H.; Płocharz, Paweł; Polak, Beata

    Planar electrochromatography is a technique in which mixture components are separated in adsorbent layer of a chromatographic plate placed in electric field. In such separation system a mobile phase movement stems from electroosmosis phenomenon. Partition and electrophoresis mechanisms are involved in separation of mixture components with this technique. Two principal modes of planar electrochromatography are described: planar electrochromatography in an open system (PEC) and planar electrochromatography in a closed system (pressurized planar electrochromatography, PPEC). The development of both modes is presented beginning with the first paper on electrochromatography by Pretorius et al. in 1974 and finishing with the last papers by Dzido et al. in 2010. Constructional development of equipment to planar electrochromatography is provided and influence of operating variables on separation efficiency as well. The advantages and challenges of PPEC technique are especially discussed.

  2. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  3. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S.; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting, and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next. PMID:23900527

  4. Polymeric optoelectronic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay A.

    2000-04-01

    Electrical interconnects are reaching their fundamental limits and are becoming the speed bottleneck as processor speeds are increasing. A polymer-based interconnect technology was developed for affordable integrated optical circuits that address the optical signal processing needs in the telecom, datacom, and performance computing industries. We engineered organic polymers that can be readily made into single-mode, multimode, and micro-optical waveguide structures of controlled numerical apertures and geometries. These materials are formed from highly-crosslinked acrylate monomers with specific linkages that determine properties such as flexibility, robustness, optical loss, thermal stability, and humidity resistance. These monomers are intermiscible, providing for precise continuous adjustment of the refractive index over a wide range. In polymer form, they exhibit state-of-the-art loss values and exceptional environmental stability, enabling use in a variety of demanding applications. A wide range of rigid and flexible substrates can be used, including glass, quartz, silicon, glass-filled epoxy printed circuit board substrates, and flexible plastic films. The devices we describe include a variety of routing elements that can be sued as part of a massively parallel photonic integrated circuit on the MCM, board, or backplane level.

  5. Constant field gradient planar cavity structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W.; Kustom, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    A cavity structure is described having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam.

  6. Constant field gradient planar coupled cavity structure

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Yoon W.; Kustom, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    A cavity structure having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam.

  7. Constant field gradient planar coupled cavity structure

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.

    1999-07-27

    A cavity structure is disclosed having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam. 16 figs.

  8. Smart and functional polymer materials for smart and functional microfluidic instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Bonnie L.

    2014-04-01

    As microfluidic systems evolve from "chip-in-the-lab" to true portable lab-on-a-chip (LoC) or lab-in-a-package (LiP) microinstrumentation, there is a need for increasingly miniaturized sensors, actuators, and integration/interconnect technologies with high levels of functionality and self-direction. Furthermore, as microfluidic instruments are increasingly realized in polymer-based rather than glass- or silicon- based platforms, there is a need to realize these highly functional components in materials that are polymer-compatible. Polymers that are altered to possess basic functionality, and even higher-functioning "smart" polymer materials, may help to realize high-functioning and selfdirecting portable microinstrumentation. Stimuli-responsive hydrogels have been recognized for over a decade as beneficial to the development of smart microfluidics systems and instrumentation. In addition, functional materials such as conductive and magnetic composite polymers are being increasingly employed to push microfluidics systems to greater degrees of functionality, portability, and/or flexibility for wearable/implantable systems. Functional and smart polymer materials can be employed to realize electrodes, electronic routing, heaters, mixers, valves, pumps, sensors, and interconnect structures in polymer-based microfluidic systems. Stimuli for such materials can be located on-chip or in a small package, thus greatly increasing the degree of portability and the potential for mechanical flexibility of such systems. This paper will examine the application of functional polymer materials to the development of high-functioning microfluidics instruments with a goal towards self-direction.

  9. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard

    2015-09-29

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having a plurality of adjacent electrochemical cells formed of an anode layer, a cathode layer spaced apart from the anode layer, and an electrolyte layer disposed between the anode layer and the cathode layer. The fuel cell system also includes at least one interconnect, the interconnect being structured to conduct free electrons between adjacent electrochemical cells. Each interconnect includes a primary conductor embedded within the electrolyte layer and structured to conduct the free electrons.

  10. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    SciTech Connect

    Goettler, Richard; Liu, Zhien

    2015-08-11

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having a plurality of adjacent electrochemical cells formed of an anode layer, a cathode layer spaced apart from the anode layer, and an electrolyte layer disposed between the anode layer and the cathode layer. The fuel cell system also includes at least one interconnect, the interconnect being structured to conduct free electrons between adjacent electrochemical cells. Each interconnect includes a primary conductor embedded within the electrolyte layer and structured to conduct the free electrons.

  11. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    SciTech Connect

    Goettler, Richard; Liu, Zhien

    2015-03-10

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having a plurality of adjacent electrochemical cells formed of an anode layer, a cathode layer spaced apart from the anode layer, and an electrolyte layer disposed between the anode layer and the cathode layer. The fuel cell system also includes at least one interconnect, the interconnect being structured to conduct free electrons between adjacent electrochemical cells. Each interconnect includes a primary conductor embedded within the electrolyte layer and structured to conduct the free electrons.

  12. Policy issues in interconnecting networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiner, Barry M.

    1989-01-01

    To support the activities of the Federal Research Coordinating Committee (FRICC) in creating an interconnected set of networks to serve the research community, two workshops were held to address the technical support of policy issues that arise when interconnecting such networks. The workshops addressed the required and feasible technologies and architectures that could be used to satisfy the desired policies for interconnection. The results of the workshop are documented.

  13. Punch card programmable microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Korir, George; Prakash, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word "PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS" using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world. PMID:25738834

  14. Three-dimensional planar-integrated optics: a comparative view with free-space optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, El-Hang; Song, Seok Ho

    2000-04-01

    This paper reports on the viability, effectiveness, versatility, and the utility of the concept of the planar integrated optical interconnection scheme with respect to the concept of the free-space interconnection scheme in realizing multiple integration of various micro/nano- photonic devices and components for applications in optical interconnection, optical circuits, optical switching, optical communication and information processing. Several planar optics schemes to detect parallel optical packet addresses in WDM switching networks, to perform a space- variant processing such as fractional correlation, and to construct multistage interconnection networks, have been successfully demonstrated in the 3D glass blocks. Using a gradient-index (GRIN) substrate as a signal propagation medium in the planar optics is a unique advantage, when compared to the free-space optics. We have demonstrated the GRIN-substrate concept by using six 1/4-pitch GRIN rod lenses and a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). The GRIN planar optics can be further extended to the use of 2D array of VCSEL microlasers and modulators in making massively parallel interconnects. A critical comparison between the planar integrated optics scheme and the free- space integrated scheme is given in terms of physics, engineering and technological concept.

  15. A microfluidic tubing method and its application for controlled synthesis of polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jidong; Chen, Wenwen; Sun, Jiashu; Liu, Chao; Yin, Qifang; Zhang, Lu; Xianyu, Yunlei; Shi, Xinghua; Hu, Guoqing; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-05-21

    This report describes a straightforward but robust tubing method for connecting polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices to external equipment. The interconnection is irreversible and can sustain a pressure of up to 4.5 MPa that is characterized experimentally and theoretically. To demonstrate applications of this high-pressure tubing technique, we fabricate a semicircular microfluidic channel to implement a high-throughput, size-controlled synthesis of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles ranging from 55 to 135 nm in diameter. This microfluidic device allows for a total flow rate of 410 mL h(-1), resulting in enhanced convective mixing which can be utilized to precipitate small size nanoparticles with a good dispersion. We expect that this tubing technique would be widely used in microfluidic chips for nanoparticle synthesis, cell manipulation, and potentially nanofluidic applications. PMID:24675980

  16. Process for electrically interconnecting electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Colella, Nicolas J.; Williams, Kenneth A.

    2002-01-01

    Electrical interconnects for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb--Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb--Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value.

  17. Microfluidic platforms for mechanobiology

    PubMed Central

    Polacheck, William J.; Li, Ran; Uzel, Sebastien G. M.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanotransduction has been a topic of considerable interest since early studies demonstrated a link between mechanical force and biological response. Until recently, studies of fundamental phenomena were based either on in vivo experiments with limited control or direct access, or on large-scale in vitro studies lacking many of the potentially important physiological factors. With the advent of microfluidics, many of the previous limitations of in vitro testing were eliminated or reduced through greater control or combined functionalities. At the same time, imaging capabilities were tremendously enhanced. In this review, we discuss how microfluidics has transformed the study of mechanotransduction. This is done in the context of the various cell types that exhibit force-induced responses and the new biological insights that have been elucidated. We also discuss new microfluidic studies that could produce even more realistic models of in vivo conditions by combining multiple stimuli or creating a more realistic microenvironment. PMID:23649165

  18. Microfluidic Mixing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Chang, Chin-Lung; Wang, Yao-Nan; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The aim of microfluidic mixing is to achieve a thorough and rapid mixing of multiple samples in microscale devices. In such devices, sample mixing is essentially achieved by enhancing the diffusion effect between the different species flows. Broadly speaking, microfluidic mixing schemes can be categorized as either “active”, where an external energy force is applied to perturb the sample species, or “passive”, where the contact area and contact time of the species samples are increased through specially-designed microchannel configurations. Many mixers have been proposed to facilitate this task over the past 10 years. Accordingly, this paper commences by providing a high level overview of the field of microfluidic mixing devices before describing some of the more significant proposals for active and passive mixers. PMID:21686184

  19. Punch Card Programmable Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Korir, George; Prakash, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word “PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS” using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world. PMID:25738834

  20. Experimental Microfluidic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbertson, Christopher; Gonda, Steve; Ramsey, John Michael

    2005-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this project is to integrate microfluidic devices with NASA's space bioreactor systems. In such a system, the microfluidic device would provide realtime feedback control of the bioreactor by monitoring pH, glucose, and lactate levels in the cell media; and would provide an analytical capability to the bioreactor in exterrestrial environments for monitoring bioengineered cell products and health changes in cells due to environmental stressors. Such integrated systems could be used as biosentinels both in space and on planet surfaces. The objective is to demonstrate the ability of microfabricated devices to repeatedly and reproducibly perform bead cytometry experiments in micro, lunar, martian, and hypergravity (1.8g).

  1. Microfluidic Flame Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Gregory S. (Inventor); Fisher, David J. (Inventor); Mungas, Christopher (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Propellants flow through specialized mechanical hardware that is designed for effective and safe ignition and sustained combustion of the propellants. By integrating a micro-fluidic porous media element between a propellant feed source and the combustion chamber, an effective and reliable propellant injector head may be implemented that is capable of withstanding transient combustion and detonation waves that commonly occur during an ignition event. The micro-fluidic porous media element is of specified porosity or porosity gradient selected to be appropriate for a given propellant. Additionally the propellant injector head design integrates a spark ignition mechanism that withstands extremely hot running conditions without noticeable spark mechanism degradation.

  2. Microfluidic CARS cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han-Wei; Bao, Ning; Le, Thuc T.; Lu, Chang; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (CARS) flow cytometry was demonstrated by combining a laser-scanning CARS microscope with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based microfluidic device. Line-scanning across the hydrodynamically focused core stream was performed for detection of flowing objects. Parameters were optimized by utilizing polystyrene beads as flowing particles. Population measurements of adipocytes isolated from mouse fat tissues demonstrated the viability of microfluidic CARS cytometry for quantitation of adipocyte size distribution. CARS cytometry could be a new modality for quantitative analysis with vibrational selectivity. PMID:18542688

  3. Interconnecting heterogeneous database management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gligor, V. D.; Luckenbaugh, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that there is still a great need for the development of improved communication between remote, heterogeneous database management systems (DBMS). Problems regarding the effective communication between distributed DBMSs are primarily related to significant differences between local data managers, local data models and representations, and local transaction managers. A system of interconnected DBMSs which exhibit such differences is called a network of distributed, heterogeneous DBMSs. In order to achieve effective interconnection of remote, heterogeneous DBMSs, the users must have uniform, integrated access to the different DBMs. The present investigation is mainly concerned with an analysis of the existing approaches to interconnecting heterogeneous DBMSs, taking into account four experimental DBMS projects.

  4. Interconnect resistance of photovoltaic submodules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volltrauer, H.; Eser, E.; Delahoy, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    Small area amorphous silicon solar cells generally have higher efficiencies than large interconnected submodules. Among the reasons for the differences in performance are the lack of large area uniformity, the effect of nonzero tin oxide sheet resistance, and possibly pinholes in the various layers. Another and usually small effect that can contribute to reduced performance of interconnected cells is the resistance of the interconnection i.e., the series resistance introduced by the metal to tin oxide contact through silicon. Proper processing problems to avoid poor contacts are discussed.

  5. Microfluidic bead suspension hopper.

    PubMed

    Price, Alexander K; MacConnell, Andrew B; Paegel, Brian M

    2014-05-20

    Many high-throughput analytical platforms, from next-generation DNA sequencing to drug discovery, rely on beads as carriers of molecular diversity. Microfluidic systems are ideally suited to handle and analyze such bead libraries with high precision and at minute volume scales; however, the challenge of introducing bead suspensions into devices before they sediment usually confounds microfluidic handling and analysis. We developed a bead suspension hopper that exploits sedimentation to load beads into a microfluidic droplet generator. A suspension hopper continuously delivered synthesis resin beads (17 μm diameter, 112,000 over 2.67 h) functionalized with a photolabile linker and pepstatin A into picoliter-scale droplets of an HIV-1 protease activity assay to model ultraminiaturized compound screening. Likewise, trypsinogen template DNA-coated magnetic beads (2.8 μm diameter, 176,000 over 5.5 h) were loaded into droplets of an in vitro transcription/translation system to model a protein evolution experiment. The suspension hopper should effectively remove any barriers to using suspensions as sample inputs, paving the way for microfluidic automation to replace robotic library distribution. PMID:24761972

  6. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  7. Learning planar ising models

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jason K; Chertkov, Michael; Netrapalli, Praneeth

    2010-11-12

    Inference and learning of graphical models are both well-studied problems in statistics and machine learning that have found many applications in science and engineering. However, exact inference is intractable in general graphical models, which suggests the problem of seeking the best approximation to a collection of random variables within some tractable family of graphical models. In this paper, we focus our attention on the class of planar Ising models, for which inference is tractable using techniques of statistical physics [Kac and Ward; Kasteleyn]. Based on these techniques and recent methods for planarity testing and planar embedding [Chrobak and Payne], we propose a simple greedy algorithm for learning the best planar Ising model to approximate an arbitrary collection of binary random variables (possibly from sample data). Given the set of all pairwise correlations among variables, we select a planar graph and optimal planar Ising model defined on this graph to best approximate that set of correlations. We present the results of numerical experiments evaluating the performance of our algorithm.

  8. Modular microfluidics for point-of-care protein purifications

    SciTech Connect

    Millet, L. J.; Lucheon, J. D.; Standaert, R. F.; Retterer, S. T.; Doktycz, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical separations are the heart of diagnostic assays and purification methods for biologics. On-chip miniaturization and modularization of separation procedures will enable the development of customized, portable devices for personalized health-care diagnostics and point-of-use production of treatments. In this report, we describe the design and fabrication of miniature ion exchange, size exclusion and affinity chromatography modules for on-chip clean-up of recombinantly-produced proteins. Our results demonstrate that these common separations techniques can be implemented in microfluidic modules with performance comparable to conventional approaches. We introduce embedded 3-D microfluidic interconnects for integrating micro-scale separation modules that can be arranged and reconfigured to suit a variety of fluidic operations or biochemical processes. In conclusion, we demonstrate the utility of the modular approach with a platform for the enrichment of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) from Escherichia coli lysate through integrated affinity and size-exclusion chromatography modules.

  9. Modular microfluidics for point-of-care protein purifications.

    PubMed

    Millet, L J; Lucheon, J D; Standaert, R F; Retterer, S T; Doktycz, M J

    2015-04-21

    Biochemical separations are the heart of diagnostic assays and purification methods for biologics. On-chip miniaturization and modularization of separation procedures will enable the development of customized, portable devices for personalized health-care diagnostics and point-of-use production of treatments. In this report, we describe the design and fabrication of miniature ion exchange, size exclusion and affinity chromatography modules for on-chip clean-up of recombinantly-produced proteins. Our results demonstrate that these common separations techniques can be implemented in microfluidic modules with performance comparable to conventional approaches. We introduce embedded 3-D microfluidic interconnects for integrating micro-scale separation modules that can be arranged and reconfigured to suit a variety of fluidic operations or biochemical processes. We demonstrate the utility of the modular approach with a platform for the enrichment of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) from Escherichia coli lysate through integrated affinity and size-exclusion chromatography modules. PMID:25740172

  10. Renewable Systems Interconnection: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Margolis, R.; Kuswa, G.; Torres, J.; Bower, W.; Key, T.; Ton, D.

    2008-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy launched the Renewable Systems Interconnection (RSI) study in 2007 to address the challenges to high penetrations of distributed renewable energy technologies. The RSI study consists of 14 additional reports.

  11. Chemical Mechanical Polishing with Nanocolloidal Ceria Slurry for Low-Damage Planarization of Dielectric Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryuzaki, Daisuke; Hoshi, Yosuke; Machii, Yoichi; Koyama, Naoyuki; Sakurai, Haruaki; Ashizawa, Toranosuke

    2012-03-01

    New chemical mechanical polishing processes using nanocolloidal ceria slurry are proposed for high-precision and low-damage planarization of silicon-dioxide-based dielectric films. In the polishing process of a shallow trench isolation structure, a hard pad and a cationic polymer additive are used in combination with the slurry. The new process is effective in improving the planarity and reducing the microscratch count in comparison with a conventional polishing process with calcined ceria slurry and a standard pad. In the polishing process of an interconnect structure with ultralow-k interlayer dielectrics (ULK-ILDs), the standard pad should be used since the ULK-ILDs are easily damaged. By employing a spin-on-type ULK-ILD having a self-planarizing effect, a high planarity is obtained when using the nanocolloidal ceria slurry with the standard pad. The electrical measurement of the interconnect structure indicates that dielectric damage due to the process is successfully suppressed.

  12. Engineering anastomosis between living capillary networks and endothelial cell-lined microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Phan, Duc T T; Sobrino, Agua; George, Steven C; Hughes, Christopher C W; Lee, Abraham P

    2016-01-21

    This paper reports a method for generating an intact and perfusable microvascular network that connects to microfluidic channels without appreciable leakage. This platform incorporates different stages of vascular development including vasculogenesis, endothelial cell (EC) lining, sprouting angiogenesis, and anastomosis in sequential order. After formation of a capillary network inside the tissue chamber via vasculogenesis, the adjacent microfluidic channels are lined with a monolayer of ECs, which then serve as the high-pressure input ("artery") and low pressure output ("vein") conduits. To promote a tight interconnection between the artery/vein and the capillary network, sprouting angiogenesis is induced, which promotes anastomosis of the vasculature inside the tissue chamber with the EC lining along the microfluidic channels. Flow of fluorescent microparticles confirms the perfusability of the lumenized microvascular network, and minimal leakage of 70 kDa FITC-dextran confirms physiologic tightness of the EC junctions and completeness of the interconnections between artery/vein and the capillary network. This versatile device design and its robust construction methodology establish a physiological transport model of interconnected perfused vessels from artery to vascularized tissue to vein. The system has utility in a wide range of organ-on-a-chip applications as it enables the physiological vascular interconnection of multiple on-chip tissue constructs that can serve as disease models for drug screening. PMID:26616908

  13. Planar high density sodium battery

    DOEpatents

    Lemmon, John P.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.

    2016-03-01

    A method of making a molten sodium battery is disclosed. A first metallic interconnect frame having a first interconnect vent hole is provided. A second metallic interconnect frame having a second interconnect vent hole is also provided. An electrolyte plate having a cathode vent hole and an anode vent hole is interposed between the metallic interconnect frames. The metallic interconnect frames and the electrolyte plate are sealed thereby forming gaseous communication between an anode chamber through the anode vent hole and gaseous communication between a cathode chamber through the cathode vent hole.

  14. Flexible optical interconnects based on silicon-containing polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzures, Ed; Dangel, Roger; Beyeler, Rene; Cannon, Allie; Horst, Folkert; Kiarie, Cecilia; Knudsen, Phil; Meier, Norbert; Moynihan, Matt; Offrein, Bert Jan

    2009-02-01

    Formulations containing silicon-based polymers have been used for the formation of planar waveguides on flexible substrates. The substrate of choice is compatible with the flexible waveguide and is made of materials commonly utilized in the printed circuit board industry. When the flexible waveguide material is combined with the chosen substrate using processes compatible with printed circuit board manufacturing techniques, the resultant optical interconnects display sufficient flexibility, low optical loss (<0.05 dB/cm at 850 nm), and high reliability.

  15. PREFACE: Nano- and microfluidics Nano- and microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2011-05-01

    The field of nano- and microfluidics emerged at the end of the 1990s parallel to the demand for smaller and smaller containers and channels for chemical, biochemical and medical applications such as blood and DNS analysis [1], gene sequencing or proteomics [2, 3]. Since then, new journals and conferences have been launched and meanwhile, about two decades later, a variety of microfluidic applications are on the market. Briefly, 'the small flow becomes mainstream' [4]. Nevertheless, research in nano- and microfluidics is more than downsizing the spatial dimensions. For liquids on the nanoscale, surface and interface phenomena grow in importance and may even dominate the behavior in some systems. The studies collected in this special issue all concentrate on these type of systems and were part ot the priority programme SPP1164 'Nano- and Microfluidics' of the German Science Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG). The priority programme was initiated in 2002 by Hendrik Kuhlmann and myself and was launched in 2004. Friction between a moving liquid and a solid wall may, for instance, play an important role so that the usual assumption of a no-slip boundary condition is no longer valid. Likewise, the dynamic deformations of soft objects like polymers, vesicles or capsules in flow arise from the subtle interplay between the (visco-)elasticity of the object and the viscous stresses in the surrounding fluid and, potentially, the presence of structures confining the flow like channels. Consequently, new theories were developed ( see articles in this issue by Münch and Wagner, Falk and Mecke, Bonthuis et al, Finken et al, Almenar and Rauscher, Straube) and experiments were set up to unambiguously demonstrate deviations from bulk, or 'macro', behavior (see articles in this issue by Wolff et al, Vinogradova and Belyaev, Hahn et al, Seemann et al, Grüner and Huber, Müller-Buschbaum et al, Gutsche et al, Braunmüller et al, Laube et al, Brücker, Nottebrock et al

  16. Microfluidic device, and related methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Eric W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making a microfluidic device is provided. The method features patterning a permeable wall on a substrate, and surrounding the permeable wall with a solid, non-permeable boundary structure to establish a microfluidic channel having a cross-sectional dimension less than 5,000 microns and a cross-sectional area at least partially filled with the permeable wall so that fluid flowing through the microfluidic channel at least partially passes through the permeable wall.

  17. Microfluidic large-scale integration.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Todd; Maerkl, Sebastian J; Quake, Stephen R

    2002-10-18

    We developed high-density microfluidic chips that contain plumbing networks with thousands of micromechanical valves and hundreds of individually addressable chambers. These fluidic devices are analogous to electronic integrated circuits fabricated using large-scale integration. A key component of these networks is the fluidic multiplexor, which is a combinatorial array of binary valve patterns that exponentially increases the processing power of a network by allowing complex fluid manipulations with a minimal number of inputs. We used these integrated microfluidic networks to construct the microfluidic analog of a comparator array and a microfluidic memory storage device whose behavior resembles random-access memory. PMID:12351675

  18. Misalignment corrections in optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Deqiang

    Optical interconnects are considered a promising solution for long distance and high bitrate data transmissions, outperforming electrical interconnects in terms of loss and dispersion. Due to the bandwidth and distance advantage of optical interconnects, longer links have been implemented with optics. Recent studies show that optical interconnects have clear advantages even at very short distances---intra system interconnects. The biggest challenge for such optical interconnects is the alignment tolerance. Many free space optical components require very precise assembly and installation, and therefore the overall cost could be increased. This thesis studied the misalignment tolerance and possible alignment correction solutions for optical interconnects at backplane or board level. First the alignment tolerance for free space couplers was simulated and the result indicated the most critical alignments occur between the VCSEL, waveguide and microlens arrays. An in-situ microlens array fabrication method was designed and experimentally demonstrated, with no observable misalignment with the waveguide array. At the receiver side, conical lens arrays were proposed to replace simple microlens arrays for a larger angular alignment tolerance. Multilayer simulation models in CodeV were built to optimized the refractive index and shape profiles of the conical lens arrays. Conical lenses fabricated with micro injection molding machine and fiber etching were characterized. Active component VCSOA was used to correct misalignment in optical connectors between the board and backplane. The alignment correction capability were characterized for both DC and AC (1GHz) optical signal. The speed and bandwidth of the VCSOA was measured and compared with a same structure VCSEL. Based on the optical inverter being studied in our lab, an all-optical flip-flop was demonstrated using a pair of VCSOAs. This memory cell with random access ability can store one bit optical signal with set or

  19. Wafer-level packaging and direct interconnection technology based on hybrid bonding and through silicon vias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühne, Stéphane; Hierold, Christofer

    2011-08-01

    The presented wafer-level packaging technology enables the direct integration of electrical interconnects during low-temperature wafer bonding of a cap substrate featuring through silicon vias (TSVs) onto a MEMS device wafer. The hybrid bonding process is based on hydrophilic direct bonding of plasma-activated Si/SiO2 surfaces and the simultaneous interconnection of the device metallization layers with Cu TSVs by transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding of ultra-thin AuSn connects. The direct bond enables precise geometry definition between device and cap substrate, whereas the TLP bonding does not require a planarization of the interconnect metallization before bonding. The complete process flow is successfully validated and the fabricated devices' characterization evidenced ohmic interconnects without interfacial voids in the TLP bond.

  20. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” - often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  1. The Microfluidic Jukebox

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Say Hwa; Maes, Florine; Semin, Benoît; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Music is a form of art interweaving people of all walks of life. Through subtle changes in frequencies, a succession of musical notes forms a melody which is capable of mesmerizing the minds of people. With the advances in technology, we are now able to generate music electronically without relying solely on physical instruments. Here, we demonstrate a musical interpretation of droplet-based microfluidics as a form of novel electronic musical instruments. Using the interplay of electric field and hydrodynamics in microfluidic devices, well controlled frequency patterns corresponding to musical tracks are generated in real time. This high-speed modulation of droplet frequency (and therefore of droplet sizes) may also provide solutions that reconciles high-throughput droplet production and the control of individual droplet at production which is needed for many biochemical or material synthesis applications. PMID:24781785

  2. Surface Acoustic Wave Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid manipulations at the microscale and beyond are powerfully enabled through the use of 10-1,000-MHz acoustic waves. A superior alternative in many cases to other microfluidic actuation techniques, such high-frequency acoustics is almost universally produced by surface acoustic wave devices that employ electromechanical transduction in wafer-scale or thin-film piezoelectric media to generate the kinetic energy needed to transport and manipulate fluids placed in adjacent microfluidic structures. These waves are responsible for a diverse range of complex fluid transport phenomena - from interfacial fluid vibration and drop and confined fluid transport to jetting and atomization - underlying a flourishing research literature spanning fundamental fluid physics to chip-scale engineering applications. We highlight some of this literature to provide the reader with a historical basis, routes for more detailed study, and an impression of the field's future directions.

  3. Microfluidic channel fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Don W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2001-01-01

    A new channel structure for microfluidic systems and process for fabricating this structure. In contrast to the conventional practice of fabricating fluid channels as trenches or grooves in a substrate, fluid channels are fabricated as thin walled raised structures on a substrate. Microfluidic devices produced in accordance with the invention are a hybrid assembly generally consisting of three layers: 1) a substrate that can or cannot be an electrical insulator; 2) a middle layer, that is an electrically conducting material and preferably silicon, forms the channel walls whose height defines the channel height, joined to and extending from the substrate; and 3) a top layer, joined to the top of the channels, that forms a cover for the channels. The channels can be defined by photolithographic techniques and are produced by etching away the material around the channel walls.

  4. Microfluidic binary phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelescu, Dan; Menetrier, Laure; Wong, Joyce; Tabeling, Patrick; Salamitou, Philippe

    2004-03-01

    We present a novel binary phase flow regime where the two phases differ substantially in both their wetting and viscous properties. Optical tracking particles are used in order to investigate the details of such multiphase flow inside capillary channels. We also describe microfluidic filters we have developed, capable of separating the two phases based on capillary pressure. The performance of the filters in separating oil-water emulsions is discussed. Binary phase flow has been previously used in microchannels in applications such as emulsion generation, enhancement of mixing and assembly of custom colloidal paticles. Such microfluidic systems are increasingly used in a number of applications spanning a diverse range of industries, such as biotech, pharmaceuticals and more recently the oil industry.

  5. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    PubMed Central

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level. PMID:26927706

  6. The Microfluidic Jukebox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Say Hwa; Maes, Florine; Semin, Benoît; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-04-01

    Music is a form of art interweaving people of all walks of life. Through subtle changes in frequencies, a succession of musical notes forms a melody which is capable of mesmerizing the minds of people. With the advances in technology, we are now able to generate music electronically without relying solely on physical instruments. Here, we demonstrate a musical interpretation of droplet-based microfluidics as a form of novel electronic musical instruments. Using the interplay of electric field and hydrodynamics in microfluidic devices, well controlled frequency patterns corresponding to musical tracks are generated in real time. This high-speed modulation of droplet frequency (and therefore of droplet sizes) may also provide solutions that reconciles high-throughput droplet production and the control of individual droplet at production which is needed for many biochemical or material synthesis applications.

  7. Microfluidic colloid filtration.

    PubMed

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J C; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today's water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a "cake layer" - often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level. PMID:26927706

  8. Microfluidics with Gel Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, Craig; Surenjav, Enkhtuul; Herminghaus, Stephan; Seemann, Ralf

    2006-03-01

    Microfluidic processing is usually achieved using single phase liquids. Instead, we use monodisperse emulsions to compartment liquids within microchannel geometries. At low continuous phase volume fractions, droplets self-organize to form well-defined arrangements, analogous to foam. While it is well-known that confined geometries can induce rearrangement of foam compartments at the millimeter-scale, similar dynamics are also expected for gel emulsions. We have studied online generation, organization and manipulation of gel emulsions using a variety of microchannel geometries. ``Passive'' reorganization, based on fixed channel geometries, can be supplemented by ``active'' manipulation by incorporating a ferrofluid phase. A ferromagnetic phase facilitates reorganization of liquid compartments on demand using an electromagnetic trigger. Moreover, coalescence between adjacent compartments within a gel emulsion can be induced using electrical potential. Microfluidics using gel emulsions will be well-suited for combinatorial chemistry, DNA sequencing, drug screening and protein crystallizations.

  9. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  10. Microfluidic Biochip Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panzarella, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As humans prepare for the exploration of our solar system, there is a growing need for miniaturized medical and environmental diagnostic devices for use on spacecrafts, especially during long-duration space missions where size and power requirements are critical. In recent years, the biochip (or Lab-on-a- Chip) has emerged as a technology that might be able to satisfy this need. In generic terms, a biochip is a miniaturized microfluidic device analogous to the electronic microchip that ushered in the digital age. It consists of tiny microfluidic channels, pumps and valves that transport small amounts of sample fluids to biosensors that can perform a variety of tests on those fluids in near real time. It has the obvious advantages of being small, lightweight, requiring less sample fluids and reagents and being more sensitive and efficient than larger devices currently in use. Some of the desired space-based applications would be to provide smaller, more robust devices for analyzing blood, saliva and urine and for testing water and food supplies for the presence of harmful contaminants and microorganisms. Our group has undertaken the goal of adapting as well as improving upon current biochip technology for use in long-duration microgravity environments. In addition to developing computational models of the microfluidic channels, valves and pumps that form the basis of every biochip, we are also trying to identify potential problems that could arise in reduced gravity and develop solutions to these problems. One such problem is due to the prevalence of bubbly sample fluids in microgravity. A bubble trapped in a microfluidic channel could be detrimental to the operation of a biochip. Therefore, the process of bubble formation in microgravity needs to be studied, and a model of this process has been developed and used to understand how bubbles develop and move through biochip components. It is clear that some type of bubble filter would be necessary in Space, and

  11. A new UV-curing elastomeric substrate for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvankarian, Jafar; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin

    2012-03-01

    Rapid prototyping in the design cycle of new microfluidic devices is very important for shortening time-to-market. Researchers are facing the challenge to explore new and suitable substrates with simple and efficient microfabrication techniques. In this paper, we introduce and characterize a UV-curing elastomeric polyurethane methacrylate (PUMA) for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices. The swelling and solubility of PUMA in different chemicals is determined. Time-dependent measurements of water contact angle show that the native PUMA is hydrophilic without surface treatment. The current monitoring method is used for measurement of the electroosmotic flow mobility in the microchannels made from PUMA. The optical, physical, thermal and mechanical properties of PUMA are evaluated. The UV-lithography and molding process is used for making micropillars and deep channel microfluidic structures integrated to the supporting base layer. Spin coating is characterized for producing different layer thicknesses of PUMA resin. A device is fabricated and tested for examining the strength of different bonding techniques such as conformal, corona treating and semi-curing of two PUMA layers in microfluidic application and the results show that the bonding strengths are comparable to that of PDMS. We also report fabrication and testing of a three-layer multi inlet/outlet microfluidic device including a very effective fluidic interconnect for application demonstration of PUMA as a promising new substrate. A simple micro-device is developed and employed for observing the pressure deflection of membrane made from PUMA as a very effective elastomeric valve in microfluidic devices.

  12. Microfluidics on compliant substrates: recent developments in foldable and bendable devices and system packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Bonnie L.

    2012-04-01

    Microfluidics is revolutionizing laboratory methods and biomedical devices, offering new capabilities and instrumentation in multiple areas such as DNA analysis, proteomics, enzymatic analysis, single cell analysis, immunology, point-of-care medicine, personalized medicine, drug delivery, and environmental toxin and pathogen detection. For many applications (e.g., wearable and implantable health monitors, drug delivery devices, and prosthetics) mechanically flexible polymer devices and systems that can conform to the body offer benefits that cannot be achieved using systems based on conventional rigid substrate materials. However, difficulties in implementing active devices and reliable packaging technologies have limited the success of flexible microfluidics. Employing highly compliant materials such as PDMS that are typically employed for prototyping, we review mechanically flexible polymer microfluidic technologies based on free-standing polymer substrates and novel electronic and microfluidic interconnection schemes. Central to these new technologies are hybrid microfabrication methods employing novel nanocomposite polymer materials and devices. We review microfabrication methods using these materials, along with demonstrations of example devices and packaging schemes that employ them. We review these recent developments and place them in the context of the fields of flexible microfluidics and conformable systems, and discuss cross-over applications to conventional rigid-substrate microfluidics.

  13. Microfluidic conductimetric bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Limbut, Warakorn; Loyprasert, Suchera; Thammakhet, Chongdee; Thavarungkul, Panote; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Asawatreratanakul, Punnee; Limsakul, Chusak; Wongkittisuksa, Booncharoen; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2007-06-15

    A microfluidic conductimetric bioreactor has been developed. Enzyme was immobilized in the microfluidic channel on poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface via covalent binding method. The detection unit consisted of two gold electrodes and a laboratory-built conductimetric transducer to monitor the increase in the conductivity of the solution due to the change of the charges generated by the enzyme-substrate catalytic reaction. Urea-urease was used as a representative analyte-enzyme system. Under optimum conditions urea could be determined with a detection limit of 0.09 mM and linearity in the range of 0.1-10 mM (r=0.9944). The immobilized urease on the microchannel chip provided good stability (>30 days of operation time) and good repeatability with an R.S.D. lower than 2.3%. Good agreement was obtained when urea concentrations of human serum samples determined by the microfluidic flow injection conductimetric bioreactor system were compared to those obtained using the Berthelot reaction (P<0.05). After prolong use the immobilized enzyme could be removed from the PDMS microchannel chip enabling new active enzyme to be immobilized and the chip to be reused. PMID:17289366

  14. Backplane photonic interconnect modules with optical jumpers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, Alexei L.; Lee, Michael G.; Yokouchi, Kishio

    2005-03-01

    Prototypes of optical interconnect (OI) modules for backplane applications are presented. The transceivers attached to the linecards E/O convert the signals that are passed to and from the backplane by optical jumpers terminated with MTP-type connectors. The connectors plug into adaptors attached to the backplane and the microlens arrays mounted in the adaptors couple the light between the fibers and waveguides. Planar polymer channel waveguides with 30-50 μm cross-sections route the optical signals across the board with propagation losses as low as 0.05 dB/cm @ 850 nm. The 45¦-tapered integrated micromirrors reflect the light in and out of the waveguide plane with the loss of 0.8 dB per mirror. The connector displacement measurements indicate that the adaptor lateral assembly accuracy can be at least +/-10 μm for the excess loss not exceeding 1 dB. Insertion losses of the test modules with integrated waveguides, 45¦ mirrors, and pluggable optical jumper connectors are about 5 dB. Eye diagrams at 10.7 Gb/s have typical width and height of 70 ps and 400 mV, respectively, and jitter of about 20 ps.

  15. Monolithic microfluidic concentrators and mixers

    DOEpatents

    Frechet, Jean M.; Svec, Frantisek; Yu, Cong; Rohr, Thomas

    2005-05-03

    Microfluidic devices comprising porous monolithic polymer for concentration, extraction or mixing of fluids. A method for in situ preparation of monolithic polymers by in situ initiated polymerization of polymer precursors within microchannels of a microfluidic device and their use for solid phase extraction (SPE), preconcentration, concentration and mixing.

  16. Monolithical integration of polymer-based microfluidic structures on application-specific integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemnitz, Steffen; Schafer, Heiko; Schumacher, Stephanie; Koziy, Volodymyr; Fischer, Alexander; Meixner, Alfred J.; Ehrhardt, Dietmar; Bohm, Markus

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, a concept for a monolithically integrated chemical lab on microchip is presented. It contains an ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit), an interface to the polymer based microfluidic layer and a Pyrex glass cap. The top metal layer of the ASIC is etched off and replaced by a double layer metallization, more suitable to microfluidic and electrophoresis systems. The metallization consists of an approximately 50 nm gold layer and a 10 nm chromium layer, acting as adhesion promoter. A necessary prerequisite is a planarized ASIC topography. SU-8 is used to serve as microfluidic structure because of its excellent aspect ratio. This polymer layer contains reservoirs, channels, mixers and electrokinetic micro pumps. The typical channel cross section is 10μm"10μm. First experimental results on a microfluidic pump, consisting of pairs of interdigitated electrodes on the bottom of the channel and without any moving parts show a flow of up to 50μm per second for low AC-voltages in the range of 5 V for aqueous fluids. The microfluidic system is irreversibly sealed with a 150μm thick Pyrex glass plate bonded to the SU-8-layer, supported by oxygen plasma. Due to capillary forces and surfaces properties of the walls the system is self-priming. The technologies for the fabrication of the microfluidic system and the preparation of the interface between the lab layer and the ASIC are presented.

  17. Fully Automated Quantification of Insulin Concentration Using a Microfluidic-Based Chemiluminescence Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ping; Liu, Zhu; Tung, Steve; Dong, Zaili; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-06-01

    A fully automated microfluidic-based detection system for the rapid determination of insulin concentration through a chemiluminescence immunoassay has been developed. The microfluidic chip used in the system is a double-layered polydimethylsiloxane device embedded with interconnecting micropumps, microvalves, and a micromixer. At a high injection rate of the developing solution, the chemiluminescence signal can be excited and measured within a short period of time. The integral value of the chemiluminescence light signal is used to determine the insulin concentration of the samples, and the results indicate that the measurement is accurate in the range from 1.5 pM to 391 pM. The entire chemiluminescence assay can be completed in less than 10 min. The fully automated microfluidic-based insulin detection system provides a useful platform for rapid determination of insulin in clinical diagnostics for diabetes, which is expected to become increasingly important for future point-of-care applications. PMID:25824205

  18. Enjoyment of Euclidean Planar Triangles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2013-01-01

    This article adopts the following classification for a Euclidean planar [triangle]ABC, purely based on angles alone. A Euclidean planar triangle is said to be acute angled if all the three angles of the Euclidean planar [triangle]ABC are acute angles. It is said to be right angled at a specific vertex, say B, if the angle ?ABC is a right angle…

  19. Active Microfluidic Devices for Single-Molecule Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2003-03-01

    Microfluidic chips have become an increasingly powerful and versatile tool in the life sciences. Multilayer devices fabricated from soft silicone elastomers in a replication molding technique are especially promising, because they permit flexible integration of active elements such as valves and pumps. In addition, they are fairly easy and inexpensive to produce. In a wide range of applications, microfluidic chips are used in conjunction with optical detection and manipulation techniques. However their widespread use has been hampered due to problems with interconnect stability, optical accessibility, and ability to perform surface chemistry. We have developed a packaging technique that encapsulates the elastomer in an epoxy resin of high optical quality. This stabilizes the interconnects so that a chip can be repeatedly plugged in and out of a socket. Our technique also eliminates the need for a baking step that is conventionally used to attach a glass cover slip to the elastomer surface. This allows us to assemble devices that contain a cover slip coated with proteins, thereby permitting subsequent in situ attachment of DNA molecules to the bottom of the flow channels. We demonstrate the utility of our chips in single-molecule applications involving tethered-particles and optical tweezers. Support: NIH R01 GM065934 & Research Corporation

  20. A metallic interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Diane Mildred

    A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrochemically converts the chemical energy of reaction into electrical energy. The commercial success of planar, SOFC stack technology has a number of challenges, one of which is the interconnect that electrically and physically connects the cathode of one cell to the anode of an adjacent cell in the SOFC stack and in addition, separates the anodic and cathodic gases. An SOFC stack operating at intermediate temperatures, between 600°C and 800°C, can utilize a metallic alloy as an interconnect material. Since the interconnect of an SOFC stack must operate in both air and fuel environments, the oxidation kinetics, adherence and electronic resistance of the oxide scales formed on commercial alloys were investigated in air and wet hydrogen under thermal cycling conditions to 800°C. The alloy, Haynes 230, exhibited the slowest oxidation kinetics and the lowest area-specific resistance as a function of oxidation time of all the alloys in air at 800°C. However, the area-specific resistance of the oxide scale formed on Haynes 230 in wet hydrogen was unacceptably high after only 500 hours of oxidation, which was attributed to the high resistivity of Cr2O3 in a reducing atmosphere. A study of the electrical conductivity of the minor phase manganese chromite, MnXCr3-XO4, in the oxide scale of Haynes 230, revealed that a composition closer to Mn2CrO4 had significantly higher electrical conductivity than that closer to MnCr 2O4. Haynes 230 was coated with Mn to form a phase closer to the Mn2CrO4 composition for application on the fuel side of the interconnect. U.S. Patent No. 6,054,231 is pending. Although coating a metallic alloy is inexpensive, the stringent economic requirements of SOFC stack technology required an alloy without coating for production applications. As no commercially available alloy, among the 41 alloys investigated, performed to the specifications required, a new alloy was created and designated DME-A2. The oxide scale

  1. Chromium Vaporization Reduction by Nickel Coatings For SOEC Interconnect Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Michael V. Glazoff; Sergey N. Rashkeev; J. Stephen Herring

    2014-09-01

    The vaporization of Cr-rich volatile species from interconnect materials is a major source of degradation that limits the lifetime of planar solid oxide devices systems with metallic interconnects, including Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells, or SOECs. Some metallic coatings (Ni, Co, and Cu) significantly reduce the Cr release from interconnects and slow down the oxide scale growth on the steel substrate. To shed additional light upon the mechanisms of such protection and find a suitable coating material for ferritic stainless steel materials, we used a combination of first-principles calculations, thermodynamics, and diffusion modeling to investigate which factors determine the quality of the Ni metallic coating at stainless steel interconnector. We found that the Cr migration in Ni coating is determined by a delicate combination of the nickel oxidation, Cr diffusion, and phase transformation processes. Although the formation of Cr2O3 oxide is more exothermic than that of NiO, the kinetic rate of the chromia formation in the coating layer and its surface is significantly reduced by the low mobility of Cr in nickel oxide and in NiCr2O4 spinel. These results are in a good agreement with diffusion modeling for Cr diffusion through Ni coating layer on the ferritic 441 steel substrate.

  2. Microfluidic and biosensor applications of fluoropolymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Glen Wallace

    2001-07-01

    Deposition of fluoropolymer films in microfluidic and biosensor applications enables the fabrication and miniaturization of several new integrated sensor devices that could provide a method for measuring oxygen consumption at the cellular level, providing an unique measurement device to be incorporated in cell based sensors. Fluoropolymer films have several properties that make them an excellent candidate for microfluidic and biosensor applications. These films are chemically inert, biocompatible, selectively gas permeable, have a low friction coefficient, are non-polarizable, and are capable of being processed using standard integrated circuit fabrication techniques. This allows for the seamless incorporation of these films into many different sensor applications, ranging from coating fluid interconnect channels to minimize protein absorption, to the realization of different miniaturized sensors which are capable of making point specific measurements. Film deposition is accomplished using an industrial standard plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) chamber, customized with the capability of producing a pulsed plasma. The film deposition process has been characterised in situ using real time power measurement techniques, ultra violet optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements, and Langmuir probe measurements. These measurements along with post processing measurements of the films properties utilizing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements, fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), ellipsometric measurements, contact angle measurements, and electrical characterization methods have been utilized to optimize the films properties for various applications. This thesis presents the characterization and optimization of the pulsed plasma deposited polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film process along with the development of a solid state dissolved oxygen sensor using the PTFE film as the oxygen permeable membrane. The plasma deposition

  3. Spatial manipulation with microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Benjamin; Levchenko, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical gradients convey information through space, time, and concentration, and are ultimately capable of spatially resolving distinct cellular phenotypes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and migration. How these gradients develop, evolve, and function during development, homeostasis, and various disease states is a subject of intense interest across a variety of disciplines. Microfluidic technologies have become essential tools for investigating gradient sensing in vitro due to their ability to precisely manipulate fluids on demand in well-controlled environments at cellular length scales. This review will highlight their utility for studying gradient sensing along with relevant applications to biology. PMID:25905100

  4. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  5. Spatial Manipulation with Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Benjamin; Levchenko, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical gradients convey information through space, time, and concentration, and are ultimately capable of spatially resolving distinct cellular phenotypes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and migration. How these gradients develop, evolve, and function during development, homeostasis, and various disease states is a subject of intense interest across a variety of disciplines. Microfluidic technologies have become essential tools for investigating gradient sensing in vitro due to their ability to precisely manipulate fluids on demand in well-controlled environments at cellular length scales. This review will highlight their utility for studying gradient sensing along with relevant applications to biology. PMID:25905100

  6. DIELECTROPHORESIS-BASED MICROFLUIDIC SEPARATION AND DETECTION SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Vykoukal, Jody; Noshari, Jamileh; Becker, Frederick; Gascoyne, Peter; Krulevitch, Peter; Fuller, Chris; Ackler, Harold; Hamilton, Julie; Boser, Bernhard; Eldredge, Adam; Hitchens, Duncan; Andrews, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of human diseases frequently requires isolation and detection of certain cell types from a complex mixture. Compared with traditional separation and detection techniques, microfluidic approaches promise to yield easy-to-use diagnostic instruments tolerant of a wide range of operating environments and capable of accomplishing automated analyses. These approaches will enable diagnostic advances to be disseminated from sophisticated clinical laboratories to the point-of-care. Applications will include the separation and differential analysis of blood cell subpopulations for host-based detection of blood cell changes caused by disease, infection, or exposure to toxins, and the separation and analysis of surface-sensitized, custom dielectric beads for chemical, biological, and biomolecular targets. Here we report a new particle separation and analysis microsystem that uses dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF). The system consists of a microfluidic chip with integrated sample injector, a DEP-FFF separator, and an AC impedance sensor. We show the design of a miniaturized impedance sensor integrated circuit (IC) with improved sensitivity, a new packaging approach for micro-flumes that features a slide-together compression package and novel microfluidic interconnects, and the design, control, integration and packaging of a fieldable prototype. Illustrative applications will be shown, including the separation of different sized beads and different cell types, blood cell differential analysis, and impedance sensing results for beads, spores and cells. PMID:22025905

  7. Planar plasmonic chiral nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zu, Shuai; Bao, Yanjun; Fang, Zheyu

    2016-02-21

    A strong chiral optical response induced at a plasmonic Fano resonance in a planar Au heptamer nanostructure was experimentally and theoretically demonstrated. The scattering spectra show the characteristic narrow-band feature of Fano resonances for both left and right circular polarized lights, with a chiral response reaching 30% at the Fano resonance. Specifically, we systematically investigate the chiral response of planar heptamers with gradually changing the inter-particle rotation angles and separation distance. The chiral spectral characteristics clearly depend on the strength of Fano resonances and the associated near-field optical distributions. Finite element method simulations together with a multipole expansion method demonstrate that the enhanced chirality is caused by the excitation of magnetic quadrupolar and electric toroidal dipolar modes. Our work provides an effective method for the design of 2D nanostructures with a strong chiral response. PMID:26818746

  8. Dielectric Covered Planar Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llombart Juan, Nuria (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Gill, John J. (Inventor); Skalare, Anders J. (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An antenna element suitable for integrated arrays at terahertz frequencies is disclosed. The antenna element comprises an extended spherical (e.g. hemispherical) semiconductor lens, e.g. silicon, antenna fed by a leaky wave waveguide feed. The extended spherical lens comprises a substantially spherical lens adjacent a substantially planar lens extension. A couple of TE/TM leaky wave modes are excited in a resonant cavity formed between a ground plane and the substantially planar lens extension by a waveguide block coupled to the ground plane. Due to these modes, the primary feed radiates inside the lens with a directive pattern that illuminates a small sector of the lens. The antenna structure is compatible with known semiconductor fabrication technology and enables production of large format imaging arrays.

  9. Planar waveguide optical immunosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquette, Steven J.; Locascio-Brown, Laurie E.; Durst, Richard A.

    1991-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were covalently bonded to the surfaces of planar waveguides to confer immunoreacth''ity. Silver-ion diffused waveguides were used to measure theophylline concentrations in a fluorescence immunoassay and silicon nitride waveguides were used to detect theophylline in an absorbance-based immunoassay. Liposomes were employed in both assays as the optically detectable label in a competitive reaction to monitor antigen-antibody complexation. Regeneration of the active antibody site will be discussed.

  10. Planar triode pulser socket

    DOEpatents

    Booth, R.

    1994-10-25

    A planar triode is mounted in a PC board orifice by means of a U-shaped capacitor housing and anode contact yoke removably attached to cathode leg extensions passing through and soldered to the cathode side of the PC board by means of a PC cathode pad. A pliant/flexible contact attached to the orifice make triode grid contact with a grid pad on the grid side of the PC board, permitting quick and easy replacement of bad triodes. 14 figs.

  11. Planar triode pulser socket

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1994-01-01

    A planar triode is mounted in a PC board orifice by means of a U-shaped capacitor housing and anode contact yoke removably attached to cathode leg extensions passing through and soldered to the cathode side of the PC board by means of a PC cathode pad. A pliant/flexible contact attached to the orifice make triode grid contact with a grid pad on the grid side of the PC board, permitting quick and easy replacement of bad triodes.

  12. Optofluidic planar reactors for photocatalytic water treatment using solar energy

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Lei; Wang, Ning; Zhang, X. M.; Tai, Qidong; Tsai, Din Ping; Chan, Helen L. W.

    2010-01-01

    Optofluidics may hold the key to greater success of photocatalytic water treatment. This is evidenced by our findings in this paper that the planar microfluidic reactor can overcome the limitations of mass transfer and photon transfer in the previous photocatalytic reactors and improve the photoreaction efficiency by more than 100 times. The microreactor has a planar chamber (5 cm×1.8 cm×100 μm) enclosed by two TiO2-coated glass slides as the top cover and bottom substrate and a microstructured UV-cured NOA81 layer as the sealant and flow input∕output. In experiment, the microreactor achieves 30% degradation of 3 ml 3×10−5M methylene blue within 5 min and shows a reaction rate constant two orders higher than the bulk reactor. Under optimized conditions, a reaction rate of 8% s−1 is achieved under solar irradiation. The average apparent quantum efficiency is found to be only 0.25%, but the effective apparent quantum efficiency reaches as high as 25%. Optofluidic reactors inherit the merits of microfluidics, such as large surface∕volume ratio, easy flow control, and rapid fabrication and offer a promising prospect for large-volume photocatalytic water treatment. PMID:21267436

  13. 47 CFR 64.1401 - Expanded interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... such equipment to connect interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission... interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission facilities (where reasonably feasible) with... interconnection of fiber optic facilities, local exchange carriers shall provide: (1) An interconnection point...

  14. 47 CFR 64.1401 - Expanded interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... such equipment to connect interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission... interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission facilities (where reasonably feasible) with... interconnection of fiber optic facilities, local exchange carriers shall provide: (1) An interconnection point...

  15. 47 CFR 64.1401 - Expanded interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... such equipment to connect interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission... interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission facilities (where reasonably feasible) with... interconnection of fiber optic facilities, local exchange carriers shall provide: (1) An interconnection point...

  16. 47 CFR 64.1401 - Expanded interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... such equipment to connect interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission... interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission facilities (where reasonably feasible) with... interconnection of fiber optic facilities, local exchange carriers shall provide: (1) An interconnection point...

  17. 47 CFR 64.1401 - Expanded interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... such equipment to connect interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission... interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission facilities (where reasonably feasible) with... interconnection of fiber optic facilities, local exchange carriers shall provide: (1) An interconnection point...

  18. Interfacial tension based on-chip extraction of microparticles confined in microfluidic Stokes flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haishui; He, Xiaoming

    2014-10-01

    Microfluidics involving two immiscible fluids (oil and water) has been increasingly used to produce hydrogel microparticles with wide applications. However, it is difficult to extract the microparticles out of the microfluidic Stokes flows of oil that have a Reynolds number (the ratio of inertia to viscous force) much less than one, where the dominant viscous force tends to drive the microparticles to move together with the surrounding oil. Here, we present a passive method for extracting hydrogel microparticles in microfluidic Stokes flow from oil into aqueous extracting solution on-chip by utilizing the intrinsic interfacial tension between oil and the microparticles. We further reveal that the thickness of an "extended confining layer" of oil next to the interface between oil and aqueous extracting solution must be smaller than the radius of microparticles for effective extraction. This method uses a simple planar merging microchannel design that can be readily fabricated and further integrated into a fluidic system to extract microparticles for wide applications.

  19. Patterned adhesive enables construction of nonplanar three-dimensional paper microfluidic circuits.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Brent; Tsutsui, Hideaki

    2014-11-21

    This article discusses the fabrication of planar and nonplanar 3D paper microfluidic circuits through the use of patterned spray adhesive application and origami techniques. The individual paper layers are held together via semi-permanent adhesive bonds without the need for external clamps. Semi-permanent bonds accommodate the repeated folding and unfolding required by complex origami device structures and allow the device to be unfolded post-use to view internally displayed results. Combinations of adhesive patterns and fluid channel widths were identified that did not prevent the fluid from traveling between layers and through the entire circuit. Further, this method was extended to nonplanar 3D paper microfluidic circuits, demonstrated via multi-fluid wicking within a modified origami peacock. Such nonplanar 3D paper microfluidic circuits are expected to offer an entirely new platform for exploring new designs and functions of paper analytical devices. PMID:25222567

  20. Integrated microfluidic systems for DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Samuel K; Chen, Hui-Wen; Witek, Małgorzata A; Soper, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    The potential utility of genome-related research in terms of evolving basic discoveries in biology has generated widespread use of DNA diagnostics and DNA forensics and driven the accelerated development of fully integrated microfluidic systems for genome processing. To produce a microsystem with favorable performance characteristics for genetic-based analyses, several key operational elements must be strategically chosen, including device substrate material, temperature control, fluidic control, and reaction product readout. As a matter of definition, a microdevice is a chip that performs a single processing step, for example microchip electrophoresis. Several microdevices can be integrated to a single wafer, or combined on a control board as separate devices to form a microsystem. A microsystem is defined as a chip composed of at least two microdevices. Among the many documented analytical microdevices, those focused on the ability to perform the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been reported extensively due to the importance of this processing step in most genetic-based assays. Other microdevices that have been detailed in the literature include those for solid-phase extractions, microchip electrophoresis, and devices composed of DNA microarrays used for interrogating DNA primary structure. Great progress has also been made in the areas of chip fabrication, bonding and sealing to enclose fluidic networks, evaluation of different chip substrate materials, surface chemistries, and the architecture of reaction conduits for basic processing steps such as mixing. Other important elements that have been developed to realize functional systems include miniaturized readout formats comprising optical or electrochemical transduction and interconnect technologies. These discoveries have led to the development of fully autonomous and functional integrated systems for genome processing that can supply "sample in/answer out" capabilities. In this chapter, we focus on

  1. Electro-Microfluidic Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, G. L.; Galambos, P. C.

    2002-06-01

    There are many examples of electro-microfluidic products that require cost effective packaging solutions. Industry has responded to a demand for products such as drop ejectors, chemical sensors, and biological sensors. Drop ejectors have consumer applications such as ink jet printing and scientific applications such as patterning self-assembled monolayers or ejecting picoliters of expensive analytes/reagents for chemical analysis. Drop ejectors can be used to perform chemical analysis, combinatorial chemistry, drug manufacture, drug discovery, drug delivery, and DNA sequencing. Chemical and biological micro-sensors can sniff the ambient environment for traces of dangerous materials such as explosives, toxins, or pathogens. Other biological sensors can be used to improve world health by providing timely diagnostics and applying corrective measures to the human body. Electro-microfluidic packaging can easily represent over fifty percent of the product cost and, as with Integrated Circuits (IC), the industry should evolve to standard packaging solutions. Standard packaging schemes will minimize cost and bring products to market sooner.

  2. Microfluidic Biochip Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panzarella, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As humans prepare for the exploration of our solar system, there is a growing need for miniaturized medical and environmental diagnostic devices for use on spacecrafts, especially during long-duration space missions where size and power requirements are critical. In recent years, the biochip (or Lab-on-a-Chip) has emerged as a technology that might be able to satisfy this need. In generic terms, a biochip is a miniaturized microfluidic device analogous to the electronic microchip that ushered in the digital age. It consists of tiny microfluidic channels, pumps and valves that transport small amounts of sample fluids to biosensors that can perform a variety of tests on those fluids in near real time. It has the obvious advantages of being small, lightweight, requiring less sample fluids and reagents and being more sensitive and efficient than larger devices currently in use. Some of the desired space-based applications would be to provide smaller, more robust devices for analyzing blood, saliva and urine and for testing water and food supplies for the presence of harmful contaminants and microorganisms. Our group has undertaken the goal of adapting as well as improving upon current biochip technology for use in long-duration microgravity environments.

  3. Immortality of Cu damascene interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P.

    2002-04-01

    We have studied short-line effects in fully-integrated Cu damascene interconnects through electromigration experiments on lines of various lengths and embedded in different dielectric materials. We compare these results with results from analogous experiments on subtractively-etched Al-based interconnects. It is known that Al-based interconnects exhibit three different behaviors, depending on the magnitude of the product of current density, j, and line length, L: For small values of (jL), no void nucleation occurs, and the line is immortal. For intermediate values, voids nucleate, but the line does not fail because the current can flow through the higher-resistivity refractory-metal-based shunt layers. Here, the resistance of the line increases but eventually saturates, and the relative resistance increase is proportional to (jL/B), where B is the effective elastic modulus of the metallization system. For large values of (jL/B), voiding leads to an unacceptably high resistance increase, and the line is considered failed. By contrast, we observed only two regimes for Cu-based interconnects: Either the resistance of the line stays constant during the duration of the experiment, and the line is considered immortal, or the line fails due to an abrupt open-circuit failure. The absence of an intermediate regime in which the resistance saturates is due to the absence of a shunt layer that is able to support a large amount of current once voiding occurs. Since voids nucleate much more easily in Cu- than in Al-based interconnects, a small fraction of short Cu lines fails even at low current densities. It is therefore more appropriate to consider the probability of immortality in the case of Cu rather than assuming a sharp boundary between mortality and immortality. The probability of immortality decreases with increasing amount of material depleted from the cathode, which is proportional to (jL2/B) at steady state. By contrast, the immortality of Al-based interconnects is

  4. Reciprocating flow-based centrifugal microfluidics mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Micic, Miodrag; Pan, Hansheng; Bartolome, Christian; Princevac, Marko; Zoval, Jim; Madou, Marc

    2009-07-01

    Proper mixing of reagents is of paramount importance for an efficient chemical reaction. While on a large scale there are many good solutions for quantitative mixing of reagents, as of today, efficient and inexpensive fluid mixing in the nanoliter and microliter volume range is still a challenge. Complete, i.e., quantitative mixing is of special importance in any small-scale analytical application because the scarcity of analytes and the low volume of the reagents demand efficient utilization of all available reaction components. In this paper we demonstrate the design and fabrication of a novel centrifugal force-based unit for fast mixing of fluids in the nanoliter to microliter volume range. The device consists of a number of chambers (including two loading chambers, one pressure chamber, and one mixing chamber) that are connected through a network of microchannels, and is made by bonding a slab of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to a glass slide. The PDMS slab was cast using a SU-8 master mold fabricated by a two-level photolithography process. This microfluidic mixer exploits centrifugal force and pneumatic pressure to reciprocate the flow of fluid samples in order to minimize the amount of sample and the time of mixing. The process of mixing was monitored by utilizing the planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique. A time series of high resolution images of the mixing chamber were analyzed for the spatial distribution of light intensities as the two fluids (suspension of red fluorescent particles and water) mixed. Histograms of the fluorescent emissions within the mixing chamber during different stages of the mixing process were created to quantify the level of mixing of the mixing fluids. The results suggest that quantitative mixing was achieved in less than 3 min. This device can be employed as a stand alone mixing unit or may be integrated into a disk-based microfluidic system where, in addition to mixing, several other sample preparation steps may be

  5. Inertial microfluidics for continuous separation of cells and particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Arpita; Kuntaegowdanahalli, Sathyakumar S.; Papautsky, Ian

    2011-02-01

    In this work we describe the use of inertial microfluidics for continuous multi-particle separation in a simple spiral microchannel. The inertial forces coupled with the rotational Dean drag force in the spiral microchannel geometry cause neutrally-buoyant particles and cells to occupy a single equilibrium position near the inner microchannel wall. This position is strongly dependent on the particle/cell diameter. Based on this concept, a 5-loop Archimedean spiral microchannel chip was used to demonstrate for the first time focusing and separation of four particles simultaneously. The polystyrene particles (7.32 μm, 10 μm, 15 μm, 20 μm in diameter) were selected for this work since they are compatible to the size of blood cells. The device exhibited an average 87% separation efficiency, which is comparable to that of other microfluidic separation systems. The simple planar structure and high sample throughput offered by this passive microfluidic approach makes it attractive for lab-on-a-chip integration in hematology applications.

  6. A microfluidic separation platform using an array of slanted ramps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risbud, Sumedh; Bernate, Jorge; Drazer, German

    2013-03-01

    The separation of the different components of a sample is a crucial step in many micro- and nano-fluidic applications, including the detection of infections, the capture of circulating tumor cells, the isolation of proteins, RNA and DNA, to mention but a few. Vector chromatography, in which different species migrate in different directions in a planar microfluidic device thus achieving spatial as well as temporal resolution, offers the promise of high selectivity along with high throughput. In this work, we present a microfluidic vector chromatography platform consisting of slanted ramps in a microfluidic channel for the separation of suspended particles. We construct these ramps using inclined UV lithography, such that the inclined portion of the ramps is upstream. We show that particles of different size displace laterally to a different extent when driven by a flow field over a slanted ramp. The flow close to the ramp reorients along the ramp, causing the size-dependent deflection of the particles. The cumulative effect of an array of these ramps would cause particles of different size to migrate in different directions, thus allowing their passive and continuous separation.

  7. 47 CFR 51.305 - Interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interconnection. 51.305 Section 51.305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Additional Obligations of Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers § 51.305 Interconnection. (a) An incumbent LEC shall provide, for the...

  8. 47 CFR 51.305 - Interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interconnection. 51.305 Section 51.305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Additional Obligations of Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers § 51.305 Interconnection. (a) An incumbent LEC shall provide, for the...

  9. 47 CFR 51.305 - Interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interconnection. 51.305 Section 51.305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Additional Obligations of Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers § 51.305 Interconnection. (a) An incumbent LEC shall provide, for the...

  10. 47 CFR 51.305 - Interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interconnection. 51.305 Section 51.305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Additional Obligations of Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers § 51.305 Interconnection. (a) An incumbent LEC shall provide, for the...

  11. 14 CFR 29.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 29.674 Section 29... Interconnected controls. Each primary flight control system must provide for safe flight and landing and operate independently after a malfunction, failure, or jam of any auxiliary interconnected control....

  12. 14 CFR 27.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 27.674 Section 27... Interconnected controls. Each primary flight control system must provide for safe flight and landing and operate independently after a malfunction, failure, or jam of any auxiliary interconnected control....

  13. 18 CFR 292.306 - Interconnection costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interconnection costs... § 292.306 Interconnection costs. (a) Obligation to pay. Each qualifying facility shall be obligated to pay any interconnection costs which the State regulatory authority (with respect to any...

  14. 18 CFR 292.306 - Interconnection costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Interconnection costs... § 292.306 Interconnection costs. (a) Obligation to pay. Each qualifying facility shall be obligated to pay any interconnection costs which the State regulatory authority (with respect to any...

  15. 18 CFR 292.306 - Interconnection costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Interconnection costs... § 292.306 Interconnection costs. (a) Obligation to pay. Each qualifying facility shall be obligated to pay any interconnection costs which the State regulatory authority (with respect to any...

  16. 47 CFR 90.477 - Interconnected systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interconnected systems. 90.477 Section 90.477 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Transmitter Control Interconnected Systems § 90.477 Interconnected systems. (a) Applicants for new land stations to...

  17. 47 CFR 90.477 - Interconnected systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interconnected systems. 90.477 Section 90.477 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Transmitter Control Interconnected Systems § 90.477 Interconnected systems. (a) Applicants for new land stations to...

  18. 47 CFR 90.477 - Interconnected systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interconnected systems. 90.477 Section 90.477... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Transmitter Control Interconnected Systems § 90.477 Interconnected systems. (a... switched telephone network only after modifying their license. See § 1.929 of this chapter. In all cases...

  19. 47 CFR 90.477 - Interconnected systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interconnected systems. 90.477 Section 90.477... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Transmitter Control Interconnected Systems § 90.477 Interconnected systems. (a... switched telephone network only after modifying their license. See § 1.929 of this chapter. In all cases...

  20. Microfluidic hydrogel arrays for direct genotyping of clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Kim, Jungkyu; Mathies, Richard A

    2016-05-15

    A microfluidic hydrogel DNA microarray is developed to overcome the limitations of conventional planar microarrays such as low sensitivity, long overnight hybridization time, lack of a melting verification of proper hybrid, and complicated sample preparation process for genotyping of clinical samples. Unlike our previous prototype hydrogel array which can analyze only single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) targets, the device is the first of its type to allow direct multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection of human clinical samples comprising double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). This advance is made possible by incorporating a streptavidin (SA) hydrogel capture/purification element in a double T-junction at the start of the linear hydrogel array structure and fabricating ten different probe DNAs-entrapped hydrogels in microfluidic channels. The purified or unpurified polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products labeled with a fluorophore and a biotin are electrophoresed through the SA hydrogel for binding and purification. After electrophoretic washing, the fluorophore-labeled DNA strand is then thermally released for hybridization capture by its complementary probe gel element. We demonstrate the precise and rapid discrimination of the genotypes of five different clinical targets by melting curve analysis based on temperature-gradient electrophoresis within 3h, which is at least 3-fold decrease in incubation time compared to conventional microarrays. In addition, a 1.7 pg (0.024 femtomoles) limit of detection for clinical samples is achieved which is ~100-fold better sensitivity than planar microarrays. PMID:26735871

  1. Ultrafast microfluidics using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that surface acoustic waves (SAWs), nanometer amplitude Rayleigh waves driven at megahertz order frequencies propagating on the surface of a piezoelectric substrate, offer a powerful method for driving a host of extremely fast microfluidic actuation and micro∕bioparticle manipulation schemes. We show that sessile drops can be translated rapidly on planar substrates or fluid can be pumped through microchannels at 1–10 cm∕s velocities, which are typically one to two orders quicker than that afforded by current microfluidic technologies. Through symmetry-breaking, azimuthal recirculation can be induced within the drop to drive strong inertial microcentrifugation for micromixing and particle concentration or separation. Similar micromixing strategies can be induced in the same microchannel in which fluid is pumped with the SAW by merely changing the SAW frequency to rapidly switch the uniform through-flow into a chaotic oscillatory flow by exploiting superpositioning of the irradiated sound waves from the sidewalls of the microchannel. If the flow is sufficiently quiescent, the nodes of the transverse standing wave that arises across the microchannel also allow for particle aggregation, and hence, sorting on nodal lines. In addition, the SAW also facilitates other microfluidic capabilities. For example, capillary waves excited at the free surface of a sessile drop by the SAW underneath it can be exploited for micro∕nanoparticle collection and sorting at nodal points or lines at low powers. At higher powers, the large accelerations off the substrate surface as the SAW propagates across drives rapid destabilization of the drop free surface giving rise to inertial liquid jets that persist over 1–2 cm in length or atomization of the entire drop to produce 1–10 μm monodispersed aerosol droplets, which can be exploited for ink-jet printing, mass spectrometry interfacing, or pulmonary drug delivery. The atomization of polymer∕protein solutions

  2. Fluidic communication between multiple vertically segregated microfluidic channels connected by nanocapillary array membranes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Maojun; Flachsbart, Bruce R; Shannon, Mark A; Bohn, Paul W; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2008-03-01

    Hybrid microfluidic/nanofluidic devices offer unique capabilities for manipulating and analyzing minute volumes of expensive or hard-to-obtain samples. Here, multilayer poly-(methyl methacrylate) microchips, with multiple spatially isolated microfluidic channels interconnected by nanocapillary array membranes (NCAMs), are fabricated using an adhesive contact printing process. The NCAMs, positioned between the microfluidic channel layers, add functionality to the inter-microchannel fluid transfer unit operation. They do so because the transport of specific analytes through the NCAM can be controlled by adjusting the ionic strength, the polarity of the applied bias, the surface charge density, and the pore size. A simplified, floating injection technique for NCAM-coupled nanofluidic devices is described and compared with conventional biased injection. In the floating injection approach, a voltage is applied across the injection channel and the slight electric field extension at the cross-section is used to transfer analytes through the nanopores to the separation channel. Floating injection excels in plug reproducibility, separation resolution, and operation simplicity, although it decreases assay throughput relative to biased injection. Floating injection can avoid the uneven distribution of analytes in the microfluidic channel that sometimes results from biased injection because of the volume mismatch between NCAM nanopore transport capacity and the supply of fluid. Moreover, the pressure-driven flow caused by the mismatch of the EOFs in the microfluidic channels connected by an NCAM must be considered when using NCAMs with pore diameters below 50 nm. PMID:18288777

  3. Solvent resistant microfluidic DNA synthesizer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyi; Castrataro, Piero; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Quake, Stephen R

    2007-01-01

    We fabricated a microfluidic DNA synthesizer out of perfluoropolyether (PFPE), an elastomer with excellent chemical compatibility which makes it possible to perform organic chemical reactions, and synthesized 20-mer oligonucleotides on chip. PMID:17180201

  4. Flexible interconnects for fuel cell stacks

    DOEpatents

    Lenz, David J.; Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc

    2004-11-09

    An interconnect that facilitates electrical connection and mechanical support with minimal mechanical stress for fuel cell stacks. The interconnects are flexible and provide mechanically robust fuel cell stacks with higher stack performance at lower cost. The flexible interconnects replace the prior rigid rib interconnects with flexible "fingers" or contact pads which will accommodate the imperfect flatness of the ceramic fuel cells. Also, the mechanical stress of stacked fuel cells will be smaller due to the flexibility of the fingers. The interconnects can be one-sided or double-sided.

  5. Interconnects for nanoscale MOSFET technology: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Amit

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a review of Cu/low-k, carbon nanotube (CNT), graphene nanoribbon (GNR) and optical based interconnect technologies has been done. Interconnect models, challenges and solutions have also been discussed. Of all the four technologies, CNT interconnects satisfy most of the challenges and they are most suited for nanometer scale technologies, despite some minor drawbacks. It is concluded that beyond 32 nm technology, a paradigm shift in the interconnect material is required as Cu/low-k interconnects are approaching fundamental limits.

  6. Passive microfluidic array card and reader

    DOEpatents

    Dugan, Lawrence Christopher; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2011-08-09

    A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

  7. Towards printable open air microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect

    Collord, Andrew; Cook, Adam W.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Fenton, Kyle Ross; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Branson, Eric D.

    2010-04-01

    We have demonstrated a novel microfluidic technique for aqueous media, which uses super-hydrophobic materials to create microfluidic channels that are open to the atmosphere. We have demonstrated the ability to perform traditional electrokinetic operations such as ionic separations and electrophoresis using these devices. The rate of evaporation was studied and found to increase with decreasing channel size, which places a limitation on the minimum size of channel that could be used for such a device.

  8. Electrodes for microfluidic applications

    DOEpatents

    Crocker, Robert W.; Harnett, Cindy K.; Rognlien, Judith L.

    2006-08-22

    An electrode device for high pressure applications. These electrodes, designed to withstand pressure of greater than 10,000 psi, are adapted for use in microfluidic devices that employ electrokinetic or electrophoretic flow. The electrode is composed, generally, of an outer electrically insulating tubular body having a porous ceramic frit material disposed in one end of the outer body. The pores of the porous ceramic material are filled with an ion conductive polymer resin. A conductive material situated on the upper surface of the porous ceramic frit material and, thus isolated from direct contact with the electrolyte, forms a gas diffusion electrode. A metal current collector, in contact with the gas diffusion electrode, provides connection to a voltage source.

  9. Microfluidic serial dilution ladder.

    PubMed

    Ahrar, Siavash; Hwang, Michelle; Duncan, Philip N; Hui, Elliot E

    2014-01-01

    Serial dilution is a fundamental procedure that is common to a large number of laboratory protocols. Automation of serial dilution is thus a valuable component for lab-on-a-chip systems. While a handful of different microfluidic strategies for serial dilution have been reported, approaches based on continuous flow mixing inherently consume larger amounts of sample volume and chip real estate. We employ valve-driven circulatory mixing to address these issues and also introduce a novel device structure to store each stage of the dilution process. The dilution strategy is based on sequentially mixing the rungs of a ladder structure. We demonstrate a 7-stage series of 1 : 1 dilutions with R(2) equal to 0.995 in an active device area of 1 cm(2). PMID:24231765

  10. Enhanced Microfluidic Electromagnetic Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovangrandi, Laurent (Inventor); Ricco, Antonio J. (Inventor); Kovacs, Gregory (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for enhanced microfluidic impedance spectroscopy include causing a core fluid to flow into a channel between two sheath flows of one or more sheath fluids different from the core fluid. Flow in the channel is laminar. A dielectric constant of a fluid constituting either sheath flow is much less than a dielectric constant of the core fluid. Electrical impedance is measured in the channel between at least a first pair of electrodes. In some embodiments, enhanced optical measurements include causing a core fluid to flow into a channel between two sheath flows of one or more sheath fluids different from the core fluid. An optical index of refraction of a fluid constituting either sheath flow is much less than an optical index of refraction of the core fluid. An optical property is measured in the channel.

  11. Inertial Focusing in Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Joseph M.; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    When Segré and Silberberg in 1961 witnessed particles in a laminar pipe flow congregating at an annulus in the pipe, scientists were perplexed and spent decades learning why such behavior occurred, finally understanding that it was caused by previously unknown forces on particles in an inertial flow. The advent of microfluidics opened a new realm of possibilities for inertial focusing in the processing of biological fluids and cellular suspensions and created a field that is now rapidly expanding. Over the past five years, inertial focusing has enabled high-throughput, simple, and precise manipulation of bodily fluids for a myriad of applications in point-of-care and clinical diagnostics. This review describes the theoretical developments that have made the field of inertial focusing what it is today and presents the key applications that will make inertial focusing a mainstream technology in the future. PMID:24905880

  12. Digital Microfluidics Sample Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen; Paik, Philip Y.; Sudarsan, Arjun; Shenderov, Alex; Hua, Zhishan; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2010-01-01

    Three innovations address the needs of the medical world with regard to microfluidic manipulation and testing of physiological samples in ways that can benefit point-of-care needs for patients such as premature infants, for which drawing of blood for continuous tests can be life-threatening in their own right, and for expedited results. A chip with sample injection elements, reservoirs (and waste), droplet formation structures, fluidic pathways, mixing areas, and optical detection sites, was fabricated to test the various components of the microfluidic platform, both individually and in integrated fashion. The droplet control system permits a user to control droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. Also, the programming system allows a user to develop software routines for controlling droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. A chip is incorporated into the system with a controller, a detector, input and output devices, and software. A novel filler fluid formulation is used for the transport of droplets with high protein concentrations. Novel assemblies for detection of photons from an on-chip droplet are present, as well as novel systems for conducting various assays, such as immunoassays and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The lab-on-a-chip (a.k.a., lab-on-a-printed-circuit board) processes physiological samples and comprises a system for automated, multi-analyte measurements using sub-microliter samples of human serum. The invention also relates to a diagnostic chip and system including the chip that performs many of the routine operations of a central labbased chemistry analyzer, integrating, for example, colorimetric assays (e.g., for proteins), chemiluminescence/fluorescence assays (e.g., for enzymes, electrolytes, and gases), and/or conductometric assays (e.g., for hematocrit on plasma and whole blood) on a single chip platform.

  13. Parallel Imaging Microfluidic Cytometer

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Daniel J.; McKenna, Brian K.; Evans, James G.; Belkina, Anna C.; Denis, Gerald V.; Sherr, David; Cheung, Man Ching

    2011-01-01

    By adding an additional degree of freedom from multichannel flow, the parallel microfluidic cytometer (PMC) combines some of the best features of flow cytometry (FACS) and microscope-based high-content screening (HCS). The PMC (i) lends itself to fast processing of large numbers of samples, (ii) adds a 1-D imaging capability for intracellular localization assays (HCS), (iii) has a high rare-cell sensitivity and, (iv) has an unusual capability for time-synchronized sampling. An inability to practically handle large sample numbers has restricted applications of conventional flow cytometers and microscopes in combinatorial cell assays, network biology, and drug discovery. The PMC promises to relieve a bottleneck in these previously constrained applications. The PMC may also be a powerful tool for finding rare primary cells in the clinic. The multichannel architecture of current PMC prototypes allows 384 unique samples for a cell-based screen to be read out in approximately 6–10 minutes, about 30-times the speed of most current FACS systems. In 1-D intracellular imaging, the PMC can obtain protein localization using HCS marker strategies at many times the sample throughput of CCD-based microscopes or CCD-based single-channel flow cytometers. The PMC also permits the signal integration time to be varied over a larger range than is practical in conventional flow cytometers. The signal-to-noise advantages are useful, for example, in counting rare positive cells in the most difficult early stages of genome-wide screening. We review the status of parallel microfluidic cytometry and discuss some of the directions the new technology may take. PMID:21704835

  14. A Programmable MicroFluidic Processor: Integrated and Hybrid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K A

    2002-05-10

    The Programmable Fluidic Processor (PFP), a device conceived of by researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center, is a reconfigurable and programmable bio-chemical analysis system designed for handheld operation in a variety of applications. Unlike most microfluidic systems which utilize channels to control fluids, the PFP device is a droplet-based system. The device is based on dielectrophoresis; a fluid transport phenomenon that utilizes mismatched polarizability between a droplet and its medium to induce droplet mobility. In the device, sample carrying droplets are polarized by an array of electrodes, individually addressable by subsurface microelectronics. My research focused on the development of a polymer-based microfluidic injection system for injecting these droplets onto the electrode array. The first of two device generations fabricated at LLNL was designed using extensive research and modeling performed by MD Anderson and Coventor. Fabricating the first generation required several iterations and design changes in order to generate an acceptable device for testing. Difficulties in planar fabrication of the fluidic system and a narrow channel design necessitated these changes. The second generation device incorporated modifications of the previous generation and improved on deficiencies discovered during experimentation with the initial device. Extensive modeling of the injection channels and fluid storage chamber also aided in redesigning the device's microfluidic system. A micromolding technique with interlocking features enabled precise alignments and dimensional control, critical requirements for device optimization. Fabrication of a final device will be fully integrated with the polymer-based microfluidics bonded directly to the silicon-based microelectronics. The optimized design and process flow developed in the trial generations will readily transfer to this approach.

  15. Microfluidic Technologies for Temporal Perturbations of Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Most cells in the body have the ability to change their physical locations during physiologic or pathologic events such as inflammation, wound healing, or cancer. When cell migration is directed toward sources of cue chemicals, the process is known as chemotaxis, and it requires linking the sensing of chemicals through receptors on the surfaces of the cells to the directional activation of the motility apparatus inside the cells. This link is supported by complex intracellular signaling pathways, and although details regarding the nature of the molecules involved in the signal transduction are well established, far less is known about how different signaling molecules and processes are dynamically interconnected and how slower and faster signaling events take place simultaneously inside moving cells. In this context, advances in microfluidic technologies are enabling the emergence of new tools that facilitate the development of experimental protocols in which the cellular microenvironment is precisely controlled in time and space and in which signaling-associated changes inside cells can be quantitatively measured and compared. These tools could enable new insights into the intricacies of the biological systems that participate in chemotaxis processes and could have the potential to accelerate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to control cell motility and enhance our abilities for medical intervention during health and disease. PMID:20450351

  16. Packaging of silicon sensors for microfluidic bio-analytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimberger-Friedl, Reinhold; Nellissen, Ton; Weekamp, Wim; van Delft, Jan; Ansems, Will; Prins, Menno; Megens, Mischa; Dittmer, Wendy; de Witz, Christiane; van Iersel, Ben

    2009-01-01

    A new industrial concept is presented for packaging biosensor chips in disposable microfluidic cartridges to enable medical diagnostic applications. The inorganic electronic substrates, such as silicon or glass, are integrated in a polymer package which provides the electrical and fluidic interconnections to the world and provides mechanical strength and protection for out-of-lab use. The demonstrated prototype consists of a molded interconnection device (MID), a silicon-based giant magneto-resistive (GMR) biosensor chip, a flex and a polymer fluidic part with integrated tubing. The various processes are compatible with mass manufacturing and run at a high yield. The devices show a reliable electrical interconnection between the sensor chip and readout electronics during extended wet operation. Sandwich immunoassays were carried out in the cartridges with surface functionalized sensor chips. Biological response curves were determined for different concentrations of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on the packaged biosensor, which demonstrates the functionality and biocompatibility of the devices. The new packaging concept provides a platform for easy further integration of electrical and fluidic functions, as for instance required for integrated molecular diagnostic devices in cost-effective mass manufacturing.

  17. Planar Submillimeter-Wave Mixer Technology with Integrated Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Gautam; Mehdi, Imran; Gill, John J.; Lee, Choonsup; lombart, Muria L.; Thomas, Betrand

    2010-01-01

    High-performance mixers at terahertz frequencies require good matching between the coupling circuits such as antennas and local oscillators and the diode embedding impedance. With the availability of amplifiers at submillimeter wavelengths and the need to have multi-pixel imagers and cameras, planar mixer architecture is required to have an integrated system. An integrated mixer with planar antenna provides a compact and optimized design at terahertz frequencies. Moreover, it leads to a planar architecture that enables efficient interconnect with submillimeter-wave amplifiers. In this architecture, a planar slot antenna is designed on a thin gallium arsenide (GaAs) membrane in such a way that the beam on either side of the membrane is symmetric and has good beam profile with high coupling efficiency. A coplanar waveguide (CPW) coupled Schottky diode mixer is designed and integrated with the antenna. In this architecture, the local oscillator (LO) is coupled through one side of the antenna and the RF from the other side, without requiring any beam sp litters or diplexers. The intermediate frequency (IF) comes out on a 50-ohm CPW line at the edge of the mixer chip, which can be wire-bonded to external circuits. This unique terahertz mixer has an integrated single planar antenna for coupling both the radio frequency (RF) input and LO injection without any diplexer or beamsplitters. The design utilizes novel planar slot antenna architecture on a 3- mthick GaAs membrane. This work is required to enable future multi-pixel terahertz receivers for astrophysics missions, and lightweight and compact receivers for planetary missions to the outer planets in our solar system. Also, this technology can be used in tera hertz radar imaging applications as well as for testing of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs).

  18. Double interconnection fuel cell array

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert; Zymboly, Gregory E.

    1993-01-01

    A fuel cell array (10) is made, containing number of tubular, elongated fuel cells (12) which are placed next to each other in rows (A, B, C, D), where each cell contains inner electrodes (14) and outer electrodes (18 and 18'), with solid electrolyte (16 and 16') between the electrodes, where the electrolyte and outer electrode are discontinuous, having two portions, and providing at least two opposed discontinuities which contain at least two oppositely opposed interconnections (20 and 20') contacting the inner electrode (14), each cell (12) having only three metallic felt electrical connectors (22) which contact surrounding cells, where each row is electrically connected to the other.

  19. Multilayer Interconnects for Microfabricated Surface Electrode Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Jason; Seidelin, Signe; Wesenberg, Janus; Britton, Joe; Blakestad, Brad; Brown, Kenton; Epstein, Ryan; Home, Jonathan; Jost, John; Langer, Chris; Leibfried, Dietrich; Ozeri, Roee; Wineland, David

    2007-06-01

    Microfabricated surface electrode traps for ions are a promising technology for building scalable trapping geometries for quantum information processing. We have expanded upon our single layer gold-on-fused-silica surface electrode trap [1] to include a second patterned conducting layer under the trapping electrodes and have demonstrated the fabrication of this architecture using standard microfabrication techniques. The multilayer approach allows for a significant increase in multi-zone trapping complexity and permits improved trapping structures that are otherwise unattainable in single layer designs without vertical interconnects through the wafer. Using improved calculational methods [2], we are in the process of optimizing the planar designs to create modular elements that can be joined into larger multi-zone trapping structures. Work supported by DTO and NIST. 1. S. Seidelin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 253003 (2006). Also, see the abstract by S. Seidelin. 2. See the abstract by J. H. Wesenberg.

  20. Functional polymer sheet patterning using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Li, Minggan; Humayun, Mouhita; Kozinski, Janusz A; Hwang, Dae Kun

    2014-07-22

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidics provide a novel approach to advanced material synthesis. While PDMS has been successfully used in a wide range of industrial applications, due to the weak mechanical property channels generally possess low aspect ratios (AR) and thus produce microparticles with similarly low ARs. By increasing the channel width to nearly 1 cm, AR to 267, and implementing flow lithography, we were able to establish the slit-channel lithography. Not only does this allow us to synthesize sheet materials bearing multiscale features and tunable chemical anisotropy but it also allows us to fabricate functional layered sheet structures in a one-step, high-throughput fashion. We showcased the technique's potential role in various applications, such as the synthesis of planar material with micro- and nanoscale features, surface morphologies, construction of tubular and 3D layered hydrogel tissue scaffolds, and one-step formation of radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. The method introduced offers a novel route to functional sheet material synthesis and sheet system fabrication. PMID:24967616

  1. Microfluidic assembly of multiscale soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Lian; Guenther, Axel

    2010-11-01

    The vast majority of materials found in nature are characterized by length scales that span several orders of magnitude. Material properties such as porosity, permeability and elasticity are therefore locally and directionally tuned to their (biological) function and adapted to local environmental conditions. We use a massively scaled microfluidic approach to synthetically define multiscale complex fluids and soft materials with precisely tunable, non-isentropic bulk properties. Two or more fluids are separately introduced to the device that consists of fifteen vertically bonded and fluidically connected substrate layers, and guided to an exit section that either consists of 23 equidistantly spaced channels or a 23 x 15 channel array. The flow rates through individual channels are computer-controlled. Upon entering a reservoir in a flow-focusing configuration, a spatially organized fluid with characteristic length scales of 250 microns and 10 mm was defined, and retained via a chemical reaction. To illustrate different soft material morphologies in one, two or three directions, we demonstrate the formation of isolated fibers (1D); planar graded and barcoded materials (2D); graded bulk materials and perfusable matrices (3D).

  2. Recent Progress of Microfluidics in Translational Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zongbin; Han, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics, featuring microfabricated structures, is a technology for manipulating fluids at the micrometer scale. The small dimension and flexibility of microfluidic systems are ideal for mimicking molecular and cellular microenvironment, and show great potential in translational research and development. Here, the recent progress of microfluidics in biological and biomedical applications, including molecular analysis, cellular analysis, and chip-based material delivery and biomimetic design is presented. The potential future developments in the translational microfluidics field are also discussed. PMID:27091777

  3. Recent Progress of Microfluidics in Translational Applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongbin; Han, Xin; Qin, Lidong

    2016-04-01

    Microfluidics, featuring microfabricated structures, is a technology for manipulating fluids at the micrometer scale. The small dimension and flexibility of microfluidic systems are ideal for mimicking molecular and cellular microenvironment, and show great potential in translational research and development. Here, the recent progress of microfluidics in biological and biomedical applications, including molecular analysis, cellular analysis, and chip-based material delivery and biomimetic design is presented. The potential future developments in the translational microfluidics field are also discussed. PMID:27091777

  4. Planar electroluminescent panel techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, C.; Kell, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Investigations of planar electroluminescent multipurpose displays with latch-in memory are described. An 18 x 24 in. flat, thin address panel with elements spacing of 0.100 in. was constructed which demonstrated essentially uniform luminosity of 3-5 foot lamberts for each of its 43200 EL cells. A working model of a 4-bit EL-PC (electroluminescent photoconductive) electrooptical decoder was made which demonstrated the feasibility of this concept. A single-diagram electroluminescent display device with photoconductive-electroluminescent latch-in memory was constructed which demonstrated the conceptual soundness of this principle. Attempts to combine these principles in a single PEL multipurpose display with latch-in memory were unsuccessful and were judged to exceed the state-of-the-art for close-packed (0.10 in. centers) photoconductor-electroluminescent cell assembly.

  5. Planar elliptic growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The planar elliptic extension of the Laplacian growth is, after a proper parametrization, given in a form of a solution to the equation for areapreserving diffeomorphisms. The infinite set of conservation laws associated with such elliptic growth is interpreted in terms of potential theory, and the relations between two major forms of the elliptic growth are analyzed. The constants of integration for closed form solutions are identified as the singularities of the Schwarz function, which are located both inside and outside the moving contour. Well-posedness of the recovery of the elliptic operator governing the process from the continuum of interfaces parametrized by time is addressed and two examples of exact solutions of elliptic growth are presented.

  6. IETI - Isogeometric Tearing and Interconnecting.

    PubMed

    Kleiss, Stefan K; Pechstein, Clemens; Jüttler, Bert; Tomar, Satyendra

    2012-11-01

    Finite Element Tearing and Interconnecting (FETI) methods are a powerful approach to designing solvers for large-scale problems in computational mechanics. The numerical simulation problem is subdivided into a number of independent sub-problems, which are then coupled in appropriate ways. NURBS- (Non-Uniform Rational B-spline) based isogeometric analysis (IGA) applied to complex geometries requires to represent the computational domain as a collection of several NURBS geometries. Since there is a natural decomposition of the computational domain into several subdomains, NURBS-based IGA is particularly well suited for using FETI methods. This paper proposes the new IsogEometric Tearing and Interconnecting (IETI) method, which combines the advanced solver design of FETI with the exact geometry representation of IGA. We describe the IETI framework for two classes of simple model problems (Poisson and linearized elasticity) and discuss the coupling of the subdomains along interfaces (both for matching interfaces and for interfaces with T-joints, i.e. hanging nodes). Special attention is paid to the construction of a suitable preconditioner for the iterative linear solver used for the interface problem. We report several computational experiments to demonstrate the performance of the proposed IETI method. PMID:24511167

  7. Interconnect fatigue design for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G. R.; Moore, D. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The results of comprehensive investigation of interconnect fatigue that has led to the definition of useful reliability-design and life-prediction algorithms are presented. Experimental data indicate that the classical strain-cycle (fatigue) curve for the interconnect material is a good model of mean interconnect fatigue performance, but it fails to account for the broad statistical scatter, which is critical to reliability prediction. To fill this shortcoming the classical fatigue curve is combined with experimental cumulative interconnect failure rate data to yield statistical fatigue curves (having failure probability as a parameter) which enable (1) the prediction of cumulative interconnect failures during the design life of an array field, and (2) the unambiguous--ie., quantitative--interpretation of data from field-service qualification (accelerated thermal cycling) tests. Optimal interconnect cost-reliability design algorithms are derived based on minimizing the cost of energy over the design life of the array field.

  8. Interconnect fatigue design for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon, G. R.; Moore, D. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1982-03-01

    The results of comprehensive investigation of interconnect fatigue that has led to the definition of useful reliability-design and life-prediction algorithms are presented. Experimental data indicate that the classical strain-cycle (fatigue) curve for the interconnect material is a good model of mean interconnect fatigue performance, but it fails to account for the broad statistical scatter, which is critical to reliability prediction. To fill this shortcoming the classical fatigue curve is combined with experimental cumulative interconnect failure rate data to yield statistical fatigue curves (having failure probability as a parameter) which enable (1) the prediction of cumulative interconnect failures during the design life of an array field, and (2) the unambiguous--ie., quantitative--interpretation of data from field-service qualification (accelerated thermal cycling) tests. Optimal interconnect cost-reliability design algorithms are derived based on minimizing the cost of energy over the design life of the array field.

  9. Machine vision for digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Jun; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2010-01-01

    Machine vision is widely used in an industrial environment today. It can perform various tasks, such as inspecting and controlling production processes, that may require humanlike intelligence. The importance of imaging technology for biological research or medical diagnosis is greater than ever. For example, fluorescent reporter imaging enables scientists to study the dynamics of gene networks with high spatial and temporal resolution. Such high-throughput imaging is increasingly demanding the use of machine vision for real-time analysis and control. Digital microfluidics is a relatively new technology with expectations of becoming a true lab-on-a-chip platform. Utilizing digital microfluidics, only small amounts of biological samples are required and the experimental procedures can be automatically controlled. There is a strong need for the development of a digital microfluidics system integrated with machine vision for innovative biological research today. In this paper, we show how machine vision can be applied to digital microfluidics by demonstrating two applications: machine vision-based measurement of the kinetics of biomolecular interactions and machine vision-based droplet motion control. It is expected that digital microfluidics-based machine vision system will add intelligence and automation to high-throughput biological imaging in the future. PMID:20113117

  10. Cascade solar cell having conductive interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Borden, Peter G.; Saxena, Ram R.

    1982-10-26

    Direct ohmic contact between the cells in an epitaxially grown cascade solar cell is obtained by means of conductive interconnects formed through grooves etched intermittently in the upper cell. The base of the upper cell is directly connected by the conductive interconnects to the emitter of the bottom cell. The conductive interconnects preferably terminate on a ledge formed in the base of the upper cell.