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Sample records for plane load-bearing structures

  1. Ceramic Fiber Structures for Cryogenic Load-Bearing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Eckel, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    This invention is intended for use as a load-bearing device under cryogenic temperatures and/or abrasive conditions (i.e., during missions to the Moon). The innovation consists of small-diameter, ceramic fibers that are woven or braided into devices like ropes, belts, tracks, or cables. The fibers can be formed from a variety of ceramic materials like silicon carbide, carbon, aluminosilicate, or aluminum oxide. The fiber architecture of the weave or braid is determined by both the fiber properties and the mechanical requirements of the application. A variety of weave or braid architectures is possible for this application. Thickness of load-bearing devices can be achieved by using either a 3D woven structure, or a layered, 2D structure. For the prototype device, a belt approximately 0.10 in. (0.25 cm) thick, and 3.0 in. (7.6 cm) wide was formed by layering and stitching a 2D aluminosilicate fiber weave.

  2. Nondimensional characterization and asymptotic model development for multifunctional structures with application to load-bearing antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santapuri, Sushma; Bechtel, Stephen E.

    2014-05-01

    This paper (i) presents a mathematical approach to formulate leading-order models for complex multifunctional systems with coupled thermomechanical and electromagnetic field interactions, and (ii) demonstrates its applicability to the modeling and analysis of a load-bearing antenna, a multifunctional sensing and transmitting device integrated with a load-bearing structure. Starting from first-principle equations, i.e. the thermomechanical balance laws coupled with Maxwell’s equations, nondimensionalization and perturbation techniques are employed to formulate a leading-order model for the coupled system. Depending on the design of the structure and nature of the excitation, the nondimensional numbers arising in the coupled multifunctional system are quantified, and through a relative ordering of these quantities, the dominant physical effects are extracted. The resulting dominant effects determine the regime of operation of the structure, and in turn dictate the appropriate computational model. This approach is demonstrated through an application to a load-bearing antenna for a prototypical design. The resulting leading-order model is subsequently solved, and the electrical and structural response of the load-bearing antenna is analyzed and compared for different combinations of material properties. The framework introduced in this paper is envisioned to have applications in developing leading-order models for a wide range of complex multifunctional systems and can be utilized for their efficient design.

  3. Composite load bearing outer skin for an arctic structure and a method for erecting same

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Birdy, J. N.; Watt, B. J.

    1985-08-27

    The load bearing outer skin contains an inner assembly and an outer assembly. Both the inner and outer assemblies include a skin plate member which is stiffened by stiffeners welded to one side of the skin plate member. The stiffeners are located at spaced intervals from each other and are disposed substantially perpendicular to the skin plate member. The inner and outer assembly are placed substantially parallel to each other to form a composite structure having an internal cavity defined by the inner and outer plates. The stiffeners of the inner assembly and the outer assembly are disposed in the cavity at a spaced relation to each other and extend partly into the cavity. A cementitious material substantially fills the cavity thereby completing the load bearing outer skin structure. The stiffeners may be flat steel plates or may have the profile of structural shapes such as angles or T's among others.

  4. Influence of structural load-bearing scaffolds on mechanical load- and BMP-2-mediated bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Anna M; Mason, Devon E; Lin, Angela S P; Guldberg, Robert E; Boerckel, Joel D

    2016-09-01

    A common design constraint in functional tissue engineering is that scaffolds intended for use in load-bearing sites possess similar mechanical properties to the replaced tissue. Here, we tested the hypothesis that in vivo loading would enhance bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-mediated bone regeneration in the presence of a load-bearing PLDL scaffold, whose pores and central core were filled with BMP-2-releasing alginate hydrogel. First, we evaluated the effects of in vivo mechanical loading on bone regeneration in the structural scaffolds. Second, we compared scaffold-mediated bone regeneration, independent of mechanical loading, with alginate hydrogel constructs, without the structural scaffold, that have been shown previously to facilitate in vivo mechanical stimulation of bone formation. Contrary to our hypothesis, mechanical loading had no effect on bone formation, distribution, or biomechanical properties in structural scaffolds. Independent of loading, the structural scaffolds reduced bone formation compared to non-structural alginate, particularly in regions in which the scaffold was concentrated, resulting in impaired functional regeneration. This is attributable to a combination of stress shielding by the scaffold and inhibition of cellular infiltration and tissue ingrowth. Collectively, these data question the necessity of scaffold similarity to mature tissue at the time of implantation and emphasize development of an environment conducive to cellular activation of matrix production and ultimate functional regeneration. PMID:27208510

  5. Network structure of the mussel plaque and its significance for load bearing and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippidi, Emmanouela; Kim, Juntae; Waite, J. Herbert; Helgeson, Matthew; Valentine, Megan T.

    2015-03-01

    Marine mussels attach to rocks, each other, and a variety of surfaces via a flat, wide plaque that is interpenetrated by the collagen fibers of a thin, long thread that connects the plaque to the mussel body. The unusually strong adhesion of the plaque has long been attributed to the molecular design of its adhesive proteins that can form a variety of strong chemical bonds. However, the molecular energies for de-adhesion are orders of magnitude smaller than the macroscopic energies measured. We propose that the mesoscopic design of the plaque is critical in enhancing load bearing and eventually adhesion. We present new results on the structure of the plaque studied via electron microscopy and neutron scattering that exhibit a plaque geometry reminiscent of structural foams. Our studies reveal a collection of pores with an inner network, further connected with an outer network. The final structure can be described by two length scales. A synthetic soft system is constructed in an effort to mimic the two-lengthscale structure of the natural plaques. The structure of the native and synthetic systems is compared with the ultimate goal of evaluating the importance of the mesoscopic structure to mechanics and adhesion. NSF MRSEC IRG-I.

  6. A two-dimensional theory of coupled electro-magneto-mechanical plates as an application to load-bearing antenna structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santapuri, S.; Bechtel, S. E.

    2011-04-01

    Multifunctional materials and structures possess the ability to perform multiple tasks by combining structural integrity with sensing and actuating capabilities. Recent progress in the development of such materials/structures has made concepts like load-bearing antennas or load-bearing batteries feasible and formed new research possibilities. Load-bearing antenna structures are multifunctional sensing and actuating devices integrated with a load-bearing structure, i.e. they can simultaneously function as a mechanical structure and an electromagnetic antenna. Such an antenna structure is subjected to mechanical forces, temperature gradients, and electromagnetic fields, giving rise to highly-coupled nonlinear thermo-electro-magneto-mechanical (TEMM) behavior. The current research focuses on modeling and characterizing the nonlinear 3-D coupled behavior of TEMM materials, consistent with first principles. This theoretical framework is specifically aimed at modeling and analysis of load-bearing antenna structures. In this paper we demonstrate the development of analytical techniques and computational tools for multiscale, multi-physics modeling of load-bearing antenna structures. The mathematical model, based predominantly on first principles, employs the thermomechanical governing equations coupled with Maxwell's equations. Our modeling has identified 92 nondimensional numbers which quantify the competition between physical effects in the operation of load-bearing antenna. A fixed relative ordering of all competing effects determines a regime of antenna/environment interaction. In this work, we demonstrate a comprehensive framework to derive the 3-D governing equations for a given regime. For thin geometries, these equations are further reduced to 2-D model, using series expansion and perturbation techniques. Mathematical modeling of thin electro-magneto-mechanical plates can have applications like design and optimization of load-bearing antennas structures. This

  7. Compliant load-bearing skins and structures for morphing aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olympio, Kingnide Raymond

    Aircraft morphing has the potential to significantly improve the performance of an aircraft over its flight envelope and expand its ight capability to allow it to perform dramatically different missions. The multiple projects carried on in the past three decades have considerably helped improve the designing of actuation systems and the utilization of smart materials for morphing aircraft structures. However, morphing aircraft and especially aircraft undergoing large shape change still face some significant technical issues. Among them, the skin covering the morphing structure must meet challenging requirements that no current conventional material fully satisfy. The design of such skin, which should be able to undergo large deformations and to carry air-loads, has received some attention in the last several years but no satisfactory solution has been found yet. In the current study, the design of compliant cellular structures and flexible skins for morphing aircraft structures is investigated for two different morphing deformations. The first morphing deformation considered corresponds to one-dimensional morphing which is representative of a wing or blade changing its chord or span. The second morphing deformation considered is shear-compression morphing which can be found in some morphing wing undergoing change in area, sweep and chord such as NextGen Aeronautics' morphing wing. Topologies of compliant cellular structures which can be used for these two types of structures are first calculated using a multi-objective approach. These topologies are calculated based on linear kinematics but the effect of geometric nonlinearities is also investigated. Then, ways to provide a smooth surface were investigated by considering a general honeycomb substructure with infill, bonded face-sheet or scales. This allowed justifying an overall skin concept made of a cellular substructure with a bonded face-sheet. Lastly, the design of an improved skin for NextGen Aeronautics

  8. Effects of load-bearing exercise on skeletal structure and mechanics differ between outbred populations of mice.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ian J; Judex, Stefan; Demes, Brigitte

    2015-03-01

    Effects of load-bearing exercise on skeletal structure and mechanical properties can vary between inbred strains of mice. Here, we examine whether such variation also exists at the population level. An experiment was performed with two outbred mouse stocks that have been reproductively isolated for >120 generations (Hsd:ICR, Crl:CD1). Growing females from each stock were either treated with a treadmill-running regimen for 1 month or served as controls. Limb forces were recorded with a force plate and cage activity monitored to verify that they were similar between stocks. After the experiment, femoral cortical and trabecular bone structure were quantified with micro-CT in the mid-diaphysis and distal metaphysis, respectively, and diaphyseal structural strength was determined with mechanical testing. Among Hsd:ICR mice, running led to significant improvements in diaphyseal bone quantity, structural geometry, and mechanical properties, as well as enhanced trabecular morphology. In contrast, among Crl:CD1 mice, the same running regimen had little effect on cortical and trabecular structure and significantly reduced diaphyseal resistance to fracture. In neither stock was body mass, muscle mass, or cage activity level different between runners and controls. Given that most environmental variables were controlled in this study, the differential effects of exercise on Hsd:ICR and Crl:CD1 bones were likely due to genetic differences between stocks. These results suggest that the benefits of loading for bone may vary between human populations (e.g., ethnic groups), in which case exercise programs and technologies designed to promote bone health with mechanical signals may be more advantageous to certain populations than others. PMID:25460574

  9. Structural finite-element modeling strategies for conformal load-bearing antenna structure (CLAS) (Air Force contract F33615-C-93-3200)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockyer, Allen J.; Alt, Kevin H.; Kudva, Jayanth N.; Kinslow, Robert W.; Goetz, Allan C.

    1997-06-01

    As the Wright Lab Air Force military contrast `Smart Skin Structures Technology Demonstration' (S3TD) Contract No. F33615-C-93-3200 draws toward conclusion, pertinent features of the program finite element modeling are presented. Analysis was performed to predict the structural performance of a complex multilayered composite panel that will be tested structurally (and electrically) for the final program deliverable. Application of finite element modeling to predict component load path and strain distribution in sandwich panel construction has been reported elsewhere in the literature for more standard applications. However, the unauthordox sandwich configuration lay-up posed by the quite revolutionary S3TD CLAS aircraft fuselage panel demonstration article merits further discussion. Difficulties with material selection, the stumbling block for many programs, are further exacerbated by conflicting material properties required to support simultaneous electrical and structural performance roles. The structural analysis challenge derives from S3TD's unique program goal, namely, to investigate load bearing antennas structural configurations, rather than conventional structurally inefficient `bolt in' installations, that have been the modus operandi for tactical aircraft antenna installations to date. Discussed below is a cost saving strategy where use of linear finite element analysis has been employed in the prediction of key structural parameters, and validated with risk reduction sub panel measurements, before proceeding to the final fabrication of a full scale 36 by 36 inch CLAS panel demonstration article.

  10. Load Bearing Innovative Construction from Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamar, R.; Eliášová, M.

    2015-11-01

    Glass plays an exceptional role in the modern architecture due to the optical properties and transparency. Structural elements from glass like beams, facades and roofs are relatively frequent in common practice [1]. Although glass has significantly higher compressive strength in comparison with tensile strength, load bearing glass elements are relatively rare. This opens up new opportunities for application of glass in such structures as transparent columns loaded by the axial force. This paper summarizes the experimental results of the tests on glass columns loaded by centric pressure, which were performed in the laboratories of the CTU in Prague, Faculty of Civil Engineering. The first set of experiments was composed of three specimens in a reduced scale 1:2 to verify real behaviour of the specimens with enclosed hollow cross-section. The main goal of the experiment was to determine force at the first breakage and consequently the maximal force at the collapse of this element.

  11. Nanogel Aerogel as Load Bearing Insulation for Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koravos, J. J.; Miller, T. M.; Fesmire, J. E.; Coffman, B. E.

    2010-04-01

    Load support structures in cryogenic storage, transport and processing systems are large contributors to the total heat leak of the system. Conventional insulation systems require the use of these support members in order to stabilize the process fluid enclosure and prevent degradation of insulation performance due to compression. Removal of these support structures would substantially improve system efficiency. Nanogel aerogel insulation performance is tested at vacuum pressures ranging from high vacuum to atmospheric pressure and under loads from loosely packed to greater than 10,000 Pa. Insulation performance is determined using boil-off calorimetry with liquid nitrogen as the latent heat recipient. Two properties of the aerogel insulation material suit it to act as a load bearing "structure" in a process vessel: (1) Ability to maintain thermal performance under load; (2) Elasticity when subjected to load. Results of testing provide positive preliminary indication that these properties allow Nanogel aerogel to effectively be used as a load bearing insulation in cryogenic systems.

  12. Designing functionally graded materials with superior load-bearing properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Ming-jie; Zhang, Denzil

    2011-01-01

    Ceramic prostheses often fail from fracture and wear. We hypothesize that these failures may be substantially mitigated by an appropriate grading of elastic modulus at the ceramic surface. In this study, we elucidate the effect of elastic modulus profile on the flexural damage resistance of functionally graded materials (FGMs), providing theoretical guidlines for designing FGM with superior load-bearing property. The Young's modulus of the graded structure is assumed to vary in a power-law relation with a scaling exponent n; this is in accordance with experimental observations from our laboratory and elsewhere. Based on the theory for bending of graded beams, we examine the effect of n value and bulk-to-surface modulus ratio (Eb/Es) on stress distribution through the graded layer. Theory predicts that a low exponent (0.15 < n < 0.5), coupled with a relatively small modulus ratio (3 < Eb/Es < 6), is most desirable for reducing the maximum stress and transferring it into the interior, while keeping the surface stress low. Experimentally, we demonstrate that elastically graded materials with various n values and Eb/Es ratios can be fabricated by infiltrating alumina and zirconia with a low-modulus glass. Flexural tests show that graded alumina and zirconia with suitable values of these parameters exhibit superior load-bearing capacity, 20% to 50% higher than their homogeneous counterparts. Improving load-bearing capacity of ceramic materials could have broad impacts on biomedical, civil, structural, and an array of other engineering applications. PMID:22178651

  13. Failure tolerance of load-bearing hierarchical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachhvah, Ajay Deep; Gupte, Neelima

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the statistics and dynamics of failure in a two-dimensional load-bearing network with branching hierarchical structure, and its variants. The variants strengthen the original lattice by using connectivity strategies which add new sites to the maximal cluster in top-to-bottom or bottom-to-top versions. We study the load-bearing capacity and the failure tolerance of all versions, as well as that of the strongest realization of the original lattice, the V lattice. The average number of failures as a function of the test load shows power-law behavior with power 5/2 for the V lattice, but sigmoidal behavior for all other versions. Thus the V lattice turns out to be the critical case of the load-bearing lattices. The distribution of failures is Gaussian for the original lattice, the V lattice, and the bottom-to-top strategy, but is non-Gaussian for the top-to-bottom one. The bottom-to-top strategy leads to stable and strong lattices, and can resist failure even when tested with weights which greatly exceed the capacity of its backbone. We also examine the behavior of asymmetric lattices and discover that the mean failure rates are minimized if the probability of connection p is symmetric with respect to both neighbors. Our results can be of relevance in the context of realistic networks.

  14. On optimal hierarchy of load-bearing biological materials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Gao, Huajian

    2011-01-01

    Load-bearing biological materials such as shell, mineralized tendon and bone exhibit two to seven levels of structural hierarchy based on constituent materials (biominerals and proteins) of relatively poor mechanical properties. A key question that remains unanswered is what determines the number of hierarchical levels in these materials. Here we develop a quasi-self-similar hierarchical model to show that, depending on the mineral content, there exists an optimal level of structural hierarchy for maximal toughness of biocomposites. The predicted optimal levels of hierarchy and cooperative deformation across multiple structural levels are in excellent agreement with experimental observations. PMID:20810437

  15. The nebulin SH3 domain is dispensable for normal skeletal muscle structure but is required for effective active load bearing in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Daniel L.; Vitiello, Carmen; Zhang, Jianlin; Gokhin, David S.; Castaldi, Alessandra; Coulis, Gerald; Piaser, Fabio; Filomena, Maria Carmela; Eggenhuizen, Peter J.; Kunderfranco, Paolo; Camerini, Serena; Takano, Kazunori; Endo, Takeshi; Crescenzi, Marco; Luther, Pradeep K. L.; Lieber, Richard L.; Chen, Ju; Bang, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    Summary Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a congenital myopathy with an estimated incidence of 1∶50,000 live births. It is caused by mutations in thin filament components, including nebulin, which accounts for about 50% of the cases. The identification of NM cases with nonsense mutations resulting in loss of the extreme C-terminal SH3 domain of nebulin suggests an important role of the nebulin SH3 domain, which is further supported by the recent demonstration of its role in IGF-1-induced sarcomeric actin filament formation through targeting of N-WASP to the Z-line. To provide further insights into the functional significance of the nebulin SH3 domain in the Z-disk and to understand the mechanisms by which truncations of nebulin lead to NM, we took two approaches: (1) an affinity-based proteomic screening to identify novel interaction partners of the nebulin SH3 domain; and (2) generation and characterization of a novel knockin mouse model with a premature stop codon in the nebulin gene, eliminating its C-terminal SH3 domain (NebΔSH3 mouse). Surprisingly, detailed analyses of NebΔSH3 mice revealed no structural or histological skeletal muscle abnormalities and no changes in gene expression or localization of interaction partners of the nebulin SH3 domain, including myopalladin, palladin, zyxin and N-WASP. Also, no significant effect on peak isometric stress production, passive tensile stress or Young's modulus was found. However, NebΔSH3 muscle displayed a slightly altered force–frequency relationship and was significantly more susceptible to eccentric contraction-induced injury, suggesting that the nebulin SH3 domain protects against eccentric contraction-induced injury and possibly plays a role in fine-tuning the excitation–contraction coupling mechanism. PMID:24046450

  16. Method of recertifying a loaded bearing member

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method is described of recertifying a loaded bearing member using ultrasound testing to compensate for different equipment configurations and temperature conditions. The standard frequency F1 of a reference block is determined via an ultrasonic tone burst generated by a first pulsed phased locked loop (P2L2) equipment configuration. Once a lock point number S is determined for F1, the reference frequency F1a of the reference block is determined at this lock point number via a second P2L2 equipment configuration to permit an equipment offset compensation factor Fo1=((F1-F1a)/F1)(1000000) to be determined. Next, a reference frequency F2 of the unloaded bearing member is determined using a second P2L2 equipment configuration and is then compensated for equipment offset errors via the relationship F2+F2(Fo1)/1000000. A lock point number b is also determined for F2. A resonant frequency F3 is determined for the reference block using a third P2L2 equipment configuration to determine a second offset compensation factor F02=((F1-F3)/F1) 1000000. Next the resonant frequency F4 of the loaded bearing member is measured at lock point number b via the third P2L2 equipment configuration and the bolt load determined by the relationship (-1000000)CI(((F2-F4)/F2)-Fo2), wherein CI is a factor correlating measured frequency shift to the applied load. Temperature compensation is also performed at each point in the process.

  17. Morphogenic Peptides in Regeneration of Load Bearing Tissues.

    PubMed

    Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenic proteins due to their short half-life require high doses of growth factors in regeneration of load bearing tissues which leads to undesirable side effects. These side effects include bone overgrowth, tumor formation and immune reaction. An alternative approach to reduce undesirable side effects of proteins in regenerative medicine is to use morphogenic peptides derived from the active domains of morphogenic proteins or soluble and insoluble components of the extracellular matrix of mineralized load bearing tissues to induce differentiation of progenitor cells, mineralization, maturation and bone formation. In that regard, many peptides with osteogenic activity have been discovered. These include peptides derived from bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs), those based on interaction with integrin and heparin-binding receptors, collagen derived peptides, peptides derived from other soluble ECM proteins such as bone sialoprotein and enamel matrix proteins, and those peptides derived from vasculoinductive and neuro-inductive proteins. Although these peptides show significant osteogenic activity in vitro and increase mineralization and bone formation in animal models, they are not widely used in clinical orthopedic applications as an alternative to morphogenic proteins. This is partly due to the limited availability of data on structure and function of morphogenic peptides in physiological medium, particularly in tissue engineered scaffolds. Due to their amphiphilic nature, peptides spontaneously self-assemble and aggregate into micellar structures in physiological medium. Aggregation alters the sequence of amino acids in morphogenic peptides that interact with cell surface receptors thus affecting osteogenic activity of the peptide. Aggregation and micelle formation can dramatically reduce the active concentration of morphogenic peptides with many-fold increase in peptide concentration in physiological medium. Other factors that affect bioactivity are the non

  18. Load-Bearing Capacity of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Abutments and One-Piece Implants.

    PubMed

    Etxeberria, Marina; Abdulmajeed, Aous A; Escuin, Tomas; Vinas, Miguel; Lassila, Lippo V J; Närhi, Timo O

    2015-06-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) can potentially help in a physiologic stress transmission due to its excellent biomechanical matching with living tissues. Novel one-piece FRC implants and abutments with two different fiber orientations were loaded until failure to assess the load-bearing capacity, fracture patterns, and precision of fit. The one-piece FRC implants showed significantly higher load-bearing capacity compared to FRC abutments regardless of the fiber orientation (p < 0.001). For FRC abutments, bidirectional abutments showed significantly higher loads compared to unidirectional abutments (p < 0.001). The type of structure and fiber orientation are strong determinant factors of the load-bearing capacity of FRC implants and abutments. PMID:26373199

  19. Load-bearing increase in alumina evoked by introduction of a functional glass gradient

    PubMed Central

    Dorthé, Erik; Zhang, Yu

    2011-01-01

    Alumina is the most commonly used ceramic in orthopedics due mainly to its wear resistance and chemical inertness. However, alumina has relatively low load-bearing capacity compared to other advanced ceramics, such as zirconia. We hypothesized that grading the elastic modulus at the surfaces may substantially increase the load-bearing capacity of alumina. In this study, graded structures were fabricated by infiltrating glass into dense alumina plates, resulting in a diminished modulus at the surface layers. The plates were then bonded to polycarbonate substrates and subjected to flexural loading with various loading rates spanning five orders of magnitude (dynamic fatigue) in water. Infiltrated specimens showed an increase in flexural load over homogenous controls for all loading rates, despite the graded alumina exhibiting greater load rate dependence than their homogenous counterparts. Our results indicate that controlled elastic gradients at the surface could be highly beneficial in improving the load-bearing capacity of alumina ceramics. PMID:22639492

  20. Interface architecture for superthick carbon-based films toward low internal stress and ultrahigh load-bearing capacity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjun; Pu, Jibin; Zhang, Guangan; Wang, Liping

    2013-06-12

    Superthick diamond-like carbon (DLC) films [(Six-DLC/Siy-DLC)n/DLC] were deposited on 304 stainless steel substrates by using a plane hollow cathode plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method. The structure was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Chemical bonding was examined by Raman, Auger electron, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. Mechanical and tribological properties were evaluated using nanoindentation, scratch, interferometry, and reciprocating-sliding friction testing. The results showed that implantation of a silicon ion into the substrate and the architecture of the tensile stress/compressive stress structure decreased the residual stress to almost 0, resulting in deposition of (Six-DLC/Siy-DLC)n/DLC films with a thickness of more than 50 μm. The hardness of the film ranged from 9 to 23 GPa, and the adhesion strength ranged from 4.6 to 57 N depending on the thickness of the film. Friction coefficients were determined in three tested environments, namely, air, water, and oil. Friction coefficients were typically below 0.24 and as low as 0.02 in a water environment. The as-prepared superthick films also showed an ultrahigh load-bearing capacity, and no failure was detected in the reciprocating wear test with contact pressure higher than 3.2 GPa. Reasons for the ultrahigh load-bearing capacity are proposed in combination with the finite-element method. PMID:23668472

  1. Fracture behaviors of ceramic tissue scaffolds for load bearing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entezari, Ali; Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Zhang, Zhongpu; Zreiqat, Hala; Dunstan, Colin R.; Li, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Healing large bone defects, especially in weight-bearing locations, remains a challenge using available synthetic ceramic scaffolds. Manufactured as a scaffold using 3D printing technology, Sr-HT-Gahnite at high porosity (66%) had demonstrated significantly improved compressive strength (53 ± 9 MPa) and toughness. Nevertheless, the main concern of ceramic scaffolds in general remains to be their inherent brittleness and low fracture strength in load bearing applications. Therefore, it is crucial to establish a robust numerical framework for predicting fracture strengths of such scaffolds. Since crack initiation and propagation plays a critical role on the fracture strength of ceramic structures, we employed extended finite element method (XFEM) to predict fracture behaviors of Sr-HT-Gahnite scaffolds. The correlation between experimental and numerical results proved the superiority of XFEM for quantifying fracture strength of scaffolds over conventional FEM. In addition to computer aided design (CAD) based modeling analyses, XFEM was conducted on micro-computed tomography (μCT) based models for fabricated scaffolds, which took into account the geometric variations induced by the fabrication process. Fracture strengths and crack paths predicted by the μCT-based XFEM analyses correlated well with relevant experimental results. The study provided an effective means for the prediction of fracture strength of porous ceramic structures, thereby facilitating design optimization of scaffolds.

  2. Fracture behaviors of ceramic tissue scaffolds for load bearing applications

    PubMed Central

    Entezari, Ali; Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Zhang, Zhongpu; Zreiqat, Hala; Dunstan, Colin R.; Li, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Healing large bone defects, especially in weight-bearing locations, remains a challenge using available synthetic ceramic scaffolds. Manufactured as a scaffold using 3D printing technology, Sr-HT-Gahnite at high porosity (66%) had demonstrated significantly improved compressive strength (53 ± 9 MPa) and toughness. Nevertheless, the main concern of ceramic scaffolds in general remains to be their inherent brittleness and low fracture strength in load bearing applications. Therefore, it is crucial to establish a robust numerical framework for predicting fracture strengths of such scaffolds. Since crack initiation and propagation plays a critical role on the fracture strength of ceramic structures, we employed extended finite element method (XFEM) to predict fracture behaviors of Sr-HT-Gahnite scaffolds. The correlation between experimental and numerical results proved the superiority of XFEM for quantifying fracture strength of scaffolds over conventional FEM. In addition to computer aided design (CAD) based modeling analyses, XFEM was conducted on micro-computed tomography (μCT) based models for fabricated scaffolds, which took into account the geometric variations induced by the fabrication process. Fracture strengths and crack paths predicted by the μCT-based XFEM analyses correlated well with relevant experimental results. The study provided an effective means for the prediction of fracture strength of porous ceramic structures, thereby facilitating design optimization of scaffolds. PMID:27403936

  3. Fracture behaviors of ceramic tissue scaffolds for load bearing applications.

    PubMed

    Entezari, Ali; Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Zhang, Zhongpu; Zreiqat, Hala; Dunstan, Colin R; Li, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Healing large bone defects, especially in weight-bearing locations, remains a challenge using available synthetic ceramic scaffolds. Manufactured as a scaffold using 3D printing technology, Sr-HT-Gahnite at high porosity (66%) had demonstrated significantly improved compressive strength (53 ± 9 MPa) and toughness. Nevertheless, the main concern of ceramic scaffolds in general remains to be their inherent brittleness and low fracture strength in load bearing applications. Therefore, it is crucial to establish a robust numerical framework for predicting fracture strengths of such scaffolds. Since crack initiation and propagation plays a critical role on the fracture strength of ceramic structures, we employed extended finite element method (XFEM) to predict fracture behaviors of Sr-HT-Gahnite scaffolds. The correlation between experimental and numerical results proved the superiority of XFEM for quantifying fracture strength of scaffolds over conventional FEM. In addition to computer aided design (CAD) based modeling analyses, XFEM was conducted on micro-computed tomography (μCT) based models for fabricated scaffolds, which took into account the geometric variations induced by the fabrication process. Fracture strengths and crack paths predicted by the μCT-based XFEM analyses correlated well with relevant experimental results. The study provided an effective means for the prediction of fracture strength of porous ceramic structures, thereby facilitating design optimization of scaffolds. PMID:27403936

  4. Design Methods for Load-bearing Elements from Crosslaminated Timber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilguts, A.; Serdjuks, D.; Goremikins, V.

    2015-11-01

    Cross-laminated timber is an environmentally friendly material, which possesses a decreased level of anisotropy in comparison with the solid and glued timber. Cross-laminated timber could be used for load-bearing walls and slabs of multi-storey timber buildings as well as decking structures of pedestrian and road bridges. Design methods of cross-laminated timber elements subjected to bending and compression with bending were considered. The presented methods were experimentally validated and verified by FEM. Two cross-laminated timber slabs were tested at the action of static load. Pine wood was chosen as a board's material. Freely supported beam with the span equal to 1.9 m, which was loaded by the uniformly distributed load, was a design scheme of the considered plates. The width of the plates was equal to 1 m. The considered cross-laminated timber plates were analysed by FEM method. The comparison of stresses acting in the edge fibres of the plate and the maximum vertical displacements shows that both considered methods can be used for engineering calculations. The difference between the results obtained experimentally and analytically is within the limits from 2 to 31%. The difference in results obtained by effective strength and stiffness and transformed sections methods was not significant.

  5. 3D Printing and Biofabrication for Load Bearing Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Claire G; Atala, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based direct biofabrication and 3D bioprinting is becoming a dominant technological platform and is suggested as a new paradigm for twenty-first century tissue engineering. These techniques may be our next step in surpassing the hurdles and limitations of conventional scaffold-based tissue engineering, and may offer the industrial potential of tissue engineered products especially for load bearing tissues. Here we present a topically focused review regarding the fundamental concepts, state of the art, and perspectives of this new technology and field of biofabrication and 3D bioprinting, specifically focused on tissue engineering of load bearing tissues such as bone, cartilage, osteochondral and dental tissue engineering. PMID:26545741

  6. Thermal coupon testing of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W. L.; Heckle, K. W.; Hurd, J.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced liquid hydrogen storage concepts being considered for long duration space travel incorporate refrigeration systems and cryocoolers to lower the heat load. Using a refrigeration loop to intercept the energy flowing through MLI to a liquid hydrogen tank at a temperature between the environment and the liquid hydrogen can lower the heat load on the propellant system by as much as 50%. However, the refrigeration loop requires structural integration into the MLI. Use of a more traditional concept of MLI underneath this refrigeration loop requires that a structural system be put in place to support the loop. Such structures, even when thermally optimized, present a relatively large parasitic heat load into the tank. Through NASA small business innovation research funding, Quest Thermal Group and Ball Aerospace have been developing a structural MLI based insulation system. These systems are designed with discrete polymeric spacers between reflective layers instead of either dacron or silk netting. The spacers (or posts) have an intrinsic structural capability that is beyond that of just supporting the internal insulation mechanical loads. This new MLI variant called Load Bearing MLI (LB-MLI) has been developed specifically for the application of supporting thermal shields within the insulation system. Test articles (coupons) of the new LB-MLI product were fabricated for thermal performance testing using liquid nitrogen at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and using cryocooler based calorimetry at Florida State University. The test results and analysis are presented. Thermal models developed for correlation with the thermal testing results both at KSC and testing that was performed at Florida State University are also discussed.

  7. An analysis of the load-bearing capacity of members of square cross section with a series of perpendicular notches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miastkowski, Jozef; Szczebiot, Ryszard

    The authors analyze the load-bearing capacity of structural members with square cross sections which have been weakened on their perimeters by a series of perpendicular notches. The analysis is based on complete solutions for axisymmetric bars with perpendicular notches and estimates of load-bearing capacity obtained from kinematically acceptable failure mechanisms. A procedure for determining the optimal distance (spacing) between the notches in the case of bars weakened by a series of perpendicular notches is described. The practical value of the analysis presented was confirmed by the results of experiments conducted on aluminum alloy test pieces of square cross section for plastic working weakened by two peripheral perpendicular notches.

  8. Out of plane analysis for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, P. C.; Saff, C. R.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Mahler, M. A.; Kan, Han Pin; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    Simple two dimensional analysis techniques were developed to aid in the design of strong joints for integrally stiffened/bonded composite structures subjected to out of plane loads. It was found that most out of plane failures were due to induced stresses arising from rapid changes in load path direction or geometry, induced stresses due to changes in geometry caused by buckling, or direct stresses produced by fuel pressure or bearing loads. While the analysis techniques were developed to address a great variety of out of plane loading conditions, they were primarily derived to address the conditions described above. The methods were developed and verified using existing element test data. The methods were demonstrated using the data from a test failure of a high strain wingbox that was designed, built, and tested under a previous program. Subsequently, a set of design guidelines were assembled to assist in the design of safe, strong integral composite structures using the analysis techniques developed.

  9. Structure analysis for plane geometry figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tianxiao; Lu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Lu; Li, Keqiang; Tang, Zhi

    2013-12-01

    As there are increasing numbers of digital documents for education purpose, we realize that there is not a retrieval application for mathematic plane geometry images. In this paper, we propose a method for retrieving plane geometry figures (PGFs), which often appear in geometry books and digital documents. First, detecting algorithms are applied to detect common basic geometry shapes from a PGF image. Based on all basic shapes, we analyze the structural relationships between two basic shapes and combine some of them to a compound shape to build the PGF descriptor. Afterwards, we apply matching function to retrieve candidate PGF images with ranking. The great contribution of the paper is that we propose a structure analysis method to better describe the spatial relationships in such image composed of many overlapped shapes. Experimental results demonstrate that our analysis method and shape descriptor can obtain good retrieval results with relatively high effectiveness and efficiency.

  10. The Influence of Operating Loads on the State of Stress and Strain in Selected Load-Bearing Elements of a Tower-Type Headgear Structure in the Light of the Experimental Data / Wpływ Obciążeń Eksploatacyjnych Na Stan Naprężenia Oraz Przemieszczenia Elementów Nośnych Konstrukcji Basztowej Wieży Szybowej W Świetle Przeprowadzonych Eksperymentów

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolny, Stanisław

    2012-12-01

    In order that the ultimate state method should be applied to the strength analysis of the tower-type headgear structure, it is required that the design loads and endurance parameters be first established. For that purpose the characteristics of loads experienced by structural elements of the headgear structure are required (Wolny, 2012) as well as the numerical analysis of stresses and strains. Thus obtained results are verified through stress (strain) measurements taken in structural elements subjected to highest loads found on the basis of the stress map derived from numerical analysis, being the subject matter of the present study. Strain (stress) measurements are taken on the beams located at the floor level +65.00 m on which the winding machines are positioned (drive shaft bearings, stators in the electric motors), as shown schematically in Fig. 2. The strength analysis by numerical methods is restricted to those elements of the load bearing structure in the headgear at the level (+65.00) where the strain (stress) and measurements are taken and where loads are measured that give rise to the maximal strain changes (Wolny, 2012). Alongside the strain (stress) measurements in the load-bearing elements of the headgear structure, measurements are taken of horizontal displacements at selected points of the structure with the use of an interferometric radar IBIS-S. Results of the repeated numerical analysis of the state of stress, restricted to those elements of the load bearing structure in the tower-type headgear where the maximal loads are registered (Wolny, 2010), agree well with experimental data obtained from tests done on a real object. Therefore, the numerical analyses of the state of stress and strain in the load-bearing elements of the headgear structures operated in the Polish collieries lead us to the assumption that when analysing the geometry of the driving systems in the winding gear, the structures on which the elements of the winder installation are

  11. Evacuated load-bearing high performance insulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmley, R. T.; Cunnington, G. R.

    1977-01-01

    A light weight, vacuum jacketed, load bearing cryogenic insulation system was developed and tested on a 1.17-m (46-in.) spherical test tank. The vacuum jacket consists of 0.08 mm (0.003 in.) thick 321 stainless steel formed into a wedge design that allows elastic jacket movements as the tank shrinks (cools) or expands (warms up or is pressurized). Hollow glass spheres, approximately 80 micrometers in diameter with a bulk density of 0.069 g/cc (4.3 lb cubic foot), provide the insulating qualities and one atmosphere load bearing capability required. The design, fabrication, and test effort developed the manufacturing methods and engineering data needed to scale the system to other tank sizes, shapes, and applications. The program demonstrated that thin wall jackets can be formed and welded to maintain the required vacuum level of .013 Pa yet flex elastically for multiple reuses. No significant shifting or breakage of the microspheres occurred after 13 simulated Space Tug flight cycles on the test tank and a hundred 1 atmosphere load cycles in a flat plate calorimeter. The test data were then scaled to the Space Tug LO2 and LH2 tanks, and weight, thermal performance, payload performance, and costs were compared with a helium purged multilayer insulation system.

  12. Human footprint variation while performing load bearing tasks.

    PubMed

    Wall-Scheffler, Cara M; Wagnild, Janelle; Wagler, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Human footprint fossils have provided essential evidence about the evolution of human bipedalism as well as the social dynamics of the footprint makers, including estimates of speed, sex and group composition. Generally such estimates are made by comparing footprint evidence with modern controls; however, previous studies have not accounted for the variation in footprint dimensions coming from load bearing activities. It is likely that a portion of the hominins who created these fossil footprints were carrying a significant load, such as offspring or foraging loads, which caused variation in the footprint which could extend to variation in any estimations concerning the footprint's maker. To identify significant variation in footprints due to load-bearing tasks, we had participants (N = 30, 15 males and 15 females) walk at a series of speeds carrying a 20kg pack on their back, side and front. Paint was applied to the bare feet of each participant to create footprints that were compared in terms of foot length, foot width and foot area. Female foot length and width increased during multiple loaded conditions. An appreciation of footprint variability associated with carrying loads adds an additional layer to our understanding of the behavior and morphology of extinct hominin populations. PMID:25738496

  13. Human Footprint Variation while Performing Load Bearing Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Wall-Scheffler, Cara M.; Wagnild, Janelle; Wagler, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Human footprint fossils have provided essential evidence about the evolution of human bipedalism as well as the social dynamics of the footprint makers, including estimates of speed, sex and group composition. Generally such estimates are made by comparing footprint evidence with modern controls; however, previous studies have not accounted for the variation in footprint dimensions coming from load bearing activities. It is likely that a portion of the hominins who created these fossil footprints were carrying a significant load, such as offspring or foraging loads, which caused variation in the footprint which could extend to variation in any estimations concerning the footprint’s maker. To identify significant variation in footprints due to load-bearing tasks, we had participants (N = 30, 15 males and 15 females) walk at a series of speeds carrying a 20kg pack on their back, side and front. Paint was applied to the bare feet of each participant to create footprints that were compared in terms of foot length, foot width and foot area. Female foot length and width increased during multiple loaded conditions. An appreciation of footprint variability associated with carrying loads adds an additional layer to our understanding of the behavior and morphology of extinct hominin populations. PMID:25738496

  14. Load-bearing properties of minimal-invasive monolithic lithium disilicate and zirconia occlusal onlays: finite element and theoretical analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Guess, Petra C.; Zhang, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that monolithic lithium disilicate glass-ceramic occlusal onlay can exhibit a load-bearing capacity that approaches monolithic zirconia, due to a smaller elastic modulus mismatch between the lithium disilicate and its supporting tooth structure relative to zirconia. Methods Ceramic occlusal onlays of various thicknesses cemented to either enamel or dentin were considered. Occlusal load was applied through an enamel-like deformable indenter or a control rigid indenter. Flexural tensile stress at the ceramic intaglio (cementation) surface—a cause for bulk fracture of occlusal onlays—was rigorously analyzed using finite element analysis and classical plate-on-foundation theory. Results When bonded to enamel (supported by dentin), the load-bearing capacity of lithium disilicate can approach 75% of that of zirconia, despite the flexural strength of lithium disilicate (400 MPa) being merely 40% of zirconia (1000 MPa). When bonded to dentin (with the enamel completely removed), the load-bearing capacity of lithium disilicate is about 57% of zirconia, still significantly higher than the anticipated value based on its strength. Both ceramics show slightly higher load-bearing capacity when loaded with a deformable indenter (enamel, glass-ceramic, or porcelain) rather than a rigid indenter. Significance When supported by enamel, the load-bearing property of minimally invasive lithium disilicate occlusal onlays (0.6 to 1.4 mm thick) can exceed 70% of that of zircona. Additionally, a relatively weak dependence of fracture load on restoration thickness indicates that a 1.2 mm thin lithium disilicate onlay can be as fracture resistant as its 1.6 mm counterpart. PMID:23683531

  15. Muscle force regulates bone shaping for optimal load-bearing capacity during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sharir, Amnon; Stern, Tomer; Rot, Chagai; Shahar, Ron; Zelzer, Elazar

    2011-08-01

    The vertebrate skeleton consists of over 200 individual bones, each with its own unique shape, size and function. We study the role of intrauterine muscle-induced mechanical loads in determining the three-dimensional morphology of developing bones. Analysis of the force-generating capacity of intrauterine muscles in mice revealed that developing bones are subjected to significant and progressively increasing mechanical challenges. To evaluate the effect of intrauterine loads on bone morphogenesis and the contribution of the emerging shape to the ability of bones to withstand these loads, we monitored structural and mineral changes during development. Using daily micro-CT scans of appendicular long bones we identify a developmental program, which we term preferential bone growth, that determines the specific circumferential shape of each bone by employing asymmetric mineral deposition and transient cortical thickening. Finite element analysis demonstrates that the resulting bone structure has optimal load-bearing capacity. To test the hypothesis that muscle forces regulate preferential bone growth in utero, we examine this process in a mouse strain (mdg) that lacks muscle contractions. In the absence of mechanical loads, the stereotypical circumferential outline of each bone is lost, leading to the development of mechanically inferior bones. This study identifies muscle force regulation of preferential bone growth as the module that shapes the circumferential outline of bones and, consequently, optimizes their load-bearing capacity during development. Our findings invoke a common mechanism that permits the formation of different circumferential outlines in different bones. PMID:21750035

  16. Plane mixing layer vortical structure kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the current project was to experimentally investigate the structure and dynamics of the streamwise vorticity in a plane mixing layer. The first part of this research program was intended to clarify whether the observed decrease in mean streamwise vorticity in the far-field of mixing layers is due primarily to the 'smearing' caused by vortex meander or to diffusion. Two-point velocity correlation measurements have been used to show that there is little spanwise meander of the large-scale streamwise vortical structure. The correlation measurements also indicate a large degree of transverse meander of the streamwise vorticity which is not surprising since the streamwise vorticity exists in the inclined braid region between the spanwise vortex core regions. The streamwise convection of the braid region thereby introduces an apparent transverse meander into measurements using stationary probes. These results corroborated with estimated secondary velocity profiles in which the streamwise vorticity produces a signature which was tracked in time.

  17. Three dimensional biphasic calcium phosphate nanocomposites for load bearing bioactive bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Garai, Subhadra; Sinha, Arvind

    2016-02-01

    Mimicking matrix mediated bio-mineralization process, three dimensional blocks of biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP, hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP)) nanocomposites, having three different stoichiometries have been synthesized for possible application as load bearing synthetic bone graft or scaffolds. Biphasic blocks with three weight ratios of 20:80, 25:75 and 30:70 of HA and TCP respectively have been synthesized. Detailed structural and chemical characterization of the samples revealed a strong dependence of porosity and mechanical properties on the stoichiometry of biphasic blocks. Effect of physiological medium on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the three different blocks has also been studied. Bioactivity of the BCP block, exhibiting highest compressive strength in air as well as in physiological medium, has been evaluated through adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells using different markers. PMID:26652386

  18. Bending strength of piezoelectric ceramics and single crystals for multifunctional load-bearing applications.

    PubMed

    Anton, Steven R; Erturk, Alper; Inman, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    The topic of multifunctional material systems using active or smart materials has recently gained attention in the research community. Multifunctional piezoelectric systems present the ability to combine multiple functions into a single active piezoelectric element, namely, combining sensing, actuation, or energy conversion ability with load-bearing capacity. Quantification of the bending strength of various piezoelectric materials is, therefore, critical in the development of load-bearing piezoelectric systems. Three-point bend tests are carried out on a variety of piezoelectric ceramics including soft monolithic piezoceramics (PZT-5A and PZT-5H), hard monolithic ceramics (PZT-4 and PZT-8), single-crystal piezoelectrics (PMN-PT and PMN-PZT), and commercially packaged composite devices (which contain active PZT-5A layers). A common 3-point bend test procedure is used throughout the experimental tests. The bending strengths of these materials are found using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory to be 44.9 MPa for PMN-PZT, 60.6 MPa for PMN-PT, 114.8 MPa for PZT- 5H, 123.2 MPa for PZT-4, 127.5 MPa for PZT-8, 140.4 MPa for PZT-5A, and 186.6 MPa for the commercial composite. The high strength of the commercial configuration is a result of the composite structure that allows for shear stresses on the surfaces of the piezoelectric layers, whereas the low strength of the single-crystal materials is due to their unique crystal structure, which allows for rapid propagation of cracks initiating at flaw sites. The experimental bending strength results reported, which are linear estimates without nonlinear ferroelastic considerations, are intended for use in the design of multifunctional piezoelectric systems in which the active device is subjected to bending loads. PMID:22711404

  19. High-strength, surface-porous polyether-ether-ketone for load-bearing orthopedic implants.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nathan T; Torstrick, F Brennan; Lee, Christopher S D; Dupont, Kenneth M; Safranski, David L; Chang, W Allen; Macedo, Annie E; Lin, Angela S P; Boothby, Jennifer M; Whittingslow, Daniel C; Carson, Robert A; Guldberg, Robert E; Gall, Ken

    2015-02-01

    Despite its widespread clinical use in load-bearing orthopedic implants, polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) is often associated with poor osseointegration. In this study, a surface-porous PEEK material (PEEK-SP) was created using a melt extrusion technique. The porous layer was 399.6±63.3 μm thick and possessed a mean pore size of 279.9±31.6 μm, strut spacing of 186.8±55.5 μm, porosity of 67.3±3.1% and interconnectivity of 99.9±0.1%. Monotonic tensile tests showed that PEEK-SP preserved 73.9% of the strength (71.06±2.17 MPa) and 73.4% of the elastic modulus (2.45±0.31 GPa) of as-received, injection-molded PEEK. PEEK-SP further demonstrated a fatigue strength of 60.0 MPa at one million cycles, preserving 73.4% of the fatigue resistance of injection-molded PEEK. Interfacial shear testing showed the pore layer shear strength to be 23.96±2.26 MPa. An osseointegration model in the rat revealed substantial bone formation within the pore layer at 6 and 12 weeks via microcomputed tomography and histological evaluation. Ingrown bone was more closely apposed to the pore wall and fibrous tissue growth was reduced in PEEK-SP when compared to non-porous PEEK controls. These results indicate that PEEK-SP could provide improved osseointegration while maintaining the structural integrity necessary for load-bearing orthopedic applications. PMID:25463499

  20. High strength, surface porous polyether-ether-ketone for load-bearing orthopaedic implants

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Nathan T.; Torstrick, F. Brennan; Lee, Christopher S.D.; Dupont, Kenneth M.; Safranski, David L.; Chang, W. Allen; Macedo, Annie E.; Lin, Angela; Boothby, Jennifer M.; Whittingslow, Daniel C.; Carson, Robert A.; Guldberg, Robert E.; Gall, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Despite its widespread clinical use in load-bearing orthopaedic implants, polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) is often associated with poor osseointegration. In this study, a surface porous PEEK material (PEEK-SP) was created using a melt extrusion technique. The porous layer thickness was 399.6±63.3 µm and possessed a mean pore size of 279.9±31.6 µm, strut spacing of 186.8±55.5 µm, porosity of 67.3±3.1%, and interconnectivity of 99.9±0.1%. Monotonic tensile tests showed that PEEK-SP preserved 73.9% of the strength (71.06±2.17 MPa) and 73.4% of the elastic modulus (2.45±0.31 GPa) of as-received, injection molded PEEK. PEEK-SP further demonstrated a fatigue strength of 60.0 MPa at one million cycles, preserving 73.4% of the fatigue resistance of injection molded PEEK. Interfacial shear testing showed the pore layer shear strength to be 23.96±2.26 MPa. An osseointegration model in the rat revealed substantial bone formation within the pore layer at 6 and 12 weeks via µCT and histological evaluation. Ingrown bone was more closely apposed to the pore wall and fibrous tissue growth was reduced in PEEK-SP when compared to non-porous PEEK controls. These results indicate that PEEK-SP could provide improved osseointegration while maintaining the structural integrity necessary for load-bearing orthopaedic applications. PMID:25463499

  1. Tank Applied Testing of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation (LB-MLI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Valenzuela, Juan G.; Feller, Jerr; Plachta, Dave

    2014-01-01

    The development of long duration orbital cryogenic storage systems will require the reduction of heat loads into the storage tank. In the case of liquid hydrogen, complete elimination of the heat load at 20 K is currently impractical due to the limitations in lift available on flight cryocoolers. In order to reduce the heat load, without having to remove heat at 20 K, the concept of Reduced Boil-Off uses cooled shields within the insulation system at approximately 90 K. The development of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation (LB-MLI) allowed the 90 K shield with tubing and cryocooler attachments to be suspended within the MLI and still be structurally stable. Coupon testing both thermally and structurally were performed to verify that the LB-MLI should work at the tank applied level. Then tank applied thermal and structural (acoustic) testing was performed to demonstrate the functionality of the LB-MLI as a structural insulation system. The LB-MLI showed no degradation of thermal performance due to the acoustic testing and showed excellent thermal performance when integrated with a 90 K class cryocooler on a liquid hydrogen tank.

  2. Tank Applied Testing of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation (LB-MLI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Valenzuela, Juan G.; Feller, Jeffrey R.; Plachta, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The development of long duration orbital cryogenic storage systems will require the reduction of heat loads into the storage tank. In the case of liquid hydrogen, complete elimination of the heat load at 20 K is currently impractical due to the limitations in lift available on flight cryocoolers. In order to reduce the heat load, without having to remove heat at 20 K, the concept of Reduced Boil-Off uses cooled shields within the insulation system at approximately 90 K. The development of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation (LB-MLI) allowed the 90 K shield with tubing and cryocooler attachments to be suspended within the MLI and still be structurally stable. Coupon testing, both thermal and structural was performed to verify that the LB-MLI should work at the tank applied level. Then tank applied thermal and structural (acoustic) testing was performed to demonstrate the functionality of the LB-MLI as a structural insulation system. The LB-MLI showed no degradation of thermal performance due to the acoustic testing and showed excellent thermal performance when integrated with a 90 K class cryocooler on a liquid hydrogen tank.

  3. Porous poly(para-phenylene) scaffolds for load-bearing orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    DiRienzo, Amy L; Yakacki, Christopher M; Frensemeier, Mareike; Schneider, Andreas S; Safranski, David L; Hoyt, Anthony J; Frick, Carl P

    2014-02-01

    The focus of this study was to fabricate and investigate the mechanical behavior of porous poly(para-phenylene) (PPP) for potential use as a load-bearing orthopedic biomaterial. PPPs are known to have exceptional mechanical properties due to their aromatic backbone; however, the manufacturing and properties of PPP porous structures have not been previously investigated. Tailored porous structures with either small (150-250µm) or large (420-500µm) pore sizes were manufactured using a powder-sintering/salt-leaching technique. Porosities were systematically varied using 50 to 90vol%. Micro-computed tomography (µCT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to verify an open-cell structure and investigate pore morphology of the scaffolds. Uniaxial mechanical behavior of solid and porous PPP samples was characterized through tensile and compressive testing. Both modulus and strength decreased with increasing porosity and matched well with foam theory. Porous scaffolds showed a significant decrease in strain-to-failure (<4%) under tensile loading and experienced linear elasticity, plastic deformation, and densification under compressive loading. Over the size ranges tested, pore size did not significantly influence the mechanical behavior of the scaffolds on a consistent basis. These results are discussed in regards to use of porous PPP for orthopedic applications and a prototype porous interbody fusion cage is presented. PMID:24374261

  4. 7. Interior of Building 1015 (land plane hangar), structural detail, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Interior of Building 1015 (land plane hangar), structural detail, looking northeast - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Building 1015, Byrd Street, .82 mile South-southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  5. 8. Interior of Building 1015 (land plane hangar), structural detail, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Interior of Building 1015 (land plane hangar), structural detail, looking northeast - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Building 1015, Byrd Street, .82 mile South-southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  6. Protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture cooperatively enable the fastest stress wave decay in load-bearing biological materials.

    PubMed

    Qwamizadeh, Mahan; Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Yong Wei

    2016-07-01

    One of the key functions of load-bearing biological materials, such as bone, dentin and sea shell, is to protect their inside fragile organs by effectively damping dynamic impact. How those materials achieve this remarkable function remains largely unknown. Using systematic finite element analyses, we study the stress wave propagation and attenuation in cortical bone at the nanoscale as a model material to examine the effects of protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture on the elastic wave decay. It is found that the staggered arrangement, protein viscosity and mineral fraction work cooperatively to effectively attenuate the stress wave. For a typical mineral volume fraction and protein viscosity, an optimal staggered nanostructure with specific feature sizes and layouts is able to give rise to the fastest stress wave decay, and the optimal aspect ratio and thickness of mineral platelets are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. In contrary, as the mineral volume fraction or the protein viscosity goes much higher, the structural arrangement is seen having trivial effect on the stress wave decay, suggesting that the damping properties of the composites go into the structure-insensitive regime from the structure-sensitive regime. These findings not only significantly add to our understanding of the structure-function relationship of load-bearing biological materials, and but also provide useful guidelines for the design of bio-inspired materials with superior resistance to impact loading. PMID:26925698

  7. ON THE BIOMECHANICAL FUNCTION OF SCAFFOLDS FOR ENGINEERING LOAD BEARING SOFT TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Stella, John A.; D’Amore, Antonio; Wagner, William R.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Replacement or regeneration of load bearing soft tissues has long been the impetus for the development bioactive materials. While maturing, current efforts continue to be confounded by our lack of understanding of the intricate multi-scale hierarchical arrangements and interactions typically found in native tissues. The current state of the art in biomaterial processing enables a degree of controllable microstructure that can be used for the development of model systems to deduce fundamental biological implications of matrix morphologies on cell function. Furthermore, the development of computational frameworks which allow for the simulation of experimentally derived observations represents a positive departure from what has mostly been an empirically driven field, enabling a deeper understanding of the highly complex biological mechanisms we wish to ultimately emulate. Ongoing research is actively pursuing new materials and processing methods to control material structure down to the micro-scale to sustain or improve cell viability, guide tissue growth, and provide mechanical integrity all while exhibiting the capacity to degrade in a controlled manner. The purpose of this review is not to focus solely on material processing but to assess the ability of these techniques to produce mechanically sound tissue surrogates, highlight the unique structural characteristics produced in these materials, and discuss how this translates to distinct macroscopic biomechanical behaviors. PMID:20060509

  8. Load bearing and stiffness tailored NiTi implants produced by additive manufacturing: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmanian, Rasool; Shayesteh Moghaddam, Narges; Haberland, Christoph; Dean, David; Miller, Michael; Elahinia, Mohammad

    2014-03-01

    Common metals for stable long-term implants (e.g. stainless steel, Titanium and Titanium alloys) are much stiffer than spongy cancellous and even stiffer than cortical bone. When bone and implant are loaded this stiffness mismatch results in stress shielding and as a consequence, degradation of surrounding bony structure can lead to disassociation of the implant. Due to its lower stiffness and high reversible deformability, which is associated with the superelastic behavior, NiTi is an attractive biomaterial for load bearing implants. However, the stiffness of austenitic Nitinol is closer to that of bone but still too high. Additive manufacturing provides, in addition to the fabrication of patient specific implants, the ability to solve the stiffness mismatch by adding engineered porosity to the implant. This in turn allows for the design of different stiffness profiles in one implant tailored to the physiological load conditions. This work covers a fundamental approach to bring this vision to reality. At first modeling of the mechanical behavior of different scaffold designs are presented as a proof of concept of stiffness tailoring. Based on these results different Nitinol scaffolds can be produced by additive manufacturing.

  9. Characterization of load bearing metrological parameters in reptilian exuviae in comparison to precision-finished cylinder liner surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aal, H. A.; El Mansori, M.

    2014-10-01

    Design of precise functional surfaces is essential for many future applications. In the technological realm, the accumulated experience with construction of such surfaces is not sufficient. Nature provides many examples of dynamic surfaces worthy of study and adoption, at least in concept, within human engineering. This work probes the load-bearing metrological features of the ventral skin in snakes. We examine the structure of two snake species that mainly move by rectilinear locomotion. These are Python regius (Pythonidae) and Bitis gabonica (Vipridae). To this end, we focus on the load-bearing characteristics of the ventral skin surface (i.e., the Sk family of parameters). Therefore, detailed comparison is drawn between the metrological structure of the reptilian surfaces and two sets of technological data. The first set pertains to an actual commercial cylinder liner, whereas the second set is a summary of recommended surface finish metrological values for several commercial cylinder liner manufacturers. The results highlight several similarities between the two types of surfaces. In particular, it is shown that there is a striking correspondence between the sense of texture morphology within both surfaces (although their construction evolved along entirely different paths). It is also shown that reptilian surfaces manifest a high degree of specialization with respect to habitat constraints on wear resistance and adhesive effects. In particular, their surface displays a high degree of pre-conditioning to functional requirements, which eliminates the need for a running-in period.

  10. Design, fabrication and test of Load Bearing multilayer insulation to support a broad area cooled shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dye, S. A.; Johnson, W. L.; Plachta, D. W.; Mills, G. L.; Buchanan, L.; Kopelove, A. B.

    2014-11-01

    Improvements in cryogenic propellant storage are needed to achieve reduced or Zero Boil Off of cryopropellants, critical for long duration missions. Techniques for reducing heat leak into cryotanks include using passive multi-layer insulation (MLI) and vapor cooled or actively cooled thermal shields. Large scale shields cannot be supported by tank structural supports without heat leak through the supports. Traditional MLI also cannot support shield structural loads, and separate shield support mechanisms add significant heat leak. Quest Thermal Group and Ball Aerospace, with NASA SBIR support, have developed a novel Load Bearing multi-layer insulation (LBMLI) capable of self-supporting thermal shields and providing high thermal performance. We report on the development of LBMLI, including design, modeling and analysis, structural testing via vibe and acoustic loading, calorimeter thermal testing, and Reduced Boil-Off (RBO) testing on NASA large scale cryotanks. LBMLI uses the strength of discrete polymer spacers to control interlayer spacing and support the external load of an actively cooled shield and external MLI. Structural testing at NASA Marshall was performed to beyond maximum launch profiles without failure. LBMLI coupons were thermally tested on calorimeters, with superior performance to traditional MLI on a per layer basis. Thermal and structural tests were performed with LBMLI supporting an actively cooled shield, and comparisons are made to the performance of traditional MLI and thermal shield supports. LBMLI provided a 51% reduction in heat leak per layer over a previously tested traditional MLI with tank standoffs, a 38% reduction in mass, and was advanced to TRL5. Active thermal control using LBMLI and a broad area cooled shield offers significant advantages in total system heat flux, mass and structural robustness for future Reduced Boil-Off and Zero Boil-Off cryogenic missions with durations over a few weeks.

  11. Glide planes symmetry in the organization of some sulfide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, S. V.; Magarill, S. A.; Pervukhina, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    The role of glide planes in the organization of structures is shown based on a crystallographic analysis of the monoclinic structures of TlAs3S5 and Tl2(As,Sb)3S13 sulfides. In the first structure, cations and anions form systems (with identical geometries) of two face-centered sublattices, linked by the c plane, with the effect of unified "two-dimensional" (2D) ordering. The second structure, exhibiting signs of order-disorder (OD) type, is interpreted as a superposition of two noncentrosymmetric components with independent cation and anion sublattices, which, however, also form a regular 2D order due to the n plane. The stabilizing role of Tl cations in the geometry of cation matrices is indicated.

  12. Event Tracking Model of Adhesion Identifies Load-bearing Bonds in Rolling Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    POSPIESZALSKA, MARIA K.; ZARBOCK, ALEXANDER; PICKARD, JOHN E.; LEY, KLAUS

    2009-01-01

    Objectives P-selectin binding to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand (PSGL)-1 mediates leukocyte rolling under conditions of inflammation and injury. The objectives were to develop an efficient, high temporal resolution model for direct simulation of leukocyte rolling, and then to conduct a study of load-bearing bonds using the model. Methods A stochastic π-calculus-driven Event Tracking Model of Adhesion was developed and compared with experimental data. Multiple simulations for each case were conducted to obtain high confidence numerical characteristics of leukocyte rolling. Results Leukocyte rolling and the underlying P-selectin—PSGL-1 bonds were studied under low wall shear rate (25-50 s-1) conditions from measured parameters of leukocyte rolling and bond properties. For the first time, the location, number, lifetime, history, and kinetics of load-bearing bonds and their influence on cell rolling are identified. Instantaneous cell displacements, translational and rotational velocities, and cell-endothelium distances are derived. The model explains the commonly observed “stop-start” type rolling behavior and reveals that a few load-bearing bonds are sufficient to support rolling while a large number of bonds dissociate before becoming load-bearing. Conclusions The presented model provides a method for precise and direct simulation of leukocyte rolling, and sets a foundation upon which further refinements can be introduced. PMID:19023690

  13. High biocompatibility and improved osteogenic potential of novel Ca-P/titania composite scaffolds designed for regeneration of load-bearing segmental bone defects.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Carla; Sprio, Simone; Panseri, Silvia; Dapporto, Massimiliano; Marcacci, Maurilio; Tampieri, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Regeneration of load-bearing bone segments is still an open challenge due to the lack of biomaterials mimicking natural bone with a suitable chemicophysical and mechanical performance. This study proposes ceramic bone scaffolds made of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and titania (TiO2 ), developed from hydroxyapatite (HA) and TiO2 starting nanopowders, which exhibit high and interconnected macroporosity (>70 vol %). The scaffold composition was designed to achieve a synergistic effect of bioactivity/resorbability and mechanical properties suitable for load-bearing regenerative applications. The analysis of the morphology, structure, and mechanical strength of the scaffolds resulted in compression strength nearly twice that of commercially available HA bone grafts with similar structure (Engipore(®)). Biological characterization was carried out for human MG-63 osteoblast-like cells proliferation, activity, attachment, and viability. β-TCP/TiO2 scaffolds show high proliferation rate, high viability, and high colonization rates. Moreover, an increased activity of the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was found. These results demonstrate that β-TCP/TiO2 scaffolds have good potential as osteogenically active load-bearing scaffolds; moreover, given the high and interconnected macroporosity as well as the resorbability properties of β-TCP, these scaffolds may enhance in vivo osteointegration and promote the formation of new organized bone, thus resulting in very promising biomimetic scaffolds for long bone regeneration. PMID:23172612

  14. Plane and hemispherical potential structures in magnetically expanding plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Igarashi, Yuichi; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    2010-07-26

    Two-dimensional potential structures are measured for different gas pressure in expanding argon plasma using permanent magnets, where the magnetic field is about 100 G in the source and several gauss in the diffusion chamber. The plane potential drop is observed near the source exit for 0.35 mTorr, while the potential structure becomes hemispherical when increasing up to 1 mTorr; the hemispherical structure results in the radial divergence of the ion beam. It is found that the trajectories of the accelerated ions and the electrons overcoming the potential drop are dominated by the potential structure and magnetic-field lines, respectively.

  15. Load-Bearing Biomedical Applications of Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings - Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Alakoski, Esa; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Soininen, Antti; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2008-01-01

    The current status of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings for biomedical applications is reviewed with emphasis on load-bearing coatings. Although diamond-like carbon coating materials have been studied for decades, no indisputably successful commercial biomedical applications for high load situations exist today. High internal stress, leading to insufficient adhesion of thick coatings, is the evident reason behind this delay of the break-through of DLC coatings for applications. Excellent adhesion of thick DLC coatings is of utmost importance for load-bearing applications. According to this review superior candidate material for articulating implants is thick and adherent DLC on both sliding surfaces. With the filtered pulsed arc discharge method, all the necessary requirements for the deposition of thick and adherent DLC are fulfilled, provided that the substrate material is selected properly. PMID:19478929

  16. Effect of nanofillers on the physico-mechanical properties of load bearing bone implants.

    PubMed

    Michael, Feven Mattews; Khalid, Mohammad; Walvekar, Rashmi; Ratnam, Chantara Thevy; Ramarad, Suganti; Siddiqui, Humaira; Hoque, M Enamul

    2016-10-01

    Bones are nanocomposites consisting of a collagenous fibre network, embedded with calcium phosphates mainly hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocrystallites. As bones are subjected to continuous loading and unloading process every day, they often tend to become prone to fatigue and breakdown. Therefore, this review addresses the use of nanocomposites particularly polymers reinforced with nanoceramics that can be used as load bearing bone implants. Further, nanocomposite preparation and dispersion modification techniques have been highlighted along with thorough discussion on the influence that various nanofillers have on the physico-mechanical properties of nanocomposites in relation to that of natural bone properties. This review updates the nanocomposites that meet the physico-mechanical properties (strength and elasticity) as well as biocompatibility requirement of a load bearing bone implant and also attempts to highlight the gaps in the reported studies to address the fatigue and creep properties of the nanocomposites. PMID:27287178

  17. Load-bearing biomedical applications of diamond-like carbon coatings - current status.

    PubMed

    Alakoski, Esa; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Soininen, Antti; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2008-01-01

    The current status of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings for biomedical applications is reviewed with emphasis on load-bearing coatings. Although diamond-like carbon coating materials have been studied for decades, no indisputably successful commercial biomedical applications for high load situations exist today. High internal stress, leading to insufficient adhesion of thick coatings, is the evident reason behind this delay of the break-through of DLC coatings for applications. Excellent adhesion of thick DLC coatings is of utmost importance for load-bearing applications. According to this review superior candidate material for articulating implants is thick and adherent DLC on both sliding surfaces. With the filtered pulsed arc discharge method, all the necessary requirements for the deposition of thick and adherent DLC are fulfilled, provided that the substrate material is selected properly. PMID:19478929

  18. Direct Ink Writing of Highly Porous and Strong Glass Scaffolds for Load-bearing Bone Defects Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    The quest for synthetic materials to repair load-bearing bone lost because of trauma, cancer, or congenital bone defects requires development of porous and high-performance scaffolds with exceptional mechanical strength. However, the low mechanical strength of porous bioactive ceramic and glass scaffolds, compared with that of human cortical bone, has limited their use for these applications. In the present work, bioactive 6P53B glass scaffolds with superior mechanical strength were fabricated using a direct ink writing technique. The rheological properties of Pluronic® F-127 (referred to hereafter simply as F-127) hydrogel-based inkswere optimized for the printing of features as fine as 30 μm and of the three-dimensional scaffolds. The mechanical strength and in vitro degradation of the scaffolds were assessed in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The sintered glass scaffolds show a compressive strength (136 ± 22 MPa) comparable to that of human cortical bone (100-150 MPa), while the porosity (60%) is in the range of that of trabecular bone (50-90%).The strength is ~100 times that of polymer scaffolds and 4–5 times that of ceramic and glass scaffolds with comparable porosities. Despite the strength decrease resulting from weight loss during immersion in an SBF, the value (77 MPa) is still far above that of trabecular bone after three weeks. The ability to create both porous and strong structures opens a new avenue for fabricating scaffolds for load-bearing bone defect repair and regeneration. PMID:21745606

  19. Surface modification and fatigue behavior of nitinol for load bearing implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Sheldon A.

    Musculoskeletal disorders are recognized amongst the most significant human health problems that exist today. Even though considerable research and development has gone towards understanding musculoskeletal disorders, there is still lack of bone replacement materials that are appropriate for restoring lost structures and functions, particularly for load-bearing applications. Many materials on the market today, such as titanium and stainless steel, suffer from significantly higher modulus than natural bone and low bioactivity leading to stress shielding and implant loosening over longer time use. Nitinol (NiTi) is an equiatomic intermetallic compound of nickel and titanium whose unique biomechanical and biological properties contributed to its increasing use as a biomaterial. An innovative method for creating dense and porous net shape NiTi alloy parts has been developed to improve biological properties while maintaining comparable or better mechanical properties than commercial materials that are currently in use. Laser engineered net shaping (LENS(TM)) and surface electrochemistry modification was used to create dense/porous samples and micro textured surfaces on NiTi parts, respectively. Porous implants are known to promote cell adhesion and have a low elastic modulus, a combination that can significantly increase the life of an implant. However, porosity can significantly reduce the fatigue life of an implant, and very little work has been reported on the fatigue behavior of bulk porous metals, specifically on porous nitinol alloy. High-cycle rotating bending and compression-compression fatigue behavior of porous NiTi fabricated using LENS(TM) were studied. In cyclic compression loading, plastic strain increased with increasing porosity and it was evident that maximum strain was achieved during the first 50000 cycles and remained constant throughout the remaining loading. No failures were observed due to loading up to 150% of the yield strength. When subjected

  20. Mechanical behaviour of Bioactive Glass granules and morselized cancellous bone allograft in load bearing defects.

    PubMed

    Hulsen, D J W; Geurts, J; van Gestel, N A P; van Rietbergen, B; Arts, J J

    2016-05-01

    Bioactive Glass (BAG) granules are osteoconductive and possess unique antibacterial properties for a synthetic biomaterial. To assess the applicability of BAG granules in load-bearing defects, the aim was to compare mechanical behaviour of graft layers consisting of BAG granules and morselized cancellous bone allograft in different volume mixtures under clinically relevant conditions. The graft layers were mechanically tested, using two mechanical testing modalities with simulated physiological loading conditions: highly controllable confined compression tests (CCT) and more clinically realistic in situ compression tests (ISCT) in cadaveric porcine bone defects. Graft layer impaction strain, residual strain, aggregate modulus, and creep strain were determined in CCT. Graft layer porosity was determined using micro computed tomography. The ISCT was used to determine graft layer subsidence in bone environment. ANOVA showed significant differences (p<0.001) between different graft layer compositions. True strains absolutely decreased for increasing BAG content: impaction strain -0.92 (allograft) to -0.39 (BAG), residual strain -0.12 to -0.01, and creep strain -0.09 to 0.00 respectively. Aggregate modulus increased with increasing BAG content from 116 to 653MPa. Porosity ranged from 66% (pure allograft) to 15% (pure BAG). Subsidence was highest for allograft, and remarkably low for a 1:1 BAG-allograft volume mixture. Both BAG granules and allograft morsels as stand-alone materials exhibit suboptimal mechanical behaviour for load-bearing purpose. BAG granules are difficult to handle and less porous, whereas allograft subsides and creeps. A 1:1 volume mixture of BAG and allograft is therefore proposed as the best graft material in load-bearing defects. PMID:26972764

  1. Strained layer superlattice focal plane array having a planar structure

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jin K; Carroll, Malcolm S; Gin, Aaron; Marsh, Phillip F; Young, Erik W; Cich, Michael J

    2012-10-23

    An infrared focal plane array (FPA) is disclosed which utilizes a strained-layer superlattice (SLS) formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5 epitaxially grown on a GaSb substrate. The FPA avoids the use of a mesa structure to isolate each photodetector element and instead uses impurity-doped regions formed in or about each photodetector for electrical isolation. This results in a substantially-planar structure in which the SLS is unbroken across the entire width of a 2-D array of the photodetector elements which are capped with an epitaxially-grown passivation layer to reduce or eliminate surface recombination. The FPA has applications for use in the wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m.

  2. A Curved, Elastostatic Boundary Element for Plane Anisotropic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S.; Klang, Eric C.

    2001-01-01

    The plane-stress equations of linear elasticity are used in conjunction with those of the boundary element method to develop a novel curved, quadratic boundary element applicable to structures composed of anisotropic materials in a state of plane stress or plane strain. The curved boundary element is developed to solve two-dimensional, elastostatic problems of arbitrary shape, connectivity, and material type. As a result of the anisotropy, complex variables are employed in the fundamental solution derivations for a concentrated unit-magnitude force in an infinite elastic anisotropic medium. Once known, the fundamental solutions are evaluated numerically by using the known displacement and traction boundary values in an integral formulation with Gaussian quadrature. All the integral equations of the boundary element method are evaluated using one of two methods: either regular Gaussian quadrature or a combination of regular and logarithmic Gaussian quadrature. The regular Gaussian quadrature is used to evaluate most of the integrals along the boundary, and the combined scheme is employed for integrals that are singular. Individual element contributions are assembled into the global matrices of the standard boundary element method, manipulated to form a system of linear equations, and the resulting system is solved. The interior displacements and stresses are found through a separate set of auxiliary equations that are derived using an Airy-type stress function in terms of complex variables. The capabilities and accuracy of this method are demonstrated for a laminated-composite plate with a central, elliptical cutout that is subjected to uniform tension along one of the straight edges of the plate. Comparison of the boundary element results for this problem with corresponding results from an analytical model show a difference of less than 1%.

  3. Investigation of Boundary Layer Structure by Dual-Plane PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmire, E. K.; Ganapathisubramani, B.; Marusic, I.

    2004-11-01

    Dual-plane PIV was employed in a turbulent boundary layer at Re_τ ˜ 1100 to study the nature of the vortical structures there. Laser sheets separated by 1 mm were aligned in streamwise-spanwise (x,y) planes, and the scattered light was captured by three cameras: two in a stereo configuration and one in a normal configuration. All velocity gradient components were determined for fields in the log (z^+ = 125) and outer (z/δ = 0.5) regions. Three-dimensional swirl strength was used to isolate vortex cores, and the vorticity direction of individual swirl centers was determined. Instantaneous fields in the log region reveal signatures of hairpin vortex packets consistent with previous results. The packets contain evidence of smaller hairpin heads embedded within the long low-speed regions surrounded by larger hairpins. The data set at z^+ = 125 yielded a most probable hairpin inclination angle of 32^rc and an average inclination angle of 57^rc. In the presentation, these results will be contrasted with those at z/δ = 0.5.

  4. Silk as a biocohesive sacrificial binder in the fabrication of hydroxyapatite load bearing scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Stephanie L.; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Schmidt, Daniel; Lo, Tim J.; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Limitations of current clinical methods for bone repair continue to fuel the demand for a high strength, bioactive bone replacement material. Recent attempts to produce porous scaffolds for bone regeneration have been limited by the intrinsic weakness associated with high porosity materials. In this study, ceramic scaffold fabrication techniques for potential use in load-bearing bone repairs have been developed using naturally derived silk from Bombyx mori. Silk was first employed for ceramic grain consolidation during green body formation, and later as a sacrificial polymer to impart porosity during sintering. These techniques allowed preparation of hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds that exhibited a wide range of mechanical and porosity profiles, with some displaying unusually high compressive strength up to 152.4 ± 9.1 MPa. Results showed that the scaffolds exhibited a wide range of compressive strengths and moduli (8.7 ± 2.7 MPa to 152.4 ± 9.1 MPa and 0.3 ± 0.1 GPa to 8.6 ± 0.3 GPa) with total porosities of up to 62.9 ± 2.7% depending on the parameters used for fabrication. Moreover, HA-silk scaffolds could be molded into large, complex shapes, and further machined post-sinter to generate specific three-dimensional geometries. Scaffolds supported bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell attachment and proliferation, with no signs of cytotoxicity. Therefore, silk-fabricated HA scaffolds show promise for load bearing bone repair and regeneration needs. PMID:24881027

  5. Stretchable and transparent electrodes based on in-plane structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kukjoo; Kim, Joohee; Hyun, Byung Gwan; Ji, Sangyoon; Kim, So-Yun; Kim, Sungwon; An, Byeong Wan; Park, Jang-Ung

    2015-08-01

    Stretchable electronics has attracted great interest with compelling potential applications that require reliable operation under mechanical deformation. Achieving stretchability in devices, however, requires a deeper understanding of nanoscale materials and mechanics beyond the success of flexible electronics. In this regard, tremendous research efforts have been dedicated toward developing stretchable electrodes, which are one of the most important building blocks for stretchable electronics. Stretchable transparent thin-film electrodes, which retain their electrical conductivity and optical transparency under mechanical deformation, are particularly important for the favourable application of stretchable devices. This minireview summarizes recent advances in stretchable transparent thin-film electrodes, especially employing strategies based on in-plane structures. Various approaches using metal nanomaterials, carbon nanomaterials, and their hybrids are described in terms of preparation processes and their optoelectronic/mechanical properties. Some challenges and perspectives for further advances in stretchable transparent electrodes are also discussed.

  6. Stretchable and transparent electrodes based on in-plane structures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kukjoo; Kim, Joohee; Hyun, Byung Gwan; Ji, Sangyoon; Kim, So-Yun; Kim, Sungwon; An, Byeong Wan; Park, Jang-Ung

    2015-09-21

    Stretchable electronics has attracted great interest with compelling potential applications that require reliable operation under mechanical deformation. Achieving stretchability in devices, however, requires a deeper understanding of nanoscale materials and mechanics beyond the success of flexible electronics. In this regard, tremendous research efforts have been dedicated toward developing stretchable electrodes, which are one of the most important building blocks for stretchable electronics. Stretchable transparent thin-film electrodes, which retain their electrical conductivity and optical transparency under mechanical deformation, are particularly important for the favourable application of stretchable devices. This minireview summarizes recent advances in stretchable transparent thin-film electrodes, especially employing strategies based on in-plane structures. Various approaches using metal nanomaterials, carbon nanomaterials, and their hybrids are described in terms of preparation processes and their optoelectronic/mechanical properties. Some challenges and perspectives for further advances in stretchable transparent electrodes are also discussed. PMID:26287668

  7. Enhanced mechanical performance and biological evaluation of a PLGA coated β-TCP composite scaffold for load-bearing applications

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yunqing; Scully, Allison; Young, Daniel A; Kim, Sungwoo; Tsao, Helen; Sen, Milan; Yang, Yunzhi

    2011-01-01

    Porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) has been used for bone repair and replacement in clinics due to its excellent biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, and biodegradability. However, the application of β-TCP has been limited by its brittleness. Here, we demonstrated that an interconnected porous β-TCP scaffold infiltrated with a thin layer of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer showed improved mechanical performance compared to an uncoated β-TCP scaffold while retaining its excellent interconnectivity and biocompatibility. The infiltration of PLGA significantly increased the compressive strength of β-TCP scaffolds from 2.90 MPa to 4.19 MPa, bending strength from 1.46 MPa to 2.41 MPa, and toughness from 0.17 MPa to 1.44 MPa, while retaining an interconnected porous structure with a porosity of 80.65%. These remarkable improvements in the mechanical properties of PLGA-coated β-TCP scaffolds are due to the combination of the systematic coating of struts, interpenetrating structural characteristics, and crack bridging. The in vitro biological evaluation demonstrated that rat bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) adhered well, proliferated, and expressed alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity on both the PLGA-coated β-TCP and the β-TCP. These results suggest a new strategy for fabricating interconnected macroporous scaffolds with significantly enhanced mechanical strength for potential load-bearing bone tissue regeneration. PMID:21892228

  8. MTF comparisons between mesa and planar focal plane detector structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, Mitchell; Wehner, Justin; Buell, Dave; Micali, Jason; McCorkle, Joe; Rehfield, Mark; Williams, Dave; Dixon, Andrew; Malone, Neil

    2013-09-01

    Raytheon Vision Systems (RVS) has developed scanning, high-speed (<3klps), all digital, with on-chip Analog-to-Digital Conversion (ADC), mid-wave infrared (MWIR 3-5mm) focal plane arrays (FPA) with excellent modulation transfer function (MTF) performance. Using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) data and detailed models of the mesa geometry, RVS modeled the predicted detector MTF performance of detectors. These detectors have a mesa structure and geometry for improved MTF performance compared to planar HgCdTe and InSb detector structures and other similar detector structures such as nBn. The modeled data is compared to measured MTF data obtained from edge spread measurements and shows good agreement, Figure 1. The measured data was obtained using a custom advanced test set with 1µm precision alignment and automatic data acquisition for report generation in less than five minutes per FPA. The measured MTF values of 83 unique parts, Figure 2, had a standard deviation of 0.0094 and a mean absolute deviation of 0.0066 at half Nyquist frequency, showing excellent process repeatability and a design that supports high MTF with good repeatability.

  9. Study on load-bearing characteristics of a new pile group foundation for an offshore wind turbine.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ruiqing; Liu, Run; Lian, Jijian; Ding, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    Because offshore wind turbines are high-rise structures, they transfer large horizontal loads and moments to their foundations. One of the keys to designing a foundation is determining the sensitivities and laws affecting its load-bearing capacity. In this study, this procedure was carried out for a new high-rise cap pile group foundation adapted to the loading characteristics of offshore wind turbines. The sensitivities of influential factors affecting the bearing properties were determined using an orthogonal test. Through a combination of numerical simulations and model tests, the effects of the inclination angle, length, diameter, and number of side piles on the vertical bearing capacity, horizontal bearing capacity, and bending bearing capacity were determined. The results indicate that an increase in the inclination angle of the side piles will increase the vertical bearing capacity, horizontal bearing capacity, and bending bearing capacity. An increase in the length of the side piles will increase the vertical bearing capacity and bending bearing capacity. When the length of the side piles is close to the central pile, the increase is more apparent. Finally, increasing the number of piles will increase the horizontal bearing capacity; however, the growth rate is small because of the pile group effect. PMID:25250375

  10. Study on Load-Bearing Characteristics of a New Pile Group Foundation for an Offshore Wind Turbine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Run; Lian, Jijian; Ding, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    Because offshore wind turbines are high-rise structures, they transfer large horizontal loads and moments to their foundations. One of the keys to designing a foundation is determining the sensitivities and laws affecting its load-bearing capacity. In this study, this procedure was carried out for a new high-rise cap pile group foundation adapted to the loading characteristics of offshore wind turbines. The sensitivities of influential factors affecting the bearing properties were determined using an orthogonal test. Through a combination of numerical simulations and model tests, the effects of the inclination angle, length, diameter, and number of side piles on the vertical bearing capacity, horizontal bearing capacity, and bending bearing capacity were determined. The results indicate that an increase in the inclination angle of the side piles will increase the vertical bearing capacity, horizontal bearing capacity, and bending bearing capacity. An increase in the length of the side piles will increase the vertical bearing capacity and bending bearing capacity. When the length of the side piles is close to the central pile, the increase is more apparent. Finally, increasing the number of piles will increase the horizontal bearing capacity; however, the growth rate is small because of the pile group effect. PMID:25250375

  11. Enhancement of entangled porous titanium by BisGMA for load-bearing biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Jiang, Guofeng; He, Guo

    2016-04-01

    The Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (BisGMA) was used as binder to fix the free cross wire nodes in the entangled porous titanium for enhancement. The entangled titanium with 60% porosity after infiltrated with 5-20 vol.% BisGMA had the pore size in the range of 100 μm-400 μm. The enhanced materials with the real porosity of 40-55% exhibited the elastic modulus in the range of 0.4-1.4 GPa and the yielding strength in the range of 12.9-52.5 MPa. Such mechanical properties were comparable with those of cancellous bones, suggesting potentials for load-bearing bio applications. PMID:26838821

  12. Microfabrication of Cell-Laden Hydrogels for Engineering Mineralized and Load Bearing Tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Cheng; Kharaziha, Mahshid; Min, Christine; Maas, Richard; Nikkhah, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Microengineering technologies and advanced biomaterials have extensive applications in the field of regenerative medicine. In this chapter, we review the integration of microfabrication techniques and hydrogel-based biomaterials in the field of dental, bone, and cartilage tissue engineering. We primarily discuss the major features that make hydrogels attractive candidates to mimic extracellular matrix (ECM), and we consider the benefits of three-dimensional (3D) culture systems for tissue engineering applications. We then focus on the fundamental principles of microfabrication techniques including photolithography, soft lithography and bioprinting approaches. Lastly, we summarize recent research on microengineering cell-laden hydrogel constructs for dental, bone and cartilage regeneration, and discuss future applications of microfabrication techniques for load-bearing tissue engineering. PMID:26545742

  13. Stress analysis of the space telescope focal plane structure joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, W. A., Jr.; Shoemaker, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Two major efforts were begun concerning the Space Telescope focal plane structure joint. The 3-D solid finite element modeling of the bipod flexure plate was carried out. Conceptual models were developed for the load transfer through the three major bolts to the flexure plate. The flexure plate drawings were reconstructed using DADAM for the purpose of developing a file from which the coordinates of any point on the flexure plate could be determined and also to locate the attachment points of the various components which connect with the flexure plate. For modeling convenience the CADAM drawing of the flexure plate has been divided into several regions which will be subdivided into finite elements using MSGMESH, which is a finite element mesh generator available with MSC/NASTRAN. In addition to the CADAM work on the flexure plate, an effort was also begun to develop computer aided drawings of the peripheral beam which will be used to assist in modeling the connection between it and the flexure plate.

  14. Degradation of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses used in load-bearing implants: A tribocorrosion appraisal.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guo-Hua; Aune, Ragnhild E; Mao, Huahai; Espallargas, Nuria

    2016-07-01

    Owing to the amorphous structure, Bulk Metallic Glasses (BMGs) have been demonstrating attractive properties for potential biomedical applications. In the present work, the degradation mechanisms of Zr-based BMGs with nominal compositions Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 and Zr65Cu18Ni7Al10 as potential load-bearing implant material were investigated in a tribocorrosion environment. The composition-dependent micro-mechanical and tribological properties of the two BMGs were evaluated prior to the tribocorrosion tests. The sample Zr65-BMG with a higher Zr content exhibited increased plasticity but relatively reduced wear resistance during the ball-on-disc tests. Both BMGs experienced abrasive wear after the dry wear test under the load of 2N. The cross-sectional subsurface structure of the wear track was examined by Focused Ion Beam (FIB). The electrochemical properties of the BMGs in simulated body fluid were evaluated by means of potentiodynamic polarization and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The spontaneous passivation of Zr-based BMGs in Phosphate Buffer Saline solution was mainly attributed to the highly concentrated zirconium cation (Zr(4+)) in the passive film. The tribocorrosion performance of the BMGs was investigated using a reciprocating tribometer equipped with an electrochemical cell. The more passive nature of the Zr65-BMG had consequently a negative influence on its tribocorrosion resistance, which induced the wear-accelerated corrosion and eventually speeded-up the degradation process. It has been revealed the galvanic coupling was established between the depassivated wear track and the surrounding passive area, which is the main degradation mechanism for the passive Zr65-BMG subjected to the tribocorrosion environment. PMID:26773648

  15. Effect of optimum plastic depth on stresses and load-bearing capacity of autofrettaged cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruilin; Zhu, Guolin

    2013-03-01

    Autofrettage is an effective measure to even distribution of stresses and raise load-bearing capacity for (ultra-)high pressure apparatus. Currently, the research on autofrettage has focused mostly on specific engineering problems, while general theoretical study is rarely done. To discover the general law contained in autofrettage theory, by the aid of the authors' previous work and according to the third strength theory, theoretical problems about autofrettage are studied including residual stresses and their equivalent stress, total stresses and their equivalent stress, etc. Because of the equation of optimum depth of plastic zone which is presented in the authors' previous work, the equations for the residual stresses and their equivalent stress as well as the total stress and their equivalent stress are simplified greatly. Thus the law of distribution of the residual stresses and their equivalent stress as well as the total stress and their equivalent stress and the varying tendency of these stresses are discovered. The relation among various parameters are revealed. The safe and optimum load-bearing conditions for cylinders are obtained. According to the results obtained by theoretical analysis, it is shown that if the two parameters, namely ratio of outside to inside radius, k, and depth of plastic zone, k j, meet the equation of optimum depth of plastic zone, when the pressure contained in an autofrettaged cylinder is lower than two times the initial yield pressure of the unautofrettaged cylinder, the equivalent residual stress and the equivalent total stress at the inside surface as well as the elastic-plastic juncture of a cylinder are lower than yield strength. When an autofrettaged cylinder is subjected to just two times the initial yield pressure of the unautofrettaged cylinder, the equivalent total stress within the whole plastic zone is just identically equal to the yield strength, or it is a constant. The proposed research theoretically depicts the

  16. Lubrication and load-bearing properties of human salivary pellicles adsorbed ex vivo on molecularly smooth substrata.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Neale M; Yakubov, Gleb E; Stokes, Jason R; Klein, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    In a series of Surface Force Balance experiments, material from human whole saliva was adsorbed to molecularly smooth mica substrata (to form an 'adsorbed salivary film'). Measurements were taken of normal (load bearing, F (n)) and shear (frictional, F (s)*) forces between two interacting surfaces. One investigation involved a salivary film formed by overnight adsorption from undiluted, centrifuged saliva, with the adsorbed film rinsed with pure water before measurement. Measurements were taken under pure water and 70 mM NaNO(3). In a second investigation, a film was formed from and measured under a solution of 7% filtered saliva in 10 mM NaNO(3). F (n) results for both systems showed purely repulsive layers, with an uncompressed thickness of 35-70 nm for the diluted saliva investigation and, prior to the application of shear, 11 nm for the rinsed system. F (s)* was essentially proportional to F (n) for all systems and independent of shear speed (in the range 100-2000 nm s(-1)), with coefficients of friction μ ≈ 0.24 and μ ≈ 0.46 for the unrinsed and rinsed systems, respectively. All properties of the rinsed system remained similar when the pure water measurement environment was changed to 70 mM NaNO(3). For all systems studied, shear gave rise to an approximately threefold increase in the range of normal forces, attributed to the ploughing up of adsorbed material during shear to form debris that stood proud of the adsorbed layer. The results provide a microscopic demonstration of the wear process for a salivary film under shear and may be of particular interest for understanding the implications for in vivo oral lubrication under conditions such as rinsing of the mouth cavity. The work is interpreted in light of earlier studies that showed a structural collapse and increase in friction for an adsorbed salivary film in an environment of low ionic strength. PMID:22881290

  17. Nano-TiO2 reinforced PEEK/PEI blends as biomaterials for load-bearing implant applications.

    PubMed

    Díez-Pascual, Ana M; Díez-Vicente, Angel L

    2015-03-11

    Biocompatible ternary nanocomposites based on poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK)/poly(ether imide) (PEI) blends reinforced with bioactive titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were fabricated via ultrasonication followed by melt-blending. The developed biomaterials were characterized using FT-IR, SEM, XRD, DSC, TGA, and DMA. Further, their water-absorption, tensile, tribological, dielectric, and antibacterial properties were evaluated. PEI acts as a coupling agent, since it can interact both with PEEK via π-π stacking and polar interactions as well as with the nanoparticles through hydrogen bonding, as corroborated by the FT-IR spectra, which resulted in a homogeneous titania dispersion within the biopolymer blend without applying any particle surface treatment or polymer functionalization. A change from promotion to retardation in the crystallization rate of the matrix was found with increasing TiO2 concentration, while its crystalline structure remained unaltered. The nanoparticles stiffened, strengthened, and toughened the matrix simultaneously, and the optimal properties were achieved at 4.0 wt % TiO2. More interesting, the tensile properties were retained after steam sterilization in an autoclave or exposure to a simulated body fluid (SBF). The nanocomposites also displayed reduced water absorption though higher thermal stability, storage modulus, glass transition temperature, dielectric constant, and dielectric loss compared to the control blend. Further, remarkable enhancements in the tribological properties under both SBF and dry environments were attained. The nanoparticles conferred antibacterial action versus Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in the presence and the absence of UV light, and the highest inhibition was attained at 4.0 wt % nanoparticle concentration. These nanocomposites are expected to be used in long-term load-bearing implant applications. PMID:25706225

  18. Injectable, high modulus, and fatigue resistant composite scaffold for load-bearing soft tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hayami, James W S; Waldman, Stephen D; Amsden, Brian G

    2013-12-01

    High modulus, two-phase, bicontinuous scaffolds were prepared by photocross-linking an aqueous suspension of chondrocytes and N-methacrylate glycol chitosan with a hydrolyzable, hydrophobic, acrylated star-copolymer. Two acrylated star-copolymers were examined: poly(ε-caprolactone-co-d,l-lactide) (5446DLLACL) and poly(ε-caprolactone-co-trimethylene carbonate) (7030TMCCL). The scaffolds were assessed for injectability, two-phase interconnectivity, fatigue resistance, and long-term static culture behavior. The 7030TMCCL scaffolds demonstrated decreased moduli of 17% after 1 × 10(6) cycles at 30% strain and 5% after 56 days in culture, compared to the 5446DLLACL scaffolds, which exhibited decreases of 58 and 68%, respectively. The 7030TMCCL scaffolds accumulated more extracellular matrix after 56 days of culture (GAG: 20.1 ± 1, collagen: 35.5 ± 1.8 μg) compared to 5446DLLACL scaffolds (GAG: 13.2 ± 0.6, collagen: 6.2 ± 3.4 μg). Overall, the 7030TMCCL-based scaffolds were shown to be better suited for use as a load bearing soft tissue scaffold. PMID:24147621

  19. An Investigation on Load Bearing Capacities of Cement and Resin Grouted Rock Bolts Installed in Weak Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyoncu Erguler, Guzide; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal

    2015-04-01

    Rock bolts have been considered one of indispensable support method to improve load bearing capacity of many underground engineering projects, and thus, various types of them have been developed until now for different purposes. Although mechanically anchored rock bolts can be successfully installed to prevent structurally controlled instabilities in hard rocks, in comparison with cement and resin grouted rock bolts, these types of anchors are not so effective in weak rocks characterized by relatively low mechanical properties. In order to investigate the applicability and to measure relative performance of cement and resin grouted rock bolts into weak and heavily jointed rock mass, a research program mainly consisting of pull-out tests was performed in a metal mine in Turkey. The rock materials excavated in this underground mining were described as basalt, tuff, ore dominated volcanic rocks and dacite. To achieve more representative results for rock materials found in this mining and openings excavated in varied dimensions, the pull-out tests were conducted on rock bolts used in many different locations where more convergences were measured and deformation dependent instability was expected to cause greater engineering problems. It is well known that the capacity of rock bolts depends on the length, diameter and density of the bolt pattern, and so considering the thickness of plastic zone in the studied openings, the length and diameter of rock bolts were taken as 2.4 m. and 25 mm., respectively. The spacing between rows changed between 70 and 180 cm. In this study, totally twenty five pull-out tests were performed to have a general understanding about axial load bearing capacity and support reaction curves of cement and resin grouted rock bolts. When pull load-displacement curves belongs to cement and resin grouted rock bolts were compared with each other, it was determined that cement grouted rock bolts carry more load ranging between 115.6 kN and 127.5 kN with

  20. Reduction of load-bearing capacity of all-ceramic crowns due to cement aging.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chenglin; Wang, Raorao; Mao, Shuangshuang; Arola, Dwayne; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how water aging of the resin cement influences the stress distribution in all-ceramic crowns and if there is an increase in the propensity for crown failure. The failure of all-ceramic crowns attributed to cement degradation was explored using a combination of experimental and numerical methods. Sectioned all-ceramic crown specimens were fabricated of IPS e.max Ceram/e.max Press (CP) and Vita VM9/Cercon zirconia (VZ), and then stored in either air or distilled water for 30 days. Monotonic contact loads were applied to fracture near the buccal cusp ridge of each sample. Deformation within the crown layers during loading was analyzed by means of Digital Image Correlation (DIC). A 3D finite element model of the restoration including veneer, core, cement and tooth substrate was developed to evaluate the stress distribution in the crowns before and after cement degradation. There was a significant decrease (p<0.001) in the critical fracture load and a change in the fracture mode after cement water absorption in the CP crowns. In contrast, there was no significant influence of cement aging on fracture modes and fracture loads (p>0.05) in the VZ crowns. Finite element analysis showed that regardless of the crown types, the stress distribution is identical by degradation in Young's modulus of the cement. However, core/substrate debonding results in a change of the stress distribution and a significant increase in the magnitude. Water aging causes reduction of stiffness and bonding strength of cement agents. Degradation in bonding strength and stiffness could potentially lead to stress redistribution in the restored crown and reduce the load-bearing capacity of all-ceramic restorations after years of service. PMID:23127630

  1. Effect of a novel load-bearing trabecular Nitinol scaffold on rabbit radius bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotman, Irena; Zaretzky, Asaph; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Gutmanas, Elazar Y.

    2015-10-01

    The research aim was to evaluate the bone regeneration capability of novel load-bearing NiTi alloy (Nitinol) scaffolds in a critical-size defect (CSD) model. High strength "trabecular Nitinol" scaffolds were prepared by PIRAC (Powder Immersion Reaction Assisted Coating) annealing of the highly porous Ni foam in Ti powder at 900°C. This was followed by PIRAC nitriding to mitigate the release of potentially toxic Ni ions. Scaffolds phase composition and microstructure were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), and their mechanical properties were tested in compression. New Zealand white rabbits received bone defect in right radius and were divided in four groups randomly. In the control group, nothing was placed in the defect. In other groups, NiTi scaffolds were implanted in the defect: (i) as produced, (ii) loaded with bone marrow aspirate (BMA), and (iii) biomimetically CaP-coated. The animals were sacrificed after 12 weeks. The forelimbs with scaffolds were resected, fixed, sectioned and examined in SEM. New bone formation inside the scaffold was studied by EDS analysis and by the processing of backscattered electron images. Bone ingrowth into the scaffold was observed in all implant groups, mostly next to the ulna. New bone formation was strongly enhanced by BMA loading and biomimeatic CaP coating, the bone penetrating as much as 1-1.5 mm into the scaffold. The results of this preliminary study demonstrate that the newly developed high strength trabecular Nitinol scaffolds can be successfully used for bone regeneration in critical size defects.

  2. Effect of a novel load-bearing trabecular Nitinol scaffold on rabbit radius bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Gotman, Irena Gutmanas, Elazar Y.; Zaretzky, Asaph; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2015-10-27

    The research aim was to evaluate the bone regeneration capability of novel load-bearing NiTi alloy (Nitinol) scaffolds in a critical-size defect (CSD) model. High strength “trabecular Nitinol” scaffolds were prepared by PIRAC (Powder Immersion Reaction Assisted Coating) annealing of the highly porous Ni foam in Ti powder at 900°C. This was followed by PIRAC nitriding to mitigate the release of potentially toxic Ni ions. Scaffolds phase composition and microstructure were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), and their mechanical properties were tested in compression. New Zealand white rabbits received bone defect in right radius and were divided in four groups randomly. In the control group, nothing was placed in the defect. In other groups, NiTi scaffolds were implanted in the defect: (i) as produced, (ii) loaded with bone marrow aspirate (BMA), and (iii) biomimetically CaP-coated. The animals were sacrificed after 12 weeks. The forelimbs with scaffolds were resected, fixed, sectioned and examined in SEM. New bone formation inside the scaffold was studied by EDS analysis and by the processing of backscattered electron images. Bone ingrowth into the scaffold was observed in all implant groups, mostly next to the ulna. New bone formation was strongly enhanced by BMA loading and biomimeatic CaP coating, the bone penetrating as much as 1–1.5 mm into the scaffold. The results of this preliminary study demonstrate that the newly developed high strength trabecular Nitinol scaffolds can be successfully used for bone regeneration in critical size defects.

  3. Calcium phosphate-titanium composites for articulating surfaces of load-bearing implants.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Dittrick, Stanley; Gualtieri, Thomas; Wu, Jeffrey; Bose, Susmita

    2016-04-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP)-titanium (Ti) composites were processed using a commercial laser engineered net shaping (LENS™) machine to increase wear resistance of articulating surfaces of load-bearing implants. Such composites could be used to cover the surface of titanium implants and potentially increase the lifetime of a joint replacement. It was hypothesized that adding calcium phosphate to commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) and Ti6Al4V alloy via laser processing would decrease the material loss when subjected to wear. This added protection would be due to the in situ formation of a CaP tribofilm. Different amounts of CaP were mixed by weight with pure Ti and Ti6Al4V powders. The mixed powders were then made into cylindrical samples using a commercial LENS™-750 system. Microstructures were observed and it was found the CaP had integrated into the titanium metal matrix. Compression test revealed that CaP significantly increased the 0.2% offset yield strength as well as the ultimate compressive strength of CP-Ti. It was found that the addition of CaP to pure titanium reduced the material loss and increased wear resistance. This was due to the formation of CaP tribofilm on the articulating surface. The in situ formed tribofilm also lowered the coefficient of friction and acted as a solid lubricant between the two interacting metal surfaces. Overall, CaP addition to Ti and its alloy Ti6Al4V show an effective way to minimize wear induced damage due to the formation of in situ tribofilm at the articulating surface, a strategy that can be utilized in various biomedical devices. PMID:26826471

  4. Load bearing capacity of bone anchored fiber-reinforced composite device.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Ahmed Mansour; Lassila, Lippo V; Vallittu, Pekka K; Närhi, Timo O

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the push-out load-bearing capacity of threaded fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) devices for use as bone-anchored devices. The purpose was also to evaluate the possibility to use bioactive glass (BAG) granules on the experimental FRC devices in terms the mechanical behavior. Three experimental FRC devices (n = 15) were fabricated for the study: (a) threaded device with smooth surface; (b) threaded device with BAG granules (S53P4, Vivoxid Ltd, Turku, Finland) and supplementary retention grooves, and (c) unthreaded device with BAG granules. Threaded titanium devices were used as controls. The FRC devices were prepared from a light-polymerized dimethacrylate resin reinforced with preimpregnated unidirectional and bidirectional E-glass fibers (EverStick, StickTech Ltd, Turku, Finland). Experimental and control devices were embedded into dental plaster to simulate bone before the mechanical push-out test was carried out. ANOVA and Weibull analysis were used for the statistical evaluation. Threaded FRC devices had significantly higher push-out strength than the threaded titanium device (p < .001). The push-out forces exceeding 2,500 N were measured for threaded FRC devices with supplementary grooves and BAG coating. No thread failures were observed in any FRC devices. The unthreaded FRC devices with BAG lost 70% of glass particles during the test, while no BAG particles were lost from threaded FRC devices. It can be concluded that threaded FRC devices can withstand high push-out forces in the dental plaster without a risk of thread failure under physiological load. PMID:17558473

  5. Load-bearing masonry system adoption and performance: A case study of construction company in a developing country

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Nor Azlinda; Abdullah, Che Sobry; Nawi, Mohd Nasrun Mohd; Bahaudin, Ahmad Yusni

    2016-08-01

    This study addresses the factors that influence the adoption of load-bearing masonry (LBM) system. A case study of the load-bearing masonry (LBM) system adoption is conducted through an interview to explore the situation of the technology adoption in a construction company. The finding indicates the factors influence the adoption of LBM system for the construction company are: organizational resources, usefulness, less maintenance, reduce construction time and cost. From the findings, these factors consistent with previous literature. Furthermore, the performance of the company was measured by looking into the financial and non-financial aspects. The LBM system brings good performance as it increased the profits of the company, a good quality of product and attracts more demand from customers. Thus, these factors should be considered for the other companies that are interested in implementing the LBM system in their projects.

  6. Grain Boundary Plane Orientation Fundamental Zones and Structure-Property Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Eric R.; Patala, Srikanth; Priedeman, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Grain boundary plane orientation is a profoundly important determinant of character in polycrystalline materials that is not well understood. This work demonstrates how boundary plane orientation fundamental zones, which capture the natural crystallographic symmetries of a grain boundary, can be used to establish structure-property relationships. Using the fundamental zone representation, trends in computed energy, excess volume at the grain boundary, and temperature-dependent mobility naturally emerge and show a strong dependence on the boundary plane orientation. Analysis of common misorientation axes even suggests broader trends of grain boundary energy as a function of misorientation angle and plane orientation. Due to the strong structure-property relationships that naturally emerge from this work, boundary plane fundamental zones are expected to simplify analysis of both computational and experimental data. This standardized representation has the potential to significantly accelerate research in the topologically complex and vast five-dimensional phase space of grain boundaries. PMID:26498715

  7. Grain boundary plane orientation fundamental zones and structure-property relationships

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Homer, Eric R.; Patala, Srikanth; Priedeman, Jonathan L.

    2015-10-26

    Grain boundary plane orientation is a profoundly important determinant of character in polycrystalline materials that is not well understood. This work demonstrates how boundary plane orientation fundamental zones, which capture the natural crystallographic symmetries of a grain boundary, can be used to establish structure-property relationships. Using the fundamental zone representation, trends in computed energy, excess volume at the grain boundary, and temperature-dependent mobility naturally emerge and show a strong dependence on the boundary plane orientation. Analysis of common misorientation axes even suggests broader trends of grain boundary energy as a function of misorientation angle and plane orientation. Due to themore » strong structure-property relationships that naturally emerge from this work, boundary plane fundamental zones are expected to simplify analysis of both computational and experimental data. This standardized representation has the potential to significantly accelerate research in the topologically complex and vast five-dimensional phase space of grain boundaries.« less

  8. Grain boundary plane orientation fundamental zones and structure-property relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Homer, Eric R.; Patala, Srikanth; Priedeman, Jonathan L.

    2015-10-26

    Grain boundary plane orientation is a profoundly important determinant of character in polycrystalline materials that is not well understood. This work demonstrates how boundary plane orientation fundamental zones, which capture the natural crystallographic symmetries of a grain boundary, can be used to establish structure-property relationships. Using the fundamental zone representation, trends in computed energy, excess volume at the grain boundary, and temperature-dependent mobility naturally emerge and show a strong dependence on the boundary plane orientation. Analysis of common misorientation axes even suggests broader trends of grain boundary energy as a function of misorientation angle and plane orientation. Due to the strong structure-property relationships that naturally emerge from this work, boundary plane fundamental zones are expected to simplify analysis of both computational and experimental data. This standardized representation has the potential to significantly accelerate research in the topologically complex and vast five-dimensional phase space of grain boundaries.

  9. Renyi complexities and information planes: Atomic structure in conjugated spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolín, J.; López-Rosa, S.; Angulo, J. C.

    2009-05-01

    Generalized Renyi complexity measures are defined and numerically analyzed for atomic one-particle densities in both conjugated spaces. These complexities provide, as particular cases, the previously known statistical and Fisher-Shannon complexities. The generalized complexities provide information on the atomic shell structure and shell-filling patterns, allowing to appropriately weight different regions of the electronic cloud.

  10. Out-of-plane structural flexibility of phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaoxue; Loh, G. C.; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P.

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorene has been rediscovered recently, establishing itself as one of the most promising two-dimensional group-V elemental monolayers with direct band gap, high carrier mobility, and anisotropic electronic properties. In this paper, surface buckling and its effect on its electronic properties are investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations together with density functional theory calculations. We find that phosphorene shows superior structural flexibility along the armchair direction allowing it to have large curvatures. The semiconducting and direct band gap nature are retained with buckling along the armchair direction; the band gap decreases and transforms to an indirect band gap with buckling along the zigzag direction. The structural flexibility and electronic robustness along the armchair direction facilitate the fabrication of devices with complex shapes, such as folded phosphorene and phosphorene nano-scrolls, thereby offering new possibilities for the application of phosphorene in flexible electronics and optoelectronics.

  11. Biomechanical evaluation of a novel suturing scheme for grafting load-bearing collagen scaffolds for rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Anowarul; Bohl, Michael S.; Tsai, Andrew G; Younesi, Mousa; Gillespie, Robert; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, there are no well-established suture protocols to attach fully load-bearing scaffolds which span tendon defects between bone and muscle for repair of critical sized tendon tears. Methods to attach load-bearing tissue repair scaffolds could enable functional repair of tendon injuries. Methods Sixteen rabbit shoulders were dissected (New Zealand white rabbits, 1 yr. old, female) to isolate the humeral-infraspinatus muscle complex. A unique suture technique was developed to allow for a 5 mm segmental defect in infraspinatus tendon to be replaced with a mechanically strong bioscaffold woven from pure collagen threads. The suturing pattern resulted in a fully load-bearing scaffold. The tensile stiffness and strength of scaffold repair was compared with intact infraspinatus and regular direct repair. Findings The failure load and displacement at failure of the scaffold repair group were 59.9 N (Standard Deviation, SD = 10.7) and 10.3 mm (SD = 2.9), respectively and matched those obtained by direct repair group which were 57.5 N (SD = 15.3) and 8.6 mm (SD = 1.5), (p > 0.05). Failure load, displacement at failure and stiffness of both of the repair groups were half of the intact infraspinatus shoulder group. Interpretation With the developed suture technique, scaffolds repair showed similar failure load, displacement at failure and stiffness to the direct repair. This novel suturing pattern and the mechanical robustness of the scaffold at time zero indicates that the proposed model is mechanically viable for future in vivo studies which has a higher potential to translate into clinical uses. PMID:26009492

  12. Vortical structure in a forced plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this phase of an ongoing study is to obtain detailed three dimensional phase-averaged measurements of forced mixing layer vorticity development and evolution. Acoustic forcing is being used to phase-lock the initial development and subsequent pairing of the span wise vortical structures. Phase averaged measurements of the three velocity components will permit the study of three dimensional vorticity distributions without invoking Taylor's hypothesis which is known to introduce uncertainty. Currently two sine waves, one at the fundamental roll-up frequency and the second, its subharmonic, are being used to force the initial roll-up and first pairing of the span wise rollers. The two dimensional measurements described in this report were obtained in order to determine the best operating conditions for the detailed three dimensional study of the mixing layer undergoing pairing via various pairing mechanisms.

  13. Growth of InxGa1-xN/GaN QW structures with high indium concentration on c-plane and m-plane surfaces by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönen, H.; Rossow, U.; Langer, T.; Dräger, A.; Hoffmann, L.; Bremers, H.; Hangleiter, A.; Bertram, F.; Metzner, S.; Christen, J.

    2008-11-01

    GaN/GaN quantum well (QW) structures grown on c-plane and m-plane surfaces have been investigated intended for long wavelength light emitters. On c-plane GaN QWs reached indium concentrations of xIn⩾35% with good optical and structural quality. For QW thicknesses dQW⩽2 nm a fully strained layer structure is observed and the indium concentration is quite homogenous. Under the same growth conditions of the QW region we find similar or even slightly larger indium concentrations on m-plane surfaces. QWs of such high indium concentrations, however, are very sensitive to the growth conditions of the subsequent layers and we observe degradation such as indium outdiffusion or partial relaxation for high growth temperatures.

  14. Simulations and cold-test results of a prototype plane wave transformer linac structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arvind; Pant, K. K.; Krishnagopal, S.

    2002-03-01

    We have built a 4-cell prototype plane wave transformer (PWT) linac structure. We discuss here details of the design and fabrication of the PWT linac structure. We present results from superfish and gdfidl simulations as well as cold tests, which are in good agreement with each other. We also present detailed tolerance maps for the PWT structure. We discuss beam dynamics simulation studies performed using parmela.

  15. Optical polarization characteristics of m-plane GaN/AlGaN quantum well structures grown on m-plane SiC substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seoung-Hwan; Ahn, Doyeol

    2015-12-01

    Optical polarization characteristics of m-plane GaN/AlGaN QW structures grown on m-plane SiC substrate were theoretically investigated using the multiband effective-mass theory. The QW structure grown on SiC substrate shows much larger in-plane optical polarization than that grown on GaN substrate. This is attributed to the fact that the QW structure grown on SiC substrate has larger y‧-polarized optical emission and smaller x‧-polarized optical emission than the QW structure grown on GaN substrate. Also, the magnitude of the optical polarization is found to depend on the carrier density and decrease gradually with increasing carrier density. This can be explained by the fact that, with increasing k∥, the x‧-polarized matrix element increases while the y‧-polarized matrix element rapidly decreases.

  16. Probabilistic constraints on structural lineament best fit plane precision obtained through numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seers, Thomas D.; Hodgetts, David

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the orientation distribution of structural discontinuities using the limited information afforded by their trace in outcrop has considerable application, with such analysis often providing the basis for geological modelling. However, eigen analysis of 3D structural lineaments mapped at decimetre to regional scales indicates that discontinuity best fit plane estimates from such datasets tend to be unreliable. Here, the relationship between digitised lineament vertex geometry (coplanarity/collinearity) and the reliability of their estimated best fitting plane is investigated using Monte Carlo experiments. Lineaments are modelled as the intersection curve between two orthonormally oriented fractional Brownian surfaces representing the outcrop and discontinuity plane. Commensurate to increasing lineament vertex collinearity (K), systematic decay in estimated pole vector precision is observed from these experiments. Pole vector distributions are circumferentially constrained around the axis of rotation set by the end nodes of the synthetic lineaments, reducing the rotational degrees of freedom of the vertex set from three to one. Vectors on the unit circle formed perpendicular to this arbitrary axis of rotation conform to von Mises (circular normal) distributions tending towards uniform at extreme values of K. This latter observation suggests that whilst intrinsically unreliable, confidence limits can be placed upon orientation estimates from 3D structural lineaments digitised from remotely sensed data. A probabilistic framework is introduced which draws upon the statistical constraints obtained from our experiments to provide robust best fit plane estimates from digitised 3D structural lineaments.

  17. Quad-plane stereoscopic PIV for fine-scale structure measurements in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naka, Y.; Tomita, K.; Shimura, M.; Fukushima, N.; Tanahashi, M.; Miyauchi, T.

    2016-05-01

    The fine-scale structure in turbulence is investigated by quad-plane stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (QPSPIV). The quad-plane consists of two each of different polarizations and wavelengths, and it provides three velocity components at four independent parallel planes. Measurements have been undertaken in the developed region of a turbulent round jet with a spatial resolution sufficient to capture the small-scale structures. The advantage of the QPSPIV is presented in terms of the spectral response in the evaluation of the out-of-plane velocity gradient. The full velocity gradient tensor is computed with a fourth-order finite difference scheme in the out-of-plane direction as well as the in-plane directions. The turbulence quantities, such as the vorticity components, the energy dissipation rate and the second and third invariants of the velocity gradient tensor, are computed according to their faithful definitions. The coherent fine-scale eddies are extracted from the present QPSPIV data. The probability density functions of the diameter and the maximum azimuthal velocity of the extracted eddies exhibit their peak at approximately 8η and 1.5u_k, respectively, where η and u_k are the Kolmogorov length and velocity. These values agree well with the data in the literature. The phase-averaged distributions of turbulence quantities around the coherent fine-scale eddy indicate an apparent elliptic feature around the axis. Furthermore, the state of the strain rate exerting the eddy is quantified from the phase-averaged distributions of eigenvalues of the strain rate tensor and the alignment of the corresponding eigenvectors against the axis. The present study gives a solid experimental support of the coherent fine-scale structures in turbulence, and the technique can be applied to various flow fields and to the higher Reynolds number condition.

  18. Probabilistic Constraints on Structural Lineament Best Fit Plane Precision Obtained through Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seers, Thomas; Hodgetts, David

    2015-04-01

    Recent advances in geological trace extraction procedures now enable three dimensional representations of structural lineaments to be delineated from digital elevation models (DEMs), orthophotos and mesh based surface reconstructions. The principle advantage of obtaining higher dimensional representations of lineaments from remotely sensed data is that they allow best fit plane estimates to be made for their corresponding discontinuities which cannot be obtained from conventional bi-dimensional datasets. These orientation estimates yield deterministic constraints upon structural architecture and enable spatially dependent discontinuity network properties, such as volumetric intensity and connectivity, known to govern key rock mass physical properties (i.e. strength, elastic modulus and permeability) to be assessed. However, the eigen characteristics of 3D structural lineaments mapped at decimetre to regional scales indicates that discontinuity plane estimates from such datasets tend to be unreliable. Here, we investigate the relationship between digitised lineament vertex geometry (coplanarity/collinearity) and the reliability of their estimated best fitting plane using Monte Carlo experiments. Lineaments are modelled as the intersection curve between two orthonormally oriented fractional Brownian surfaces representing the outcrop and discontinuity plane. Commensurate to increasing lineament vertex collinearity (K), systematic decay in estimated pole vector precision is observed from our experiments. Pole vector distributions are circumferentially constrained around the axis of rotation set by the end nodes of the synthetic lineaments, effectively reducing the rotational degrees of freedom of the vertex set from three to one. Vectors on the unit circle formed perpendicular to this arbitrary axis of rotation conform to von Mises (circular normal) distributions, only transforming to uniform at extreme values of K. This latter observation suggests that whilst

  19. Load-bearing capacity and biological allowable limit of biodegradable metal based on degradation rate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Youn; Chae, Soo-Won; Choi, Kui Won; Seok, Hyun Kwang; Han, Hyung Seop; Yang, Seok Jo; Kim, Young Yul; Kim, Jong Tac; Jung, Jae Young; Assad, Michel

    2012-08-01

    In this study, a newly developed Mg-Ca-Zn alloy for low degradation rate and surface erosion properties was evaluated. The compressive, tensile, and fatigue strength were measured before implantation. The degradation behavior was evaluated by analyzing the microstructure and local hardness of the explanted specimen. Mean and maximum degradation rates were measured using micro CT equipment from 4-, 8-, and 16- week explants, and the alloy was shown to display surface erosion properties. Based on these characteristics, the average and minimum load bearing capacities in tension, compression, and bending modes were calculated. According to the degradation rate and references of recommended dietary intakes (RDI), the Mg-Ca-Zn alloy appears to be safe for human use. PMID:22689439

  20. Performance of bioactive PMMA-based bone cement under load-bearing conditions: an in vivo evaluation and FE simulation.

    PubMed

    Fottner, Andreas; Nies, Berthold; Kitanovic, Denis; Steinbrück, Arnd; Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Schröder, Christian; Heinemann, Sascha; Pohl, Ulrich; Jansson, Volkmar

    2016-09-01

    In the past, bioactive bone cement was investigated in order to improve the durability of cemented arthroplasties by strengthening the bone-cement interface. As direct bone-cement bonding may theoretically lead to higher stresses within the cement, the question arises, whether polymethylmethacrylate features suitable mechanical properties to withstand altered stress conditions? To answer this question, in vivo experiments and finite element simulations were conducted. Twelve rabbits were divided into two groups examining either bioactive polymethylmethacrylate-based cement with unchanged mechanical properties or commercially available polymethylmethacrylate cement. The cements were tested under load-bearing conditions over a period of 7 months, using a spacer prosthesis cemented into the femur. For the finite element analyses, boundary conditions of the rabbit femur were simulated and analyses were performed with respect to different loading scenarios. Calculations of equivalent stress distributions within the cements were applied, with a completely bonded cement surface for the bioactive cement and with a continuously interfering fibrous tissue layer for the reference cement. The bioactive cement revealed good in vivo bioactivity. In the bioactive cement group two failures (33 %), with complete break-out of the prosthesis occurred, while none in the reference group. Finite element analyses of simulated bioactive cement fixation showed an increase in maximal equivalent stress by 49.2 to 109.4 % compared to the simulation of reference cement. The two failures as well as an increase in calculated equivalent stress highlight the importance of fatigue properties of polymethylmethacrylate in general and especially when developing bioactive cements designated for load-bearing conditions. PMID:27530301

  1. Development of hydroxyapatite/calcium silicate composites addressed to the design of load-bearing bone scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sprio, Simone; Tampieri, Anna; Celotti, Giancarlo; Landi, Elena

    2009-04-01

    This work deals with the preparation of bioactive ceramic composites to be employed for the development of load-bearing bone substitutes, made of hydroxyapatite (Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)(OH)(2), HA) and bioactive dicalcium silicate (Ca(2)SiO(4), C(2)S) as a reinforcing phase. The composite materials were prepared by Fast Hot-Pressing (FHP), which allowed the rapid sintering of monolithic ceramics at temperatures up to 1500 degrees C, well above the commonly adopted temperatures for the consolidation of hydroxyapatite (1200-1300 degrees C). The purpose was to achieve the grain coalescence of both HA and the strengthening phase, so that to obtain a homogeneous ceramic material characterized by controlled phase composition and improved mechanical strength; the dwell time was reduced as much as possible to prevent HA decomposition and excessive grain growth. The most remarkable result, in terms of phase composition, was the absence of any secondary phases in the final ceramics other than HA and C(2)S, even after sintering at 1500 degrees C. The flexure strength of the composite materials was found to be much higher than that of HA alone. Further mechanical characterization was also carried out on HA and composites, sintered in different conditions, to evaluate the elastic properties and fracture toughness, and properties close to those of mineral bone were found. These preliminary results confirmed that composites of HA and Ca(2)SiO(4) are promising for the development of bioactive load-bearing ceramic bone substitutes with controlled phase composition. PMID:19627818

  2. A novel dual-frequency loading system for studying mechanobiology of load-bearing tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunqiu; Qiu, Lulu; Gao, Lilan; Guan, Yinjie; Xu, Qiang; Zhang, Xizheng; Chen, Qian

    2016-12-01

    In mechanobiological research, an appropriate loading system is an essential tool to mimic mechanical signals in a native environment. To achieve this goal, we have developed a novel loading system capable of applying dual-frequency loading including both a low-frequency high-amplitude loading and a high-frequency low-amplitude loading, according to the mechanical conditions experienced by bone and articular cartilage tissues. The low-frequency high-amplitude loading embodies the main force from muscular contractions and/or reaction forces while the high-frequency low-amplitude loading represents an assistant force from small muscles, ligaments and/or other tissue in order to maintain body posture during human activities. Therefore, such dual frequency loading system may reflect the natural characteristics of complex mechanical load on bone or articular cartilage than the single frequency loading often applied during current mechanobiological experiments. The dual-frequency loading system is validated by experimental tests using precision miniature plane-mirror interferometers. The dual-frequency loading results in significantly more solute transport in articular cartilage than that of the low-frequency high-amplitude loading regiment alone, as determined by quantitative fluorescence microscopy of tracer distribution in articular cartilage. Thus, the loading system can provide a new method to mimic mechanical environment in bone and cartilage, thereby revealing the in vivo mechanisms of mechanosensation, mechanotransduction and mass-transport, and improving mechanical conditioning of cartilage and/or bone constructs for tissue engineering. PMID:27612712

  3. In-plane structural and electronic anisotropy of iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomberg, Erick

    Many iron-based superconductors undergo a tetragonal to orthorhombic change of their crystallographic lattice symmetry, as well as paramagnetic to anti-ferromagnetic ordering upon cooling through a characteristic temperature TN. The anisotropic structure of the orthorhombic crystal symmetry would naturally lead one to expect to find in-plane electronic anisotropy. Upon cooling through Ts, and going into the orthorhombic symmetry, crystals divide into many small twin domains. Although crystallographically identical, the twin domains express four different rotations of the orthorhombic lattice within the ab-plane making direct measurements along an individual orthorhombic axis impossible. This complication lead to the developement of uniaxial stress and strain detwinning, which makes one of the four domain rotations far more energetically favorable than the other three, to the extent that more than 90% of the entire crystal volume may be represented by the dominant domain. Once in this detwinned state, measurements may be made along the individual orthorhombic axes, allowing one to probe in-plane anisotropy. Following the developement of the detwinning technique, measurements of the in-plane resistivity anisotropy between the orthorhombic a o and bo axes were made. The results, however, turned out to be the opposite of what is predicted from simple models of electrical resistivity. Many different competing theories were developed to understand this unusual behavior. The goal of my doctoral research is to understand the validitiy of these different theories and discover the primary driving force behind this unexpected result. My experiments on the effects of doping on the in-plane resistivity anisotropy yielded an interesting result that not only is there an assymetry between electron and hole doping, but also that the sign of the anisotropy changes sign with sufficient hole doping. This result, along with the tempreature dependence of the in-plane resistivity

  4. Laser induced plane acoustic wave generation, propagation, and interaction with rigid structures in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Seung H.; Ryu, Sang G.; Misra, Nipun; Pan, Heng; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Kladias, Nick; Panides, Elias; Domoto, Gerald A.

    2008-10-01

    Short pulsed laser induced single acoustic wave generation, propagation, interaction with rigid structures, and focusing in water are experimentally and numerically studied. A large area short duration single plane acoustic wave was generated by the thermoelastic interaction of a homogenized nanosecond pulsed laser beam with a liquid-solid interface and propagated at the speed of sound in water. Laser flash schlieren photography was used to visualize the transient interaction of the plane acoustic wave with various submerged rigid structures [(a) a single block, (b) double blocks, (c) 33° tilted single block, and (d) concave cylindrical acoustic lens configurations]. Excellent agreement between the experimental results and numerical simulation is observed. Our simulation results demonstrate that the laser induced planar acoustic wave can be focused down to several tens of micron size and several bars in pressure.

  5. Structural Properties of Lanthanide and Actinide Compounds within the Plane Wave Pseudopotential Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, Chris J.; Winkler, Björn; Chen, Roger K.; Payne, M. C.; Lee, M. H.; Lin, J. S.; White, J. A.; Milman, V.; Vanderbilt, David

    2000-12-01

    We show that plane wave ultrasoft pseudopotential methods readily extend to the calculation of the structural properties of lanthanide and actinide containing compounds. This is demonstrated through a series of calculations performed on UO, UO2, UO3, U3O8, UC2, α-CeC2, CeB6, CeSe, CeO2, NdB6, TmOI, LaBi, LaTiO3, YbO, and elemental Lu.

  6. Structural properties of lanthanide and actinide compounds within the plane wave pseudopotential approach

    PubMed

    Pickard; Winkler; Chen; Payne; Lee; Lin; White; Milman; Vanderbilt

    2000-12-11

    We show that plane wave ultrasoft pseudopotential methods readily extend to the calculation of the structural properties of lanthanide and actinide containing compounds. This is demonstrated through a series of calculations performed on UO, UO2, UO3, U3O8, UC2, alpha-CeC2, CeB6, CeSe, CeO2, NdB6, TmOI, LaBi, LaTiO3, YbO, and elemental Lu. PMID:11102201

  7. Designing stable finite state machine behaviors using phase plane analysis and variable structure control

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.T.; Robinett, R.D.; Driessen, B.J.

    1998-03-10

    This paper discusses how phase plane analysis can be used to describe the overall behavior of single and multiple autonomous robotic vehicles with finite state machine rules. The importance of this result is that one can begin to design provably asymptotically stable group behaviors from a set of simple control laws and appropriate switching points with decentralized variable structure control. The ability to prove asymptotically stable group behavior is especially important for applications such as locating military targets or land mines.

  8. GROWING ALTERNATIVE SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS: BIO-COMPOSITE PRODUCTS FROM NATURAL FIBER, BIODEGRADABLE AND RECYCLABLE POLYMER MATERIALS FOR LOAD-BEARING CONSTRUCTION COMPONENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project is an integrative educational and research project that will revolutionize design and construction methods towards more sustainable buildings. The project will develop and test new product design concepts using bio-composite materials in load-bearing and fa&cced...

  9. Chiral nematic self-assembly of minimally surface damaged chitin nanofibrils and its load bearing functions

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dongyeop X.; Cha, Yun Jeong; Nguyen, Hoang-Linh; Je, Hwa Heon; Jho, Yong Seok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature, with 1010 tons produced annually as hierarchically organized nanofibril fillers to reinforce the exoskeletons of arthropods. This green and cheap biomaterial has attracted great attention due to its potential application to reinforce biomedical materials. Despite that, its practical use is limited since the extraction of chitin nanofibrils requires surface modification involving harsh chemical treatments, leading to difficulties in reproducing their natural prototypal hierarchical structure, i.e. chiral nematic phase. Here, we develop a chemical etching-free approach using calcium ions, called “natural way”, to disintegrate the chitin nanofibrils while keeping the essential moiety for the self-assembly, ultimately resulting in the reproduction of chitin’s natural chiral structure in a polymeric matrix. This chiral chitin nanostructure exceptionally toughens the composite. Our resultant chiral nematic phase of chitin materials can contribute to the understanding and use of the reinforcing strategy in nature. PMID:26988392

  10. Chiral nematic self-assembly of minimally surface damaged chitin nanofibrils and its load bearing functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Dongyeop X.; Cha, Yun Jeong; Nguyen, Hoang-Linh; Je, Hwa Heon; Jho, Yong Seok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-03-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature, with 1010 tons produced annually as hierarchically organized nanofibril fillers to reinforce the exoskeletons of arthropods. This green and cheap biomaterial has attracted great attention due to its potential application to reinforce biomedical materials. Despite that, its practical use is limited since the extraction of chitin nanofibrils requires surface modification involving harsh chemical treatments, leading to difficulties in reproducing their natural prototypal hierarchical structure, i.e. chiral nematic phase. Here, we develop a chemical etching-free approach using calcium ions, called “natural way”, to disintegrate the chitin nanofibrils while keeping the essential moiety for the self-assembly, ultimately resulting in the reproduction of chitin’s natural chiral structure in a polymeric matrix. This chiral chitin nanostructure exceptionally toughens the composite. Our resultant chiral nematic phase of chitin materials can contribute to the understanding and use of the reinforcing strategy in nature.

  11. Chiral nematic self-assembly of minimally surface damaged chitin nanofibrils and its load bearing functions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dongyeop X; Cha, Yun Jeong; Nguyen, Hoang-Linh; Je, Hwa Heon; Jho, Yong Seok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature, with 10(10) tons produced annually as hierarchically organized nanofibril fillers to reinforce the exoskeletons of arthropods. This green and cheap biomaterial has attracted great attention due to its potential application to reinforce biomedical materials. Despite that, its practical use is limited since the extraction of chitin nanofibrils requires surface modification involving harsh chemical treatments, leading to difficulties in reproducing their natural prototypal hierarchical structure, i.e. chiral nematic phase. Here, we develop a chemical etching-free approach using calcium ions, called "natural way", to disintegrate the chitin nanofibrils while keeping the essential moiety for the self-assembly, ultimately resulting in the reproduction of chitin's natural chiral structure in a polymeric matrix. This chiral chitin nanostructure exceptionally toughens the composite. Our resultant chiral nematic phase of chitin materials can contribute to the understanding and use of the reinforcing strategy in nature. PMID:26988392

  12. Modulated magnetic phase of structurally heterogeneous easy-plane weak ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhuraev, D. R.; Niyazov, L. N.; Sokolov, B. Yu.

    2016-06-01

    The modulated magnetic phase of a structurally heterogeneous easy-plane weak ferromagnet is considered in terms of the thermodynamic Landau theory of phase transitions. The temperature and field dependences of the main magnetic order modulation parameters are determined. The results obtained are compared with the experimental data obtained for the orientational phase transition into a modulated magnetic state that occurs in hematite and iron borate crystals doped with diamagnetic ions to create structural heterogeneity. The proposed theoretical model is shown to describe the entire set of experimental results consistently with some exceptions.

  13. Anti-plane transverse waves propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, A-Li; Yan, Dong-Jia; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, anti-plane transverse wave propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures is studied. The localization factor is introduced to characterize the wave propagation behavior. The transfer matrix method based on the nonlocal piezoelectricity continuum theory is used to calculate the localization factor. Additionally, the stiffness matrix method is applied to compute the wave transmission spectra. A cut-off frequency is found, beyond which the elastic waves cannot propagate through the periodic structure. The size effect or the influence of the ratio of the internal to external characteristic lengths on the cut-off frequency and the wave propagation behavior are investigated and discussed. PMID:26518526

  14. A full 3D plane-wave-expansion model for 1-3 piezoelectric composite structures.

    PubMed

    Wilm, Mikaël; Ballandras, Sylvain; Laude, Vincent; Pastureaud, Thomas

    2002-09-01

    The plane-wave-expansion (PWE) approach dedicated to the simulation of periodic devices has been extended to 1-3 connectivity piezoelectric composite structures. The case of simple but actual piezoelectric composite structures is addressed, taking piezoelectricity, acoustic losses, and electrical excitation conditions rigorously into account. The material distribution is represented by using a bidimensional Fourier series and the electromechanical response is simulated using a Bloch-Floquet expansion together with the Fahmy-Adler formulation of the Christoffel problem. Application of the model to 1-3 connectivity piezoelectric composites is reported and compared to previously published analyses of this problem. PMID:12243182

  15. Structural anisotropic properties of a-plane GaN epilayers grown on r-plane sapphire by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lotsari, A.; Kehagias, Th.; Katsikini, M.; Arvanitidis, J.; Ves, S.; Komninou, Ph.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Tsiakatouras, G.; Tsagaraki, K.; Georgakilas, A.; Christofilos, D.

    2014-06-07

    Heteroepitaxial non-polar III-Nitride layers may exhibit extensive anisotropy in the surface morphology and the epilayer microstructure along distinct in-plane directions. The structural anisotropy, evidenced by the “M”-shape dependence of the (112{sup ¯}0) x-ray rocking curve widths on the beam azimuth angle, was studied by combining transmission electron microscopy observations, Raman spectroscopy, high resolution x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy in a-plane GaN epilayers grown on r-plane sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). The structural anisotropic behavior was attributed quantitatively to the high dislocation densities, particularly the Frank-Shockley partial dislocations that delimit the I{sub 1} intrinsic basal stacking faults, and to the concomitant plastic strain relaxation. On the other hand, isotropic samples exhibited lower dislocation densities and a biaxial residual stress state. For PAMBE growth, the anisotropy was correlated to N-rich (or Ga-poor) conditions on the surface during growth, that result in formation of asymmetric a-plane GaN grains elongated along the c-axis. Such conditions enhance the anisotropy of gallium diffusion on the surface and reduce the GaN nucleation rate.

  16. On load paths and load bearing topology from finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, D.; Reidsema, C.; Lee, M.

    2010-06-01

    Load paths can be mapped from vector plots of 'pointing stress vectors'. They define a path along which a component of load remains constant as it traverses the solution domain. In this paper the theory for the paths is first defined. Properties of the plots that enable a designer to interpret the structural behavior from the contours are then identified. Because stress is a second order tensor defined on an orthogonal set of axes, the vector plots define separate paths for load transfer in each direction of the set of axes. An algorithm is therefore presented that combines the vectors to define a topology to carry the loads. The algorithm is shown to straighten the paths reducing bending moments and removing stress concentration. Application to a bolted joint, a racing car body and a yacht hull demonstrate the usefulness of the plots.

  17. Anodized titania: Processing and characterization to improve cell-materials interactions for load bearing implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kakoli

    The objective of this study is to investigate in vitro cell-materials interactions using human osteoblast cells on anodized titanium. Titanium is a bioinert material and, therefore, gets encapsulated after implantation into the living body by a fibrous tissue that isolates them from the surrounding tissues. In this work, bioactive nonporous and nanoporous TiO2 layers were grown on commercially pure titanium substrate by anodization process using different electrolyte solutions namely (1) H3PO 4, (2) HF and (3) H2SO4, (4) aqueous solution of citric acid, sodium fluoride and sulfuric acid. The first three electrolytes produced bioactive TiO2 films with a nonporous structure showing three distinctive surface morphologies. Nanoporous morphology was obtained on Ti-surfaces from the fourth electrolyte at 20V for 4h. Cross-sectional view of the nanoporous surface reveals titania nanotubes of length 600 nm. It was found that increasing anodization time initially increased the height of the nanotubes while maintaining the tubular array structure, but beyond 4h, growth of nanotubes decreased with a collapsed array structure. Human osteoblast (HOB) cell attachment and growth behavior were studied using an osteoprecursor cell line (OPC 1) for 3, 7 and 11 days. Colonization of the cells was noticed with distinctive cell-to-cell attachment on HF anodized surfaces. TiO2 layer grown in H2SO4 electrolyte did not show significant cell growth on the surface, and some cell death was also noticed. Good cellular adherence with extracellular matrix extensions in between the cells was noticed for samples anodized with H3PO 4 electrolyte and nanotube surface. Cell proliferation was excellent on anodized nanotube surfaces. An abundant amount of extracellular matrix (ECM) between the neighboring cells was also noticed on nanotube surfaces with filopodia extensions coming out from cells to grasp the nanoporous surface for anchorage. To better understand and compare cell-materials interactions

  18. Woven silk fabric-reinforced silk nanofibrous scaffolds for regenerating load-bearing soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Han, F; Liu, S; Liu, X; Pei, Y; Bai, S; Zhao, H; Lu, Q; Ma, F; Kaplan, D L; Zhu, H

    2014-02-01

    Although three-dimensional (3-D) porous regenerated silk scaffolds with outstanding biocompatibility, biodegradability and low inflammatory reactions have promising application in different tissue regeneration, the mechanical properties of regenerated scaffolds, especially suture retention strength, must be further improved to satisfy the requirements of clinical applications. This study presents woven silk fabric-reinforced silk nanofibrous scaffolds aimed at dermal tissue engineering. To improve the mechanical properties, silk scaffolds prepared by lyophilization were reinforced with degummed woven silk fabrics. The ultimate tensile strength, elongation at break and suture retention strength of the scaffolds were significantly improved, providing suitable mechanical properties strong enough for clinical applications. The stiffness and degradation behaviors were then further regulated by different after-treatment processes, making the scaffolds more suitable for dermal tissue regeneration. The in vitro cell culture results indicated that these scaffolds maintained their excellent biocompatibility after being reinforced with woven silk fabrics. Without sacrifice of porous structure and biocompatibility, the fabric-reinforced scaffolds with better mechanical properties could facilitate future clinical applications of silk as matrices in skin repair. PMID:24090985

  19. Fabrication of a biodegradable calcium polyphosphate/polyvinyl-urethane carbonate composite for high load bearing osteosynthesis applications.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Scott D; Pilliar, Robert M; Santerre, J Paul

    2010-07-01

    The formation of biodegradable implants for use in osteosynthesis has been a major goal of biomaterials research for the past 2-3 decades. Self-reinforced polylactide systems represent the most significant success of this research to date, however, with elastic constants up to 12-15 GPa at best, they fail to provide the initial stiffness required of devices for stabilizing fractures of major load-bearing bones. Our research has investigated the use of calcium polyphosphate (CPP), an inorganic polymer in combination with polyvinyl-urethane carbonate (PVUC) organic polymers for such applications. Initial studies indicated that composite samples formed as interpenetrating phase composites (IPC) exhibited suitable as-made strength and stiffness, however, they displayed a rapid loss of properties when exposed to in vitro aging. An investigation to determine the mechanism of this accelerated in vitro degradation for the IPCs as well as to identify possible design changes to overcome this drawback was undertaken using a model IPC system. It was found that strong interfacial strength and minimal swelling of the PVUC are very important for obtaining and maintaining appropriate mechanical properties in vitro. PMID:20524193

  20. The Behavior of Water in Collagen and Hydroxyapatite Sites of Cortical Bone: Fracture, Mechanical Wear, and Load Bearing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gul-E-Noor, Farhana; Singh, Chandan; Papaioannou, Antonios; Sinha, Neeraj; Boutis, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of cortical bone, which is largely comprised of collagen, hydroxyapatite, and water, are known to hinge on hydration. Recently, the characteristics of water in bone have drawn attention as potential markers of bone quality. We report on the dynamics, diffusion, population, and exchange of water in cortical bone by NMR relaxation and diffusion methodologies. Relaxation measurements over timescales ranging from 0.001 to 4.2 s reveal two distinguishable water environments. Systematic exposure to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or collagenase reveals one peak in our 2D relaxation map belonging to water present in the hydroxyapatite rich environment, and a second peak with shorter relaxation times arising from a collagen rich site. Diffusion-T2 measurements allowed for direct measurement of the diffusion coefficient of water in all observable reservoirs. Further, deuterium relaxation methods were applied to study cortical bone under an applied force, following mechanical wear or fracture. The tumbling correlation times of water reduce in all three cases, indicating that water dynamics may be used as a probe of bone quality. Lastly, changes in the relative populations and correlation times of water in bone under an applied force suggest that load bearing occurs largely in the collagen rich environment and is reversible. PMID:26659838

  1. A novel H-plane filter using double-layer substrate integrated waveguide with defected ground structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghayari, Hassan; Komjani, Nader; Molaei Garmjani, Nima

    2013-06-01

    The novel double layer substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) technology is used for realisation of conventional H-plane filter, which is manufactured in waveguide. This proposed filter is totally realised in double layer dielectric substrate with metallic vias and fabricated using a standard printed circuit board (PCB) process. In previous studies, prototypes of E-plane and H-plane filter were designed and fabricated in standard waveguides. The H-plane type of those two has the same frequency response as that of the E-plane type, while its cross section is one-quarter. Similarly, the SIW H-plane filter, which is presented in this article, has the same dispersion characteristics as that of waveguide filter while its dimensions are very shorter. Moreover, by using a sandwich model of double layer SIW, the interleaved metal vane is fabricated between two substrates easily. We can also improve the frequency response of the SIW H-plane filter using defected ground structure (DGS). Therefore, in DGS SIW H-plane filter, which is presented, the return loss and insertion loss in passband are less than conventional H-plane filter. The improvement of the spurious response is the other trait of DGS SIW H-plane filter.

  2. Engineering of optical polarization based on electronic band structures of A-plane ZnO layers under biaxial strains

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Hiroaki Tabata, Hitoshi; Hasuike, Noriyuki; Harima, Hiroshi

    2014-09-21

    In-plane anisotropic strains in A-plane layers on the electronic band structure of ZnO were investigated from the viewpoint of optical polarization anisotropy. Investigations utilizing k·p perturbation theory revealed that energy transitions and associated oscillation strengths were dependent on in-plane strains. The theoretical correlation between optical polarizations and in-plane strains was experimentally demonstrated using A-plane ZnO layers with different in-plane strains. Finally, optical polarization anisotropy and its implications for in-plane optical properties are discussed in relation to the energy shift between two orthogonal directions. Higher polarization rotations were obtained in an A-plane ZnO layer with in-plane biaxially compressive strains as compared to strain-free ZnO. This study provides detailed information concerning the role played by in-plane strains in optically polarized applications based on nonpolar ZnO in the ultra-violet region.

  3. Controlling the Electronic Structures and Properties of in-Plane Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides Quantum Wells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Dai, Ying; Niu, Chengwang; Huang, Baibiao

    2015-01-01

    In-plane transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) quantum wells have been studied on the basis of first-principles density functional calculations to reveal how to control the electronic structures and the properties. In collection of quantum confinement, strain and intrinsic electric field, TMD quantum wells offer a diverse of exciting new physics. The band gap can be continuously reduced ascribed to the potential drop over the embedded TMD and the strain substantially affects the band gap nature. The true type-II alignment forms due to the coherent lattice and strong interface coupling suggesting the effective separation and collection of excitons. Interestingly, two-dimensional quantum wells of in-plane TMD can enrich the photoluminescence properties of TMD materials. The intrinsic electric polarization enhances the spin-orbital coupling and demonstrates the possibility to achieve topological insulator state and valleytronics in TMD quantum wells. In-plane TMD quantum wells have opened up new possibilities of applications in next-generation devices at nanoscale. PMID:26616013

  4. Complex band structure under plane-wave nonlocal pseudopotential Hamiltonian of metallic wires and electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao

    2009-07-17

    We present a practical approach to calculate the complex band structure of an electrode for quantum transport calculations. This method is designed for plane wave based Hamiltonian with nonlocal pseudopotentials and the auxiliary periodic boundary condition transport calculation approach. Currently there is no direct method to calculate all the evanescent states for a given energy for systems with nonlocal pseudopotentials. On the other hand, in the auxiliary periodic boundary condition transport calculation, there is no need for all the evanescent states at a given energy. The current method fills this niche. The method has been used to study copper and gold nanowires and bulk electrodes.

  5. Phase structure function and AOA fluctuations of plane and spherical waves propagating through oceanic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lu; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Pengfei; Qiao, Chunhong; Fan, Chengyu; Zhang, Jinghui; Ji, Xiaoling

    2015-08-01

    Based on the characteristics of a hypergeometric function, the analytical expressions for the phase structure function and angle-of-arrival (AOA) fluctuations of plane and spherical waves propagating through oceanic turbulence are derived. The results are verified by comparing them with the numerical calculations of the definitions using four important parameters (i.e., the rate of dissipation of mean-squared temperature {χ }T, the rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid \\varepsilon , the ratio of temperature to salinity contribution to the refractive index spectrum w, and the Kolmogorov microscale η ). The relation between AOA fluctuations and the spatial coherence radius {ρ }0 is also investigated.

  6. Three-dimensional vortical structures of transition in plane channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.

    1987-01-01

    Three-dimensional visualization of flwo field structures in transitional plane channel flow obtained from a numerical simulation are presented at two Reynolds numbers. It is revealed that at the one-spike stage, independent of Reynolds number, the flow is characterized by a multi-layer vortex system. In the upper layer, total vorticity vector plots indicate a high-shear layer dominated by spanwise vorticity, whereas the middle layer (corresponding approximately to the critical layer) forms a vortex loop (alpha-vortex) consisting of strong streamwise and spanwise vorticity components. At the three-spike stage, the breakdown of the vortical structure proceeds in a manner similar to frontal relaminarization of turbulent spots. This process is accompanied by intense vortex lift-up activity near the wall which seems to originate at the legs of the vortex loop trailing the high-shear layer. Finally, at the five-spike stage, it is shown that high-vorticity regions (vortical structures) develop into horseshow eddies in planes inclined to the main flow direction.

  7. Initial condition effects on large scale structure in numerical simulations of plane mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullan, W. A.; Garrett, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Large Eddy Simulations are performed on the spatially developing plane turbulent mixing layer. The simulated mixing layers originate from initially laminar conditions. The focus of this research is on the effect of the nature of the imposed fluctuations on the large-scale spanwise and streamwise structures in the flow. Two simulations are performed; one with low-level three-dimensional inflow fluctuations obtained from pseudo-random numbers, the other with physically correlated fluctuations of the same magnitude obtained from an inflow generation technique. Where white-noise fluctuations provide the inflow disturbances, no spatially stationary streamwise vortex structure is observed, and the large-scale spanwise turbulent vortical structures grow continuously and linearly. These structures are observed to have a three-dimensional internal geometry with branches and dislocations. Where physically correlated provide the inflow disturbances a "streaky" streamwise structure that is spatially stationary is observed, with the large-scale turbulent vortical structures growing with the square-root of time. These large-scale structures are quasi-two-dimensional, on top of which the secondary structure rides. The simulation results are discussed in the context of the varying interpretations of mixing layer growth that have been postulated. Recommendations are made concerning the data required from experiments in order to produce accurate numerical simulation recreations of real flows.

  8. Electronic and crystal structure changes induced by in-plane oxygen vacancies in multiferroic YMnO3

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cheng, Shaobo; Meng, Qingping; Li, Mengli; Duan, Wenhui; Zhao, Y. G.; Sun, X. F.; Zhu, Yimei; Zhu, Jing

    2016-02-08

    Here, the widely spread oxygen vacancies (VO) in multiferroic materials can strongly affect their physical properties. However, their exact influence has rarely been identified in hexagonal manganites. Here, with the combined use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and first-principles calculations, we have systematically studied the electronic and crystal structure modifications induced by VO located at the same Mn atomic plane (in-plane VO). Our TEM experiments reveal that the easily formed in-plane VO not only influence the electronic structure of YMnO3 but alter the in-plane Wyckoff positions of Mn ions, which may subsequently affect the intraplane and interplane exchange interaction ofmore » Mn ions. The ferroelectricity is also impaired due to the introduction of VO. Further calculations confirm these electronic and structural changes and modifications. Our results indicate that the electronic and crystal structure of YMnO3 can be manipulated by the creation of VO.« less

  9. Simulated ΛCDM analogues of the thin Plane of Satellites around the Andromeda galaxy are not kinematically coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Tobias; Dutton, Aaron A.; Macciò, Andrea V.

    2016-05-01

    A large fraction of the dwarf satellites orbiting the Andromeda galaxy are surprisingly aligned in a thin, extended and apparently kinematically coherent planar structure. Such a structure is not easily found in simulations based on the Cold Dark Matter model (ΛCDM). Using 21 high resolution cosmological simulations we analyse the kinematics of planes of satellites similar to the one around Andromeda. We find good agreement when co-rotation is characterized by the line-of-sight velocity. At the same time, when co-rotation is inferred by the angular momenta of the satellites, the planes are in agreement with the plane around our Galaxy. We find such planes to be common in our high concentration haloes. The number of co-rotating satellites obtained from the sign of the line-of-sight velocity shows large variations depending on the viewing angle and is consistent with that obtained from a sample with random velocities. We find that the clustering of angular momentum vectors of the satellites in the plane is a better measure of the kinematic coherence. Thus we conclude that the line-of-sight velocity is not well suited as a proxy for the kinematical coherence of the plane. Analysis of the kinematics of our planes shows a fraction of ˜30% chance aligned satellites. Tracking the satellites in the plane back in time reveals that these planes are a transient feature and not kinematically coherent as would appear at first sight. Thus we expect some of the satellites in the plane around Andromeda to have high velocities perpendicular to the plane.

  10. Simulated ΛCDM analogues of the thin plane of satellites around the Andromeda galaxy are not kinematically coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Tobias; Dutton, Aaron A.; Macciò, Andrea V.

    2016-08-01

    A large fraction of the dwarf satellites orbiting the Andromeda galaxy are surprisingly aligned in a thin, extended and apparently kinematically coherent planar structure. Such a structure is not easily found in simulations based on the cold dark matter model (ΛCDM). Using 21 high-resolution cosmological simulations, we analyse the kinematics of planes of satellites similar to the one around Andromeda. We find good agreement when co-rotation is characterized by the line-of-sight velocity. At the same time, when co-rotation is inferred by the angular momenta of the satellites, the planes are in agreement with the plane around our Galaxy. We find such planes to be common in our high-concentration haloes. The number of co-rotating satellites obtained from the sign of the line-of-sight velocity shows large variations depending on the viewing angle and is consistent with that obtained from a sample with random velocities. We find that the clustering of angular momentum vectors of the satellites in the plane is a better measure of the kinematic coherence. Thus we conclude that the line-of-sight velocity is not well suited as a proxy for the kinematical coherence of the plane. Analysis of the kinematics of our planes shows a fraction of ˜30 per cent chance-aligned satellites. Tracking the satellites in the plane back in time reveals that these planes are a transient feature and not kinematically coherent as would appear at first sight. Thus we expect some of the satellites in the plane around Andromeda to have high velocities perpendicular to the plane.

  11. Dense ionic fluids confined in planar capacitors: in- and out-of-plane structure from classical density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härtel, Andreas; Samin, Sela; van Roij, René

    2016-06-01

    The ongoing scientific interest in the properties and structure of electric double layers (EDLs) stems from their pivotal role in (super)capacitive energy storage, energy harvesting, and water treatment technologies. Classical density functional theory (DFT) is a promising framework for the study of the in- and out-of-plane structural properties of double layers. Supported by molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate the adequate performance of DFT for analyzing charge layering in the EDL perpendicular to the electrodes. We discuss charge storage and capacitance of the EDL and the impact of screening due to dielectric solvents. We further calculate, for the first time, the in-plane structure of the EDL within the framework of DFT. While our out-of-plane results already hint at structural in-plane transitions inside the EDL, which have been observed recently in simulations and experiments, our DFT approach performs poorly in predicting in-plane structure in comparison to simulations. However, our findings isolate fundamental issues in the theoretical description of the EDL within the primitive model and point towards limitations in the performance of DFT in describing the out-of-plane structure of the EDL at high concentrations and potentials.

  12. Dense ionic fluids confined in planar capacitors: in- and out-of-plane structure from classical density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Härtel, Andreas; Samin, Sela; van Roij, René

    2016-06-22

    The ongoing scientific interest in the properties and structure of electric double layers (EDLs) stems from their pivotal role in (super)capacitive energy storage, energy harvesting, and water treatment technologies. Classical density functional theory (DFT) is a promising framework for the study of the in- and out-of-plane structural properties of double layers. Supported by molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate the adequate performance of DFT for analyzing charge layering in the EDL perpendicular to the electrodes. We discuss charge storage and capacitance of the EDL and the impact of screening due to dielectric solvents. We further calculate, for the first time, the in-plane structure of the EDL within the framework of DFT. While our out-of-plane results already hint at structural in-plane transitions inside the EDL, which have been observed recently in simulations and experiments, our DFT approach performs poorly in predicting in-plane structure in comparison to simulations. However, our findings isolate fundamental issues in the theoretical description of the EDL within the primitive model and point towards limitations in the performance of DFT in describing the out-of-plane structure of the EDL at high concentrations and potentials. PMID:27116552

  13. An experimental study of forced streamwise vortical structures in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.; Bell, James H.

    1989-01-01

    Streamwise structures have been shown to ride among the primary spanwise vortices in past flow visualization investigations of plane mixing layers. More recently, quantitative measurements were obtained which showed the origin and evolution of streamwise vortices within a mixing layer. In the present study, the effects of perturbing the mixing layer using two different mechanisms are investigated. A serration on the splitter plate trailing edge was found to have a relatively small effect, confined to the near-field development of the streamwise structures. The installation of cylindrical pegs in the high-speed side boundary layer, however, not only generated a regular array of vortex pairs, but also affected the mean development of the mixing layer far downstream. In both cases, the mean streamwise vorticity was found to decay rapidly with increasing downstream distance.

  14. An experimental study of forced streamwise vortical structures in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.; Bell, James H.

    Streamwise structures have been shown to ride among the primary spanwise vortices in past flow visualization investigations of plane mixing layers. More recently, quantitative measurements were obtained which showed the origin and evolution of streamwise vortices within a mixing layer. In the present study, the effects of perturbing the mixing layer using two different mechanisms are investigated. A serration on the splitter plate trailing edge was found to have a relatively small effect, confined to the near-field development of the streamwise structures. The installation of cylindrical pegs in the high-speed side boundary layer, however, not only generated a regular array of vortex pairs, but also affected the mean development of the mixing layer far downstream. In both cases, the mean streamwise vorticity was found to decay rapidly with increasing downstream distance.

  15. Strained-layer superlattice focal plane array having a planar structure

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jin K.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Gin, Aaron; Marsh, Phillip F.; Young, Erik W.; Cich, Michael J.

    2010-07-13

    An infrared focal plane array (FPA) is disclosed which utilizes a strained-layer superlattice (SLS) formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5 epitaxially grown on a GaSb substrate. The FPA avoids the use of a mesa structure to isolate each photodetector element and instead uses impurity-doped regions formed in or about each photodetector for electrical isolation. This results in a substantially-planar structure in which the SLS is unbroken across the entire width of a 2-D array of the photodetector elements which are capped with an epitaxially-grown passivation layer to reduce or eliminate surface recombination. The FPA has applications for use in the wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m.

  16. Cross-plane heat transfer through single-layer carbon structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaichen; Nedea, Silvia V; Rindt, Camilo C M; Smeulders, David M J

    2016-02-21

    Graphene-based nano-structures have been recently proposed to function as additives to improve the conductivity of thermally sluggish phase change materials (PCMs). Based on the existing research studies, the improvement is dependent not only on the matrix material, but also on the geometry of the carbon structure. To gain more insight into the nano-scale thermal transport problem, we launched the current pilot research using water as the matrix material, to represent the hydroxyl-group-rich sugar alcohols as PCMs. We have found that the heat conduction across a graphene layer to water is much faster than the heat conduction to the graphene layer itself. Also, the high graphene-water thermal contact resistance fails to acknowledge the fast thermal kinetics of the low frequency phonons. In the investigation of the geometry effect, the cross-plane heat transfer coefficient is found to decrease with decreasing CNT diameter except CNT(9,9). PMID:26818392

  17. Turbulent rotating plane Couette flow: Reynolds and rotation number dependency of flow structure and momentum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Takuya; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Plane Couette flow under spanwise, anticyclonic system rotation [rotating plane Couette flow (RPCF)] is studied experimentally using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry for different Reynolds and rotation numbers in the fully turbulent regime. Similar to the laminar regime, the turbulent flow in RPCF is characterized by roll cells, however both instantaneous snapshots of the velocity field and space correlations show that the roll cell structure varies with the rotation number. All three velocity components are measured and both the mean flow and all four nonzero Reynolds stresses are obtained across the central parts of the channel. This also allows us to determine the wall shear stress from the viscous stress and the Reynolds stress in the center of the channel, and for low rotation rates the wall shear stress increases with increasing rotation rate as expected. The results show that zero absolute vorticity is established in the central parts of the channel of turbulent RPCF for high enough rotation rates, but also that the mean velocity profile for certain parameter ranges shows an S shape giving rise to a negative velocity gradient in the center of the channel. We find that from an analysis of the Reynolds stress transport equation using the present data there is a transport of the Reynolds shear stress towards the center of the channel, which may then result in a negative mean velocity gradient there.

  18. Load-bearing capacity of screw-retained CAD/CAM-produced titanium implant frameworks (I-Bridge®2) before and after cyclic mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    DITTMER, Marc Philipp; NENSA, Moritz; STIESCH, Meike; KOHORST, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Implant-supported screw-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) produced by CAD/ CAM have been introduced in recent years for the rehabilitation of partial or total endentulous jaws. However, there is a lack of data about the long-term mechanical characteristics. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the failure mode and the influence of extended cyclic mechanical loading on the load-bearing capacity of these frameworks. Material and Methods Ten five-unit FDP frameworks simulating a free-end situation in the mandibular jaw were manufactured according to the I-Bridge®2-concept (I-Bridge®2, Biomain AB, Helsingborg, Sweden) and each was screw-retained on three differently angulated Astra Tech implants (30º buccal angulation/0º angulation/30º lingual angulation). One half of the specimens was tested for static load-bearing capacity without any further treatment (control), whereas the other half underwent five million cycles of mechanical loading with 100 N as the upper load limit (test). All specimens were loaded until failure in a universal testing machine with an occlusal force applied at the pontics. Load-displacement curves were recorded and the failure mode was macro- and microscopically analyzed. The statistical analysis was performed using a t-test (p=0.05). Results All the specimens survived cyclic mechanical loading and no obvious failure could be observed. Due to the cyclic mechanical loading, the load-bearing capacity decreased from 8,496 N±196 N (control) to 7,592 N±901 N (test). The cyclic mechanical loading did not significantly influence the load-bearing capacity (p=0.060). The failure mode was almost identical in all specimens: large deformations of the framework at the implant connection area were obvious. Conclusion The load-bearing capacity of the I-Bridge®2 frameworks is much higher than the clinically relevant occlusal forces, even with considerably angulated implants. However, the performance under functional loading in vivo

  19. A substrate-free optical readout focal plane array with a heat sink structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rmwen, Liu; Yanmei, Kong; Binbin, Jiao; Zhigang, Li; Haiping, Shang; Dike, Lu; Chaoqun, Gao; Dapeng, Chen; Qingchuan, Zhang

    2013-02-01

    A substrate-free optical readout focal plane array (FPA) operating in 8-12 μm with a heat sink structure (HSS) was fabricated and its performance was tested. The temperature distribution of the FPA with an HSS investigated by using a commercial FLIR IR camera shows excellent uniformity. The thermal cross-talk effect existing in traditional substrate-free FPAs was eliminated effectively. The heat sink is fabricated successfully by electroplating copper, which provides high thermal capacity and high thermal conductivity, on the frame of substrate-free FPA. The FPA was tested in the optical-readout system, the results show that the response and NETD are 13.6 grey/K (F / # = 0.8) and 588 mK, respectively.

  20. Investigation of flaw geometry and loading effects on plane strain fracture in metallic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The effects on fracture and flaw growth of weld-induced residual stresses, combined bending and tension stresses, and stress fields adjacent to circular holes in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5AI-2.5Sn(ELI) titanium alloys were evaluated. Static fracture tests were conducted in liquid nitrogen; fatigue tests were performed in room air, liquid nitrogen, and liquid hydrogen. Evaluation of results was based on linear elastic fracture mechanics concepts and was directed to improving existing methods of estimating minimum fracture strength and fatigue lives for pressurized structure in spacecraft and booster systems. Effects of specimen design in plane-strain fracture toughness testing were investigated. Four different specimen types were tested in room air, liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen environments using the aluminum and titanium alloys. Interferometry and holograph were used to measure crack-opening displacements in surface-flawed plexiglass test specimens. Comparisons were made between stress intensities calculated using displacement measurements, and approximate analytical solutions.

  1. Adhesive strength of bone-implant interfaces and in-vivo degradation of PHB composites for load-bearing applications.

    PubMed

    Meischel, M; Eichler, J; Martinelli, E; Karr, U; Weigel, J; Schmöller, G; Tschegg, E K; Fischerauer, S; Weinberg, A M; Stanzl-Tschegg, S E

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the response of bone to novel biodegradable polymeric composite implants in the femora of growing rats. Longitudinal observation of bone reaction at the implant site (BV/TV) as well as resorption of the implanted pins were monitored using in vivo micro-focus computed tomography (µCT). After 12, 24 and 36 weeks femora containing the implants were explanted, scanned with high resolution ex vivo µCT, and the surface roughness of the implants was measured to conclude on the ingrowth capability for bone tissue. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used to observe changes on the surface of Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) during degradation and cell ingrowth. Four different composites with zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) and Herafill(®) were compared. After 36 weeks in vivo, none of the implants did show significant degradation. The PHB composite with ZrO2 and a high percentage (30%) of Herafill® as well as the Mg-alloy WZ21 showed the highest values of bone accumulation (increased BV/TV) around the implant. The lowest value was measured in PHB with 3% ZrO2 containing no Herafill®. Roughness measurements as well as EDX and SEM imaging could not reveal any changes on the PHB composites׳ surfaces. Biomechanical parameters, such as the adhesion strength between bone and implant were determined by measuring the shear strength as well as push-out energy of the bone-implant interface. The results showed that improvement of these mechanical properties of the studied PHBs P3Z, P3Z10H and P3Z30H is necessary in order to obtain appropriate load-bearing material. The moduli of elasticity, tensile strength and strain properties of the PHB composites are close to that of bone and thus promising. Compared to clinically used PLGA, PGA and PLA materials, their additional benefit is an unchanged local pH value during degradation, which makes them well tolerated by cells and immune system. They might be used

  2. Structural Affects on the Slamming Pressures of High-Speed Planing Craft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Christine; Taravella, Brandon; Judge, Carolyn

    2015-11-01

    High-speed planing craft are subjected to repeated slamming events in waves that can be very extreme depending on the wave topography, impact angle of the ship, forward speed of the ship, encounter angle, and height out of the water. The current work examines this fluid-structure interaction problem through the use of wedge drop experiments and a CFD code. In the first set of experiments, a rigid 20-degree deadrise angle wedge was dropped from a range of heights (0 <= H <= 0 . 6 m) and while pressures and accelerations of the slam even were measured. The second set of experiments involved a flexible-bottom 15-degree deadrise angle wedge that was dropped from from the same range of heights. In these second experiments, the pressures, accelerations, and strain field were measured. Both experiments are compared with a non-linear boundary value flat cylinder theory code in order to compare the pressure loading. The code assumes a rigid structure, therefore, the results between the code and the first experiment are in good agreement. The second experiment shows pressure magnitudes that are lower than the predictions due to the energy required to deform the structure. Funding from University of New Orleans Office of Research and Sponsored Programs and the Office of Naval Research.

  3. Inertial effects on thin-film wave structures with imposed surface shear on an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapuratharasu, M.; Hibberd, S.; Hubbard, M. E.; Power, H.

    2016-06-01

    This study provides an extended approach to the mathematical simulation of thin-film flow on a flat inclined plane relevant to flows subject to high surface shear. Motivated by modelling thin-film structures within an industrial context, wave structures are investigated for flows with moderate inertial effects and small film depth aspect ratio ε. Approximations are made assuming a Reynolds number, Re ∼ O(ε-1) and depth-averaging used to simplify the governing Navier-Stokes equations. A parallel Stokes flow is expected in the absence of any wave disturbance and a generalisation for the flow is based on a local quadratic profile. This approach provides a more general system which includes inertial effects and is solved numerically. Flow structures are compared with studies for Stokes flow in the limit of negligible inertial effects. Both two-tier and three-tier wave disturbances are used to study film profile evolution. A parametric study is provided for wave disturbances with increasing film Reynolds number. An evaluation of standing wave and transient film profiles is undertaken and identifies new profiles not previously predicted when inertial effects are neglected.

  4. Electronic levels and electrical response of periodic molecular structures from plane-wave orbital-dependent calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanli; Dabo, Ismaila

    2011-10-01

    Plane-wave electronic-structure predictions based upon orbital-dependent density-functional theory (OD-DFT) approximations, such as hybrid density-functional methods and self-interaction density-functional corrections, are severely affected by computational inaccuracies in evaluating electron interactions in the plane-wave representation. These errors arise from divergence singularities in the plane-wave summation of electrostatic and exchange interaction contributions. Auxiliary-function corrections are reciprocal-space countercharge corrections that cancel plane-wave singularities through the addition of an auxiliary function to the point-charge electrostatic kernel that enters into the expression of interaction terms. At variance with real-space countercharge corrections that are employed in the context of density-functional theory (DFT), reciprocal-space corrections are computationally inexpensive, making them suited to more demanding OD-DFT calculations. Nevertheless, there exists much freedom in the choice of auxiliary functions and various definitions result in different levels of performance in eliminating plane-wave inaccuracies. In this work we derive exact point-charge auxiliary functions for the description of molecular structures of arbitrary translational symmetry, including the yet unaddressed one-dimensional case. In addition, we provide a critical assessment of different reciprocal-space countercharge corrections and demonstrate the improved accuracy of point-charge auxiliary functions in predicting the electronic levels and electrical response of conjugated polymers from plane-wave OD-DFT calculations.

  5. Is Quadrupole Structure of Out-of-Plane Magnetic Field Evidence for Hall Reconnection?

    SciTech Connect

    Karimabadi, H.; Vu, H. X.; Loring, B.; Omelchenko, Y.; Dorelli, J.

    2011-01-04

    The experimental observation of a quadrupole pattern in the ''out-of-plane'' field B{sub y} is usually interpreted as a tell-tale sign of Hall MHD mediated magnetic reconnection in the vicinity of a reconnecting X-point. In contrast to these conventional expectations, it is shown B{sub y} means of analytical equations describing the generation of B{sub y} that quadrupole structure can be formed even in the absence of Hall effects. In general, B{sub y} can be generated due to inhomogeneous ion flow, inhomogeneous current (Hall effect), or terms proportional to a pre-existing B{sub y}. This prediction is validated in a 3D global MHD simulation where it is shown that vortex flows at the dayside magnetopause lead to formation of a finite B{sub y} even in the absence of a pre-existing IMF B{sub y}. The generated field is shown to have a quadrupolar pattern in B{sub y} with peak amplitude {approx}0.5 of the total field. Similar vortex flows are also observed in 3D global hybrid simulations but the resulting B{sub y} structure in this case is a combination of the Hall effects and the inhomogeneous ion flows. Thus special care must be taken in using observations of quadrupole B{sub y} in satellite and experiments to infer information about its particular generation mechanism or attributing it to the Hall MHD reconnection regime.

  6. Structure of exhaust jets produced by magnetic reconnection localized in the out-of-plane direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchett, P. L.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations are used to investigate the structure of exhaust jets produced by magnetic reconnection localized in the out-of-plane direction. The localized reconnection is produced by periodically blocking the cross-tail current density, a procedure that has effects analogous to those produced by the assumption of a region of anomalous resistivity in fluid treatments of reconnection. The width of the blocking region is varied between 4 and 24di, where di is the ion inertial length. After an initial displacement in the electron-drift direction, the jet front undergoes a marked expansion in the ion-drift direction, reaching a total cross-tail width of 15-20di regardless of the initial width. The jet front breaks up into small-scale finger structures of the order of 1-2di in width, which appears to be due to the action of the ballooning/interchange instability. Ahead of the front, the ion pressure Pixx is increased due to reflection of ions from the moving front and the penetration of high-speed ions in the jet through the front. The ion temperature Tixx exhibits a minimum within the front, while the electron temperature is enhanced in the front. The properties of the reconnection-generated fronts are compared and contrasted with those of interchange heads produced by a decreasing entropy profile.

  7. Influence of the overall stiffness of a load-bearing porous titanium implant on bone ingrowth in critical-size mandibular bone defects in sheep.

    PubMed

    Schouman, T; Schmitt, M; Adam, C; Dubois, G; Rouch, P

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the influence of reduction of the apparent mechanical properties of fully load-bearing porous titanium implants used in mandibular bone defects. Segmental 18mm long bone defects were created bilaterally in the lower jaws of adult ewes. One group of 6 ewes (group A) was treated with load-bearing 'rigid' (high stiffness) porous implants on the right side, and with control on the left side. A second group of 6 ewes (group B) was treated with 'flexible' porous and control implants exhibiting apparent mechanical properties ten times lower than the rigid implants. The mechanical behavior of the reconstructed hemi-mandibles was assessed by cantilever testing and bone ingrowth into the segmental defects was assessed by BV/TV measurement within the implant using micro-CT 12 weeks after implantation. A significantly higher rigidity was identified for porous implants compared with control implants at the anterior interface in group B. BV/TV of porous implants was significantly higher than that of control implants in group A. BV/TV differences were significant between porous and control implants in group B and were homogeneous along the main axis. Significantly higher BV/TV was identified in most sub-volumes of group B porous implants compared with group A. This work highlights the critical importance of the tuning of scaffolds to promote bone ingrowth with reference to the local strains occurring within the porous scaffold, which in this application was achieved using fully load-bearing low-stiffness porous titanium implants. PMID:26999620

  8. Flow around submerged structures subjected to shallow submergence over plane bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Arindam; Ratha, Dwarikanath

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on the flow field around submerged structures on horizontal plane beds, measured by an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV), are presented. Experiments were conducted for various conditions of submergence, having submergence factors ranging from 1.0 to 2.0 and average flow velocity ranging from 0.25 to 0.51 m/s. The Froude number and the Reynolds number of the approaching flow for different runs are in the range of 0.18-0.42 and 50 000-76 500, respectively. The vertical distributions of time-averaged three dimensional velocity components and turbulence intensity components at different radial distances from the submerged structures are plotted. Deceleration and acceleration of the approaching flow around the submerged body are evident from the vertical distributions of the horizontal velocity component, whereas the lifting and diving nature of the flow are indicated by the vertical velocity component distributions. The vertical distributions of the horizontal velocity component indicate reduction of 30% of the non-dimensional time-averaged horizontal velocity component magnitude for the cylinder of diameter 11.5 cm in comparison to the cylinder of diameter 10 cm. Also, there is an increase of 10-25% in the horizontal velocity component at different radial sections. The flow is three dimensional in the downstream of the submerged structure. The velocity and the turbulent intensity components are also well predicted by FLUENT. The flow characteristics in the wake and the induced bed shear stress are also analyzed with FLUENT.

  9. Evaluation of the Load-bearing Capacity of Fractured Incisal Edge of Maxillary Permanent Central Incisors restored with a Glass Fiber-reinforced Nanocomposite: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Srilatha, KT; Nandlal, B; Dhull, Kanika Singh

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the load-bearing capacity of fractured incisal edge of maxillary permanent central incisors restored with a nanocomposite and a glass fiber-reinforced nanocomposite. Materials and methods: Thirty-six extracted sound maxillary central incisors randomly divided in three groups were used for the present study. Group I (control) contained untreated teeth. Samples in experimental groups II and III were prepared by cutting the incisal (one-third) part of the crown horizontally and subjected to enamel preparations and restored with a nanocomposite and a glass fiber-reinforced nanocomposite respectively. All restored teeth were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours. Fracture resistance was evaluated as peak load at failure (Newton) for samples tested in a cantilever-bending test using Hounsfield universal testing machine. Failure modes were microscopically examined. Results: Highest mean peak failure load (Newton) among experimental groups was observed in glass fiber-reinforced nano composite group (863.50 ± 76.12 N) followed by nanocomposite group (633.67 ± 40.14 N). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the restoration technique significantly affected the load-bearing capacity (p < 0.001). Scheffe’s post-hoc comparison test (subset for α = 0.05) revealed that there was significant difference in the mean peak failure load values of nanocomposite and glass fiber-reinforced nanocomposite groups when considered together (p < 0.001). Experimental groups showed similar types of failure modes with majority occurring ascohesive and mixed type. Fifty-eight percent of the teeth in glass fiber-reinforced nanocomposite group fractured below the cementoenamel junction. Conclusion: By using fiber-reinforced composite substructure under conventional composites in the repair of fractured incisors, the load-bearing capacity of the restored incisal edge could be substantially

  10. Transverse plane of apical vertebra of structural thoracic curve: vertebra displacement versus vertebral deformation.

    PubMed

    Kotwicki, Tomasz; Napiontek, Marek; Nowakowski, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    CT transversal scans of the trunk provided at the level of Th8 or Th9 (apical vertebra) of 23 patients with structural thoracic scoliosis were reviewed. The following parameters were studied: 1) alpha angle formed by the axis of vertebra and the axis of spinous process, 2) beta concave and beta convex angle between the spinous process and the left and right transverse process respectively, 3) gamma concave and gamma convex angle between the axis of vertebra and the left and right transverse process respectively, 4) rotation angle to the sagittal plane according to Aaro and Dahlborn, 5) Cobb angle. Values of measured parameters demonstrated a common pattern of intravertebral deformity: counter clockwise deviation of the spinous process (alpha angle 15,0 +/-8,5 degrees), beta concave (69,8 +/-8,5 degrees) significantly greater than beta convex (38,8 +/-8,5 degrees), gamma concave (54,3 +/-7,8 degrees) not different from gamma convex (56,0 +/-8,0 degrees). Strong linear positive correlation between alpha angle and Aaro-Dahlborn angle was observed (r=0,78, p<0,05). Changes in morphology of apical vertebra due to intravertebral bone remodelling followed the vertebral spatial displacement and there existed a linear correlation in between. The two processes develop in opposite directions. PMID:17108421

  11. Effect of in-plane uniaxial anisotropy on self-organized magnetic structures generated by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, S. W.; Kwon, H. Y.; Won, C.

    2013-03-01

    The influences of uniaxial in-plane anisotropy on the properties of ordered magnetic structures generated by the DM interaction were investigated by performing Monte-Carlo simulated annealing. The uniaxial anisotropy aligns the magnetic structure along a specific direction and helps to organize magnetic skyrmions to form either a horizontal or a vertical hexagonal structure, depending on the anisotropy strength. The uniaxial in-plane anisotropy not only enhances the ordering of the structure but also enriches the phases of the system, which include a rectangular lattice structure of skyrmions and 1D skyrmion arrays separated by stripe domains. We investigate the formation conditions of the anisotropy strength and the external field for various magnetic phases.

  12. Detection of trans–cis flips and peptide-plane flips in protein structures

    SciTech Connect

    Touw, Wouter G.; Joosten, Robbie P.; Vriend, Gert

    2015-07-28

    A method is presented to detect peptide bonds that need either a trans–cis flip or a peptide-plane flip. A coordinate-based method is presented to detect peptide bonds that need correction either by a peptide-plane flip or by a trans–cis inversion of the peptide bond. When applied to the whole Protein Data Bank, the method predicts 4617 trans–cis flips and many thousands of hitherto unknown peptide-plane flips. A few examples are highlighted for which a correction of the peptide-plane geometry leads to a correction of the understanding of the structure–function relation. All data, including 1088 manually validated cases, are freely available and the method is available from a web server, a web-service interface and through WHAT-CHECK.

  13. Structure and magnetism of bulk Fe and Cr: from plane waves to LCAO methods.

    PubMed

    Soulairol, R; Fu, Chu-Chun; Barreteau, C

    2010-07-28

    Magnetic, structural and energetic properties of bulk Fe and Cr were studied using first-principles calculations within density functional theory (DFT). We aimed to identify the dependence of these properties on key approximations of DFT, namely the exchange-correlation functional, the pseudopotential and the basis set. We found a smaller effect of pseudopotentials (PPs) on Fe than on Cr. For instance, the local magnetism of Cr was shown to be particularly sensitive to the potentials representing the core electrons, i.e. projector augmented wave and Vanderbilt ultrasoft PPs predict similar results, whereas standard norm-conserving PPs tend to overestimate the local magnetic moments of Cr in bcc Cr and in dilute bcc FeCr alloys. This drawback is suggested to be closely correlated to the overestimation of Cr solution energy in the latter system. On the other hand, we point out that DFT methods with very reduced localized basis sets (LCAO: linear combination of atomic orbitals) give satisfactory results compared with more robust plane-wave approaches. A minimal-basis representation of '3d' electrons comes to be sufficient to describe non-trivial magnetic phases including spin spirals in both fcc Fe and bcc Cr, as well as the experimental magnetic ground state of bcc Cr showing a spin density wave (SDW) state. In addition, a magnetic 'spd' tight binding model within the Stoner formalism was proposed and validated for Fe and Cr. The respective Stoner parameters were obtained by fitting to DFT data. This efficient semiempirical approach was shown to be accurate enough for studying various collinear and non-collinear phases of bulk Fe and Cr. It also enabled a detailed investigation of different polarization states of SDW in bcc Cr, where the longitudinal state was suggested to be the ground state, consistent with existing experimental data. PMID:21399309

  14. Simultaneous in-plane and out-of-plane displacement measurement based on a dual-camera imaging system and its application to inspection of large-scale space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ri, Shien; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Takeshi; Umebayashi, Takashi; Sato, Akiyoshi; Sato, Eiichi

    2015-07-01

    Optical methods providing full-field deformation data have potentially enormous interest for mechanical engineers. In this study, an in-plane and out-of-plane displacement measurement method based on a dual-camera imaging system is proposed. The in-plane and out-of-plane displacements are determined simultaneously using two measured in-plane displacement data observed from two digital cameras at different view angles. The fundamental measurement principle and experimental results of accuracy confirmation are presented. In addition, we applied this method to the displacement measurement in a static loading and bending test of a solid rocket motor case (CFRP material; 2.2 m diameter and 2.3 m long) for an up-to-date Epsilon rocket developed by JAXA. The effectiveness and measurement accuracy is confirmed by comparing with conventional displacement sensor. This method could be useful to diagnose the reliability of large-scale space structures in the rocket development.

  15. Detection of trans–cis flips and peptide-plane flips in protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Touw, Wouter G.; Joosten, Robbie P.; Vriend, Gert

    2015-01-01

    A coordinate-based method is presented to detect peptide bonds that need correction either by a peptide-plane flip or by a trans–cis inversion of the peptide bond. When applied to the whole Protein Data Bank, the method predicts 4617 trans–cis flips and many thousands of hitherto unknown peptide-plane flips. A few examples are highlighted for which a correction of the peptide-plane geometry leads to a correction of the understanding of the structure–function relation. All data, including 1088 manually validated cases, are freely available and the method is available from a web server, a web-service interface and through WHAT_CHECK. PMID:26249342

  16. Octupolar out-of-plane magnetic field structure generation during collisionless magnetic reconnection in a stressed X-point collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Graf von der Pahlen, J.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2014-06-15

    The out-of-plane magnetic field, generated by fast magnetic reconnection, during collisionless, stressed X-point collapse, was studied with a kinetic, 2.5D, fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle-in-cell numerical code, using both closed (flux conserving) and open boundary conditions on a square grid. It was discovered that the well known quadrupolar structure in the out-of-plane magnetic field gains four additional regions of opposite magnetic polarity, emerging near the corners of the simulation box, moving towards the X-point. The emerging, outer, magnetic field structure has opposite polarity to the inner quadrupolar structure, leading to an overall octupolar structure. Using Ampere's law and integrating electron and ion currents, defined at grid cells, over the simulation domain, contributions to the out-of-plane magnetic field from electron and ion currents were determined. The emerging regions of opposite magnetic polarity were shown to be the result of ion currents. Magnetic octupolar structure is found to be a signature of X-point collapse, rather than tearing mode, and factors relating to potential discoveries in experimental scenarios or space-craft observations are discussed.

  17. The use of the plane wave fluid-structure interaction loading approximation in NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Plane Wave Approximation (PWA) is widely used in finite element analysis to implement the loading generated by an underwater shock wave. The method required to implement the PWA in NASTRAN is presented along with example problems. A theoretical background is provided and the limitations of the PWA are discussed.

  18. Study of the in-plane magnetic structure of a layered system using polarized neutron scattering under grazing incidence geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, R.; Bigault, T.; Wildes, A. R.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Soyama, K.; Courtois, P.

    2016-05-01

    The in-plane magnetic structure of a layered system with a polycrystalline grain size less than the ferromagnetic exchange length was investigated using polarized neutron off-specular scattering and grazing incidence small angle scattering measurements to gain insight into the mechanism that controls the magnetic properties which are different from the bulk. These complementary measurements with different length scales and the data analysis based on the distorted wave Born approximation revealed the lateral correlation on a length scale of sub- μm due to the fluctuating orientation of the magnetization in the layer. The obtained in-plane magnetic structure is consistent with the random anisotropy model, i.e. competition between the exchange interactions between neighboring spins and the local magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  19. In-plane chemical pressure essential for superconductivity in BiCh2-based (Ch: S, Se) layered structure

    PubMed Central

    Mizuguchi, Yoshikazu; Miura, Akira; Kajitani, Joe; Hiroi, Takafumi; Miura, Osuke; Tadanaga, Kiyoharu; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Magome, Eisuke; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    BiCh2-based compounds (Ch: S, Se) are a new series of layered superconductors, and the mechanisms for the emergence of superconductivity in these materials have not yet been elucidated. In this study, we investigate the relationship between crystal structure and superconducting properties of the BiCh2-based superconductor family, specifically, optimally doped Ce1−xNdxO0.5F0.5BiS2 and LaO0.5F0.5Bi(S1−ySey)2. We use powder synchrotron X-ray diffraction to determine the crystal structures. We show that the structure parameter essential for the emergence of bulk superconductivity in both systems is the in-plane chemical pressure, rather than Bi-Ch bond lengths or in-plane Ch-Bi-Ch bond angle. Furthermore, we show that the superconducting transition temperature for all REO0.5F0.5BiCh2 superconductors can be determined from the in-plane chemical pressure. PMID:26447333

  20. In-plane chemical pressure essential for superconductivity in BiCh2-based (Ch: S, Se) layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuguchi, Yoshikazu; Miura, Akira; Kajitani, Joe; Hiroi, Takafumi; Miura, Osuke; Tadanaga, Kiyoharu; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Magome, Eisuke; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2015-10-01

    BiCh2-based compounds (Ch: S, Se) are a new series of layered superconductors, and the mechanisms for the emergence of superconductivity in these materials have not yet been elucidated. In this study, we investigate the relationship between crystal structure and superconducting properties of the BiCh2-based superconductor family, specifically, optimally doped Ce1-xNdxO0.5F0.5BiS2 and LaO0.5F0.5Bi(S1-ySey)2. We use powder synchrotron X-ray diffraction to determine the crystal structures. We show that the structure parameter essential for the emergence of bulk superconductivity in both systems is the in-plane chemical pressure, rather than Bi-Ch bond lengths or in-plane Ch-Bi-Ch bond angle. Furthermore, we show that the superconducting transition temperature for all REO0.5F0.5BiCh2 superconductors can be determined from the in-plane chemical pressure.

  1. Repair of Segmental Load-Bearing Bone Defect by Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Plasma-Derived Fibrin Impregnated Ceramic Block Results in Early Recovery of Limb Function

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Min Hwei; Duski, Suryasmi; Tan, Kok Keong; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Low, Kiat Cheong; Mohamed Rose, Isa; Mohamed, Zahiah; Bin Saim, Aminuddin; Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj

    2014-01-01

    Calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes have not been used to repair load-bearing bone defects due to their weak mechanical property. In this study, we reevaluated the functional outcomes of combining ceramic block with osteogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma (TEB) to repair critical-sized segmental tibial defect. Comparisons were made with fresh marrow-impregnated ceramic block (MIC) and partially demineralized allogeneic bone block (ALLO). Six New Zealand White female rabbits were used in each study group and three rabbits with no implants were used as negative controls. By Day 90, 4/6 rabbits in TEB group and 2/6 in ALLO and MIC groups resumed normal gait pattern. Union was achieved significantly faster in TEB group with a radiological score of 4.50 ± 0.78 versus ALLO (1.06 ± 0.32), MIC (1.28 ± 0.24), and negative controls (0). Histologically, TEB group scored the highest percentage of new bone (82% ± 5.1%) compared to ALLO (5% ± 2.5%) and MIC (26% ± 5.2%). Biomechanically, TEB-treated tibiae achieved the highest compressive strength (43.50 ± 12.72 MPa) compared to those treated with ALLO (15.15 ± 3.57 MPa) and MIC (23.28 ± 6.14 MPa). In conclusion, TEB can repair critical-sized segmental load-bearing bone defects and restore limb function. PMID:25165699

  2. In vivo evaluation of bioactive PMMA-based bone cement with unchanged mechanical properties in a load-bearing model on rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fottner, Andreas; Nies, Berthold; Kitanovic, Denis; Steinbrück, Arnd; Hausdorf, Jörg; Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Pohl, Ulrich; Jansson, Volkmar

    2015-07-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate-based bone cements are widely used for fixation of joint replacements. To improve the long-term outcome, bioactive bone cements are aspired to advance the bone-cement interface. This study evaluated the in vivo properties of a new polymethylmethacrylate-based bioactive bone cement with addition of amphiphilic phosphorylated 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate. Previous in vitro studies confirmed bioactive properties in cell culture, as well as unchanged mechanical properties are tests according to ISO 5833:2002.Three different variations of the cement (polymethylmethacrylate + phosphorylated 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate, polymethylmethacrylate + phosphorylated 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate + CaCl2 and polymethylmethacrylate + phosphorylated 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate + CaCl2 + Na2CO3) were compared to conventional polymethylmethacrylate cement. To evaluate the properties under load-bearing conditions, a spacer prosthesis was implanted into the femoral diaphysis of 24 rabbits. Additionally, a cement plug was installed into the proximal tibia. After three months, polished sections with Giemsa surface staining were prepared. The bioactivity was determined using the bone affinity index.The sections showed a good osseointegration of the bioactive bone cement without cement cracks under load-bearing conditions. Regarding the bone affinity index, the bioactive bone cement revealed a significantly higher value in the proximal tibia (25.9-37.7%) and around the spacer prosthesis (36.8-58.9%) compared to the conventional polymethylmethacrylate cement (12.8-17.0%).The results confirm the in vivo bioactivity of this bone cement. The absence of cement cracks indicates a sufficient mechanical stability to fix prostheses with this bioactive cement, but for a final assessment long-term tests are necessary. PMID:25627649

  3. InSb photovoltaic infrared detector array with quasi-plane structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z.; Wang, L.; Chen, X.; Shen; Shouzhen

    1984-12-01

    A quasi-plane technology is developed, which is based on a mesa photosensitive unit with SiO2 medium as mask, using a metal film as expanding electrode and a supersonic technique for welding the electrode wire on the substrate. The detectors made with this technology have good electrical and photoelectrical performance, such as high junction impedance, high reverse breakdown voltage, good stability of performance and no crosstalk. The mechanism yielding high performance is briefly discussed.

  4. Heat transfer and vortical structures of a plane impinging jet excited by spanwise periodic disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Yoshifumi; Kaneko, Jun-Ichi; Sakakibara, Jun

    2001-11-01

    Wall temperature and vorticity distribution of a stagnation region of a plane impinging jet with spanwise and temporal periodic disturbances has been measured by using thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) and PIV. The plane jet of water was excited in time and space by adding suction/blowing type disturbances produced by servomotor-driven injectors. Stainless foil heaters with TLC coating glued on a Plexiglass plate was used as a heated impingement wall. The TLC surface was observed by 3 monochrome CCD cameras through RGB filters to acquire color distribution, and the velocity and vorticity field in a center-plane of the jet have been measured by PIV. Strouhal and Reynolds number were set respectively at St=0.45 and Re=2300. Surface temperature distribution showed unsteady streaks in parallel with a wall jet direction. It was evident from the PIV results that these streaks were caused by counter-rotating vortices induced on the wall. The vorticity magnitude and heat transfer rate could be modified by the temporal phase angle between disturbances added in adjacent spanwise locations.

  5. Fabrication and optical transmission characteristics of polymers woodpile photonic crystal structures with different crystal planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ling-Jing; Dong, Xian-Zi; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    The photonic band gap effect which originates from the translational invariance of the periodic lattice of dielectrics has been widely applied in the technical applications of microwave, telecommunication and visible wavelengths. Among the various examples, polymers based three dimensional (3D) photonic crystals (PhCs) have attracted considerable interest because they can be easily fabricated by femo-second (fs) ultrafast laser direct writing (DLW) method. However, it is difficult to realize complete band gap in polymers PhCs due to the low index contrast between polymers and air. Here, we report the design and experimental realization of light's nonreciprocal propagation in woodpile PhCs fabricated with DLW method. Firstly, we fabricated several polymers woodpile PhCs on glass substrate with different crystal planes. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements are in agreement with the theoretical predictions, which proves the validity and the accuracy of our DLW method. Further measurements of the transmission spectra with respect to the incident angle reveal that the surface crystal planes and incident wave vectors play important roles in the optical response. Furthermore, we designed and fabricated a 30° PhC wedge. And we find nonreciprocal transmission effect between the forward and backward waves, resulting from the nonsymmetrical refraction of the light in different planes. Our results may find potential applications in future 3D photonic integrated circuits and pave the way for the fabrication of other photonic and optical devices with DLW method.

  6. Structural analysis of FAST reflector supporting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y. F.; Deng, C. G.; Li, G. Q.; He, Y. M.

    According to the deformation and movement requirements of the FAST reflector, a multi-purpose analysis, including the load-bearing behavior, deformation, construction costs of the reflector supporting structure and its model, is presented in this paper. The advantages and disadvantages of steel and aluminum alloy structures are also discussed and compared through detailed design calculations under load-bearing capacity and normal working conditions.

  7. Direct spontaneous growth and interfacial structural properties of inclined GaN nanopillars on r-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Adikimenakis, A.; Aretouli, K. E.; Tsagaraki, K.; Androulidaki, M.; Georgakilas, A.; Lotsari, A.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P. Kehagias, Th.; Komninou, Ph.

    2015-06-28

    The spontaneous growth of GaN nanopillars (NPs) by direct plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on nitridated r-plane sapphire substrates has been studied. The emanation of metal-polarity NPs from inside an a-plane nonpolar GaN film was found to depend on both the substrate nitridation and the growth conditions. The density of NPs increased with increasing the duration of the nitridation process and the power applied on the radio-frequency plasma source, as well as the III/V flux ratio, while variation of the first two parameters enhanced the roughness of the substrate's surface. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were employed to reveal the structural characteristics of the NPs and their nucleation mechanism from steps on the sapphire surface and/or interfacial semipolar GaN nanocrystals. Lattice strain measurements showed a possible Al enrichment of the first 5–6 monolayers of the NPs. By combining cross-sectional and plan-view TEM observations, the three-dimensional model of the NPs was constructed. The orientation relationship and interfacial accommodation between the NPs and the nonpolar a-plane GaN film were also elucidated. The NPs exhibited strong and narrow excitonic emission, suggesting an excellent structural quality.

  8. Gas-liquid two-phase flow structure in the multi-scale weighted complexity entropy causality plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yi; Zhao, An; Ren, Ying-yu; Dou, Fu-Xiang; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-05-01

    The multi-scale weighted complexity entropy causality plane (MS-WCECP) is proposed for characterizing the physical structure of complex system. Firstly we use the method to investigate typical nonlinear time series. Compared with the multi-scale complexity entropy causality plane (MS-CECP), the MS-WCECP can not only uncover the dynamic information loss of complex system with the increase of scale, but also can characterize the complexity of nonlinear dynamic system. In particular, the algorithm of MS-WCECP performs strong anti-noise ability. Then we calculate the MS-WCECP for the conductance fluctuating signals measured from vertical upward gas-liquid two-phase flow experiments in a small diameter pipe, the results demonstrate that the MS-WCECP is a useful approach for exploring the stability and complexity in gas-liquid two-phase flows.

  9. A multiple-plane approach to measure the structural properties of functionally active regions in the human cortex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Garfinkel, Sarah N; King, Anthony P; Angstadt, Mike; Dennis, Michael J; Xie, Hong; Welsh, Robert C; Tamburrino, Marijo B; Liberzon, Israel

    2010-02-15

    Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide the means of studying both the structural and the functional properties of various brain regions, allowing us to address the relationship between the structural changes in human brain regions and the activity of these regions. However, analytical approaches combining functional (fMRI) and structural (sMRI) information are still far from optimal. In order to improve the accuracy of measurement of structural properties in active regions, the current study tested a new analytical approach that repeated a surface-based analysis at multiple planes crossing different depths of cortex. Twelve subjects underwent a fear conditioning study. During these tasks, fMRI and sMRI scans were acquired. The fMRI images were carefully registered to the sMRI images with an additional correction for cortical borders. The fMRI images were then analyzed with the new multiple-plane surface-based approach as compared to the volume-based approach, and the cortical thickness and volume of an active region were measured. The results suggested (1) using an additional correction for cortical borders and an intermediate template image produced an acceptable registration of fMRI and sMRI images; (2) surface-based analysis at multiple depths of cortex revealed more activity than the same analysis at any single depth; (3) projection of active surface vertices in a ribbon fashion improved active volume estimates; and (4) correction with gray matter segmentation removed non-cortical regions from the volumetric measurement of active regions. In conclusion, the new multiple-plane surface-based analysis approaches produce improved measurement of cortical thickness and volume of active brain regions. These results support the use of novel approaches for combined analysis of functional and structural neuroimaging. PMID:19922802

  10. Design procedures for fiber composite structural components: Panels subjected to combined in-plane loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    Step by step procedures are described which can be used to design panels made from fiber composite angleplied laminates and subjected to combined in plane loads. The procedures are set up as a multistep sample design. Steps in the sample design procedure range from selection of the laminate configuration to the subsequent analyses required to check design requirements for: (1) displacement, (2) ply stresses, and (3) buckling. The sample design steps are supplemented with appropriate tabular and graphical data which can be used to expedite the design process.

  11. Advanced III/V quantum-structure devices for high performance infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, Robert; Walther, Martin; Schmitz, Johannes; Rutz, Frank; Fleissner, Joachim; Scheibner, Ralf; Ziegler, Johann

    2009-09-01

    A mature production technology for Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) focal plane arrays (FPAs) and InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL) FPAs has been developed. Dual-band and dual-color QWIP- and SL-imagers are demonstrated for the 3-5 μm and 8-12 μm atmospheric windows in the infrared. The simultaneous, co-located detection of both spectral channels resolves the temporal and spatial registration problems common to existing bispectral IRimagers. The ability for a reliable remote detection of hot CO2 signatures makes tailored dual-color superlattice imagers ideally suited for missile warning systems for airborne platforms.

  12. Iterative diagonalization in augmented plane wave based methods in electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Blaha, P.; Laskowski, R.; Schwarz, K.

    2010-01-20

    Due to the increased computer power and advanced algorithms, quantum mechanical calculations based on Density Functional Theory are more and more widely used to solve real materials science problems. In this context large nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems must be solved repeatedly to calculate the electronic ground state of a solid or molecule. Due to the nonlinear nature of this problem, an iterative solution of the eigenvalue problem can be more efficient provided it does not disturb the convergence of the self-consistent-field problem. The blocked Davidson method is one of the widely used and efficient schemes for that purpose, but its performance depends critically on the preconditioning, i.e. the procedure to improve the search space for an accurate solution. For more diagonally dominated problems, which appear typically for plane wave based pseudopotential calculations, the inverse of the diagonal of (H - ES) is used. However, for the more efficient 'augmented plane wave + local-orbitals' basis set this preconditioning is not sufficient due to large off-diagonal terms caused by the local orbitals. We propose a new preconditioner based on the inverse of (H - {lambda}S) and demonstrate its efficiency for real applications using both, a sequential and a parallel implementation of this algorithm into our WIEN2k code.

  13. The vertical structure of the F ring of Saturn from ring-plane crossings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharringhausen, Britt R.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2013-11-01

    We present a photometric model of the rings of Saturn which includes the main rings and an F ring, inclined to the main rings, with a Gaussian vertical profile of optical depth. This model reproduces the asymmetry in brightness between the east and west ansae of the rings of Saturn that was observed by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) within a few hours after the Earth ring-plane crossing (RPX) of 10 August 1995. The model shows that during this observation the inclined F ring unevenly blocked the east and west ansae of the main rings. The brightness asymmetry produced by the model is highly sensitive to the vertical thickness and radial optical depth of the F ring. The F-ring model that best matches the observations has a vertical full width at half maximum of 13 ± 7 km and an equivalent depth of 10 ± 4 km. The model also reproduces the shape of the HST profiles of ring brightness vs. distance from Saturn, both before and after the time of ring-plane crossing. Smaller asymmetries observed before the RPX, when the Earth was on the dark side of the rings, cannot be explained by blocking of the main rings by the F ring or vice versa and are probably instead due to the intrinsic longitudinal variation exhibited by the F ring.

  14. Effects of the Coordinates Planes Crystal Orientation on the Structural Strength of Single-Crystal Turbine Vanes and Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinxiang; Hashimoto, Ryosaku; Fukuyama, Yoshitaka; Matsushita, Masahiro; Ogawa, Akinori; Osawa, Makoto; Yokokawa, Tadaharu; Harada, Hiroshi

    The effects of crystal orientation (θ) on the structural strength of single crystal turbine vanes and blades calculated with the finite element method (FEM) are discussed in this paper. TMS-75, a 3rd generation single-crystal Ni-base superalloy, is chosen as the model material for turbine vanes and blades. It became clear that, (1) the elastic constant matrix changes were equivalence for each of three coordinate due to the orientation variation (0° < θ < 90°), and the strength of the turbine vane and blade were strongly related to θ, and also depended on the load and model shape. (2) The strength dependence of the turbine vane on the crystal orientation was depended on coordinate plane: there are lower Mises stress in XY plane and maximum Mises stress in near the θ=45° at both YZ and ZX Planes. (3) In the case of a blade, the influence is similar to the vane on blade tip, but the converse holds for the blade root. It is clear that the creep rupture time can be extended, when the <100> crystallographic axes is the Y or X axis of the blade under higher rotation speed.

  15. Glide-plane symmetry and superconducting gap structure of iron-based superconductors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Berlijn, T; Hirschfeld, P J; Scalapino, D J; Maier, T A

    2015-03-13

    We consider the effect of glide-plane symmetry of the Fe-pnictogen/chalcogen layer in Fe-based superconductors on pairing in spin fluctuation models. Recent theories have proposed that so-called η-pairing states with nonzero total momentum can be realized and possess exotic properties such as odd parity spin singlet symmetry and time-reversal symmetry breaking. Here we show that η pairing is inevitable when there is orbital weight at the Fermi level from orbitals with even and odd mirror reflection symmetry in z; however, by explicit calculation, we conclude that the gap function that appears in observable quantities is identical to that found in earlier, 1 Fe per unit cell pseudocrystal momentum calculations. PMID:25815960

  16. Glide-plane symmetry and superconducting gap structure of iron-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yan; Berlijn, Tom; Hirschfeld, Peter J.; Scalapino, Douglas J.; Maier, Thomas A.

    2015-03-10

    We consider the effect of glide-plane symmetry of the Fe-pnictogen/chalcogen layer in Fe-based superconductors on pairing in spin fluctuation models. Recent theories propose that so-called η-pairing states with nonzero total momentum can be realized and possess such exotic properties as odd parity spin singlet symmetry and time-reversal symmetry breaking. Here we show that when there is orbital weight at the Fermi level from orbitals with even and odd mirror reflection symmetry in z, η pairing is inevitable; however, we conclude from explicit calculation that the gap function appearing in observable quantities is identical to that found in earlier pseudocrystal momentum calculations with 1 Fe per unit cell.

  17. Glide-plane symmetry and superconducting gap structure of iron-based superconductors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Yan; Berlijn, Tom; Hirschfeld, Peter J.; Scalapino, Douglas J.; Maier, Thomas A.

    2015-03-10

    We consider the effect of glide-plane symmetry of the Fe-pnictogen/chalcogen layer in Fe-based superconductors on pairing in spin fluctuation models. Recent theories propose that so-called η-pairing states with nonzero total momentum can be realized and possess such exotic properties as odd parity spin singlet symmetry and time-reversal symmetry breaking. Here we show that when there is orbital weight at the Fermi level from orbitals with even and odd mirror reflection symmetry in z, η pairing is inevitable; however, we conclude from explicit calculation that the gap function appearing in observable quantities is identical to that found in earlier pseudocrystal momentummore » calculations with 1 Fe per unit cell.« less

  18. TIGHT CORRELATIONS BETWEEN MASSIVE GALAXY STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES AND DYNAMICS: THE MASS FUNDAMENTAL PLANE WAS IN PLACE BY z ∼ 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bezanson, Rachel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Leja, Joel; Van de Sande, Jesse; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska

    2013-12-20

    The fundamental plane (FP) is an empirical relation between the size, surface brightness, and velocity dispersion of early-type galaxies. This relation has been studied extensively for early-type galaxies in the local universe to constrain galaxy formation mechanisms. The evolution of the zero point of this plane has been extended to high redshifts to study the luminosity evolution of massive galaxies, under the assumption of structural homology. In this work, we assess this assumption by replacing surface brightness with stellar mass density and present the evolution of the ''mass FP'' for massive, quiescent galaxies since z ∼ 2. By accounting for stellar populations, we thereby isolate and trace structural and dynamical evolution. Despite the observed dramatic evolution in the sizes and morphologies of massive galaxies since z ∼ 3, we find that quiescent galaxies lie on the mass FP out to z ∼ 2. In contrast with ∼1.4 dex evolution in the luminosity FP, average residuals from the z ∼ 0 mass FP are less than ∼0.15 dex since z ∼ 2. Assuming the Hyde and Bernardi mass FP slope, we find that this minimal offset scales as (1 + z){sup –0.095} {sup ±} {sup 0.043}. This result lends credence to previous studies that derived luminosity evolution from the FP. Therefore, despite their compact sizes and suggestions that massive galaxies are more disk-like at z ∼ 2, the relationship between their dynamics and structural properties are consistent with local early-type galaxies. Finally, we find no strong evidence for a tilt of the mass FP relative to the virial plane, but emphasize the need for full models including selection biases to fully investigate this issue.

  19. Spin-polaron theory of high-{Tc} superconductivity: 2, electronic structure of the CuO{sub 2} planes

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.F.

    1993-06-01

    After an introductory discussion of electronic structure calculations for the CuO{sub 2} planes in the copper-oxide based high-{Tc} superconductors, the method suggested by Slater for studying antiferromagnetic (AF) metals is described. In this method, as applied here, the chemical unit cell is doubled to form a magnetic unit cell which contains one Cu ion with predominantly up spin and one with predominantly down spin. Down spins are kept off up-spin sites, and conversely, by the introduction of a Hubbard U term. As a result, the band structure obtained is typical of that for a Mott-Hubbard (M-H) or, more generally, a charge transfer insulator. Conductivity in the a-b plane results when holes are introduced into the M-H valence band. The band structure as a function of the parameters in Koster-Slater type calculations is discussed and the Fermi surface is described. A calculation of the delocalization energy for spin-polaron formation is carried out within the context of the band calculations.

  20. Mechanical properties and in vivo performance of load-bearing fiber-reinforced composite intramedullary nails with improved torsional strength.

    PubMed

    Moritz, N; Strandberg, N; Zhao, D S; Mattila, R; Paracchini, L; Vallittu, P K; Aro, H T

    2014-12-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) could be feasible materials for fracture fixation devices if the mechanical properties of the composites are congruent with the local structural properties of bone. In a recently developed FRC implant, bisphenol A dimethacrylate (BisGMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin was reinforced with unidirectional E-glass fibers. The addition of a braided glass fiber sleeving to the unidirectional fibers increased the torsional strength (99.5MPa) of the FRC implants at the expense of the flexural strength (602.0MPa). The flexural modulus was 15.3GPa. Two types of FRC intramedullary nails were prepared; first type was FRC as such, second type was FRC with a surface layer of bioactive glass (BG) granules. Experimental oblong subtrochanteric defect was created in 14 rabbits. The defect, which reduced the torsional strength of the bones by 66%, was fixed with an FRC intramedullary nail of either type. The contralateral intact femur served as the control. This model simulated surgical stabilization of bone metastasis. After 12 weeks of follow-up, the femurs were harvested and analyzed by torsional testing, micro-CT and hard tissue histology. Healed undisplaced peri-implant fractures were noticed in half of the animals irrespective of the type of FRC implant. Torsional testing showed no significant differences between the implantation groups. The torsional strength of the bones stabilized by either type of FRC implant was 83% of that of the contralateral femurs. In histological analysis, no implant debris and no adverse tissue reactions were observed. While the mechanical properties of the modified FRCs were suboptimal, the FRC intramedullary nails supported the femurs without structural failure, even in the cases of peri-implant fractures. PMID:25222871

  1. Resorbable composites with bioresorbable glass fibers for load-bearing applications. In vitro degradation and degradation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Timo J; Tuominen, Jukka U; Hiekkanen, Elina

    2013-01-01

    An in vitro degradation study of three bioresorbable glass fiber-reinforced poly(l-lactide-co-dl-lactide) (PLDLA) composites was carried out in simulated body fluid (SBF), to simulate body conditions, and deionized water, to evaluate the nature of the degradation products. The changes in mechanical and chemical properties were systematically characterized over 52 weeks dissolution time to determine the degradation mechanism and investigate strength retention by the bioresorbable glass fiber-reinforced PLDLA composite. The degradation mechanism was found to be a combination of surface and bulk erosion and does not follow the typical core-accelerated degradation mechanism of poly(α-hydroxyacids). Strength retention by bioresorbable glass fiber-reinforced PLDLA composites can be tailored by changing the oxide composition of the glass fibers, but the structure-property relationship of the glass fibers has to be understood and controlled so that the phenomenon of ion leaching can be utilized to control the degradation rate. Therefore, these high performance composites are likely to open up several new possibilities for utilizing resorbable materials in clinical applications which could not be realized in the past. PMID:22963847

  2. Host Galaxies of Luminous Quasars: Structural Properties and the Fundamental Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Marsha J.; Sheinis, Andrew I.

    2008-10-01

    We present stellar velocity dispersion measurements in the host galaxies of ten luminous quasars (MV < -23) using the Ca H&K lines in off-nuclear spectra. We combine these data with effective radii and magnitudes from the literature to place the host galaxies on the fundamental plane (FP) where their properties are compared with other types of galaxies. We find that the radio-loud (RL) QSO hosts have similar properties to massive elliptical galaxies, while the radio-quiet (RQ) hosts are more similar to intermediate-mass galaxies. The RL hosts lie at the upper extreme of the FP due to their large velocity dispersions (langσ*rang = 321 km s-1), low surface brightness (langμ e (r)rang = 20.8 mag arcsec-2), and large effective radii (langRe rang = 11.4 kpc), and have langM *rang = 1.5 × 1012 M sun and langM/Lrang = 12.4. In contrast, properties of the RQ hosts are langσ*rang = 241 km s-1, langM *rang = 4.4 × 1011 M sun, and M/L ~ 5.3. The distinction between these galaxies occurs at σ*~ 300 km s-1, Re ~ 6 kpc, and corresponding M * ~ 5.9 ± 3.5 × 1011 M sun. Our data support previous results that Palomar-Green QSOs are related to gas-rich galaxy mergers that form intermediate-mass galaxies, while RL QSOs reside in massive early-type galaxies, most of which also show signs of recent mergers or interactions. Previous authors have drawn these conclusions by using estimates of the black hole mass and inferring host galaxy properties from that, while here we have relied purely on directly measured host galaxy properties.

  3. Soil-structure interaction on shallow rigid circular foundation: plane SH waves from far-field earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Vincent W.; Luo, Hao

    2014-03-01

    A closed-form wave function analytic solution of two-dimensional scattering and diffraction of incident plane SH-waves by a flexible wall on a rigid shallow circular foundation embedded in an elastic half-space is presented. This research generalizes the previous solution by Trifunac in 1972, which tackled only the semi-circular foundation, to arbitrary shallow circular-arc foundation cases, and is thus comparatively more realistic. Ground surface displacement spectra at higher frequencies are also obtained. As an analytical series solution, the accuracy and error analysis of the numerical results are also discussed. It was observed from the results that the rise-to-span ratio of the foundation profile, frequency of incident waves, and mass ratios of different media (foundation-structure-soil) are the three primary factors that may affect the surface ground motion amplitudes near the structure.

  4. Predicting the Influence of Nano-Scale Material Structure on the In-Plane Buckling of Orthotropic Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Odegard, Gregory M.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.

    2004-01-01

    A multi-scale analysis of the structural stability of a carbon nanotube-polymer composite material is developed. The influence of intrinsic molecular structure, such as nanotube length, volume fraction, orientation and chemical functionalization, is investigated by assessing the relative change in critical, in-plane buckling loads. The analysis method relies on elastic properties predicted using the hierarchical, constitutive equations developed from the equivalent-continuum modeling technique applied to the buckling analysis of an orthotropic plate. The results indicate that for the specific composite materials considered in this study, a composite with randomly orientated carbon nanotubes consistently provides the highest values of critical buckling load and that for low volume fraction composites, the non-functionalized nanotube material provides an increase in critical buckling stability with respect to the functionalized system.

  5. On the dynamics underlying the emergence of large scale structures in barotropic beta-plane turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakas, Nikolaos; Constantinou, Navid; Ioannou, Petros

    2016-04-01

    Planetary turbulent flows are observed to self-organize into large scale structures such as zonal jets and coherent vortices. In this work, the eddy-mean flow dynamics underlying the formation of both zonal and nonzonal coherent structures in a barotropic turbulent flow is investigated within the statistical framework of stochastic structural stability theory (S3T). Previous studies have shown that the coherent structures emerge due to the instability of the homogeneous turbulent flow in the statistical dynamical S3T system and that the statistical predictions of S3T are reflected in direct numerical simulations. In this work, the dynamics underlying this S3T statistical instability are studied. It is shown that, for weak planetary vorticity gradient beta, both zonal jets and non-zonal large-scale structures form from upgradient momentum fluxes due to shearing of the eddies by the emerging flow. For large beta, the dynamics of the S3T instability differs for zonal and non-zonal flows. Shearing of the eddies by the mean flow continues to be the mechanism for the emergence of zonal jets while non-zonal large-scale flows emerge from resonant and near-resonant triad interactions between the large-scale flow and the stochastically forced eddies.

  6. Modeling and performance of two types of piston-like out-of-plane motion micromechanical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Si-Hyung; Horowitz, Roberto; Majumdar, Arunava

    2006-07-01

    We have modeled and analyzed the performance of two types of piston-like out-of-plane motion micromechanical structures: a conventional microstructure, which has a single bimorph region, and a flip-over-bimaterial (FOB) microstructure, which has two bimorph regions respectively located on the top and bottom sides of the structure. For both structures, simple analytical expressions of their end-point deflections have been established to facilitate parametric studies in sensor or actuator designs. These structures can be used in several applications such as temperature and chemical sensors, or as actuators for micromirrors. The derived analytical deflection predictions are in good agreement with those made using finite element (FE) models. For a micro-opto-mechanical sensor using interconnected FOB microstructures, these analytical and FE predictions agree with the experimental results within about 25%. Discrepancies can be attributed to uncertainties in the material properties of the specimen being tested. Both the analytically derived deflection expressions and the FE models predict that the FOB microstructures are capable of achieving up to two times higher deflection than conventional microstructures that have a single bimorph region. When compared to a cantilever design, a sensor design having interconnected FOB structures has a higher signal-to-noise ratio for the same device footprint. The analytical modeling and performance analysis presented in this paper can be useful to predict the device performance as well as optimize design parameters.

  7. A new approach to plane-sweep overlay: topological structuring and line-segment classification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Roessel, Jan W.

    1991-01-01

    An integrated approach to spatial overlay was developed with the objective of creating a single function that can perform most of the tasks now assigned to discrete functions in current systems. Two important components of this system are a unique method for topological structuring, and a method for attribute propagation and line-segment classification. -Author

  8. In-plane current induced domain wall nucleation and its stochasticity in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Hall cross structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sethi, P.; Murapaka, C.; Lim, G. J.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-11-09

    Hall cross structures in magnetic nanowires are commonly used for electrical detection of magnetization reversal in which a domain wall (DW) is conventionally nucleated by a local Oersted field. In this letter, we demonstrate DW nucleation in Co/Ni perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire at the magnetic Hall cross junction. The DWs are nucleated by applying an in-plane pulsed current through the nanowire without the need of a local Oersted field. The change in Hall resistance, detected using anomalous Hall effect, is governed by the magnetic volume switched at the Hall junction, which can be tuned by varying the magnitude of the applied current density and pulse width. The nucleated DWs are driven simultaneously under the spin transfer torque effect when the applied current density is above a threshold. The possibility of multiple DW generation and variation in magnetic volume switched makes nucleation process stochastic in nature. The in-plane current induced stochastic nature of DW generation may find applications in random number generation.

  9. Mueller based scatterometry measurement of nanoscale structures with anisotropic in-plane optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthinti, Gangadhara R.; Medikonda, Manasa; Fronheiser, Jody; Kamineni, Vimal K.; Peterson, Brennan; Race, Joseph; Diebold, Alain C.

    2013-04-01

    The uses of strained channel became prevalent at the 65 nm node and have continued to be a large part of logic device performance improvements in every technology generation. These material and integration innovations will continue to be important in sub-22nm devices, and are already being applied in finFET devices where total available in-channel strains are potentially higher. The measurement of structures containing these materials is complicated by the intrinsic correlation of the measured optical thickness and variation of optical properties with strain, as well as the dramatic reduction in total volume of the device. Optical scatterometry has enabled characterization of the feature shape and dimensions of complex 3D structures, including non-planar transistors and memory structures. Ellipsometric methods have been successfully applied to the measurement of thin films of SiGe and related strained structures. A direction for research is validating that the thin film stress results can be extended into the much more physically complex 3D shape. There are clear challenges in this: the stress in a SiGe fin is constrained to match the underlying Si along one axis, but the sides and top are free, leading to very large strain gradients both along the fin width and height. Practical utilization of optical techniques as a development tool is often limited by the complexity of the scatterometry model and setup, and this added material complexity presents a new challenge. In this study, generalized spectroscopic ellipsometric measurements of strained grating was undertaken, in parallel with reference cross sectional and top down SEM data. The measurements were modeled for both anisotropy calculations, as well as full scatterometry calculations, fitting the strain and structure. The degree to which strain and CD can be quickly quantified in an optical model is discussed. Sum decomposition method has been implemented to extract the effective anisotropic coefficients and a

  10. Ab initio electronic structure of quasi-two-dimensional materials: A "native" Gaussian-plane wave approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisanutto, Paolo E.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    Ab initio electronic structure calculations of two-dimensional layered structures are typically performed using codes that were developed for three-dimensional structures, which are periodic in all three directions. The introduction of a periodicity in the third direction (perpendicular to the layer) is completely artificial and may lead in some cases to spurious results and to difficulties in treating the action of external fields. In this paper we develop a new approach, which is "native" to quasi-2D materials, making use of basis function that are periodic in the plane, but atomic-like in the perpendicular direction. We show how some of the basic tools of ab initio electronic structure theory — density functional theory, GW approximation and Bethe-Salpeter equation — are implemented in the new basis. We argue that the new approach will be preferable to the conventional one in treating the peculiarities of layered materials, including the long range of the unscreened Coulomb interaction in insulators, and the effects of strain, corrugations, and external fields.

  11. Ab initio electronic structure of quasi-two-dimensional materials: A "native" Gaussian-plane wave approach.

    PubMed

    Trevisanutto, Paolo E; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-05-28

    Ab initio electronic structure calculations of two-dimensional layered structures are typically performed using codes that were developed for three-dimensional structures, which are periodic in all three directions. The introduction of a periodicity in the third direction (perpendicular to the layer) is completely artificial and may lead in some cases to spurious results and to difficulties in treating the action of external fields. In this paper we develop a new approach, which is "native" to quasi-2D materials, making use of basis function that are periodic in the plane, but atomic-like in the perpendicular direction. We show how some of the basic tools of ab initio electronic structure theory - density functional theory, GW approximation and Bethe-Salpeter equation - are implemented in the new basis. We argue that the new approach will be preferable to the conventional one in treating the peculiarities of layered materials, including the long range of the unscreened Coulomb interaction in insulators, and the effects of strain, corrugations, and external fields. PMID:27250294

  12. Compact Test Structure to Measure All Thermophysical Properties for the In-Plane Figure of Merit ZT of Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Dominik; Mueller, David; Paul, Oliver

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports a versatile thermophysical test structure to measure all material properties contributing to the in-plane thermoelectric figure of merit ZT=S^2Tκ ^{-1} ρ ^{-1} from a single thin film sample of only about 0.5 mm^2 . These properties are the Seebeck coefficient S of the sample against aluminum (Al), its thermal conductivity κ, and its resistivity ρ . The thermal membrane-based test structure is produced using standard thin film deposition and structuring processes followed by silicon micromachining. It can be used to characterize thin films deposited at high temperature, such as doped polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si), as well as films deposited at low temperature, e.g., sputtered metals. We present the measurement of all components of the ZT of low-pressure, chemical vapor-deposited n- and p-doped poly-Si thin films in the temperature range from 300 K to 380 K. Values of 1.46 × 10-2 and 0.95 × 10-2 were found at room temperature (RT) for the ZT of n- and p-doped poly-Si films, respectively. Furthermore, the test structure was used to extract ρ and κ of a sputtered aluminum film in the same temperature range. The respective RT values are 48.7 × 10-9 Ω m and 154 W m-1 K-1.

  13. Electronic structure of hole centers in CuO2 planes of cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvin, A. S.; Panov, Yu. D.

    2011-03-01

    A theoretical analysis and a large amount of experimental data indicate that the structure of the valence hole states in doped cuprates is more complicated than assumed in the simple Zhang-Rice singlet model. In fact, we are dealing with a competition between a hybrid Cu3d -O2pb1g∝dx2-y2-state and purely oxygen nonbonding states with a2g- and eux ,y∝px ,y-symmetries. Thus, as a cluster analog of a Cu3+ ion, the ground state of a non-Zhang-Rice CuO45- hole center of this sort should be described by complicated A1g1-B2g1,3-Eu1,3 multiplet with a set of charge, orbital, and spin order parameters, some of which are well known (e.g., spin moment or "ferromagnetic" Ising orbital momentum localized on oxygen ions) while others are unconventional or hidden (e.g., "antiferromagnetic" ordering of Ising orbital momenta localized on four oxygen atoms or a combined spin-orbital-quadrupole ordering). The non-Zhang-Rice CuO45- centers are actually singlet-triplet pseudo-Jahn-Teller centers with strong vibron coupling to the lattice. The complicated structure of the ground-state multiplet of the hole centers shows up in many of the unusual properties of doped cuprates, in particular, their pseudo-gap phase.

  14. Magnetization reversal induced by in-plane current in Ta/CoFeB/MgO structures with perpendicular magnetic easy axis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Yamanouchi, M. Ikeda, S.; Sato, H.; Fukami, S.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-07

    We investigate in-plane current-induced magnetization reversal under an in-plane magnetic field in Hall bar shaped devices composed of Ta/CoFeB/MgO structures with perpendicular magnetic easy axis. The observed relationship between the directions of current and magnetization switching and Ta thickness dependence of magnetization switching current are accordance with those for magnetization reversal by spin transfer torque originated from the spin Hall effect in the Ta layer.

  15. Low elastic modulus Ti-Ta alloys for load-bearing permanent implants: enhancing the biodegradation resistance by electrochemical surface engineering.

    PubMed

    Kesteven, Jazmin; Kannan, M Bobby; Walter, Rhys; Khakbaz, Hadis; Choe, Han-Choel

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the in vitro degradation behaviour of titanium-tantalum (Ti-Ta) alloys (10-30 wt.% Ta) was investigated and compared with conventional implant materials, i.e., commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti) and titanium-aluminium-vanadium (Ti6Al4V) alloy. Among the three Ti-Ta alloys studied, the Ti20Ta (6.3×10(-4) mm/y) exhibited the lowest degradation rate, followed by Ti30Ta (1.2×10(-3) mm/y) and Ti10Ta (1.4×10(-3) mm/y). All the Ti-Ta alloys exhibited lower degradation rate than that of Cp-Ti (1.8×10(-3) mm/y), which suggests that Ta addition to Ti is beneficial. As compared to Ti6Al4V alloy (8.1×10(-4) mm/y), the degradation rate of Ti20Ta alloy was lower by ~22%. However, the Ti30Ta alloy, which has closer elastic modulus to that of natural bone, showed ~48% higher degradation rate than that of Ti6Al4V alloy. Hence, to improve the degradation performance of Ti30Ta alloy, an intermediate thin porous layer was formed electrochemically on the alloy followed by calcium phosphate (CaP) electrodeposition. The coated Ti30Ta alloy (3.8×10(-3) mm/y) showed ~53% lower degradation rate than that of Ti6Al4V alloy. Thus, the study suggests that CaP coated Ti30Ta alloy can be a viable material for load-bearing permanent implants. PMID:25491981

  16. In-plane structural and electronic anisotropy in de-twinned CaFe2As2 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomberg, Erick; Tanatar, M. A.; Ran, S.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Prozorov, R.

    2013-03-01

    In-plane structural and electronic anisotropy has been studied in a wide range of iron-based superconductors by detwinning via uniaxial stress or strain. In particular, materials based on BaFe2As2 (''112'') are among the most studied systems, where different dopants, annealing protocols and different flux growths were extensively explored. However CaFe2As2 remains a much less studied compound and it exhibits properties quite different from Ba-based 122's. Here we report polarized-light microscopy and electric transport measurements of strain-detwinned CaFe2As2 compounds. Our results reveal unusual evolution of the structural, electronic and magnetic properties dependent on annealing, growth from Sn flux vs FeAs flux, and doping, as compared to BaFe2As2. Among the key observations are the differences in twin domain evolution, and a hysteresis in structural and electronic anisotropy upon warming and cooling. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-O7CH11358.

  17. Off-easy-plane antiferromagnetic spin canting in coupled FePt/NiO bilayer structure with perpendicular exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tenghua; Itokawa, Nobuhide; Wang, Jian; Yu, Youxing; Harumoto, Takashi; Nakamura, Yoshio; Shi, Ji

    2016-08-01

    We report on the investigation of perpendicular exchange bias in FePt (001 ) /NiO (1 ¯1 ¯1 ) orthogonal exchange couple with FePt partially L 10 ordered. From initial magnetization curve measurement and magnetic domain imaging, we find that, for the as-grown bilayer structure, the FePt layer experiences a small-angle magnetization rotation when it is magnetized near to saturation in film normal direction. After field cooling, the bilayer structure shows a significant enhancement of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, indicating the field mediated coupling between the spins across the FePt/NiO interface. According to Koon's theoretical calculation on the basis of lowest energy ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic coupling configuration for compensated spins at antiferromagnetic side, we consider slightly slanted Ni spins at the interface off the (1 ¯1 ¯1 ) easy plane can stabilize the spin coupling between FePt and NiO and result in the observed exchange bias in this paper. This consideration was further confirmed by stripe domain width calculation.

  18. Self-consistent linearized augmented-plane-wave study of the electronic structure and superconductivity of fcc lanthanum under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickett, Warren E.; Freeman, A. J.; Koelling, D. D.

    1980-09-01

    We report the results of a linearized augmented-plane-wave calculation of the electronic structure of fcc La at three lattice constants corresponding to ambient pressure, 50, and 120 kbars. The Kohn-Sham-Gáspar approximation for exchange and correlation is used and the potential is allowed a fully non-muffin-tin form. The f bands lie ~2-2.5 eV above the Fermi level and are ~1 eV wide, resulting in a very small (0.05 electrons) localized f occupation. Under pressure the f bands rise and broaden appreciably, resulting in only a slight increase in f occupation. The rigid-muffin-tin approximation for the electron-phonon interaction λ overestimates the superconducting transition temperature Tc by 40%, but we find that the drastic increase in Tc under pressure can be attributed primarily to changes in the electronic stiffness η. Structural transitions which occur at 25 and 53 kbars may be related to changes in Fermi-surface topology which we find to occur approximately at these pressures.

  19. Improved performance of HgCdTe infrared detector focal plane arrays by modulating light field based on photonic crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Jian; Hu, Weida Ye, Zhenhua; Li, Zhifeng; Chen, Xiaoshuang Lu, Wei; Liao, Lei

    2014-05-14

    An HgCdTe long-wavelength infrared focal plane array photodetector is proposed by modulating light distributions based on the photonic crystal. It is shown that a promising prospect of improving performance is better light harvest and dark current limitation. To optimize the photon field distributions of the HgCdTe-based photonic crystal structure, a numerical method is built by combining the finite-element modeling and the finite-difference time-domain simulation. The optical and electrical characteristics of designed HgCdTe mid-wavelength and long-wavelength photon-trapping infrared detector focal plane arrays are obtained numerically. The results indicate that the photon crystal structure, which is entirely compatible with the large infrared focal plane arrays, can significantly reduce the dark current without degrading the quantum efficiency compared to the regular mesa or planar structure.

  20. The vertical photoconductor: A novel device structure suitable for HgCdTe two-dimensional infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siliquini, J. F.; Faraone, L.

    1997-06-01

    A novel photoconductive device structure is proposed and described that has been designed specifically as a sensing element for high density two-dimensional infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) applications. Although the design concept can be applied to a variety of epitaxially grown HgCdTe material, optimum performance can be achieved using n-type HgCdTe semiconductor material consisting of epitaxially grown heterostructure layers in which a two-dimensional mosaic of vertical design photoconductors are fabricated. The heterostructure layers provide high performance devices at greatly reduced power dissipation levels, while the vertical design allows for the high density integration of photoconductors in a two-dimensional array geometry with high fill factor. The salient feature of the proposed device structure is that the bias field is applied in the vertical direction such that it is parallel to the impinging infrared radiation. A comprehensive one-dimensional model is presented for the vertical design photoconductor, which is subsequently used to determine the optimum design parameters in order to achieve maximum responsivity at the lowest possible power dissipation level. It is found that the proposed device structure has the potential to be used in the fabrication of long wavelength IRFPAs approaching 10 6 pixels using 25 × 25 μm 2 detector elements. Furthermore, this is achieved with individual device detectivities that are background limited and for a total array power dissipation of less than 0.1 W using a pulsed biasing scheme. Performance issues such as response uniformity, pixel yield, fill factor, crosstalk, power dissipation, detector impedance, array architecture, and maximum array size are discussed in relation to the suitability of the proposed vertical photoconductor structure for use in IRFPA modules. When considering IRFPA operability, it is found that in many cases the proposed technology has the potential to deliver significant advantages, such

  1. Determination of the effect of initial inner-core structure on tropical cyclone intensification and track on a beta plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guanghua

    2016-08-01

    The sensitivity of TC intensification and track to the initial inner-core structure on a β plane is investigated using a numerical model. The results show that the vortex with large inner-core winds (CVEX-EXP) experiences an earlier intensification than that with small inner-core winds (CCAVE-EXP), but they have nearly the same intensification rate after spin-up. In the early stage, the convective cells associated with surface heat flux are mainly confined within the inner-core region in CVEX-EXP, whereas the vortex in CCAVE-EXP exhibits a considerably asymmetric structure with most of the convective vortices being initiated to the northeast in the outer-core region due to the β effect. The large inner-core inertial stability in CVEX-EXP can prompt a high efficiency in the conversion from convective heating to kinetic energy. In addition, much stronger straining deformation and PBL imbalance in the inner-core region outside the primary eyewall ensue during the initial development stage in CVEX-EXP than in CCAVE-EXP, which is conducive to the rapid axisymmetrization and early intensification in CVEX-EXP. The TC track in CVEX-EXP sustains a northwestward displacement throughout the integration, whereas the TC in CCAVE-EXP undergoes a northeastward recurvature when the asymmetric structure is dominant. Due to the enhanced asymmetric convection to the northeast of the TC center in CCAVE-EXP, a pair of secondary gyres embedded within the large-scale primary β gyres forms, which modulates the ventilation flow and thus steers the TC to move northeastward.

  2. Effect of SiNx interlayer on structural and electrical properties of nonpolar a-plane (11-20) gallium nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Hwang, Sung-Min; Seo, Yong Gon; Kim, Doo Soo; Baik, Kwang Hyeon; Park, Jung Ho

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the effects of SiNx interlayers on the structural and electrical properties of nonpolar a-plane (11-20) GaN grown on r-plane (1-102) sapphire substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The Nomarski optical microscope images showed that the deposition conditions of the SiNx layer could strongly affect the a-plane GaN surface morphology due to the different SiNx coverage. Basal-plane stacking faults (BSFs) and threading dislocation (TD) densities were reduced in the a-plane GaN samples with high SiNx coverage and multiple SiNx-treated GaN interlayers. These results indicate that TD reduction is associated with an increase in the 3D growth step and with the blocking of TD propagation. From on-axis (11-20) X-ray rocking curve (XRC) measurements, the anisotropy of full width at half maximum (FWHM) can be attributed to the crystal mosaicity due to insertion of different SiNx interlayers. The anisotropy of sheet resistance between the c-and m-axis was also clearly seen in a-plane GaN samples with a high density of defects, which was attributed to the BSFs as scattering centers.

  3. An orthogonal-plane PIV technique for the investigations of three-dimensional vortical structures in a turbulent boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Chun; Yoon, Sang Youl; Kim, Sang Moon; Chun, H. H.; Lee, Inwon

    2006-06-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out regarding a three-dimensional topology of a zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer. In this study, the polarization separation technique has been applied to the PIV measurements. Two mutually perpendicular measurement planes have been employed in x- y and x- z planes, respectively. Synchronization between a stereoscopic PIV with another plane PIV system was made toward the detection of such salient features of the coherent structure as the legs and the head of the hairpin vortices. Polarization rotation via a half-waveplate and subsequent particle image separation using polarizer minimized the spurious particle images. The PIV results clearly demonstrate the presence of hairpin-like coherent vortical structures and coincidence between the near-wall quasi-streamwise vortex pair and the legs of the hairpin vortex.

  4. Insight into the band structure engineering of single-layer SnS2 with in-plane biaxial strain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Umezawa, Naoto

    2016-03-21

    The effects of in-plane biaxial strain on the electronic structure of a photofunctional material, single-layer SnS2, were systematically investigated using hybrid density functional calculations. The bonding diagram for the band gap was firstly proposed based on the crystal orbital overlap population analysis. The conduction band-edge of single-layer SnS2 is determined by the anti-bonding interaction between Sn-5s and S-3p orbitals, while the valence band-edge comes from the anti-bonding between the neighboring S atoms. It is found that the compressive strain not only decreases the indirect band gap of single-layer SnS2, but also effectively promotes the band-edges of the conduction band to realize the overall water splitting. Besides, the dispersion of the valence band of single-layer SnS2 becomes weaker with increasing tensile strain which is beneficial for the photo-excitation through direct transitions. PMID:26912413

  5. Multilayer out-of-plane overlap electrostatic energy harvesting structure actuated by blood pressure for powering intra-cardiac implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deterre, M.; Risquez, S.; Bouthaud, B.; Dal Molin, R.; Woytasik, M.; Lefeuvre, E.

    2013-12-01

    We present an innovative multilayer out-of-plane electrostatic energy harvesting device conceived in view of scavenging energy from regular blood pressure in the heart. This concept involves the use of a deformable packaging for the implant in order to transmit the blood pressure to the electrostatic transducer. As shown in previous work, this is possible by using thin metal micro-bellows structure, providing long term hermeticity and high flexibility. The design of the electrostatic device has overcome several challenges such as the very low frequency of the mechanical excitation (1 to 2 Hz) and the small available room in the medical implant. Analytical and numerical models have been used to maximize the capacitance variation, and hence to optimize the energy conversion. We have theoretically shown that a 25-layer transducer with 6-mm diameter and 1-mm thickness could harvest at least 20 mJ per heart beat in the left ventricle under a maximum voltage of 75 V. These results show that the proposed concept is promising and could power the next generation of leadless pacemakers.

  6. Liquid crystal-gated-organic field-effect transistors with in-plane drain-source-gate electrode structure.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jooyeok; Nam, Sungho; Jeong, Jaehoon; Lee, Chulyeon; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2015-01-14

    We report planar liquid crystal-gated-organic field-effect transistors (LC-g-OFETs) with a simple in-plane drain-source-gate electrode structure, which can be cost-effectively prepared by typical photolithography/etching processes. The LC-g-OFET devices were fabricated by forming the LC layer (4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl, 5CB) on top of the channel layer (poly(3-hexylthiophene), P3HT) that was spin-coated on the patterned indium-tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrates. The LC-g-OFET devices showed p-type transistor characteristics, while a current saturation behavior in the output curves was achieved for the 50-150 nm-thick P3HT (channel) layers. A prospective on/off ratio (>1 × 10(3)) was obtained regardless of the P3HT thickness, whereas the resulting hole mobility (0.5-1.1 cm(2)/(V s)) at a linear regime was dependent on the P3HT thickness. The tilted ordering of 5CB at the LC-P3HT interfaces, which is induced by the gate electric field, has been proposed as a core point of working mechanism for the present LC-g-OFETs. PMID:25478816

  7. Experimental study on the structure of high-frequency perturbations near the exit plane of a stationary plasma thruster with a high specific impulse

    SciTech Connect

    Gorshkov, O. A.; Tomilin, D. A.; Shagaida, A. A.

    2012-03-15

    Results from experimental studies of the structure of high-frequency waves near the exit plane of a stationary plasma thruster are presented. The role played by such waves in the electron transport across the magnetic field is discussed on the basis of the obtained experimental data.

  8. Feasibility of in-plane GDL structuration: Impact on current density distribution in large-area Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbour, Lara; Robin, Christophe; Nandjou, Fredy; Vincent, Remi; Micoud, Fabrice; Poirot-Crouvezier, Jean-Philippe; d'Arbigny, Julien; Gerard, Mathias

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, the in-plane structuration of the electrode Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) is proposed as an interesting approach to reduce the operating heterogeneities occurring within the cell along the gas flow fields, especially in dry operating conditions. This is especially important for transportation applications where the fuel cell is often operated in these conditions. Structured and homogeneous large-area (220 cm2) membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) are tested in single-cell and 6-cell stack configurations. An S++® electronic card inserted in the stack is used to measure the current distribution within the cell, which is an indicator of the local electrochemical reaction conditions. The results of the current distribution measurements together with the cell performances obtained for the structured and the homogenous MEAs indicate that the electrode in-plane structuration is effective in reducing the functioning heterogeneities within the cell under specific operating conditions.

  9. System and method of designing a load bearing layer that interfaces to a structural pass-through of an inflatable vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spexarth, Gary R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for determining a design of an inflatable module including a rigid member disposed in a restraint layer, wherein the restraint layer includes orthogonal straps, includes modeling a strap adjacent to the rigid member and a strap connected to the rigid member. The adjacent strap and the member strap extend in a first direction. The method further includes selecting a first length of the member strap such that the adjacent strap carries load before the member strap during pressurization of the inflatable module, modeling tensions in the member strap with the first length and the adjacent strap during pressurization of the inflatable model, and outputting the modeled tensions in the member strap with the first length and the adjacent strap. An inflatable module includes a member strap having a length such that an adjacent strap carries load before the member strap during pressurization of the inflatable module.

  10. Plane wave density functional theory studies of the structural and the electronic properties of amino acids attached to graphene oxide via peptide bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byeong June; Jeong, Hae Kyung; Lee, ChangWoo

    2015-08-01

    We studied via plane wave pseudopotential total-energy calculations within the local spin density approximation (LSDA) the electronic and the structural properties of amino acids (alanine, glycine, and histidine) attached to graphene oxide (GO) by peptide bonding. The HOMO-LUMO gap, the Hirshfeld charges, and the equilibrium geometrical structures exhibit distinctive variations that depend on the species of the attached amino acid. The GO-amino acid system appears to be a good candidate for a biosensor.

  11. Structural and electrical anisotropies of Si-doped a-plane (11-20) GaN films with different SiNx interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Hwang, Sung-Min; Seo, Yong Gon; Baik, Kwang Hyeon; Park, Jung Ho

    2013-08-01

    The effects of different SiNx interlayers on the structural and electrical properties of nonpolar Si-doped a-plane (11-20) GaN films grown on r-plane (1-102) sapphire were investigated. The surface roughness depends strongly on the SiNx coverage, deposition temperature and number of SiNx layers. The in-plane anisotropy of on-axis x-ray rocking curves (XRCs) (full width at half-maximum) was significantly decreased by the introduction of multiple SiNx-treated GaN interlayers, indicating coherently scattering domains of uniform size. Off-axis XRC measurements were also employed to investigate the effects on the mosaic twist corresponding to edge dislocation and the I1-type basal-plane stacking fault (BSF) density. Hall effect measurement showed that the electrical conductivity was the highest when multiple SiNx/GaN interlayers were employed. The measured sheet resistances (Rsh) along the c-axis were higher than those along the m-axis. These anisotropic conductivities could be explained by BSFs acting as carrier scattering centers. The ratios of Rsh along the two in-plane orientations also correlated well with the BSF densities.

  12. Vibration and acoustic properties of honeycomb sandwich structures subject to variable incident plane-wave angle pressure loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiaxue

    Honeycomb structures are widely used in many areas for their material characteristics such as high strength-to-weight ratio, stiffness-to-weight, sound transmission, and other properties. Honeycomb structures are generally constructed from periodically spaced tessellations of unit cells. It can be shown that the effective stiffness and mass properties of honeycomb are controlled by the local geometry and wall thickness of the particular unit cells used. Of particular interest are regular hexagonal (6-sided) honeycomb unit cell geometries which exhibit positive effective Poisson's ratio, and modified 6-sided auxetic honeycomb unit cells with Poisson's ratio which is effectively negative; a property not found in natural materials. One important honeycomb meta-structure is sandwich composites designed with a honeycomb core bonded between two panel layers. By changing the geometry of the repetitive unit cell, and overall depth and material properties of the honeycomb core, sandwich panels with different vibration and acoustic properties can be designed to shift resonant frequencies and improve intensity and Sound Transmission Loss (STL). In the present work, a honeycomb finite element model based on beam elements is programmed in MATLAB and verified with the commercial finite element software ABAQUS for frequency extraction and direct frequency response analysis. The MATLAB program was used to study the vibration and acoustic properties of different kinds of honeycomb sandwich panels undergoing in-plane loading with different incident pressure wave angles and frequency. Results for the root mean square intensity IRMS based on normal velocity on the transmitted side of the panel measure vibration magnitude are reported for frequencies between 0 and 1000 Hz. The relationship between the sound transmission loss computed with ABAQUS and the inverse of the intensity of surface velocity is established. In the present work it is demonstrated that the general trend between the

  13. Fermions on the low-buckled honey-comb structured lattice plane and classical Casimir-Polder force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Partha

    2016-05-01

    We start with the well-known expression for the vacuum polarization and suitably modify it for 2+1-dimensional spin-orbit coupled (SOC) fermions on the low-buckled honey-comb structured lattice plane described by the low-energy Liu-Yao-Feng-Ezawa (LYFE) model Hamiltonian involving the Dirac matrices in the chiral representation obeying the Clifford algebra. The silicene and germanene fit this description suitably. They have the Dirac cones similar to those of graphene and SOC is much stronger. The system could be normal or ferromagnetic in nature. The silicene turns into the latter type if there is exchange field arising due to the proximity coupling to a ferromagnet (FM) such as depositing Fe atoms to the silicene surface. For the silicene, we find that the many-body effects considerably change the bare Coulomb potential by way of the dependence of the Coulomb propagator on the real-spin, iso-spin and the potential due to an electric field applied perpendicular to the silicene plane. The computation aspect of the Casimir-Polder force (CPF) needs to be investigated in this paper. An important quantity in this process is the dielectric response function (DRF) of the material. The plasmon branch was obtained by finding the zeros of DRF in the long-wavelength limit. This leads to the plasmon frequencies. We find that the collective charge excitations at zero doping, i.e., intrinsic plasmons, in this system, are absent in the Dirac limit. The valley-spin-split intrinsic plasmons, however, come into being in the case of the massive Dirac particles with characteristic frequency close to 10 THz. Our scheme to calculate the Casimir-Polder interaction (CPI) of a micro-particle with a sheet involves replacing the dielectric constant of the sample in the CPI expression obtained on the basis of the Lifshitz theory by the static DRF obtained using the expressions for the polarization function we started with. Though the approach replaces a macroscopic constant by a microscopic

  14. Enhanced plane wave expansion analysis for the band structure of bulk modes in two-dimensional high-contrast solid-solid phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baboly, Mohammadhosein Ghasemi; Soliman, Yasser; Su, Mehmet F.; Reinke, Charles M.; Leseman, Zayd C.; El-Kady, Ihab

    2014-11-01

    Plane wave expansion analyses that use the inverse rule to obtain the Fourier coefficients of the elastic tensor instead of the more conventional Laurent's rule, exhibit faster convergence rates for solid-solid phononic crystals. In this work, the band structure convergence of calculations using the inverse rule is investigated and applied to the case of high acoustic impedance contrast solid-solid phononic crystals, previously known for convergence difficulties. Results are contrasted to those obtained with the conventional plane wave expansion method. The inverse rule is found to converge at a much rate for all ranges of impedance contrast, and the ratio between the computational times needed to obtain a convergent band structure for a high-contrast solid-solid phononic crystal with the conventional plane wave expansion method using 1369 reciprocal lattice vectors is as large as 6800:1. This ratio decreases for material sets with lower impedance contrast; however, the inverse rule is still faster for a given error threshold for even the lowest impedance contrast phononic crystals reported in the literature. This convergence enhancement is a major factor in reconsidering the plane wave expansion method as an important tool in obtaining propagating elastic modes in phononic crystals.

  15. THE CANADA-FRANCE ECLIPTIC PLANE SURVEY-FULL DATA RELEASE: THE ORBITAL STRUCTURE OF THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, J.-M.; Rousselot, P.; Mousis, O.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Gladman, B. J.; Jones, R. L.; Van Laerhoven, C.; Parker, J. Wm.; Bieryla, A.; Nicholson, P.; Mars, G.; Marsden, B.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Taylor, M.; Bernabeu, G.; Benavidez, P.; Campo Bagatin, A.

    2011-10-15

    We report the orbital distribution of the trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) discovered during the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS), whose discovery phase ran from early 2003 until early 2007. The follow-up observations started just after the first discoveries and extended until late 2009. We obtained characterized observations of 321 deg{sup 2} of sky to depths in the range g {approx} 23.5-24.4 AB mag. We provide a database of 169 TNOs with high-precision dynamical classification and known discovery efficiency. Using this database, we find that the classical belt is a complex region with sub-structures that go beyond the usual splitting of inner (interior to 3:2 mean-motion resonance [MMR]), main (between 3:2 and 2:1 MMR), and outer (exterior to 2:1 MMR). The main classical belt (a = 40-47 AU) needs to be modeled with at least three components: the 'hot' component with a wide inclination distribution and two 'cold' components (stirred and kernel) with much narrower inclination distributions. The hot component must have a significantly shallower absolute magnitude (H{sub g} ) distribution than the other two components. With 95% confidence, there are 8000{sup +1800}{sub -1600} objects in the main belt with H{sub g} {<=} 8.0, of which 50% are from the hot component, 40% from the stirred component, and 10% from the kernel; the hot component's fraction drops rapidly with increasing H{sub g} . Because of this, the apparent population fractions depend on the depth and ecliptic latitude of a trans-Neptunian survey. The stirred and kernel components are limited to only a portion of the main belt, while we find that the hot component is consistent with a smooth extension throughout the inner, main, and outer regions of the classical belt; in fact, the inner and outer belts are consistent with containing only hot-component objects. The H{sub g} {<=} 8.0 TNO population estimates are 400 for the inner belt and 10,000 for the outer belt to within a factor of two (95

  16. Spin-orbit torque induced magnetization switching in Ta/Co20Fe60B20/MgO structures under small in-plane magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jiangwei; Zheng, Yuqiang; Su, Xianpeng; Hao, Liang; Wang, Ying; Bai, Jianmin; Wei, Fulin

    2016-04-01

    Spin-orbit torque (SOT)-induced magnetization switching under small in-plane magnetic fields in as-deposited and annealed Ta/CoFeB/MgO structures is studied. For the as-deposited samples, partial SOT-induced switching behavior is observed under an in-plane field of less than 100 Oe. Conversely, for the annealed samples, an in-plane field of 10 Oe is large enough to achieve full deterministic magnetization switching. The Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction at the Ta/CoFeB interface is believed to be the main reason for the discrepancy of the requisite in-plane magnetic fields for switching in the as-deposited and annealed samples. In addition, asymmetric field dependence behavior of SOT-induced magnetization switching is observed in the annealed samples. Deterministic magnetization switching in the absence of an external magnetic field is obtained in the annealed samples, which is extremely important to develop SOT-based magnetoresistive random access memory.

  17. Anisotropic electronic structure of in-plane aligned a-axis YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, C. W.; Chen, M. H.; Liu, S. J.; Wu, K. H.; Juang, J. Y.; Uen, T. M.; Lin, J.-Y.; Chen, J.-M.; Gou, Y. S.

    2003-09-01

    Polarization-dependent x-ray absorption near-edge spectra (XANES) of the O 1s has been measured on a highly in-plane aligned a-axis YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) thin film. The in-plane XANES, with the electric field E of the linearly polarized synchrotron light being parallel to the b or c axis of YBCO films (E//b or E//c) were obtained in a normal-incidence alignment. The XANES for E//a was then calculated from the data obtained by varying the angle. The results lend strong support to those obtained by using detwinned YBCO single crystals in all crystalline orientations, including the extrapolated c-axis spectra.

  18. Futurepath: The Story of Research and Technology at NASA Lewis Research Center. Structures for Flight Propulsion, ARC Sprayed Monotape, National Aero-Space Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The story of research and technology at NASA Lewis Research Center's Structures Division is presented. The job and designs of the Structures Division needed for flight propulsion is described including structural mechanics, structural dynamics, fatigue, and fracture. The video briefly explains why properties of metals used in structural mechanics need to be tested. Examples of tests and simulations used in structural dynamics (bodies in motion) are briefly described. Destructive and non-destructive fatigue/fracture analysis is also described. The arc sprayed monotape (a composite material) is explained, as are the programs in which monotape plays a roll. Finally, the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP or x-30) is introduced, including the material development and metal matrix as well as how NASP will reduce costs for NASA.

  19. Magnon-driven longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in F | N and N | F | N structures: Role of asymmetric in-plane magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotorlishvili, L.; Toklikishvili, Z.; Etesami, S. R.; Dugaev, V. K.; Barnaś, J.; Berakdar, J.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of an asymmetric in-plane magnetic anisotropy Kx ≠Ky on the thermally activated spin current is studied theoretically for two different systems: (i) the F | N system consisting of a ferromagnetic insulator (F) in a direct contact with a nonmagnetic metal (N) and (ii) the sandwich structure N | F | N consisting of a ferromagnetic insulating part sandwiched between two nonmagnetic metals. It is shown that when the difference between the temperatures of the two nonmagnetic metals in a N | F | N structure is not large, the spin pumping currents from the magnetic part to the nonmagnetic ones are equal in amplitude and have opposite directions, so only the spin torque current contributes to the total spin current. The spin current flows then from the nonmagnetic metal with the higher temperature to the nonmagnetic metal having a lower temperature. Its amplitude varies linearly with the difference in temperatures. In addition, we have found that if the magnetic anisotropy is in the layer plane, then the spin current increases with the magnon temperature, while in the case of an out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy the spin current decreases when the magnon temperature enhances. Enlarging the difference between the temperatures of the nonmagnetic metals, the linear response becomes important, as confirmed by analytical expressions inferred from the Fokker-Planck approach and by the results obtained upon a full numerical integration of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation.

  20. In-plane magnetic-field effect on transport properties of the chiral edge state in a quasi-three-dimensional quantum well structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.; Brooks, J.; Wang, Z.; Simmons, J.; Reno, J.; Lumpkin, N.; OBrien, J.; Clark, R.

    1999-09-01

    The transport properties of a quasi-three-dimensional, 200-layer quantum-well structure are investigated at integer filling in the quantum Hall state, concomitant with the chiral edge state condition. We find that the transverse magnetoresistance R{sub xx}, the Hall resistance R{sub xy}, and the vertical resistance R{sub zz} all follow a similar behavior with {ital both} temperature and in-plane magnetic field. A general characteristic of the influence of increasing in-plane field B{sub in} is that the quantization condition first improves, but above a critical value B{sub in}{sup C}, the quantization is systematically removed. We consider the interplay of the chiral edge state transport and the bulk (quantum Hall) transport properties. This mechanism may arise from the competition of the cyclotron energy with the superlattice band-structure energies. A comparison of the results with existing theories of the chiral edge state transport with in-plane field is also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Development of a fatigue-life methodology for composite structures subjected to out-of-plane load components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumich, Mark; Kedward, Keith T.

    1991-01-01

    The efforts to identify and implement a fatigue life methodology applicable to demonstrate delamination failures for use in certifying composite rotor blades are presented. The RSRA/X-Wing vehicle was a proof-of-concept stopped rotor aircraft configuration which used rotor blades primarily constructed of laminated carbon fiber. Delamination of the main spar during ground testing demonstrated that significant interlaminar stresses were produced. Analysis confirmed the presence of out-of-plane load components. The wear out (residual strength) methodology and the requirements for its implementation are discussed.

  2. Effects of electron irradiation on the ferroelectric 180 deg. in-plane nanostripe domain structure in a thin film prepared from a bulk single crystal of BaTiO{sub 3} by focused ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Takao; Okamoto, Masakuni

    2011-01-01

    Effects of electron irradiation on the ferroelectric 180 deg. in-plane nanostripe domain structure in a thin film prepared from a bulk single crystal of BaTiO{sub 3} by focused ion beam were studied. The domain structure transformed into a characteristic 90 deg. in-plane nanostripe domain structure under intense electron irradiation. In particular, an unconventional triangular 90 deg. in-plane nanostripe domain structure was observed. Polarization analysis suggests the existence of an incomplete or half tetradomain vortex at the boundary of the triangular domain structure. Together with the help of phase-field simulations using time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations, it is suggested that such a domain structure is created by an anisotropic in-plane electric field, which is plausibly induced by an anisotropic interaction of the incident electron beam with the ferroelectric material.

  3. Comparison tests and experimental compliance calibration of the proposed standard round compact plane strain fracture toughness specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. M.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Standard round specimen fracture test results compared satisfactorily with results from standard rectangular compact specimens machined from the same material. The location of the loading pin holes was found to provide adequate strength in the load bearing region for plane strain fracture toughness testing. Excellent agreement was found between the stress intensity coefficient values obtained from compliance measurements and the analytic solution proposed for inclusion in the standard test method. Load displacement measurements were made using long armed displacement gages and hollow loading cylinders. Gage points registered on the loading hole surfaces through small holes in the walls of the loading cylinders.

  4. Optical and structural properties of GaN epitaxial layers on LiAlO2 substrates and their correlation with basal-plane stacking faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsenko, E. V.; Rzheutski, M. V.; Pavlovskii, V. N.; Yablonskii, G. P.; Alanzi, M.; Hamidalddin, A.; Alyamani, A.; Mauder, C.; Kalisch, H.; Reuters, B.; Heuken, M.; Vescan, A.; Naresh-Kumar, G.; Trager-Cowan, C.

    2016-01-01

    The optical and structural properties of m-plane GaN layers grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy on LiAlO2 (100) substrates were investigated. Temperature-dependent and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL), X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering measurements were performed to analyze the correlation of the sample properties with the density of I1-type basal-plane stacking faults (BSFs). Electron channeling contrast imaging was used to reveal and calculate the density of BSFs reaching the surface of an m-plane GaN/LiAlO2 layer. It was shown that a local increase of BSF density in the investigated samples results in a rise of the total PL efficiency at low temperatures because of the localization of excitons at BSFs and, therefore, a suppression of their diffusion to nonradiative centers. Parameters of time decay and temperature quenching of the BSF-related PL band were determined. A correlation of both εxx and εzz strain components with the BSFs and crystal mosaicity was observed, and possible reasons of this correlation are discussed.

  5. Structural properties of Al-rich AlInN grown on c-plane GaN substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The attractive prospect for AlInN/GaN-based devices for high electron mobility transistors with advanced structure relies on high-quality AlInN epilayer. In this work, we demonstrate the growth of high-quality Al-rich AlInN films deposited on c-plane GaN substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy show that the films lattice-matched with GaN can have a very smooth surface with good crystallinity and uniform distribution of Al and In in AlInN. PMID:25489282

  6. Structure and switching of in-plane ferroelectric nano-domains in strained PbxSr1-xTiO3 thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Matzen, Sylivia; Nesterov, Okeksiy; Rispens, Gregory; Heuver, J. A.; Bark, C; Biegalski, Michael D; Christen, Hans M; Noheda, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale ferroelectrics, the active elements of a variety of nanoelectronic devices, develop denser and richer domain structures than the bulk counterparts. With shrinking device sizes understanding and controlling domain formation in nanoferroelectrics is being intensely studied. Here we show that a precise control of the epitaxy and the strain allows stabilizing a hierarchical domain architecture in PbxSr1-xTiO3 thin films, showing periodic, purely in-plane polarized, ferroelectric nano-domains that can be switched by a scanning probe.

  7. Mn concentration dependent structural and optical properties of a-plane Zn0.99-xMnxNa0.01O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, B.; Zhou, T. T.; Ma, M. J.; Ye, Y. H.; Ye, Z. Z.; Lu, J. G.; Pan, X. H.

    2013-12-01

    Non-polar a-plane (112¯0) Zn0.99-xMnxNa0.01O (x = 0, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04, and 0.05) thin films have been prepared on r-plane (112¯0) sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The influences of Mn content on the structural and optical properties of the films have been studied. It is indicated that moderate Mn doping facilitates the non-polar growth of ZnO, and all the doped films are single phase with a hexagonal wurtzite structure. The transmittance spectra suggested that all films are transparent in the visible region exhibiting a transmittance above 80%. Mn2+ doped Zn0.99Na0.01O shows an initial decrease of optical band gap (OBG) for small concentration of Mn, followed by a monotonic increase. The anomalous decrease in OBG for low concentrations of Mn is attributed to the strong exchange interaction present between the sp electrons of the host matrix and d electrons of Mn. Emission studies were also performed showing suppressed blue-shifted ultraviolet band and dominant violet-blue bands, which might originate from the zinc vacancy (VZn) and zinc interstitial (Zni) defects. The intensity of defect-related emission peaks is Mn doping-level-dependent as well and the results coincide well with that from the structural analyses.

  8. Molecular crowding of collagen: a pathway to produce highly-organized collagenous structures.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Nima; Karmelek, Kathryn P; Paten, Jeffrey A; Zareian, Ramin; DiMasi, Elaine; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2012-10-01

    Collagen in vertebrate animals is often arranged in alternating lamellae or in bundles of aligned fibrils which are designed to withstand in vivo mechanical loads. The formation of these organized structures is thought to result from a complex, large-area integration of individual cell motion and locally-controlled synthesis of fibrillar arrays via cell-surface fibripositors (direct matrix printing). The difficulty of reproducing such a process in vitro has prevented tissue engineers from constructing clinically useful load-bearing connective tissue directly from collagen. However, we and others have taken the view that long-range organizational information is potentially encoded into the structure of the collagen molecule itself, allowing the control of fibril organization to extend far from cell (or bounding) surfaces. We here demonstrate a simple, fast, cell-free method capable of producing highly-organized, anistropic collagen fibrillar lamellae de novo which persist over relatively long-distances (tens to hundreds of microns). Our approach to nanoscale organizational control takes advantage of the intrinsic physiochemical properties of collagen molecules by inducing collagen association through molecular crowding and geometric confinement. To mimic biological tissues which comprise planar, aligned collagen lamellae (e.g. cornea, lamellar bone or annulus fibrosus), type I collagen was confined to a thin, planar geometry, concentrated through molecular crowding and polymerized. The resulting fibrillar lamellae show a striking resemblance to native load-bearing lamellae in that the fibrils are small, generally aligned in the plane of the confining space and change direction en masse throughout the thickness of the construct. The process of organizational control is consistent with embryonic development where the bounded planar cell sheets produced by fibroblasts suggest a similar confinement/concentration strategy. Such a simple approach to nanoscale

  9. Anisotropic structural and optical properties of semi-polar (11–22) GaN grown on m-plane sapphire using double AlN buffer layers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guijuan; Wang, Lianshan; Yang, Shaoyan; Li, Huijie; Wei, Hongyuan; Han, Dongyue; Wang, Zhanguo

    2016-01-01

    We report the anisotropic structural and optical properties of semi-polar (11–22) GaN grown on m-plane sapphire using a three-step growth method which consisted of a low temperature AlN buffer layer, followed by a high temperature AlN buffer layer and GaN growth. By introducing double AlN buffer layers, we substantially improve the crystal and optical qualities of semi-polar (11–22) GaN, and significantly reduce the density of stacking faults and dislocations. The high resolution x-ray diffraction measurement revealed that the in-plane anisotropic structural characteristics of GaN layer are azimuthal dependent. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that the majority of dislocations in the GaN epitaxial layer grown on m-sapphire are the mixed-type and the orientation of GaN layer was rotated 58.4° against the substrate. The room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra showed the PL intensity and wavelength have polarization dependence along parallel and perpendicular to the [1–100] axis (polarization degrees ~ 0.63). The realization of a high polarization semi-polar GaN would be useful to achieve III-nitride based lighting emission device for displays and backlighting. PMID:26861595

  10. Anisotropic structural and optical properties of semi-polar (11-22) GaN grown on m-plane sapphire using double AlN buffer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guijuan; Wang, Lianshan; Yang, Shaoyan; Li, Huijie; Wei, Hongyuan; Han, Dongyue; Wang, Zhanguo

    2016-02-01

    We report the anisotropic structural and optical properties of semi-polar (11-22) GaN grown on m-plane sapphire using a three-step growth method which consisted of a low temperature AlN buffer layer, followed by a high temperature AlN buffer layer and GaN growth. By introducing double AlN buffer layers, we substantially improve the crystal and optical qualities of semi-polar (11-22) GaN, and significantly reduce the density of stacking faults and dislocations. The high resolution x-ray diffraction measurement revealed that the in-plane anisotropic structural characteristics of GaN layer are azimuthal dependent. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that the majority of dislocations in the GaN epitaxial layer grown on m-sapphire are the mixed-type and the orientation of GaN layer was rotated 58.4° against the substrate. The room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra showed the PL intensity and wavelength have polarization dependence along parallel and perpendicular to the [1-100] axis (polarization degrees ~ 0.63). The realization of a high polarization semi-polar GaN would be useful to achieve III-nitride based lighting emission device for displays and backlighting.

  11. Anisotropic structural and optical properties of semi-polar (11-22) GaN grown on m-plane sapphire using double AlN buffer layers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guijuan; Wang, Lianshan; Yang, Shaoyan; Li, Huijie; Wei, Hongyuan; Han, Dongyue; Wang, Zhanguo

    2016-01-01

    We report the anisotropic structural and optical properties of semi-polar (11-22) GaN grown on m-plane sapphire using a three-step growth method which consisted of a low temperature AlN buffer layer, followed by a high temperature AlN buffer layer and GaN growth. By introducing double AlN buffer layers, we substantially improve the crystal and optical qualities of semi-polar (11-22) GaN, and significantly reduce the density of stacking faults and dislocations. The high resolution x-ray diffraction measurement revealed that the in-plane anisotropic structural characteristics of GaN layer are azimuthal dependent. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that the majority of dislocations in the GaN epitaxial layer grown on m-sapphire are the mixed-type and the orientation of GaN layer was rotated 58.4° against the substrate. The room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra showed the PL intensity and wavelength have polarization dependence along parallel and perpendicular to the [1-100] axis (polarization degrees ~ 0.63). The realization of a high polarization semi-polar GaN would be useful to achieve III-nitride based lighting emission device for displays and backlighting. PMID:26861595

  12. KrF resists for implant layers patterning extreme high-aspect ratio structures with a double focal plane exposure technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaelli, Giorgio; Ferri, Fabio; Volpi, Stefano; Hong, Chisun

    2012-03-01

    The design rules for advanced image sensor applications are requiring continuous CD shrinkage, and increasing aspect ratios which resulting in major challenges associated with using KrF technology. For the implant photo layers in particular, the need to block high-energy boron implants (well above 2 MeV) with extremely localized implant profiles requires an aspect ratio of deep well structures greater than 10:1. Other desirable attributes of a good photoresist for such demanding applications are high transparency, a steep wall profile consistent throughout the entire film, good adhesion with no structure collapse, and a wide process window. In this paper, we will discuss the role of a chemically amplified, ESCAP-type of resist in meeting these design criteria using a double focal plane exposure technique.

  13. THE CANADA-FRANCE ECLIPTIC PLANE SURVEY-L3 DATA RELEASE: THE ORBITAL STRUCTURE OF THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Kavelaars, J. J.; Jones, R. L.; Murray, I.; Gladman, B. J.; Petit, J.-M.; Van Laerhoven, C.; Parker, Joel Wm.; Bieryla, A.; Nicholson, P.; Margot, J. L.; Rousselot, P.; Mousis, O.; Scholl, H.; Marsden, B.; Benavidez, P.; Campo Bagatin, A.; Doressoundiram, A.; Veillet, C.

    2009-06-15

    We report the orbital distribution of the trans-Neptunian comets discovered during the first discovery year of the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS). CFEPS is a Kuiper Belt object survey based on observations acquired by the Very Wide component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (LS-VW). The first year's detections consist of 73 Kuiper Belt objects, 55 of which have now been tracked for three years or more, providing precise orbits. Although this sample size is small compared to the world-wide inventory, because we have an absolutely calibrated and extremely well-characterized survey (with known pointing history) we are able to de-bias our observed population and make unbiased statements about the intrinsic orbital distribution of the Kuiper Belt. By applying the (publically available) CFEPS Survey Simulator to models of the true orbital distribution and comparing the resulting simulated detections to the actual detections made by the survey, we are able to rule out several hypothesized Kuiper Belt object orbit distributions. We find that the main classical belt's so-called 'cold' component is confined in semimajor axis (a) and eccentricity (e) compared to the more extended 'hot' component; the cold component is confined to lower e and does not stretch all the way out to the 2:1 resonance but rather depletes quickly beyond a = 45 AU. For the cold main classical belt population we find a robust population estimate of N(H{sub g} < 10) = 50 {+-} 5 x 10{sup 3} and find that the hot component of the main classical belt represents {approx}60% of the total population. The inner classical belt (sunward of the 3:2 mean-motion resonance) has a population of roughly 2000 trans-Neptunian objects with absolute magnitudes H{sub g} < 10, and may not share the inclination distribution of the main classical belt. We also find that the plutino population lacks a cold low-inclination component, and so, the population is somewhat larger than recent estimates

  14. Atomic-scale investigation of structural defects in GaN layer on c-plane sapphire substrate during initial growth stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Tohoru; Sugimoto, Kohei; Okada, Narihito; Tadatomo, Kazuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Structural defects in the initial growth stages of GaN on sapphire, including stacking faults (SFs), threading dislocations (TDs), and mosaic structure containing grain boundaries, are investigated at the atomic scale. Individual grains in the as-deposited low temperature-GaN buffer layer are found to have twists correlated with those of the adjacent grains. These grains have little similarity on the stacking sequences, and the atomic arrangement on each side of the grain boundaries may be rearranged by annealing to achieve higher similarity in the stacking sequence. The TD identified as a-type at the top of the SFs-rich interfacial region is thought to originate from Frank partial dislocations. The Frank partial dislocation produces a distorted wurtzite-type structure. At the intermediate region of the basal-plane stacking fault between Frank and Shockley partial dislocations, the TD relieves the distortion in the wurtzite-type structure. In the TD, the wurtzite structure slips relative to the surrounding wurtzite.

  15. Nano-structure fabrication of GaAs using AFM tip-induced local oxidation method: different doping types and plane orientations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have fabricated nano-scaled oxide structures on GaAs substrates that are doped in different conductivity types of p- and n-types and plane orientations of GaAs(100) and GaAs(711), respectively, using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip-induced local oxidation method. The AFM-induced GaAs oxide patterns were obtained by varying applied bias from approximately 5 V to approximately 15 V and the tip loading forces from 60 to 180 nN. During the local oxidation, the humidity and the tip scan speed are fixed to approximately 45% and approximately 6.3 μm/s, respectively. The local oxidation rate is further improved in p-type GaAs compared to n-type GaAs substrates whereas the rate is enhanced in GaAs(100) compared to and GaAs(711), respectively, under the identical conditions. In addition, the oxide formation mechanisms in different doping types and plane orientations were investigated and compared with two-dimensional simulation results. PMID:21978373

  16. Out-of-plane (SH) soil-structure interaction: a shear wall with rigid and flexible ring foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thang; Lee, Vincent W.; Luo, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Soil-structure interaction (SSI) of a building and shear wall above a foundation in an elastic half-space has long been an important research subject for earthquake engineers and strong-motion seismologists. Numerous papers have been published since the early 1970s; however, very few of these papers have analytic closed-form solutions available. The soil-structure interaction problem is one of the most classic problems connecting the two disciplines of earthquake engineering and civil engineering. The interaction effect represents the mechanism of energy transfer and dissipation among the elements of the dynamic system, namely the soil subgrade, foundation, and superstructure. This interaction effect is important across many structure, foundation, and subgrade types but is most pronounced when a rigid superstructure is founded on a relatively soft lower foundation and subgrade. This effect may only be ignored when the subgrade is much harder than a flexible superstructure: for instance a flexible moment frame superstructure founded on a thin compacted soil layer on top of very stiff bedrock below. This paper will study the interaction effect of the subgrade and the superstructure. The analytical solution of the interaction of a shear wall, flexible-rigid foundation, and an elastic half-space is derived for incident SH waves with various angles of incidence. It found that the flexible ring (soft layer) cannot be used as an isolation mechanism to decouple a superstructure from its substructure resting on a shaking half-space.

  17. The structure of deuterated benzene films adsorbed on the graphite (0001) basal plane: what happens below and above the monolayer coverage?

    PubMed

    Bahn, Emanuel; Hedgeland, Holly; Jardine, Andrew P; Henry, Paul F; Hansen, Thomas C; Fouquet, Peter

    2014-10-28

    An exact description of the interactions in aromatic carbon systems is a key condition for the design of carbon based nanomaterials. In this paper we investigate the binding and adsorbate structure of the simplest prototype system in this class - the single aromatic ring molecule benzene on graphite. We have collected neutron diffraction data of the ordered phase of deuterated benzene, C6D6, adsorbed on the graphite (0001) basal plane surface. We examined relative coverages from 0.15 up to 1.3 monolayers (ML) in a temperature range of 80 to 250 K. The results confirm the flat lying commensurate (√7 × √7)R19.1° monolayer with lattice constants a = b = 6.5 Å at coverages of less than 1 ML. For this structure we observe a progressive melting well below the desorption temperature. At higher coverages we do neither observe an ordered second layer nor a densification of the structure by upright tilting of first layer molecules, as generally assumed up to now. Instead, we see the formation of clusters with a bulk crystalline structure for coverages only weakly exceeding 1 ML. PMID:25209023

  18. Structural, electronic, and optical properties of m -plane InGaN/GaN quantum wells: Insights from experiment and atomistic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, S.; Tanner, D. P.; O'Reilly, E. P.; Caro, M. A.; Martin, T. L.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Moody, M. P.; Tang, F.; Griffiths, J. T.; Oehler, F.; Kappers, M. J.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J.; Sutherland, D.; Davies, M. J.; Dawson, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the structural, electronic, and optical properties of an m -plane (In,Ga)N/GaN quantum well structure grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. The sample has been structurally characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and 3D atom probe tomography. The optical properties of the sample have been studied by photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved PL spectroscopy, and polarized PL excitation spectroscopy. The PL spectrum consisted of a very broad PL line with a high degree of optical linear polarization. To understand the optical properties we have performed atomistic tight-binding calculations, and based on our initial atom probe tomography data, the model includes the effects of strain and built-in field variations arising from random alloy fluctuations. Furthermore, we included Coulomb effects in the calculations. Our microscopic theoretical description reveals strong hole wave function localization effects due to random alloy fluctuations, resulting in strong variations in ground state energies and consequently the corresponding transition energies. This is consistent with the experimentally observed broad PL peak. Furthermore, when including Coulomb contributions in the calculations we find strong exciton localization effects which explain the form of the PL decay transients. Additionally, the theoretical results confirm the experimentally observed high degree of optical linear polarization. Overall, the theoretical data are in very good agreement with the experimental findings, highlighting the strong impact of the microscopic alloy structure on the optoelectronic properties of these systems.

  19. Infrared spectroscopy of the phenol-N2 cluster in S0 and D0: Direct evidence of the in-plane structure of the cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Asuka; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Ebata, Takayuki; Mikami, Naohiko

    1999-06-01

    The OH stretching vibration of jet-cooled phenol-N2 in the neural and cationic ground states was observed by using infrared-ultraviolet double resonance spectroscopy and infrared photodissociation spectroscopy, respectively. The OH vibration showed a small but significant low-frequency shift of 5 cm-1 upon the cluster formation in the neutral, while the shift drastically increased up to 159 cm-1 in the cation. These results represent the direct evidence of the in-plane cluster structure, in which phenolic OH is hydrogen bonded to N2, as was proposed in the zero kinetic energy photoelectron study [S. R. Haines et al., J. Chem. Phys. 109, 9244 (1998)].

  20. Plane-wave based electronic structure calculations for correlated materials using dynamical mean-field theory and projected local orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadon, B.; Lechermann, F.; Georges, A.; Jollet, F.; Wehling, T. O.; Lichtenstein, A. I.

    2008-05-01

    The description of realistic strongly correlated systems has recently advanced through the combination of density functional theory in the local density approximation (LDA) and dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). This LDA+DMFT method is able to treat both strongly correlated insulators and metals. Several interfaces between LDA and DMFT have been used, such as ( Nth order) linear muffin-tin orbitals or maximally localized Wannier functions. Such schemes are, however, either complex in use or additional simplifications are often performed (i.e., the atomic sphere approximation). We present an alternative implementation of LDA+DMFT , which keeps the precision of the Wannier implementation, but which is lighter. It relies on the projection of localized orbitals onto a restricted set of Kohn-Sham states to define the correlated subspace. The method is implemented within the projector augmented wave and within the mixed-basis pseudopotential frameworks. This opens the way to electronic structure calculations within LDA+DMFT for more complex structures with the precision of an all-electron method. We present an application to two correlated systems, namely, SrVO3 and β -NiS (a charge-transfer material), including ligand states in the basis set. The results are compared to calculations done with maximally localized Wannier functions, and the physical features appearing in the orbitally resolved spectral functions are discussed.

  1. Discovery of universal outflow structures above and below the accretion disc plane in radio-quiet quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Justin; Schild, Rudolph E.; Leiter, Darryl

    2011-04-01

    59 quasars in the background of the Magellanic Clouds had brightness records monitored by the MACHO project during the years 1992-99. Because the circumpolar fields of these quasars had no seasonal sampling defects, their observation produced data sets well suited to further careful analysis. Following a preliminary report wherein we showed the existence of reverberation in the data for one of the radio-quiet quasars in this group, we now show that similar reverberations have been seen in all of the 55 radio-quiet quasars with adequate data, making possible the determination of the quasar inclination to the observer's line of sight. The reverberation signatures indicate the presence of large-scale elliptical outflow structures similar to that predicted by the Elvis and 'dusty torus' models of quasars, whose characteristic sizes vary within a surprisingly narrow range of scales. More importantly, the observed opening angle relative to the polar axis of the universal elliptical outflow structure present was consistently found to be on the order of 78°.

  2. Study of Defect Structures in 6H-SiC a/ m-Plane Pseudofiber Crystals Grown by Hot-Wall CVD Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goue, Ouloide Y.; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Yang, Yu; Guo, Jianqiu; Dudley, Michael; Kisslinger, Kim; Trunek, Andrew J.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Woodworth, Andrew A.

    2016-04-01

    Structural perfection of silicon carbide (SiC) single crystals is essential to achieve high-performance power devices. A new bulk growth process for SiC proposed by researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center, called large tapered crystal (LTC) growth, based on axial fiber growth followed by lateral expansion, could produce SiC boules with potentially as few as one threading screw dislocation per wafer. In this study, the lateral expansion aspect of LTC growth is addressed through analysis of lateral growth of 6H-SiC a/ m-plane seed crystals by hot-wall chemical vapor deposition. Preliminary synchrotron white-beam x-ray topography (SWBXT) indicates that the as-grown boules match the polytype structure of the underlying seed and have a faceted hexagonal morphology with a strain-free surface marked by steps. SWBXT Laue diffraction patterns of transverse and axial slices of the boules reveal streaks suggesting the existence of stacking faults/polytypes, and this is confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Transmission x-ray topography of both transverse and axial slices reveals inhomogeneous strains at the seed-epilayer interface and linear features propagating from the seed along the growth direction. Micro-Raman mapping of an axial slice reveals that the seed contains high stacking disorder, while contrast extinction analysis (g· b and g· b× l) of the linear features reveals that these are mostly edge-type basal plane dislocations. Further high-resolution transmission electron microscopy investigation of the seed-homoepilayer interface also reveals nanobands of different SiC polytypes. A model for their formation mechanism is proposed. Finally, the implication of these results for improving the LTC growth process is addressed.

  3. In-plane ESR microwave conductivity measurements and electronic band structure studies of the organic superconductor, {beta}'-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3}.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. H.; VanZile, M. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; Geiser, U.; Kini, A. M.; Sche, P. P.; Koo, H.-J.; Whangbo, M.-H.; Nixon, P. G.; Winter, R. W.; Gard, G. L.; Chemistry; North Carolina State Univ.; Portland State Univ.

    1999-07-01

    The electronic structure of the organic superconductor {beta}''-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3} (BEDT-TTF is bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene) was characterized with the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and electronic band structure calculations. The room-temperature ESR line width is 24-27 G in the plane of a donor molecule layer (i.e., in the ab-plane) and {approx}32 G along the normal to this plane (i.e., along the c*-direction). The ab-plane anisotropy of the microwave conductivity was extracted for the first time from the ESR Dysonian line shape analysis. The in-plane conductivity varies sinusoidally, is maximal along the interstack direction (b-axis), and is minimal along the donor stack direction (a-axis). The Fermi surfaces of the title compound consist of a 2D hole pocket and a pair of 1D wavy lines. The directions for the in-plane conductivity maximum and minimum are in excellent agreement with the electronic band structure calculated for {beta}''-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}SF{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 2}SO{sub 3}, and the origin of the in-plane conductivity anisotropy lies in the one-dimensional part of the Fermi surface. This is the first time that an organic conductor shows Dysonian ESR line shape due to its 2D and strongly metallic nature, yet the 1D character is revealed simultaneously through the in-plane conductivity anisotropy.

  4. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, David L.; Horner, Scott D.; Aamodt, Earl K.

    2002-12-01

    Advances in systems engineering, applied sciences, and manufacturing technologies have enabled the development of large ground based and spaced based astronomical instruments having a large Field of View (FOV) to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A larger FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optical elements, improved support structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPA). A mFPA designed for astronomy can use multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single camera baseplate integrated at the instrument plane of focus. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tighter control on the design trades, component development, CCD characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the capability Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company's (LMSSC) Advanced Technology Center (ATC) has developed to perform CCD characterization, mFPA assembly and alignment, and mFPA system level testing.

  5. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, D.; Horner, S.; Aamodt, E.

    Advances in manufacturing and applied sciences have enabled the development of large ground and spaced based astronomical instruments having a Field of View (FOV) large enough to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A large FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optics, improved structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPAs). A mFPA comprises multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single baseplate integrated at the focus plane of the instrument. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tight control on the design trades of component development, CCD definition and characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the results of the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC), Advanced Technology Center (ATC) developed mFPA. The design trades and performance characterization are services provided by the LMSSC ATC but not detailed in this paper.

  6. Variational theory of complex rays applied to shell structures: in-plane inertia, quasi-symmetric ray distribution, and orthotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattabiani, Alessandro; Barbarulo, Andrea; Riou, Hervé; Ladevèze, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Recently, interest of aerospace and automotive industries on medium-frequency vibrational behavior of composite shell structures has grown due to their high specific stiffness and fatigue resistance. Conventional methods such as the finite element method and the statistical energy analysis are not suitable for the medium-frequency bandwidth. Conversely, the variational theory of complex rays (VTCR) is taking place as an ad-hoc technique to tackle such frequency band. It is a Trefftz method based on a weak variational formulation. Equilibrium equations are met using exact solutions as shape functions. The variational problem imposes boundary conditions in weak form. The present paper extends VTCR to orthotropic shell structures. Moreover, several new enhancements are introduced. Now, we use a quasi-symmetric ray distribution which can greatly reduce computational costs, and addresses in-plane inertia which was neglected in previous works. Some relevant numerical examples are presented to show the strategy and results are compared with a FEM reference to study performances.

  7. High density load bearing insulation peg

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

    1985-01-29

    A high density peg is disclosed which can support a large load and exhibits excellent thermal resistance produced by a method wherein the peg is made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 4 figs.

  8. High density load bearing insulation peg

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, Jeffert J.; Owens, William J.

    1985-01-01

    A high density peg which can support a large load and exhibits excellent thermal resistance produced by a method wherein the peg is made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

  9. NORMAL LOAD BEARING BY SITE SPECIFIC CANISTER

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2005-03-23

    The overall purpose of this calculation is to perform a preliminary analysis of the Site Specific Canister/Basket, subject to static gravity loads that include the self weight of the Canister Shell, the Basket, the Spent Nuclear Fuel, the Shield Plug and the related hardware, so that the loads are approximately known for sizing purposes. Based on these loads the stress levels in various components of the Site Specific Canister/Basket are evaluated.

  10. Load-bearing capacity of indirect inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses made of particulate filler composite alone or reinforced with E-glass fibers impregnated with various monomers.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Mutlu; Koekoek, Winand; Pekkan, Gurel

    2012-08-01

    The load-bearing capacity and failure types of indirect inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDP), made of particulate filler composite (PFC) (Estenia) alone or reinforced with E-glass fibers impregnated with various monomers were evaluated. Indirect inlay-retained FDPs were made between first premolars and first molars (N=30, 10/per group). The inlay parts of the specimens were silica coated and silanized and the specimens were cemented with dual-polymerized resin cement under ultrasonic vibrations. The experimental groups were as follows: Group 1: FRC1 (BR-100, UTMA) + PFC; Group 2: FRC2 (everStick C&B, Bis-GMA/PMMA) + PFC; Group 3: PFC only. The specimens were kept in distilled water at 37 °C for one month and then subjected to fracture strength test. No significant difference was found between the Group 1 and Group 2 FDPs (1357±301 N and 1213±316 N, respectively) (p>0.05) (ANOVA). Group 3 (856±299 N) showed significantly lower results than those of FRC reinforced groups (p<0.05). Failure analyses revealed no debonding of any of the FDPs from the inlay cavities. FDPs made of PFC only showed mainly catastrophic fracture of the pontic. In the FRC reinforced groups, predominantly delamination of the veneering was observed. The use of silica coating and silanization in combination with the dual-polymerized resin cement used; under ultrasonic cementation procedure provided sufficient adhesion to withstand static loading forces at the cementation interface, since the failures were predominantly delamination of the veneering in the FRC reinforced groups. PMID:22732482

  11. Mechanics, degradability, bioactivity, in vitro, and in vivo biocompatibility evaluation of poly(amino acid)/hydroxyapatite/calcium sulfate composite for potential load-bearing bone repair.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoxia; Ren, Haohao; Luo, Xiaoman; Wang, Peng; Lv, Guoyu; Yuan, Huipin; Li, Hong; Yan, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    A ternary composite of poly(amino acid), hydroxyapatite, and calcium sulfate (PAA/HA/CS) was prepared using in situ melting polycondensation method and evaluated in terms of mechanical strengths, in vitro degradability, bioactivity, as well as in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility. The results showed that the ternary composite exhibited a compressive strength of 147 MPa, a bending strength of 121 MPa, a tensile strength of 122 MPa, and a tensile modulus of 4.6 GPa. After immersion in simulated body fluid, the compressive strength of the composite decreased from 147 to 98 MPa for six weeks and the bending strength decreased from 121 to 75 MPa for eight weeks, and both of them kept stable in the following soaking period. The composite could be slowly degraded with 7.27 wt% loss of initial weight after soaking in phosphate buffered solution for three weeks when started to keep stable weight in the following days. The composite was soaked in simulated body fluid solution and the hydroxyapatite layer, as flower-like granules, formed on the surface of the composite samples, showing good bioactivity. Moreover, it was found that the composite could promote proliferation of MG-63 cells, and the cells with normal phenotype extended and spread well on the composite surface. The implantation of the composite into the ulna of sheep confirmed that the composite was biocompatible and osteoconductive in vivo, and offered the PAA/HA/CS composite promising material for load-bearing bone substitutes for clinical application. PMID:26635202

  12. Optimum design of phononic crystal perforated plate structures for widest bandgap of fundamental guided wave modes and maximized in-plane stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayatrasa, Saeid; Abhary, Kazem; Uddin, Mohammad; Ng, Ching-Tai

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a topology optimization of single material phononic crystal plate (PhP) to be produced by perforation of a uniform background plate. The primary objective of this optimization study is to explore widest exclusive bandgaps of fundamental (first order) symmetric or asymmetric guided wave modes as well as widest complete bandgap of mixed wave modes (symmetric and asymmetric). However, in the case of single material porous phononic crystals the bandgap width essentially depends on the resultant structural integration introduced by achieved unitcell topology. Thinner connections of scattering segments (i.e. lower effective stiffness) generally lead to (i) wider bandgap due to enhanced interfacial reflections, and (ii) lower bandgap frequency range due to lower wave speed. In other words higher relative bandgap width (RBW) is produced by topology with lower effective stiffness. Hence in order to study the bandgap efficiency of PhP unitcell with respect to its structural worthiness, the in-plane stiffness is incorporated in optimization algorithm as an opposing objective to be maximized. Thick and relatively thin Polysilicon PhP unitcells with square symmetry are studied. Non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm NSGA-II is employed for this multi-objective optimization problem and modal band analysis of individual topologies is performed through finite element method. Specialized topology initiation, evaluation and filtering are applied to achieve refined feasible topologies without penalizing the randomness of genetic algorithm (GA) and diversity of search space. Selected Pareto topologies are presented and gradient of RBW and elastic properties in between the two Pareto front extremes are investigated. Chosen intermediate Pareto topology, even not extreme topology with widest bandgap, show superior bandgap efficiency compared with the results reported in other works on widest bandgap topology of asymmetric guided waves, available in the literature

  13. In-plane magnetic field effect on hole cyclotron mass and gz factor in high-mobility SiGe/Ge/SiGe structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drichko, I. L.; Malysh, V. A.; Smirnov, I. Yu.; Golub, L. E.; Tarasenko, S. A.; Suslov, A. V.; Mironov, O. A.; Kummer, M.; von Känel, H.

    2014-09-01

    The high-frequency (ac) conductivity of a high quality modulation doped GeSi/Ge/GeSi single quantum well structure with hole density p =6×1011cm-2 was measured by the surface acoustic wave (SAW) technique at frequencies of 30 and 85 MHz and magnetic fields B of up to 18 T in the temperature range of 0.3-5.8 K. The acoustic effects were also measured as a function of the tilt angle of the magnetic field with respect to the normal of the two-dimensional channel at T =0.3 K. It is shown that at the minima of the conductivity oscillations holes are localized on the Fermi level, and that there is a temperature domain in which the high-frequency conductivity in the bulk of the quantum well is of the activation nature. The analysis of the temperature dependence of the conductivity at odd filling factors enables us to determine the effective gz factor. It is shown that the in-plane component of the magnetic field leads to an increase of the cyclotron mass and to a reduction of the gz factor. We developed a microscopic theory of these effects for the heavy-hole states of the complex valence band in quantum wells which describes well the experimental findings.

  14. TEMP-STRESS---A thermomechanical finite element program for the analysis of plane and axisymmetric reinforced/prestressed concrete structures: User`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J. M.; Pfeiffer, P. A.; Marchertas, A. H.

    1989-01-01

    TEMP-STRESS has been developed to improve the understanding of the behavior of concrete subjected to mechanical loadings and high temperatures simulating the effects of coolant spills, molten debris, etc. The capability to model concrete structures subjected to static and dynamic overpressures, such as LWR and LMR containments with complex axisymmetric geometries, can be solved. The computer code is a finite element program which has a weakly coupled thermomechanical formulation. It can handle transient and steady state problems through the use of explicit time integration and dynamic relaxation. There is a plane or axisymmetric continuum element and flexural beam and shell elements for concrete discretization. The continuum element is a four node quadrilateral using numerical integration and elastic hourglass control. Variable material properties as a function of temperature are available. Thermal and/or mechanical loading can be handled. The concrete material model has the following characteristics: (a) elastic-plastic response, (b) variable loading surface capability, (c) cracking normal to maximum principal strain at specified failure surface, (d) post-failure element treatment, and (e) variable temperature dependence. Concrete can be reinforced and/or prestressed. 15 refs., 33 figs., 24 tabs.

  15. THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. XII. DISTANCE CATALOG EXPANSION USING KINEMATIC ISOLATION OF DENSE MOLECULAR CLOUD STRUCTURES WITH {sup 13}CO(1-0)

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy P.; Glenn, Jason; Rosolowsky, Erik; Ginsburg, Adam; Evans II, Neal J.; Battersby, Cara; Shirley, Yancy L.; Svoboda, Brian

    2015-01-20

    We present an expanded distance catalog for 1710 molecular cloud structures identified in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) version 2, representing a nearly threefold increase over the previous BGPS distance catalog. We additionally present a new method for incorporating extant data sets into our Bayesian distance probability density function (DPDF) methodology. To augment the dense-gas tracers (e.g., HCO{sup +}(3-2), NH{sub 3}(1,1)) used to derive line-of-sight velocities for kinematic distances, we utilize the Galactic Ring Survey (GRS) {sup 13}CO(1-0) data to morphologically extract velocities for BGPS sources. The outline of a BGPS source is used to select a region of the GRS {sup 13}CO data, along with a reference region to subtract enveloping diffuse emission, to produce a line profile of {sup 13}CO matched to the BGPS source. For objects with a HCO{sup +}(3-2) velocity, ≈95% of the new {sup 13}CO(1-0) velocities agree with that of the dense gas. A new prior DPDF for kinematic distance ambiguity (KDA) resolution, based on a validated formalism for associating molecular cloud structures with known objects from the literature, is presented. We demonstrate this prior using catalogs of masers with trigonometric parallaxes and H II regions with robust KDA resolutions. The distance catalog presented here contains well-constrained distance estimates for 20% of BGPS V2 sources, with typical distance uncertainties ≲ 0.5 kpc. Approximately 75% of the well-constrained sources lie within 6 kpc of the Sun, concentrated in the Scutum-Centaurus arm. Galactocentric positions of objects additionally trace out portions of the Sagittarius, Perseus, and Outer arms in the first and second Galactic quadrants, and we also find evidence for significant regions of interarm dense gas.

  16. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. XII. Distance Catalog Expansion Using Kinematic Isolation of Dense Molecular Cloud Structures with 13CO(1-0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy P.; Rosolowsky, Erik; Glenn, Jason; Ginsburg, Adam; Evans, Neal J., II; Battersby, Cara; Shirley, Yancy L.; Svoboda, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present an expanded distance catalog for 1710 molecular cloud structures identified in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) version 2, representing a nearly threefold increase over the previous BGPS distance catalog. We additionally present a new method for incorporating extant data sets into our Bayesian distance probability density function (DPDF) methodology. To augment the dense-gas tracers (e.g., HCO^+(3-2), NH3(1,1)) used to derive line-of-sight velocities for kinematic distances, we utilize the Galactic Ring Survey (GRS) 13CO(1-0) data to morphologically extract velocities for BGPS sources. The outline of a BGPS source is used to select a region of the GRS 13CO data, along with a reference region to subtract enveloping diffuse emission, to produce a line profile of 13CO matched to the BGPS source. For objects with a HCO^+(3-2) velocity, ≈95% of the new 13CO(1-0) velocities agree with that of the dense gas. A new prior DPDF for kinematic distance ambiguity (KDA) resolution, based on a validated formalism for associating molecular cloud structures with known objects from the literature, is presented. We demonstrate this prior using catalogs of masers with trigonometric parallaxes and H II regions with robust KDA resolutions. The distance catalog presented here contains well-constrained distance estimates for 20% of BGPS V2 sources, with typical distance uncertainties <~ 0.5 kpc. Approximately 75% of the well-constrained sources lie within 6 kpc of the Sun, concentrated in the Scutum-Centaurus arm. Galactocentric positions of objects additionally trace out portions of the Sagittarius, Perseus, and Outer arms in the first and second Galactic quadrants, and we also find evidence for significant regions of interarm dense gas.

  17. Mismatch relaxation by stacking fault formation of AlN islands in AlGaN/GaN structures on m-plane GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Smalc-Koziorowska, Julita; Sawicka, Marta; Skierbiszewski, Czeslaw; Grzegory, Izabella

    2011-08-08

    We study the mismatch relaxation of 2-5 nm thin elongated AlN islands formed during growth of AlGaN on bulk m-plane GaN by molecular beam epitaxy. The relaxation of these m-plane AlN layers is anisotropic and occurs through the introduction of stacking faults in [0001] planes during island coalescence, while no relaxation is observed along the perpendicular [1120] direction. This anisotropy in the mismatch relaxation and the formation of stacking faults in the AlN islands are explained by the growth mode of the AlN platelets and their coalescence along the [0001] direction.

  18. Electronic structure of the ingredient planes of the cuprate superconductor Bi2Sr2CuO6 +δ : A comparison study with Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yan-Feng; Wang, Wen-Lin; Ding, Hao; Wang, Yang; Ding, Ying; Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John; Gu, G. D.; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Zhao, Lin; Zhou, Xing-Jiang; Song, Can-Li; Ma, Xu-Cun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-04-01

    By means of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, we report on the electronic structures of the BiO and SrO planes of the Bi2Sr2CuO6 +δ (Bi-2201) superconductor prepared by argon-ion bombardment and annealing. Depending on post annealing conditions, the BiO planes exhibit either a pseudogap (PG) with sharp coherence peaks and an anomalously large gap magnitude of 49 meV or van Hove singularity (vHS) near the Fermi level, while the SrO is always characteristic of a PG-like feature. This contrasts with the Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ (Bi-2212) superconductor where vHS occurs solely on the SrO plane. We disclose the interstitial oxygen dopants (δ in the formulas) as a primary cause for the occurrence of vHS, which are located dominantly around the BiO and SrO planes, respectively, in Bi-2201 and Bi-2212. This is supported by the contrasting structural buckling amplitude of the BiO and SrO planes in the two superconductors. Our findings provide solid evidence for the irrelevance of PG to the superconductivity in the two superconductors, as well as insights into why Bi-2212 can achieve a higher superconducting transition temperature than Bi-2201, and by implication, the mechanism of cuprate superconductivity.

  19. Electronic structure of the ingredient planes of the cuprate superconductor Bi2Sr2CuO6+δ: A comparison study with Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yan -Feng Lv; Gu, G. D.; Wang, Wen -Lin; Ding, Hao; Wang, Yang; Ding, Ying; Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; et al

    2016-04-15

    By means of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, we report on the electronic structures of the BiO and SrO planes of the Bi2Sr2CuO6+δ (Bi-2201) superconductor prepared by argon-ion bombardment and annealing. Depending on post annealing conditions, the BiO planes exhibit either a pseudogap (PG) with sharp coherence peaks and an anomalously large gap magnitude of 49 meV or van Hove singularity (vHS) near the Fermi level, while the SrO is always characteristic of a PG-like feature. This contrasts with the Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) superconductor where vHS occurs solely on the SrO plane. We disclose the interstitial oxygen dopants (δ in the formulas)more » as a primary cause for the occurrence of vHS, which are located dominantly around the BiO and SrO planes, respectively, in Bi-2201 and Bi-2212. This is supported by the contrasting structural buckling amplitude of the BiO and SrO planes in the two superconductors. Furthermore, our findings provide solid evidence for the irrelevance of PG to the superconductivity in the two superconductors, as well as insights into why Bi-2212 can achieve a higher superconducting transition temperature than Bi-2201, and by implication, the mechanism of cuprate superconductivity.« less

  20. Material Selection for Cryogenic Support Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Erik; Kellaris, Nicholas; Daal, Miguel; Sadoulet, Bernard; Golwala, Sunil; Hollister, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    Design specifications for the support structures of low temperature instrumentation often call for low thermal conductivity between temperature stages, high stiffness, and specific load bearing capabilities. While overall geometric design plays an important role in both overall stiffness and heat conduction between stages, material selection can affect a structure's properties significantly. In this contribution, we suggest and compare several alternative materials to the current standard materials for building cryogenic support structures.

  1. Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, E. H. T.; Kalish, R.; Kulik, J.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2011-03-21

    Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes can be deposited by applying energetic carbon bombardment. The present work shows the possibility of structuring graphitic planes perpendicular to the substrate in following two distinct ways: (i) applying sufficiently large carbon energies for deposition at room temperature (E>10 keV), (ii) utilizing much lower energies for deposition at elevated substrate temperatures (T>200 deg. C). High resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to probe the graphitic planes. The alignment achieved at elevated temperatures does not depend on the deposition angle. The data provides insight into the mechanisms leading to the growth of oriented graphitic planes under different conditions.

  2. Experiments with Planing Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sottorf, W

    1934-01-01

    A previous report discusses the experimental program of a systematic exploration of all questions connected with the planing problem as well as the first fundamental results of the investigation of a flat planing surface. The present report is limited to the conversion of the model test data to full scale.

  3. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  4. Structural polymers in upstream production service

    SciTech Connect

    Dismukes, J.P.; Lustiger, A.; Chang, J.; Abrams, P.I.; Chiu, A.S.

    1993-12-31

    Polymers in the form of coatings, seals and composites for corrosion resistant and secondary load-bearing applications have been used in oilfield production operations for a number of years in specialty applications. The increasing needs of the industry for corrosion resistant piping, and for structural components combining corrosion resistance with high specific strength and weight, have now made the potential for use of polymer composites of increasing interest, for pipe and tubing and for load-bearing structural members. The purpose of this paper is to review the current status of structural polymer usage in the upstream, and to highlight major application areas where there is a strong economic incentive to evaluate the benefits for applying polymer composite. In addition, the underlying science and technology affecting composite properties, application life, environmental resistance and economics are assessed, since these issues need to be addressed in considering the decision to design-in composites, as compared to commonly used metals and alloys.

  5. Structure and Function of the Superior Temporal Plane in Adult Males with Cleft Lip and Palate: Pathologic Enlargement with No Relationship to Childhood Hearing Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriver, A. S.; Canady, J.; Richman, L.; Andreasen, N. C.; Nopoulos, P.

    2006-01-01

    Background: In a previous study from our lab, adult males with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate (NSCLP) were shown to have significantly lower temporal lobe gray matter volume than matched controls. The current study was designed to begin a regional analysis of specific subregions of the temporal lobe. The superior temporal plane (STP) is a…

  6. 2. VIEW SOUTH, INCLINE PLANE CAR, INCLINE PLANE TRACK, UPPER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTH, INCLINE PLANE CAR, INCLINE PLANE TRACK, UPPER STATION. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  7. Structure and Composition of Air-Plane Soots and Surrogates Analyzed by Raman Spectroscopy and Laser/Ions Desorption Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ismael; Chazallon, Bertrand; Carpentier, Yvain; Irimiea, Cornelia; Focsa, Cristian; Ouf, François-Xavier; Salm, François; Delhaye, David; Gaffié, Daniel; Yon, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    Aviation alters the composition of the atmosphere globally and can thus drive climate change and ozone depletion [1]. An aircraft exhaust plume contains species emitted by the engines, species formed in the plume from the emitted species and atmospheric species that become entrained into the plume. The majority of emitted species (gases and soot particles) are produced by the combustion of kerosene with ambient air in the combustion chamber of the engine. Emissions of soot particles by air-planes produce persistent contrails in the upper troposphere in ice-supersaturated air masses that contribute to cloudiness and impact the radiative properties of the atmosphere. These aerosol-cloud interactions represent one of the largest sources of uncertainty in global climate models [2]. Though the formation of atmospheric ice particles has been studied since many years [3], there are still numerous opened questions on nucleation properties of soot particles [4], as the ice nucleation experiments showed a large spread in results depending on the nucleation mode chosen and origin of the soot produced. Most likely one of the reasons behind these discrepancies resides in the different physico-chemical properties (composition, structure) of soot particles produced in different conditions, e.g. with respect to fuel or combustion techniques. In this work, we use Raman microscopy (266, 514 and 785 nm excitation) and ablation techniques (SIMS, Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry, and Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry) to characterize soot particles produced from air-plane at different engine regimes simulating a landing and taking-off (LTO) cycle. First, the spectral parameters of the first-order Raman band of various soot samples, collected from three different sources in the frame of the MERMOSE project (http://mermose.onera.fr/): PowerJet SaM-146 turbofan (four engine regimes), CAST generator (propane fuel, four different global equivalence ratios), and Kerosene laboratory flame

  8. Crystal structures of LaO{sub 1−x}F{sub x}BiS{sub 2} (x∼0.23, 0.46): Effect of F doping on distortion of Bi–S plane

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Akira Nagao, Masanori; Takei, Takahiro; Watauchi, Satoshi; Tanaka, Isao; Kumada, Nobuhiro

    2014-04-01

    The crystal structures of superconducting LaO{sub 1−x}F{sub x}BiS{sub 2} (x∼0.23, 0.46) were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Their space group was P4/nmm. Distortion of the Bi–S plane changed when the F content was increased from 0.23 to 0.46, and a nearly flat Bi–S plane was formed at x∼0.46. Computational calculations supported this effect of F doping on distortion of Bi–S plane. LaO{sub 1−x}F{sub x}BiS{sub 2} with higher F contents were computationally predicted to be thermodynamically more unstable under ambient pressure. We discussed the bonding, conductivities, and synthetic routes of LaO{sub 1−x}F{sub x}BiS{sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: Distortion of the Bi–S plane in LaO{sub 1−x}F{sub x}BiS{sub 2} changed when the F content was increased from 0.23 to 0.46, and a nearly flat Bi–S plane was formed at x∼0.46 with the appearance of superconductivity. - Highlights: • Crystal structure of LaO{sub 1−x}F{sub x}BiS{sub 2} was determined by single-crystal XRD. • Doping amount of F changes the distortion of the Bi–S plane. • Nearly flat Bi–S planes were found in superconductive LaO{sub 1−x}F{sub x}BiS{sub 2} (x∼0.46). • LaO{sub 1−x}F{sub x}BiS{sub 2} with higher F contents was thermodynamically more unstable. • Bonding, superconductivities, and synthetic routes of LaO{sub 1−x}F{sub x}BiS{sub 2} were discussed.

  9. Simultaneous growth of GaN/AlGaN quantum wells on c-, a-, m-, and (20.1)-plane GaN bulk substrates obtained by the ammonothermal method: Structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudziński, M.; Kudrawiec, R.; Patriarche, G.; Kucharski, R.; Caban, P.; Strupiński, W.

    2015-03-01

    GaN/AlGaN quantum wells (QWs) were grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on c-, a-, m-, and (20.1)-plane GaN substrates obtained by the ammonothermal method in the same MOVPE process, i.e. a process with growth parameters optimized for c-plane GaN templates. The structural properties of GaN/AlGaN QWs were carefully investigated by high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Sharp GaN/AlGaN interfaces were seen for QWs grown on the c-, a-, and m-plane GaN substrates, but very rough interfaces with {1-100} and {1-101} facets were observed on the (20.1)-plane GaN substrate. In addition, the Al-rich region of AlGaN and GaN transition was identified for each of the GaN/AlGaN QW samples deposited in this process. The thickness and composition of this region varied with the crystallographic orientation of GaN substrates.

  10. Eight plane IPND mechanical testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, A.; Guarino, V.; Wood, K.; Nephew, T.; Ayres, D.; Lee, A.; High Energy Physics; FNAL

    2008-03-18

    A mechanical test of an 8 plane IPND mechanical prototype, which was constructed using extrusions from the testing/tryout of the 16 cell prototype extrusion die in Argonne National Laboratory, was conducted. There were 4 vertical and 4 horizontal planes in this 8 plane IPND prototype. Each vertical plane had four 16 cell extrusions, while each horizontal plane had six 16 cell extrusions. Each plane was glued together using the formulation of Devcon adhesive, Devcon 60. The vertical extrusions used in the vertical planes shares the same dimensions as the horizontal extrusions in the horizontal planes with the average web thickness of 2.1 mm and the average wall thickness of 3.1 mm. This mechanical prototype was constructed with end-seals on the both ends of the vertical extrusions. The gaps were filled with epoxy between extrusions and end-seals. The overall dimension of IPND is 154.8 by 103.1 by 21.7 inches with the weight of approximately 1200 kg, as shown in a figure. Two similar mechanical tests of 3 layer and 11 layer prototypes have been done in order to evaluate the strength of the adhesive joint between extrusions in the NOvA detector. The test showed that the IPND prototype was able to sustain under the loading of weight of itself and scintillator. Two FEA models were built to verify the measurement data from the test. The prediction from FEA slice model seems correlated reasonably well to the test result, even under a 'rough' estimated condition for the wall thickness (from an untuned die) and an unknown property of 'garage type' extrusion. A full size of FEA 3-D model also agrees very well with the test data from strain gage readings. It is worthy to point out that the stress distribution of the structure is predominantly determined by the internal pressure, while the buckling stability relies more on the loading weight from the extrusions themselves and scintillate. Results of conducted internal pressure tests, including 3- cell, 11-cell and the IPND

  11. Core structure, dislocation energy and Peierls stress for 1/3?11 0? edge dislocations with (0001) and {1 00} slip planes in α-Zr.

    SciTech Connect

    Voskoboinikov, Roman E; Osetskiy, Yury N; Bacon, David J

    2005-01-01

    Atomic-scale simulations of edge dislocations of the 1/3<11{bar 2}0> (0001) and 1/3<11{bar 2}0> {l_brace}1{bar 1}00{r_brace} slip systems have been carried out using a Finnis-Sinclair-type interatomic potential for {alpha}-zirconium. The distribution of atomic displacements in the dislocation core shows that in this model the edge dislocation in the basal plane dissociates into two Shockley partials whereas the dislocation in the prism plane remains undissociated. The effective core radius and core energy are estimated, and dislocation response to increasing applied shear strain is investigated. The core properties and the critical stress for dislocation glide (Peierls stress) depend sensitively on whether the core extends or not.

  12. SNAP focal plane

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Kim, A.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Berkovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro,R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland, S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder,E.V.; Loken, S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square-degree field sensitive in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. We describe the requirements for the instrument suite and the evolution of the focal plane design to the present concept in which all the instrumentation--visible and near-infrared imagers, spectrograph, and star guiders--share one common focal plane.

  13. Foam rigidized inflatable structural assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L. (Inventor); Schnell, Andrew R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An inflatable and rigidizable structure for use as a habitat or a load bearing structure is disclosed. The structure consists of an outer wall and an inner wall defining a containment member and a bladder. The bladder is pressurized to erect the structure from an initially collapsed state. The containment member is subsequently injected with rigidizable fluid through an arrangement of injection ports. Exhaust gases from the curing rigidizable fluid are vented through an arrangement of exhaust ports. The rate of erection can be controlled by frictional engagement with a container or by using a tether. A method for fabricating a tubular structure is disclosed.

  14. Effect of CuO2 planes on the structural and superconducting transport properties of [CuTl ‑ 12(n ‑ 1)n;n = 2,3,4] superconductor family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzaffar, M. Usman; Khan, Nawazish A.

    2016-06-01

    Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Can‑1CunO2n+4‑δ (n = 2, 3, 4) superconducting bulk samples have been synthesized by using two-step solid state reaction method. We investigated the effects of CuO2 planes on the structural and superconducting transport properties of [CuTl ‑ 12(n ‑ 1)n; n = 2, 3, 4] superconducting family. These samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopy and DC-resistivity (ρ) measurements. These samples are c-axis length oriented and have shown orthorhombic crystal structure. All the samples have shown metallic variations of resistivity from room temperature down to onset of superconductivity. The zero resistivity critical temperature Tc(R = 0) increases with the increase in superconducting planes and normal state resistivity systematically decreases, which show the density of inadvertent defects decreases in the final compound. The apical oxygen phonon modes are hardened as observed in the FTIR absorption measurements. The intrinsic microscopic superconducting parameters, such as the cross-over temperatures, coherence length along c-axis (ξc(0)) at 0 K, inter-layer coupling (J), inter-grain coupling (α) and fermi velocity (VF), were extracted from the fluctuation-induced conductivity (FIC) analysis. FIC analysis also showed the improvement in superconductivity with the increase in CuO2 planes.

  15. Beamlet focal plane diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J.A.; Nielsen, N.D.; Patton, H.G.; Seppala, L.G.; Thompson, C.E.; Wegner, P.J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the major optical and mechanical design features of the Beamlet Focal Plane Diagnostic system as well as measurements of the system performance, and typical data obtained to date. We also discuss the NIF requirements on the focal spot that we are interested in measuring, and some of our plans for future work using this system.

  16. Self-accommodation of B19' martensite in Ti-Ni shape memory alloys - Part II. Characteristic interface structures between habit plane variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, M.; Okunishi, E.; Nishiura, T.; Kawano, H.; Inamura, T.; S., Ii; Hara, T.

    2012-06-01

    Four characteristic interface microstructures between habit plane variants (HPVs) in the self-accommodation morphologies of B19‧ martensite in Ti-Ni alloys have been investigated by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The straight interface of a ? B19‧ type I twin is present at interface I. The relaxation of the transformation strain at interface II is achieved by a volume reduction of the minor correspondence variants (CVs) in the relevant habit plane variants (HPVs). The relaxation of the transformation strain at interface III is mainly due to the formation of a ? B19‧ type I twin between the two major CVs. Subsequently, local strain around the tips of the minor CVs perpendicular to the interface is released by the formation of micro-twins with the ⟨011⟩B19‧ type II and/or ? B19‧ type I relation. The major and minor CVs in each HPV are alternately connected through fine variants with the ? B19‧ type I twin relation parallel to interface IV. The results are compared with macroscopic observations and the predictions of PTMC analysis.

  17. Double plane wave reverse time migration with plane wave Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Sen, M. K.; Stoffa, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    Reverse time migration (RTM) is effective in obtaining complex subsurface structures from seismic data. By solving the two-way wave equation, RTM can use entire wavefield for imaging. Although powerful computer are becoming available, the conventional pre-stack shot gather RTM is still computationally expensive. Solving forward and backward wavefield propagation for each source location and shot gather is extremely time consuming, especially for large seismic datasets. We present an efficient, accurate and flexible plane wave RTM in the frequency domain where we utilize a compressed plane wave dataset, known as the double plane wave (DPW) dataset. Provided with densely sampled seismic dataset, shot gathers can be decomposed into source and receiver plane wave components with minimal artifacts. The DPW RTM is derived under the Born approximation and utilizes frequency domain plane wave Green's function for imaging. Time dips in the shot profiles can help to estimate the range of plane wave components present in shot gathers. Therefore, a limited number of plane wave Green's functions are needed for imaging. Plane wave Green's functions can be used for imaging both source and receiver plane waves. Source and receiver reciprocity can be used for imaging plane wave components at no cost and save half of the computation time. As a result, the computational burden for migration is substantially reduced. Plane wave components can be migrated independently to recover specific targets with given dips, and ray parameter common image gathers (CIGs) can be generated after migration directly. The ray parameter CIGs can be used to justify the correctness of velocity models. Subsurface anisotropy effects can also be included in our imaging condition, provided with plane wave Green's functions in the anisotropic media.

  18. The tail plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Max M

    1923-01-01

    This report deals with the calculation of the equilibrium, statistical stability, and damping of the tail plane. The author has simplified the present theory of longitudinal stability for the particular purpose of obtaining one definite coefficient characteristics of the effect of the tail plane. This coefficient is obtained by substituting certain aerodynamic characteristics and some dimensions of the airplane in a comparatively simple mathematical expression. Care has been taken to confine all aerodynamical information necessary for the calculation of the coefficient to the well-known curves representing the qualities of the wing section. This is done by making use of the present results of modern aerodynamics. All formulas and relations necessary for the calculation are contained in the paper. They give in some cases only an approximation of the real values. An example of calculation is added in order to illustrate the application of the method. The coefficient indicates not only whether the effect of the tail plane is great enough, but also whether it is not too great. It appears that the designer has to avoid a certain critical length of the fuselage, which inevitably gives rise to periodical oscillations of the airplane. The discussion also shows the way and in what direction to carry out experimental work.

  19. Full-scale testing and numerical modeling of a multistory masonry structure subjected to internal blast loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, Brian Jarvis

    As military and diplomatic representatives of the United States are deployed throughout the world, they must frequently make use of local, existing facilities; it is inevitable that some of these will be load bearing unreinforced masonry (URM) structures. Although generally suitable for conventional design loads, load bearing URM presents a unique hazard, with respect to collapse, when exposed to blast loading. There is therefore a need to study the blast resistance of load bearing URM construction in order to better protect US citizens assigned to dangerous locales. To address this, the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte conducted three blast tests inside a decommissioned, coal-fired, power plant prior to its scheduled demolition. The power plant's walls were constructed of URM and provided an excellent opportunity to study the response of URM walls in-situ. Post-test analytical studies investigated the ability of existing blast load prediction methodologies to model the case of a cylindrical charge with a low height of burst. It was found that even for the relatively simple blast chamber geometries of these tests, simplified analysis methods predicted blast impulses with an average net error of 22%. The study suggested that existing simplified analysis methods would benefit from additional development to better predict blast loads from cylinders detonated near the ground's surface. A hydrocode, CTH, was also used to perform two and three-dimensional simulations of the blast events. In order to use the hydrocode, Jones Wilkins Lee (JWL) equation of state (EOS) coefficients were developed for the experiment's Unimax dynamite charges; a novel energy-scaling technique was developed which permits the derivation of new JWL coefficients from an existing coefficient set. The hydrocode simulations were able to simulate blast impulses with an average absolute error of 34.5%. Moreover, the hydrocode simulations

  20. Periodicity, planarity, and pixel (3P): a program using the intrinsic residual dipolar coupling periodicity-to-peptide plane correlation and phi/psi angles to derive protein backbone structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinbu; Walsh, Joseph D; Kuszewski, John; Wang, Yun-Xing

    2007-11-01

    We present a detailed description of a theory and a program called 3P. "3P" stands for periodicity, planarity, and pixel. The 3P program is based on the intrinsic periodic correlations between residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) and in-plane internuclear vectors, and between RDCs and the orientation of peptide planes relative to an alignment tensor. The program extracts accurate rhombic, axial components of the alignment tensor without explicit coordinates, and discrete peptide plane orientations, which are utilized in combination with readily available phi/psi angles to determine the three-dimensional backbone structures of proteins. The 3P program uses one alignment tensor. We demonstrate the utility and robustness of the program, using both experimental and synthetic data sets, which were added with different levels of noise or were incomplete. The program is interfaced to Xplor-NIH via a "3P" module and is available to the public. The limitations and differences between our program and existing methods are also discussed. PMID:17892961

  1. Tip gap height effects on the aerodynamic performance of a cavity squealer tip in a turbine cascade in comparison with plane tip results: part 1—tip gap flow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Seon Ung

    2010-11-01

    Tip gap height effects on the flow structure over a cavity squealer tip have been investigated in a linear turbine cascade for power generation, in comparison with the corresponding plane tip results. Oil film flow visualizations are conducted on the tip surface and casing wall for tip gap height-to-chord ratios of h/c = 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0%. The squealer tip has a recessed cavity enclosed by a full length squealer with its rim height-to-chord ratio of 5.51%. The results show that most of in-coming fluid entering the tip gap inlet for the cavity squealer tip is entrapped by the suction-side squealer rim, and the cavity fluid is discharged into the blade flow passage over the suction-side squealer rim in the region from the mid-chord to the trailing edge. Regardless of h/c, the cavity squealer tip makes the leakage flow zone narrower than the plane tip, and is superior to the plane tip in reducing the tip leakage mass flow rate. A qualitative flow model describing full flow features over the cavity squealer tip is suggested. In this flow model, the tip gap exit area is classified into four different regions, and the tip gap height effects on the discharge characteristics in each region are discussed in detail.

  2. Structural Characterization of Lateral-grown 6H-SiC am-plane Seed Crystals by Hot Wall CVD Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goue, Ouloide Yannick; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael; Trunek, Andrew J.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Woodworth, Andrew A.; Spry, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of commercially available silicon carbide (SiC) power devices is limited due to inherently high density of screw dislocations (SD), which are necessary for maintaining polytype during boule growth and commercially viable growth rates. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has recently proposed a new bulk growth process based on axial fiber growth (parallel to the c-axis) followed by lateral expansion (perpendicular to the c-axis) for producing multi-faceted m-plane SiC boules that can potentially produce wafers with as few as one SD per wafer. In order to implement this novel growth technique, the lateral homoepitaxial growth expansion of a SiC fiber without introducing a significant number of additional defects is critical. Lateral expansion is being investigated by hot wall chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) growth of 6H-SiC am-plane seed crystals (0.8mm x 0.5mm x 15mm) designed to replicate axially grown SiC single crystal fibers. The post-growth crystals exhibit hexagonal morphology with approximately 1500 m (1.5 mm) of total lateral expansion. Preliminary analysis by synchrotron white beam x-ray topography (SWBXT) confirms that the growth was homoepitaxial, matching the polytype of the respective underlying region of the seed crystal. Axial and transverse sections from the as grown crystal samples were characterized in detail by a combination of SWBXT, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy to map defect types and distribution. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates the seed crystal contained stacking disorders and this appears to have been reproduced in the lateral growth sections. Analysis of the relative intensity for folded transverse acoustic (FTA) and optical (FTO) modes on the Raman spectra indicate the existence of stacking faults. Further, the density of stacking faults is higher in the seed than in the grown crystal. Bundles of dislocations are observed propagating from the seed in m-axis lateral directions

  3. Deep plane facelifting for facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Neil; Adam, Stewart

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide the facial plastic surgeon with anatomical and embryologic evidence to support the use of the deep plane technique for optimal treatment of facial aging. A detailed description of the procedure is provided to allow safe and consistent performance. Insights into anatomical landmarks, technical nuances, and alternative approaches for facial variations are presented. The following points will be further elucidated in the article. The platysma muscle/submuscular aponeurotic system/galea are the continuous superficial cervical fascia encompassing the majority of facial fat, and this superficial soft tissue envelope is poorly anchored to the face. The deep cervical fascia binds the structural aspects of the face and covers the facial nerve and buccal fat pad. Facial aging is mainly due to gravity's long-term effects on the superficial soft tissue envelope, with more subtle effects on the deeper structural compartments. The deep plane is the embryologic cleavage plane between these fascial layers, and is the logical place for facial dissection. The deep plane allows access to the buccal fat pad for treatment of jowling. Soft tissue mobilization is maximized in deep plane dissections and requires careful hairline planning. Flap advancement creates tension only at the fascia level allowing natural, tension-free skin closure, and long-lasting outcomes. The deep plane advancement flap is well vascularized and resistant to complications. PMID:25076447

  4. Chlamydia trachomatis protein CT009 is a structural and functional homolog to the key morphogenesis component RodZ and interacts with division septal plane localized MreB

    PubMed Central

    Kemege, Kyle E.; Hickey, John M.; Barta, Michael L.; Wickstrum, Jason; Balwalli, Namita; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Hefty, P. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell division in Chlamydiae is poorly understood as apparent homologs to most conserved bacterial cell division proteins are lacking and presence of elongation (rod shape) associated proteins indicate non-canonical mechanisms may be employed. The rod-shape determining protein MreB has been proposed as playing a unique role in chlamydial cell division. In other organisms, MreB is part of an elongation complex that requires RodZ for proper function. A recent study reported that the protein encoded by ORF CT009 interacts with MreB despite low sequence similarity to RodZ. The studies herein expand on those observations through protein structure, mutagenesis, and cellular localization analyses. Structural analysis indicated that CT009 shares high level of structural similarity to RodZ, revealing the conserved orientation of two residues critical for MreB interaction. Substitutions eliminated MreB protein interaction and partial complementation provided by CT009 in RodZ deficient E. coli. Cellular localization analysis of CT009 showed uniform membrane staining in Chlamydia. This was in contrast to the localization of MreB, which was restricted to predicted septal planes. MreB localization to septal planes provides direct experimental observation for the role of MreB in cell division and supports the hypothesis that it serves as a functional replacement for FtsZ in Chlamydia. PMID:25382739

  5. Interfacial structure and defect analysis of nonpolar ZnO films grown on R-plane sapphire by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Vennegues, P.; Korytov, M.; Deparis, C.; Zuniga-Perez, J.; Morhain, C.; Chauveau, J. M.

    2008-04-15

    The interfacial relationship and the microstructure of nonpolar (11-20) ZnO films epitaxially grown on (1-102) R-plane sapphire by molecular beam epitaxy are investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The already-reported epitaxial relationships [1-100]{sub ZnO} parallel [11-20]{sub sapphire} and <0001>{sub ZnO} parallel [-1101]{sub sapphire} are confirmed, and we have determined the orientation of the Zn-O (cation-anion) bond along [0001]{sub ZnO} in the films as being uniquely defined with respect to a reference surface Al-O bond on the sapphire substrate. The microstructure of the films is dominated by the presence of I{sub 1} basal stacking faults [density=(1-2)x10{sup 5} cm{sup -1}] and related partial dislocations [density=(4-7)x10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}]. It is shown that I{sub 1} basal stacking faults correspond to dissociated perfect dislocations, either c or a+c type.

  6. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  7. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Dane, C. Brent; Tiszauer, Detlev H.

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  8. The Three Planes of Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Gloria

    1999-01-01

    Currently, the language sciences place together four different forms of mental activity on one plane of language, which results in confusion. This paper presents arguments from metaphysics, hermeneutics, and semiotics to demonstrate that there are actually three planes of language (a biologically-based information processing plane, a literal…

  9. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains how our weather occurs, and why Solar radiation is responsible. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  10. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains what high and low pressure weather systems are, and how they form. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  11. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains what high and low pressure weather systems are, and how these affect weather patterns. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  12. The effect of prior out-of-plane damage on the in-plane behavior of unreinforced masonry infilled frames

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D.; Burdette, E.G.; Porter, M.L.

    1993-08-25

    In order to address the effect of prior out-of-plane damage on the in-plane behavior of unreinforced masonry infills, two full-scale (24 feet tall by 28 feet long) structural clay tile infills and one frame-only (no infilling) were constructed and tested. The infilled frame, consisting of two wide flange columns surrounded by masonry plasters and an eccentric wide flange purlin, was identical to many of the infills located at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The masonry infill was approximately 12.5 inches thick and was composed of individual four- and eight-inch hollow clay tile (HCT) units. One of the infill panels was tested out-of-plane by four quasi-static actuators -- two on each column. The test structure was deflected out-of-plane equally at all four actuator locations in order to simulate the computed deflection path of the top and bottom chords of a roof truss framing into the columns at these locations. Prior to the infill testing, a bare frame was loaded similarly in order to determine the behavior and stiffness contribution of the frame only. Following the out-of-plane test of the infilled panel, the structure was loaded in-plane to failure in order to ascertain residual strength. A second, identical infilled frame was then constructed and tested in-plane to failure. In this way, in-plane behavior with and without prior out-of-plane damage could be established and compared. For both out-of-plane and in-plane testing, reversed-cyclic quasi-static loading was used in order to obtain full tension/compression hystereses. Also, natural frequencies of the first infilled panel were determined before and after the out-of-plane testing. This paper describes the test series and discusses the conclusions pertinent to the effect of out-of-plane cracking on in-plane stiffness and behavior.

  13. Stabilization of endangered part of structures by building dry brunt brick buttressing, critical case study of plane wall in DKG-North Area, Mohenjo daro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, J. M.; Park, J.

    2013-07-01

    'World Heritage Sites' are places or buildings of outstanding universal value recognized as constituting a world heritage 'for whose protection it is the duty of the international community as a whole to co-operate'. The concept of World Heritage is at the core of the World Heritage Convention, adopted by Heritage List as a means of identifying, protecting, conserving and presenting those parts of the world's natural and cultural heritage that are of sufficient 'outstanding universal value' to be the responsibility of the international community as a whole. By joining the Convention, nation states are pledged to safeguard the WH S by protecting their national heritage. UNESCO in 1972, to which 160 nations have now been adhered. The Convention came into force in 1975 and established a Site in their territory as part of a universally agreed policy for World. Moenjodaro site covering an area of 555 Acres out of which only 10 % of it has been excavated by exposing 50 Kilometer standing walls. The wall of the main street of DK G Area, Mohen jo Daro partially deformed, due to the torque effects this is studied here on a lateral cross wall in the chief house. Furthermore, the resulting behaviour of the bucking wall demonstrates the significant loadbearing capacity of the structure under service conditions and its high sensitivity to imposed changes of the geometry. Although the tensile stresses exceeded the flexural strength at the vertices and the length of the wall, hence both the geometry and condition of this area are critical for the safety of the wall. The results of this study can improve the assessment and thus help in the preservation of many important structures of the metropolitan city. Here the hydrous characteristic of the brick is studied as a general phenomenon, it is observed that the remains of the sites located in Sindh suffered a lot mostly due to age, human neglect variations of atmospheric condition, severe temperature and natural disasters. The main

  14. Visualization of microvascular proliferation as a tumor infiltration structure in rat glioma specimens using the diffraction-enhanced imaging in-plane CT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Seung-Jun; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Huo, Qingkai; Ando, Masami; Choi, Gi-Hwan; Kim, Hong-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hong; Jeong, Eun-Ju; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2012-03-01

    In order to study potent microenvironments of malignant gliomas with a high- resolution x-ray imaging technique, an injection orthotopic glioma model was made using the Sprague-Dawley rat. Total brain tissue, taken out as an ex vivo model, was examined with diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) computed tomography (CT) acquired with a 35 keV monochromatic x-ray. In the convolution-reconstructed 2D/3D images with a spatial resolution of 12.5 × 12.5 × 25 µm, distinction among necrosis, typical ring-shaped viable tumors, edemas and healthy tissues was clearly observed near the frontal lobe in front of the rat's caudate nucleus. Multiple microvascular proliferations (MVPs) were observed surrounding peritumoral edemas as a tumor infiltration structure. Typical dimensions of tubular MVPs were 130 (diameter) ×250 (length) µm with a partial sprout structure revealed in the 3D reconstructed image. Hyperplasia of cells around vessel walls was revealed with tumor cell infiltration along the perivascular space in microscopic observations of mild MVP during histological analysis. In conclusion, DEI-CT is capable of imaging potent tumor-infiltrating MVP structures surrounding high-grade gliomas.

  15. GALAXY STRUCTURE AND MODE OF STAR FORMATION IN THE SFR-MASS PLANE FROM z {approx} 2.5 TO z {approx} 0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Wuyts, Stijn; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Magnelli, Benjamin; Genzel, Reinhard; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Gracia-Carpio, Javier; Nordon, Raanan; Van der Wel, Arjen; Guo, Yicheng; Aussel, Herve; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Hathi, Nimish P.; Huang, Kuang-Han; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; and others

    2011-12-01

    We analyze the dependence of galaxy structure (size and Sersic index) and mode of star formation ({Sigma}{sub SFR} and SFR{sub IR}/SFR{sub UV}) on the position of galaxies in the star formation rate (SFR) versus mass diagram. Our sample comprises roughly 640,000 galaxies at z {approx} 0.1, 130,000 galaxies at z {approx} 1, and 36,000 galaxies at z {approx} 2. Structural measurements for all but the z {approx} 0.1 galaxies are based on Hubble Space Telescope imaging, and SFRs are derived using a Herschel-calibrated ladder of SFR indicators. We find that a correlation between the structure and stellar population of galaxies (i.e., a 'Hubble sequence') is already in place since at least z {approx} 2.5. At all epochs, typical star-forming galaxies on the main sequence are well approximated by exponential disks, while the profiles of quiescent galaxies are better described by de Vaucouleurs profiles. In the upper envelope of the main sequence, the relation between the SFR and Sersic index reverses, suggesting a rapid buildup of the central mass concentration in these starbursting outliers. We observe quiescent, moderately and highly star-forming systems to co-exist over an order of magnitude or more in stellar mass. At each mass and redshift, galaxies on the main sequence have the largest size. The rate of size growth correlates with specific SFR, and so does {Sigma}{sub SFR} at each redshift. A simple model using an empirically determined star formation law and metallicity scaling, in combination with an assumed geometry for dust and stars, is able to relate the observed {Sigma}{sub SFR} and SFR{sub IR}/SFR{sub UV}, provided a more patchy dust geometry is assumed for high-redshift galaxies.

  16. Structural, mechanical and electronic properties of in-plane 1T/2H phase interface of MoS{sub 2} heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xiaoyan; Yang, Guohui; Zhang, Junfeng; Xu, Xiaohong

    2015-09-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) phase hybrid system composed by 2H and 1T phase is a natural metal/semiconductor heterostructures and promised a wide range of potential applications. Here, we report the first principle investigations on the structural, mechanical and electronic properties of hybrid system with armchair (AC) and zigzag (ZZ) interfaces. The ZZ type 1T/2H interface are more energy favorable than AC type interface with 3.39 eV/nm. Similar with that of bulked 1T MoS{sub 2}, the intrinsic strengths of the heterostructures are lower than that of the bulk 2H, especially for that with ZZ interface. Analysis of density of states shows that the electronic properties gradually transmitted from the metallic 1T phase to the semiconducting 2H phase for the structural abrupt interface. The present theoretical results constitute a useful picture for the 2D electronic devices using current MoS{sub 2} 1T/2H heterostructures and provide vital insights into the other 2D hybrid materials.

  17. Plane Mercury librations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    theory of Mercury librations in longitude by using three characteristics of Mercury rotation determined in the paper [3]. Two from these parameters are values of angle of librations in longitude and angular velocity in moment of passage of perihelion of Mercury orbit on 17 April 2002: (^g)0 = 0007 ± 0001, (^?•? )0 = (2.10± 0.06)•? ars/d. Third parameter determined in [3] is a dynamical coefficient: K = (B -A)•(4Cm ) = (5.08± 0.30) × 10-5. B > A are principal moment of inertia, corresponding to equatorial axes of inertia; Cm is a polar moment of inertia of the mantle of Mercury. 1 Analytical theory of plane Mercury librations. This theory describes forced and free librations of Mercury in longitude in the frame of plane problem about resonant librations of Mercury considered or as non-spherical rigid body, or as system of rigid non-spherical mantle and liquid ellipsoidal core. Saving the main terms for the perturbations of angle of librations ^g and angular velocity ^? in both mentioned cases we will have formulae [6]: ^g = K(E sin M + E sin2M + E sin 3M + E sin4M + E sin5M ) 1 2 3 4 5+K0 sin(E šKM- - φ) (A)

  18. SAS-2 gamma-ray results from the galactic plane and their implications for galactic structure and galactic cosmic-ray dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The final SAS-2 results related to high energy galactic gamma-ray emission show a strong correlation with galactic structural features seen at other wavelenghts, when the known gamma-ray sources are subtracted. Theoretical considerations and analysis of the gamma-ray data suggest that the galactic cosmic rays are dynamically coupled to the interstellar matter through the magnetic fields, and hence the cosmic ray density is enhanced where the matter density is greatest on the scale of the galactic arms. This concept has been explored in a galactic model that assumes: (1) cosmic rays are galactic and not universal; (2)on the scale of the galactic arms, the cosmic ray column (surface) density is proportional to the total interstellar gas column density; (3)the cosmic ray scale height is significantly larger than the scale height to the matter; and (4) ours is a spiral galaxy characterized by an arm to interarm density ratio of over 2:1.

  19. Transformation from an easy-plane to an easy-axis antiferromagnetic structure in the mixed rare-earth ferroborates Pr x Y1-x Fe3(BO3)4: magnetic properties and crystal field calculations.

    PubMed

    Pankrats, A I; Demidov, A A; Ritter, C; Velikanov, D A; Semenov, S V; Tugarinov, V I; Temerov, V L; Gudim, I A

    2016-10-01

    The magnetic structure of the mixed rare-earth system Pr x Y1-x Fe3(BO3)4 (x  =  0.75, 0.67, 0.55, 0.45, 0.25) was studied via magnetic and resonance measurements. These data evidence the successive spin reorientation from the easy-axis antiferromagnetic structure formed in PrFe3(BO3)4 to the easy-plane one of YFe3(BO3)4 associated with the weakening of the magnetic anisotropy of the Pr subsystem due to its diamagnetic dilution by nonmagnetic Y. This reorientation occurs through the formation of an inclined magnetic structure, as was confirmed by our previous neutron research in the range of x  =  0.67 ÷ 0.45. In the compounds with x  =  0.75 and 0.67 whose magnetic structure is close to the easy-axis one, a two-step spin reorientation takes place in the magnetic field H||c. Such a peculiarity is explained by the formation of an interjacent inclined magnetic structure with magnetic moments of Fe ions located closer to the basal plane than in the initial state, with these intermediate states remaining stable in some ranges of the magnetic field. An approach based on a crystal field model for the Pr(3+) ion and the molecular-field approximation is used to describe the magnetic characteristics of the system Pr x Y1-x Fe3(BO3)4. With the parameters of the d-d and f-d exchange interactions, of the magnetic anisotropy of the iron subsystem and of the crystal field parameters of praseodymium thus determined, it is possible to achieve a good agreement between the experimental and calculated temperature and field dependences of the magnetization curves (up to 90 kOe) and magnetic susceptibilities (2-300 K). PMID:27478162

  20. Plane Smoothers for Multiblock Grids: Computational Aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llorente, Ignacio M.; Diskin, Boris; Melson, N. Duane

    1999-01-01

    Standard multigrid methods are not well suited for problems with anisotropic discrete operators, which can occur, for example, on grids that are stretched in order to resolve a boundary layer. One of the most efficient approaches to yield robust methods is the combination of standard coarsening with alternating-direction plane relaxation in the three dimensions. However, this approach may be difficult to implement in codes with multiblock structured grids because there may be no natural definition of global lines or planes. This inherent obstacle limits the range of an implicit smoother to only the portion of the computational domain in the current block. This report studies in detail, both numerically and analytically, the behavior of blockwise plane smoothers in order to provide guidance to engineers who use block-structured grids. The results obtained so far show alternating-direction plane smoothers to be very robust, even on multiblock grids. In common computational fluid dynamics multiblock simulations, where the number of subdomains crossed by the line of a strong anisotropy is low (up to four), textbook multigrid convergence rates can be obtained with a small overlap of cells between neighboring blocks.

  1. Plane Transformations in a Complex Setting I: Homotheties-Translations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana-Picard, T.

    2006-01-01

    A previous note described how complex numbers can be used for elementary analytic geometry in the plane, describing lines, circles and their intersections using complex Cartesian equations. In the present note, a description of elementary plane transformations, namely homotheties and translations, their group structure and their operations on…

  2. The structural and in-plane dielectric/ferroelectric properties of the epitaxial (Ba, Sr)(Zr, Ti)O{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, N. Y. Wang, Y.; Chan, H. L. W.; Wang, D. Y.; Dai, J. Y.

    2014-06-21

    Epitaxial (Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x})(Zr{sub 0.1}Ti{sub 0.9})O{sub 3} (BSZT, x = 0 – 0.45) thin films were deposited on (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(Sr{sub 2}AlTaO{sub 6}){sub 0.35} (LSAT) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The experimental results demonstrate that the structural, dielectric, and ferroelectric properties of the BSZT thin films were greatly dependent on the strontium content. The BSZT thin films transformed from tetragonal to cubic phase when x ≥ 0.35 at room temperature. The Curie temperature and room-temperature remnant polarization decrease with increasing strontium concentration. The optimal dielectric properties were found in (Ba{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.45})(Zr{sub 0.1}Ti{sub 0.9})O{sub 3} thin films which is in paraelectric state, having tunability of 47% and loss tangent of 0.0338 under an electric field of 20 MV/m at 1 MHz. This suggests that BSZT thin film is a promising candidate for tunable microwave device applications.

  3. The structural and in-plane dielectric/ferroelectric properties of the epitaxial (Ba, Sr)(Zr, Ti)O3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, N. Y.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, Y.; Dai, J. Y.; Chan, H. L. W.

    2014-06-01

    Epitaxial (Ba1-xSrx)(Zr0.1Ti0.9)O3 (BSZT, x = 0 - 0.45) thin films were deposited on (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2AlTaO6)0.35 (LSAT) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The experimental results demonstrate that the structural, dielectric, and ferroelectric properties of the BSZT thin films were greatly dependent on the strontium content. The BSZT thin films transformed from tetragonal to cubic phase when x ≥ 0.35 at room temperature. The Curie temperature and room-temperature remnant polarization decrease with increasing strontium concentration. The optimal dielectric properties were found in (Ba0.55Sr0.45)(Zr0.1Ti0.9)O3 thin films which is in paraelectric state, having tunability of 47% and loss tangent of 0.0338 under an electric field of 20 MV/m at 1 MHz. This suggests that BSZT thin film is a promising candidate for tunable microwave device applications.

  4. Difference in linear polarization of biaxially strained I nxG a1 -xN alloys on nonpolar a -plane and m -plane GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Siyuan; Cui, Ying; Griffiths, James T.; Fu, Wai Y.; Freysoldt, Christoph; Neugebauer, Jörg; Humphreys, Colin J.; Oliver, Rachel A.

    2015-12-01

    I nxG a1 -xN structures epitaxially grown on a -plane or m -plane GaN exhibit in-plane optical polarization. Linear elasticity theory treats the two planes equivalently and is hence unable to explain the experimentally observed higher degree of linear polarization for m -plane than a -plane I nxG a1 -xN . Using density functional theory, we study the response of I nxG a1 -xN random alloys to finite biaxial strains on both nonpolar planes. The calculated m -plane I nxG a1 -xN valence band splitting is larger than that of the a plane, due to a greater degree of structural relaxation in a -plane I nxG a1 -xN . We provide a parametrization of the valence band splitting of I nxG a1 -xN strained to a -plane and m -plane GaN for In compositions between 0 and 0.5, which agrees with experimental measurements and qualitatively explains the experimentally observed difference between a -plane and m -plane polarization.

  5. Reflections on the Hyperbolic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecian, Orchidea Maria

    2013-12-01

    The most general solution to the Einstein equations in 4 = 3 + 1 dimensions in the asymptotic limit close to the cosmological singularity under the BKL (Belinskii-Khalatnikov-Lifshitz) hypothesis can be visualized by the behavior of a billiard ball in a triangular domain on the Upper Poincaré Half Plane (UPHP). The billiard system (named "big billiard") can be schematized by dividing the successions of trajectories according to Poincaré return map on the sides of the billiard table, according to the paradigms implemented by the BKL investigation and by the CB-LKSKS (Chernoff-Barrow-Lifshitz-Khalatnikov-Sinai-Khanin-Shchur) one. Different maps are obtained, according to different symmetry-quotienting mechanisms used to analyze the dynamics. In the inhomogeneous case, new structures have been uncovered, such that, in this framework, the billiard table (named "small billiard") consists of 1/6 of the previous one. The connections between the symmetry-quotienting mechanisms are further investigated on the UPHP. The relation between the complete billiard and the small billiard are also further explained according to the role of Weyl reflections. The quantum properties of the system are sketched as well, and the physical interpretation of the wave function is further developed. In particular, a physical interpretation for the symmetry-quotienting maps is proposed.

  6. The Fisher Shannon information plane for atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, J. B.; Sen, K. D.; Nagy, Á.

    2008-03-01

    The Fisher-Shannon information product and plane for atoms are presented analytically assuming Thomas-Fermi-Gáspár statistical model. A comparison with the Hartree-Fock densities reveals that the atomic shell structure is inadequately expressed information theoretically in the statistical model. The shape complexity measure of Lopez et al. is found to have a better large Z dependence than the one obtained from non-relativistic Hartree-Fock densities.

  7. Crack initiation under generalized plane strain conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, D.K.M.; Merkle, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    A method for estimating the decrease in crack-initiation toughness, from a reference plane strain value, due to positive straining along the crack front of a circumferential flaw in a reactor pressure vessel is presented in this study. This method relates crack initiation under generalized plane strain conditions with material failure at points within a distance of a few crack-tip-opening displacements ahead of a crack front, and involves the formulation of a micromechanical crack-initiation model. While this study is intended to address concerns regarding the effects of positive out-of- plane straining on ductile crack initiation, the approach adopted in this work can be extended in a straightforward fashion to examine conditions of macroscopic cleavage crack initiation. Provided single- parameter dominance of near-tip fields exists in the flawed structure, results from this study could be used to examine the appropriateness of applying plane strain fracture toughness to the evaluation of circumferential flaws, in particular to those in ring-forged vessels which have no longitudinal welds. In addition, results from this study could also be applied toward the analysis of the effects of thermal streaming on the fracture resistance of circumferentially oriented flaws in a pressure vessel. 37 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Dynamically variable negative stiffness structures

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Christopher B.; Shahan, David W.; Smith, Sloan P.; Keefe, Andrew C.; McKnight, Geoffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Variable stiffness structures that enable a wide range of efficient load-bearing and dexterous activity are ubiquitous in mammalian musculoskeletal systems but are rare in engineered systems because of their complexity, power, and cost. We present a new negative stiffness–based load-bearing structure with dynamically tunable stiffness. Negative stiffness, traditionally used to achieve novel response from passive structures, is a powerful tool to achieve dynamic stiffness changes when configured with an active component. Using relatively simple hardware and low-power, low-frequency actuation, we show an assembly capable of fast (<10 ms) and useful (>100×) dynamic stiffness control. This approach mitigates limitations of conventional tunable stiffness structures that exhibit either small (<30%) stiffness change, high friction, poor load/torque transmission at low stiffness, or high power active control at the frequencies of interest. We experimentally demonstrate actively tunable vibration isolation and stiffness tuning independent of supported loads, enhancing applications such as humanoid robotic limbs and lightweight adaptive vibration isolators. PMID:26989771

  9. Dynamically variable negative stiffness structures.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Christopher B; Shahan, David W; Smith, Sloan P; Keefe, Andrew C; McKnight, Geoffrey P

    2016-02-01

    Variable stiffness structures that enable a wide range of efficient load-bearing and dexterous activity are ubiquitous in mammalian musculoskeletal systems but are rare in engineered systems because of their complexity, power, and cost. We present a new negative stiffness-based load-bearing structure with dynamically tunable stiffness. Negative stiffness, traditionally used to achieve novel response from passive structures, is a powerful tool to achieve dynamic stiffness changes when configured with an active component. Using relatively simple hardware and low-power, low-frequency actuation, we show an assembly capable of fast (<10 ms) and useful (>100×) dynamic stiffness control. This approach mitigates limitations of conventional tunable stiffness structures that exhibit either small (<30%) stiffness change, high friction, poor load/torque transmission at low stiffness, or high power active control at the frequencies of interest. We experimentally demonstrate actively tunable vibration isolation and stiffness tuning independent of supported loads, enhancing applications such as humanoid robotic limbs and lightweight adaptive vibration isolators. PMID:26989771

  10. The solar system's invariable plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souami, D.; Souchay, J.

    2012-07-01

    Context. The dynamics of solar system objects, such as dwarf planets and asteroids, has become a well-established field of celestial mechanics in the past thirty years, owing to the improvements that have been made in observational techniques and numerical studies. In general, the ecliptic is taken as the reference plane in these studies, although there is no dynamical reason for doing so. In contrast, the invariable plane as originally defined by Laplace, seems to be a far more natural choice. In this context, the latest study of this plane dates back to Burkhardt. Aims: We define and determine the orientation of the invariable plane of the solar system with respect to both the ICRF and the equinox-ecliptic of J2000.0, and evaluate the accuracy of our determination. Methods: Using the long-term numerical ephemerides DE405, DE406, and INPOP10a over their entire available time span, we computed the total angular momentum of the solar system, as well as the individual contribution to it made by each of the planets, the dwarf planets Pluto and Ceres, and the two asteroids Pallas and Vesta. We then deduced the orientation of the invariable plane from these ephemerides. Results: We update the previous results on the determination of the orientation of the invariable plane with more accurate data, and a more complete analysis of the problem, taking into account the effect of the dwarf planet (1) Ceres as well as two of the biggest asteroids, (4) Vesta and (2) Pallas. We show that the inclusion of these last three bodies significantly improves the accuracy of determination of the invariable plane, whose orientation over a 100 y interval does not vary more than 0.1 mas in inclination, and 0.3 mas in longitude of the ascending node. Moreover, we determine the individual contributions of each body to the total angular momentum of the solar system, as well as the inclination and longitude of the node with respect to this latter plane. Conclusions: Owing to the high accuracy

  11. Peptidoglycan architecture can specify division planes in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Turner, Robert D; Ratcliffe, Emma C; Wheeler, Richard; Golestanian, Ramin; Hobbs, Jamie K; Foster, Simon J

    2010-01-01

    Division in Staphylococci occurs equatorially and on specific sequentially orthogonal planes in three dimensions, resulting, after incomplete cell separation, in the 'bunch of grapes' cluster organization that defines the genus. The shape of Staphylococci is principally maintained by peptidoglycan. In this study, we use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy with vancomycin labelling to examine purified peptidoglycan architecture and its dynamics in Staphylococcus aureus and correlate these with the cell cycle. At the presumptive septum, cells were found to form a large belt of peptidoglycan in the division plane before the centripetal formation of the septal disc; this often had a 'piecrust' texture. After division, the structures remain as orthogonal ribs, encoding the location of past division planes in the cell wall. We propose that this epigenetic information is used to enable S. aureus to divide in sequentially orthogonal planes, explaining how a spherical organism can maintain division plane localization with fidelity over many generations. PMID:20975691

  12. Concentric Nested Toroidal Inflatable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Raboin, Jasen L.; Spexarth, Gary R.

    2010-01-01

    Assemblies comprising multiple limited- height toroidal inflatable structures nested in a concentric arrangement have been invented to obtain more design flexibility than can be obtained in single taller, wider toroidal inflatable structures (see figure). Originally intended for use as containers for habitats for humans in outer space or on remote planets, these and related prior inflatable structures could also be useful on Earth as lightweight, compactly stowable, portable special-purpose buildings that could be transported to remote locations and there inflated to full size and shape. In the case of a single inflatable toroidal structure, one important source of lack of design flexibility is the fact that an increase in outer diameter (which is sometimes desired) is necessarily accompanied by an increase in height (which is sometimes undesired). Increases in diameter and height can also cause difficulty in utilization of the resulting larger volume, in that it can become necessary to partition the volume by means of walls and floors, and features (e.g., stairs or ladders) must be added to enable vertical movement between floors. Moreover, ascending and descending between floors in a gravitational environment could pose unacceptable difficulty for the inhabitants under some circumstances. Another source of lack of design flexibility in a single toroidal inflatable structure is that for a given inflation pressure, an increase in the outer diameter of the structure necessarily entails an increase in the maximum stress in the structure. Because it is necessary to keep the maximum stress within the load-bearing capability of the structural materials, consistent with other aspects of the design, this may translate to a limit on the outer diameter. In an assembly comprising concentric nested toroidal structures, an increase in outer diameter does not necessarily entail an increase in height or a maximum stress in excess of the load-bearing capability of the structural

  13. Surface anatomy and anatomical planes in the adult turkish population.

    PubMed

    Uzun, C; Atman, E D; Ustuner, E; Mirjalili, S A; Oztuna, D; Esmer, T S

    2016-03-01

    Surface anatomy and anatomical planes are widely used in education and clinical practice. The planes are largely derived from cadaveric studies and their projections on the skin show discrepancies between and within anatomical reference textbooks. In this study, we reassessed the accuracy of common thoracic and abdominopelvic anatomical planes using computed tomography (CT) imaging in the live adult Turkish population. After patients with distorting pathologies had been excluded, CT images of 150 supine patients at the end tidal inspiration were analyzed. Sternal angle, transpyloric, subcostal, supracristal and pubic crest planes and their relationships to anatomical structures were established by dual consensus. The tracheal bifurcation, azygos vein/superior vena cava (SVC) junction and pulmonary bifurcation were usually below the sternal angle while the concavity of the aortic arch was generally within the plane. The tip of the tenth rib, the superior mesenteric artery and the portal vein were usually within the transpyloric plane while the renal hila and the fundus of the gallbladder were below it. The inferior mesenteric artery was below the subcostal plane and the aortic bifurcation was below the supracristal plane in most adults. Projectional surface anatomy is fundamental to medical education and clinical practice. Modern cross-sectional imaging techniques allow large groups of live patients to be examined. Classic textbook information regarding anatomy needs to be reviewed and updated using the data gathered from these recent studies, taking ethnic differences into consideration. Clin. Anat. 29:183-190, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26403267

  14. Plane waves as tractor beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács, Péter; Lukács, Árpád; Romańczukiewicz, Tomasz

    2013-12-01

    It is shown that in a large class of systems, plane waves act as tractor beams: i.e., an incident plane wave can exert a pulling force on the scatterer. The underlying physical mechanism for the pulling force is due to the sufficiently strong scattering of the incoming wave into another mode carrying more momentum, in which case excess momentum is created behind the scatterer. This tractor beam or negative radiation pressure (NRP) effect, is found to be generic in systems with multiple scattering channels. In a birefringent medium, electromagnetic plane waves incident on a thin plate exert NRP of the same order of magnitude as optical radiation pressure, while in artificial dielectrics (metamaterials), the magnitude of NRP can even be macroscopic. In two dimensions, we study various scattering situations on vortices, and NRP is shown to occur by the scattering of heavy baryons into light leptons off cosmic strings, and by neutron scattering off vortices in the XY model.

  15. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, Stanley P.

    1988-01-01

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

  16. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  17. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. The Laplace Planes of Uranus and Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite orbits close to an oblate planet precess about its equatorial plane, while distant satellites precess around the plane of the planet's heliocentric orbit. In between, satellites in nearly circular orbits precess about a warped intermediate surface called the Laplace 'plane.' Herein we derive general formulas for locating the Laplace plane. Because Uranus and Pluto have high obliquities, their Laplace planes are severely warped. We present maps of these Laplace planes, of interest in telescopic searches for new satellites. The Laplace plane of the Solar System as a whole is similarly distorted, but comets in the inner Oort cloud precess too slowly to sense the Laplace plane.

  19. Plane waves in noncommutative fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, M. C. B.; Holender, L.; Santos, M. A.; Vancea, I. V.

    2013-08-01

    We study the dynamics of the noncommutative fluid in the Snyder space perturbatively at the first order in powers of the noncommutative parameter. The linearized noncommutative fluid dynamics is described by a system of coupled linear partial differential equations in which the variables are the fluid density and the fluid potentials. We show that these equations admit a set of solutions that are monochromatic plane waves for the fluid density and two of the potentials and a linear function for the third potential. The energy-momentum tensor of the plane waves is calculated.

  20. Space-Plane Spreadsheet Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackall, Dale

    1993-01-01

    Basic Hypersonic Data and Equations (HYPERDATA) spreadsheet computer program provides data gained from three analyses of performance of space plane. Equations used to perform analyses derived from Newton's second law of physics, derivation included. First analysis is parametric study of some basic factors affecting ability of space plane to reach orbit. Second includes calculation of thickness of spherical fuel tank. Third produces ratio between volume of fuel and total mass for each of various aircraft. HYPERDATA intended for use on Macintosh(R) series computers running Microsoft Excel 3.0.

  1. Lower body negative pressure to provide load bearing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Whalen, Robert T.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Schwandt, Douglas F.; Krock, Larry P.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from an experiment to determine whether lower body negative pressure (LBNP) produces a footward force equal to the product of the pressure differential and body cross-sectional area at the waist seal. Twelve male volunteers were sealed at the superior iliac crest in upright and supine LBNP chambers. Each subject was exposed to 10 mm Hg increments of LBNP up to 70 mm HG (standing) or to 50-100 mm Hg (supine), depending upon individual tolerance. Static reaction force was measured at each LBNP level for about 1-2 min. The forces measured during LBNP agreed well with forces calculated from the cross-sectional areas of the subjects' waists. It is inferred from these results that exercise in microgravity against 100 mm Hg LBNP could produce static and inertial forces similar in magnitude to those occurring on earth. It is concluded that this gravity-independent technique can help maintain the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems of crew members during prolonged exposure to microgravity.

  2. Vacuum plane waves: Cartan invariants and physical interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A.; McNutt, D.; Milson, R.

    2012-12-01

    As an application of the Cartan invariants obtained using the Karlhede algorithm, we study a simple subclass of the PP-wave spacetimes, the gravitational plane waves. We provide an invariant classification of these spacetimes and then study a few notable subcases: the linearly polarized plane waves, the weak-field circularly polarized waves, and another class of plane waves found by imposing conditions on the set of invariants. As we study these spacetimes we relate the invariant structure (i.e., Cartan scalars) to the physical description of these spacetimes using the geodesic deviation equations relative to timelike geodesic observers.

  3. Radiation enhanced basal plane dislocation glide in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimov, Eugene B.; Vergeles, Pavel S.; Polyakov, Alexander Y.; Lee, In-Hwan; Pearton, Stephen J.

    2016-05-01

    A movement of basal plane segments of dislocations in GaN films grown by epitaxial lateral overgrowth under low energy electron beam irradiation (LEEBI) was studied by the electron beam induced current (EBIC) method. Only a small fraction of the basal plane dislocation segments were susceptible to irradiation and the movement was limited to relatively short distances. The effect is explained by the radiation enhanced dislocation glide (REDG) in the structure with strong pinning. A dislocation velocity under LEEBI with a beam current lower than 1 nA was estimated as about 10 nm/s. The results assuming the REDG for prismatic plane dislocations were presented.

  4. Two Planes of Satellites in the Centaurus A Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, R. Brent; Libeskind, Noam I.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Karachentseva, Valentina E.; Rizzi, Luca; Shaya, Edward J.

    2015-04-01

    Tip of the red giant branch measurements based on Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based imaging have resulted in accurate distances to 29 galaxies in the nearby Centaurus A Group. All but 2 of the 29 galaxies lie in either of two thin planes roughly parallel with the supergalactic equator. The planes are only slightly tilted from the line of sight, leaving little ambiguity regarding the morphology of the structure. The planes have characteristic rms long axis dimensions of ∼300 kpc and short axis dimensions of ∼60 kpc, hence axial ratios ∼0.2, and are separated in the short axis direction by 303 kpc.

  5. Two Polymorphic Forms of a Six-Coordinate Mononuclear Cobalt(II) Complex with Easy-Plane Anisotropy: Structural Features, Theoretical Calculations, and Field-Induced Slow Relaxation of the Magnetization.

    PubMed

    Roy, Subhadip; Oyarzabal, Itziar; Vallejo, Julia; Cano, Joan; Colacio, Enrique; Bauza, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Kirillov, Alexander M; Drew, Michael G B; Das, Subrata

    2016-09-01

    A mononuclear cobalt(II) complex [Co(3,5-dnb)2(py)2(H2O)2] {3,5-Hdnb = 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid; py = pyridine} was isolated in two polymorphs, in space groups C2/c (1) and P21/c (2). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that 1 and 2 are not isostructural in spite of having equal formulas and ligand connectivity. In both structures, the Co(II) centers adopt octahedral {CoN2O4} geometries filled by pairs of mutually trans terminal 3,5-dnb, py, and water ligands. However, the structures of 1 and 2 disclose distinct packing patterns driven by strong intermolecular O-H···O hydrogen bonds, leading to their 0D→2D (1) or 0D→1D (2) extension. The resulting two-dimensional layers and one-dimensional chains were topologically classified as the sql and 2C1 underlying nets, respectively. By means of DFT theoretical calculations, the energy variations between the polymorphs were estimated, and the binding energies associated with the noncovalent interactions observed in the crystal structures were also evaluated. The study of the direct-current magnetic properties, as well as ab initio calculations, reveal that both 1 and 2 present a strong easy-plane magnetic anisotropy (D > 0), which is larger for the latter polymorph (D is found to exhibit values between +58 and 117 cm(-1) depending on the method). Alternating current dynamic susceptibility measurements show that these polymorphs exhibit field-induced slow relaxation of the magnetization with Ueff values of 19.5 and 21.1 cm(-1) for 1 and 2, respectively. The analysis of the whole magnetic data allows the conclusion that the magnetization relaxation in these polymorphs mainly takes place through a virtual excited state (Raman process). It is worth noting that despite the notable difference between the supramolecular networks of 1 and 2, they exhibit almost identical magnetization dynamics. This fact suggests that the relaxation process is intramolecular in nature and that the virtual state involved in the

  6. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  7. Apparatus for integrating a rigid structure into a flexible wall of an inflatable structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J. (Inventor); Patterson, Ross M. (Inventor); Spexarth, Gary R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    For an inflatable structure having a flexible outer shell or wall structure having a flexible restraint layer comprising interwoven, load-bearing straps, apparatus for integrating one or more substantially rigid members into the flexible shell. For each rigid member, a corresponding opening is formed through the flexible shell for receiving the rigid member. A plurality of connection devices are mounted on the rigid member for receiving respective ones of the load-bearing straps. In one embodiment, the connection devices comprise inner connecting mechanisms and outer connecting mechanisms, the inner and outer connecting mechanisms being mounted on the substantially rigid structure and spaced along a peripheral edge portion of the structure in an interleafed array in which respective outer connecting mechanisms are interposed between adjacent pairs of inner connecting mechanisms, the outer connecting mechanisms projecting outwardly from the peripheral edge portion of the substantially rigid structure beyond the adjacent inner connecting mechanisms to form a staggered array of connecting mechanisms extending along the panel structure edge portion. In one embodiment, the inner and outer connecting mechanisms form part of an integrated, structure rotatably mounted on the rigid member peripheral edge portion.

  8. Mechanical Impedance of the Non-loaded Lower Leg with Relaxed Muscles in the Transverse Plane

    PubMed Central

    Ficanha, Evandro Maicon; Ribeiro, Guilherme Aramizo; Rastgaar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the protocols and results of the experiments for the estimation of the mechanical impedance of the humans’ lower leg in the External–Internal direction in the transverse plane under non-load bearing condition and with relaxed muscles. The objectives of the estimation of the lower leg’s mechanical impedance are to facilitate the design of passive and active prostheses with mechanical characteristics similar to the humans’ lower leg, and to define a reference that can be compared to the values from the patients suffering from spasticity. The experiments were performed with 10 unimpaired male subjects using a lower extremity rehabilitation robot (Anklebot, Interactive Motion Technologies, Inc.) capable of applying torque perturbations to the foot. The subjects were in a seated position, and the Anklebot recorded the applied torques and the resulting angular movement of the lower leg. In this configuration, the recorded dynamics are due mainly to the rotations of the ankle’s talocrural and the subtalar joints, and any contribution of the tibiofibular joints and knee joint. The dynamic mechanical impedance of the lower leg was estimated in the frequency domain with an average coherence of 0.92 within the frequency range of 0–30 Hz, showing a linear correlation between the displacement and the torques within this frequency range under the conditions of the experiment. The mean magnitude of the stiffness of the lower leg (the impedance magnitude averaged in the range of 0–1 Hz) was determined as 4.9 ± 0.74 Nm/rad. The direct estimation of the quasi-static stiffness of the lower leg results in the mean value of 5.8 ± 0.81 Nm/rad. An analysis of variance shows that the estimated values for the stiffness from the two experiments are not statistically different. PMID:26697424

  9. Optimization of starshades: focal plane versus pupil plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flamary, R.; Aime, C.

    2014-09-01

    We search for the best possible transmission for an external occulter coronagraph that is dedicated to the direct observation of terrestrial exoplanets. We show that better observation conditions are obtained when the flux in the focal plane is minimized in the zone in which the exoplanet is observed, instead of for the total flux received by the telescope. We describe the transmission of the occulter as a sum of basis functions. For each element of the basis, we numerically computed the Fresnel diffraction at the aperture of the telescope and the complex amplitude at its focus. The basis functions are circular disks that are linearly apodized over a few centimeters (truncated cones). We complemented the numerical calculation of the Fresnel diffraction for these functions by a comparison with pure circular disks (cylinder) for which an analytical expression, based on a decomposition in Lommel series, is available. The technique of deriving the optimal transmission for a given spectral bandwidth is a classical regularized quadratic minimization of intensities, but linear optimizations can be used as well. Minimizing the integrated intensity on the aperture of the telescope or for selected regions of the focal plane leads to slightly different transmissions for the occulter. For the focal plane optimization, the resulting residual intensity is concentrated behind the geometrical image of the occulter, in a blind region for the observation of an exoplanet, and the level of background residual starlight becomes very low outside this image. Finally, we provide a tolerance analysis for the alignment of the occulter to the telescope, which also favors the focal plane optimization. This means that telescope offsets of a few decimeters do not strongly reduce the efficiency of the occulter.

  10. Plane Wave and Coulomb Asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, P. G.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    2004-01-01

    A simple plane wave solution of the Schrödinger Helmholtz equation is a quantum eigenfunction obeying both energy and linear momentum correspondence principles. Inclusion of the outgoing wave with scattering amplitude f obeys unitarity and the optical theorem. By closely considering the standard asymptotic development of the plane wave, we show that there is a problem with angular momentum when we consider forward scattering at the point of closest approach and at large impact parameter given semiclassically by (l + 1/2)/k where l is the azimuthal quantum number and may be large (J Leech et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 257901 (2002)). The problem is resolved via non-uniform, non-standard analysis involving the Heaviside step function, unifying classical, semiclassical and quantum mechanics, and the treatment is extended to the case of pure Coulomb scattering.

  11. Orbital Space Plane (OSP) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, Patrick M.

    2003-01-01

    Lockheed Martin has been an active participant in NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) programs over the past several years. SLI, part of NASA's Integrated Space Transportation Plan (ISTP), was restructured in November of 2002 to focus the overall theme of safer, more afford-able space transportation along two paths - the Orbital Space Plane Program and the Next Generation Launch Technology programs. The Orbital Space Plane Program has the goal of providing rescue capability from the International Space Station by 2008 and transfer capability for crew (and limited cargo) by 2012. The Next Generation Launch Technology program is combining research and development efforts from the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2GRLV) program with cutting-edge, advanced space transportation programs (previously designated 3rd Generation) into one program aimed at enabling safe, reliable, cost-effective reusable launch systems by the middle of the next decade. Lockheed Martin is one of three prime contractors working to bring Orbital Space Plane system concepts to a system definition level of maturity by December of 2003. This paper and presentation will update the international community on the progress of the' OSP program, from an industry perspective, and provide insights into Lockheed Martin's role in enabling the vision of a safer, more affordable means of taking people to and from space.

  12. Symmetry in finite phase plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, J.

    2010-03-01

    The known symmetries in one-dimensional systems are inversion and translations. These symmetries persist in finite phase plane, but a novel symmetry arises in view of the discrete nature of the coordinate xi and the momentum pi : xi and pi can undergo permutations. Thus, if xi assumes M discrete values, i = 0, 1,2,..., M - 1, a permutation will change the order of the set x0,x1,..., xM-1 into a new ordered set. Such a symmetry element does not exist for a continuous x-coordinate in an infinite phase plane. Thus, in a finite phase plane, translations can be replaced by permutations. This is also true for the inversion operator. The new permutation symmetry has been used for the construction of conjugate representations and for the splitting of the M-dimensional vector space into independent subspaces. This splitting is exhaustive in the sense that if M = iMi with Mi being prime numbers, the M-dimensional space splits into M1,M2,...Mn-dimensional independent subspaces. It is shown that following this splitting one can design new potentials with appropriate constants of motion. A related problem is the Weyl-Heisenberg group in the M-dimensional space which turns into a direct product of its subgroups in the Mi-dimensional subspaces. As an example we consider the case of M = 8.

  13. A method of plane geometry primitive presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Anbo; Luo, Haibo; Chang, Zheng; Hui, Bin

    2014-11-01

    Point feature and line feature are basic elements in object feature sets, and they play an important role in object matching and recognition. On one hand, point feature is sensitive to noise; on the other hand, there are usually a huge number of point features in an image, which makes it complex for matching. Line feature includes straight line segment and curve. One difficulty in straight line segment matching is the uncertainty of endpoint location, the other is straight line segment fracture problem or short straight line segments joined to form long straight line segment. While for the curve, in addition to the above problems, there is another difficulty in how to quantitatively describe the shape difference between curves. Due to the problems of point feature and line feature, the robustness and accuracy of target description will be affected; in this case, a method of plane geometry primitive presentation is proposed to describe the significant structure of an object. Firstly, two types of primitives are constructed, they are intersecting line primitive and blob primitive. Secondly, a line segment detector (LSD) is applied to detect line segment, and then intersecting line primitive is extracted. Finally, robustness and accuracy of the plane geometry primitive presentation method is studied. This method has a good ability to obtain structural information of the object, even if there is rotation or scale change of the object in the image. Experimental results verify the robustness and accuracy of this method.

  14. Planes of satellite galaxies: when exceptions are the rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cautun, Marius; Bose, Sownak; Frenk, Carlos S.; Guo, Qi; Han, Jiaxin; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Sawala, Till; Wang, Wenting

    2015-10-01

    The detection of planar structures within the satellite systems of both the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) has been reported as being in stark contradiction to the predictions of the standard cosmological model (Λ cold dark matter - ΛCDM). Given the ambiguity in defining a planar configuration, it is unclear how to interpret the low incidence of the MW and M31 planes in ΛCDM. We investigate the prevalence of satellite planes around galactic mass haloes identified in high-resolution cosmological simulations. We find that planar structures are very common, and that ˜10 per cent of ΛCDM haloes have even more prominent planes than those present in the Local Group. While ubiquitous, the planes of satellite galaxies show a large diversity in their properties. This precludes using one or two systems as small-scale probes of cosmology, since a large sample of satellite systems is needed to obtain a good measure of the object-to-object variation. This very diversity has been misinterpreted as a discrepancy between the satellite planes observed in the Local Group and ΛCDM predictions. In fact, ˜10 per cent of ΛCDM galactic haloes have planes of satellites that are as infrequent as the MW and M31 planes. The look-elsewhere effect plays an important role in assessing the detection significance of satellite planes and accounting for it leads to overestimating the significance level by a factor of 30 and 100 for the MW and M31 systems, respectively.

  15. Eta Carinae: Orientation of The Orbital Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T. R.; Nielsen, K. E.; Ivarsson, S.; Corcoran, M. F.; Verner, E.; Hillier, J. D.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence continues to build that Eta Carinae is a massive binary system with a hidden hot companion in a highly elliptical orbit. We present imaging and spectroscopic evidence that provide clues to the orientation of the orbital plane. The circumstellar ejecta, known as the Homunculus and Little Homunculus, are hourglass-shaped structures, one encapsulated within the other, tilted at about 45 degrees from the sky plane. A disk region lies between the bipolar lobes. Based upon their velocities and proper motions, Weigelt blobs B, C and D, very bright emission clumps 0.1 to 0.3" Northwest from Eta Carinae, lie in the disk. UV flux from the hot companion, Eta Car B, photoexcites the Weigelt blobs. Other clumps form a complete chain around the star, but are not significantly photoexcited. The strontium filament, a 'neutral' emission structure, lies in the same general direction as the Weigelt blobs and exhibits peculiar properties indicative that much mid-UV, but no hydrogen-ionizing radiation impinges on this structure. It is shielded by singly-ionized iron. P Cygni absorptions in Fe I I lines, seen directly in line of sight from Eta Carinae, are absent in the stellar light scattered by the Weigelt blobs. Rather than a strong absorption extending to -600 km/s, a low velocity absorption feature extends from -40 to -150 km/s. No absorbing Fe II exists between Eta Carinae and Weigelt D, but the outer reaches of the wind are intercepted in line of sight from Weigelt D to the observer. This indicates that the UV radiation is constrained by the dominating wind of Eta Car A to a small cavity carved out by the weaker wind of Eta Car B. Since the high excitation nebular lines are seen in the Weigelt blobs at most phases, the cavity, and hence the major axis of the highly elliptical orbit, must lie in the general direction of the Weigelt blobs. The evidence is compelling that the orbital major axis of Eta Carinae is projected at -45 degrees position angle on the sky. Moreover

  16. SNAP Satellite Focal Plane Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bebek, C.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Bergstrom, L.; Berstein, G.P.; Bester, M.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmett, W.; Eriksson, M.; Fouchez,D.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Johnson, W.; Kadel, R.; Karcher,A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureaux, J.; Lampton, M.; Lefevre, O.; Levi, M.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Roe, N.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz,D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Smadja, G.; Smith, R.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle,G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-07-07

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square degree field in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. The requirements for the instrument suite and the present configuration of the focal plane concept are presented. A two year R&D phase, largely supported by the Department of Energy, is just beginning. We describe the development activities that are taking place to advance our preparedness for mission proposal in the areas of detectors and electronics.

  17. National Aero-Space Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piland, William M.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of the technology development management objectives thus far planned for the DOD/NASA National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The technology required by NASP will first be developed in ground-based facilities and then integrated during the design and construction of the X-30 experimental aircraft. Five airframe and three powerplant manufacturers are currently engaged in an 18-month effort encompassing design studies and tradeoff analyses. The first flight of the X-30 is scheduled for early 1993.

  18. Drag reduction at a plane wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    The objective is to determine by analytical means how drag on a plane wall may be modified favorably using a minimal amount of flow information - preferably only information at the wall. What quantities should be measured? How should that information be assimilated in order to arrive at effective control? As a prototypical problem, incompressible, viscous flow, governed by the Navier-Stokes equations, past a plane wall at which the no-slip condition was modified was considered. The streamwise and spanwise velocity components are required to be zero, but the normal component is to be specified according to some control law. The challenge is to choose the wall-normal velocity component based on flow conditions at the wall so that the mean drag is as small as possible. There can be no net mass flux through the wall, and the total available control energy is constrained. A turbulent flow is highly unsteady and has detailed spatial structure. The mean drag on the wall is the integral over the wall of the local shear forces exerted by the fluid, which is then averaged in time; it is a 'macroscopic' property of the flow. It is not obvious how unsteady boundary control is to be applied in order to modify the mean flow most effectively, especially in view of the non- self-adjoint nature of the governing equations. An approximate analytical solution to the suboptimal scheme is pursued.

  19. Thermomechanical architecture of the VIS focal plane for Euclid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martignac, Jérôme; Carty, Michaël.; Tourette, Thierry; Bachet, Damien; Berthé, Michel; Augueres, Jean-Louis; Amiaux, Jérôme; Fontignie, Jean; Horeau, Benoît; Renaud, Diana; Pottinger, Sabrina; Denniston, James; Winter, Berend; Guttridge, Phillip; Cole, Richard; Cropper, Mark; Niemi, Sami; Coker, John; Hunt, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    One of the main challenges for current and near future space experiments is the increase of focal plane complexity in terms of amount of pixels. In the frame work of the ESA Euclid mission to be launched in 2020, the Euclid Consortium is developing an extremely large and stable focal plane for the VIS instrument. CEA has developed the thermomechanical architecture of that Focal Plane taking into account all the very stringent performance and mission related requirements. The VIS Focal Plane Assembly integrates 36 CCDs (operated at 150K) connected to their front end electronics (operated at 280K) as to obtain one of the largest focal plane (˜0.6 billion pixels) ever built for space application after the GAIA one. The CCDs are CCD273 type specially designed and provided by the e2v company under ESA contract, front end electronics is studied and provided by MSSL. In this paper we first recall the specific requirements that have driven the overall architecture of the VIS-FPA and especially the solutions proposed to cope with the scientific needs of an extremely stable focal plane, both mechanically and thermally. The mechanical structure based on SiC material used for the cold sub assembly supporting the CCDs is detailed. We describe also the modular architecture concept that we have selected taking into account AIT-AIV and programmatic constraints.

  20. Rewritable photochromic focal plane masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Emilio; Bertarelli, Chiara; Bianco, Andrea; Bortoletto, Fabio; Conconi, Paolo; Crimi, Giuseppe; Gallazzi, Maria C.; Giro, Enrico; Lucotti, Andrea; Pernechele, Claudio; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2003-02-01

    The application of organic photochromic materials in astronomy is opening new possibilities which we are investigating in order to design innovative devices for future instrumentation. The photochromic property of transparent/opaque transition (although in a limited wavelength range) and the changes in intrinsic refractive index have led our studies to application in astronomic spectrographs, both as focal plane mask (for MOS application) and as dispersive elements (volume phase holographic gratings, VPHG), respectively. In both cases the possibility to write and erase devices with suitable irradiation has revealed a new perspective for non-disposable and fully customizable items for spectroscopy. Pursuing this goal we have synthesized a series of novel photochromic materials belonging to the diarylethenes. They fulfill the requirements of thermal stability and fatigue resistance necessary to build functional devices. Prototypes of high contrast focal plane mask working in the H-alpha spectral region have been manufactured and characterized both in laboratory and with the AFOSC camera at Asiago telescope (1.8 m). A custom writing robot (ARATRO) which, taking imaging frames and with the aid of interactive mask design software and ad hoc control electronics, is able to write MOS masks, has been constructed. The design of the MOS masks allow the fitting in the AFOSC slit wheel. The overall set-up is ready for the sky tests.

  1. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, Jason; Aguirre, James; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Bradley, Eric Todd; Cyganowski, Claudia; Dowell, Darren; Drosback, Meredith; Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J., II; Ginsburg, Adam; Harvey, Paul; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schlingman, Wayne; Shirley, Yancy L.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) is a 1.1 millimeter continuum survey of the northern Galactic Plane made with Bolocam and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The coverage totals 170 square degrees, comprised of a contiguous range from -10.5 deg is less than or equal to 90.5 deg, 0.5 deg is less than or equal to b is less than or equal to 0.5 deg, with extended coverage in b in selected regions, and four targeted regions in the outer Galaxy, including: IC1396, toward the Perseus arm at l is approximately 111 deg, W3/4/5, and Gem OB1. Depths of the maps range from 30 to 60 mJy beam (sup 1). Approximately 8,400 sources were detected and the maps and source catalog have been made publicly available. Millimeter-wave thermal dust emission reveals dense regions within molecular clouds, thus the BGPS serves as a database for studies of the dense interstellar medium and star formation within the Milky Way.

  2. Image plane sweep volume illumination.

    PubMed

    Sundén, Erik; Ynnerman, Anders; Ropinski, Timo

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, many volumetric illumination models have been proposed, which have the potential to simulate advanced lighting effects and thus support improved image comprehension. Although volume ray-casting is widely accepted as the volume rendering technique which achieves the highest image quality, so far no volumetric illumination algorithm has been designed to be directly incorporated into the ray-casting process. In this paper we propose image plane sweep volume illumination (IPSVI), which allows the integration of advanced illumination effects into a GPU-based volume ray-caster by exploiting the plane sweep paradigm. Thus, we are able to reduce the problem complexity and achieve interactive frame rates, while supporting scattering as well as shadowing. Since all illumination computations are performed directly within a single rendering pass, IPSVI does not require any preprocessing nor does it need to store intermediate results within an illumination volume. It therefore has a significantly lower memory footprint than other techniques. This makes IPSVI directly applicable to large data sets. Furthermore, the integration into a GPU-based ray-caster allows for high image quality as well as improved rendering performance by exploiting early ray termination. This paper discusses the theory behind IPSVI, describes its implementation, demonstrates its visual results and provides performance measurements. PMID:22034331

  3. Empirically Derived Strength of Residential Roof Structures for Solar Installations.

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; Sanchez, Alfred; Campos, Ivan A.; Gerstle, Walter H.

    2014-12-01

    Engineering certification for the installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules on wood roofs is often denied because existing wood roofs do not meet structural design codes. This work is intended to show that many roofs are actually sufficiently strong given the conservatism in codes, documented allowable strengths, roof structure system effects, and beam composite action produced by joist-sheathing interaction. This report provides results from a testing program to provide actual load carrying capacity of residential rooftops. The results reveal that the actual load carrying capacity of structural members and systems tested are significantly stronger than allowable loads provided by the International Residential Code (IRC 2009) and the national structural code found in Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (ASCE 7-10). Engineering analysis of residential rooftops typically ignores the system affects and beam composite action in determining rooftop stresses given a potential PV installation. This extreme conservatism combined with conservatism in codes and published allowable stress values for roof building materials (NDS 2012) lead to the perception that well built homes may not have adequate load bearing capacity to enable a rooftop PV installation. However, based on the test results presented in this report of residential rooftop structural systems, the actual load bearing capacity is several times higher than published values (NDS 2012).

  4. SOI diode uncooled infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, Masafumi; Ueno, Masashi; Takeda, Munehisa; Seto, Toshiki

    2006-02-01

    An uncooled infrared focal plane array (IR FPA) is a MEMS device that integrates an array of tiny thermal infrared detector pixels. An SOI diode uncooled IR FPA is a type that uses freestanding single-crystal diodes as temperature sensors and has various advantages over the other MEMS-based uncooled IR FPAs. Since the first demonstration of an SOI diode uncooled IR FPA in 1999, the pixel structure has been improved by developing sophisticated MEMS processes. The most advanced pixel has a three-level structure that has an independent metal reflector for interference infrared absorption between the temperature sensor (bottom level) and the infrared-absorbing thin metal film (top level). This structure makes it possible to design pixels with lower thermal conductance by allocating more area for thermal isolation without reducing infrared absorption. The new MEMS process for the three-level structure includes a XeF II dry bulk silicon etching process and a double organic sacrificial layer surface micromachining process. Employing advanced MEMS technology, we have developed a 640 x 480-element SOI diode uncooled IR FPA with 25-μm square pixels. The noise equivalent temperature difference of the FPA is 40 mK with f/1.0 optics. This result clearly demonstrates the great potential of the SOI diode uncooled IR FPA for high-end applications. In this paper, we explain the advances and state-of-the-art technology of the SOI diode uncooled IR FPA.

  5. P-Wave and S-Wave Velocity Structure of Submarine Landslide Associated With Gas Hydrate Layer on Frontal Ridge of Northern Cascadia Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, T.; Lu, H.; Yelisetti, S.; Spence, G.

    2015-12-01

    The submarine landslide associated with gas hydrate is a potential risk for environment and engineering projects, and thus from long time ago it has been a hot topic of hydrate research. The study target is Slipstream submarine landslide, one of the slope failures observed on the frontal ridges of the Northern Cascadia accretionary margin off Vancouver Island. The previous studies indicated a possible connection between this submarine landslide feature and gas hydrate, whose occurrence is indicated by a prominent bottom-simulating reflector (BSR), at a depth of ~265-275 m beneath the seafloor (mbsf). The OBS (Ocean Bottom Seismometer) data collected during SeaJade (Seafloor Earthquake Array - Japan Canada Cascadia Experiment) project were used to derive the subseafloor velocity structure for both P- and S-wave using travel times picked from refraction and reflection events. The P-wave velocity structure above the BSR showed anomalous high velocities of about 2.0 km/s at shallow depths of 100 mbsf, closely matching the estimated depth of the glide plane (100 ± 10 m). Forward modelling of S-waves was carried out using the data from the OBS horizontal components. The S-wave velocities, interpreted in conjunction with the P-wave results, provide the key constraints on the gas hydrate distribution within the pores. The hydrate distribution in the pores is important for determining concentrations, and also for determining the frame strength which is critical for controlling slope stability of steep frontal ridges. The increase in S-wave velocity suggests that the hydrate is distributed as part of the load-bearing matrix to increase the rigidity of the sediment.

  6. Optimal focal-plane restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.; Park, Stephen K.

    1989-01-01

    Image restoration can be implemented efficiently by calculating the convolution of the digital image and a small kernel during image acquisition. Processing the image in the focal-plane in this way requires less computation than traditional Fourier-transform-based techniques such as the Wiener filter and constrained least-squares filter. Here, the values of the convolution kernel that yield the restoration with minimum expected mean-square error are determined using a frequency analysis of the end-to-end imaging system. This development accounts for constraints on the size and shape of the spatial kernel and all the components of the imaging system. Simulation results indicate the technique is effective and efficient.

  7. Broken chiral symmetry on a null plane

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas R.

    2013-10-15

    On a null-plane (light-front), all effects of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking are contained in the three Hamiltonians (dynamical Poincaré generators), while the vacuum state is a chiral invariant. This property is used to give a general proof of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane. Focusing on null-plane QCD with N degenerate flavors of light quarks, the chiral-symmetry breaking Hamiltonians are obtained, and the role of vacuum condensates is clarified. In particular, the null-plane Gell-Mann–Oakes–Renner formula is derived, and a general prescription is given for mapping all chiral-symmetry breaking QCD condensates to chiral-symmetry conserving null-plane QCD condensates. The utility of the null-plane description lies in the operator algebra that mixes the null-plane Hamiltonians and the chiral symmetry charges. It is demonstrated that in a certain non-trivial limit, the null-plane operator algebra reduces to the symmetry group SU(2N) of the constituent quark model. -- Highlights: •A proof (the first) of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane is given. •The puzzle of chiral-symmetry breaking condensates on a null-plane is solved. •The emergence of spin-flavor symmetries in null-plane QCD is demonstrated.

  8. Studies of mechanical, themal and fabrication characteristics of multifunctional structural metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruganti, Ramkumar K.

    Structural materials, in addition to bearing load, are being sought to perform other functions such as enforcing mechanical compatibility between materials, heat exchange and crash energy absorption. Such needs have led to the development of multifunctional materials, notable among these, and those studied in this research, being compositionally and functionally graded materials (FGM's) and cellular metals. FGM's can be used to reduce thermal expansion mismatch between two materials such as a functional coating and a load-bearing substrate. In such cases, the deformation and creep behavior of the composite interlayers between the two materials becomes of interest. To study this aspect, composites of typical FGM materials, a nickel base superalloy and zirconia, were fabricated by powder metallurgy. It was found that zirconia reacted with Y' (Ni3Al) to form alumina and introduced elemental zirconium and oxygen into the superalloy matrix. These changes resulted in greater strengthening than that expected from composite theory at lower creep rates. At higher creep rates, though, weakening of the composites relative to the original alloy was observed. For the part of research directed toward cellular structures, techniques were developed to fabricate hexagonal honeycomb structures and a bonded woven wire mesh structure. High temperature deformation properties of the honeycomb structures in the transverse (in-plane) direction were investigated. Differences in elastic and anelastic behavior and creep strengths from those observed in solid materials are attributed mainly to the open nature of the structures. Creep in the honeycombs is characterized by cycles of primary, secondary and tertiary stages caused by shear instability in layers of cells. Room temperature tests on the woven wire bonded structure showed sharp yielding in tension but gradual yielding and higher strength in compression. Thermal expansion behavior of some cellular structures was studied since it is of

  9. Thermoelectric characterization and fabrication of nanostructured p-type Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 and n-type Bi2Te3 thin film thermoelectric energy generator with an in-plane planar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, No-Won; Park, Tae-Hyun; Ahn, Jay-Young; Kang, So-Hyeon; Lee, Won-Yong; Yoon, Young-Gui; Yoon, Soon-Gil; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents in-plane bismuth-telluride-based thermoelectric (TE) energy generators fabricated using metal-shadow and radio-frequency sputtering methods at room temperature. The TE energy generators consist of four couples of 300-nm-thick nanostructured Bi2Te3 (n-BT) and Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 (p-BST) thin films used as n-type and p-type materials, respectively, on a Si substrate for the p/n junctions of the TE energy generators. Furthermore, the effect of annealing treatment of both n-BT and p-BST thin films on the electrical and TE properties as well as the TE performance of the TE energy generators is discussed. By varying the temperature between the hot and cold junction legs of the n-BT/p-BST in-plane TE energy generators annealed at 200 °C, the maximum output voltage and power are determined to be ˜3.6 mV and ˜1.1 nW, respectively, at a temperature difference of 50 K. The output powers increased by ˜590% compared to that of the as-grown TE generator at a temperature difference of 90 K. This improvement in the TE performance is attributed to the enhancement of the electrical conductivity after heat treatment. From a numerical simulation conducted using a commercial software (COMSOL), we are confident that it plays a crucial role in determining the dimension (i.e., thickness of each leg) and material properties of both n-BT and p-BST materials of the in-plane TE energy generators.

  10. The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, P. W.; Hoare, M. G.; Longmore, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Davis, C. J.; Adamson, A.; Bandyopadhyay, R. M.; de Grijs, R.; Smith, M.; Gosling, A.; Mitchison, S.; Gáspár, A.; Coe, M.; Tamura, M.; Parker, Q.; Irwin, M.; Hambly, N.; Bryant, J.; Collins, R. S.; Cross, N.; Evans, D. W.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Hodgkin, S.; Lewis, J.; Read, M.; Riello, M.; Sutorius, E. T. W.; Lawrence, A.; Drew, J. E.; Dye, S.; Thompson, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) is one of the five near-infrared Public Legacy Surveys that are being undertaken by the UKIDSS consortium, using the Wide Field Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. It is surveying 1868 deg2 of the northern and equatorial Galactic plane at Galactic latitudes -5° < b < 5° in the J, H and K filters and a ~200-deg2 area of the Taurus-Auriga-Perseus molecular cloud complex in these three filters and the 2.12 μm (1-0) H2 filter. It will provide data on ~2 × 109 sources. Here we describe the properties of the data set and provide a user's guide for its exploitation. We also present brief Demonstration Science results from DR2 and from the Science Verification programme. These results illustrate how GPS data will frequently be combined with data taken in other wavebands to produce scientific results. The Demonstration Science comprises six studies. (1) A GPS-Spitzer-GLIMPSE cross-match for the star formation region G28.983-0.603 to identify YSOs. This increases the number of YSOs identified by a factor of 10 compared to GLIMPSE alone. (2) A wide-field study of the M17 nebula, in which an extinction map of the field is presented and the effect of source confusion on luminosity functions in different subregions is noted. (3) H2 emission in the ρ Ophiuchi dark cloud. All the molecular jets are traced back to a single active clump containing only a few protostars, which suggests that the duration of strong jet activity and associated rapid accretion in low-mass protostars is brief. (4) X-ray sources in the nuclear bulge. The GPS data distinguishes local main-sequence counterparts with soft X-ray spectra from nuclear bulge giant counterparts with hard X-ray spectra. (5) External galaxies in the zone of avoidance. The galaxies are clearly distinguished from stars in fields at longitudes l > 90°. (6) IPHAS-GPS optical-infrared spectrophotometric typing. The (i' - J) versus (J - H) diagram is used to distinguish A-F type

  11. Out-of-plane properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes three areas of research which were performed to characterize out-of-plane properties of composite materials. In the first investigation, a series of tests was run to characterize the through-the-thickness tensile strength for a variety of composites that included 2D braids, 2D and 3D weaves, and prepreg tapes. A new test method based on a curved beam was evaluated. Failures were significantly different between the 2D materials and the 3D weaves. The 2D materials delaminated between layers due to out-of-plane tensile stresses while the 3D weaves failed due to the formation of radial cracks between the surface plies caused by high circumferential stresses along the inner radius. The strength of the 2D textile composites did not increase relative to the tapes. Final failure in the 3D weaves was caused by a circumferential crack similar to the 2D materials and occurred at a lower bending moment than in other materials. The early failures in the 3D weaves were caused by radial crack formation rather than a low through-the-thickness strength. The second investigation focused on the development of a standard impact test method to measure impact damage resistance. The only impact tests that currently exist are compression after impact (CAI) tests which incorporate elements of both damage resistance and damage tolerance. A new impact test method is under development which uses a quasi-static indentation (QSI) test to directly measure damage resistance. Damage resistance is quantified in terms of the contact force to produce a unit of damage where a metric for damage may be area in C-scan, depth of residual dent , penetration, damage growth, etc. A final draft of an impact standard that uses a QSI test method will be presented to the ASTM Impact Task Group on impact. In the third investigation, the impact damage resistance behavior of a variety of textile materials was studied using the QSI test method. In this study, the force where large damage

  12. Duel-Plane Optical Disdrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsky, B. E.; Eichinger, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    Acquiring better drop-size distributions of rainfall will improve our understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of rainfall. In order to fully capture the spatial and temporal variability of rainfall, a robust, calibration free, low-cost instrument that provides an accurate drop-size distribution is required. Therefore, The University of Iowa Lidar Group has developed and built a new duel-plane optical disdrometer that meets these criteria. Two sheets of laser light, vertically spaced by 1 cm are produced by two 670nm laser beams passing through a collecting lens and culminating lens, respectively. The two sheets of laser light then pass through a convex lens located 20 cm from the lasers that focuses the light on a photo detector. A computer reads in and stores the voltages at 10 kHz. The velocity, diameter, shape and drop-size distribution of raindrops are extracted from the voltage measurements. Rainfall data collected in Iowa City, IA tested our disdrometer's robustness and accuracy of providing drop-size distributions. Our distrometer is advantageous because it is simple, low-cost, and requires no calibration.

  13. Radioactivity in the galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walraven, G. D.; Haymes, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports the detection of a large concentration of interstellar radioactivity during balloon-altitude measurements of gamma-ray energy spectra in the band between 0.02 and 12.27 MeV from galactic and extragalactic sources. Enhanced counting rates were observed in three directions towards the plane of the Galaxy; a power-law energy spectrum is computed for one of these directions (designated B 10). A large statistical deviation from the power law in a 1.0-FWHM interval centered near 1.16 MeV is discussed, and the existence of a nuclear gamma-ray line at 1.15 MeV in B 10 is postulated. It is suggested that Ca-44, which emits gamma radiation at 1.156 MeV following the decay of radioactive Sc-44, is a likely candidate for this line, noting that Sc-44 arises from Ti-44 according to explosive models of supernova nucleosynthesis. The 1.16-MeV line flux inferred from the present data is shown to equal the predicted flux for a supernova at a distance of approximately 3 kpc and an age not exceeding about 100 years.

  14. Development and evolution of the helicoidal plane of dental occlusion.

    PubMed

    Smith, B H

    1986-01-01

    The helicoidal plane of dental occlusion is a composite feature involving axial inclination of teeth and effects of dental attrition. Recent studies disagree on its distribution and significance in hominoid primates. The distribution, development, and functional basis of the helicoidal plane are investigated here, based on quantitative analysis of dental morphology and attrition in 667 human and 60 chimpanzee dentitions. Helicoidal planes are nearly universal in the human and chimpanzee dentitions studied. Increasing axial inclination of molars from M1 to M3 is primarily responsible for the helicoidal plane, although attrition acts to increase its expression. In hominoids, increased molar axial tilt appears to be associated with facial shortening and dental reduction. Population and species comparisons suggest a functional relationship with cranial structure. Progressive axial tilt of molars producing a helicoidal plane is found consistently in mammals with cheek teeth positioned partly under the cranium, as in hominids, pongids, some cebids, macropodids, ursids, and sciurids. Facial shortening is an important trend in hominid evolution and axial inclination of molars might be expected to show progressive change from Australopithecus afarensis to recent Homo sapiens. PMID:3080898

  15. The Evolution of Plane Wakes Subjected to Irrotational Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, M. R.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Three direct numerical simulations of time-evolving turbulent plane wakes developing in the presence of various irrotational plane strains have been generated. A pseudospectral numerical method with up to 26 million modes is used to solve the equations in a reference frame moving with the irrotational strain. The initial condition for each simulation is taken from a previous turbulent self-similar plane wake direct numerical simulation at a velocity deficit Reynolds number, Re, of about 2000. Three different plane strains (of the same magnitude) are imposed. In the first two simulations the strain is in a plane normal to the streamwise wake direction (the two cases having strain of opposite sign); in the third the wake is compressed in the streamwise direction and stretched in the inhomogeneous cross-stream direction. The two flows that are stretched in the cross-stream direction experience an exponential increase of Re; flow visualization indicates many small-scale vortices with little or no organized large-scale structure. In the flow that is compressed in the cross-stream direction Re decays exponentially and the layer appears to be relaminarizing. The evolution of several turbulence statistics in each of these flows is examined.

  16. A Collaborative Knowledge Plane for Autonomic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbaye, Maïssa; Krief, Francine

    Autonomic networking aims to give network components self-managing capabilities. Several autonomic architectures have been proposed. Each of these architectures includes sort of a knowledge plane which is very important to mimic an autonomic behavior. Knowledge plane has a central role for self-functions by providing suitable knowledge to equipment and needs to learn new strategies for more accuracy.However, defining knowledge plane's architecture is still a challenge for researchers. Specially, defining the way cognitive supports interact each other in knowledge plane and implementing them. Decision making process depends on these interactions between reasoning and learning parts of knowledge plane. In this paper we propose a knowledge plane's architecture based on machine learning (inductive logic programming) paradigm and situated view to deal with distributed environment. This architecture is focused on two self-functions that include all other self-functions: self-adaptation and self-organization. Study cases are given and implemented.

  17. Collinearity-preserving functions between Desarguesian planes

    PubMed Central

    Carter, David S.; Vogt, Andrew

    1980-01-01

    Using concepts from valuation theory, we obtain a characterization of all collinearity-preserving functions from one affine or projective Desarguesian plane into another. The case in which the planes are projective and the range contains a quadrangle has been treated previously in the literature. Our results permit one or both planes to be affine and include cases in which the range contains a triangle but no quadrangle. A key theorem is that, with the exception of certain embeddings defined on planes of order 2 and 3, every collinearity-preserving function from one affine Desarguesian plane into another can be extended to a collinearity-preserving function between enveloping projective planes. PMID:16592845

  18. Cast aluminum in the vehicle structure taking the example of a city car study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehl, K.M.

    1989-01-01

    The analysis of the lightweight design potential of different materials for car body application shows that cast aluminum is suitable for the load bearing structure of the passenger compartment. Design freedom, component integration, tooling costs and recycling possibilities are arguments in favour of the casting material. In order to get practical findings about possibilities and limits of aluminum castings in the bodywork a highly integrated passenger compartment has been developed for a city car study. It is described in this paper compared with a sheet steel structure.

  19. Hubble Views Saturn Ring-Plane Crossing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This sequence of images from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope documents a rare astronomical alignment -- Saturn's magnificent ring system turned edge-on. This occurs when the Earth passes through Saturn's ring plane, as it does approximately every 15 years.

    These pictures were taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on 22 May 1995, when Saturn was at a distance of 919 million miles (1.5 billion kilometers) from Earth. At Saturn, Hubble can see details as small as 450 miles (725 km) across. In each image, the dark band across Saturn is the ring shadow cast by the Sun which is still 2.7 degrees above Saturn's ring plane. The box around the western portion of the rings (to the right of Saturn) in each image indicates the area in which the faint light from the rings has been multiplied through image processing (by a factor of 25) to make the rings more visible.

    [Top] -

    This image was taken while the Earth was above the lit face of the rings. The moons Tethys and Dione are visible to the east (left) of Saturn; Janus is the bright spot near the center of the ring portion in the box, and Pandora is faintly visible just inside the left edge of this box. Saturn's atmosphere shows remarkable detail: multiple banding in both the northern and southern hemispheres, wispy structure at the north edge of the equatorial zone, and a bright area above the ring shadow that is caused by sunlight scattered off the rings onto the atmosphere. There is evidence of a faint polar haze over the north pole of Saturn and a fainter haze over the south.

    [Center] -

    This image was taken close to the time of ring-plane crossing. The rings are 75% fainter than in the top image, though they do not disappear completely because the vertical face of the rings still reflects sunlight when the rings are edge-on. Rhea is visible to the east of Saturn, Enceladus is the bright satellite in the rings to the west, and Janus is the fainter blip to its right. Pandora is just to the left of

  20. Deployable Soft Composite Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel. PMID:26892762

  1. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  2. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel. PMID:26892762

  3. Sagittal plane biomechanics. American Diabetes Association.

    PubMed

    Dananberg, H J

    2000-01-01

    During walking, the center of body mass must pass from behind the weightbearing foot to in front of it. For this to take place, the foot must function as a sagittal plane pivot. Because the range required for this motion is approximately five times as great as both frontal and transverse plane motion, its evaluation should become an essential part of a podiatric biomechanical assessment. Lack of proper sagittal plane motion and its sequelae are described. PMID:10659532

  4. Recent developments in surgical skin planing.

    PubMed

    AYRES, S; WILSON, J W; LUIKART, R

    1958-02-01

    In surgical skin planing steel wire brushes have been largely replaced by the less hazardous diamond chip burs or "fraises" and serrated steel wheels. In addition to acne pits and wrinkling, multiple actinic (senile) keratoses are an important indication for planing. Planing provides a nonscarring method for the treatment of existing keratoses, as well as a prophylaxis against skin cancer by replacing the sun-damaged, precancerous epidermis with new epidermal cells derived from the cutaneous adnexa (pilosebaceous and sweat gland units). There are clinical landmarks indicating the depth of planing which can serve as a guide to the operator and can be correlated with microscopic findings. The results of experiments on the comparative effects of refrigerants on animal and human skin indicate that human facial skin can tolerate considerable freezing with ethyl chloride or dichlorotetrafluoroethane (Freon 114) but that mixtures containing large proportions of the much colder dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon 12) may be undesirable. Refreezing an area of the skin in order to perform a more adequate planing is not considered hazardous.THE REGENERATION OF THE SKIN FOLLOWING PLANING HAS THREE COMPONENTS: Epidermal, adnexal and dermal. The cells of the epidermis and the adnexa are equipotential. A knowledge of the anatomy of the acne pit enables the operator to decide which pits can be benefited by planing and which should be excised before planing. The successful treatment of acne pits of the face by planing in patients having keloids elsewhere on the body is reported. PMID:13500217

  5. Digital scanner infrared focal plane technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, M. A.; Malone, N. R.; Harris, M.; Shin, J.; Byers, S.; Price, D.; Vampola, J.

    2011-09-01

    Advancements in finer geometry and technology advancements in circuit design now allow placement of digital architecture on cryogenic focal planes while using less power than heritage analog designs. These advances in technology reduce the size, weight, and power of modern focal planes. In addition, the interface to the focal plane is significantly simplified and is more immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). The cost of the customer's instrument after integration with the digital scanning Focal Plane Array (FPA) has been significantly reduced by placing digital architecture such as Analog to digital convertors and Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) Inputs and Outputs (I/O) on the Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC).

  6. Galactic diffuse gamma rays from galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateyama, N.; Nishimura, J.

    2001-08-01

    The dominant part of the diffuse gamma rays from the Galactic plane, with energy greater than 1TeV, has been thought as due to the inverse Compton scattering of the interstellar photons with the high-energy cosmic electrons. In these energy regions, the diffuse gamma-ray observation gives us unique infor-mation on the energy spectrum of the high-energy electrons in the interstellar space, since we cannot observe those electrons directly. This provides us information on the cosmicray source, production mechanism and propagation in the Galaxy. We discuss the implication of our results by comparing with the work of Porter and Protheroe, and also compare with the data observed by the most recent extensive air showers. It is also pointed out that the patchy structure of gammaray distribution will appear at high-energy side, if we observe the distribution with a higher angular resolution of a few arc degrees. This patchy structure will become clear beyond 10TeV of IC gamma rays, where the number of contributing sources of parent decrease and the diffusion distance of the electrons become smaller.

  7. National Aerospace Plane Thermal Development. (Latest Citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning thermal properties of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP). Analysis of thermal stress, and methods for determining thermal effects on the plane's supersonic structure are discussed. The citations also review temperature extremes that the vehicle is likely to encounter. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. National Aerospace Plane Thermal Development. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning thermal properties of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP). Analysis of thermal stress, and methods for determining thermal effects on the plane's supersonic structure are discussed. The citations also review temperature extremes that the vehicle is likely to encounter.

  9. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2014-01-07

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  10. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2013-07-08

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  11. Slipping and Rolling on an Inclined Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aghamohammadi, Cina; Aghamohammadi, Amir

    2011-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, using a direct calculation two-dimensional motion of a particle sliding on an inclined plane is investigated for general values of friction coefficient ([mu]). A parametric equation for the trajectory of the particle is also obtained. In the second part of the paper, the motion of a sphere on the inclined plane is…

  12. Uncooled infrared sensors with digital focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Charles A.; Butler, Neal R.; Blackwell, Richard; Murphy, Robert; Breen, Thomas

    1996-06-01

    Loral Infrared & Imaging Systems is developing low cost, high performance, uncooled infrared imaging products for both military and commercial applications. These products are based on the microbolometer technology, a silicon micromachined sensor which combines the wafer level silicon processing with a device structure capable of yielding excellent infrared imaging performance. Here, we report on the development of an uncooled sensor, the LTC500, which incorporates an all digital focal plane array and has a measured NETD of less than 70 mK. The focal plane array and the electronics within the LTC500 have been designed as an integrated unit to meet a broad range of end user applications by providing features such as nonuniformity correction, autogain and level, NTSC video, and digital outputs. The 327 X 245 element focal plane array has a 46.25 micrometers pixel pitch and an on focal plane array 14 bit to analog to digital converter (ADC). The ADC has a measured instantaneous dynamic range of more than 76 dB at a 6.1 MHz output data rate and 60 Hz frame rate. The focal plane array consumes less than 500 mW of power, of which less than 250 mW is used in the ADC. An additional 36 dB of digital coarse offset correction in front of the ADC on the focal plane array results in a total electronic dynamic range of 112 dB. The MRT of the LTC500 camera has been measured at less 0.2 C at f(subscript o).

  13. Progress in patch repair of aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weiguo; Zhang, Weifang; Tang, Qingyun

    2011-11-01

    With the rapid application of the composite structure in the aerospace industry, more load-bearing structures and components are used with composites instead of conventional engineering materials. However, the composite structures are inevitably suffered damages in the complex environment, the composites structures repair become more important in the airplane maintenance. This paper describes the composites patch repair progress. Firstly, the flaws and damages concerned to composite structures are concluded, and also the repair principles are presented. Secondly, the advantages and disadvantages for different repair methods are analyzed, as well as the different bonded repair and their applicability to different structures is discussed. According the recent research in theory and experiment, the scarf repair effects under different parameters are analyzed. Finally, the failure mechanisms of repair structure are discussed, and some prospects are put forward.

  14. Progress in patch repair of aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weiguo; Zhang, Weifang; Tang, Qingyun

    2012-04-01

    With the rapid application of the composite structure in the aerospace industry, more load-bearing structures and components are used with composites instead of conventional engineering materials. However, the composite structures are inevitably suffered damages in the complex environment, the composites structures repair become more important in the airplane maintenance. This paper describes the composites patch repair progress. Firstly, the flaws and damages concerned to composite structures are concluded, and also the repair principles are presented. Secondly, the advantages and disadvantages for different repair methods are analyzed, as well as the different bonded repair and their applicability to different structures is discussed. According the recent research in theory and experiment, the scarf repair effects under different parameters are analyzed. Finally, the failure mechanisms of repair structure are discussed, and some prospects are put forward.

  15. Exotensioned structural members with energy-absorbing effects

    SciTech Connect

    Brockwell, Michael Ian

    2014-01-07

    Structural members having enhanced load bearing capacity per unit mass include a skeleton structure formed from strips of material. Notches may be placed on the strips and a weave of tensile material placed in the notches and woven around the skeleton structure. At least one pair of structural members can be jointed together to provide very strong joints due to a weave patterns of tensile material, such as Kevlar, that distributes stress throughout the structure, preventing stress from concentrating in one area. Methods of manufacturing such structural members include molding material into skeletons of desired cross section using a matrix of molding segments. Total catastrophic failures in composite materials are substantially avoided and the strength to weight ratio of structures can be increased.

  16. Exotensioned structural members with energy-absorbing effects

    SciTech Connect

    Brockwell, Michael Ian

    2015-08-11

    Structural members having enhanced load bearing capacity per unit mass include a skeleton structure formed from strips of material. Notches may be placed on the strips and a weave of tensile material placed in the notches and woven around the skeleton structure. At least one pair of structural members can be jointed together to provide very strong joints due to a weave patterns of tensile material, such as Kevlar, that distributes stress throughout the structure, preventing stress from concentrating in one area. Methods of manufacturing such structural members include molding material into skeletons of desired cross section using a matrix of molding segments. Total catastrophic failures in composite materials are substantially avoided and the strength to weight ratio of structures can be increased.

  17. Study the Z-Plane Strip Capacitance

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, H.; Swain, S.; /SLAC

    2005-12-15

    The BaBaR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is currently undergoing an upgrade to improve its muon and neutral hadron detection system. The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) that had been used till now have deteriorated in performance over the past few years and are being replaced by Limited Streamer Tube (LSTs). Each layer of the system consists of a set of up to 10 streamer tube modules which provide one coordinate ({phi} coordinate) and a single ''Z-plane'' which provides the Z coordinate of the hit. The large area Z-planes (up to 12m{sup 2}) are 1mm thick and contain 96 copper strips that detect the induced charge from avalanches created in the streamer tube wires. All the Z-planes needed for the upgrade have already been constructed, but only a third of the planes were installed last summer. After installing the 24 Z-planes last year, it was learned that 0.7% of the strips were dead when put inside the detector. This was mainly due to the delicate solder joint between the read-out cable and the strip, and since it is difficult to access or replace the Z-planes inside the detector, it is very important to perform various tests to make sure that the Z-planes will be efficient and effective in the long term. We measure the capacitance between the copper strips and the ground plane, and compare it to the theoretical value that we expect. Instead of measuring the capacitance channel by channel, which would be a very tedious job, we developed a more effective method of measuring the capacitance. Since all the Z-planes were built at SLAC, we also built a smaller 46 cm by 30 cm Z-plane with 12 strips just to see how they were constructed and to gain a better understanding about the solder joints.

  18. A Cool Tool for Deicing Planes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Nicknamed the "ice zapper," the Electro Expulsive Separation System (EESS) is an aircraft ice removal system that "pulverizes ice and removes layers of ice as thin as frost or as thick as an inch of glaze," according to the principle inventor of the technology. Patented by NASA's Ames Research Center, the EESS consists of layers of conductors encased in materials that are bonded directly to the airframe structure. When ice accumulates on the aircraft, an electric current is sent through the conductors, causing them to pulse. Even though the conductors move less than a twenty-thousandth of an inch in just a millisecond, the movement is sufficient to pulverize the ice. It is this highly accelerated motion that shatters the ice into particles the size of table salt; too small to be harmful to the aircraft. When compared with other systems in use, such as thermal deicers and pneumatic boots, the ice zapper does very well. Thermal deicers are fairly common, although they use an enormous amount of energy and present the possibility of ice refreezing. Pneumatic boots are not always effective because they require an inflation device that is unable to work until a quarter inch of ice has accumulated. With both systems, the ice that is loosened may still be large enough to cause problems for the plane once dislodged.

  19. Quantum dynamics of a plane pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Leibscher, Monika; Schmidt, Burkhard

    2009-07-15

    A semianalytical approach to the quantum dynamics of a plane pendulum is developed, based on Mathieu functions which appear as stationary wave functions. The time-dependent Schroedinger equation is solved for pendular analogs of coherent and squeezed states of a harmonic oscillator, induced by instantaneous changes of the periodic potential energy function. Coherent pendular states are discussed between the harmonic limit for small displacements and the inverted pendulum limit, while squeezed pendular states are shown to interpolate between vibrational and free rotational motion. In the latter case, full and fractional revivals as well as spatiotemporal structures in the time evolution of the probability densities (quantum carpets) are quantitatively analyzed. Corresponding expressions for the mean orientation are derived in terms of Mathieu functions in time. For periodic double well potentials, different revival schemes, and different quantum carpets are found for the even and odd initial states forming the ground tunneling doublet. Time evolution of the mean alignment allows the separation of states with different parity. Implications for external (rotational) and internal (torsional) motion of molecules induced by intense laser fields are discussed.

  20. Interactive visualizations of blowups of the plane.

    PubMed

    Schenzel, Peter; Stussak, Christian

    2013-06-01

    Blowups are an important technique in algebraic geometry that permit the smoothing of singular algebraic varieties. It is a challenge to visualize this process even in the case of blowups of points X in the affine plane AA(IR)(2). First results were obtained by Brodmann with the aid of the so-called toroidal blowup, a compact embedding of the blowup into affine 3-space. In fact, Brodmann provides a rational parametrization of the toroidal blowup, but its visualization fails in the neighborhood of X because the parametrization tends to indefinite terms of the form 0/0. Our approach is based on implicitization of the parametric form. By methods from commutative algebra we are able to reduce the implicitization to the computation of a single, fairly simple resultant. This provides an algebraic equation of the implicit surface of the toroidal blowup including the so-called exceptional fiber associated with X. Surprisingly, the degree of the equation grows only linearly with the degree of the parametrization. By applying additional clipping techniques to the implicit surface we are able to visualize the toroidal blowup as well as its deformations by several parameters interactively in real time using GPU-based ray casting techniques. The methods of the paper provide insights in the structure of blowups of points, even if the points are interactively moved or tend to degenerations. PMID:22802122

  1. An assessment of tailoring of lightning protection design requirements for a composite wing structure on a metallic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwood, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Navy A-6E aircraft is presently being modified with a new wing which uses graphite/epoxy structures and substructures around a titanium load-bearing structure. The ability of composites to conduct electricity is less than that of aluminum. This is cause for concern when the wing may be required to conduct large lightning currents. The manufacturer attempted to solve lightning protection issues by performing a risk assessment based on a statistical approach which allows relaxation of the wing lightning protection design levels over certain locations of the composite wing. A sensitivity study is presented designed to define the total risk of relaxation of the design levels.

  2. Turbulent plane Couette flow subject to strong system rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Knut H.; Andersson, Helge I.

    1997-09-01

    System rotation is known to substantially affect the mean flow pattern as well as the turbulence structure in rotating channel flows. In a numerical study of plane Couette flow rotating slowly about an axis aligned with the mean vorticity, Bech & Andersson (1996a) found that the turbulence level was damped in the presence of anticyclonic system rotation, in spite of the occurrence of longitudinal counter-rotating roll cells. Moreover, the turbulence anisotropy was practically unaffected by the weak rotation, for which the rotation number Ro, defined as the ratio of twice the imposed angular vorticity [Omega] to the shear rate of the corresponding laminar flow, was ±0.01. The aim of the present paper is to explore the effects of stronger anticyclonic system rotation on directly simulated turbulent plane Couette flow. Turbulence statistics like energy, enstrophy and Taylor lengthscales, both componental and directional, were computed from the statistically steady flow fields and supplemented by structural information obtained by conditional sampling.

  3. Bi3+/M2+ oxyphosphate: a continuous series of polycationic species from the 1D single chain to the 2D planes. Part 1: From HREM images to crystal-structure deduction.

    PubMed

    Huvé, M; Colmont, M; Mentré, O

    2006-08-21

    This work deals with the crystal-structure deduction of new structural types of Bi3+-M2+ oxyphosphates (M is a transition element) from HREM images. Previous studies showed the unequivocal attribution of particular HREM contrasts to the corresponding Bi/M/O-based polycationic species in similar materials. On this basis, the examination of isolated crystallites of polyphased samples led to new HREM contrasts assigned to new polycationic species in three new structural types. This helped us to solve one crystal structure, and the two other forms have been deduced through HREM image decoding. It helped to model the investigated materials from the structural point of view as well as the chemical one. The three assumed crystal structures are formed by polycationic ribbons, n tetrahedra wide, surrounded by PO4 groups, as already encountered in these series of oxyphosphates. However, here we deal with the original n= 4-6 cases, whereas, up to this work, only the n= 1-3 ribbons have been reported. The greater size of ribbons is associated with particular structural modifications responsible for complex HREM contrasts. The validity of the proposed models is verified in Part 2 of this work. PMID:16903714

  4. Back focal plane imaging spectroscopy of photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Rebecca; Heerklotz, Lars; Kortenbruck, Nikolai; Cichos, Frank

    2012-08-01

    Back focal plane imaging spectroscopy is introduced to record angle resolved emission spectra of 3-dimensional colloidal photonic crystals. The auto-fluorescence of the colloids is used to quickly map the photonic band structure up to 72 % of the solid angle of a semisphere with the help of a high numerical aperture objective. Local excitation provides spatially resolved information on the photonic crystal's optical properties. The obtained fractional density of states allows direct conclusions on the crystal's stacking faults or defects.

  5. Stability and Load Bearing Capacity of a Bars with Built up Cross Section and Elastic Supports / Badania Stateczności I Nosności Prętów Złożonych Z Podporami Sprężystymi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajewski, Marcin

    2015-03-01

    The present paper is devoted to the numerical analysis and experimental tests of compressed bars with built-up cross section which are commonly used as a top chord of the roof trusses. The significant impact on carrying capacity for that kind of elements in case of out-of-plane buckling is appropriate choice of battens which are used to provide interaction between separate members. Linear buckling analysis results and nonlinear static analysis results, with material and geometrical nonlinearity, are presented for the bar with built-up cross section which was used as the top chord of the truss made in reality. Diagonals and verticals which are supports for the top chord between marginal joints were replaced by the elastic supports. The threshold stiffness (minimum stiffness) for the intermediate elastic supports which ensures maximum buckling load was appointed for the beam and shell model of the structure. The magnitude of limit load depended on length of the battens was calculated for models with initial geometric imperfections. The experimental tests results for the axially compressed bars with builtup cross section and elastic support are presented. Niniejsza praca poświecona jest analizom numerycznym i badaniom doświadczalnym ściskanych prętów złożonych, które są często stosowane, jako pasy górne kratownic dachowych. Istotny wpływ na nośność tego typu elementów, przy założeniu wyboczenia z płaszczyzny układu, ma odpowiedni dobór przewiązek zapewniający współpracę poszczególnych gałęzi. W pracy przedstawiono rezultaty liniowych analiz stateczności oraz fizycznie i geometrycznie nieliniowych analiz statycznych dla pręta złożonego, z którego zbudowany jest pas górny kratownicy wykonanej w rzeczywistości. Słupki i krzyżulce podpierające pas między węzłami skrajnymi zastąpiono podporami sprężystymi. Wyznaczono graniczną (minimalna) sztywność sprężystych podpór pośrednich zapewniającą maksymalną wartość obci

  6. Development of multi-functional composite structures with embedded electronics for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong Jang, Tae; Soo Oh, Dae; Kyu Kim, Jin; In Kang, Kyung; Ho Cha, Won; Woo Rhee, Seung

    2011-01-01

    Conventional spacecraft structural function has been limited to supporting loads and mounting avionics only. In contrast, the technology of 'multi-functional structures' can integrate thermal and electronic functions into the spacecraft's inherent load-bearing capability. In addition, sufficient radiation shielding effectiveness can be provided for the anticipated mission environment. Utilizing this concept, the ratio of electrical functionality to spacecraft volume can be dramatically increased and significant mass savings can be obtained. In this paper, spacecraft electronics are miniaturized using advanced IT applications such as flexible circuitry, miniaturized components, featherweight connectors, and so on, that they can be easily embedded within a structural panel. A sandwich structural panel consists of an aluminum honeycomb core and lightweight CFRP facesheets. Integration of electronics is implemented within the panel by mounting electronics on a multi-layered composite enclosure with multi-materials. This composite enclosure provides a load-bearing, effective thermal conduction, radiation shielding capabilities and an available space for embedding electronics. A series of environmental tests and analyses is carried out to demonstrate that the flight hardware is qualified for the expected mission environments. This approach will be utilized for the advanced small satellite 'STSAT-3' to validate the multi-functional structures concept.

  7. Reconnaissance with slant plane circular SAR imaging.

    PubMed

    Soumekh, M

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a method for imaging from the slant plane data collected by a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) over the full rotation or a partial segment of a circular flight path. A Fourier analysis for the Green's function of the imaging system is provided. This analysis is the basis of an inversion for slant plane circular SAR data. The reconstruction algorithm and resolution for this SAR system are outlined. It is shown that the slant plane circular SAR, unlike the slant plane linear SAR, has the capability to extract three-dimensional imaging information of a target scene. The merits of the algorithm are demonstrated via a simulated target whose ultra wideband foliage penetrating (FOPEN) or ground penetrating (GPEN) ultrahigh frequency (UHF) radar signature varies with the radar's aspect angle. PMID:18285213

  8. Chemical vapor deposition of m-plane and c-plane InN nanowires on Si (100) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Subrina; Han, Lu; Zhao, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, synthesis of indium nitride (InN) nanowires (NWs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is studied. InN NWs were synthesized via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism using high purity indium foil and ammonia as the source materials, and nitrogen as carrier gas. The mixture of nonpolar m-plane oriented and polar c-plane oriented tapered InN NWs is observed grown on top of Si (100) substrate. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) showed that the tips of the NWs are primarily consisted of Au and the rest of the NWs are consisted of indium (In) and nitrogen (N). High resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) revealed that the InN NWs have both triangular and hexagonal cross sections. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) diffraction pattern showed that the NWs are high quality single crystals having wurtzite crystal structure. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) showed the growth directions of the InN NWs with triangular cross section are along <10-10> nonpolar m-plane orientation and the InN NWs with hexagonal cross section are along <0001> polar c-plane orientation.

  9. Attitude analysis in Flatland: The plane truth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuster, Malcolm D.

    1993-01-01

    Many results in attitude analysis are still meaningful when the attitude is restricted to rotations about a single axis. Such a picture corresponds to attitude analysis in the Euclidean plane. The present report formalizes the representation of attitude in the plane and applies it to some well-known problems. In particular, we study the connection of the 'additive' and 'multiplicative' formulations of the differential corrector for the quaternion in its two-dimensional setting.

  10. Signal processing of microbolometer infrared focal-plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junju; Qian, Yunsheng; Chang, Benkang; Xing, Suxia; Sun, Lianjun

    2005-01-01

    A 320×240-uncooled-microbolometer-based signal processing circuit for infrared focal-plane arrays is presented, and the software designs of this circuit system are also discussed in details. This signal processing circuit comprises such devices as FPGA, D/A, A/D, SRAM, Flash, DSP, etc., among which, FPGA is the crucial part, which realizing the generation of drive signals for infrared focal-plane, nonuniformity correction, image enhancement and video composition. The device of DSP, mainly offering auxiliary functions, carries out communication with PC and loads data when power-up. The phase locked loops (PLL) is used to generate high-quality clocks with low phase dithering and multiple clocks are to used satisfy the demands of focal-plane arrays, A/D, D/A and FPGA. The alternate structure is used to read or write SRAM in order to avoid the contradiction between different modules. FIFO embedded in FPGA not only makes full use of the resources of FPGA but acts as the channel between different modules which have different-speed clocks. What's more, working conditions, working process, physical design and management of the circuit are discussed. In software designing, all the function modules realized by FPGA and DSP devices, which are mentioned in the previous part, are discussed explicitly. Particularly to the nonuniformity correction module, the pipeline structure is designed to improve the working frequency and the ability to realize more complex algorithm.

  11. On-chip ADC for infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Chen, Guo-qiang; Wang, Pan; Ding, Rui-jun

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a low power and small area analog-digital converter (ADC) for infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA) readout integrated circuit (ROIC). Successive approximation register (SAR) ADC architecture is used in this IRFPA readout integrated circuit. Each column of the IRFPA shares one SAR ADC. The most important part is the three-level DAC. Compared to the previous design, this three-level DAC needs smaller area, has lower power, and more suitable for IRFPA ROIC. In this DAC, its most significant bit (MSB) sub-DAC uses charge scaling, while the least significant bit (LSB) sub-DAC uses voltage scaling. Where the MSB sub-DAC consists of a four-bit charge scaling DAC and a five-bit sub-charge scaling DAC. We need to put a scaling capacitor Cs between these two sub-DACs. Because of the small area, we have more design methods to make the ADC has a symmetrical structure and has higher accuracy. The ADC also needs a high resolution comparator. In this design the comparator uses three-stage operational amplifier structure to have a 77dB differential gain. As the IR focal plane readout circuit signal is stepped DC signal, the circuit design time without adding the sample and hold circuit, so we can use a DC signal instead of infrared focal plane readout circuit output analog signals to be simulated. The simulation result shows that the resolution of the ADC is 12 bit.

  12. On the relationship between the dynamic behavior and nanoscale staggered structure of the bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qwamizadeh, Mahan; Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Yong Wei

    2015-05-01

    Bone, a typical load-bearing biological material, composed of ordinary base materials such as organic protein and inorganic mineral arranged in a hierarchical architecture, exhibits extraordinary mechanical properties. Up to now, most of previous studies focused on its mechanical properties under static loading. However, failure of the bone occurs often under dynamic loading. An interesting question is: Are the structural sizes and layouts of the bone related or even adapted to the functionalities demanded by its dynamic performance? In the present work, systematic finite element analysis was performed on the dynamic response of nanoscale bone structures under dynamic loading. It was found that for a fixed mineral volume fraction and unit cell area, there exists a nanoscale staggered structure at some specific feature size and layout which exhibits the fastest attenuation of stress waves. Remarkably, these specific feature sizes and layouts are in excellent agreement with those experimentally observed in the bone at the same scale, indicating that the structural size and layout of the bone at the nanoscale are evolutionarily adapted to its dynamic behavior. The present work points out the importance of dynamic effect on the biological evolution of load-bearing biological materials.

  13. Implementation strategy of wafer-plane and aerial-plane inspection for advanced mask manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won-Sun; Chung, Dong-Hoon; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Cho, HanKu; Huang, William; Miller, John; Inderhees, Gregg; Pinto, Becky; Hur, Jiuk; Park, Kihun; Han, Jay

    2009-04-01

    Inspection of aggressive Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) designs, improvement of usable sensitivity, and reduction of cost of ownership are the three major challenges for today's mask inspection methodologies. In this paper we will discuss using aerial-plane inspection and wafer-plane inspection as novel approaches to address these challenges for advanced reticles. Wafer-plane inspection (WPI) and aerial-plane inspection (API) are two lithographic inspection modes. This suite of new inspection modes is based on high resolution reflected and transmitted light images in the reticle plane. These images together with scanner parameters are used to generate the aerial plane image using either vector or scalar models. Then information about the resist is applied to complete construction of the wafer plane image. API reports defects based on intensity differences between test and reference images at the aerial plane, whereas WPI applies a resist model to the aerial image to enhance discrimination between printable and non-printable defects at the wafer plane. The combination of WPI and API along with the industry standard Reticle Plane Inspection (RPI) is designed to handle complex OPC features, improve usable sensitivity and reduce the cost of ownership. This paper will explore the application of aerial-plane and wafer-plane die-to-die inspections on advanced reticles. Inspection sensitivity, inspectability, and comparison with Aerial Imaging Measurement System (AIMSTM[1]) or wafer-print-line will be analyzed. Most importantly, the implementation strategy of a combination of WPI and API along with RPI leading-edge mask manufacturing will be discussed.

  14. Single domain m-plane ZnO grown on m-plane sapphire by radio frequency magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Lin, B H; Liu, W-R; Lin, C Y; Hsu, S T; Yang, S; Kuo, C C; Hsu, C-H; Hsieh, W F; Chien, F S-S; Chang, C S

    2012-10-24

    High-quality m-plane orientated ZnO films have been successfully grown on m-plane sapphire by using radio frequency magnetron sputtering deposition. The introduction of a nanometer-thick, low-temperature-grown ZnO buffer layer effectively eliminates inclusions of other undesirable orientations. The structure characteristics of the ZnO epi-layers were thoroughly studied by synchrotron X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The in-plane epitaxial relationship between ZnO and sapphire follows (0002)(ZnO) [parallel] (112[overline]0)(sapphire) and (112[overline]0)(ZnO) [parallel] (0006)(sapphire) and the ZnO/sapphire interface structure can be described by the domain matching epitaxy along the [112[overline]0](ZnO) direction. The vibrational properties of the films were investigated by polarization dependent micro-Raman spectroscopy. Both XRD and micro-Raman results reveal that the obtained m-ZnO layers are under an anisotropic biaxial strain but still retains a hexagonal lattice. PMID:22989018

  15. INTERIOR OF SECOND FLOOR BRIDGE BETWEEN PLANING MILL AND CAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF SECOND FLOOR BRIDGE BETWEEN PLANING MILL AND CAR MACHINE SHOP, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD PLANING MILL. - Southern Pacific, Sacramento Shops, Planing Mill, 111 I Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  16. GLAMER - II. Multiple-plane gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Margarita; Metcalf, R. Benton; Giocoli, Carlo

    2014-12-01

    We present an extension to multiple planes of the gravitational lensing code GLAMER. The method entails projecting the mass in the observed light-cone on to a discrete number of lens planes and inverse ray-shooting from the image to the source plane. The mass on each plane can be represented as haloes, simulation particles, a projected mass map extracted form a numerical simulation or any combination of these. The image finding is done in a source-oriented fashion, where only regions of interest are iteratively refined on an initially coarse image plane grid. The calculations are performed in parallel on shared memory machines. The code is able to handle different types of analytic haloes (NFW, NSIE, power law, etc.), haloes extracted from numerical simulations and clusters constructed from semi-analytic models (MOKA). Likewise, there are several different options for modelling the source(s) which can be distributed throughout the light-cone. The distribution of matter in the light-cone can be either taken from a pre-existing N-body numerical simulations, from halo catalogues, or are generated from an analytic mass function. We present several tests of the code and demonstrate some of its applications such as generating mock images of galaxy and galaxy cluster lenses.

  17. A Viewpoint on the Quantity "Plane Angle"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Properties of the quantity "plane angle" are explored under the hypothesis that it is a dimensional quantity. The exploration proceeds especially with respect to the physical concept, its mathematical treatment, vector concepts, measurement theory, units of related quantities, engineering pragmatism, and SI. An attempt is made to bring these different relations into a rational, logical and consistent framework, and thus to justify the hypothesis. Various types of vectorial quantities are recognized, and their properties described with an outline of the necessary algebraic manipulations. The concept of plane angle is amplified, and its interdependence with the circular arc is explored. The resulting units of plane angle form a class of similar scales of measurement. Consequences of the confirmed hypothesis are developed for mathematical expressions involving trigonometric functions, rotational volumes and areas, mathematical limits, differentiation and series expansion. Consequences for mechanical rotational quantities are developed, with proposals for revisions to a number of expressions for derived units within SI. A revised definition for the quantity "plane angle" is stated to take account of the developed insights. There is a clear need to reconsider the status of plane angle and some other quantities within the international framework of SI.

  18. Focal Plane Metrology for the LSST Camera

    SciTech Connect

    A Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Hale, Layton; Kim, Peter; Lee, Eric; Perl, Martin; Schindler, Rafe; Takacs, Peter; Thurston, Timothy; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    Meeting the science goals for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) translates into a demanding set of imaging performance requirements for the optical system over a wide (3.5{sup o}) field of view. In turn, meeting those imaging requirements necessitates maintaining precise control of the focal plane surface (10 {micro}m P-V) over the entire field of view (640 mm diameter) at the operating temperature (T {approx} -100 C) and over the operational elevation angle range. We briefly describe the hierarchical design approach for the LSST Camera focal plane and the baseline design for assembling the flat focal plane at room temperature. Preliminary results of gravity load and thermal distortion calculations are provided, and early metrological verification of candidate materials under cold thermal conditions are presented. A detailed, generalized method for stitching together sparse metrology data originating from differential, non-contact metrological data acquisition spanning multiple (non-continuous) sensor surfaces making up the focal plane, is described and demonstrated. Finally, we describe some in situ alignment verification alternatives, some of which may be integrated into the camera's focal plane.

  19. Solid-state curved focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael (Inventor); Jones, Todd (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to curved focal plane arrays. More specifically, the present invention relates to a system and method for making solid-state curved focal plane arrays from standard and high-purity devices that may be matched to a given optical system. There are two ways to make a curved focal plane arrays starting with the fully fabricated device. One way, is to thin the device and conform it to a curvature. A second way, is to back-illuminate a thick device without making a thinned membrane. The thick device is a special class of devices; for example devices fabricated with high purity silicon. One surface of the device (the non VLSI fabricated surface, also referred to as the back surface) can be polished to form a curved surface.

  20. Plane gravitational waves in real connection variables

    SciTech Connect

    Hinterleitner, Franz; Major, Seth

    2011-02-15

    We investigate using plane-fronted gravitational wave space-times as model systems to study loop quantization techniques and dispersion relations. In this classical analysis we start with planar symmetric space-times in the real connection formulation. We reduce via Dirac constraint analysis to a final form with one canonical pair and one constraint, equivalent to the metric and Einstein equations of plane-fronted-with-parallel-rays waves. Because of the symmetries and use of special coordinates, general covariance is broken. However, this allows us to simply express the constraints of the consistent system. A recursive construction of Dirac brackets results in nonlocal brackets, analogous to those of self-dual fields, for the triad variables. Not surprisingly, this classical analysis produces no evidence for dispersion, i.e. a variable propagation speed of gravitational plane-fronted-with-parallel-rays waves.

  1. Turbulent boundary layers over nonstationary plane boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roper, A. T.

    1976-01-01

    Methods of predicting integral parameters and skin-friction coefficients of turbulent boundary layers developing over moving-ground-planes are evaluated using test information from three different wind tunnel facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center. These data include test information from the VSTOL tunnel which is presented for the first time. The three methods evaluated were: (1) relative integral parameter method, (2) relative power law method, and (3) modified law of the wall method. Methods (1) and (2) can be used to predict moving-ground-plane shape factors with an expected accuracy of + or - 10%. They may also be used to predict moving-ground-plane displacement and momentum thicknesses with lower expected accuracy. This decrease in accuracy can be traced to the failure of approximations upon which these methods are based to prove universal when compared with VSTOL tunnel test results.

  2. NASA R and T aerospace plane vehicles: Progress and plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Progress made in key technologies such as materials, structures, aerothermodynamics, hypersonic aerodynamics, and hypersonic airbreathing propulsion are reported. Advances were made in more generic, areas such as active controls, flight computer hardware and software, and interdisciplinary analytical design methodology. These technology advances coupled with the development of and experiences with the Space Shuttle make feasible aerospace plane-type vehicles that meet the more demanding requirements of various DOD missions and/or an all-weather Shuttle II with reduced launch costs. Technology needs and high payoff technologies, and the technology advancements in propulsion, control-configured-vehicles, aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, aerothermal loads, and materials and structures were studied. The highest payoff technologies of materials and structures including thermal-structural analysis and high temperature test techniques are emphasized. The high priority technology of propulsion, and plans, of what remains to be done rather than firm program commitments, are briefly discussed.

  3. Improvements in in-plane electrophoretic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzen, Alex

    2011-03-01

    Electronic paper is now developing fast into an accepted alternative for paper. Its applications nowadays seem focused on books, documents and newspapers. Development of credible color implementations of electrophoretic displays has been initiated, focusing on multi-layer in-plane electrophoresis, but the difficulties associated with these systems (particle drift, aperture, accuracy) were so far not solved. Electro-osmotic principles lead to openings towards multi-layer color displays as well as fast switching, high reflectance grayscale displays. Drift, aperture and accuracy can be brought to the level necessary to create in-plane switching electro-osmotic displays without the need for encapsulation

  4. Hybrid Extrinsic Silicon Focal Plane Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerrenig, D. H.; Meinhardt, T.; Lowe, J.

    1981-02-01

    Large-area focal planes require mechanical assembly techniques which must be compatible with optical alignment, minimum deadspace, and cryogenic requirements in order to achieve optimum performance. Hybrid extrinsic silicon has been found particularly suitable for such an application. It will be shown that by choosing a large-area extrinsic silicon detector array which is hybrid-mated to a multiplicity of multiplexers a very cost-effective and high-density focal plane module can be assembled. Other advantages of this approach are inherent optical alignment and excellent performance.

  5. Horizons and plane waves: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund

    2003-11-06

    We review the attempts to construct black hole/string solutions in asymptotically plane wave spacetimes. First, we demonstrate that geometries admitting a covariantly constant null Killing vector cannot admit event horizons, which implies that pp-waves can't describe black holes. However, relaxing the symmetry requirements allows us to generate solutions which do possess regular event horizons while retaining the requisite asymptotic properties. In particular, we present two solution generating techniques and use them to construct asymptotically plane wave black string/brane geometries.

  6. Note: A novel integrated microforce measurement system for plane-plane contact research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Rostoucher, D.; Gauthier, M.

    2010-11-01

    The evaluation of plane-plane contact force has become a big issue in micro-/nano research, for example in microassembly. However with the lack of effective experimental equipments, the research on plane-plane contact has been limited to theoretical formulations or virtual simulation. In this paper, a microforce sensor and precision parallel robot integrated system is proposed for the microforce measurement of plane-plane contact. In the proposed system, the two objects are fixed on the parallel robot end-platform and the microforce sensor probe tip, respectively, and the high precision robot system is employed to provide six degree-of-freedom motions between both objects. So it is convenient for the microforce measurement between the planar objects with different orientations. As a significant application, the proposed system is utilized for measurements of pull-off force between planar objects, in which the validation of the system is demonstrated in practice. The proposed microforce measurement system is generic, which can be extended to a variety of microforce measurements in plane-plane contact.

  7. Magnetic anisotropy and order structure of L10-FePt(001) single-crystal films grown epitaxially on (001) planes of MgO, SrTiO3, and MgAl2O4 substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, A.; Ono, T.; Hatayama, M.; Tsumura, K.; Kikuchi, N.; Okamoto, S.; Kitakami, O.; Shimatsu, T.

    2014-05-01

    L10-FePt(001) single-crystal films were grown epitaxially on SrTiO3(001), MgAl2O4(001), and MgO(001) substrates. Their uniaxial magnetic anisotropy Ku and the order structure were examined for the film thickness t range of 2-14 nm. All series of films show large Ku of 4 × 107 erg/cm3 in the thickness range higher than 10 nm, with order parameter S of 0.8 and saturation magnetization Ms of 1120 emu/cm3. Ku decreased gradually as t decreased. The Ku reduction was considerable when t decreased from 4 nm to 2 nm. No marked difference in the thickness dependence of Ku was found in any series of films, although the lattice mismatch between FePt and the substrates was markedly different. Ku reduction showed good agreement with the reduction of S for the films on MgAl2O4 and MgO. The Ku ˜ S2 plot showed an almost linear relation, which is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Transmission electron microscopy images for a FePt film on MgO substrate revealed that the lattice mismatch between FePt(001) and MgO(001) was relaxed in the initial 1 or 2 layers of FePt(001) lattices, which is likely to be true also for two other series of films.

  8. In-plane velocity measurement for CFRP modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossi, Richard; Tat, Hong; Gordon, Trey; Stewart, Alan; Lin, John; Djordjevic, Boro

    2012-05-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) laminate composites are often tailored to provide stiffness in particular directions to optimize performance. The standard ultrasonic inspection however uses a cross ply measurement of acoustic attenuation to assess the consolidation quality of the CFRP. While this is useful for porosity, delamination or inclusion detection, it does not address a primary interest in the use of CFRP. A more appropriate measure of the quality of the laminate would be the determination of the in-plane characteristics to evaluate the desired directional stiffness of the product. This paper describes an in-plane ultrasound method using insertion and receiving sensors spaced known distances apart on the surface of the CFRP structure and in a desired directional orientation for evaluation. The time and distance of the transmission of the head wave from the insertion to the sensing allows a velocity calculation. This method is demonstrated using laser generated ultrasound and a pin receiver. Measurement of the in-plane acoustic head wave velocity has been found to correlate to the CFRP material modulus from mechanical tests.

  9. Parameterization of the three-dimensional room transfer function in horizontal plane.

    PubMed

    Bu, Bing; Abhayapala, Thushara D; Bao, Chang-chun; Zhang, Wen

    2015-09-01

    This letter proposes an efficient parameterization of the three-dimensional room transfer function (RTF) which is robust for the position variations of source and receiver in respective horizontal planes. Based on azimuth harmonic analysis, the proposed method exploits the underlying properties of the associated Legendre functions to remove a portion of the spherical harmonic coefficients of RTF which have no contribution in the horizontal plane. This reduction leads to a flexible measuring-point structure consisting of practical concentric circular arrays to extract horizontal plane RTF coefficients. The accuracy of the above parameterization is verified through numerical simulations. PMID:26428827

  10. Current-induced in-plane superconducting transition in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, L. X.; Yurgens, A.; Winkler, D.; Torstensson, M.; Kajiki, K.; Tanaka, I.

    2006-05-01

    In stacks of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) with lateral sizes of several microns, the current is non-uniform in many cases. In certain geometries a significant part of the current flows along the superconducting planes and can reach the critical value. The current-driven superconductivity breakdown within a single Cu2O4 plane can be seen as an extra branch structure of the c-axis current-voltage characteristics. This allows us to deduce the sheet critical current of a single Cu2O4 plane in different measurement configurations. The conditions for the observation of such a current-induced transition in different IJJ geometries are discussed.

  11. How important is the {103} plane of stable Ge2 Sb2 Te5 for phase-change memory?

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Zheng, W T; Kim, J-G; Cui, X Q; Li, L; Qi, J G; Kim, Y-J; Song, S A

    2015-07-01

    Closely correlating with {200} plane of cubic phase, {103} plane of hexagonal phase of Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) plays a crucial role in achieving fast phase change process as well as formation of modulation structures, dislocations and twins in Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5). The behaviors of {103} plane of hexagonal phase render the phase-change memory process as a nanoscale shape memory. PMID:25809085

  12. Some Reflections on Plane Mirrors and Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galili, Igal; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the following questions based on the assumption that students' personal experiences and prior beliefs about plane mirrors can promote interesting discussions: (1) How mirror images are formed? (2) Why doesn't paper behave like a mirror? (3) Does a mirror left-right reverse objects? and (4) Why are corner images of two perpendicular…

  13. Hands-On Discovery of Mirror Planes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Deborah A.; Cortes-Figueroa, Jose E.

    2001-01-01

    In the study of chemical applications of group theory, some students find it difficult to identify the symmetry elements in a simple geometrical figure or molecular model. Suggests that pattern blocks and mirrors can identify mirror planes in geometrical figures to help students construct, develop, and explain concepts of symmetry elements. (ASK)

  14. MTI Focal Plane Assembly Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, M.; Rienstra, J.L.

    1999-06-17

    The focal plane assembly for the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) consists of sensor chip assemblies, optical filters, and a vacuum enclosure. Sensor chip assemblies, composed of linear detector arrays and readout integrated circuits, provide spatial resolution in the cross-track direction for the pushbroom imager. Optical filters define 15 spectral bands in a range from 0.45 {micro}m to 10.7 {micro}m. All the detector arrays are mounted on a single focal plane and are designed to operate at 75 K. Three pairs of sensor chip assemblies (SCAs) are required to provide cross-track coverage in all 15 spectral bands. Each pair of SCAs includes detector arrays made from silicon, iridium antimonide, and mercury cadmium telluride. Read out integrated circuits multiplex the signals from the detectors to 18 separate video channels. Optical filter assemblies defining the spectral bands are mounted over the linear detector arrays. Each filter assembly consists of several filter strips bonded together side-by-side. The MTI focal plane assembly has been integrated with the rest of the payload and has undergone detailed testing and calibration. This paper includes representative test data for the various spectral bands and the overall performance of the focal plane assembly.

  15. Optical interconnections to focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rienstra, J.L.; Hinckley, M.K.

    2000-11-01

    The authors have successfully demonstrated an optical data interconnection from the output of a focal plane array to the downstream data acquisition electronics. The demonstrated approach included a continuous wave laser beam directed at a multiple quantum well reflectance modulator connected to the focal plane array analog output. The output waveform from the optical interconnect was observed on an oscilloscope to be a replica of the input signal. They fed the output of the optical data link to the same data acquisition system used to characterize focal plane array performance. Measurements of the signal to noise ratio at the input and output of the optical interconnection showed that the signal to noise ratio was reduced by a factor of 10 or more. Analysis of the noise and link gain showed that the primary contributors to the additional noise were laser intensity noise and photodetector receiver noise. Subsequent efforts should be able to reduce these noise sources considerably and should result in substantially improved signal to noise performance. They also observed significant photocurrent generation in the reflectance modulator that imposes a current load on the focal plane array output amplifier. This current loading is an issue with the demonstrated approach because it tends to negate the power saving feature of the reflectance modulator interconnection concept.

  16. Spatial Reasoning and Polya's Five Planes Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Sean P.; Diaz, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Middle and High school students of the twenty-first century possess surprising powers of spatial reasoning. They are assisted by technologies not available to earlier generations. Both of these assertions are demonstrated by students who are challenged with George Polya's classic Five Planes Problem. (Contains 5 figures.)

  17. Simple Harmonic Motion in Harmonic Plane Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benumof, Reuben

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the distribution of kinetic and potential energy in transverse and longitudinal waves and examines the transmission of power and momentum. This discussion is intended to aid in understanding the simple harmonic motion of a particle involved in the propagation of a harmonic mechanical plane wave. (HM)

  18. Wafer plane inspection evaluated for photomask production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Emily; Badger, Karen; Lawliss, Mark; Kodera, Yutaka; Azpiroz, Jaione Tirapu; Pang, Song; Zhang, Hongqin; Eugenieva, Eugenia; Clifford, Chris; Goonesekera, Arosha; Tian, Yibin

    2008-10-01

    Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is a novel approach to inspection, developed to enable high inspectability on fragmented mask features at the optimal defect sensitivity. It builds on well-established high resolution inspection capabilities to complement existing manufacturing methods. The production of defect-free photomasks is practical today only because of informed decisions on the impact of defects identified. The defect size, location and its measured printing impact can dictate that a mask is perfectly good for lithographic purposes. This inspection - verification - repair loop is timeconsuming and is predicated on the fact that detectable photomask defects do not always resolve or matter on wafer. This paper will introduce and evaluate an alternative approach that moves the mask inspection to the wafer plane. WPI uses a high NA inspection of the mask to construct a physical mask model. This mask model is used to create the mask image in the wafer plane. Finally, a threshold model is applied to enhance sensitivity to printing defects. WPI essentially eliminates the non-printing inspection stops and relaxes some of the pattern restrictions currently placed on incoming photomask designs. This paper outlines the WPI technology and explores its application to patterns and substrates representative of 32nm designs. The implications of deploying Wafer Plane Inspection will be discussed.

  19. Electrostatic Image Problems with Plane Boundaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terras, Riho; Swanson, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    Considers the electrostatic problem of a point charge in a domain bounded by conducting planes. Lists all such domains for which a solution by images exists, describes the image charge arrays in familiar crystallographic terms, and gives an illustrative example. (Author/GS)

  20. Dual band QWIP focal plane array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Choi, Kwong Kit (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) that provides two-color image sensing. Two different quantum wells are configured to absorb two different wavelengths. The QWIPs are arrayed in a focal plane array (FPA). The two-color QWIPs are selected for readout by selective electrical contact with the two different QWIPs or by the use of two different wavelength sensitive gratings.

  1. Deep-Plane Lipoabdominoplasty in East Asians

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jun-Young; Hong, Yoon Gi; Sim, Hyung Bo; Sun, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to develop a new surgical technique by combining traditional abdominoplasty with liposuction. This combination of operations permits simpler and more accurate management of various abdominal deformities. In lipoabdominoplasty, the combination of techniques is of paramount concern. Herein, we introduce a new combination of liposuction and abdominoplasty using deep-plane flap sliding to maximize the benefits of both techniques. Methods Deep-plane lipoabdominoplasty was performed in 143 patients between January 2007 and May 2014. We applied extensive liposuction on the entire abdomen followed by a sliding flap through the deep plane after repairing the diastasis recti. The abdominal wound closure was completed with repair of Scarpa's fascia. Results The average amount of liposuction aspirate was 1,400 mL (700–3,100 mL), and the size of the average excised skin ellipse was 21.78×12.81 cm (from 15×10 to 25×15 cm). There were no major complications such as deep-vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. We encountered 22 cases of minor complications: one wound infection, one case of skin necrosis, two cases of undercorrection, nine hypertrophic scars, and nine seromas. These complications were solved by conservative management or simple revision. Conclusions The use of deep-plane lipoabdominoplasty can correct abdominal deformities more effectively and with fewer complications than traditional abdominoplasty. PMID:27462568

  2. Microscale out-of-plane anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chang (Inventor); Chen, Jack (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A microscale out-of-plane thermal sensor. A resistive heater is suspended over a substrate by supports raised with respect to the substrate to provide a clearance underneath the resistive heater for fluid flow. A preferred fabrication process for the thermal sensor uses surface micromachining and a three-dimensional assembly to raise the supports and lift the resistive heater over the substrate.

  3. Selective plane illumination microscopy on a chip.

    PubMed

    Paiè, Petra; Bragheri, Francesca; Bassi, Andrea; Osellame, Roberto

    2016-04-26

    Selective plane illumination microscopy can image biological samples at a high spatiotemporal resolution. Complex sample preparation and system alignment normally limit the throughput of the method. Using femtosecond laser micromachining, we created an integrated optofluidic device that allows obtaining continuous flow imaging, three-dimensional reconstruction and high-throughput analysis of large multicellular spheroids at a subcellular resolution. PMID:27030116

  4. Trajectory optimization for the National Aerospace Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ping

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this second phase research is to investigate the optimal ascent trajectory for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) from runway take-off to orbital insertion and address the unique problems associated with the hypersonic flight trajectory optimization. The trajectory optimization problem for an aerospace plane is a highly challenging problem because of the complexity involved. Previous work has been successful in obtaining sub-optimal trajectories by using energy-state approximation and time-scale decomposition techniques. But it is known that the energy-state approximation is not valid in certain portions of the trajectory. This research aims at employing full dynamics of the aerospace plane and emphasizing direct trajectory optimization methods. The major accomplishments of this research include the first-time development of an inverse dynamics approach in trajectory optimization which enables us to generate optimal trajectories for the aerospace plane efficiently and reliably, and general analytical solutions to constrained hypersonic trajectories that has wide application in trajectory optimization as well as in guidance and flight dynamics. Optimal trajectories in abort landing and ascent augmented with rocket propulsion and thrust vectoring control were also investigated. Motivated by this study, a new global trajectory optimization tool using continuous simulated annealing and a nonlinear predictive feedback guidance law have been under investigation and some promising results have been obtained, which may well lead to more significant development and application in the near future.

  5. Towards Dualband Megapixel QWIP Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Hill, C. J.; Rafol, S. B.; Salazar, D.; Woolaway, J.; LeVan, P. D.; Tidrow, M. Z.

    2006-01-01

    Mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) 1024 x 1024 pixel quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal planes have been demonstrated with excellent imaging performance. The MWIR QWIP detector array has demonstrated a noise equivalent differential temperature (NEDT) of 17 mK at a 95 K operating temperature with f/2.5 optics at 300 K background and the LWIR detector array has demonstrated a NEDT of 13 mK at a 70 K operating temperature with the same optical and background conditions as the MWIR detector array after the subtraction of system noise. Both MWIR and LWIR focal planes have shown background limited performance (BLIP) at 90 K and 70 K operating temperatures respectively, with similar optical and background conditions. In addition, we have demonstrated MWIR and LWIR pixel co-registered simultaneously readable dualband QWIP focal plane arrays. In this paper, we will discuss the performance in terms of quantum efficiency, NEDT, uniformity, operability, and modulation transfer functions of the 1024 x 1024 pixel arrays and the progress of dualband QWIP focal plane array development work.

  6. Large Format Multicolor QWIP Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soibel, A.; Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Ting, D. Z.; Hill, C. J.; Nguyen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) multicolor focal plane array (FPA) cameras are essential for many DoD and NASA applications including Earth and planetary remote sensing. In this paper we summarize our recent development of large format multicolor QWIP FPA that cover MWIR and LWIR bands.

  7. Vertical-cavity in-plane heterostructures: Physics and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Taghizadeh, Alireza; Mørk, Jesper; Chung, Il-Sug

    2015-11-02

    We show that in-plane (lateral) heterostructures realized in vertical cavities with high contrast grating reflectors can be used to significantly modify the anisotropic dispersion curvature, also interpreted as the photon effective mass. This design freedom enables exotic configurations of heterostructures and many interesting applications. The effects of the anisotropic photon effective mass on the mode confinement, mode spacing, and transverse modes are investigated. As a possible application, the method of boosting the speed of diode lasers by engineering the photon-photon resonance is discussed. Based on this platform, we propose a system of two laterally coupled cavities, which shows the breaking of parity-time symmetry in vertical cavity structures.

  8. The three-dimensional evolution of a plane wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maekawa, H.; Moser, R. D.; Mansour, N. N.

    1993-01-01

    In the past three decades, linear stability analysis has led to a comprehensive understanding of the linear stages of transition in plane wakes. Our understanding of the nonlinear and turbulent stages is less developed. Nonlinear theory developed by Papageorgiou and Smith was used to study the long-wavelength regime in wakes. The nonlinear and turbulent stages were investigated experimentally, and few numerical studies examined the early nonlinear stages of forced wakes. The evolution of three dimensional disturbances in an incompressible wake is investigated using direct numerical simulations. The instantaneous three-dimaensional structures and corresponding statistics are presented.

  9. Domain faceting in an in-plane magnetic reorientation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Vescovo, E.; Mentes, T.O.; Sadowski, J.T.; Ablett, J.M.; Nino, M.A.; Locatelli, A.

    2010-11-04

    The microscopic structure of the 90{sup o} in-plane magnetic reorientation transition in Fe(110) films is examined using photoemission x-ray microscopy. At the nanoscale, sharp magnetic boundaries are detected. They are indicative of a first-order transition and are consistent with Fe magnetic anisotropy constants. At the micron scale, the magnetic boundary breaks up into triangular patterns whose characteristic angular dependence is revealed by experiments on conical microwedges. This effect, fully accounted by micromagnetic simulations, opens the possibility to control the sharpness of the transition at the microscopic scale.

  10. The effect of temperature on supported dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers: structure and lubrication performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Zander, Thomas; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Chao; Raj, Akanksha; Wieland, D C Florian; Garamus, Vasil M; Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Claesson, Per Martin; Dėdinaitė, Andra

    2015-05-01

    Phospholipids fulfill an important role in joint lubrication. They, together with hyaluronan and glycoproteins, are the biolubricants that sustain low friction between cartilage surfaces bathed in synovial fluid. In this work we have investigated how the friction force and load bearing capacity of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayers on silica surfaces are affected by temperature, covering the temperature range 25-52°C. Friction forces have been determined utilizing the AFM colloidal probe technique, which showed that DPPC bilayers are able to provide low friction forces over the whole temperature interval. However, the load bearing capacity is improved at higher temperatures. We interpret this finding as being a consequence of lower rigidity and higher self-healing capacity of the DPPC bilayer in the liquid disordered state compared to the gel state. The corresponding structure of solid supported DPPC bilayers at the silica-liquid interface has been followed using X-ray reflectivity measurements, which suggests that the DPPC bilayer is in the gel phase at 25°C and 39°C and in the liquid disordered state at 55°C. Well-defined bilayer structures were observed for both phases. The deposited DPPC bilayers were also imaged using AFM PeakForce Tapping mode, and these measurements indicated a less homogeneous layer at temperatures below 37°C. PMID:25596372

  11. Innovative design of composite structures: Design, manufacturing, and testing of plates utilizing curvilinear fiber trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Rust, R. J.; Waters, W. A., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    As a means of improving structural design, the concept of fabricating flat plates containing holes by incorporating curvilinear fiber trajectories to transmit loads around the hole is studied. In the present discussion this concept is viewed from a structural level, where access holes, windows, doors, and other openings are of significant size. This is opposed to holes sized for mechanical fasteners. Instead of cutting the important load-bearing fibers at the hole edge, as a conventional straightline design does, the curvilinear design preserves the load-bearing fibers by orienting them in smooth trajectories around the holes, their loading not ending abruptly at the hole edge. Though the concept of curvilinear fiber trajectories has been studied before, attempts to manufacture and test such plates have been limited. This report describes a cooperative effort between Cincinnati Milacron Inc., NASA Langley Research Center, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University to design, manufacture, and test plates using the curvilinear fiber trajectory concept. The paper discusses details of the plate design, details of the manufacturing, and a summary of results from testing the plates with inplane compressive buckling loads and tensile loads. Comparisons between the curvilinear and conventional straightline fiber designs based on measurements and observation are made. Failure modes, failure loads, strains, deflections, and other key responses are compared.

  12. Respective influence of in-plane and out-of-plane spin-transfer torques in magnetization switching of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timopheev, A. A.; Sousa, R.; Chshiev, M.; Buda-Prejbeanu, L. D.; Dieny, B.

    2015-09-01

    The relative contributions of in-plane (damping-like) and out-of-plane (field-like) spin-transfer torques (STT) in the magnetization switching of out-of-plane magnetized magnetic tunnel junctions (pMTJ) has been theoretically analyzed using the transformed Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation with the STT terms. It is demonstrated that in a pMTJ structure obeying macrospin dynamics, the out-of-plane torque influences the precession frequency, but it does not contribute significantly to the STT switching process (in particular to the switching time and switching current density), which is mostly determined by the in-plane STT contribution. This conclusion is confirmed by finite temperature and finite writing pulse macrospin simulations of the current field switching diagrams. It contrasts with the case of STT switching in in-plane magnetized magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) in which the field-like term also influences the switching critical current. This theoretical analysis was successfully applied to the interpretation of voltage field STT switching diagrams experimentally measured on pMTJ pillars 36 nm in diameter, which exhibit macrospin behavior. The physical nonequivalence of Landau and Gilbert dissipation terms in the presence of STT-induced dynamics is also discussed.

  13. Growth and properties of m-plane GaN on m-plane sapphire by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduano, Qing S.; Weyburne, David W.; Tomich, David H.

    2013-03-01

    A characterization study of heteroepitaxial grown m-plane GaN on m-plane sapphire substrates by MOCVD was undertaken. Using X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence, the growth characteristics and epi-layer properties of m-GaN layers were investigated with special emphasis on the role of AlN buffer layers in preventing unintentional nitridation prior to GaN deposition. Substrate nitridation was found to lead to undesirable crystallographic orientations. In-plane lattice parameters of m-GaN obtained from X-ray reciprocal space mapping indicate anisotropic residual strain is present in these layers even under optimized growth conditions. Compressive and tensile strains were observed along either [0001] or [112¯0] directions, depending on AlN buffer layer conditions and the presence of extended structural defects. In addition, extended structural defects commonly observed in GaN showed a significant effect on stacking fault related luminescence in m-GaN.

  14. Varied line spacing plane holographic grating recorded by using uniform line spacing plane gratings.

    PubMed

    Qing, Ling; Gang, Wu; Bin, Liu; Qiuping, Wang

    2006-07-20

    Uniform line spacing plane gratings are introduced into a recording system to generate aspherical wavefronts for recording varied line spacing plane holographic gratings. Analytical expressions of groove parameters are derived to the fourth order. A ray-tracing validation algorithm is provided based on Fermat's principle and a local search method. The recording parameters are optimized to record a varied line spacing plane holographic grating with the aid of derived analytical expressions. A design example demonstrates the exactness of the analytical expressions and the superiority of recording optics with auxiliary gratings. PMID:16826244

  15. Out-of-plane Block Copolymer Microdomains in High Aspect-Ratio Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadelrab, Karim; Bai, Wubin; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Ross, Caroline

    The use of directed self-assembly DSA of block copolymers BCP proved to be a power approach for nanoscale fabrication. It combines the ability of BCPs to self-assemble into nanoscale features with the use of lithographic tools to create controlled long range order. In addition, BCP with highly incompatible blocks (high Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χ)) offer improvement in resolution, and line edge fluctuations of the self-assembled patterns. Unfortunately, high- χ BCPs usually exhibit large differences in surface affinity between the two blocks, leading to the formation of a surface layer of the lower surface energy block and favoring in-plane orientation of lamellae or cylindrical microdomains. Here, we explore the conditions under which a high χ BCP creates an out-of-plane lamellar structure using functionalized high aspect ratio trenches with preferential walls. We employ the free energy analysis of self-consistent field theory SCFT to identify whether an in-plane or out-of-plane structure is stable for a particular trench width. In addition, we employ the single mode expansion of Ginzburg-Landau free energy expression in the weak segregation limit to analytically construct a phase diagram of the in-plane and out-of-plane lamellae as a function of aspect ratio and surface attraction strength. It is found that achieving an out of plane lamellar structure necessitates a coupling between aspect ratio and surface functionality. In particular, strong side wall attraction results in out-of-plane lamellae when the trench aspect ratio is greater than unity. The results are validated for a lamellar forming polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-b-PDMS) within trenches made using interference lithography.

  16. VAST PLANES OF SATELLITES IN A HIGH-RESOLUTION SIMULATION OF THE LOCAL GROUP: COMPARISON TO ANDROMEDA

    SciTech Connect

    Gillet, N.; Ocvirk, P.; Aubert, D.; Knebe, A.; Yepes, G.; Libeskind, N.; Gottlöber, S.; Hoffman, Y.

    2015-02-10

    We search for vast planes of satellites (VPoS) in a high-resolution simulation of the Local Group performed by the CLUES project, which improves significantly the resolution of previous similar studies. We use a simple method for detecting planar configurations of satellites, and validate it on the known plane of M31. We implement a range of prescriptions for modeling the satellite populations, roughly reproducing the variety of recipes used in the literature, and investigate the occurrence and properties of planar structures in these populations. The structure of the simulated satellite systems is strongly non-random and contains planes of satellites, predominantly co-rotating, with, in some cases, sizes comparable to the plane observed in M31 by Ibata et al. However, the latter is slightly richer in satellites, slightly thinner, and has stronger co-rotation, which makes it stand out as overall more exceptional than the simulated planes, when compared to a random population. Although the simulated planes we find are generally dominated by one real structure forming its backbone, they are also partly fortuitous and are thus not kinematically coherent structures as a whole. Provided that the simulated and observed planes of satellites are indeed of the same nature, our results suggest that the VPoS of M31 is not a coherent disk and that one-third to one-half of its satellites must have large proper motions perpendicular to the plane.

  17. Synchrotron-radiation plane-wave GID topography (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, D. V.; Gog, T.; Griebenow, M.; Materlik, G.

    1995-02-01

    X-ray-diffraction topography is a traditional tool for investigating the real structure of crystals and provides high sensitivity to lattice constant variations with good space resolution. However, recent advances in technology and the growing importance of surface regions of single-crystal and multilayer systems require new approaches to this method, which are made possible by the high brightness and wide tunability of synchrotron radiation. In this work the SR plane-wave grazing-incidence diffraction (GID) topography is discussed as an effective tool for depth-resolved investigations of near-surface defect structures in single crystals and epitaxial layers. The favorable properties of synchrotron radiation enable one to avoid the usual limitations on applicability of this diffraction geometry and investigate all classes of defects in real materials. The experiments were performed at the beamlines ROEMO1 and CEMO of HASYLAB, using double-crystal Ge/asymmetric Si monochromators. The image formation of near-surface dislocations and the effects of refraction on rough surfaces were investigated. Oblique diffraction planes were used to compare the topography in skew incoplanar and coplanar geometries. The latter is shown to be more effective, as it utilizes the wavelength tunability of SR and allows one to vary the diffraction conditions in a wide range from usual highly asymmetric to grazing incidence below the critical angle of total external reflection (and the penetration depth from hundreds to tens of nanometers) without off-plane rotations and provides pictures free of complicated geometrical distortions. The dislocation images at different diffraction conditions proved to be qualitatively the same for near-surface defects, while the structure distortions, produced by the defects in the underlying layers, become invisible at grazing incidence, due to both depth resolution of the method and inevitable loss of lattice-parameter resolution. This might be a

  18. In-plane vibrations of a rectangular plate: Plane wave expansion modelling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arreola-Lucas, A.; Franco-Villafañe, J. A.; Báez, G.; Méndez-Sánchez, R. A.

    2015-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental results for in-plane vibrations of a uniform rectangular plate with free boundary conditions are obtained. The experimental setup uses electromagnetic-acoustic transducers and a vector network analyzer. The theoretical calculations were obtained using the plane wave expansion method applied to the in-plane thin plate vibration theory. The agreement between theory and experiment is excellent for the lower 95 modes covering a very wide frequency range from DC to 20 kHz. Some measured normal-mode wave amplitudes were compared with the theoretical predictions; very good agreement was observed. The excellent agreement of the classical theory of in-plane vibrations confirms its reliability up to very high frequencies

  19. Polar flexoelectric in-plane and out-of-plane switching in bent core nematic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elamain, Omaima; Hegde, Gurumurthy; Komitov, Lachezar

    2016-07-01

    Polar electro-optic response, arising from the coupling between an applied in-plane and out-of-plane dc electric field, respectively, and the flexoelectric polarization of bent core nematic liquid crystal mixtures with hybrid alignment is studied in conventional sandwich cells with homeotropic anchoring at one of the cell substrates and planar at the other. Such a hybrid alignment, however, results in a splay/bend elastic deformation of the nematic giving rise of a flexoelectric polarization. It was found that a pronounced polar electro-optic response, both in-plane and out of plane, took place in the bent core nematic mixtures at very low voltages due to the high flexoelectric polarization in these mixtures, compared with the one observed in calamitic liquid crystals.

  20. The iPTF Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, Eric Christopher; Prince, Thomas A.; Miller, Adam; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Kupfer, Thomas; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank J.; Oded Ofek, Eran; Shupe, David L.; Surace, Jason A.; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in 2013, the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory has conducted a survey of the Northern Galactic Plane. The major science goals of the survey include mapping variable stars throughout the Galaxy; discovering outbursting sources such as Cataclysmic Variables, FU Ori outbursts, and M-dwarf flares; and identifying rare types of compact binaries. Through 2015 the survey has obtained an average of 60 epochs in R-band in the spatial region 0 < l < 150 degrees, |b| < 20 degrees, with greatest coverage in the |b| < 5 degree region.I will describe the performance of the survey and present initial results, with a focus on variability-based identification of X-ray sources. The Zwicky Transient Facility, to begin in 2017, will include an extensive public variability survey of the Galactic Plane.

  1. Teal Amber Visible Focal Plane Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Charles R.; Burczewski, Ron

    1981-12-01

    Deep-space surveillance missions have imposed severe demands on existing technology and simulated the search for new, advanced technology developments to provide higher performance. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) sponsored Teal Amber as a visible charge-coupled device (CCD) and associated focal plane signal processing technology development and demonstration program. This paper describes this large-scale, staring-array-sensor concept. The current state of art in the resulting visibled CCD imagers is specified, along with the focal plane signal processor implementation in low power-weight-volume large-scale integrated (LSI) circuitry. Performance requirements and analytic predictions are compared to demonstration system results from an electro-optical test site in White Sands, New Mexico.

  2. Image-plane processing of visual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Fales, C. L.; Park, S. K.; Samms, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Shannon's theory of information is used to optimize the optical design of sensor-array imaging systems which use neighborhood image-plane signal processing for enhancing edges and compressing dynamic range during image formation. The resultant edge-enhancement, or band-pass-filter, response is found to be very similar to that of human vision. Comparisons of traits in human vision with results from information theory suggest that: (1) Image-plane processing, like preprocessing in human vision, can improve visual information acquisition for pattern recognition when resolving power, sensitivity, and dynamic range are constrained. Improvements include reduced sensitivity to changes in lighter levels, reduced signal dynamic range, reduced data transmission and processing, and reduced aliasing and photosensor noise degradation. (2) Information content can be an appropriate figure of merit for optimizing the optical design of imaging systems when visual information is acquired for pattern recognition. The design trade-offs involve spatial response, sensitivity, and sampling interval.

  3. Intraoperative tracking of aortic valve plane.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D L H; Garreau, M; Auffret, V; Le Breton, H; Verhoye, J P; Haigron, P

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to track the aortic valve plane in intra-operative fluoroscopic images in order to optimize and secure Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) procedure. This paper is focused on the issue of aortic valve calcifications tracking in fluoroscopic images. We propose a new method based on the Tracking-Learning-Detection approach, applied to the aortic valve calcifications in order to determine the position of the aortic valve plane in intra-operative TAVI images. This main contribution concerns the improvement of object detection by updating the recursive tracker in which all features are tracked jointly. The approach has been evaluated on four patient databases, providing an absolute mean displacement error less than 10 pixels (≈2mm). Its suitability for the TAVI procedure has been analyzed. PMID:24110703

  4. Split-field pupil plane determination apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, Joseph T.

    1996-01-01

    A split-field pupil plane determination apparatus (10) having a wedge assembly (16) with a first glass wedge (18) and a second glass wedge (20) positioned to divide a laser beam (12) into a first laser beam half (22) and a second laser beam half (24) which diverge away from the wedge assembly (16). A wire mask (26) is positioned immediately after the wedge assembly (16) in the path of the laser beam halves (22, 24) such that a shadow thereof is cast as a first shadow half (30) and a second shadow half (32) at the input to a relay telescope (14). The relay telescope (14) causes the laser beam halves (22, 24) to converge such that the first shadow half (30) of the wire mask (26) is aligned with the second shadow half (32) at any subsequent pupil plane (34).

  5. The national aero-space plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendez, Bruce

    1988-01-01

    The National Aerospace Plane is an extremely versatile and adaptable aircraft. It can be developed into an Orient Express that would dramatically improve trade with countries in Asia and elsewhere: a commuter transport to ferry men and materials to space, an advanced tactical fighter or bomber, and an unparalleled high altitude spy-plane to observe troubled spots all over the globe. Utilizing the technology developed by this pilot program, it will be possible to quickly and easily get to low Earth orbit, go halfway around the world in a fraction of the time it previously took, and lead the world in the development of advanced technology to improve our lives and the lives of many others.

  6. The crack problem for a nonhomogeneous plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    The plane elasticity problem for a nonhomogeneous medium containing a crack is considered. It is assumed that the Poisson's ratio of the medium is constant and the Young's modulus E varies exponentially with the coordinate parallel to the crack. First the half plane problem is formulated and the solution is given for arbitrary tractions along the boundary. Then the integral equation for the crack problem is derived. It is shown that the integral equation having the derivative of the crack surface displacement as the density function has a simple Cauchy type kernel. Hence, its solution and the stresses around the crack tips have the conventional square root singularity. The solution is given for various loading conditions. The results show that the effect of the Poisson's ratio and consequently that of the thickness constraint on the stress intensity factors are rather negligible.

  7. Crack problem for a nonhomogeneous plane

    SciTech Connect

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-09-01

    This study considers the plane elasticity problem for a nonhomogeneous medium containing a crack. It is assumed that the Poisson's ratio of the medium is constant and the Young's modulus E varies exponentially with the coordinate parallel to the crack. First the half plane problem is formulated and the solution is given for arbitrary tractions along the boundary. Then, the integral equation for the crack problem is derived. It is shown that the integral equation having the derivative of the crack surface displacement as the density function has a simple Cauchy-type kernel. Hence, its solution and the stresses around the crack tips have the conventional square-root singularity. The solution is given for various loading conditions. The results show that the effect of the Poisson's ratio and consequently that of the thickness constraint on the stress intensity factors are rather negligible. 14 references.

  8. The crack problem for a nonhomogeneous plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The plane elasticity problem for a nonhomogeneous medium containing a crack is considered. It is assumed that the Poisson's ratio of the medium is constant and the Young's modulus E varies exponentially with the coordinate parallel to the crack. First the half plane problem is formulated and the solution is given for arbitrary tractions along the boundary. Then the integral equation for the crack problem is derived. It is shown that the integral equation having the derivative of the crack surface displacement as the density function has a simple Cauchy type kernel. Hence, its solution and the stresses around the crack tips have the conventional square root singularity. The solution is given for various loading conditions. The results show that the effect of the Poisson's ratio and consequently that of the thickness constraint on the stress intensity factors are rather negligible.

  9. Wafer plane inspection for advanced reticle defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Rajesh; Ghadiali, Firoz; Kim, Jun; Huang, Tracy; Pang, Song

    2008-05-01

    Readiness of new mask defect inspection technology is one of the key enablers for insertion & transition of the next generation technology from development into production. High volume production in mask shops and wafer fabs demands a reticle inspection system with superior sensitivity complemented by a low false defect rate to ensure fast turnaround of reticle repair and defect disposition (W. Chou et al 2007). Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is a novel approach to mask defect inspection, complementing the high resolution inspection capabilities of the TeraScanHR defect inspection system. WPI is accomplished by using the high resolution mask images to construct a physical mask model (D. Pettibone et al 1999). This mask model is then used to create the mask image in the wafer aerial plane. A threshold model is applied to enhance the inspectability of printing defects. WPI can eliminate the mask restrictions imposed on OPC solutions by inspection tool limitations in the past. Historically, minimum image restrictions were required to avoid nuisance inspection stops and/or subsequent loss of sensitivity to defects. WPI has the potential to eliminate these limitations by moving the mask defect inspections to the wafer plane. This paper outlines Wafer Plane Inspection technology, and explores the application of this technology to advanced reticle inspection. A total of twelve representative critical layers were inspected using WPI die-to-die mode. The results from scanning these advanced reticles have shown that applying WPI with a pixel size of 90nm (WPI P90) captures all the defects of interest (DOI) with low false defect detection rates. In validating CD predictions, the delta CDs from WPI are compared against Aerial Imaging Measurement System (AIMS), where a good correlation is established between WPI and AIMSTM.

  10. Similitude in hydrodynamic tests involving planing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruson, M F

    1936-01-01

    The problems of using models in planing tests are addressed. If one passes from the model to a hull of linear dimensions n times greater, the speeds are connected by the law of mechanical similitude. The normal forces given by the hydrodynamic equations (perfect fluid) also follow the law of dynamic similitude (Reech's method) and are multiplied by n(exp 3). A series of tests were performed and the actual results were compared to theoretical results.

  11. Marine terraces; datum planes for study of structural deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, N.K.

    1975-01-01

    Along the earthquake-prone coastal area of north-central California, geologists are searching for criteria to establish the nature, extent, and rate of crustal movement or deformation that may be related to activity along known or postulated faults. This search has led to a study of marine terraces along the coast between San Francisco and Santa Cruz in the area that is transected by the Seal Cove-San Gregorio-Palo Colorado fault, a branch of the San Andreas fault system. 

  12. NASA's Structure and Evolution of the Universe focal plane directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, P. C.

    2004-01-01

    The SEU theme encompasses an extremely diverse area of space science. Recent roadmapping efforts been devoted to prioritizing science challenges rather than defining all that is contained in the SEU theme. The highest priorities are the Big Bang and a look at Black Holes and the regions near them. To support these challenges the following technologies are of high priority: Cryogenic Systems, Formation Flying, High Performance Optics: Mid- and Far-IR Optics, X-Ray/UV optics, Advanced Detectors: X-ray and Submm/Far IR, Energy resolving detectors and Large Format Arrays. The initiative, Beyond Einstein, includes baseline missions that utilize technologies that are generally at a laboratory proof of concept level. Technology development plans are established for the flagship missions: Con-X and LISA. Conceptual development is still progressing for some Einstein Probe missions. Vision missions are still in conceptual development.

  13. Dynamics of coherent structures in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, Fazle; Moser, R. D.; Colonius, T.; Moin, P.; Rogers, M. M.

    1988-01-01

    An incompressible, time developing 3-D mixing layer with idealized initial conditions was simulated numerically. Consistent with the suggestions from experimental measurements, the braid region between the dominant spanwise vortices or rolls develops longitudinal vortices or ribs, which are aligned upstream and downstream of a roll and produce spanwise distortion of the rolls. The process by which this distortion occurs is explained by studying a variety of quantities of dynamic importance (e.g., production of enstrophy, vortex stretching). Other quantities of interest (dissipation, helicity density) are also computed and discussed. The currently available simulation only allows the study of the early evolution (before pairing) of the mixing layer. New simulations in progress will relieve this restriction.

  14. 26Al Emission Structure Along the Galactic Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, William R.

    1996-01-01

    During the grant period (February 1995 - February 1996), the NU team members worked to analyze the available data. Results of this analysis were presented at the 24(th) international Cosmic Ray Conference held in Rome, Italy, August 28 - September 8, 1995, and at the 1996 meeting of the AAS/High Energy Astrophysics Division held in San Diego, California, April 30 - May 3, 1996. The results were also published in the conference proceedings of the Cosmic Ray Conference. As a result of this work, subsequent proposals have been submitted to continue this effort and to develop enhanced capabilities for OSSE observations of high energy emission.

  15. Direct assessment of structural resistance against pressurized fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzon, G.; Cocchetti, G.

    2003-04-01

    The determination of the load bearing capacity of hydraulic structures such as dams, reservoirs and retaining walls requires the consideration of mixed-mode fracture, possibly driven by the fluid pressure, in correspondence to artificial and natural joints (or cracks, in the latter case). A friction-cohesive softening interface model with coupled degradation of normal and tangential strength is introduced here to account for the essential features of the joint behaviour; its predictive capability is assessed through extensive calculations. Alternative numerical techniques resting on the discrete-crack approach are considered, focusing on simplified approaches for the direct appraisal of the structural resistance. Comparison is made with the results of evolutionary analyses, based on a priori piecewise linearization of the interface model and on exact integration.

  16. In-plane and out-of-plane motions of the human tympanic membrane.

    PubMed

    Khaleghi, Morteza; Cheng, Jeffrey Tao; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J

    2016-01-01

    Computer-controlled digital holographic techniques are developed and used to measure shape and four-dimensional nano-scale displacements of the surface of the tympanic membrane (TM) in cadaveric human ears in response to tonal sounds. The combination of these measurements (shape and sound-induced motions) allows the calculation of the out-of-plane (perpendicular to the surface) and in-plane (tangential) motion components at over 1,000,000 points on the TM surface with a high-degree of accuracy and sensitivity. A general conclusion is that the in-plane motion components are 10-20 dB smaller than the out-of-plane motions. These conditions are most often compromised with higher-frequency sound stimuli where the overall displacements are smaller, or the spatial density of holographic fringes is higher, both of which increase the uncertainty of the measurements. The results are consistent with the TM acting as a Kirchhoff-Love's thin shell dominated by out-of-plane motion with little in-plane motion, at least with stimulus frequencies up to 8 kHz. PMID:26827009

  17. Infrared fiber optic focal plane dispersers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Far infrared transmissive fiber optics as a component in the design of integrated far infrared focal plane array utilization is discussed. A tightly packed bundle of fibers is placed at the focal plane, where an array of infrared detectors would normally reside, and then fanned out in two or three dimensions to individual detectors. Subsequently, the detectors are multiplexed by cryogenic electronics for relay of the data. A second possible application is frequency up-conversion (v sub 1 + v sub 2 = v sub 3), which takes advantage of the nonlinear optical index of refraction of certain infrared transmissive materials in fiber form. Again, a fiber bundle is utilized as above, but now a laser of frequency v sub 1 is mixed with the incoming radiation of frequency v sub 1 within the nonlinear fiber material. The sum, v sub 2 is then detected by near infrared or visible detectors which are more sensitive than those available at v sub 2. Due to the geometrical size limitations of detectors such as photomultipliers, the focal plane dispersal technique is advantageous for imaging up-conversion.

  18. Restoring Aperture Profile At Sample Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J L; Hackel, R P; Lungershausen, A W

    2003-08-03

    Off-line conditioning of full-size optics for the National Ignition Facility required a beam delivery system to allow conditioning lasers to rapidly raster scan samples while achieving several technical goals. The main purpose of the optical system designed was to reconstruct at the sample plane the flat beam profile found at the laser aperture with significant reductions in beam wander to improve scan times. Another design goal was the ability to vary the beam size at the sample to scan at different fluences while utilizing all of the laser power and minimizing processing time. An optical solution was developed using commercial off-the-shelf lenses. The system incorporates a six meter relay telescope and two sets of focusing optics. The spacing of the focusing optics is changed to allow the fluence on the sample to vary from 2 to 14 Joules per square centimeter in discrete steps. More importantly, these optics use the special properties of image relaying to image the aperture plane onto the sample to form a pupil relay with a beam profile corresponding almost exactly to the flat profile found at the aperture. A flat beam profile speeds scanning by providing a uniform intensity across a larger area on the sample. The relayed pupil plane is more stable with regards to jitter and beam wander. Image relaying also reduces other perturbations from diffraction, scatter, and focus conditions. Image relaying, laser conditioning, and the optical system designed to accomplish the stated goals are discussed.

  19. On the Road Map of Vogel's Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkrtchyan, Ruben L.

    2016-01-01

    We define "population" of Vogel's plane as points for which universal character of adjoint representation is regular in the finite plane of its argument. It is shown that they are given exactly by all solutions of seven Diophantine equations of third order on three variables. We find all their solutions: classical series of simple Lie algebras (including an "odd symplectic" one), {D_{2,1,λ}} superalgebra, the line of sl(2) algebras, and a number of isolated solutions, including exceptional simple Lie algebras. One of these Diophantine equations, namely {knm=4k+4n+2m+12,} contains all simple Lie algebras, except so{(2N+1).} Among isolated solutions are, besides exceptional simple Lie algebras, so called {e_{71/2}} algebra and also two other similar unidentified objects with positive dimensions. In addition, there are 47 isolated solutions in "unphysical semiplane" with negative dimensions. Isolated solutions mainly belong to the few lines in Vogel plane, including some rows of Freudenthal magic square. Universal dimension formulae have an integer values on all these solutions at least for first three symmetric powers of adjoint representation.

  20. Focal plane scanner with reciprocating spatial window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Chengye (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A focal plane scanner having a front objective lens, a spatial window for selectively passing a portion of the image therethrough, and a CCD array for receiving the passed portion of the image. All embodiments have a common feature whereby the spatial window and CCD array are mounted for simultaneous relative reciprocating movement with respect to the front objective lens, and the spatial window is mounted within the focal plane of the front objective. In a first embodiment, the spatial window is a slit and the CCD array is one-dimensional, and successive rows of the image in the focal plane of the front objective lens are passed to the CCD array by an image relay lens interposed between the slit and the CCD array. In a second embodiment, the spatial window is a slit, the CCD array is two-dimensional, and a prism-grating-prism optical spectrometer is interposed between the slit and the CCD array so as to cause the scanned row to be split into a plurality of spectral separations onto the CCD array. In a third embodiment, the CCD array is two-dimensional and the spatial window is a rectangular linear variable filter (LVF) window, so as to cause the scanned rows impinging on the LVF to be bandpass filtered into spectral components onto the CCD array through an image relay lens interposed between the LVF and the CCD array.

  1. Hamiltonian maps in the complex plane

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.M.; Percival, I.C.

    1981-01-01

    Following Arnol'd's proof of the KAM theorem, an analogy with the vertical pendulum, and some general arguments concerning maps in the complex plane, detailed calculations are presented and illustrated graphically for the standard map at the golden mean frequency. The functional dependence of the coordinate q on the canonical angle variable theta is analytically continued into the complex theta-plane, where natural boundaries are found at constant absolute values of Im theta. The boundaries represent the appearance of chaotic motion in the complex plane. Two independent numerical methods based on Fourier analysis in the angle variable were used, one based on a variation-annihilation method and the other on a double expansion. The results were further checked by direct solution of the complex equations of motion. The numerically simpler, but intrinsically complex, semipendulum and semistandard map are also studied. We conjecture that natural boundaries appear in the analogous analytic continuation of the invariant tori or KAM surfaces of general nonintegrable systems.

  2. The fundamental plane correlations for globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djorgovski, S.

    1995-01-01

    In the parameter space whose axes include a radius (core, or half-light), a surface brightness (central, or average within the half-light radius), and the central projected velocity dispersion, globular clusters lie on a two-dimensional surface (a plane, if the logarithmic quantities are used). This is analogous to the 'fundamental plane' of elliptical galaxies. The implied bivariate correlations are the best now known for globular clusters. The derived scaling laws for the core properties imply that cluster cores are fully virialized, homologous systems, with a constant (M/L) ratio. The corresponding scaling laws on the half-light scale are differrent, but are nearly identical to those derived from the 'fundamental plane' of ellipticals. This may be due to the range of cluster concentrations, which are correlated with other parameters. A similar explanation for elliptical galaxies may be viable. These correlations provide new empirical constraints for models of globular cluster formation and evolution, and may also be usable as rough distance-indicator relations for globular clusters.

  3. Plane wave facing technique for ultrasonic elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mingu; Shim, Hwan; Cheon, Byeong Geun; Jung, Yunsub

    2014-03-01

    A shear wave generation technique which exploits multiple plane waves facing with each other toward their center line is introduced. On this line, ultrasonic waves interfere constructively resulting two planar shear waves that propagate to the opposite directions parallel to the transducer instead of oblique wave from multiple point focused pushes due to the temporal inconsistency of the pushes. One advantage of the plane wave facing technique over an unfocused push beam is that it generates much larger shear waves because it actively takes advantage of constructive interference between waves and, moreover, a larger number of elements can be used without diffusing the beam pattern. Field II simulated intensity maps of the push beams using the proposed method are presented with those of multiple point focusing and unfocusing techniques for comparison. In the simulation, two plane waves are considered for the simplicity, and the number of elements, apodization, and steering angles for facing are varied as parameters. Also, elasticity images of CIRS 049A phantom are presented using the proposed technique with comb-shaped push beams, i.e. multiple push beams are used simultaneously at different locations. L7-4 transducer is used for the simulation and elasticity imaging.

  4. Geometry of state space in plane Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvitanović, P.; Gibson, J. F.

    A large conceptual gap separates the theory of low-dimensional chaotic dynamics from the infinite-dimensional nonlinear dynamics of turbulence. Recent advances in experimental imaging, computational methods, and dynamical systems theory suggest a way to bridge this gap in our understanding of turbulence. Recent discoveries show that recurrent coherent structures observed in wall-bounded shear flows (such as pipes and plane Couette flow) result from close passes to weakly unstable invariant solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. These 3D, fully nonlinear solutions (equilibria, traveling waves, and periodic orbits) structure the state space of turbulent flows and provide a skeleton for analyzing their dynamics. We calculate a hierarchy of invariant solutions for plane Couette, a canonical wall-bounded shear flow. These solutions reveal organization in the flow's turbulent dynamics and can be used to predict directly from the fundamental equations physical quantities such as bulk flow rate and mean wall drag. All results and the code that generates them are disseminated through through our group's open-source CFD software and solution database Channelflow.org and the collaborative e-book ChaosBook.org.

  5. Tilt plane orientation in antiferroelectric liquid crystal cells and the origin of the pretransitional effect.

    PubMed

    Rudquist, P; Lagerwall, J P F; Meier, J G; D'havé, K; Lagerwall, S T

    2002-12-01

    The optic, electro-optic, and dielectric properties of antiferroelectric liquid crystals (AFLCs) are analyzed and discussed in terms of the local tilt plane orientation. We show that the so-called pretransitional effect is a combination of two different electro-optic modes: the field-induced antiphase distortion of the antiferroelectric structure and the field-induced reorientation of the tilt plane. In the presence of a helix, the latter corresponds to a field-induced distortion of the helix. Both electro-optic modes are active only when the electric field has a component along the tilt plane. Thus, by assuring a horizontal surface-stabilized condition, where the helix is unwound by surface action and the tilt plane is everywhere parallel to the cell plates, the pretransitional effect should be suppressed. We also discuss the dielectrically active modes in AFLCs and under which circumstances they contribute to the measured dielectric permittivity. PMID:12513306

  6. Estimation of vocal fold plane in 3D CT images for diagnosis of vocal fold abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hewavitharanage, Sajini; Gubbi, Jayavardhana; Thyagarajan, Dominic; Lau, Ken; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2015-01-01

    Vocal folds are the key body structures that are responsible for phonation and regulating air movement into and out of lungs. Various vocal fold disorders may seriously impact the quality of life. When diagnosing vocal fold disorders, CT of the neck is the commonly used imaging method. However, vocal folds do not align with the normal axial plane of a neck and the plane containing vocal cords and arytenoids does vary during phonation. It is therefore important to generate an algorithm for detecting the actual plane containing vocal folds. In this paper, we propose a method to automatically estimate the vocal fold plane using vertebral column and anterior commissure localization. Gray-level thresholding, connected component analysis, rule based segmentation and unsupervised k-means clustering were used in the proposed algorithm. The anterior commissure segmentation method achieved an accuracy of 85%, a good estimate of the expert assessment. PMID:26736949

  7. Aerodynamics of flapping insect wing in inclined stroke plane hovering with ground effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda v, Krishne; Vengadesan, S.

    2014-11-01

    This work presents the time-varying aerodynamic forces and the unsteady flow structures of flapping insect wing in inclined stroke plane hovering with ground effect. Two-dimensional dragonfly model wing is chosen and the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically by using immersed boundary method. The main objective of the present work is to analyze the ground effect on the unsteady forces and vortical structures for the inclined stroke plane motions. We also investigate the influences of kinematics parameters such as Reynolds number (Re), stroke amplitude, wing rotational timing, for various distances between the airfoil and the ground. The effects of aforementioned parameters together with ground effect, on the stroke averaged force coefficients and regimes of force behavior are similar in both normal (horizontal) and inclined stroke plane motions. However, the evolution of the vortex structures which produces the effects are entirely different.

  8. Optical-based spectral modeling of infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzali, Salima; Lefebvre, Sidonie; Rommeluère, Sylvain; Ferrec, Yann; Primot, Jérôme

    2016-07-01

    We adopt an optical approach in order to model and predict the spectral signature of an infrared focal plane array. The modeling is based on a multilayer description of the structure and considers a one-dimensional propagation. It provides a better understanding of the physical phenomena occurring within the pixels, which is useful to perform radiometric measurements, as well as to reliably predict the spectral sensitivity of the detector. An exhaustive model is presented, covering the total spectral range of the pixel response. A heuristic model is also described, depicting a complementary approach that separates the different optical phenomena inside the pixel structure. Promising results are presented, validating the models through comparison with experimental results. Finally, advantages and limitations of this approach are discussed.

  9. Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xian-Rong Gog, Thomas; Assoufid, Lahsen; Peng, Ru-Wen; Siddons, D. P.

    2014-11-03

    Based on rigorous dynamical-theory calculations, we demonstrate the principle of an x-ray multiple-beam diffraction (MBD) scheme that overcomes the long-lasting difficulties of high-resolution in-plane diffraction from crystal surfaces. This scheme only utilizes symmetric reflection geometry with large incident angles but activates the out-of-plane and in-plane diffraction processes simultaneously and separately in the continuous MBD planes. The in-plane diffraction is realized by detoured MBD, where the intermediate diffracted waves propagate parallel to the surface, which corresponds to an absolute Bragg surface diffraction configuration that is extremely sensitive to surface structures. A series of MBD diffraction and imaging techniques may be developed from this principle to study surface/interface (misfit) strains, lateral nanostructures, and phase transitions of a wide range of (pseudo)cubic crystal structures, including ultrathin epitaxial films and multilayers, quantum dots, strain-engineered semiconductor or (multi)ferroic materials, etc.

  10. Improving the connection between wood and cement using LBL nanocoating to create a lightweight, eco-friendly structural material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejo, L.; Major, B.; Csoka, L.; Hantos, Z.; Karacsonyi, Zs

    2016-04-01

    Structural elements made out of cement bonded wood may be an excellent alternative to flammable organic bonded composite beams, and CO2 intensive, heavy and nonrenewable reinforced concrete. Unfortunately, preliminary studies showed that a sufficient load-bearing performance is difficult to achieve. Improving the compatibility of cement and wood by LbL nanocoating may be a significant step towards creating viable cement bonded wood load bearing elements. The study involved creating multi layer nanocoating on the surface of poplar veneer using various polyelectrolyte combinations and numbers of treatment cycles, and testing the withdrawal resistance of the samples from a cement matrix. PDDA-PSS treatment was found to form increasingly uniform coating on the surface of wood, while the results were less straightforward for PAH-PSS. Both types and all levels of treatment caused dramatic improvement in load withdrawal resistance. The best result - a more than tenfold improvement - was achieved by at least 10 cycles of PDDA-PSS treatment. PAH-PSS treatment yielded a somewhat more modest improvement, which was already evident after five treatment cycles. The results point to the excellent potential of LbL nanocoating for creating cement bonded structural wood based composite materials.

  11. Symmetrically converging plane thermonuclear burn waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charakhch'yan, A. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2013-10-01

    Five variants of a one-dimensional problem on synchronous bilateral action of two identical drivers on opposite surfaces of a plane layer of DT fuel with the normal or five times greater initial density, where the solution includes two thermonuclear burn waves propagating to meet one another at the symmetry plane, are simulated. A laser pulse with total absorption of energy at the critical density (in two variants) and a proton bunch that provides for a nearly isochoric heating (in three variants) are considered as drivers. A wide-range equation of state for the fuel, electron and ion heat conduction, self-radiation of plasma and plasma heating by α-particles are taken into account. In spite of different ways of ignition, various models of α-particle heat, whether the burn wave remains slow or transforms into the detonation wave, and regardless of way of such a transformation, the final value of the burn-up factor depends essentially on the only parameter Hρ0, where H is the half-thickness of the layer and ρ0 is the initial fuel density. This factor is about 0.35 at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and about 0.7 at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. The expansion stage of the flow (after reflecting the burn or detonation wave from the symmetry plane) gives the main contribution in forming the final values of the burn-up factor and the gain at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and increases them approximately two times at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. In the case of the proton driver, the final value of the gain is about 200 at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and about 2000 at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. In the case of the laser driver, the above values are four times less in conformity with the difference between the driver energies.

  12. Wafer plane inspection with soft resist thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Carl; Shi, Rui-fang; Wihl, Mark; Xiong, Yalin; Pang, Song

    2008-10-01

    Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is an inspection mode on the KLA-Tencor TeraScaTM platform that uses the high signalto- noise ratio images from the high numerical aperture microscope, and then models the entire lithographic process to enable defect detection on the wafer plane[1]. This technology meets the needs of some advanced mask manufacturers to identify the lithographically-significant defects while ignoring the other non-lithographically-significant defects. WPI accomplishes this goal by performing defect detection based on a modeled image of how the mask features would actually print in the photoresist. There are several advantages to this approach: (1) the high fidelity of the images provide a sensitivity advantage over competing approaches; (2) the ability to perform defect detection on the wafer plane allows one to only see those defects that have a printing impact on the wafer; (3) the use of modeling on the lithographic portion of the flow enables unprecedented flexibility to support arbitrary illumination profiles, process-window inspection in unit time, and combination modes to find both printing and non-printing defects. WPI is proving to be a valuable addition to the KLA-Tencor detection algorithm suite. The modeling portion of WPI uses a single resist threshold as the final step in the processing. This has been shown to be adequate on several advanced customer layers, but is not ideal for all layers. Actual resist chemistry has complicated processes including acid and base-diffusion and quench that are not consistently well-modeled with a single resist threshold. We have considered the use of an advanced resist model for WPI, but rejected it because the burdensome requirements for the calibration of the model were not practical for reticle inspection. This paper describes an alternative approach that allows for a "soft" resist threshold to be applied that provides a more robust solution for the most challenging processes. This approach is just

  13. Colostomy with Transversus Abdominis Plane Block.

    PubMed

    Tekelioğlu, Ümit Yaşar; Demirhan, Abdullah; Şit, Mustafa; Kurt, Adem Deniz; Bilgi, Murat; Koçoğlu, Hasan

    2015-12-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is one of the abdominal field block. The TAP block is used for both anaesthetic management and post-operative pain therapy in lower abdominal surgery. TAP block is a procedure in which local anaesthetic agents are applied to the anatomic neurofacial space between the internal oblique and the transversus abdominis muscle. TAP block is a good method for post-operative pain control as well as allows for short operations involving the abdominal area. In this article, a case of colostomy under TAP block is presented. PMID:27366540

  14. National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tank, Ming H.

    1991-01-01

    A program to develop the technology for reusable airbreathing hypersonic/transatmospheric vehicles is addressed. Information on the following topics is presented in viewgraph form: (1) the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program schedule; (2) the NASP program organization; (3) competitive strategy; (4) propulsion options; (5) wind tunnel data available for NASP; (6) ground track of envelope expansion; and (7) altitude vs. Mach number. A NASP/Space Shuttle comparison, NASP configuration matrix, and the propulsion concept of a high speed scramjet are also briefly addressed.

  15. Electrically assisted drop sliding on inclined planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Mannetje, D. J. C. M.; Murade, C. U.; van den Ende, D.; Mugele, F.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that electrowetting using alternating current (ac) voltage can be used to overcome pinning of small drops due to omnipresent heterogeneities on solid surfaces. By balancing contact angle hysteresis with gravity on inclined planes, we find that the critical electrowetting number for mobilizing drops is consistent with the voltage-dependent reduction in contact angle hysteresis in ac electrowetting. Moreover, the terminal velocity of sliding drops under ac electrowetting is found to increase linearly with the electrowetting number. Based on this effect, we present a prototype of a wiper-free windscreen.

  16. Brane webs and O5-planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafrir, Gabi

    2016-03-01

    We explore the properties of five-dimensional supersymmetric gauge theories living on 5-brane webs in orientifold 5-plane backgrounds. This allows constructing quiver gauge theories with alternating USp(2 N) and SO(N) gauge groups with fundamental matter, and thus leads to the existence of new 5 d fixed point theories. The web description can be further used to study non-perturbative phenomena such as enhancement of symmetry and duality. We further suggest that one can use these systems to engineer 5 d SO group with spinor matter. We present evidence for this claim.

  17. The quasar mass-luminosity plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Charles Louis

    2010-11-01

    This thesis investigates the quasar mass-luminosity plane, as a new tool to explore the relationship between black hole mass and quasar luminosity over time. Previous techniques used quasar luminosity function and mass functions, which are one-dimensional projections of the mass-luminosity plane. The M --- L plane contains information that cannot be seen in these projections. We use 62,185 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR5 sample to develop several new constraints on quasar accretion. Black hole masses, based on the widths of their Hbeta, Mg II, and C IV lines and adjacent continuum luminosities, were used assuming using standard virial mass estimate scaling laws. In each redshift interval over the range 0.2 < z < 4.0, low-mass quasars reach at their Eddington luminosity, but high-mass quasars fall short, even by a factor of ten or more at 0.2 < z < 0.6. We examine several potential sources of measurement uncertainty or bias and show that none of them can account for this effect. We also show the statistical uncertainty in virial mass estimation to have an upper bound of ˜ 0.2 dex, smaller than the 0.4 dex previously reported. The maximum mass of quasars at each redshift is sharp and evolving. High-mass black holes turn off their luminous accretion at higher redshift than lower-mass black holes. Further, turnoff for quasars at any given mass is synchronized to within 0.7--3 Gyr, tighter than would be expected given the dynamics of their host galaxies. We find potential signatures of the quasar turnoff mechanism, including a dearth of high-mass quasars at low Eddington ratio, low CIV/MgII emission line ratio, and a red spectral tilt. Finally, we use these new constraints to analyze models for the evolution of individual quasars over time. We find a restricted family of tracks that lie within the M --- L plane at all redshifts, suggesting that a single, constant feedback mechanism between all supermassive black holes and their host galaxies might apply

  18. Characterization of DECam focal plane detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, H.Thomas; Angstadt, Robert; Campa, Julia; Cease, Herman; Derylo, Greg; Emes, John H.; Estrada, Juan; Kibik, Donna; Flaugher, Brenna L.; Holland, Steve E.; Jonas, Michelle; /Fermilab /Madrid, CIEMAT /LBL, Berkeley /Argonne /Pennsylvania U.

    2008-06-01

    DECam is a 520 Mpix, 3 square-deg FOV imager being built for the Blanco 4m Telescope at CTIO. This facility instrument will be used for the 'Dark Energy Survey' of the southern galactic cap. DECam has chosen 250 ?m thick CCDs, developed at LBNL, with good QE in the near IR for the focal plane. In this work we present the characterization of these detectors done by the DES team, and compare it to the DECam technical requirements. The results demonstrate that the detectors satisfy the needs for instrument.

  19. Black Plane Solutions and Localized Gravitational Energy

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We explore the issue of gravitational energy localization for static plane-symmetric solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations in 3+1 dimensions with asymptotic anti-de Sitter behavior. We apply three different energy-momentum complexes, the Einstein, Landau-Lifshitz, and Møller prescriptions, to the metric representing this category of solutions and determine the energy distribution for each. We find that the three prescriptions offer identical energy distributions, suggesting their utility for this type of model. PMID:27347499

  20. Crystal-plane-dependent metal-support interaction in Au/TiO2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lichen; Ge, Chengyan; Zou, Weixin; Gu, Xianrui; Gao, Fei; Dong, Lin

    2015-02-21

    Metal-support interactions between Au and TiO2 are studied based on Au/TiO2 catalysts with different TiO2 crystal planes exposed. With ex situ XPS, TEM and in situ DRIFTS, we have investigated the crystal-plane-dependent metal-support interaction effects on the physiochemical properties of Au/TiO2 catalysts. Based on the structural characterization and spectroscopic results, we can observe chemical oscillations (including the electronic structures of Au nanoparticles and the interaction between Au/TiO2 catalysts and CO molecules) during alternate H2 and O2 pre-treatments. Their variation tendencies of oscillations are greatly dependent on the crystal planes of TiO2 and the pre-treatment temperature. Furthermore, their surface and electronic changes after H2 and O2 pre-treatments can be well correlated with their catalytic activities in CO oxidation. Electron-transfer processes across the Au-TiO2 interface are proved to be the origin accounting for their changes after H2 and O2 pre-treatments. The different electronic structures of different TiO2 crystal planes should have relationships with the crystal-plane-dependent metal-support interaction effects in Au/TiO2. PMID:25601595

  1. Preliminary Design and Analysis of an In-plane PRSEUS Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Poplawski, Steven

    2013-01-01

    As part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) program, the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) has been designed, developed and tested. However, PRSEUS development efforts to date have only addressed joints required to transfer bending moments between PRSEUS panels. Development of in-plane joints for the PRSEUS concept is necessary to facilitate in-plane transfer of load from PRSEUS panels to an adjacent structure, such as from a wing panel into a fuselage. This paper presents preliminary design and analysis of an in-plane PRSEUS joint for connecting PRSEUS panels at the termination of the rod-stiffened stringers. Design requirements are provided, the PRSEUS blade joint concept is presented, and preliminary design changes and analyses are carried out to examine the feasibility of the proposed in-plane PRSEUS blade joint. The study conducted herein focuses mainly on the PRSEUS structure on one side of the joint. In particular, the design requirements for the rod shear stress and bolt bearing stress are examined. A PRSEUS blade joint design was developed that demonstrates the feasibility of this in-plane PRSEUS joint concept to terminate the rod-stiffened stringers. The presented design only demonstrates feasibility, therefore, some areas of refinement are presented that would lead to a more optimum and realistic design.

  2. 10. LOWER STATION, FIRST FLOOR, INCLINE PLANE TRCK LOOKING SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. LOWER STATION, FIRST FLOOR, INCLINE PLANE TRCK LOOKING SOUTH SOUTHEAST, UPPER STATION. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  3. 1. VIEW WEST SOUTHWEST, UPPER STATION. INCLINE PLANE TRACK AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW WEST SOUTHWEST, UPPER STATION. INCLINE PLANE TRACK AND LOWER STATION. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  4. 3. INCLINE PLANE CAR INTERIOR, UPPER COMPARTMENT. Monongahela Incline ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INCLINE PLANE CAR INTERIOR, UPPER COMPARTMENT. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  5. 4. VIEW SOUTHWEST, LOWER STATION FRONT, INCLINE PLANE TRACK, UPPER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW SOUTHWEST, LOWER STATION FRONT, INCLINE PLANE TRACK, UPPER STATION. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  6. 5. VIEW SOUTHWEST, LOWER STATION FRONT, INCLINE PLANE TRACK, UPPER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW SOUTHWEST, LOWER STATION FRONT, INCLINE PLANE TRACK, UPPER STATION. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  7. 55. LOOKING EAST FROM HEAD OF PLANE 2 EAST. POWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. LOOKING EAST FROM HEAD OF PLANE 2 EAST. POWER HOUSE AND FLUME VISIBLE TO RIGHT, TAILRACE RUNNING THROUGH CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH. CRADLE TO INCLINED PLANE 3 EAST IS VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND TO LEFT. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  8. 5. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM TOP OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM TOP OF ABUTMENT, FILL CONFIGURATION - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  9. 6. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM MIDSLOPE VICINITY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM MID-SLOPE VICINITY, CUT CONFIGURATION - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  10. 2. VIEW SOUTH, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTH, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON WEST SIDE OF PA ROUTE 56 - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  11. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON WEST SIDE OF PA ROUTE 56 - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  12. PLANING MILL, FIRST FLOOR INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTH. THE LARGE DEVICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PLANING MILL, FIRST FLOOR INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTH. THE LARGE DEVICE IS A WHEEL BORING MACHINE USED DURING THE TIME THIS AREA WAS A WHEEL SHOP. - Southern Pacific, Sacramento Shops, Planing Mill, 111 I Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  13. Plane wave scattering by a thick lossy dielectric half-plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, K.; Aoki, K.

    A solution is obtained for the scattering of a plane wave by a lossy, thick, dielectric half-plane, with a view to applications for calculating the TV electromagnetic wave scattering by a tall building made of concrete. The problem is analytically framed in terms of the incident and scattered electric fields, assuming the polarization in each case to be invariant. Boundary conditions are defined within which Fourier components of the scattered field are calculated. The far-fields were analyzed employing the saddle-point method. Numerical examples for 100 MHz broadcasts are presented, demonstrating a good agreement in the illuminated region between calculations for a lossy dielectric and a perfectly conducting half plane.

  14. Dual-plane ultrasound flow measurements in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, Lars; Nauber, Richard; Burger, Markus; Räbiger, Dirk; Franke, Sven; Eckert, Sven; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-05-01

    An ultrasound measurement system for dual-plane, two-component flow velocity measurements especially in opaque liquids is presented. Present-day techniques for measuring local flow structures in opaque liquids disclose considerable drawbacks concerning line-wise measurement of single ultrasound probes. For studying time-varying flow patterns, conventional ultrasound techniques are either limited by time-consuming mechanical traversing or by the sequential operation of single probes. The measurement system presented within this paper employs four transducer arrays with a total of 100 single elements which allows for flow mapping without mechanical traversing. A high frame rate of several 10 Hz has been achieved due to an efficient parallelization scheme using time-division multiplexing realized by a microcontroller-based electronic switching matrix. The functionality and capability of the measurement system are demonstrated on a liquid metal flow at room temperature inside a cube driven by a rotating magnetic field (RMF). For the first time, the primary and the secondary flow have been studied in detail and simultaneously using a configuration with two crossed measurement planes. The experimental data confirm predictions made by numeric simulation. After a sudden switching on of the RMF, inertial oscillations of the secondary flow were observed by means of a time-resolved measurement with a frame rate of 3.4 Hz. The experiments demonstrate that the presented measurement system is able to investigate complex and transient flow structures in opaque liquids. Due to its ability to study the temporal evolution of local flow structures, the measurement system could provide considerable progress for fluid dynamics research, in particular for applications in the food industry or liquid metal technologies.

  15. Traveling hairpin-shaped fluid vortices in plane Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, K.; Nagata, M.

    2010-11-01

    Traveling-wave solutions are discovered in plane Couette flow. They are obtained when the so-called steady hairpin vortex state found recently by Gibson [J. Fluid Mech. 638, 243 (2009)]10.1017/S0022112009990863 and Itano and Generalis [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 114501 (2009)]10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.114501 is continued to sliding Couette flow geometry between two concentric cylinders by using the radius ratio as a homotopy parameter. It turns out that in the plane Couette flow geometry two traveling waves having the phase velocities with opposite signs are associated with their appearance from the steady hairpin vortex state, where the amplitude of the phase velocities increases gradually from zero as the Reynolds number is increased. The solutions obviously inherit the streaky structure of the hairpin vortex state, but shape preserving flow patterns propagate in the streamwise direction. Other striking features of the solution are asymmetric mean flow profiles and strong quasistreamwise vortices which occupy the vicinity of only the top or bottom moving boundary, depending on the sign of the phase velocity. Furthermore, we find that the pitchfork bifurcation associated with the appearance of the solution becomes imperfect when the flow is perturbed by a Poiseuille flow component.

  16. Mid-callosal plane determination using preferred directions from diffusion tensor images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, André L.; Rittner, Letícia; Lotufo, Roberto A.; Appenzeller, Simone

    2015-03-01

    The corpus callosum is the major brain structure responsible for inter{hemispheric communication between neurons. Many studies seek to relate corpus callosum attributes to patient characteristics, cerebral diseases and psychological disorders. Most of those studies rely on 2D analysis of the corpus callosum in the mid-sagittal plane. However, it is common to find conflicting results among studies, once many ignore methodological issues and define the mid-sagittal plane based on precary or invalid criteria with respect to the corpus callosum. In this work we propose a novel method to determine the mid-callosal plane using the corpus callosum internal preferred diffusion directions obtained from diffusion tensor images. This plane is analogous to the mid-sagittal plane, but intended to serve exclusively as the corpus callosum reference. Our method elucidates the great potential the directional information of the corpus callosum fibers have to indicate its own referential. Results from experiments with five image pairs from distinct subjects, obtained under the same conditions, demonstrate the method effectiveness to find the corpus callosum symmetric axis relative to the axial plane.

  17. Magnetotransport potentials for anisotropic thin films with stripline and ground plane contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yang; Grayson, M.

    2015-01-01

    Superlattice layers in infrared emitters and detectors can be highly anisotropic in their electrical properties, and proper characterization of their in-plane and cross-plane transport can reveal information about the band structure, doping density, impurities, and carrier lifetimes. This work introduces numerical simulation methods for the potential distribution in an anisotropic resistive layer representing a suplerlattice, using both and non-conformal and conformal mapping to simplify the calculation of the potential int he presence of a magnetic field. A shingle strip-line contact is modeled atop the resistive superlattrive layer of interest, which, in turn, contact with a highly conducting back-plane and magnetic field-dependent Neumann boundary conditions at the floating front-plane. To increase cpomputational efficiency, non-conformal an conformal mapping are combined to transform the problem of an intractable infinitely wide anisotropic thin-film smaple to calculable, finite isotropic rectangular shape. The potential calculations introduced here should prove useful for deducing the full conductivity tensor of the superlattice region, including in-plane, cross-plane, and transverse conductivity tensor components.

  18. Characterization of the KATRIN Focal Plane Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodine, Laura; Leber, Michelle; Myers, Allan; Tolich, Kazumi; Vandevender, Brent; Wall, Brandon

    2008-10-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) Experiment is a next generation tritium beta decay experiment designed to measure directly the electron neutrino mass with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV. In the experiment, electrons from tritium decay of a gaseous source are magnetically guided through analyzing solenoidal retarding electrostatic spectrometers and detected via a focal plane detector. The focal plane detector is a 90mm diameter, 500 micron thick monolithic silicon pin-diode array with 148 pixels. The diode contacts have a titanium nitride overlayer and are connected to preamplifiers via an array of spring-loaded pogo pins. This novel connection scheme minimizes backgrounds from radioactive materials near the detector, facilitates characterization and replacement of the detector wafer, but requires a unique mounting design. The force of the pins strains the silicon, possibly altering the detector properties and performance. Results on the mechanical, thermal and electrical performance of a prototype detector under stress from pogo pin readouts will be presented.

  19. A jumping cylinder on an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, R. W.; Hernández-Gómez, J. J.; Marquina, V.

    2012-09-01

    The problem of a cylinder of mass m and radius r, with its centre of mass out of the cylinder’s axis, rolling on an inclined plane that makes an angle α with respect to the horizontal, is analysed. The equation of motion is partially solved to obtain the site where the cylinder loses contact with the inclined plane (jumps). Several simplifications are made: the analysed system consists of an homogeneous disc with a one-dimensional straight line mass parallel to the disc axis at a distance y < r of the centre of the cylinder. To compare our results with experimental data, we use a styrofoam cylinder to which a long brass rod is embedded parallel to the disc axis at a distance y < r from it, so the centre of mass lies at a distance d from the centre of the cylinder. Then the disc rolls without slipping on a long wooden ramp inclined at 15°, 30° and 45° with respect to the horizontal. To determine the jumping site, the movements are recorded with a high-speed video camera (Casio EX ZR100) at 240 and 480 frames per second. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical predictions.

  20. Plane wave imaging using phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno

    2014-02-01

    Phased arrays are often used for rapid inspections. Phased arrays can be used to synthesize different wave fronts. For imaging, focused wave fronts are frequently used. In order to build an image, the phased array has to be fired multiple times at the same location. Alternatively, different data acquisition configurations can be designed in combination with an imaging algorithm. The objective of this paper is to use the minimal amount of data required to construct an image. If a plane wave is synthesized, the region of interest is illuminated completely. For plane wave synthesis, all elements in the phase array are fired. This ensures a good signal to noise ratio. Imaging can be performed efficiently with a mapping algorithm in the wavenumber domain. The algorithm involves only two Fourier transforms and can therefore be extremely fast. The obtained resolution is comparable to conventional imaging algorithms. This work investigates the potential and limitations of this mapping algorithm on simulated data. With this approach, frame rates of more than 1 kHz can be achieved.