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Sample records for plane wave diffraction

  1. The Uniform geometrical Theory of Diffraction for elastodynamics: Plane wave scattering from a half-plane.

    PubMed

    Djakou, Audrey Kamta; Darmon, Michel; Fradkin, Larissa; Potel, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    Diffraction phenomena studied in electromagnetism, acoustics, and elastodynamics are often modeled using integrals, such as the well-known Sommerfeld integral. The far field asymptotic evaluation of such integrals obtained using the method of steepest descent leads to the classical Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD). It is well known that the method of steepest descent is inapplicable when the integrand's stationary phase point coalesces with its pole, explaining why GTD fails in zones where edge diffracted waves interfere with incident or reflected waves. To overcome this drawback, the Uniform geometrical Theory of Diffraction (UTD) has been developed previously in electromagnetism, based on a ray theory, which is particularly easy to implement. In this paper, UTD is developed for the canonical elastodynamic problem of the scattering of a plane wave by a half-plane. UTD is then compared to another uniform extension of GTD, the Uniform Asymptotic Theory (UAT) of diffraction, based on a more cumbersome ray theory. A good agreement between the two methods is obtained in the far field. PMID:26627800

  2. Effects of missing low-frequency information on ptychographic and plane-wave coherent diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haigang; Xu, Zijian; Zhang, Xiangzhi; Wu, Yanqing; Guo, Zhi; Tai, Renzhong

    2013-04-10

    In coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) experiments, a beamstop (BS) is commonly used to extend the exposure time of the charge-coupled detector and obtain high-angle diffraction signals. However, the negative effect of a large BS is also evident, causing low-frequency signals to be missed and making CDI reconstruction unstable or causing it to fail. We performed a systematic simulation investigation of the effects of BSs on the quality of reconstructed images from both plane-wave and ptychographic CDI (PCDI). For the same imaging quality, we found that ptychography can tolerate BSs that are at least 20 times larger than those for plane-wave CDI. For PCDI, a larger overlap ratio and a smaller illumination spot can significantly increase the imaging robustness to the negative influence of BSs. Our results provide guidelines for the usage of BSs in CDI, especially in PCDI experiments, which can help to further improve the spatial resolution of PCDI. PMID:23670772

  3. Plane Wave Diffraction by a Finite Plate with Impedance Boundary Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Rab; Ayub, Muhammad; Javaid, Akmal

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have examined a plane wave diffraction problem by a finite plate having different impedance boundaries. The Fourier transforms were used to reduce the governing problem into simultaneous Wiener-Hopf equations which are then solved using the standard Wiener-Hopf procedure. Afterwards the separated and interacted fields were developed asymptotically by using inverse Fourier transform and the modified stationary phase method. Detailed graphical analysis was also made for various physical parameters we were interested in. PMID:24755624

  4. Wave diffraction by a half-plane with an obstacle perpendicular to the boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, L. P.; Kapanadze, D.

    We prove the unique existence of solutions for different types of boundary value problems of wave diffraction by a half-plane with a screen or a crack perpendicular to the boundary. Representations of the solutions are also obtained upon the consideration of some associated operators. This is done in a Bessel potential spaces framework and for complex (non-real) wave numbers. The investigation is mostly based on the construction of explicit operator relations, the potential method, and a factorization technique for a certain class of oscillating Fourier symbols which naturally arise from the problems.

  5. Plane-wave Fresnel diffraction by elliptic apertures: a Fourier-based approach.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Riccardo

    2014-10-01

    A simple theoretical approach to evaluate the scalar wavefield, produced, within paraxial approximation, by the diffraction of monochromatic plane waves impinging on elliptic apertures or obstacles is presented. We find that the diffracted field can be mathematically described in terms of a Fourier series with respect to an angular variable suitably related to the elliptic parametrization of the observation plane. The convergence features of such Fourier series are analyzed, and a priori truncation criterion is also proposed. Two-dimensional maps of the optical intensity diffraction patterns are then numerically generated and compared, at a visual level, with several experimental pictures produced in the past. The last part of this work is devoted to carrying out an analytical investigation of the diffracted field along the ellipse axis. A uniform approximation is derived on applying a method originally developed by Schwarzschild, and an asymptotic estimate, valid in the limit of small eccentricities, is also obtained via the Maggi-Rubinowicz boundary wave theory. PMID:25401234

  6. Plane-wave diffraction at the periodically corrugated boundary of vacuum and a negative-phase-velocity material.

    PubMed

    Depine, Ricardo A; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2004-05-01

    Considering the diffraction of a plane wave by a periodically corrugated half-space, we show that the transformation of the refracting medium from positive (negative) phase velocity to negative (positive) phase velocity type has an influence on the diffraction efficiencies. This effect increases with increasing corrugation depth, owing to the presence of evanescent waves in the troughs of the corrugated interface. PMID:15244981

  7. Scalar problem of plane wave diffraction by a system of nonintersecting screens and inhomogeneous bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedik, M. Yu.; Smirnov, Yu. G.; Tsupak, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    The scalar problem of plane wave diffraction by a system of bodies and infinitely thin screens is considered in a quasi-classical formulation. The solution is sought in the classical sense but is defined not in the entire space ℝ3 but rather everywhere except for the screen edges. The original boundary value problem for the Helmholtz equation is reduced to a system of weakly singular integral equations in the regions occupied by the bodies and on the screen surfaces. The equivalence of the integral and differential formulations is proven, and the solvability of the system in the Sobolev spaces is established. The integral equations are approximately solved by the Bubnov-Galerkin method. The convergence of the method is proved, its software implementation is described, and numerical results are presented.

  8. Scattering and diffraction of plane SH-waves by periodically distributed canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Zhenning; Liang, Jianwen; Zhang, Yanju

    2016-06-01

    A new method is presented to study the scattering and diffraction of plane SH-waves by periodically distributed canyons in a layered half-space. This method uses the indirect boundary element method combined with Green's functions of uniformly distributed loads acting on periodically distributed inclined lines. The periodicity feature of the canyons is exploited to limit the discretization effort to a single canyon, which avoids errors induced by the truncation of the infinite boundary, and the computational complexity and the demand on memory can be significantly reduced. Furthermore, the total wave fields are decomposed into the free field and scattered field in the process of calculation, which means that the method has definite physical meaning. The implementation of the method is described in detail and its accuracy is verified. Parametric studies are performed in the frequency domain by taking periodically distributed canyons of semi-circular and semi-elliptic cross-sections as examples. Numerical results show that the dynamic responses of periodically distributed canyons can be quite different from those for a single canyon and significant dynamic interactions exist between the canyons.

  9. A rigorous theoretical model of guided waves excitation in a plane dielectric layer under electromagnetic diffraction by a conducting strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdyuk, Vladimir M.; Titovitsky, Joseph A.

    2014-06-01

    An exact solution of two-dimensional problem of plane electromagnetic wave scattering by a perfectly conducting strip in the presence of a parallel plane dielectric layer is presented. The given solution is constructed using the mode-matching technique in the form of diffraction integrals over propagation parameter, i.e. in the form of superposition of a large number of homogeneous and inhomogeneous plane waves with continuous spectrum of spatial frequencies. These integrals have poles, which are caused by the presence of a transparent dielectric layer and correspond to its waveguide modes. Because of this, diffraction integrals need the procedure of regularization with explicit extraction of pole terms and smoothing of integrands, whereupon the residual diffraction integrals are computed using simple numerical methods. They describe usual scattered field of a bounded obstacle, which is determined by regularized diffraction integrals and decreases in all directions from an obstacle. Besides, the total diffraction field contains a discrete finite sum of waveguide fields of guided modes of a plane dielectric layer, which correspond to the extracted pole terms of initial diffraction integrals. These fields correspond to pairs of guided waves, which move apart from the region of their excitation near a strip, propagating parallel to the boundaries of a layer and conserving finite amplitude at infinity.

  10. Solution of the three-dimensional problem of plane wave diffraction by a two-period plane grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manenkov, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    Using the discrete source method, we develop an algorithm for solving the three-dimensional problem of wave scattering by a plane grating consisting of acoustically soft or acoustically stiff bodies. An efficient algorithm is proposed for determining the periodic Green's function of the grating. Numerical results are obtained for different geometries of the grating elements. The fulfillment of the energy conservation law is verified along with the fulfillment of the boundary condition at the surface of the central grating element.

  11. Diffraction of homogeneous and inhomogeneous plane waves on a doubly corrugated liquid/solid interface.

    PubMed

    Declercq, Nico F; Degrieck, Joris; Briers, Rudy; Leroy, Oswald

    2005-08-01

    This paper extends the theory of the diffraction of sound on 1D corrugated surfaces to 2D corrugated surfaces. Such surfaces, that are egg crate shaped, diffract incoming sound into all polar directions, which is fundamentally different from 1D corrugated surfaces. A theoretical justification is given for extending the classical grating equation to the case of incident inhomogeneous waves, for 1D corrugated surfaces as well as for 2D corrugated surfaces. Even though the present paper presents a theory which is valid for all angles of incidence, special attention is given to the particular case of the stimulation of surface waves by normal incident sound. The most interesting conclusion is that, depending on the frequency and the incident inhomogeneity, Scholte-Stoneley waves and leaky Rayleigh waves can be generated in different directions. This effect might be of particular interest in the development of surface acoustic wave devices and the basic idea of this steering effect can be of importance for planar actuators. PMID:15913694

  12. Solving the problem of electromagnetic wave diffraction at a finite plane grating with small elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyurkchan, A. G.; Manenkov, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Two approaches for solving the three-dimensional problem of wave diffraction at a finite grating consisting of bodies of revolution are proposed. An approximate solution is obtained for a grating with small elements. This solution is applied to consider gratings with a large number of elements. The coincidence of the results obtained by the two methods is shown. The reflection and transmission coefficients are compared for finite and infinite gratings.

  13. High-resolution diffraction microscopy using the plane-wave field of a nearly diffraction limited focused x-ray beam

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yukio; Nishino, Yoshinori; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Kubo, Hideto; Furukawa, Hayato; Mimura, Hidekazu; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Matsubara, Eiichiro; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2009-08-01

    X-ray waves in the center of the beam waist of nearly diffraction limited focused x-ray beams can be considered to have amplitude and phase that are both almost uniform, i.e., they are x-ray plane waves. Here we report the results of an experimental demonstration of high-resolution diffraction microscopy using the x-ray plane wave of the synchrotron x-ray beam focused using Kirkpatrik-Baez mirrors. A silver nanocube with an edge length of {approx}100 nm is illuminated with the x-ray beam focused to a {approx}1 {mu}m spot at 12 keV. A high-contrast symmetric diffraction pattern of the nanocube is observed in the forward far field. An image of the nanocube is successfully reconstructed by an iterative phasing method and its half-period resolution is 3.0 nm. This method does not only dramatically improve the spatial resolution of x-ray microscopy but also is a key technology for realizing single-pulse diffractive imaging using x-ray free-electron lasers.

  14. Interference between Diffraction Radiation and a Scattered Plane Wave as a Possible Source of Information about Properties of a Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feshchenko, A. M.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    We investigate a possibility of an interference of diffraction radiation with a field, originated from scattering of refracted on a non-uniform surface electromagnetic wave in a case of total internal reflection. An effect of the field from fast charged particle and the refracted field on surface inhomogeneities gives rise to emergence of surface polarization currents. Radiation from these currents can be of use in analysis of surface optical features. The opportunity of studying of surface characteristics by means of diffraction radiation and total internal reflection of the electromagnetic wave is discussed in this paper.

  15. Diffraction of a finite-radius plane wave and a Gaussian beam by a helical axicon and a spiral phase plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlyar, Victor V.; Kovalev, Alexey A.; Skidanov, Roman V.; Moiseev, Oleg Yu.; Soifer, Victor A.

    2007-07-01

    We derive what we believe to be new analytical relations to describe the Fraunhofer diffraction of the finite-radius plane wave by a helical axicon (HA) and a spiral phase plate (SPP). The solutions are deduced in the form of a series of the Bessel functions for the HA and a finite sum of the Bessel functions for the SPP. The solution for the HA changes to that for the SPP if the axicon parameter is set equal to zero. We also derive what we believe to be new analytical relations to describe the Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction of the Gaussian beam by a HA are derived. The solutions are deduced in the form of a series of the hypergeometric functions. We have fabricated by photolithography a binary diffractive optical element (a HA with number n=10) able to produce in the focal plane of a spherical lens an optical vortex, which was then used to perform rotation of several polystyrene beads of diameter 5 μm.

  16. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, Stanley P.

    1988-01-01

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

  17. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  18. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. E-polarized plane wave diffraction by an impedance loaded parallel-plate waveguide located in cold plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Tufail A.; Ayub, M.; Jilani, K.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of wall impedances with cold plasma permittivity on an E-polarized electromagnetic signal propagating through a parallel-plate waveguide immersed in a cold plasma have been analyzed. The Helmholtz equation in cold plasma is derived from the model equations. The solution of the Helmholtz equation in cold plasma is determined by Wiener-Hopf technique. From the solution it is observed that the amplitude of the diffracted field decreases with increasing permittivity of the plasma (i.e., by decreasing electron number density (or plasma frequency) or by increasing ion number density). The work presented may be of great importance to quantify the effects of ionosphere plasma on the communicating signals between an Earth station and an artificial satellite in Earth's atmosphere.

  20. Plane waves as tractor beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács, Péter; Lukács, Árpád; Romańczukiewicz, Tomasz

    2013-12-01

    It is shown that in a large class of systems, plane waves act as tractor beams: i.e., an incident plane wave can exert a pulling force on the scatterer. The underlying physical mechanism for the pulling force is due to the sufficiently strong scattering of the incoming wave into another mode carrying more momentum, in which case excess momentum is created behind the scatterer. This tractor beam or negative radiation pressure (NRP) effect, is found to be generic in systems with multiple scattering channels. In a birefringent medium, electromagnetic plane waves incident on a thin plate exert NRP of the same order of magnitude as optical radiation pressure, while in artificial dielectrics (metamaterials), the magnitude of NRP can even be macroscopic. In two dimensions, we study various scattering situations on vortices, and NRP is shown to occur by the scattering of heavy baryons into light leptons off cosmic strings, and by neutron scattering off vortices in the XY model.

  1. Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xian-Rong Gog, Thomas; Assoufid, Lahsen; Peng, Ru-Wen; Siddons, D. P.

    2014-11-03

    Based on rigorous dynamical-theory calculations, we demonstrate the principle of an x-ray multiple-beam diffraction (MBD) scheme that overcomes the long-lasting difficulties of high-resolution in-plane diffraction from crystal surfaces. This scheme only utilizes symmetric reflection geometry with large incident angles but activates the out-of-plane and in-plane diffraction processes simultaneously and separately in the continuous MBD planes. The in-plane diffraction is realized by detoured MBD, where the intermediate diffracted waves propagate parallel to the surface, which corresponds to an absolute Bragg surface diffraction configuration that is extremely sensitive to surface structures. A series of MBD diffraction and imaging techniques may be developed from this principle to study surface/interface (misfit) strains, lateral nanostructures, and phase transitions of a wide range of (pseudo)cubic crystal structures, including ultrathin epitaxial films and multilayers, quantum dots, strain-engineered semiconductor or (multi)ferroic materials, etc.

  2. Plane waves in noncommutative fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, M. C. B.; Holender, L.; Santos, M. A.; Vancea, I. V.

    2013-08-01

    We study the dynamics of the noncommutative fluid in the Snyder space perturbatively at the first order in powers of the noncommutative parameter. The linearized noncommutative fluid dynamics is described by a system of coupled linear partial differential equations in which the variables are the fluid density and the fluid potentials. We show that these equations admit a set of solutions that are monochromatic plane waves for the fluid density and two of the potentials and a linear function for the third potential. The energy-momentum tensor of the plane waves is calculated.

  3. Plane Wave and Coulomb Asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, P. G.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    2004-01-01

    A simple plane wave solution of the Schrödinger Helmholtz equation is a quantum eigenfunction obeying both energy and linear momentum correspondence principles. Inclusion of the outgoing wave with scattering amplitude f obeys unitarity and the optical theorem. By closely considering the standard asymptotic development of the plane wave, we show that there is a problem with angular momentum when we consider forward scattering at the point of closest approach and at large impact parameter given semiclassically by (l + 1/2)/k where l is the azimuthal quantum number and may be large (J Leech et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 257901 (2002)). The problem is resolved via non-uniform, non-standard analysis involving the Heaviside step function, unifying classical, semiclassical and quantum mechanics, and the treatment is extended to the case of pure Coulomb scattering.

  4. Optical Diffraction in Close Proximity to Plane Apertures. II. Comparison of Half-Plane Diffraction Theories

    PubMed Central

    Mielenz, Klaus D.

    2003-01-01

    The accuracy and physical significance of the classical Rayleigh-Sommerfeld and Kirchhoff diffraction integrals are assessed in the context of Sommerfeld’s rigorous theory of half-plane diffraction and Maxwell’s equations. It is shown that the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals are in satisfactory agreement with Sommerfeld’s theory in most of the positive near zone, except at sub-wavelength distances from the screen. On account of the bidirectional nature of diffraction by metallic screens the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals themselves cannot be used for irradiance calculations, but must first be resolved into their forward and reverse components and it is found that Kirchhoff’s integral is the appropriate measure of the forward irradiance. Because of the inadequate boundary conditions assumed in their derivation the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld and Kirchhoff integrals do not correctly describe the flow of energy through the aperture.

  5. Electron diffraction by plasmon waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García de Abajo, F. J.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2016-07-01

    An electron beam traversing a structured plasmonic field is shown to undergo diffraction with characteristic angular patterns of both elastic and inelastic outgoing electron components. In particular, a plasmonic grating (e.g., a standing wave formed by two counterpropagating plasmons in a thin film) produces diffraction orders of the same parity as the net number of exchanged plasmons. Large diffracted beam fractions are predicted to occur for realistic plasmon intensities in attainable geometries due to a combination of phase and amplitude changes locally imprinted on the passing electron wave. Our study opens vistas in the study of multiphoton exchanges between electron beams and evanescent optical fields with unexplored effects related to the transversal component of the electron wave function.

  6. Dynamical Diffraction and X-Ray Standing Waves from Atomic Planes Normal to a Twofold Symmetry Axis of the Quasicrystal AlPdMn

    SciTech Connect

    Jach, T.; Zhang, Y.; Colella, R.; de Boissieu, M.; Boudard, M.; Goldman, A.I.; Lograsso, T.A.; Delaney, D.W.; Kycia, S.

    1999-04-01

    We have observed dynamical diffraction in the 0240{ovr 2}4 and 0460{ovr 4}6 reflections of the icosahedral quasicrystal AlPdMn in the back-reflection geometry ({theta}{sub B}=90{degree} ). The x-ray fluorescence from the Al and Pd atoms exhibits strong standing wave behavior, similar to that observed in crystalline materials. The data indicate a long-range order of each species of atoms, with the coherent positions attributable to distributions of the Al and Pd, which we compare to a centrosymmetric model. We observe deviations from the model which imply small departures from inversion symmetry along the twofold symmetry axis and from the expected coherent fractions for Al. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Electromagnetic diffraction efficiencies for plane reflection diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marathay, A. S.; Shrode, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented of research activities on holographic grating research. A large portion of this work was performed using rigorous vector diffraction theory, therefore, the necessary theory has been included in this report. The diffraction efficiency studies were continued using programs based on a rigorous theory. The simultaneous occurrence of high diffraction efficiencies and the phenomenon of double Wood's anomalies is demonstrated along with a graphic method for determining the necessary grating parameters. Also, an analytical solution for a grating profile that is perfectly blazed is obtained. The performance of the perfectly blazed grating profile is shown to be significantly better than grating profiles previously studied. Finally, a proposed method is described for the analysis of coarse echelle gratings using rigorous vector diffraction that is currently being developed.

  8. Electromagnetic diffraction efficiencies for plane reflection diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marathay, A. S.; Shrode, T. E.

    1974-01-01

    The theory and computer programs, based on electromagnetic theory, for the analysis and design of echelle gratings were developed. The gratings are designed for instruments that operate in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. The theory was developed so that the resulting computer programs will be able to analyze deep (up to 30 wavelengths) gratings by including as many as 100 real or homogeneous diffraction orders. The program calculates the complex amplitude coefficient for each of the diffracted orders. A check on the numerical method used to solve the integral equations is provided by a conservation of energy calculation.

  9. Photoelectron wave function in photoionization: plane wave or Coulomb wave?

    PubMed

    Gozem, Samer; Gunina, Anastasia O; Ichino, Takatoshi; Osborn, David L; Stanton, John F; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-11-19

    The calculation of absolute total cross sections requires accurate wave functions of the photoelectron and of the initial and final states of the system. The essential information contained in the latter two can be condensed into a Dyson orbital. We employ correlated Dyson orbitals and test approximate treatments of the photoelectron wave function, that is, plane and Coulomb waves, by comparing computed and experimental photoionization and photodetachment spectra. We find that in anions, a plane wave treatment of the photoelectron provides a good description of photodetachment spectra. For photoionization of neutral atoms or molecules with one heavy atom, the photoelectron wave function must be treated as a Coulomb wave to account for the interaction of the photoelectron with the +1 charge of the ionized core. For larger molecules, the best agreement with experiment is often achieved by using a Coulomb wave with a partial (effective) charge smaller than unity. This likely derives from the fact that the effective charge at the centroid of the Dyson orbital, which serves as the origin of the spherical wave expansion, is smaller than the total charge of a polyatomic cation. The results suggest that accurate molecular photoionization cross sections can be computed with a modified central potential model that accounts for the nonspherical charge distribution of the core by adjusting the charge in the center of the expansion. PMID:26509428

  10. Diffraction optics for terahertz waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltse, James C.

    2004-09-01

    Conventional lenses are important components for many terahertz applications, but ordinary lenses are very difficult to fabricate for short-focal lengths. Multi-level phase-corrected zoned lens antennas have been investigated with particular application at terahertz wavelengths. These zoned lenses (or diffractive optics) give better performance than ordinary lenses, and because of their planar construction are easier and cheaper to fabricate. The depths of cut needed for a grooved zone plate are quite small, even when materials with low dielectric constants are used. Zoned lenses have been built and tested at various frequencies from 100 GHz to 1.5 THz, with phase correction levels of half-wave, quarter-wave, or eighth-wavelength. The inherent losses in transparent materials increase monotonically over this frequency range. Typical low-loss materials include polystyrene, polyethylene, Teflon, polycarbonate, polystyrene foam, foamed polyethylene, low density polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), TPX, quartz, sapphire, and silicon. Low dielectric-constant materials are normally preferred to reduce reflection and attenuation losses. Techniques for cutting or milling the materials to small dimensions are important, because at 1.0 THz an eighth-wavelength correction for silicon is only 15 μm. Another characteristic of zoned diffraction optics is their frequency behavior. Previous investigations have considered their bandwidth dependence and quasi-periodic extended frequency response for a specified focal length. As frequency changes, the focal point moves along the axis of the zoned lens. An analysis is given to explain this effect.

  11. Double plane wave reverse time migration with plane wave Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Sen, M. K.; Stoffa, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    Reverse time migration (RTM) is effective in obtaining complex subsurface structures from seismic data. By solving the two-way wave equation, RTM can use entire wavefield for imaging. Although powerful computer are becoming available, the conventional pre-stack shot gather RTM is still computationally expensive. Solving forward and backward wavefield propagation for each source location and shot gather is extremely time consuming, especially for large seismic datasets. We present an efficient, accurate and flexible plane wave RTM in the frequency domain where we utilize a compressed plane wave dataset, known as the double plane wave (DPW) dataset. Provided with densely sampled seismic dataset, shot gathers can be decomposed into source and receiver plane wave components with minimal artifacts. The DPW RTM is derived under the Born approximation and utilizes frequency domain plane wave Green's function for imaging. Time dips in the shot profiles can help to estimate the range of plane wave components present in shot gathers. Therefore, a limited number of plane wave Green's functions are needed for imaging. Plane wave Green's functions can be used for imaging both source and receiver plane waves. Source and receiver reciprocity can be used for imaging plane wave components at no cost and save half of the computation time. As a result, the computational burden for migration is substantially reduced. Plane wave components can be migrated independently to recover specific targets with given dips, and ray parameter common image gathers (CIGs) can be generated after migration directly. The ray parameter CIGs can be used to justify the correctness of velocity models. Subsurface anisotropy effects can also be included in our imaging condition, provided with plane wave Green's functions in the anisotropic media.

  12. Aberrations of diffracted wave fields. II. Diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, V N

    2000-12-01

    The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld theory is applied to diffraction of a spherical wave by a grating. The grating equation is obtained from the aberration-free diffraction pattern, and its aberrations are shown to be the same as the conventional aberrations obtained by using Fermat's principle. These aberrations are shown to be not associated with the diffraction process. Moreover, it is shown that the irradiance distribution of a certain diffraction order is the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of the grating aperture as a whole aberrated by the aberration of that order. PMID:11140481

  13. Simple Harmonic Motion in Harmonic Plane Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benumof, Reuben

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the distribution of kinetic and potential energy in transverse and longitudinal waves and examines the transmission of power and momentum. This discussion is intended to aid in understanding the simple harmonic motion of a particle involved in the propagation of a harmonic mechanical plane wave. (HM)

  14. A scattering approach to sea wave diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradini, M. L.; Garbuglia, M.; Maponi, P.; Ruggeri, M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper intends to show a model for the diffraction of sea waves approaching an OWC device, which converts the sea waves motion into mechanical energy and then electrical energy. This is a preliminary study to the optimisation of the device, in fact the computation of sea waves diffraction around the device allows the estimation of the sea waves energy which enters into the device. The computation of the diffraction phenomenon is the result of a sea waves scattering problem, solved with an integral equation method.

  15. Horizons and plane waves: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund

    2003-11-06

    We review the attempts to construct black hole/string solutions in asymptotically plane wave spacetimes. First, we demonstrate that geometries admitting a covariantly constant null Killing vector cannot admit event horizons, which implies that pp-waves can't describe black holes. However, relaxing the symmetry requirements allows us to generate solutions which do possess regular event horizons while retaining the requisite asymptotic properties. In particular, we present two solution generating techniques and use them to construct asymptotically plane wave black string/brane geometries.

  16. A uniform GTD analysis of the EM diffraction by a thin dielectric/ferrite half-plane and related configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojas, Roberto G.

    1985-01-01

    A uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) solution is developed for the problem of the diffraction by a thin dielectric/ferrite half plane when it is excited by a plane, cylindrical, or surface wave field. Both transverse electric and transverse magnetic cases are considered. The solution of this problem is synthesized from the solutions to the related problems of EM diffraction by configurations involving perfectly conducting electric and magnetic walls covered by a dielectric/ferrite half-plane of one half the thickness of the original half-plane.

  17. Plane wave facing technique for ultrasonic elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mingu; Shim, Hwan; Cheon, Byeong Geun; Jung, Yunsub

    2014-03-01

    A shear wave generation technique which exploits multiple plane waves facing with each other toward their center line is introduced. On this line, ultrasonic waves interfere constructively resulting two planar shear waves that propagate to the opposite directions parallel to the transducer instead of oblique wave from multiple point focused pushes due to the temporal inconsistency of the pushes. One advantage of the plane wave facing technique over an unfocused push beam is that it generates much larger shear waves because it actively takes advantage of constructive interference between waves and, moreover, a larger number of elements can be used without diffusing the beam pattern. Field II simulated intensity maps of the push beams using the proposed method are presented with those of multiple point focusing and unfocusing techniques for comparison. In the simulation, two plane waves are considered for the simplicity, and the number of elements, apodization, and steering angles for facing are varied as parameters. Also, elasticity images of CIRS 049A phantom are presented using the proposed technique with comb-shaped push beams, i.e. multiple push beams are used simultaneously at different locations. L7-4 transducer is used for the simulation and elasticity imaging.

  18. An investigation of the diffraction of an acoustic plane wave by a curved surface of finite impedance. Ph.D. Thesis Final Technical Report, 1 Feb. 1985 - 1 Sep. 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearns, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Phenomena associated with long range propagation of sound over irregular topography motivated this work, which was to analyze the diffraction effects which would occur near the tops of hills and ridges. The diffraction of a high frequency plane wave due to its grazing of a two-dimensional curved surface of finite impedance was also studied. Laboratory scale models were constructed and measurements were made of the field on, above, and behind either of two curved surfaces possessing distinctly different impedances; that is, one was soft while the other was hard. The experimental technique consisted of simultaneously measuring the pressure at a reference point and at a field point due to a transient pulse generated by an electric spark. The pressure waveforms were digitized and processed. The ratio of the discrete Fourier transforms of the two waveforms provided an estimate of the insertion loss between them. The results of the measurements were compared with the predictions of a theory which was derived by Pierce using the method of Matched Asymptotic Expansions (MAE). The predictions relied upon the experimental evaluation of the impedance of each surface at grazing angles of incidence. This evaluation was achieved by a fairly standard technique involving empirical models of various generic types of surfaces. An example was shown of the important role that the structural intricacies of a surface play in the determination of an appropriate model. The comparison between the measurements and predictions indicated that the theory gives an excellent description of the field anywhere near a curved surface. Further, with a simple modification, the theory was also shown to give nearly as good of a description of the field surrounding a curved surface even at distances far behind the surface yet near the line of sight.

  19. Rayleigh–Bloch waves along elastic diffraction gratings

    PubMed Central

    Colquitt, D. J.; Craster, R. V.; Antonakakis, T.; Guenneau, S.

    2015-01-01

    Rayleigh–Bloch (RB) waves in elasticity, in contrast to those in scalar wave systems, appear to have had little attention. Despite the importance of RB waves in applications, their connections to trapped modes and the ubiquitous nature of diffraction gratings, there has been no investigation of whether such waves occur within elastic diffraction gratings for the in-plane vector elastic system. We identify boundary conditions that support such waves and numerical simulations confirm their presence. An asymptotic technique is also developed to generate effective medium homogenized equations for the grating that allows us to replace the detailed microstructure by a continuum representation. Further numerical simulations confirm that the asymptotic scheme captures the essential features of these waves. PMID:25568616

  20. Plane gravitational waves in real connection variables

    SciTech Connect

    Hinterleitner, Franz; Major, Seth

    2011-02-15

    We investigate using plane-fronted gravitational wave space-times as model systems to study loop quantization techniques and dispersion relations. In this classical analysis we start with planar symmetric space-times in the real connection formulation. We reduce via Dirac constraint analysis to a final form with one canonical pair and one constraint, equivalent to the metric and Einstein equations of plane-fronted-with-parallel-rays waves. Because of the symmetries and use of special coordinates, general covariance is broken. However, this allows us to simply express the constraints of the consistent system. A recursive construction of Dirac brackets results in nonlocal brackets, analogous to those of self-dual fields, for the triad variables. Not surprisingly, this classical analysis produces no evidence for dispersion, i.e. a variable propagation speed of gravitational plane-fronted-with-parallel-rays waves.

  1. Wave diffraction by a cosmic string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Núñez, Isabel; Bulashenko, Oleg

    2016-08-01

    We show that if a cosmic string exists, it may be identified through characteristic diffraction pattern in the energy spectrum of the observed signal. In particular, if the string is on the line of sight, the wave field is shown to fit the Cornu spiral. We suggest a simple procedure, based on Keller's geometrical theory of diffraction, which allows to explain wave effects in conical spacetime of a cosmic string in terms of interference of four characteristic rays. Our results are supposed to be valid for scalar massless waves, including gravitational waves, electromagnetic waves, or even sound in case of condensed matter systems with analogous topological defects.

  2. Multipole and plane wave expansions of diverging and converging fields.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thanh Xuan; Chen, Xudong; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2014-04-21

    This paper presents and compares two basis systems, spherical harmonics and plane waves, for studying diverging and converging beams in an optical system. We show a similarity between a converging field and the time reversed field of a radiation field. We present and analyze the differences between the Debye-Wolf diffraction integral and the multipole theory for focusing of polarized light. The Debye-Wolf diffraction integral gives a well-known anomalous behavior on the optical axis and at the edge of the focused beam that can be avoided by using the multipole theory. PMID:24787784

  3. Coded Excitation Plane Wave Imaging for Shear Wave Motion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pengfei; Urban, Matthew W.; Manduca, Armando; Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2015-01-01

    Plane wave imaging has greatly advanced the field of shear wave elastography thanks to its ultrafast imaging frame rate and the large field-of-view (FOV). However, plane wave imaging also has decreased penetration due to lack of transmit focusing, which makes it challenging to use plane waves for shear wave detection in deep tissues and in obese patients. This study investigated the feasibility of implementing coded excitation in plane wave imaging for shear wave detection, with the hypothesis that coded ultrasound signals can provide superior detection penetration and shear wave signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) compared to conventional ultrasound signals. Both phase encoding (Barker code) and frequency encoding (chirp code) methods were studied. A first phantom experiment showed an approximate penetration gain of 2-4 cm for the coded pulses. Two subsequent phantom studies showed that all coded pulses outperformed the conventional short imaging pulse by providing superior sensitivity to small motion and robustness to weak ultrasound signals. Finally, an in vivo liver case study on an obese subject (Body Mass Index = 40) demonstrated the feasibility of using the proposed method for in vivo applications, and showed that all coded pulses could provide higher SNR shear wave signals than the conventional short pulse. These findings indicate that by using coded excitation shear wave detection, one can benefit from the ultrafast imaging frame rate and large FOV provided by plane wave imaging while preserving good penetration and shear wave signal quality, which is essential for obtaining robust shear elasticity measurements of tissue. PMID:26168181

  4. Polarization of almost-plane waves.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, C J

    2000-02-01

    The general polarization behavior of almost-plane waves, in which the electric field varies slowly over a circular pupil, is considered, on the basis of an axial Hertz potential treatment and expansion in Zernike polynomials. The resultant modes of a circular aperture are compared with the well-known waveguide (or optical fiber) modes and Gaussian beam modes. The wave can be decomposed into partial waves of electric and magnetic types. The modes for a square pupil are also considered. The particular application of the effect on polarization of focusing the waves is discussed. Another application discussed is the Fresnel reflection from a dielectric interface, it being shown that the Fresnel reflection alters the relative strength of the electric and magnetic components. PMID:10680636

  5. Optics in a nonlinear gravitational plane wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harte, Abraham I.

    2015-09-01

    Gravitational waves can act like gravitational lenses, affecting the observed positions, brightnesses, and redshifts of distant objects. Exact expressions for such effects are derived here in general relativity, allowing for arbitrarily-moving sources and observers in the presence of plane-symmetric gravitational waves. At least for freely falling sources and observers, it is shown that the commonly-used predictions of linear perturbation theory can be generically overshadowed by nonlinear effects; even for very weak gravitational waves, higher-order perturbative corrections involve secularly-growing terms which cannot necessarily be neglected when considering observations of sufficiently distant sources. Even on more moderate scales where linear effects remain at least marginally dominant, nonlinear corrections are qualitatively different from their linear counterparts. There is a sense in which they can, for example, mimic the existence of a third type of gravitational wave polarization.

  6. Exact solution for scalar diffraction between tilted and translated planes using impulse functions over a surface.

    PubMed

    Onural, Levent

    2011-03-01

    The diffraction relation between a plane and another plane that is both tilted and translated with respect to the first one is revisited. The derivation of the result becomes easier when the impulse function over a surface is used as a tool. Such an approach converts the original 2D problem to an intermediate 3D problem and thus allows utilization of easy-to-interpret Fourier transform properties due to rotation and translation. An exact solution for the scalar monochromatic propagating waves case when the propagation direction is restricted to be in the forward direction is presented. PMID:21383808

  7. Plane wave imaging using phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno

    2014-02-01

    Phased arrays are often used for rapid inspections. Phased arrays can be used to synthesize different wave fronts. For imaging, focused wave fronts are frequently used. In order to build an image, the phased array has to be fired multiple times at the same location. Alternatively, different data acquisition configurations can be designed in combination with an imaging algorithm. The objective of this paper is to use the minimal amount of data required to construct an image. If a plane wave is synthesized, the region of interest is illuminated completely. For plane wave synthesis, all elements in the phase array are fired. This ensures a good signal to noise ratio. Imaging can be performed efficiently with a mapping algorithm in the wavenumber domain. The algorithm involves only two Fourier transforms and can therefore be extremely fast. The obtained resolution is comparable to conventional imaging algorithms. This work investigates the potential and limitations of this mapping algorithm on simulated data. With this approach, frame rates of more than 1 kHz can be achieved.

  8. Symmetrically converging plane thermonuclear burn waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charakhch'yan, A. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2013-10-01

    Five variants of a one-dimensional problem on synchronous bilateral action of two identical drivers on opposite surfaces of a plane layer of DT fuel with the normal or five times greater initial density, where the solution includes two thermonuclear burn waves propagating to meet one another at the symmetry plane, are simulated. A laser pulse with total absorption of energy at the critical density (in two variants) and a proton bunch that provides for a nearly isochoric heating (in three variants) are considered as drivers. A wide-range equation of state for the fuel, electron and ion heat conduction, self-radiation of plasma and plasma heating by α-particles are taken into account. In spite of different ways of ignition, various models of α-particle heat, whether the burn wave remains slow or transforms into the detonation wave, and regardless of way of such a transformation, the final value of the burn-up factor depends essentially on the only parameter Hρ0, where H is the half-thickness of the layer and ρ0 is the initial fuel density. This factor is about 0.35 at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and about 0.7 at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. The expansion stage of the flow (after reflecting the burn or detonation wave from the symmetry plane) gives the main contribution in forming the final values of the burn-up factor and the gain at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and increases them approximately two times at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. In the case of the proton driver, the final value of the gain is about 200 at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and about 2000 at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. In the case of the laser driver, the above values are four times less in conformity with the difference between the driver energies.

  9. Synchrotron-radiation plane-wave GID topography (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, D. V.; Gog, T.; Griebenow, M.; Materlik, G.

    1995-02-01

    X-ray-diffraction topography is a traditional tool for investigating the real structure of crystals and provides high sensitivity to lattice constant variations with good space resolution. However, recent advances in technology and the growing importance of surface regions of single-crystal and multilayer systems require new approaches to this method, which are made possible by the high brightness and wide tunability of synchrotron radiation. In this work the SR plane-wave grazing-incidence diffraction (GID) topography is discussed as an effective tool for depth-resolved investigations of near-surface defect structures in single crystals and epitaxial layers. The favorable properties of synchrotron radiation enable one to avoid the usual limitations on applicability of this diffraction geometry and investigate all classes of defects in real materials. The experiments were performed at the beamlines ROEMO1 and CEMO of HASYLAB, using double-crystal Ge/asymmetric Si monochromators. The image formation of near-surface dislocations and the effects of refraction on rough surfaces were investigated. Oblique diffraction planes were used to compare the topography in skew incoplanar and coplanar geometries. The latter is shown to be more effective, as it utilizes the wavelength tunability of SR and allows one to vary the diffraction conditions in a wide range from usual highly asymmetric to grazing incidence below the critical angle of total external reflection (and the penetration depth from hundreds to tens of nanometers) without off-plane rotations and provides pictures free of complicated geometrical distortions. The dislocation images at different diffraction conditions proved to be qualitatively the same for near-surface defects, while the structure distortions, produced by the defects in the underlying layers, become invisible at grazing incidence, due to both depth resolution of the method and inevitable loss of lattice-parameter resolution. This might be a

  10. Boundary diffraction wave integrals for diffraction modeling of external occulters.

    PubMed

    Cady, Eric

    2012-07-01

    An occulter is a large diffracting screen which may be flown in conjunction with a telescope to image extrasolar planets. The edge is shaped to minimize the diffracted light in a region beyond the occulter, and a telescope may be placed in this dark shadow to view an extrasolar system with the starlight removed. Errors in position, orientation, and shape of the occulter will diffract additional light into this region, and a challenge of modeling an occulter system is to accurately and quickly model these effects. We present a fast method for the calculation of electric fields following an occulter, based on the concept of the boundary diffraction wave: the 2D structure of the occulter is reduced to a 1D edge integral which directly incorporates the occulter shape, and which can be easily adjusted to include changes in occulter position and shape, as well as the effects of sources-such as exoplanets-which arrive off-axis to the occulter. The structure of a typical implementation of the algorithm is included. PMID:22772218

  11. Stolt's f-k migration for plane wave ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Damien; Le Tarnec, Louis; Muth, Stéphan; Montagnon, Emmanuel; Porée, Jonathan; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-09-01

    Ultrafast ultrasound is an emerging modality that offers new perspectives and opportunities in medical imaging. Plane wave imaging (PWI) allows one to attain very high frame rates by transmission of planar ultrasound wave-fronts. As a plane wave reaches a given scatterer, the latter becomes a secondary source emitting upward spherical waves and creating a diffraction hyperbola in the received RF signals. To produce an image of the scatterers, all the hyperbolas must be migrated back to their apexes. To perform beamforming of plane wave echo RFs and return high-quality images at high frame rates, we propose a new migration method carried out in the frequency-wavenumber (f-k) domain. The f-k migration for PWI has been adapted from the Stolt migration for seismic imaging. This migration technique is based on the exploding reflector model (ERM), which consists in assuming that all the scatterers explode in concert and become acoustic sources. The classical ERM model, however, is not appropriate for PWI. We showed that the ERM can be made suitable for PWI by a spatial transformation of the hyperbolic traces present in the RF data. In vitro experiments were performed to outline the advantages of PWI with Stolt's f-k migration over the conventional delay-and-sum (DAS) approach. The Stolt's f-k migration was also compared with the Fourier-based method developed by J.-Y. Lu. Our findings show that multi-angle compounded f-k migrated images are of quality similar to those obtained with a stateof- the-art dynamic focusing mode. This remained true even with a very small number of steering angles, thus ensuring a highly competitive frame rate. In addition, the new FFT-based f-k migration provides comparable or better contrast-to-noise ratio and lateral resolution than the Lu's and DAS migration schemes. Matlab codes for the Stolt's f-k migration for PWI are provided. PMID:24626107

  12. Advanced x-ray stress analysis method for a single crystal using different diffraction plane families

    SciTech Connect

    Imafuku, Muneyuki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Sueyoshi, Kazuyuki; Akita, Koichi; Ohya, Shin-ichi

    2008-06-09

    Generalized formula of the x-ray stress analysis for a single crystal with unknown stress-free lattice parameter was proposed. This method enables us to evaluate the plane stress states with any combination of diffraction planes. We can choose and combine the appropriate x-ray sources and diffraction plane families, depending on the sample orientation and the apparatus, whenever diffraction condition is satisfied. The analysis of plane stress distributions in an iron single crystal was demonstrated combining with the diffraction data for Fe{l_brace}211{r_brace} and Fe{l_brace}310{r_brace} plane families.

  13. Scalar wave diffraction from a circular aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Cerjan, C.

    1995-01-25

    The scalar wave theory is used to evaluate the expected diffraction patterns from a circular aperture. The standard far-field Kirchhoff approximation is compared to the exact result expressed in terms of oblate spheroidal harmonics. Deviations from an expanding spherical wave are calculated for circular aperture radius and the incident beam wavelength using suggested values for a recently proposed point diffractin interferometer. The Kirchhoff approximation is increasingly reliable in the far-field limit as the aperture radius is increased, although significant errors in amplitude and phase persist.

  14. Counterpropagating Rossby waves in confined plane wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biancofiore, L.; Gallaire, F.

    2012-07-01

    In the present work, we revisit the temporal and the spatio-temporal stability of confined plane wakes under the perspective of the counterpropagating Rossby waves (CRWs). Within the context of broken line velocity profiles, each vorticity discontinuity can be associated to a counterpropagating Rossby wave. In the case of a wake modeled by a broken line profile, the interaction of two CRWs is shown to originate in a shear instability. Following this description, we first recover the stability results obtained by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 590, 163-185 (2007)], 10.1017/S0022112007007975 and Biancofiore and Gallaire [Phys. Fluids 23, 034103 (2011)], 10.1063/1.3554764 by means of the classical normal mode analysis. In this manner, we propose an explanation of the stabilizing influence of the confinement on the temporal stability properties. The CRW description further allows us to propose a new interpretation of the counterintuitive spatio-temporal destabilization in wake flows at moderate confinement noticed by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 565, 171-195 (2006)], 10.1017/S0022112006001558: it is well predicted by the mean group velocity of the uncoupled CRWs.

  15. Counterpropagating Rossby waves in confined plane wakes

    PubMed Central

    Biancofiore, L.; Gallaire, F.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, we revisit the temporal and the spatio-temporal stability of confined plane wakes under the perspective of the counterpropagating Rossby waves (CRWs). Within the context of broken line velocity profiles, each vorticity discontinuity can be associated to a counterpropagating Rossby wave. In the case of a wake modeled by a broken line profile, the interaction of two CRWs is shown to originate in a shear instability. Following this description, we first recover the stability results obtained by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 590, 163–185 (2007)]10.1017/S0022112007007975 and Biancofiore and Gallaire [Phys. Fluids 23, 034103 (2011)]10.1063/1.3554764 by means of the classical normal mode analysis. In this manner, we propose an explanation of the stabilizing influence of the confinement on the temporal stability properties. The CRW description further allows us to propose a new interpretation of the counterintuitive spatio-temporal destabilization in wake flows at moderate confinement noticed by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 565, 171–195 (2006)]10.1017/S0022112006001558: it is well predicted by the mean group velocity of the uncoupled CRWs. PMID:22865998

  16. Counterpropagating Rossby waves in confined plane wakes.

    PubMed

    Biancofiore, L; Gallaire, F

    2012-07-01

    In the present work, we revisit the temporal and the spatio-temporal stability of confined plane wakes under the perspective of the counterpropagating Rossby waves (CRWs). Within the context of broken line velocity profiles, each vorticity discontinuity can be associated to a counterpropagating Rossby wave. In the case of a wake modeled by a broken line profile, the interaction of two CRWs is shown to originate in a shear instability. Following this description, we first recover the stability results obtained by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 590, 163-185 (2007)]10.1017/S0022112007007975 and Biancofiore and Gallaire [Phys. Fluids 23, 034103 (2011)]10.1063/1.3554764 by means of the classical normal mode analysis. In this manner, we propose an explanation of the stabilizing influence of the confinement on the temporal stability properties. The CRW description further allows us to propose a new interpretation of the counterintuitive spatio-temporal destabilization in wake flows at moderate confinement noticed by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 565, 171-195 (2006)]10.1017/S0022112006001558: it is well predicted by the mean group velocity of the uncoupled CRWs. PMID:22865998

  17. Multiple Plane Phase Retrieval Based On Inverse Regularized Imaging and Discrete Diffraction Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migukin, Artem; Katkovnik, Vladimir; Astola, Jaakko

    2010-04-01

    The phase retrieval is formulated as an inverse problem, where the forward propagation is defined by Discrete Diffraction Transform (DDT) [1], [2]. This propagation model is precise and aliasing free for pixelwise invariant (pixelated) wave field distributions in the sensor and object planes. Because of finite size of sensors DDT can be ill-conditioned and the regularization is an important component of the inverse. The proposed algorithm is designed for multiple plane observations and can be treated as a generalization of the Gerchberg-Saxton iterative algorithm. The proposed algorithm is studied by numerical experiments produced for phase and amplitude modulated object distributions. Comparison versus the conventional forward propagation models such as the angular spectrum decomposition and the convolutional model used in the algorithm of the same structure shows a clear advantage of DDT enabling better accuracy and better imaging.

  18. Plane wave gravitons, curvature singularities and string physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, R. . Center for Theoretical Physics)

    1991-03-21

    This paper discusses bounded (compactifying) potentials arising from a conspiracy between plane wave graviton and dilaton condensates. So are string propagation and supersymmetry in spacetimes with curvature singularities.

  19. Hydroelastic wave diffraction by a vertical cylinder.

    PubMed

    Brocklehurst, Paul; Korobkin, Alexander; Părău, Emilian I

    2011-07-28

    A linear three-dimensional problem of hydroelastic wave diffraction by a bottom-mounted circular cylinder is analysed. The fluid is of finite depth and is covered by an ice sheet, which is clamped to the cylinder surface. The ice stretches from the cylinder to infinity in all lateral directions. The hydroelastic behaviour of the ice sheet is described by linear elastic plate theory, and the fluid flow by a potential flow model. The two-dimensional incident wave is regular and has small amplitude. An analytical solution of the coupled problem of hydroelasticity is found by using a Weber transform. We determine the ice deflection and the vertical and horizontal forces acting on the cylinder and analyse the strain in the ice sheet caused by the incident wave. PMID:21690136

  20. Scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave by a Luneburg lens. II. Wave theory.

    PubMed

    Lock, James A

    2008-12-01

    The partial wave scattering and interior amplitudes for the interaction of an electromagnetic plane wave with a modified Luneburg lens are derived in terms of the exterior and interior radial functions of the scalar radiation potentials evaluated at the lens surface. A Debye series decomposition of these amplitudes is also performed and discussed. The effective potential inside the lens for the transverse electric polarization is qualitatively examined, and the approximate lens size parameters of morphology-dependent resonances are determined. Finally, the physical optics model is used to calculate wave scattering in the vicinity of the ray theory orbiting condition in order to demonstrate the smoothing of ray theory discontinuities by the diffraction of scattered waves. PMID:19037389

  1. Optical Diffraction in Close Proximity to Plane Apertures. I. Boundary-Value Solutions for Circular Apertures and Slits

    PubMed Central

    Mielenz, Klaus D.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the classical Rayleigh-Sommerfeld and Kirchhoff boundary-value diffraction integrals are solved in closed form for circular apertures and slits illuminated by normally incident plane waves. The mathematical expressions obtained involve no simplifying approximations and are free of singularities, except in the aperture plane itself. Their use for numerical computations was straightforward and provided new insight into the nature of diffraction in the near zone where the Fresnel approximation does not apply. The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals were found to be very similar to each other, so that polarization effects appear to be negligibly small. On the other hand, they differ substantially at sub-wavelength differences from the aperture plane and do not correctly describe the diffracted field as an analytical continuation of the incident geometrical field.

  2. Reflectarray Demonstrated to Transform Spherical Waves into Plane Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afrosz J.

    1998-01-01

    The development of low-cost, high-efficiency array antennas has been the research focus of NASA Lewis Research Center's Communications Technology Division for the past 15 years. One area of current interest is reflectarray development. Reflectarrays have generally been used to replace reflector antennas. In this capacity, different configurations (such as prime focus and offset) and various applications (such as dual frequency and scanning) have been demonstrated with great success. One potential application that has not been explored previously is the use of reflectarrays to compensate for phase errors in space-power-combining applications, such as a space-fed lens and power-combining amplifiers. Recently, we experimentally investigated the feasibility of using a reflectarray as an alternative to a dielectric lens for such applications. The experiment involved transforming the spherical waves from an orthomode horn to plane waves at the horn aperture. The reflectarray consists of square patches terminated in open stubs to provide the necessary phase compensation.

  3. Vacuum plane waves: Cartan invariants and physical interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A.; McNutt, D.; Milson, R.

    2012-12-01

    As an application of the Cartan invariants obtained using the Karlhede algorithm, we study a simple subclass of the PP-wave spacetimes, the gravitational plane waves. We provide an invariant classification of these spacetimes and then study a few notable subcases: the linearly polarized plane waves, the weak-field circularly polarized waves, and another class of plane waves found by imposing conditions on the set of invariants. As we study these spacetimes we relate the invariant structure (i.e., Cartan scalars) to the physical description of these spacetimes using the geodesic deviation equations relative to timelike geodesic observers.

  4. Problems of diffraction and propagation of waves (selected articles)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, G. I.; Tikhomirov, N. P.; Vyatkin, V. M.

    1984-07-01

    The first particle presented concerns the Tropospheric Refraction or radio waves, or more specifically, direct and inverse problems of diffraction on the impedance sphere of a large radius. The exponential profile, which is a precise approximation of the regular component of the atmospheric heterogeneity of the Earth, is selected. Concerning tropospheric refraction, different profiles were studied: bilinear; exponential; and the more general profiles. The second article concerns the refinement of Booker's equation for cylindrical layered inhomogeneous anisotropic media. Booker's equation was originally derived for the case of plane layered anisotropic medium. It is necessary to refine Booker's equation considering the final curvature and terrestrial magnetic field of the modified ionosphere. It was found that the values of the roots of Booker's equation decrease in comparison with the flat plane case, and the effect of final curvature of the ionosphere and magnetic bump of the Earth on the height is manifested such that WKB approximation is inapplicable.

  5. The plain truth about forming a plane wave of neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagh, Apoorva G.; Abbas, Sohrab; Treimer, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    We have attained the first sub-arcsecond collimation of a monochromatic neutron beam by diffracting neutrons from a Bragg prism, viz. a single crystal prism operating in the vicinity of Bragg incidence. Analytical as well numerical computations based on the dynamical diffraction theory, led to the optimised collimator configuration of a silicon {1 1 1} Bragg prism for 5.26 Å neutrons. We fabricated a Bragg prism to these specifications, tested and operated it at the double diffractometer setup in Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin to produce a 0.58 arcsec wide monochromatic neutron beam. With a similarly optimised Bragg prism analyser of opposite asymmetry, we recorded a 0.62 arcsec wide virgin rocking curve for this ultra-parallel beam. With this nearly plane-wave neutron beam, we have recorded the first ever USANS spectrum in Q˜10-6 Å-1 range with a hydroxyapatite casein protein sample and demonstrated the instrument capability to characterise agglomerates up to 150 μm in size. The super-collimated monochromatic beam has also enabled us to record the first neutron diffraction pattern from a macroscopic grating of 200 μm period. The transverse coherence length of 175 μm (FWHM) of the ultra-parallel beam derived from the analysis of this pattern, is the greatest achieved to date for Å wavelength neutrons.

  6. Polarization and amplitude attributes of reflected plane and spherical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jinjun; Baird, Graham; Blair, Dane

    1998-03-01

    The characteristics of a reflected spherical wave at a free surface are investigated by numerical methods; in particular, the polarization angles and amplitude coefficients of a reflected spherical wave are studied. The classical case of the reflection of a plane P wave from a free surface is revisited in order to establish our terminology, and the classical results are recast in a way which is more suited for the study undertaken. The polarization angle of a plane P wave, for a given angle of incidence, is shown to be 90° minus twice the angle of reflection of the reflected S wave. For a Poisson's ratio less than 1/3, there is a non-normal incident angle for which both amplification coefficients are 2 precisely; for this incident angle the direction of the particle motion at the free surface is also the direction of the incident wave. For a wave emanating from a spherical source, the polarization angle, for all angles of incidence, is always less than, or equal to, the polarization angle of a plane P wave. The vector amplification coefficient of a spherical wave, for all angles of incidence, is always greater than the vector amplification coefficient of a plane P wave. As expected, the results for a spherical wave approach the results for a plane P wave in the far field. Furthermore, there was a good agreement between the theoretical modelling and the numerical modelling using the dynamic finite element method (DFEM).

  7. Automatic decomposition of a complex hologram based on the virtual diffraction plane framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, A. S. M.; Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, T.-C.; Liu, J.-P.; Lee, C.-C.; Lam, Y. K.

    2014-07-01

    Holography is a technique for capturing the hologram of a three-dimensional scene. In many applications, it is often pertinent to retain specific items of interest in the hologram, rather than retaining the full information, which may cause distraction in the analytical process that follows. For a real optical image that is captured with a camera or scanner, this process can be realized by applying image segmentation algorithms to decompose an image into its constituent entities. However, because it is different from an optical image, classic image segmentation methods cannot be applied directly to a hologram, as each pixel in the hologram carries holistic, rather than local, information of the object scene. In this paper, we propose a method to perform automatic decomposition of a complex hologram based on a recently proposed technique called the virtual diffraction plane (VDP) framework. Briefly, a complex hologram is back-propagated to a hypothetical plane known as the VDP. Next, the image on the VDP is automatically decomposed, through the use of the segmentation on the magnitude of the VDP image, into multiple sub-VDP images, each representing the diffracted waves of an isolated entity in the scene. Finally, each sub-VDP image is reverted back to a hologram. As such, a complex hologram can be decomposed into a plurality of subholograms, each representing a discrete object in the scene. We have demonstrated the successful performance of our proposed method by decomposing a complex hologram that is captured through the optical scanning holography (OSH) technique.

  8. Diffractive wave transmission in dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescarret, Vincent

    The aim of this paper is to study the reflection-transmission of diffractive geometrical optic rays described by semi-linear symmetric hyperbolic systems such as the Maxwell-Lorentz equations with the anharmonic model of polarization. The framework is that of P. Donnat's thesis [P. Donnat, Quelques contributions mathématiques en optique non linéaire, chapters 1 and 2, thèse, 1996] and V. Lescarret [V. Lescarret, Wave transmission in dispersive media, M3AS 17 (4) (2007) 485-535]: we consider an infinite WKB expansion of the wave over long times/distances O(1/ɛ) and because of the boundary, we decompose each profile into a hyperbolic (purely oscillating) part and elliptic (evanescent) part as in M. William [M. William, Boundary layers and glancing blow-up in nonlinear geometric optics, Ann. Sci. École Norm. Sup. 33 (2000) 132-209]. Then to get the usual sublinear growth on the hyperbolic part of the profiles, for every corrector, we consider E, the space of bounded functions decomposing into a sum of pure transports and a "quasi compactly" supported part. We make a detailed analysis on the nonlinear interactions on E which leads us to make a restriction on the set of resonant phases. We finally give a convergence result which justifies the use of "quasi compactly" supported profiles.

  9. Spin-dependent diffraction of evanescent waves by subwavelength gratings.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kedi; Wang, Guo Ping

    2015-08-15

    We present a way to observe the spin-to-orbital conversion phenomenon. A spinning evanescent wave can be asymmetrically transformed into propagation waves through one certain diffraction order by a periodical subwavelength grating. By detecting diffraction field distribution behind the grating, we observed spin-dependent diffraction patterns. Furthermore, replacing the periodical grating by a Fibonacci grating, we can simultaneously observe multiple order diffractions of a spin evanescent wave. In this case, the multiple diffraction beams can interfere with each other behind the quasi-periodical grating to form asymmetric interference patterns. Our work provides another way toward the realization of spin-to-orbital conversion of light. PMID:26274640

  10. DLCQ and plane wave matrix Big Bang models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blau, Matthias; O'Loughlin, Martin

    2008-09-01

    We study the generalisations of the Craps-Sethi-Verlinde matrix big bang model to curved, in particular plane wave, space-times, beginning with a careful discussion of the DLCQ procedure. Singular homogeneous plane waves are ideal toy-models of realistic space-time singularities since they have been shown to arise universally as their Penrose limits, and we emphasise the role played by the symmetries of these plane waves in implementing the flat space Seiberg-Sen DLCQ prescription for these curved backgrounds. We then analyse various aspects of the resulting matrix string Yang-Mills theories, such as the relation between strong coupling space-time singularities and world-sheet tachyonic mass terms. In order to have concrete examples at hand, in an appendix we determine and analyse the IIA singular homogeneous plane wave - null dilaton backgrounds.

  11. Ohmic Losses During Scattering of a Plane Electromagnetic Wave by a Metal Corrugated Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koposova, E. V.

    2015-10-01

    We estimate the ohmic losses in the case of scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by a metal corrugated surface. Comparative analysis of the losses is performed for different regimes of wave incidence and scattering (self-collimation and different incidence angles), and their dependence on the amplitude and shape of the corrugation profile is studied. The study is based on numerical solving of the integral equation which describes the diffraction of a plane electromagnetic wave by a corrugated interface between two dielectrics. Metal is regarded as a dielectric with purely imaginary dielectric permittivity of a great value which is determined by metal conductivity. The waves with E polarization (i.e., the waves with the electric-field vector directed along the grooves), which are used in echelette gyrotron cavities, are studied in detail.

  12. Exact Nonlinear Internal Equatorial Waves in the f-plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hung-Chu

    2016-07-01

    We present an explicit exact solution of the nonlinear governing equations for internal geophysical water waves propagating westward above the thermocline in the f-plane approximation near the equator. Moreover, the mass transport velocity induced by this internal equatorial wave is eastward and a westward current occurs in the transition zone between the great depth where the water is still and the thermocline.

  13. An Apparatus for Constructing an Electromagnetic Plane Wave Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneubil, Fabiana Botelho; Loures, Marcus Vinicius Russo; Amado, William

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we report on an activity aimed at building an electromagnetic wave. This was part of a class on the concept of mass offered to a group of 20 pre-service Brazilian physics teachers. The activity consisted of building a plane wave using an apparatus in which it is possible to fit some rods representing electric and magnetic fields into…

  14. Arrayed Ultrasonic Transducers on Arc Surface for Plane Wave Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Soon; Kim, Jung-Ho; Kim, Moo-Joon; Ha, Kang-Lyeol; Yamada, Akira

    2004-05-01

    In ultrasonic computed tomography (UCT), it is necessary to synthesize a plane wave using waves emitted from sound sources arranged in the interior surface of a cylinder. In order to transmit a plane wave into a cylindrical surface, an ultrasonic transducer which has many vibrating elements with piezoelectric transverse effect arrayed on an arc surface is proposed. To achieve a wide beam width, the elements should have a small radiation area with a much narrow width. The measured electroacoustic efficiency for the elements was approximately 40% and the beam width defined by -3 dB level from the maximum was as wide as 120 deg. It was confirmed that plane wave synthesis is possible using the proposed transducer array.

  15. Angular beam width of a slit-diffracted wave with noncollinear group and phase velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, Edwin H.

    2012-12-01

    Taking magnetostatic surface wave diffraction as an example, this paper theoretically investigates the 2D diffraction pattern arising in the far-field region of a ferrite slab in the case of a plane wave with noncollinear group and phase velocities incident on a wide, arbitrarily oriented slit in an opaque screen. A universal analytical formula for the angular width of a diffracted beam is derived, which is valid for magnetostatic and other types of waves in anisotropic media and structures (including metamaterials) in 2D geometries. It is shown that the angular width of a diffracted beam in an anisotropic medium can not only take values greater or less than \\lambda _0/D (where \\lambda _0 is the incident wavelength, and D is the slit width), but can also be zero under certain conditions.

  16. Antenna arrays for producing plane whistler waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, Reiner; Urrutia, J. Manuel

    2015-11-01

    In a large uniform laboratory plasma helicon modes with mode numbers 1 - 8 have been excited. Using a circular phased array it is shown that positive and negative modes can propagate equally well. The phase fronts of helicons form Archimedian screw surfaces. The electromagnetic field carries linear momentum due to the axial propagation and angular momentum due to the azimuthal propagation. Associated with the orbital angular momentum is a transverse Doppler shift. It is demonstrated that a rapidly rotating ``receiver'' observes a different frequency than the wave. This implies that a rotating electron can undergo cyclotron resonance when moving against the field rotation. Analogous to the axial Doppler shift cyclotron damping and cyclotron instabilities are possible due to the field rotation in helicons. Since helicons exist in unbounded laboratory plasma they should also exist in space plasmas. The angular wave-particle interaction may be an alternate approach for the remedial of energetic electrons. Work supported by NSF/DOE.

  17. In-plane vibrations of a rectangular plate: Plane wave expansion modelling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arreola-Lucas, A.; Franco-Villafañe, J. A.; Báez, G.; Méndez-Sánchez, R. A.

    2015-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental results for in-plane vibrations of a uniform rectangular plate with free boundary conditions are obtained. The experimental setup uses electromagnetic-acoustic transducers and a vector network analyzer. The theoretical calculations were obtained using the plane wave expansion method applied to the in-plane thin plate vibration theory. The agreement between theory and experiment is excellent for the lower 95 modes covering a very wide frequency range from DC to 20 kHz. Some measured normal-mode wave amplitudes were compared with the theoretical predictions; very good agreement was observed. The excellent agreement of the classical theory of in-plane vibrations confirms its reliability up to very high frequencies

  18. Diffraction effects of planar transducers using a numerical expression for edge waves.

    PubMed

    Mair, H D; Bresse, L; Hutchins, D A

    1988-10-01

    It is well established that the field from uniformly vibrating piston transducers may be considered as being derived from two components: a plane wave and an edge wave. These have been both predicted and observed in practice, but it would seem that a mathematical expression for the edge-wave component has not yet been developed fully. In this article, expressions are developed for the pressure and particle velocity edge waves that can be used to calculate the field that results when a plane wave is diffracted by an edge. The expressions are used to study a particular example, namely, that of an arbitrarily shaped piston radiator. The results for certain situations are shown to agree with existing solutions for a disk source. PMID:3198874

  19. Inhomogeneous plane wave and the most energetic complex ray.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, M; Poncelet, O

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a study on the wave surfaces of anisotropic solids. In addition to the classical and real rays, which are defined by the normal to the slowness surfaces, it is obtained complex rays, which are associated to specific inhomogeneous plane waves. Referring to the complex Christoffel's equation and to the Fermat's principle, an intrinsic equation can be associated to these complex rays. Limiting the study to principal planes and plotting the associated complex wave surfaces, it can be shown that four energetic rays always exist in any directions for both quasi-isotropic and anisotropic media (even beyond the cusp). Consequently, it is always possible to define four closed wave surfaces (real or not). PMID:12159950

  20. Colliding gravitational plane waves with noncollinear polarization. II

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, F.J.; Garcia D., A.; Hauser, I.

    1987-12-01

    A simple criterion for colliding gravitational plane waves is developed. This colliding wave condition is preserved by a new realization of the Geroch group augmented by a Kramer--Neugebauer involution. A three-parameter generalization of a two-parameter family of solutions with noncollinear polarization discovered recently by Ferrari, Ibanez, and Bruni is presented, and two additional solutions are derived that demonstrate that much larger families are likely to be constructed in the near future.

  1. Plane wave scattering by a thick lossy dielectric half-plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, K.; Aoki, K.

    A solution is obtained for the scattering of a plane wave by a lossy, thick, dielectric half-plane, with a view to applications for calculating the TV electromagnetic wave scattering by a tall building made of concrete. The problem is analytically framed in terms of the incident and scattered electric fields, assuming the polarization in each case to be invariant. Boundary conditions are defined within which Fourier components of the scattered field are calculated. The far-fields were analyzed employing the saddle-point method. Numerical examples for 100 MHz broadcasts are presented, demonstrating a good agreement in the illuminated region between calculations for a lossy dielectric and a perfectly conducting half plane.

  2. Plane shock wave interaction with a cylindrical water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembian, S.; Liverts, M.; Tillmark, N.; Apazidis, N.

    2016-05-01

    A complex system of waves propagating inside a water column due to the impact of plane shock wave is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Flow features, such as, focusing of expansion waves generating large negative pressure, nucleation of cavitation bubbles, and a re-circulation zone are observed and discussed qualitatively and quantitatively. Experiments are conducted on a 22 mm diametrical water column hit by shock waves with Mach numbers 1.75 and 2.4 in a newly constructed exploding wire facility. A new technique to create a properly shaped, repeatable, large diameter water column with straight walls is presented. Qualitative features of the flow are captured using the shadowgraph technique. With the aid of numerical simulations the wave motions inside the column are analyzed; the spatial location of the expansion wave focusing point and the corresponding negative peak pressures is estimated.

  3. Diffraction model of peristrophic multiplexing with spherical reference wave.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shuhei; Takahata, Yosuke; Horiuchi, Shuma; Yamamoto, Manabu

    2015-02-01

    Multiplexing recording is a primary contributor to determining the recording density in holographic data storage. Therefore, many different kinds of recording methods have been proposed. Among them, the method that utilizes spherical waves as reference waves is characterized by the ability to enable multiplexing recording only by moving (shifting or rotating) the recording medium. In our research, we propose a theoretical diffraction model of peristrophic multiplexing with a spherical reference wave and evaluate the diffraction efficiency; this multiplexing recording method has incorporated spherical reference waves in rotation of the media. Additionally, we verify the effectiveness of the model by comparing it with experimental results. PMID:26366593

  4. Metaphysics of colliding self-gravitating plane waves

    SciTech Connect

    Matzner, R.A.; Tipler, F.J.

    1984-04-15

    We discuss certain global features of colliding plane-wave solutions to Einstein's equations. In particular, we show that the apparently local curvature singularities both in the Khan-Penrose solution and in the Bell-Szekeres solution are actually global. These global singularities are associated with the breakdown of nondegenerate planar symmetry in the characteristic initial data sets.

  5. Colliding gravitational plane waves with noncollinear polarization. I

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, F.J.; Garcia D., A.; Hauser, I.

    1987-09-01

    An Ehlers transformation on the Ernst potential for the Nutku--Halil solution (Phys. Rev. Lett. 39, 1379 (1977)) provides a new solution of the Einstein field equations describing colliding gravitational plane waves with noncollinear polarization, the first of an infinite sequence of solutions that can be generated using techniques described in this paper.

  6. Comment on ''Collision of plane gravitational waves without singularities''

    SciTech Connect

    Nutku, Y.

    1981-08-15

    An incorrect paper was published by B. J. Stoyanov carrying the title above. Here we shall point out a coordinate transformation whereby ''the new exact solution'' of his paper is recognized as a Kasner universe. Further, we shall show that Stoyanov's interpretation of the Kasner solution as colliding plane gravitational waves runs into the difficulty that the Einstein field equations are not satisfied everywhere.

  7. Colliding gravitational plane waves with noncollinear polarization. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Frederick J.; García D., Alberto; Hauser, Isidore

    1987-09-01

    An Ehlers transformation on the Ernst potential for the Nutku-Halil solution [Phys. Rev. Lett. 39, 1379 (1977)] provides a new solution of the Einstein field equations describing colliding gravitational plane waves with noncollinear polarization, the first of an infinite sequence of solutions that can be generated using techniques described in this paper.

  8. Ultrafast vascular strain compounding using plane wave transmission.

    PubMed

    Hansen, H H G; Saris, A E C M; Vaka, N R; Nillesen, M M; de Korte, C L

    2014-03-01

    Deformations of the atherosclerotic vascular wall induced by the pulsating blood can be estimated using ultrasound strain imaging. Because these deformations indirectly provide information on mechanical plaque composition, strain imaging is a promising technique for differentiating between stable and vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. This paper first explains 1-D radial strain estimation as applied intravascularly in coronary arteries. Next, recent methods for noninvasive vascular strain estimation in a transverse imaging plane are discussed. Finally, a compounding technique that our group recently developed is explained. This technique combines motion estimates of subsequently acquired focused ultrasound images obtained at various insonification angles. However, because the artery moves and deforms during the multi-angle acquisition, errors are introduced when compounding. Recent advances in computational power have enabled plane wave ultrasound acquisition, which allows 100 times faster image acquisition and thus might resolve the motion artifacts. In this paper the performance of strain imaging using plane wave compounding is investigated using simulations of an artery with a vulnerable plaque and experimental data of a two-layered vessel phantom. The results show that plane wave compounding outperforms 0° focused strain imaging. For the simulations, the root mean squared error reduced by 66% and 50% for radial and circumferential strain, respectively. For the experiments, the elastographic signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (SNR(e) and CNR(e)) increased with 2.1 dB and 3.7 dB radially, and 5.6 dB and 16.2dB circumferentially. Because of the high frame rate, the plane wave compounding technique can even be further optimized and extended to 3D in future. PMID:24484646

  9. Gravitational scattering of zero-rest-mass plane waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Logi, W. K.; Kovacs, S. J., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The Feyman-diagram technique is used to calculate the differential cross sections for the scattering of zero-rest-mass plane waves of spin 0, 1, and 2 by linearized Schwarzschild and Kerr geometries in the long-wavelength weak-field limit. It is found that the polarization of right (or left) circularly polarized electromagnetic waves is unaffected by the scattering process (i.e., helicity is conserved) and that the two helicity (polarization) states of the photon are scattered differently by the Kerr geometry. This coupling between the photon helicity and the angular momentum of the scatterer also leads to a partial polarization of unpolarized incident light. For gravitational waves, on the other hand, there is neither helicity conservation nor helicity-dependent scattering; the angular momentum of the scatterer has no polarizing effect on incident unpolarized gravitational waves.

  10. Predictive GW calculations using plane waves and pseudopotentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimeš, Jiří; Kaltak, Merzuk; Kresse, Georg

    2014-08-01

    We derive a finite-basis-set correction for quasiparticle (QP) energies in the GW approximation and many-body correlation energies in the random phase approximation. Since the correction requires only knowledge of the ground-state density distribution, it is straightforward to implement in any plane-wave code and significantly improves convergence at negligible computational cost. The expression also indicates that QP energies might converge to the wrong value using the projector augmented wave (PAW) method since the overlap densities of occupied orbitals and high-energy, plane-wave-like orbitals are inaccurately described. The error is shown to be related to the incompleteness of the partial waves inside the atomic spheres. It can be avoided by adopting norm-conserving partial waves. G0W0 and GW0 results based on such norm-conserving PAW potentials are presented for a large set of semiconductors and insulators. Accurate extrapolation procedures to the infinite-basis-set limit and infinite-k-point limit are discussed in detail.

  11. Worldline approach to helicity flip in plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilderton, Anton; Torgrimsson, Greger

    2016-04-01

    We apply worldline methods to the study of vacuum polarization effects in plane wave backgrounds, in both scalar and spinor QED. We calculate helicity-flip probabilities to one loop order and treated exactly in the background field, and provide a toolkit of methods for use in investigations of higher-order processes. We also discuss the connections between the worldline, S-matrix, and lightfront approaches to vacuum polarization effects.

  12. Holography and entropy bounds in the plane wave matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Mints, Aleksey L.

    2006-06-15

    As a quantum theory of gravity, matrix theory should provide a realization of the holographic principle, in the sense that a holographic theory should contain one binary degree of freedom per Planck area. We present evidence that Bekenstein's entropy bound, which is related to area differences, is manifest in the plane wave matrix model. If holography is implemented in this way, we predict crossover behavior at strong coupling when the energy exceeds N{sup 2} in units of the mass scale.

  13. Diffraction of dust acoustic waves by a circular cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.-H.; Heinrich, J. R.; Merlino, R. L.

    2008-09-15

    The diffraction of dust acoustic (DA) waves around a long dielectric rod is observed using video imaging methods. The DA waves are spontaneously excited in a dusty plasma produced in a direct current glow discharge plasma. The rod acquires a negative charge that produces a coaxial dust void around it. The diameter of the void is the effective size of the 'obstacle' encountered by the waves. The wavelength of the DA waves is approximately the size of the void. The observations are considered in relation to the classical problem of the diffraction of sound waves from a circular cylinder, a problem first analyzed by Lord Rayleigh [Theory of Sound, 2nd ed. (MacMillan, London, 1896)].

  14. Development of attenuation and diffraction corrections for linear and nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves radiating from a uniform line source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Cho, Sungjong; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-04-01

    In recent studies with nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves, harmonic generation measurements have been successfully employed to characterize material damage and microstructural changes, and found to be sensitive to early stages of damage process. A nonlinearity parameter of Rayleigh surface waves was derived and frequently measured to quantify the level of damage. The accurate measurement of the nonlinearity parameter generally requires making corrections for beam diffraction and medium attenuation. These effects are not generally known for nonlinear Rayleigh waves, and therefore not properly considered in most of previous studies. In this paper, the nonlinearity parameter for a Rayleigh surface wave is defined from the plane wave displacement solutions. We explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections for fundamental and second harmonic Rayleigh wave beams radiated from a uniform line source. Attenuation corrections are obtained from the quasilinear theory of plane Rayleigh wave equations. To obtain closed-form expressions for diffraction corrections, multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) models are employed to represent the integral solutions derived from the quasilinear theory of the full two-dimensional wave equation without parabolic approximation. Diffraction corrections are presented for a couple of transmitter-receiver geometries, and the effects of making attenuation and diffraction corrections are examined through the simulation of nonlinearity parameter determination in a solid sample.

  15. Diffracted and head waves associated with waves on nonseparable surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, Raymond L.

    1992-01-01

    A theory is presented for computing waves radiated from waves on a smooth surface. With the assumption that attention of the surface wave is due only to radiation and not to dissipation in the surface material, the radiation coefficient is derived in terms of the attenuation factor. The excitation coefficient is determined by the reciprocity condition. Formulas for the shape and the spreading of the radiated wave are derived, and some sample calculations are presented. An investigation of resonant phase matching for nonseparable surfaces is presented with a sample calculation. A discussion of how such calculations might be related to resonant frequencies of nonseparable thin shell structures is included. A description is given of nonseparable surfaces that can be modeled in the vector that facilitates use of the appropriate formulas of differential geometry.

  16. Transition operators in electromagnetic-wave diffraction theory - General theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    A formal theory is developed for the scattering of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves from impenetrable immobile obstacles with given linear, homogeneous, and generally nonlocal boundary conditions of Leontovich (impedance) type for the wave of the obstacle's surface. The theory is modeled on the complete Green's function and the transition (T) operator in time-independent formal scattering theory of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. An expression for the differential scattering cross section for plane electromagnetic waves is derived in terms of certain matrix elements of the T operator for the obstacle.

  17. Decoding the matrix: Coincident membranes on the plane wave

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Mints, Aleksey L.

    2006-03-15

    At the core of nonperturbative theories of quantum gravity lies the holographic encoding of bulk data in large matrices. At present this mapping is poorly understood. The plane wave matrix model provides a laboratory for isolating aspects of this problem in a controlled setting. At large boosts, configurations of concentric membranes become superselection sectors, whose exact spectra are known. From the bulk point of view, one expects product states of individual membranes to be contained within the full spectrum. However, for non-BPS states this inclusion relation is obscured by Gauss law constraints. Its validity rests on nontrivial relations in representation theory, which we identify and verify by explicit computation.

  18. Various approximations made in augmented-plane-wave calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacalis, N. C.; Blathras, K.; Thomaides, P.; Papaconstantopoulos, D. A.

    1985-10-01

    The effects of various approximations used in performing augmented-plane-wave calculations were studied for elements of the fifth and sixth columns of the Periodic Table, namely V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, and W. Two kinds of approximations have been checked: (i) variation of the number of k points used to iterate to self-consistency, and (ii) approximations for the treatment of the core states. In addition a comparison between relativistic and nonrelativistic calculations is made, and an approximate method of calculating the spin-orbit splitting is given.

  19. Plane shock wave studies of Westerly granite and Nugget sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.B.; Anderson, G.D.

    1980-12-01

    Plane shock wave experiments were performed by using a light-gas gun on dry and water-saturated Westerly granite and dry Nugget sandstone. Changes in the slopes of the shock velocity versus particle velocity curves at 2 to 3 GPa and 1 to 2 GPa for dry granite and for dry sandstone, respectively, are attributed to the onset of pore collapse. However, there is little apparent loss of shear strength in either dry rock over the stress range of the experiments (i.e., 9.3 GPa in Westerly granite and 9.2 GPa in Nugget sandstone). Agreement between the shock wave data and quasistatic, uniaxial strain data for the dry rock implies the absence of rate-dependence in uniaxial strain. The shock data on saturated granite agree well with those for dry granite, thus suggesting there was no loss in shear strength as a result of pore pressure buildup.

  20. Numerical simulation of shock wave diffraction by TVD schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Victor Y. C.; Yee, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    An upwind total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme and a predictor-corrector symmetric TVD scheme were used to numerically simulate the blast wave diffraction on a stationary object. The objective is to help design an optimum configuration so that lateral motion is minimized and at the same time vortex shedding and flow separation are reduced during a blast wave encounter. Results are presented for a generic configuration for both a coarse grid and a fine grid to illustrate the global and local diffraction flow fields. Numerical experiments for the shock wave reflection on a wedge are also included to validate the current approach. Numerical study indicated that these TVD schemes are more stable and produced higher shock resolution than classical shock capturing methods such as the explicit MacCormack scheme.

  1. Spherically-arranged piecewise planar hologram for capturing a diffracted object wave field in 360 degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seungtaik; Seo, Hoyong; Hwang, Chi-Young; Lee, Beom-Ryeol; Son, Wookho

    2013-05-01

    We present a new method to record and reconstruct a diffracted object wave field in all directions. For this, we are going to use spherically-arranged holograms instead of a single spherical hologram. Our spherically-arranged holograms are constructed to store all components of plane waves propagating in all directions. One can use the well-known efficient FFT-based diffraction formulae such as Fresnel transform and angular spectrum method in generation and reconstruction of our spherically-arranged holograms. It is possible to synthesize a new hologram with an arbitrary position and orientation without the geometry of the object. Numerical experiments are presented to show the effectiveness of our method.

  2. The implementation of holography in the plane wave matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mints, Aleksey Leonidovich

    It is expected that at the core of nonperturbative theories of quantum gravity, such as M-theory, lies the realization of the holographic principle, in the sense that a holographic theory should contain one binary degree of freedom per Planck area. Present understanding of such theories requires the holographic encoding of bulk data in large matrices. Currently this mapping is poorly understood. The plane wave matrix model provides a laboratory for isolating aspects of this problem in a controlled setting. At large boosts, configurations of concentric membranes become superselection sectors, whose exact spectra are known. From the bulk point of view one expects product states of individual membranes to be contained within the full spectrum. However, for non-BPS states this inclusion relation is obscured by Gauss law constraints. Its validity rests on nontrivial relations in representation theory, which we identify and verify by explicit computation. Beyond the decoding and partial identification of selected states in large matrices, one would like to get a better understanding of the holographic state counting of these degrees of freedom, i.e., entropy. Contrary to the naive expectation of holography realized in terms of the covariant entropy bound, we present evidence that it is the Bekenstein entropy bound, which is related to area differences, that is manifest in the plane wave matrix model. If holography is implemented in this way, we predict crossover behavior at strong coupling when the energy exceeds N2 in units of the mass scale.

  3. Plane wave based selfconsistent solution of the GW Dyson equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Cao, Huawei

    We have developed a selfconsistent procedure to calculate the full Dyson equation based on plane wave basis set. The whole formalism is based on the Greens function matrix of the plane wave G-vector. There is no truncation of the conduction band when the dielectric function is calculated. The Dyson equation is the variational minimum solution of the total energy in terms of the Greens function. The calculation uses the ''space-time'' method, with special algorithm for imaginary time integration and Fourier transformation. We have tested isolated molecules and periodic systems. The effects of selfconsistency compared to the G0W0 results will be presented. We will also discuss some special techniques used in the k-point summation for the periodic system. Massive parallelization is used to carry out such calculations. This work is supported by the Director, SC/BES/MSED of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, through the Material Theory program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  4. Acoustic plane wave preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Tolt, Thomas L.; Poeppel, Roger B.

    1991-01-01

    A polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the conduction of high current densities. With the superconducting metal oxide in the form of a ceramic slip which has not yet set, orientation of the crystal basal planes parallel with the direction of desired current flow is accomplished by an applied acoustic plane wave in the acoustic or ultrasonic frequency range (either progressive or standing) in applying a torque to each crystal particle. The ceramic slip is then set and fired by conventional methods to produce a conductor with preferentially oriented grains and substantially enhanced current carrying capacity.

  5. A plane wave generation method by wave number domain point focusing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ji-Ho; Choi, Jung-Woo; Kim, Yang-Hann

    2010-11-01

    A method for generation of a wave-field that is a plane wave is described. This method uses an array of loudspeakers phased so that the field in the wave-number domain is nearly concentrated at a point, this point being at the wave-number vector of the desired plane wave. The method described here for such a wave-number concentration makes use of an expansion in spherical harmonics, and requires a relatively small number of measurement points for a good approximate achievement of a plane wave. The measurement points are on a spherical surface surrounding the array of loudspeakers. The input signals for the individual loudspeakers can be derived without a matrix inversion or without explicit assumptions about the loudspeakers. The mathematical development involves spherical harmonics and three-dimensional Fourier transforms. Some numerical examples are given, with various assumptions concerning the nature of the loudspeakers, that support the premise that the method described in the present paper may be useful in applications. PMID:21110571

  6. Love wave tomography in southern Africa from a two-plane-wave inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aibing; Li, Lun

    2015-08-01

    Array measurements of surface wave phase velocity can be biased by multipath arrivals. A two-plane-wave (TPW) inversion method, in which the incoming wavefield is represented by the interference of two plane waves, is able to account for the multipath effect and solve for laterally varying phase velocity. Despite broad applications of the TPW method, its usage has been limited to Rayleigh waves. In this study, we have modified the TPW approach and applied it to Love waves. Main modifications include decomposing Love wave amplitude on the transverse component to x and y components in a local Cartesian system for each earthquake and using both components in the inversion. Such decomposition is also applied to the two plane waves to predict the incoming wavefield of an earthquake. We utilize fundamental mode Love wave data recorded at 85 broad-band stations from 69 distant earthquakes and solved for phase velocity in nine frequency bands with centre periods ranging from 34 to 100 s. The average phase velocity in southern Africa increases from 4.30 km s-1 at 34 s to 4.87 km s-1 at 100 s. Compared with predicted Love wave phase velocities from the published 1-D SV velocity model and radial anisotropy model in the region, these values are compatible from 34 to 50 s and slightly higher beyond 50 s, indicating radial anisotropy of VSH > VSV in the shallow upper mantle. A high Love wave velocity anomaly is imaged in the central and southern Kaapvaal craton at all periods, reflecting a cold and depleted cratonic lithosphere. A low velocity anomaly appears in the Bushveld Complex from 34 to 50 s, which can be interpreted as being caused by high iron content from an intracratonic magma intrusion. The modified TPW method provides a new way to measure Love wave phase velocities in a regional array, which are essential in developing radial anisotropic models and understanding the Earth structure in the crust and upper mantle.

  7. Microbeam X-Ray Standing Wave and High Resolution Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kazimirov, A.; Bilderback, D.H.; Huang, R.; Sirenko, A.

    2004-05-12

    Post-focusing collimating optics are introduced as a tool to condition X-ray microbeams for the use in high-resolution X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques. As an example, a one-bounce imaging capillary and miniature Si(004) channel-cut crystal were used to produce a microbeam with 10 {mu}m size and an ultimate angular resolution of 2.5 arc sec. This beam was used to measure the strain in semiconductor microstructures by using X-ray high resolution diffraction and standing wave techniques to {delta}d/d < 5x10-4.

  8. Measuring In-Plane Displacements with Variable Sensitivity Using Diffractive Optic Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Robert L.; Gilbert, John A.; Cole, Helen J.; Ashley, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper introduces a method called diffractive optic interferometry (DOI) which allows in-plane displacement components to be measured with variable sensitivity. DOI relies on binary optical elements fabricated as phase-type Dammann gratings which produce multiple diffraction orders of nearly equal intensity. Sensitivity is varied by combining the different wavefronts produced by a conjugate pair of these binary optical elements; a transmission element is used to produce several illumination beams while a reflective element, replicated on the surface of a specimen, provides the reference for the undeformed state. The steps taken to design and fabricate these binary optical elements are described. The specimen grating is characterized, and tested on a disk subjected to diametrical compression. Overall, the results are excellent, with experimental data agreeing to within a few percent of the theoretical predictions.

  9. Neutron diffraction investigation of an in-plane biaxial fatigued stainless steel sample of cruciform geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Yu V.; Balagurov, A. M.; Sheverev, S. G.; Schreiber, J.; Korsunsky, A. M.; Vorster, W. J. J.; Bomas, H.; Stoeberl, C.

    2008-03-01

    Fatigue and fracture under multiaxial stresses are among the most important current research topics aimed at ensuring improved reliability of industrial components. An ex situ in-plane biaxial low cycle fatigued sample of cruciform geometry from austenitic stainless steel AISI 321 H was investigated on the FSD stress-diffractometer at the IBR-2 pulsed nuclear reactor by using the neutron strain scanner and the uniaxial stress rig. The phase composition of fatigued material was determined and the residual macrostresses and phase microstresses were measured. To the best of our knowledge, no neutron diffraction investigations of materials subjected to biaxial loading have been previously carried out. The first results of the neutron diffraction experiment are presented and discussed.

  10. Exact solution to plane-wave scattering by an ideal "left-handed" wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monzon, Cesar; Forester, Donald W.; Smith, Douglas; Loschialpo, Peter

    2006-02-01

    An exact analytical solution to the problem of plane-wave diffraction by a penetrable left-handed medium (LHM) epsilon=µ=-1 wedge of arbitrary angle (subject to valid physical constraints) is presented. Standard analysis involving discontinuous angular eigenfunctions and even/odd symmetry decomposition resulted in a discrete spectrum leading to a series solution resembling the traditional perfect electric conductor wedge solution but exhibiting the expected negative refraction phenomenology. Numerical results are presented, some of which seemed paradoxical but are explainable by classical means. A new type of illusory edge radiation is observed and explained. Also, a novel edge-launched interface standing wave is observed on the directly illuminated side. The exact analytical solution is verified by comparison with finite-difference time-domain simulation on causal LHM materials.

  11. Dual series solution to the scattering of plane waves from a binary conducting grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, Yon-Lin; Gallagher, Neal C., Jr.; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    1989-07-01

    The problem of EM-wave scattering from a perfectly conducting grating with a periodic groove structure is considered. A system of dual series equations is derived by enforcing the EM boundary conditions; this leads to a boundary-value problem that is solved. The mathematics leading to the solution of the dual series system is derived from the equivalent Riemann-Hilbert problem in complex-variable theory and its solution. The solution converges absolutely and makes it possible to obtain analytical results, even where other numerical methods, such as the mode-matching method and spectral iteration methods, are numerically unstable. Consideration is also given to the relative phase values for the diffracted fields. The phase differences between the scattered fields resulting from two orthogonally polarized incident plane waves can be explicitly determined for any incidence angles and for any groove dimensions.

  12. Plane wave method for elastic wave scattering by a heterogeneous fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Seiji; Nihei, Kurt T.; Myer, Larry R.

    2003-02-21

    A plane-wave method for computing the three-dimensional scattering of propagating elastic waves by a planar fracture with heterogeneous fracture compliance distribution is presented. This method is based upon the spatial Fourier transform of the seismic displacement-discontinuity (SDD) boundary conditions (also called linear slip interface conditions), and therefore, called the wave-number-domain SDD method (wd-SDD method). The resulting boundary conditions explicitly show the coupling between plane waves with an incident wave number component (specular component) and scattered waves which do not follow Snell's law (nonspecular components) if the fracture is viewed as a planar boundary. For a spatially periodic fracture compliance distribution, these boundary conditions can be cast into a linear system of equations that can be solved for the amplitudes of individual wave modes and wave numbers. We demonstrate the developed technique for a simulated fracture with a stochastic (correlated) surface compliance distribution. Low- and high-frequency solutions of the method are also compared to the predictions by low-order Born series in the weak and strong scattering limit.

  13. Diffractive theorems for the wave equation with inverse square potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Randy Zhigang

    This dissertation investigates the phenomenon of diffraction resulting from the addition of an inverse square potential term to the wave operator. In particular, it explicitly establishes the existence of diffraction for the solution to the wave operator with an inverse square potential in 2-dimensional euclidean space and proves a propagation of smoothness result in two more general settings. Chapter 2 establishes diffraction in the fundamental solutions to the wave operator plus inverse square potential with a Dirac Delta initial condition in 2-dimensional euclidean space. Following methods as described by Cheeger and Taylor, we separate variables, apply spectral transforms to each variable, and employ contour deformation techniques to establish an explicit form for diffractive front in the fundamental solution. Chapter 3 proves a propagation of smoothness result for a related wave operator with potential, where instead of a constant, we put a smooth bounded function in the numerator of the potential. Microlocal energy estimates are used following the basic propagation methods of Duistermaat and Hormander, and employing the heavy refinements due to Melrose, Vasy, and Wunsch to handle propagation through the radial point at the origin. The potential term is estimated using Hardy's Inequality. Chapter 4 extends the propagation of smoothness result to conic manifolds with an inverse square potential concentrated at their boundary. We state a product decomposition theorem for the conic metric due to Melrose and Wunsch, then use the resulting coordinates to deploy our argument from Chapter 3. New terms with dependence on distance to the boundary arise, and we show how to bound them.

  14. Unsteady relativistic shock-wave diffraction by cylinders and spheres.

    PubMed

    Tsai, I-Nan; Huang, Juan-Chen; Tsai, Shang-Shi; Yang, J Y

    2012-02-01

    The unsteady relativistic shock-wave diffraction patterns generated by a relativistic blast wave impinging on a circular cylinder and a sphere are numerically simulated using some high-resolution relativistic kinetic beam schemes in a general coordinate system for solving the relativistic Euler equations of gas dynamics. The diffraction patterns are followed through about 6 radii of travel of the incident shock past the body. The complete diffraction patterns, including regular reflection, transition from regular to Mach reflection, slip lines, and the complex shock-on-shock interaction at the wake region resulting from the Mach shocks collision behind the body are reported in detail. Computational results of several incident shock Mach numbers covering the near ultrarelativistic limit are studied. Various contours of flow properties including the Lorentz factor and velocity streamline plots are also presented to add a better understanding of the complex diffraction phenomena. The three-dimensional relieving effects of the sphere cases are evident and can be quantitatively evaluated as compared with the corresponding cylinder cases. PMID:22463327

  15. Unsteady relativistic shock-wave diffraction by cylinders and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, I.-Nan; Huang, Juan-Chen; Tsai, Shang-Shi; Yang, J. Y.

    2012-02-01

    The unsteady relativistic shock-wave diffraction patterns generated by a relativistic blast wave impinging on a circular cylinder and a sphere are numerically simulated using some high-resolution relativistic kinetic beam schemes in a general coordinate system for solving the relativistic Euler equations of gas dynamics. The diffraction patterns are followed through about 6 radii of travel of the incident shock past the body. The complete diffraction patterns, including regular reflection, transition from regular to Mach reflection, slip lines, and the complex shock-on-shock interaction at the wake region resulting from the Mach shocks collision behind the body are reported in detail. Computational results of several incident shock Mach numbers covering the near ultrarelativistic limit are studied. Various contours of flow properties including the Lorentz factor and velocity streamline plots are also presented to add a better understanding of the complex diffraction phenomena. The three-dimensional relieving effects of the sphere cases are evident and can be quantitatively evaluated as compared with the corresponding cylinder cases.

  16. Six-mm, plane-wave shock driver

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A.M.; Chau, H.H.

    1993-06-14

    A 6-mm-diameter, plane-wave shock generation system has been developed and characterized as a laboratory bench driver for small scale experiments. The driver is based on an exploding-foil-driven slapper used either directly or to initiate an HE pellet. The slapper is driven by a low-inductance fireset with burst currents on the order of 30 kA and burst times of about 250ns, with a time-to-burst jitter under 10ns. Both the slapper impact and the detonation breakout of the pellet have been measured to be flat to within 10ns over a 6-mm diameter. Fabry-Perot velocimetry of impacts with LiF crystals were used to characterize shock pressures and durations. Attenuator plates and flyers driven by the HE were also measured, which provided a variety of available pulse shapes and data for modeling efforts.

  17. The angular apodization in coherent plane-wave compounding.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Molares, Alfonso; Torp, Hans; Denarie, Bastien; Løvstakken, Lasse

    2015-11-01

    This article describes the relation between apodization in conventional focused imaging and apodization in coherent plane-wave compounding (CPWC). We pose the hypothesis that equivalent transmit beams can be produced with both methods if the transmit apodization is adequately transformed. We derive a relation between apodization in CPWC and in synthetic transmit aperture imaging (STAI), which we argue to be equivalent to conventional optimal multifocus imaging. We find that under certain conditions, the transformation of the apodization becomes trivial and the same window used in STAI can be applied for CPWC but extended to the whole angle sequence. We test the hypothesis with in silico data and find that the transformed apodization accurately mimics the objective transmit apodization, with differences in the lateral resolution between 3% and 6%. PMID:26559630

  18. Source function and plane waves: Toward complete bader analysis.

    PubMed

    Tantardini, Christian; Ceresoli, Davide; Benassi, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    The source function (SF) is a topological descriptor that was introduced and developed by C. Gatti and R.W. Bader in 1998. The SF describes the contribution of each atom to the total electron density at a given point. To date, this descriptor has only been calculable from electron densities generated by all-electron (AE) methods for the investigation of single molecules or periodic systems. This study broadens the accessibility of the SF, offering its calculation from electron densities generated by plane wave (PW) methods. The new algorithm has been implemented in the open source code, CRITIC2. Our novel approach has been validated on a series of test systems, comparing the results obtained at PW level with those previously obtained through AE methods. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27364862

  19. Terahertz 3D printed diffractive lens matrices for field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Sypek, Maciej; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Suszek, Jarosław; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, Anna; Yahniuk, Ivan; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Nowakowska-Siwińska, Anna; Coquillat, Dominique; But, Dmytro B; Rachoń, Martyna; Węgrzyńska, Karolina; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    We present the concept, the fabrication processes and the experimental results for materials and optics that can be used for terahertz field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays. More specifically, we propose 3D printed arrays of a new type - diffractive multi-zone lenses of which the performance is superior to that of previously used mono-zone diffractive or refractive elements and evaluate them with GaN/AlGaN field-effect transistor terahertz detectors. Experiments performed in the 300-GHz atmospheric window show that the lens arrays offer both a good efficiency and good uniformity, and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the terahertz field-effect transistor detectors by more than one order of magnitude. In practice, we tested 3 × 12 lens linear arrays with printed circuit board THz detector arrays used in postal security scanners and observed significant signal-to-noise improvements. Our results clearly show that the proposed technology provides a way to produce cost-effective, reproducible, flat optics for large-size field-effect transistor THz-detector focal plane arrays. PMID:27607620

  20. Laboratory modeling of edge wave generation over a plane beach by breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abcha, Nizar; Ezersky, Alexander; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2015-04-01

    Edge waves play an important role in coastal hydrodynamics: in sediment transport, in formation of coastline structure and coastal bottom topography. Investigation of physical mechanisms leading to the edge waves generation allows us to determine their effect on the characteristics of spatially periodic patterns like crescent submarine bars and cusps observed in the coastal zone. In the present paper we investigate parametric excitation of edge wave with frequency two times less than the frequency of surface wave propagating perpendicular to the beach. Such mechanism of edge wave generation has been studied previously in a large number of papers using the assumption of non-breaking waves. This assumption was used in theoretical calculations and such conditions were created in laboratory experiments. In the natural conditions, the wave breaking is typical when edge waves are generated at sea beach. We study features of such processes in laboratory experiments. Experiments were performed in the wave flume of the Laboratory of Continental and Coast Morphodynamics (M2C), Caen. The flume is equipment with a wave maker controlled by computer. To model a plane beach, a PVC plate is placed at small angle to the horizontal bottom. Several resistive probes were used to measure characteristics of waves: one of them was used to measure free surface displacement near the wave maker and two probes were glued on the inclined plate. These probes allowed us to measure run-up due to parametrically excited edge waves. Run-up height is determined by processing a movie shot by high-speed camera. Sub-harmonic generation of standing edge waves is observed for definite control parameters: edge waves represent themselves a spatial mode with wavelength equal to double width of the flume; the frequency of edge wave is equal to half of surface wave frequency. Appearance of sub-harmonic mode instability is studied using probes and movie processing. The dependence of edge wave exponential

  1. Dispersive photonic crystals from the plane wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara-Cabrera, E.; Palomino-Ovando, M. A.; Flores-Desirena, B.; Gaspar-Armenta, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays photonic crystals are widely used in many different applications. One of the most used methods to compute their band structure is the plane wave method (PWM). However, it can only be applied directly to non-dispersive media and be extended to systems with a few model dielectric functions. We explore an extension of the PWM to photonic crystals containing dispersive materials, that solves an eigenvalue equation for the Bloch wave vectors. First we compare our calculation with analytical results for one dimensional photonic crystals containing Si using experimental values of its optical parameters, and obtainig very well agreement, even for the spectrum region with strong absorption. Then, using the same method, we computed the band structure for a two dimensional photonic crystal without absorption, formed by an square array of MgO cylinders in air. The optical parameters for MgO were modeled with the Lorentz dielectric function. Finally, we studied an array of MgO cylinders in a metal, using Drude model without absorption, for the metal dielectric function. For this last case, we study the gap-midgap ratio as a function of the filling fraction for both the square and triangular lattice. The gap-midgap ratio is larger for the triangular lattice, with a maximum value of 10% for a filling fraction of 0.6. Our results show that the method can be applied to dispersive materials, and then to a wide range of applications where photonic crystals can be used.

  2. Rayleigh and Wood anomalies in the diffraction of acoustic waves from the periodically corrugated surface of an elastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maradudin, A. A.; Simonsen, I.

    2016-05-01

    By the use of the Rayleigh method we have calculated the angular dependence of the reflectivity and the efficiencies of several other diffracted orders when the periodically corrugated surface of an isotropic elastic medium is illuminated by a volume acoustic wave of shear horizontal polarization. These dependencies display the signatures of Rayleigh and Wood anomalies, usually associated with the diffraction of light from a metallic grating. The Rayleigh anomalies occur at angles of incidence at which a diffracted order appears or disappears; the Wood anomalies here are caused by the excitation of the shear horizontal surface acoustic waves supported by the periodically corrugated surface of an isotropic elastic medium. The dispersion curves of these waves in both the nonradiative and radiative regions of the frequency-wavenumber plane are calculated, and used in predicting the angles of incidence at which the Wood anomalies are expected to occur.

  3. Resonant Enhancement of Charge Density Wave Diffraction in the Rare-Earth Tri-Tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.S.; Sorini, A.P.; Yi, M.; Chuang, Y.D.; Moritz, B.; Yang, W.L.; Chu, J.-H.; Kuo, H.H.; Gonzalez, A.G.Cruz; Fisher, I.R.; Hussain, Z.; Devereau, T.P.; Shen, Z.X.

    2012-05-15

    We performed resonant soft X-ray diffraction on known charge density wave (CDW) compounds, rare earth tri-tellurides. Near the M{sub 5} (3d - 4f) absorption edge of rare earth ions, an intense diffraction peak is detected at a wavevector identical to that of CDW state hosted on Te{sub 2} planes, indicating a CDW-induced modulation on the rare earth ions. Surprisingly, the temperature dependence of the diffraction peak intensity demonstrates an exponential increase at low temperatures, vastly different than that of the CDW order parameter. Assuming 4f multiplet splitting due to the CDW states, we present a model to calculate X-ray absorption spectrum and resonant profile of the diffraction peak, agreeing well with experimental observations. Our results demonstrate a situation where the temperature dependence of resonant X-ray diffraction peak intensity is not directly related to the intrinsic behavior of the order parameter associated with the electronic order, but is dominated by the thermal occupancy of the valence states.

  4. X-ray diffraction study of crystal plane distortion in silicon carbide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastro, M. A.; Fatemi, M.; Gaskill, D. K.; Lew, K.-K.; Van Mil, B. L.; Eddy, C. R.; Wood, C. E. C.

    2006-11-01

    Bulk growth of 4H-SiC is challenging due to the required high growth temperatures and gradients used in sublimation physical vapor transport that are difficult to control, particularly over large diameter boules. We used x-ray diffraction mapping to show concave crystal plane curvature in substrates from five commercial suppliers with two suppliers producing wafers with ⩽2° curvature. The extent of curvature varied little for substrates from any particular supplier. Maps of peak position and full width at half maximum from symmetric and asymmetric reflections were used to identify defective regions in the crystal. Closer examination of the rocking curves in the defective regions found a low density of low angle grain boundaries only in substrates from one supplier.

  5. Rigorous formulation for electromagnetic plane-wave scattering from a general-shaped groove in a perfectly conducting plane: comment.

    PubMed

    Skigin, Diana C; Depine, Ricardo A

    2008-05-01

    We show that the problem of scattering of an obliquely incident plane wave by a general-shaped groove engraved on a perfectly conducting plane, which was recently studied by Basha et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A24, 1647 (2007)], was solved 11 years ago using the same formulation. This method was further extended to deal with a finite number of grooves and also with complex apertures including several nonlossy and lossy dielectrics, as well as real metals. PMID:18451923

  6. Numerical investigation of diffraction of acoustic waves by phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-05-01

    Diffraction as well as transmission of acoustic waves by two-dimensional phononic crystals (PCs) composed of steel rods in water are investigated in this paper. The finite element simulations were performed in order to compute pressure fields generated by a line source that are incident on a finite size PC. Such field maps are analyzed based on the complex band structure for the infinite periodic PC. Finite size computations indicate that the exponential decrease of the transmission at deaf frequencies is much stronger than that in Bragg band gaps.

  7. Diffraction efficiency of radially-profiled off-plane reflection gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Drew M.; Tutt, James H.; DeRoo, Casey T.; Marlowe, Hannah; Peterson, Thomas J.; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Menz, Benedikt; Burwitz, Vadim; Hartner, Gisela; Laubis, Christian; Scholze, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Future X-ray missions will require gratings with high throughput and high spectral resolution. Blazed off-plane reflection gratings are capable of meeting these demands. A blazed grating profile optimizes grating efficiency, providing higher throughput to one side of zero-order on the arc of diffraction. This paper presents efficiency measurements made in the 0.3 - 1.5 keV energy band at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) BESSY II facility for three holographically-ruled gratings, two of which are blazed. Each blazed grating was tested in both the Littrow configuration and anti-Littrow configuration in order to test the alignment sensitivity of these gratings with regard to throughput. This paper outlines the procedure of the grating experiment performed at BESSY II and discuss the resulting efficiency measurements across various energies. Experimental results are generally consistent with theory and demonstrate that the blaze does increase throughput to one side of zero-order. However, the total efficiency of the non-blazed, sinusoidal grating is greater than that of the blazed gratings, which suggests that the method of manufacturing these blazed profiles fails to produce facets with the desired level of precision. Finally, evidence of a successful blaze implementation from first diffraction results of prototype blazed gratings produce via a new fabrication technique at the University of Iowa are presented.

  8. NMR Shielding in Metals Using the Augmented Plane Wave Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present calculations of solid state NMR magnetic shielding in metals, which includes both the orbital and the complete spin response of the system in a consistent way. The latter contains an induced spin-polarization of the core states and needs an all-electron self-consistent treatment. In particular, for transition metals, the spin hyperfine field originates not only from the polarization of the valence s-electrons, but the induced magnetic moment of the d-electrons polarizes the core s-states in opposite direction. The method is based on DFT and the augmented plane wave approach as implemented in the WIEN2k code. A comparison between calculated and measured NMR shifts indicates that first-principle calculations can obtain converged results and are more reliable than initially concluded based on previous publications. Nevertheless large k-meshes (up to 2 000 000 k-points in the full Brillouin-zone) and some Fermi-broadening are necessary. Our results show that, in general, both spin and orbital components of the NMR shielding must be evaluated in order to reproduce experimental shifts, because the orbital part cancels the shift of the usually highly ionic reference compound only for simple sp-elements but not for transition metals. This development paves the way for routine NMR calculations of metallic systems. PMID:26322148

  9. Quasinormal modes in de Sitter space: Plane wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanhayi, M. Reza

    2014-09-01

    Recently, in the context of dS/CFT correspondence, quasinormal modes have been put forward to address certain features of this conjecture. In particular, it is argued that the dual states of quasinormal modes are in fact the states of CFT3 which are created by operator insertions. For a scalar field in dS4, quasinormal modes which are singular on the past horizon of the south pole and decay exponentially towards the future have been considered in [G. S. Ng and A. Strominger, Classical Quantum Gravity 30, 104002 (2013); D. L. Jafferis et al., arXiv:1305.5523]; these modes lie in two complex highest-weight representations of the dS4 isometry group. In this work, we present a simple group representation analysis of these modes so that the de Sitter invariance is obviously manifest. By making use of the so-called plane wave method, we will show that the quasinormal modes correspond to one class of the unitary irreducible representation of the de Sitter group. This consideration could be generalized straightforwardly for higher-spin fields and higher dimensions; in particular, we will study the quasinormal modes for gauge and spinor fields, and, in the case of a scalar field, the generalization to higher dimensions is also obtained.

  10. Dynamical representation of the operators for the Dirac particle in the field of a plane wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    We find an explicit form of the integrals of motion for a Dirac particle placed in a plane-wave field. These operators are a realization of the Lie algebra of the Poincaré group in the case where the representation space consists of solutions of the Dirac-Pauli equation for the particle in a plane-wave field.

  11. Unsteady oblique interaction of a shock wave with a plane disturbance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Franklin K

    1954-01-01

    Analysis is made of the flow field produced by oblique impingement of weak plane disturbances of arbitrary profile on a plane normal shock. Three types of disturbance are considered: (a) sound wave propagating in the gas at rest into which the shock moves; (b) sound wave overtaking the shock from behind,(The sound wave reflects as a sound wave, and a stationary vorticity wave is produced); (c) an incompressible vorticity wave stationary in the gas ahead of the shock. The incident wave refracts as a stationary vorticity wave, and either a sound wave or attenuating pressure wave is also produced. Computations are presented for the first two types of incident wave, over the range of incidence angles, for shock Mach numbers of 1, 1.5, and infinity.

  12. Generating Damon-Eshbach Spin Waves in Py using a Conducting Diffraction Grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklenar, J.; Bhat, V. S.; Delong, L.; Ketterson, J. B.

    2012-02-01

    We have patterned silver hole arrays directly on top of uniform permalloy (Py) films. Typical Py and Ag film thicknesses are 25nm and 40 nm respectively; the holes in the Ag have a 500nm diameter and are patterned on a 1 micron lattice constant. We have measured resonant modes arising from a quasi-uniform microwave excitation field, applied in the plane of the sample, as a function of the in-plane external field and the in-plane field orientation relative to the principal axes of the array. Measurements were done using our broadband meanderline-based ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectrometer.ootnotetextC. C. Tsai, J. Choi, S. Cho, B. K. Sarma, C. Thompson, O. Chernyashevskyy, I. Nevirkovets, and J. B Ketterson, Rev. of Sci. Instr. 80, 023904 (2009). In addition to a uniform FMR mode we observe satellite modes that correspond to the Damon-Eshbach spin wavesootnotetextR. W. Damon and J. R. Eshbach J. Phys. Chem. Solids 19, 308 (1961). with wave vectors having Fourier components of the reciprocal lattice of the silver array. Hence, in an otherwise uniform magnetic film the silver array acts as a diffraction grating which excites spin waves with k 0 from the dynamic k 0 microwave magnetic field. The observed spin wave angular dispersion is in excellent agreement with a magnon dispersion relation for spin waves in a uniform film given by Kriesel et al.ootnotetextA. Kreisel, F. Sauli, L. Bartosch, and P. Kopietz, Eur. Phys. J. B 71, 59 (2009).

  13. Modelling ultrasonic array signals in multilayer anisotropic materials using the angular spectrum decomposition of plane wave responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeida, Yousif; Pinfield, Valerie J.; Challis, Richard E.

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasonic arrays have seen increasing use for the characterisation of composite materials. In this paper, ultrasonic wave propagation in multilayer anisotropic materials has been modelled using plane wave and angular spectrum decomposition techniques. Different matrix techniques, such as the stiffness matrix method and the transfer matrix method, are used to calculate the reflection and transmission coefficients of ultrasonic plane waves in the considered media. Then, an angular decomposition technique is used to derive the bounded beams from finite-width ultrasonic array elements from the plane wave responses calculated earlier. This model is considered to be an analytical exact solution for the problem; hence the diffraction of waves in such composite materials can be calculated for different incident angles for a very wide range of frequencies. This model is validated against experimental measurements using the Full-Matrix Capture (FMC) of array data in both a homogeneous isotropic material, i.e. aluminium, and an inhomogeneous multilayer anisotropic material, i.e. a carbon fibre reinforced composite.

  14. X-ray diffraction study of A- plane non-polar InN epilayer grown by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moret, Matthieu; Briot, Olivier; Gil, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Strong polarisation-induced electric fields in C-plane oriented nitrides semiconductor layers reduce the performance of devices. Eliminating the polarization fields can be achieved by growing nitrides along non polar direction. We have grown non polar A-plane oriented InN on R-plane (1‾102) nitridated sapphire substrate by MOCVD. We have studied the structural anisotropy observed in these layers by analyzing High Resolution XRay Diffraction rocking curve (RC) experiments as a function of the in-plane beam orientation. A-plane InN epilayer have a unique epitaxial relationship on R-Plane sapphire and show a strong structural anisotropy. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the InN(11‾20) XRD RC values are contained between 44 and 81 Arcmin. FWHM is smaller when the diffraction occurs along the [0001] and the largest FWHM values, of the (11‾20) RC, are obtained when the diffraction occurs along the [1‾100] in-plane direction. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging revealed morphologies with well organized crystallites. The grains are structured along a unique crystallographic orientation of InN, leading to larger domains in this direction. This structural anisotropy can be, in first approximation, attributed to the difference in the domain sizes observed. XRD reciprocal space mappings (RSM) were performed in asymmetrical configuration on (13‾40) and (2‾202) diffraction plane. RSM are measured with a beam orientation corresponding to a maximal and a minimal width of the (11‾20) Rocking curves, respectively. A simple theoretical model is exposed to interpret the RSM. We concluded that the dominant contribution to the anisotropy is due to the scattering coherence length anisotropy present in our samples.

  15. Ab initio quantum transport calculations using plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Lekue, A.; Vergniory, M. G.; Jiang, X. W.; Wang, L. W.

    2015-08-01

    We present an ab initio method to calculate elastic quantum transport at the nanoscale. The method is based on a combination of density functional theory using plane wave nonlocal pseudopotentials and the use of auxiliary periodic boundary conditions to obtain the scattering states. The method can be applied to any applied bias voltage and the charge density and potential profile can either be calculated self-consistently, or using an approximated self-consistent field (SCF) approach. Based on the scattering states one can straightforwardly calculate the transmission coefficients and the corresponding electronic current. The overall scheme allows us to obtain accurate and numerically stable solutions for the elastic transport, with a computational time similar to that of a ground state calculation. This method is particularly suitable for calculations of tunneling currents through vacuum, that some of the nonequilibrium Greens function (NEGF) approaches based on atomic basis sets might have difficulty to deal with. Several examples are provided using this method from electron tunneling, to molecular electronics, to electronic devices: (i) On a Au nanojunction, the tunneling current dependence on the electrode-electrode distance is investigated. (ii) The tunneling through field emission resonances (FERs) is studied via an accurate description of the surface vacuum states. (iii) Based on quantum transport calculations, we have designed a molecular conformational switch, which can turn on and off a molecular junction by applying a perpendicular electric field. (iv) Finally, we have used the method to simulate tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) based on two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), where we have studied the performance and scaling limits of such nanodevices and proposed atomic doping to enhance the transistor performance.

  16. Plane wave holonomies in quantum gravity. II. A sine wave solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Donald E.

    2015-08-01

    This paper constructs an approximate sinusoidal wave packet solution to the equations of canonical gravity. The theory uses holonomy-flux variables with support on a lattice (LHF =lattice-holonomy flux ). There is an SU(2) holonomy on each edge of the LHF simplex, and the goal is to study the behavior of these holonomies under the influence of a passing gravitational wave. The equations are solved in a small sine approximation: holonomies are expanded in powers of sines and terms beyond sin2 are dropped; also, fields vary slowly from vertex to vertex. The wave is unidirectional and linearly polarized. The Hilbert space is spanned by a set of coherent states tailored to the symmetry of the plane wave case. Fixing the spatial diffeomorphisms is equivalent to fixing the spatial interval between vertices of the loop quantum gravity lattice. This spacing can be chosen such that the eigenvalues of the triad operators are large, as required in the small sine limit, even though the holonomies are not large. Appendices compute the energy of the wave, estimate the lifetime of the coherent state packet, discuss circular polarization and coarse-graining, and determine the behavior of the spinors used in the U(N) SHO realization of LQG.

  17. Stolt’s f-k migration for plane wave ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Damien; Le Tarnec, Louis; Muth, Stéphan; Montagnon, Emmanuel; Porée, Jonathan; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Ultrafast ultrasound is an emerging modality that offers new perspectives and opportunities in medical imaging. Plane wave imaging (PWI) allows one to attain very high frame rates by transmission of planar ultrasound wavefronts. As a plane wave reaches a given scatterer, the latter becomes a secondary source emitting upward spherical waves and creating a diffraction hyperbola in the received RF (radio-frequency) signals. To produce an image of the scatterers, all the hyperbolas must be migrated back to their apexes. In order to perform beamforming of plane wave echo RFs and return high-quality images at high frame rates, we propose a new migration method carried out in the frequency-wavenumber (f-k) domain. The f-k migration for PWI has been adapted from the Stolt migration for seismic imaging. This migration technique is based on the exploding reflector model (ERM), which consists in assuming that all the scatterers explode in concert and become acoustic sources. The classical ERM model, however, is not appropriate for PWI. We showed that the ERM can be made suitable for PWI by a spatial transformation of the hyperbolic traces present in the RF data. In vitro experiments were performed to sketch the advantages of PWI with Stolt’s f-k migration over the conventional delay-and-sum (DAS) approach. The Stolt’s f-k migration was also compared with the Fourier-based method developed by J-Y Lu. Our findings show that multi-angle compounded f-k migrated images are of quality similar to those obtained with a state-of-the-art dynamic focusing mode. This remained true even with a very small number of steering angles thus ensuring a highly competitive frame rate. In addition, the new FFT-based f-k migration provides comparable or better contrast-to-noise ratio and lateral resolution than the Lu’s and DAS migration schemes. Matlab codes of the Stolt’s f-k migration for PWI are provided. PMID:24626107

  18. [Design and analysis of automatic measurement instrument for diffraction efficiency of plane reflection grating].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Qi, Xiang-Dong; Yu, Hong-Zhu; Yu, Hai-Li

    2009-02-01

    A new-style system that automatically measures the diffraction efficiency of plane reflection grating was designed. The continuous illuminant was adopted for illumination, the duplex grating spectrograph structure was applied, and the linear array NMOS was the receiving component. Wielding relevant principle of the grating spectrograph, theoretical analysis principle was carried out for the testing system. Integrating the aberration theory of geometrical optics, the image quality of this optics system was analyzed. Analysis indicated that the systematic device structure is compact, and electronics system is simplified. The system does not have the problem about wavelength sweep synchronization of the two grating spectrographs, and its wavelength repeatability is very good. So the precision is easy to guarantee. Compared with the former automated scheme, the production cost is reduced, moreover it is easy to operate, and the working efficiency is enhanced. The study showed that this automatic measurement instrument system features a spectral range of 190-1 100 nm and resolution is less than 3 nm, which entirely satisfies the design request. It is an economical and feasible plan. PMID:19445251

  19. Shock wave interactions between slender bodies - Some aspects of three-dimensional shock wave diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooseria, S. J.; Skews, B. W.

    2016-04-01

    A complex interference flowfield consisting of multiple shocks and expansion waves is produced when high-speed slender bodies are placed in close proximity. The disturbances originating from a generator body impinge onto the adjacent receiver body, modifying the local flow conditions over the receiver. This paper aims to uncover the basic gas dynamics produced by two closely spaced slender bodies in a supersonic freestream. Experiments and numerical simulations were used to interpret the flowfield, where good agreement between the predictions and measurements was observed. The numerical data were then used to characterise the attenuation associated with shock wave diffraction, which was found to be interdependent with the bow shock contact perimeter over the receiver bodies. Shock-induced boundary layer separation was observed over the conical and hemispherical receiver bodies. These strong viscous-shock interactions result in double-reflected, as well as double-diffracted shock wave geometries in the interference region, and the diffracting waves progress over the conical and hemispherical receivers' surfaces in "lambda" type configurations. This gives evidence that viscous effects can have a substantial influence on the local bow shock structure surrounding high-speed slender bodies in close proximity.

  20. Plane waves in de Sitter space: Spin-1/2 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza Tanhayi, M.; Mohsenzadeh, M.; Yusofi, E.

    2016-06-01

    We employ the coordinate-independent plane wave solution in de Sitter space to study the spin-1/2 particle production. The so-called plane waves in the zero-curvature limit reduce to the usual plane waves in flat space. Previously in (Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 24, 1550052 (2015)) we used such modes to study the instability of the de Sitter space, here, by explicit calculation, we study the sipn-1/2 particle creation in de Sitter space caused by mixing modes.

  1. Gauss' law and nonlinear plane waves for Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapalis, A.; Politis, E. P.; Maintas, X. N.; Diakonos, F. K.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate nonlinear plane-wave solutions of the classical Minkowskian Yang-Mills (YM) equations of motion. By imposing a suitable ansatz which solves Gauss' law for the SU(3) theory, we derive solutions which consist of Jacobi elliptic functions depending on an enumerable set of elliptic modulus values. The solutions represent periodic anharmonic plane waves which possess arbitrary nonzero mass and are exact extrema of the nonlinear YM action. Among them, a unique harmonic plane wave with a nontrivial pattern in phase, spin, and color is identified. Similar solutions are present in the SU(4) case, while they are absent from the SU(2) theory.

  2. Multi-frame visualization for detonation wave diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagura, Y.; Kasahara, J.; Matsuo, A.

    2016-05-01

    When a detonation wave emerges from a tube into unconfined space filled with a gas mixture, detonation wave diffraction occurs due to abrupt changes in the cross-sectional area. In the present study, we focused on the local explosion in reinitiation and propagation of a transverse detonation wave by performing comprehensive and direct observation with high time resolution visualization in a two-dimensional rectangular channel. Using the visualization methods of shadowgraph and multi-frame, short-time, open-shutter photography, we determined where the wall reflection point is generated, and also determined where the bright point is originated by the local explosion, and investigated the effects of the deviation angle and initial pressure of the gas mixture. We found that the reinitiation of detonation had two modes that were determined by the deviation angle of the channel. If the deviation angle was less than or equal to 30°, the local explosion of reinitiation might occur in the vicinity of the channel wall, and if the deviation angle was greater than or equal to 60°, the local explosion might originate on the upper side of the tube exit. With a deviation angle greater than 60°, the position of the wall reflection point depended on the cell width, so the radial distance of the wall reflection point from the apex of the tube exit was about 12 times the cell width. Similarly, the bright point (local explosion point) was located a distance of about 11 times the cell width from the apex of the tube exit, with a circumferential angle of 48°.

  3. Soil-structure interaction on shallow rigid circular foundation: plane SH waves from far-field earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Vincent W.; Luo, Hao

    2014-03-01

    A closed-form wave function analytic solution of two-dimensional scattering and diffraction of incident plane SH-waves by a flexible wall on a rigid shallow circular foundation embedded in an elastic half-space is presented. This research generalizes the previous solution by Trifunac in 1972, which tackled only the semi-circular foundation, to arbitrary shallow circular-arc foundation cases, and is thus comparatively more realistic. Ground surface displacement spectra at higher frequencies are also obtained. As an analytical series solution, the accuracy and error analysis of the numerical results are also discussed. It was observed from the results that the rise-to-span ratio of the foundation profile, frequency of incident waves, and mass ratios of different media (foundation-structure-soil) are the three primary factors that may affect the surface ground motion amplitudes near the structure.

  4. Method for the measurement of surface-relief grating's profile using initial phase of diffraction wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Fanrong; Wu, Jianhong; Gao, Fei

    2015-11-01

    The analysis of initial phase of diffraction wave of grating mask is based on rigorous coupled-wave analysis method. In this paper, the general diffraction analysis numerical code based on the rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) is written by MATLAB software to calculate the 0th refraction wave of grating mask. Since large measurement errors will occur while measuring the grove shape by AFM, the method of measuring the initial phase of diffraction wave was proposed and the feasibility of this method has also been verified.

  5. Matter-wave diffraction at the natural limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Christian; Sclafani, Michele; Knobloch, Christian; Lilach, Yigal; Juffmann, Thomas; Kotakoski, Jani; Mangler, Clemens; Winter, Andreas; Turchanin, Andrey; Meyer, Jannik; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Arndt, Markus

    2016-05-01

    The high sensitivity of matter-wave interferometry experiments to forces and perturbations makes them an essential tool for precision measurements and tests of quantum physics. While mostly grating made of laser-light are used, material gratings have the advantage that they are independent of the particle's internal properties. This makes them universally applicable. However, the molecules will experience substantial van der Waals shifts while passing the grating slits, which suggests limiting this perturbation by reducing the material thickness. In a comprehensive study we compared the van der Waals interactions for free-standing gratings made from single and double layer graphene to masks commonly used in atom interferometry. From the population of high fringe orders we deduce a surprisingly strong electrical interaction between the polarizable molecules and the nanomasks. As even for these thinnest diffraction elements which-path information is not shared with the environment, we interpret this as an experimental affirmation of Bohr's arguments in his famous debate with Einstein.

  6. Verification of the Uncertainty Principle by Using Diffraction of Light Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolic, D.; Nesic, Lj

    2011-01-01

    We described a simple idea for experimental verification of the uncertainty principle for light waves. We used a single-slit diffraction of a laser beam for measuring the angular width of zero-order diffraction maximum and obtained the corresponding wave number uncertainty. We will assume that the uncertainty in position is the slit width. For the…

  7. Underdetermined system theory applied to qualitative analysis of response caused by attenuating plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yukio

    1989-05-01

    A qualitative analysis of the mechanical response of rate-dependent media caused by a one-dimensional plane smooth wave front and by a continuous wave front attenuating in the media is performed by an underdetermined system of nonlinear partial differential equations. The analysis reveals that smooth strain, particle velocity, and stress profiles, which the smooth wave front has, are not similar and that the wave front is composed of some partial waves having different properties. The property is represented by a set of strain rate, acceleration, and stress rate. The wave front derived here from the analysis is composed of four different partial waves. The front of the wave front is necessarily a contraction wave in which strain, particle velocity, and stress increase with time, while the rear is a rarefaction wave where they all decrease with time. Between these two wave fronts there are two remaining wave fronts. We call these wave fronts mesocontraction waves I and II. Wave front I is a wave in which stress decreases notwithstanding the increase in strain and particle velocity with time, which is followed by the other, i.e., wave front II, where with time, particle velocity, and stress decrease in spite of the increase in strain. The continuous wave front having continuous and nonsmooth profiles of strain, particle velocity, and stress can also be composed of four waves. These waves possess the same property as the corresponding waves in the smooth wave front mentioned above. The velocities at three boundaries that the waves have are discontinuous. Therefore, these four wave fronts are independent waves, just as a shock wave and a rarefraction wave. Specifically, the front wave, i.e., a contraction wave front is being outrun by a second wave front, the second one is being outrun by a third wave front, and the third is being outrun by a fourth wave front, i.e., a rarefaction wave. We call the second wave front degenerate contraction wave I. We also call the third

  8. Reduction of Bubble Cavitation by Modifying the Diffraction Wave from a Lithotripter Aperture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose A new method was devised to suppress the bubble cavitation in the lithotripter focal zone to reduce the propensity of shockwave-induced renal injury. Materials and Methods An edge extender was designed and fabricated to fit on the outside of the ellipsoidal reflector of an electrohydraulic lithotripter to disturb the generation of diffraction wave at the aperture, but with little effect on the acoustic field inside the reflector. Results Although the peak negative pressures at the lithotripter focus using the edge extender at 20 kV were similar to that of the original configuration (-11.1±0.9 vs −10.6±0.7 MPa), the duration of the tensile wave was shortened significantly (3.2±0.54 vs 5.83±0.56 μs, P<0.01). There is no difference, however, in both the amplitude and duration of the compressive shockwaves between these two configurations as well as the −6 dB beam width in the focal plane. The significant suppression effect of bubble cavitation was confirmed by the measured bubble collapse time using passive cavitation detection. At the lithotripter focus, while only about 30 shocks were needed to rupture a blood vessel phantom using the original HM-3 reflector at 20 kV, no damage could be produced after 300 shocks using the edge extender. Meanwhile, the original HM-3 lithotripter at 20 kV can achieve a stone comminution efficiency of 50.4±2.0% on plaster-of-Paris stone phantom after 200 shocks, which is comparable to that of using the edge extender (46.8±4.1%, P=0.005). Conclusions Modifying the diffraction wave at the lithotripter aperture can suppress the shockwave-induced bubble cavitation with significant reduced damage potential on the vessel phantom but satisfactory stone comminution ability. PMID:22332839

  9. Bragg diffraction of light by ultrasonic waves in planargyrotrophic optical waveguides in an external electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, G.V.

    1995-09-01

    Features of Bragg diffraction of light by two-partial surface ultrasonic waves in planar gyrotropic optical waveguides placed in an external electric field are considered. General expressions for complex vector amplitudes of diffracted fields are presented. It is shown that the diffracted waves have elliptic polarization, the ellipticity being determined by the linear anisotropy of the waveguide structure, the anisotropy induced by an external electric field, the anisotropy of photoelasticity, and the crystal gyrotropy. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Traveling wave modes of a plane layered anelastic earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odom, Robert I.

    2016-05-01

    Incorporation of attenuation into the normal mode sum representations of seismic signals is commonly effected by applying perturbation theory. This is fine for weak attenuation, but problematic for stronger attenuation. In this work modes of the anelastic medium are represented as complex superpositions of elastic eigenfunctions. For the P-SV system a generalized eigenvalue equation for the complex eigenwavenumbers and complex coefficients used to construct the anelastic eigenfunctions is derived. The generalized eigenvalue problem for the P-SV problem is exactly linear in the eigenwavenumber at the expense of doubling the dimension. The SH problem is exactly linear in the square of the eigenwavenumber. This is in contrast to a similar standing wave problem for the earth free oscillations (Tromp and Dahlen, 1990). Attenuation is commonly incorporated into synthetic seismogram calculations by introduction of complex frequency dependent elastic moduli. The moduli depend nonlinearly on the frequency. The independent variable in the standing wave free oscillation problem is the frequency, which makes the eigenvalue problem nonlinear. The choice of the wavenumber as the independent variable for the traveling wave problem leads to a linear problem. The Earth model may be transversely isotropic. Compressional waves, and both polarizations of shear waves (SV, SH) are treated.

  11. Travelling wave modes of a plane layered anelastic earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odom, Robert I.

    2016-08-01

    Incorporation of attenuation into the normal mode sum representations of seismic signals is commonly effected by applying perturbation theory. This is fine for weak attenuation, but problematic for stronger attenuation. In this work, modes of the anelastic medium are represented as complex superpositions of elastic eigenfunctions. For the P-SV system, a generalized eigenvalue equation for the complex eigenwavenumbers and complex coefficients used to construct the anelastic eigenfunctions is derived. The generalized eigenvalue problem for the P-SV problem is exactly linear in the eigenwavenumber at the expense of doubling the dimension. The SH problem is exactly linear in the square of the eigenwavenumber. This is in contrast to a similar standing wave problem for the earth free oscillations. Attenuation is commonly incorporated into synthetic seismogram calculations by introduction of complex frequency-dependent elastic moduli. The moduli depend nonlinearly on the frequency. The independent variable in the standing wave free oscillation problem is the frequency, which makes the eigenvalue problem nonlinear. The choice of the wavenumber as the independent variable for the travelling wave problem leads to a linear problem. The Earth model may be transversely isotropic. Compressional waves and both polarizations of shear waves (SV, SH) are treated.

  12. The use of the plane wave fluid-structure interaction loading approximation in NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Plane Wave Approximation (PWA) is widely used in finite element analysis to implement the loading generated by an underwater shock wave. The method required to implement the PWA in NASTRAN is presented along with example problems. A theoretical background is provided and the limitations of the PWA are discussed.

  13. Detection of in-plane displacements of acoustic wave fields using extrinsic Fizeau fiber interferometric sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhawan, R.; Gunther, M. F.; Claus, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the in-plane particle displacement components of ultrasonic surface acoustic wave fields using extrinsic Fizeau fiber interferometric (EFFI) sensors are reported. Wave propagation in materials and the fiber sensor elements are briefly discussed. Calibrated experimental results obtained for simulated acoustic emission events on homogeneous metal test specimens are reported and compared to previous results obtained using piezoelectric transducers.

  14. The Relativistic Transformation for an Electromagnetic Plane Wave with General Time Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Glenn S.

    2012-01-01

    In special relativity, the transformation between inertial frames for an electromagnetic plane wave is usually derived for the time-harmonic case (the field is a sinusoid of infinite duration), even though all practical waves are of finite duration and may not even contain a dominant sinusoid. This paper presents an alternative derivation in which…

  15. An Exact Solution for Geophysical Edge Waves in the {β}-Plane Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu-Kruse, Delia

    2015-12-01

    By taking into account the {β}-plane effects, we provide an exact nonlinear solution to the geophysical edge-wave problem within the Lagrangian framework. This solution describes trapped waves propagating eastward or westward along a sloping beach with the shoreline parallel to the Equator.

  16. On the optical theorem and non-plane-wave scattering in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouesbet, G.

    2009-11-01

    In quantum mechanics, the optical theorem states that the extinction cross section is equal (within a prefactor 4π/k, in which k is a quantum wave number) to the imaginary part of the forward scattering angular function. This theorem is valid for plane wave scattering. We discuss modifications required for non-plane-wave scattering and establish a generalized expression for the extinction cross section in quantum mechanics. Examples are provided for two kinds of quantum shaped beams, namely, Gaussian and Bessel beams.

  17. Cylindrical and spherical space equivalents to the plane wave expansion technique of Maxwell's wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Robert C.; Alzahrani, Mohammed A.; Jafari, Seyed Hamed

    2015-02-01

    The plane wave expansion (PWM) technique applied to Maxwell's wave equations provides researchers with a supply of information regarding the optical properties of dielectric structures. The technique is well suited for structures that display a linear periodicity. When the focus is directed towards optical resonators and structures that lack linear periodicity the eigen-process can easily exceed computational resources and time constraints. In the case of dielectric structures which display cylindrical or spherical symmetry, a coordinate system specific set of basis functions have been employed to cast Maxwell's wave equations into an eigen-matrix formulation from which the resonator states associated with the dielectric profile can be obtained. As for PWM, the inverse of the dielectric and field components are expanded in the basis functions (Fourier-Fourier-Bessel, FFB, in cylindrical and Fourier- Bessel-Legendre, BLF, in spherical) and orthogonality is employed to form the matrix expressions. The theoretical development details will be presented indicating how certain mathematical complications in the process have been overcome and how the eigen-matrix can be tuned to a specific mode type. The similarities and differences in PWM, FFB and BLF are presented. In the case of structures possessing axial cylindrical symmetry, the inclusion of the z axis component of propagation constant makes the technique applicable to photonic crystal fibers and other waveguide structures. Computational results will be presented for a number of different dielectric geometries including Bragg ring resonators, cylindrical space slot channel waveguides and bottle resonators. Steps to further enhance the computation process will be reported.

  18. Theoretical calculation of plane wave speeds for alkali metals under pressure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eftis, J.; Macdonald, D. E.; Arkilic, G. M.

    1971-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of the variation with pressure of small amplitude plane wave speeds are performed for sodium and potassium at zero temperature. The results obtained for wave speeds associated with volume dependent second-order elastic coefficients show better agreement with experimental data than for wave speeds associated with shear dependent coefficients. This result is believed to be due to omission of the band structure correction to the strain energy density.

  19. Interaction of a plane shock wave in water with a thin layer of lower density

    SciTech Connect

    Bergel`son, V.I.; Nemchinov, I.V.; Orlova, T.I.; Khazins, V.M.

    1992-08-01

    A numerical analysis is conducted on the interaction of a plane shock wave in water with a thin layer of lower density, which is perpendicular to the wave front. Parameters are defined for the perturbed flow structure and for large-scale precursors, which arise ahead of the shock front. Possibilities are discussed of experimentally investigating this phenomena with a cylindrical shock wave using standard explosives. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Anti-plane transverse waves propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, A-Li; Yan, Dong-Jia; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, anti-plane transverse wave propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures is studied. The localization factor is introduced to characterize the wave propagation behavior. The transfer matrix method based on the nonlocal piezoelectricity continuum theory is used to calculate the localization factor. Additionally, the stiffness matrix method is applied to compute the wave transmission spectra. A cut-off frequency is found, beyond which the elastic waves cannot propagate through the periodic structure. The size effect or the influence of the ratio of the internal to external characteristic lengths on the cut-off frequency and the wave propagation behavior are investigated and discussed. PMID:26518526

  1. Feasibility of detecting near-surface feature with Rayleigh-wave diffraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Nyquist, J.E.; Xu, Y.; Roth, M.J.S.; Miller, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    Detection of near-surfaces features such as voids and faults is challenging due to the complexity of near-surface materials and the limited resolution of geophysical methods. Although multichannel, high-frequency, surface-wave techniques can provide reliable shear (S)-wave velocities in different geological settings, they are not suitable for detecting voids directly based on anomalies of the S-wave velocity because of limitations on the resolution of S-wave velocity profiles inverted from surface-wave phase velocities. Therefore, we studied the feasibility of directly detecting near-surfaces features with surface-wave diffractions. Based on the properties of surface waves, we have derived a Rayleigh-wave diffraction traveltime equation. We also have solved the equation for the depth to the top of a void and an average velocity of Rayleigh waves. Using these equations, the depth to the top of a void/fault can be determined based on traveltime data from a diffraction curve. In practice, only two diffraction times are necessary to define the depth to the top of a void/fault and the average Rayleigh-wave velocity that generates the diffraction curve. We used four two-dimensional square voids to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting a void with Rayleigh-wave diffractions: a 2??m by 2??m with a depth to the top of the void of 2??m, 4??m by 4??m with a depth to the top of the void of 7??m, and 6??m by 6??m with depths to the top of the void 12??m and 17??m. We also modeled surface waves due to a vertical fault. Rayleigh-wave diffractions were recognizable for all these models after FK filtering was applied to the synthetic data. The Rayleigh-wave diffraction traveltime equation was verified by the modeled data. Modeling results suggested that FK filtering is critical to enhance diffracted surface waves. A real-world example is presented to show how to utilize the derived equation of surface-wave diffractions. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by a generalized Luneburg sphere-Part 2: Wave scattering and time-domain scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laven, Philip; Lock, James A.; Adam, John A.

    2015-09-01

    We calculated scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave by a radially inhomogeneous particle and a radially inhomogeneous bubble when the square of the refractive index profile is parabolic as a function of radius. Such a particle or bubble is called a generalized Luneburg lens. A wide variety of scattering phenomena can occur, depending on the value of the two adjustable parameters of the parabola. These phenomena, including transmission rainbows, the weak caustic for near-critical-angle scattering by a bubble, surface orbiting, the interior orbiting paths of morphology-dependent resonances, and the separation of diffraction are studied here using wave theory and time domain scattering. These phenomena are also compared with their appearance or absence for scattering by a homogeneous sphere.

  3. Well-posedness and generalized plane waves simulations of a 2D mode conversion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbert-Gérard, Lise-Marie

    2015-12-01

    Certain types of electro-magnetic waves propagating in a plasma can undergo a mode conversion process. In magnetic confinement fusion, this phenomenon is very useful to heat the plasma, since it permits to transfer the heat at or near the plasma center. This work focuses on a mathematical model of wave propagation around the mode conversion region, from both theoretical and numerical points of view. It aims at developing, for a well-posed equation, specific basis functions to study a wave mode conversion process. These basis functions, called generalized plane waves, are intrinsically based on variable coefficients. As such, they are particularly adapted to the mode conversion problem. The design of generalized plane waves for the proposed model is described in detail. Their implementation within a discontinuous Galerkin method then provides numerical simulations of the process. These first 2D simulations for this model agree with qualitative aspects studied in previous works.

  4. Wave dislocations in the diffraction pattern of a higher-order optical catastrophe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, J. F.

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores a partial unfolding of the canonical three-dimensional diffraction field associated with the optical catastrophe X9 with modulus K = -6. A practical realization would be the focal region of a thin lens created by setting a drop of water on a horizontal glass slide and constraining its perimeter to be square. The pattern of caustics formed around the focus is a twisted and ribbed double trumpet with 4-fold symmetry. Like all diffraction catastrophes the essential structure is based on a pattern of line singularities (wave dislocations or optical vortices) on which the amplitude is zero and the phase is indeterminate. The caustic is encircled on the outside, and in the focal plane, by a highly puckered and non-circular ring and a forest of other dislocations. Far from the axis these are organized by the planar group 3m, despite the 4-fold symmetry. On the inside, the dislocation lines form a curved quasi-periodic lattice of small, nearly planar, nearly circular, rings based on the tetragonal space group I4mm. There are similarities to the pattern for the elliptic umbilic catastrophe, and, just as in that case, far from the focus the inner rings in lines close to the ribs of the caustic eventually join together to become the straight inner dislocations of the Pearcey pattern for the cusp. But the way in which this transition is accomplished, which involves four simultaneous reconnections, is quite different for the two catastrophes. Further, in the elliptic (and hyperbolic) umbilic catastrophes diffraction splits the focal spot longitudinally; in X9 with K = -6 it does not.

  5. Source extension of chorus waves in the equatorial plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayosh, M.; Santolik, O.; Parrot, M.

    2009-04-01

    We use measurements of the Cluster spacecraft and a ray tracing simulation to estimate the location and size of the global source of whistler-mode chorus emissions. In this study we use the data provided simultaneously by the STAFF-SA instruments on the four Cluster spacecraft on 19 August, 2003. To determine the direction of propagation of chorus we calculate Poynting vector whereas a ray-tracing method is used to estimate the chorus source extension. For the first time this analysis has been made along whole particular Cluster orbit in both hemispheres. Our study shows that minimum size of the global chorus source region in the equatorial plane is between 1-3 Earth's radii. The resulting location of the chorus source region is at radial distances between 3 and 8 Earth radii. This result is in agreement with previous analysis of Cluster data by Parrot et al., 2003, 2004 and with the study of Santolik et al., 2005 who analyzed data from the Double Star TC-1 spacecraft.

  6. Ground state and the spin precession of the Dirac electron in counterpropagating plane electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzdov, G. N.

    2016-06-01

    The fundamental solution of the Dirac equation for an electron in an electromagnetic field with harmonic dependence on space-time coordinates is obtained. The field is composed of three standing plane harmonic waves with mutually orthogonal phase planes and the same frequency. Each standing wave consists of two eigenwaves with different complex amplitudes and opposite directions of propagation. The fundamental solution is obtained in the form of the projection operator defining the subspace of solutions to the Dirac equation. It is illustrated by the analysis of the ground state and the spin precession of the Dirac electron in the field of two counterpropagating plane waves with left and right circular polarizations. Interrelations between the fundamental solution and approximate partial solutions is discussed and a criterion for evaluating the accuracy of approximate solutions is suggested.

  7. Crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP) analysis as projected from plane-wave basis sets.

    PubMed

    Deringer, Volker L; Tchougréeff, Andrei L; Dronskowski, Richard

    2011-06-01

    Simple, yet predictive bonding models are essential achievements of chemistry. In the solid state, in particular, they often appear in the form of visual bonding indicators. Because the latter require the crystal orbitals to be constructed from local basis sets, the application of the most popular density-functional theory codes (namely, those based on plane waves and pseudopotentials) appears as being ill-fitted to retrieve the chemical bonding information. In this paper, we describe a way to re-extract Hamilton-weighted populations from plane-wave electronic-structure calculations to develop a tool analogous to the familiar crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP) method. We derive the new technique, dubbed "projected COHP" (pCOHP), and demonstrate its viability using examples of covalent, ionic, and metallic crystals (diamond, GaAs, CsCl, and Na). For the first time, this chemical bonding information is directly extracted from the results of plane-wave calculations. PMID:21548594

  8. Plane-wave decomposition by spherical-convolution microphone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaely, Boaz; Park, Munhum

    2001-05-01

    Reverberant sound fields are widely studied, as they have a significant influence on the acoustic performance of enclosures in a variety of applications. For example, the intelligibility of speech in lecture rooms, the quality of music in auditoria, the noise level in offices, and the production of 3D sound in living rooms are all affected by the enclosed sound field. These sound fields are typically studied through frequency response measurements or statistical measures such as reverberation time, which do not provide detailed spatial information. The aim of the work presented in this seminar is the detailed analysis of reverberant sound fields. A measurement and analysis system based on acoustic theory and signal processing, designed around a spherical microphone array, is presented. Detailed analysis is achieved by decomposition of the sound field into waves, using spherical Fourier transform and spherical convolution. The presentation will include theoretical review, simulation studies, and initial experimental results.

  9. Qualitative analysis of response caused by growing plane waves by underdetermined system theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yukio

    1991-03-01

    A qualitative analysis of the mechanical response of rate-dependent media caused by one-dimensional plane smooth- and continuous-wave fronts with the growing peaks of strain, particle velocity, and stress is performed by an underdetermined system of nonlinear partial differential equations. The response found by the analysis reveals that strain, particle velocity, and stress profiles in the smooth-wave front are not similar and that the front is composed of five partial waves having different properties. The property is represented by the set of strain rate, acceleration, and stress rate as in a previous study. The front of the wave front is necessarily a contraction wave in which strain, particle velocity, and stress increase with time. The second partial wave is another contraction wave. We call the wave a vice-contraction wave. The rear is assumed to be a rarefaction wave where they all decrease with time. Between these two partial waves there are two remaining partial waves. We call these waves mesorarefaction waves I and II. Wave II is a wave in which particle velocity and stress increase, notwithstanding the decrease in strain with time. It is followed by wave I in which the increase in stress with time occurs in spite of the decrease in strain and particle velocity. The continuous-wave front, which has discontinuous-movement velocities at the continuous, but nonsmooth, positions in the profiles of strain, particle velocity, and stress, is composed of five independent waves. These waves are a contraction wave, a vice-contraction wave, evolutional rarefaction waves II and I, and a rarefaction wave which possess the same properties as the corresponding partial waves in the smooth-wave front mentioned above. Both in the smooth-growing-wave front and in the continuous one the peak precedence is in the order of the strain, particle velocity, and stress peaks. The stress-strain path and stress-particle velocity path at a position in a rate-dependent medium which is

  10. An algorithm for the calculation of the partial wave expansion of the Coulomb-distorted plane wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornyak, I.; Kruppa, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    The partial wave expansion of the Coulomb-distorted plane wave is determined by the help of the complex generalized hypergeometric function 2F2(a , a ; a + l + 1 , a - l ; z) . An algorithm for the calculation of 2F2(a , a ; a + l + 1 , a - l ; z) is created and it is implemented as a FORTRAN-90 code. The code is fast and its accuracy is 14 significant decimal digits.

  11. Cascading processes in the nonlinear diffraction of light by standing acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadoenkova, Yu. S.; Dadoenkova, N. N.; Bentivegna, F. F. L.; Lyubchanskii, I. L.; Lee, Y. P.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of two types of cascading process to the nonlinear optical diffraction of electromagnetic waves from a standing acoustic wave in a GaAs crystal is theoretically studied. The first type of cascading process results from second-harmonic generation followed by linear acousto-optical diffraction, while the second type involves linear acousto-optical diffraction from the standing acoustic wave and subsequent sum-frequency generation. In contrast to the third, direct, nonlinear acousto-optical diffraction process we previously investigated, the photoelastic interaction between electromagnetic and acoustic waves is here linear. We establish the rules governing the cascading processes and show that in most cases the output signal simultaneously results from two or even three of the possible nonlinear diffraction mechanisms. However, we demonstrate that a careful choice of the incidence angles of the incoming electromagnetic waves, of the polarization combinations of the incoming and diffracted waves, and of the type of acoustic wave (longitudinal or transverse) makes it always possible to distinguish between the direct and either of the two cascading processes.

  12. On the use of evanescent plane waves for low-frequency energy transmission across material interfaces.

    PubMed

    Woods, Daniel C; Bolton, J Stuart; Rhoads, Jeffrey F

    2015-10-01

    The transmission of airborne sound into high-impedance media is of interest in several applications. For example, sonic booms in the atmosphere may impact marine life when incident on the ocean surface, or affect the integrity of existing structures when incident on the ground. Transmission across high impedance-difference interfaces is generally limited by reflection and refraction at the surface, and by the critical angle criterion. However, spatially decaying incident waves, i.e., inhomogeneous or evanescent plane waves, may transmit energy above the critical angle, unlike homogeneous plane waves. The introduction of a decaying component to the incident trace wavenumber creates a nonzero propagating component of the transmitted normal wavenumber, so energy can be transmitted across the interface. A model of evanescent plane waves and their transmission across fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces is developed here. Results are presented for both air-water and air-solid interfaces. The effects of the incident wave parameters (including the frequency, decay rate, and incidence angle) and the interfacial properties are investigated. Conditions for which there is no reflection at the air-solid interface, due to impedance matching between the incident and transmitted waves, are also considered and are found to yield substantial transmission increases over homogeneous incident waves. PMID:26520290

  13. Nonlinear Breit-Wheeler process in the collision of a photon with two plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuan-Bin; Xue, She-Sheng

    2014-07-01

    The nonlinear Breit-Wheeler process of electron-positron pair production off a probe photon colliding with a low-frequency and a high-frequency electromagnetic wave that propagate in the same direction is analyzed. We calculate the pair-production probability and the spectra of the created pair in the nonlinear Breit-Wheeler processes of pair production off a probe photon colliding with two plane waves or one of these two plane waves. The differences of these two cases are discussed. We evidently show, in the two-wave case, the possibility of Breit-Wheeler pair production with simultaneous photon emission into the low-frequency wave and the high multiphoton phenomena: (i) Breit-Wheeler pair production by absorption of the probe photon and a large number of photons from the low-frequency wave, in addition to the absorption of one photon from the high-frequency wave; (ii) Breit-Wheeler pair production by absorption of the probe photon and one photon from the high-frequency wave with simultaneous emission of a large number of photons into the low-frequency wave. The phenomenon of photon emission into the wave cannot happen in the one-wave case. Compared with the one-wave case, the contributions from high multiphoton processes are largely enhanced in the two-wave case. The results presented in this article show a possible way to access the observations of the phenomenon of photon emission into the wave and high multiphoton phenomenon in Breit-Wheeler pair production even with the laser-beam intensity of order 1018 W/cm2.

  14. kṡp formula for use with linearized augmented plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishidou, Tatsuya; Oguchi, Tamio

    2008-12-01

    We provide kṡp formalism within the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (LAPW) method. Unlike the pure plane waves, the LAPW functions do not behave trivially in moving from k to k+q and their incompleteness as a basis set should be taken into account. Derivatives of the sphere matching coefficients play the key role, for which we find a simple formula. Concrete formula for the kṡp matrix elements is derived and numerically tested. Generalized second-order perturbation theory allowing for a degenerate case is presented and the literally exact electronic band gradients and curvatures are accessible.

  15. Killing spinors and exact plane-wave solutions of extended supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, C. M.

    1984-07-01

    Urrutia's ansatz for exact plane-wave solutions of simple supergravity is generalized to N=2 extended supergravity and conditions are given for the solutions to be nontrivial. Conditions are also given for the plane-wave background to be invariant under a local supersymmetry transformation generated by a Killing spinor. It is seen that even though a bosonic background can admit a spin-32 solution when it does not possess a Killing spinor, if it is supersymmetric it admits a more general gravitino solution. Comparison is made with the solutions of Aichelburg and Dereli.

  16. Solid explosive plane-wave lenses pressed-to-shape with dies

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, B.

    2007-11-01

    Solid-explosive plane-wave lenses 1", 2" and 4¼" in diameter have been mass-produced from components pressed-to-shape with aluminum dies. The method used to calculate the contour between the solid plane-wave lens components pressed-to-shape with the dies is explained. The steps taken to press, machine, and assemble the lenses are described. The method of testing the lenses, the results of those tests, and the corrections to the dies are reviewed. The work on the ½", 8", and 12" diameter lenses is also discussed.

  17. Efficiency of magnetic plane wave pumping of a ferrofluid through a planar duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felderhof, B. U.

    2011-09-01

    The efficiency of ferrohydrodynamic pumping of a ferrofluid through a planar duct by means of a running magnetic plane wave is studied to second order in the amplitude of the exciting current density. The rate of dissipation in the fluid is calculated from the first order magnetic field and magnetization. It turns out that the efficiency, defined as the ratio of net flow velocity to power input, is comparable in magnitude to that for Stokes peristaltic pumping. The theory for electrohydrodynamic pumping of a polar liquid by means of a running electric plane wave is shown to be nearly identical.

  18. Vectorial spherical-harmonics representation of an inhomogeneous elliptically polarized plane wave.

    PubMed

    Frezza, F; Mangini, F

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a generalization of the vectorial spherical-harmonics expansion of an inhomogeneous elliptically polarized plane wave is presented. The solution has been achieved using the Legendre functions generalized via hypergeometric and gamma functions, shifting the difficulty to the determination of only expansion coefficients. In order to validate the presented method, a Matlab code has been implemented. To compare the results a Mie scattering by a sphere is considered, then a truncation criterion for the numerical evaluation of the series is proposed, and the Mie scattering coefficients by perfectly conducting and dielectric spheres excited by an inhomogeneous elliptically polarized plane wave are shown. PMID:26367169

  19. Free energy and phase transition of the matrix model on a plane wave

    SciTech Connect

    Hadizadeh, Shirin; Ramadanovic, Bojan; Semenoff, Gordon W.; Young, Donovan

    2005-03-15

    It has recently been observed that the weakly coupled plane-wave matrix model has a density of states which grows exponentially at high energy. This implies that the model has a phase transition. The transition appears to be of first order. However, its exact nature is sensitive to interactions. In this paper, we analyze the effect of interactions by computing the relevant parts of the effective potential for the Polyakov loop operator in the finite temperature plane-wave matrix model to three-loop order. We show that the phase transition is indeed of first order. We also compute the correction to the Hagedorn temperature to order two loops.

  20. Optical measurements of the mutual reflection of two-plane shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, F.J.; Skews, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    A bifurcated shock tube is used to create two synchronized waves of equal strength. Essentially a single shock wave is split symmetrically in two, the two waves then are later brought back together at a trailing edge of a wedge to interact, the plane of symmetry acting as an ideal rigid wall. The normal method of studying mach reflections is to allow a plane shock wave to impinge on a wedge, however the boundary layer growth on the wedge surface effectively ensures that the flow direction behind the Mach stem does not have to satisfy the boundary condition of being parallel to the surface of the wedge. Thus the transition from regular to Mach reflection occurs at higher angles of incidence than theory allows. The present experiment was initiated to generate data on the ideal cause of reflection off a plane wall. The advantage of the new system is that like classical theory and computational solutions of the inviscid Euler equations, the boundary layer no slip condition is not imposed at the plane of reflection. Optical methods are used to investigate the post-shock flow, as well as to help explain the complex interactions which occur when the two shock waves are not synchronized. These interactions show many very interesting features and clearly indicate the need for higher resolution measurements such as are obtained using holographic interferometry, and also to extend the work to different wedge angles and Mach numbers.

  1. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-01-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  2. Plane shock waves and Haff's law in a granular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Lakshminarayana; Alam, Meheboob

    2015-11-01

    The Riemann problem of planar shock waves is analyzed for a dilute granular gas by solving Euler- and Navier-Stokes-order equations numerically. The density and temperature profiles are found to be asymmetric, with the maxima of both density and temperature occurring within the shock-layer. The density-peak increases with increasing Mach number and inelasticity, and is found to propagate at a steady speed at late times. The granular temperature at the upstream end of the shock decay according to Haff's law [ θ (t) ~t-2 ], but the downstream temperature decays faster than its upstream counterpart. The Haff's law seems to hold inside the shock up-to a certain time for weak shocks, but deviations occur for strong shocks. The time at which the maximum temperature deviates from Haff's law follows a power-law scaling with upstream Mach number and the restitution coefficient. The continual build-up of density inside the shock is discussed, the origin of which seems to be tied to a pressure instability in granular gases. It is shown that the granular energy equation must be `regularized' to arrest the maximum density, and the regularized hydrodynamic equations should be used for shock calculations (Reddy & Alam, 2015, J. Fluid Mech., to be published).

  3. Role of diffractive optical elements in the design of mid-wave infrared zoom lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudyma, Russell M.

    1993-08-01

    The advantages of hybrid refractive/diffractive components in medium wave infrared (MWIR) zooms are illustrated through the use of design examples. The examples illustrate that hybrids may be used to simplify the construction of achromatic or athermal zoom groups.

  4. Laser induced plane acoustic wave generation, propagation, and interaction with rigid structures in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Seung H.; Ryu, Sang G.; Misra, Nipun; Pan, Heng; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Kladias, Nick; Panides, Elias; Domoto, Gerald A.

    2008-10-01

    Short pulsed laser induced single acoustic wave generation, propagation, interaction with rigid structures, and focusing in water are experimentally and numerically studied. A large area short duration single plane acoustic wave was generated by the thermoelastic interaction of a homogenized nanosecond pulsed laser beam with a liquid-solid interface and propagated at the speed of sound in water. Laser flash schlieren photography was used to visualize the transient interaction of the plane acoustic wave with various submerged rigid structures [(a) a single block, (b) double blocks, (c) 33° tilted single block, and (d) concave cylindrical acoustic lens configurations]. Excellent agreement between the experimental results and numerical simulation is observed. Our simulation results demonstrate that the laser induced planar acoustic wave can be focused down to several tens of micron size and several bars in pressure.

  5. Far-field diffraction and focal plane misalignment effects on simulated GIFTS data from the IHOP field program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Erik R.; Knuteson, Robert O.; Revercomb, Hank E.; Li, Jun; Huang, Hung-Lung A.

    2004-10-01

    The Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) and the Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) instruments are geostationary infrared spectrometers. Geostationary orbit provides observations with very good time resolution, but also increases the effect of diffraction. There can be significant differences in emitted radiances due to clouds and changes in surface characteristics. High, thick clouds in particular are much cooler than clear areas. Diffraction causes radiation that originates from cloudy areas outside of the detector field of view to contaminate the clear pixels. GIFTS will also have two detector arrays on different focal planes, which may not be perfectly aligned. This can cause spatial misalignment between the data for the two spectral regions. High spatial resolution numerical models run at the University of Wisconsin - Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (UW-CIMSS) provide data for examining the diffraction and misalignment effects. The model data represents a variable cloud case during the IHOP field experiment at 1.3-km resolution. This paper outlines the production of high spatial resolution simulated data, characterization of the far field diffraction effects on radiances, and analysis of misalignment effects on temperature and moisture profile retrievals.

  6. From plane waves to local Gaussians for the simulation of correlated periodic systems.

    PubMed

    Booth, George H; Tsatsoulis, Theodoros; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Grüneis, Andreas

    2016-08-28

    We present a simple, robust, and black-box approach to the implementation and use of local, periodic, atom-centered Gaussian basis functions within a plane wave code, in a computationally efficient manner. The procedure outlined is based on the representation of the Gaussians within a finite bandwidth by their underlying plane wave coefficients. The core region is handled within the projected augment wave framework, by pseudizing the Gaussian functions within a cutoff radius around each nucleus, smoothing the functions so that they are faithfully represented by a plane wave basis with only moderate kinetic energy cutoff. To mitigate the effects of the basis set superposition error and incompleteness at the mean-field level introduced by the Gaussian basis, we also propose a hybrid approach, whereby the complete occupied space is first converged within a large plane wave basis, and the Gaussian basis used to construct a complementary virtual space for the application of correlated methods. We demonstrate that these pseudized Gaussians yield compact and systematically improvable spaces with an accuracy comparable to their non-pseudized Gaussian counterparts. A key advantage of the described method is its ability to efficiently capture and describe electronic correlation effects of weakly bound and low-dimensional systems, where plane waves are not sufficiently compact or able to be truncated without unphysical artifacts. We investigate the accuracy of the pseudized Gaussians for the water dimer interaction, neon solid, and water adsorption on a LiH surface, at the level of second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory. PMID:27586908

  7. Mid-Wave and Long-Wave Infrared Dualband Megapixel QWIP Focal Plane Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Hill, C. J.; Ting, D. Z.; Kurth, E.; Woolaway, J.; LeVan, P. D.; Tidrow, M. Z.

    2008-01-01

    Mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) 1024x1024 pixel InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs based quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal planes and a 320x256 pixel dual-band pixel co-registered simultaneous QWIP focal plane array have been demonstrated as pathfinders. In this paper, we discuss the development of 1024x1024 MWIR/LWIR dual-band pixel co-registered simultaneous QWIP focal plane array.

  8. Three-wave diffraction in damaged epitaxial layers with a wurtzite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyutt, R. N.

    2011-05-01

    Three-wave diffraction of X-rays is measured using the Renninger scheme for a series of GaN epitaxial layers of various thicknesses and degrees of structural perfection. In each 30°-angular interval of azimuthal rotation, all ten three-wave peaks determined by the geometry of diffraction with the 0001 first forbidden reflection and Cu K α radiation are observed. The φ- and θ-scanned diffraction curves are measured for each three-wave combination. The angular FWHM of the diffraction peaks formed in experiments and its relation with the parameters of the two-wave diffraction pattern and the dislocation structure of the layers are analyzed. It is shown that the φ-scan peaks are less sensitive to the degree of structural perfection than the γ-mode peaks. The strongest dependence on the dislocation density for the latter peaks is observed for the (1bar 100)/(bar 1101) and (3bar 2bar 10)/(bar 3211) three-wave combinations with a pure Laue component of secondary radiation, while the (01bar 13)/(0bar 11bar 2) combination with a large Bragg component exhibits the weakest dependence. Splitting of three-wave Renninger peaks associated with the coarse-block structure of some of the layers with rotations of the blocks about the normal to the surface is detected. The total integrated intensity of all three-wave combinations is determined and their ratios are in qualitative agreement with the theory.

  9. Guided torsional wave generation of a linear in-plane shear piezoelectric array in metallic pipes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wensong; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Shi, Tonglu

    2016-02-01

    Cylindrical guided waves based techniques are effective and promising tools for damage detection in long pipes. The essential operations are generation and reception of guided waves in the structures utilizing transducers. A novel in-plane shear (d36 type) PMNT wafer is proposed to generate and receive the guided wave, especially the torsional waves, in metallic pipes. In contrast to the traditional wafer, this wafer will directly introduce in-plane shear deformation when electrical field is conveniently applied through its thickness direction. A single square d36 PMNT wafer is bonded on the surface of the pipe positioned collinearly with its axis, when actuated can predominantly generate torsional (T) waves along the axial direction, circumferential shear horizontal (C-SH) waves along circumferential direction, and other complex cylindrical Lamb-like wave modes along other helical directions simultaneously. While a linear array of finite square size d36 PMNT wafers was equally spaced circumferentially, when actuated simultaneously can nearly uniform axisymmetric torsional waves generate in pipes and non-symmetric wave modes can be suppressed greatly if the number of the d36 PMNT wafer is sufficiently large. This paper first presents the working mechanism of the linear d36 PMNT array from finite element analysis (FEA) by examining the constructive and destructive displacement wavefield phenomena in metallic pipes. Furthermore, since the amplitude of the received fundamental torsional wave signal strongly depends on frequency, a series of experiments are conducted to determine the frequency tuning curve for the torsional wave mode. All results indicate the linear d36 PMNT array has potential for efficiently generating uniform torsional wavefield of the fundamental torsional wave mode, which is more effective in monitoring structural health in metallic pipes. PMID:26548525

  10. A beamforming method for plane wave Doppler imaging of high flow velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Omar; Poepping, Tamie L.; Lacefield, James C.

    2016-04-01

    Plane wave imaging is desirable for its ability to achieve high frame rates, allowing the capture of fast dynamic events, and continuous Doppler data. In most implementations of plane-wave imaging, multiple low resolution image (LRI) frames from different plane wave tilt angles are compounded to form a single high resolution image (HRI) frame, thereby reducing the frame rate. Compounding is a low-pass mean filter that causes attenuation and aliasing to signals with high Doppler shifts. On the other hand, the lateral beam profile and hence the quality of the HRI frames is improved by increasing the number of compounded frames. Therefore, a tradeoff exists between the Doppler limits and beam profile. In this paper, we present a method that eliminates this tradeoff and produces high resolution images without the use of compounding. The method suppresses the off-focus (clutter) signal by spreading its spectrum, while keeping the spectrum of the in-focus signal intact. The spreading is achieved by using a random sequence of tilt angles, as opposed to a linear sweep. Experiments performed using a carotid vessel phantom with constant flow demonstrate that the spread-spectrum method more accurately measures the parabolic flow profile of the vessel and in particular outperforms conventional plane-wave Doppler at higher flow velocities. The spread-spectrum method is expected to be valuable for Doppler applications that require measurement of high velocities at high frame rates.

  11. Determination of the plane specific elastic constants of Waspaloy using neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, H.J.; Reed, R.C.; Holden, T.M.

    1999-01-08

    In the present paper, the plane specific elastic constants for Waspaloy, a high strength nickel-base superalloy, have been determined with a considerable degree of precision. For this purpose, in-situ tensile tests have been carried out in a neutron diffractometer. The data which are reported are of considerable significance, since they allow an accurate determination of the residual stress slate from an estimate of the local d-spacing from the hkl lattice reflection. Thus, the data should be of interest to those interested in the determination of the residual stress state in components which are fabricated from Waspaloy, and nickel-base superalloys in general.

  12. Diffraction-resistant scalar beams generated by a parabolic reflector and a source of spherical waves.

    PubMed

    Zamboni-Rached, Michel; de Assis, Mariana Carolina; Ambrosio, Leonardo A

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we propose the generation of diffraction-resistant beams by using a parabolic reflector and a source of spherical waves positioned at a point slightly displaced from its focus (away from the reflector). In our analysis, considering the reflector dimensions much greater than the wavelength, we describe the main characteristics of the resulting beams, showing their properties of resistance to the diffraction effects. Due to its simplicity, this method may be an interesting alternative for the generation of long-range diffraction-resistant waves. PMID:26193137

  13. Computational Electromagnetic Dosimetry of a Human Body in a Vehicle for Plane-wave Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akimasa

    The present study investigated whole-body specific absorption rate of a human body in a vehicle cabin for plane-wave exposure. The rationale for this investigation is that fields in the vehicle without human have been enhanced in particular frequency region due to standing waves, and thus power absorption in the human body is of interest. For our computational results, the whole-body average specific absorption rate of the human in the vehicle was found to be 60% smaller than that in free space. The reason for this upset is that the standing wave over the vehicle cabin was suppressed due to power absorption by the human.

  14. Formation of Roll-Waves on Thin Laminar Flow down an Inclined Plane Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tougou, Hirohumi

    1980-02-01

    The linear stability of periodic permanent roll-wave trains on thin laminar flow of a viscous fluid down an inclined plane wall has been investigated analytically on the basis of a hydraulic model. The analytical result is here confirmed by following numerically the time development of a periodic initial disturbance superimposed upon a basic steady parallel flow into a stable or unstable permanent roll-wave train. Furthermore, it is shown that roll-waves can be generated successively from a localized initial disturbance.

  15. Geometrical Reasoning in Wave Situations: The Case of Light Diffraction and Coherent Illumination Optical Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurines, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This particular study is part of a research programme on the difficulties encountered by students when learning about wave phenomena in a three-dimensional medium in the absence or presence of obstacles. It focuses on how students reason in situations in which wave optics need to be used: diffraction of light by an aperture, imaging in the…

  16. Interference Phenomena of Diffraction Waves Originating on the Boundary of a Small Obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itô, Hiroshi; Kanai, Norikane

    1988-03-01

    Existence of boundary diffraction waves originating at every point of the outline of an obstacle illuminated by coherent light is studied experimentally. Optical fringes appearing in the shadow region of the obstacle are recognized to be made by interference of this kind of wave.

  17. Reflection of electromagnetic waves from mixtures of plane gravitational and scalar waves

    SciTech Connect

    Gurtug, O.; Halilsoy, M.; Unver, O.

    2006-08-15

    We consider colliding wave packets consisting of hybrid mixtures of electromagnetic, gravitational, and scalar waves. Irrespective of the scalar field, the electromagnetic wave still reflects from the gravitational wave. Some reflection processes are given for different choice of packets in which the Coulomb-like component {psi}{sub 2} vanishes. Exact solution for multiple reflection of an electromagnetic wave from successive impulsive gravitational waves is obtained in a closed form. It is shown that a successive sign flip in the Maxwell spinor arises as a result of encountering with an impulsive train (i.e. the Dirac's comb curvature) of gravitational waves. Such an observable effect may be helpful in the detection of gravitational wave bursts.

  18. Photoacoustic clutter reduction by inversion of a linear scatter model using plane wave ultrasound measurements.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Hans-Martin; Beckmann, Martin F; Schmitz, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging aims to visualize light absorption properties of biological tissue by receiving a sound wave that is generated inside the observed object as a result of the photoacoustic effect. In clinical applications, the strong light absorption in human skin is a major problem. When high amplitude photoacoustic waves that originate from skin absorption propagate into the tissue, they are reflected back by acoustical scatterers and the reflections contribute to the received signal. The artifacts associated with these reflected waves are referred to as clutter or skin echo and limit the applicability of photoacoustic imaging for medical applications severely. This study seeks to exploit the acoustic tissue information gained by plane wave ultrasound measurements with a linear array in order to correct for reflections in the photoacoustic image. By deriving a theory for clutter waves in k-space and a matching inversion approach, photoacoustic measurements compensated for clutter are shown to be recovered. PMID:27446669

  19. Photoacoustic clutter reduction by inversion of a linear scatter model using plane wave ultrasound measurements

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Hans-Martin; Beckmann, Martin F.; Schmitz, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging aims to visualize light absorption properties of biological tissue by receiving a sound wave that is generated inside the observed object as a result of the photoacoustic effect. In clinical applications, the strong light absorption in human skin is a major problem. When high amplitude photoacoustic waves that originate from skin absorption propagate into the tissue, they are reflected back by acoustical scatterers and the reflections contribute to the received signal. The artifacts associated with these reflected waves are referred to as clutter or skin echo and limit the applicability of photoacoustic imaging for medical applications severely. This study seeks to exploit the acoustic tissue information gained by plane wave ultrasound measurements with a linear array in order to correct for reflections in the photoacoustic image. By deriving a theory for clutter waves in k-space and a matching inversion approach, photoacoustic measurements compensated for clutter are shown to be recovered. PMID:27446669

  20. Theory of steady-state plane tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kyuregyan, A. S.

    2013-07-15

    The effect of band-to-band and trap-assisted tunneling on the properties of steady-state plane ionization waves in p{sup +}-n-n{sup +} structures is theoretically analyzed. It is shown that such tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves do not differ in a qualitative sense from ordinary impact ionization waves propagating due to the avalanche multiplication of uniformly distributed seed electrons and holes. The quantitative differences of tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves from impact ionization waves are reduced to a slightly different relation between the wave velocity u and the maximum field strength E{sub M} at the front. It is shown that disregarding impact ionization does not exclude the possibility of the existence of tunneling-assisted ionization waves; however, their structure radically changes, and their velocity strongly decreases for the same E{sub M}. A comparison of the dependences u(E{sub M}) for various ionization-wave types makes it possible to determine the conditions under which one of them is dominant. In conclusion, unresolved problems concerning the theory of tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves are discussed and the directions of further studies are outlined.

  1. Propagation of plane waves in a rotating transversely isotropic two temperature generalized thermoelastic solid half-space with voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijarnia, R.; Singh, B.

    2016-05-01

    The paper is concerned with the propagation of plane waves in a transversely isotropic two temperature generalized thermoelastic solid half-space with voids and rotation. The governing equations are modified in the context of Lord and Shulman theory of generalized thermoelasticity and solved to show the existence of four plane waves in the x - z plane. Reflection of these plane waves from thermally insulated stress free surface is also studied to obtain a system of four non-homogeneous equations. For numerical computations of speed and reflection coefficients, a particular material is modelled as transversely isotropic generalized thermoelastic solid half-space. The speeds of plane waves are computed against the angle of propagation to observe the effects of two temperature and rotation. Reflection coefficients of various reflected waves are also computed against the angle of incidence to observe the effects of various parameters.

  2. Scattering of plane evanescent waves by buried cylinders: Modeling the coupling to guided waves and resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.

    2003-04-01

    The coupling of sound to buried targets can be associated with acoustic evanescent waves when the sea bottom is smooth. To understand the excitation of guided waves on buried fluid cylinders and shells by acoustic evanescent waves and the associated target resonances, the two-dimensional partial wave series for the scattering is found for normal incidence in an unbounded medium. The shell formulation uses the simplifications of thin-shell dynamics. The expansion of the incident wave becomes a double summation with products of modified and ordinary Bessel functions [P. L. Marston, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 2378 (2002)]. Unlike the case of an ordinary incident wave, the counterpropagating partial waves of the same angular order have unequal magnitudes when the incident wave is evanescent. This is a consequence of the exponential dependence of the incident wave amplitude on depth. Some consequences of this imbalance of partial-wave amplitudes are given by modifying previous ray theory for the scattering [P. L. Marston and N. H. Sun, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 97, 777-783 (1995)]. The exponential dependence of the scattering on the location of a scatterer was previously demonstrated in air [T. J. Matula and P. L. Marston, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 93, 1192-1195 (1993)].

  3. Plane wave transport method for low symmetry lattices and its application

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Manoj K; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Nicholson, Don M; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The existing first-principles plane wave transport method implementation \\cite{,choi-1,qe} has the limitation that it only allows transport directions along lattice vectors perpendicular to the basal plane formed by two other lattice vectors. We generalize the algorithm to low symmetry, nonorthogonal lattices thus allowing solution to problems in which the transport direction is not along any lattice vectors. As an application, we calculate the transmission and reflection coefficients, and determine interface resistance of various grain boundaries in crystalline copper.

  4. Ring-plane traveling-wave tube slow-wave circuit design simulations at V-Band frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Kory, C.L.; Wilson, J.D.

    1995-06-01

    The V-Band frequency range of 59-64 GHz is a region of the millimeter-wave spectrum that has been designated for intersatellite communications. As a first effort to develop a high-efficiency V-band TWT, variations on a ring-plane slow-wave circuit were computationally investigated to develop an alternative to the more conventional ferruled coupled-cavity circuit. The ring-plane circuit was chosen because of its high interaction impedance, large beam aperture, and excellent thermal dissipation properties. Despite the high-power capabilities of the ring-plane TWT, disadvantages of low bandwidth and high voltage requirements have until now prevented its acceptance outside the laboratory. In this paper, the authors use the three-dimensional electromagnetic simulation code MAFIA to investigate methods of increasing the bandwidth and lowering the operating voltage. Dispersion, impedance, and attenuation calculations for various geometric variations and loading distributions were performed. Based on the results of the variations, a circuit termed the finned-ladder TWT slowwave circuit was designed and is compared here to the scaled ring-plane prototype and the conventional ferruled coupled-cavity TWT circuit over the V-band frequency range.

  5. Ring-plane traveling-wave tube slow-wave circuit design simulations at V-Band frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    1995-01-01

    The V-Band frequency range of 59-64 GHz is a region of the millimeter-wave spectrum that has been designated for intersatellite communications. As a first effort to develop a high-efficiency V-band TWT, variations on a ring-plane slow-wave circuit were computationally investigated to develop an alternative to the more conventional ferruled coupled-cavity circuit. The ring-plane circuit was chosen because of its high interaction impedance, large beam aperture, and excellent thermal dissipation properties. Despite the high-power capabilities of the ring-plane TWT, disadvantages of low bandwidth and high voltage requirements have until now prevented its acceptance outside the laboratory. In this paper, we use the three-dimensional electromagnetic simulation code MAFIA to investigate methods of increasing the bandwidth and lowering the operating voltage. Dispersion, impedance, and attenuation calculations for various geometric variations and loading distributions were performed. Based on the results of the variations, a circuit termed the finned-ladder TWT slowwave circuit was designed and is compared here to the scaled ring-plane prototype and the conventional ferruled coupled-cavity TWT circuit over the V-band frequency range.

  6. Cavity-based linear polarizer immune to the polarization direction of an incident plane wave.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang; Shen, Zhongxiang; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Wen

    2016-01-15

    We herein report a linear polarizer based on a 2D array of substrate integrated waveguide cavities, which can convert an arbitrary linearly polarized (LP) incident wave into an outgoing LP wave in a specified polarization direction with constant transmittance. Two orthogonal slots etched on the front surface of the cavity are utilized to couple a wave of arbitrary polarization into the cavity, while another slot on the back side helps to couple the field out along a desired polarization direction. Microwave experiments are performed as a proof of concept. The proposed polarizer exhibits very good performance with stable transmittance as 50% and a polarization extinction ratio over 45 dB. The new polarizer is potentially useful in novel polarization-selective devices that are immune to the polarization direction of an incident plane wave. PMID:26766730

  7. Travelling-wave solutions bifurcating from relative periodic orbits in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Subhandu; Cossu, Carlo; Rincon, François

    2016-06-01

    Travelling-wave solutions are shown to bifurcate from relative periodic orbits in plane Poiseuille flow at Re = 2000 in a saddle-node infinite-period bifurcation. These solutions consist in self-sustaining sinuous quasi-streamwise streaks and quasi-streamwise vortices located in the bulk of the flow. The lower branch travelling-wave solutions evolve into spanwise localized states when the spanwise size Lz of the domain in which they are computed is increased. On the contrary, the upper branch of travelling-wave solutions develops multiple streaks when Lz is increased. Upper-branch travelling-wave solutions can be continued into coherent solutions to the filtered equations used in large-eddy simulations where they represent turbulent coherent large-scale motions.

  8. The instability of finite amplitude Rossby waves on the infinite beta-plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jeffrey L.

    The normal mode instability problem for a stationary Rossby wave of finite amplitude and arbitrary orientation is examined on the infinite beta-plane using a Floquet technique. A survey of the instability problem as a function of the basic state wave amplitude and wave orientation is presented. In the large amplitude case, two modes of instability are found, while in the small amplitude case, a family of resonant interactions can completely describe the Floquet results. For intermediate values of amplitude, a combination of the large and small amplitude limits can explain the instabilities. For the range of greatest geophysical interest, two physically distinct unstable modes of approximately equal growth rate are available for certain values of the basic state wave orientation. Relevance to geophysical flows and the instability problem on the sphere are discussed briefly.

  9. Diffraction of spin waves from a submicrometer-size defect in a microwaveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birt, Daniel R.; O'Gorman, Brian; Tsoi, Maxim; Li, Xiaoqin; Demidov, Vladislav E.; Demokritov, Sergej O.

    2009-09-01

    We have experimentally studied the diffraction of spin waves propagating in a Permalloy-film microwaveguide from a submicrometer-sized circular defect. For microwave excitation above the cutoff frequency of the fundamental transverse mode, the defect leads to a frequency dependent reflection of the spin wave. The efficiency of the reflection appears to be dependent on the wavelength of the incident spin wave in a nonmonotonous way. The observed two-dimensional spin wave distribution pattern after the defect can be understood based on the interference of several copropagating modes, suggesting that the defect couples the fundamental mode with higher order modes.

  10. Relativistic Two-Boson System in Presence of Electromagnetic Plane Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droz-Vincent, Ph.

    2016-09-01

    The relativistic two-body problem is considered for spinless particles subject to an external electromagnetic field. When this field is made of the monochromatic superposition of two counter-propagating plane waves (and provided the mutual interaction between particles is known), it is possible to write down explicitly a pair of coupled wave equations (corresponding to a pair of mass-shell constraints) which takes into account also the field contribution. These equations are manifestly covariant; constants of the motion are exhibited, so one ends up with a reduced problem involving five degrees of freedom.

  11. Mid-wave infrared metasurface microlensed focal plane array for optical crosstalk suppression.

    PubMed

    Akın, Onur; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2015-10-19

    Spatial crosstalk is one of the fundamental drawbacks of diminishing pixel size in mid-wave infrared focal plane arrays (IR-FPAs). We proposed an IR-FPA using the concept of optical phase discontinuities for substantial optical crosstalk suppression. This IR-FPA consists of asymmetrically tailored V-shaped optical antennas. Full-wave simulations confirmed major improvements in narrowing the intensity distribution of incident light beam by over 30-folds and concentrating these distributions in the central pixel of IR-FPA by achieving optical crosstalks of <1%. PMID:26480363

  12. Quantum mechanics of lattice gas automata: One-particle plane waves and potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, D.A.

    1997-05-01

    Classical lattice gas automata effectively simulate physical processes, such as diffusion and fluid flow (in certain parameter regimes), despite their simplicity at the microscale. Motivated by current interest in quantum computation we recently defined {ital quantum} lattice gas automata; in this paper we initiate a project to analyze which physical processes these models can effectively simulate. Studying the single particle sector of a one-dimensional quantum lattice gas we find discrete analogs of plane waves and wave packets, and then investigate their behavior in the presence of inhomogeneous potentials. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. A standing wave linear ultrasonic motor operating in in-plane expanding and bending modes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhijiang; Li, Xiaotian; Ci, Penghong; Liu, Guoxi; Dong, Shuxiang

    2015-03-01

    A novel standing wave linear ultrasonic motor operating in in-plane expanding and bending modes was proposed in this study. The stator (or actuator) of the linear motor was made of a simple single Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) ceramic square plate (15 × 15 × 2 mm(3)) with a circular hole (D = 6.7 mm) in the center. The geometric parameters of the stator were computed with the finite element analysis to produce in-plane bi-mode standing wave vibration. The calculated results predicted that a driving tip attached at midpoint of one edge of the stator can produce two orthogonal, approximate straight-line trajectories, which can be used to move a slider in linear motion via frictional forces in forward or reverse direction. The investigations showed that the proposed linear motor can produce a six times higher power density than that of a previously reported square plate motor. PMID:25832267

  14. Acoustic plane waves incident on an oblique clamped panel in a rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unz, H.; Roskam, J.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of acoustic plane waves incident on an oblique clamped panel in a rectangular duct was developed from basic theoretical concepts. The coupling theory between the elastic vibrations of the panel (plate) and the oblique incident acoustic plane wave in infinite space was considered in detail, and was used for the oblique clamped panel in the rectangular duct. The partial differential equation which governs the vibrations of the clamped panel (plate) was modified by adding to it stiffness (spring) forces and damping forces. The Transmission Loss coefficient and the Noise Reduction coefficient for oblique incidence were defined and derived in detail. The resonance frequencies excited by the free vibrations of the oblique finite clamped panel (plate) were derived and calculated in detail for the present case.

  15. Proposal of coherent Cherenkov radiation matched to circular plane wave for intense terahertz light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sei, Norihiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Ken; Tanaka, Toshinari; Hayakawa, Yasushi; Nakao, Keisuke; Nogami, Kyoko; Inagaki, Manabu

    2015-10-01

    We propose a high-peak-power terahertz-wave source based on an electron accelerator. By passing an electron beam through a hollow conical dielectric with apex facing the incident electron beam, the wave front of coherent Cherenkov radiation generated on the inner surface of the hollow conical dielectric matches the basal plane. Using the electron beam generated at the Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application at Nihon University, the calculated power of coherent Cherenkov radiation that matched the circular plane (CCR-MCP) was above 1 MW per micropulse with a short interval of 350 ps, for wavelengths ranging from 0.5 to 5 mm. The electron beam is not lost for generating the CCR-MCP beam by using the hollow conical dielectric. It is possible to combine the CCR-MCP beams with other light sources based on an accelerator.

  16. Diffraction of electromagnetic waves in a three-dimensional magnetodielectric body of arbitrary shape

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitrenko, A.G.; Mukomolov, A.I.

    1995-12-01

    A numerical method of solving the problem of the diffraction of electromagnetic waves by a three-dimensional magnetodielectric body of arbitrary shape in the resonance frequency region is proposed. The method is applied in the form of a FORTRAN software package for calculating the components of the diffraction field of bodies with different electrodynamic and geometrical parameters. The directivity parameters of some bodies of complex shape are given.

  17. A nonperturbative definition of N = 4 Super Yang-Mills by the plane wave matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Shimasaki, Shinji

    2008-11-23

    We propose a nonperturbative definition of N = 4 Super Yang-Mills(SYM). We realize N = 4 SYM on RxS{sup 3} as the theory around a vacuum of the plane wave matrix model. Our regularization preserves 16 supersymmetries and the gauge symmetry. We perform the one-loop calculation to give evidence that in the continuum limit the superconformal symmetry is restored.

  18. Transition between free-space Helmholtz equation solutions with plane sources and parabolic wave equation solutions.

    PubMed

    Mahillo-Isla, R; Gonźalez-Morales, M J; Dehesa-Martínez, C

    2011-06-01

    The slowly varying envelope approximation is applied to the radiation problems of the Helmholtz equation with a planar single-layer and dipolar sources. The analyses of such problems provide procedures to recover solutions of the Helmholtz equation based on the evaluation of solutions of the parabolic wave equation at a given plane. Furthermore, the conditions that must be fulfilled to apply each procedure are also discussed. The relations to previous work are given as well. PMID:21643384

  19. Structural Properties of Lanthanide and Actinide Compounds within the Plane Wave Pseudopotential Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, Chris J.; Winkler, Björn; Chen, Roger K.; Payne, M. C.; Lee, M. H.; Lin, J. S.; White, J. A.; Milman, V.; Vanderbilt, David

    2000-12-01

    We show that plane wave ultrasoft pseudopotential methods readily extend to the calculation of the structural properties of lanthanide and actinide containing compounds. This is demonstrated through a series of calculations performed on UO, UO2, UO3, U3O8, UC2, α-CeC2, CeB6, CeSe, CeO2, NdB6, TmOI, LaBi, LaTiO3, YbO, and elemental Lu.

  20. Structural properties of lanthanide and actinide compounds within the plane wave pseudopotential approach

    PubMed

    Pickard; Winkler; Chen; Payne; Lee; Lin; White; Milman; Vanderbilt

    2000-12-11

    We show that plane wave ultrasoft pseudopotential methods readily extend to the calculation of the structural properties of lanthanide and actinide containing compounds. This is demonstrated through a series of calculations performed on UO, UO2, UO3, U3O8, UC2, alpha-CeC2, CeB6, CeSe, CeO2, NdB6, TmOI, LaBi, LaTiO3, YbO, and elemental Lu. PMID:11102201

  1. Simulations and cold-test results of a prototype plane wave transformer linac structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arvind; Pant, K. K.; Krishnagopal, S.

    2002-03-01

    We have built a 4-cell prototype plane wave transformer (PWT) linac structure. We discuss here details of the design and fabrication of the PWT linac structure. We present results from superfish and gdfidl simulations as well as cold tests, which are in good agreement with each other. We also present detailed tolerance maps for the PWT structure. We discuss beam dynamics simulation studies performed using parmela.

  2. Status of very long infrared-wave focal plane array development at DEFIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravrand, O.; Chorier, Ph.

    2009-05-01

    The very long infrared wavelength (>14μm) is a very challenging range for the design of large HgCdTe focal plane arrays. As the wavelength gets longer (ie the semiconductor gap gets smaller), the physic of photodiodes asks for numerous technological improvements to keep a high level of detection performance. DEFIR (LETI-Sofradir common research team) has been highly active in this field during the last few years. The need (mainly expressed by the space industry ESA and CNES) of very long wave focal plane arrays appears very demanding in terms of dark current, defect density and of course quantum efficiency. This paper aims at presenting a status of long and very long wave focal plane array development at DEFIR for three different ion implanted technologies: n on p mercury vacancies doped technology, n on p extrinsic doped technology, and p on n arsenic on indium technology. Special focus is done to 15μm cut off n/p focal plane array fabricated in our laboratory demonstrating high uniformity, diffusion and shot noise limited photodiodes at 50K.

  3. Finite Frequency Measurements of Conventional and Core-diffracted P-waves (P and Pdiff)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, K.; Sigloch, K.; Stähler, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Core-diffracted waves are body waves that dive deep enough to sense the core, and by interaction with this wave guide become dispersive. They sample the core-mantle boundary and the lower third of the mantle extensively. In ray theoretical modeling, the deepest part of the ray starts to graze the core at around 97 degrees distance, but ray theory is a very poor approximation to propagation of core-diffracted waves. In reality, finite-frequency waves with their spatially extend sensitivity regions start to sense the core at significantly smaller distances already. The actual, non-ray-like sensitivities have been difficult to model, as have been the associated synthetic seismograms. Core-diffracted waves have therefore not been used in tomography, despite abundant observations of these phases on modern broadband seismograms. Hence current global body-wave tomographies illuminate the lower third of the mantle much less well than the upper and especially the middle third. This study aims for broadband, global waveform tomography that seamlessly incorporates core-diffracted phases alongside conventional, teleseismic waves as well as regional body-waves. Here, we investigate the properties of P-diffracted waves in terms of waveform characteristics and travel-time measurements as compared to teleseismic P-wave measured by the same methods. Travel time anomalies, the primary data for tomography, are measured by waveform cross-correlation of data with synthetics, where the synthetics are calculated from fully numerical wave propagation in a spherically symmetric background model. These same numerical tools will be used to calculate the associated sensitivity kernels for tomography (figure, top). Demonstrating the extent to which waveform modeling can fit real data, we assemble and discuss a global data set of 851,905 Pdiff and 2,368,452 P-wave multi-frequency cross-correlation travel times. Findings are summarized in the Pdiff travel time map (figure, bottom) in which most

  4. A program to compute EM scattering of plane wave by a perfectly conducting half-plane in a finitely conducting layered half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleb Dhanasekaran, P.; Poddar, M.

    A FORTRAN program utilizing an integral equation calculates 10 field quantities relating to the electromagnetic (EM) scattering of plane wave by a perfectly conducting half-plane buried in a finitely conducting layered half-space. The computing algorithm is executable on a computer of small storage capacity such as PDP 11/40 and as such is useful to many exploration scientists without the facility of a mainframe computer, for computing model curves to interpret field data.

  5. Diffraction using laser-driven broadband electron wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junliang; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Zhang, Kaikai; Lai, Yu Hang; Lin, C. D.; Miller, Terry A.; Agostini, Pierre; Dimauro, Louis F.

    2014-08-01

    Directly monitoring atomic motion during a molecular transformation with atomic-scale spatio-temporal resolution is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. Here we provide the foundation for a new imaging method, fixed-angle broadband laser-induced electron scattering, based on structural retrieval by direct one-dimensional Fourier transform of a photoelectron energy distribution observed along the polarization direction of an intense ultrafast light pulse. The approach exploits the scattering of a broadband wave packet created by strong-field tunnel ionization to self-interrogate the molecular structure with picometre spatial resolution and bond specificity. With its inherent femtosecond resolution, combining our technique with molecular alignment can, in principle, provide the basis for time-resolved tomography for multi-dimensional transient structural determination.

  6. Diffraction using laser-driven broadband electron wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junliang; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Zhang, Kaikai; Lai, Yu Hang; Lin, C. D.; Miller, Terry A.; Agostini, Pierre; Dimauro, Louis F.

    2015-05-01

    Directly monitoring atomic motion during a molecular transformation with atomic-scale spatio-temporal resolution is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. Here we provide the foundation for a new imaging method, fixed-angle broadband laser-induced electron scattering, based on structural retrieval by direct one-dimensional Fourier transform of a photoelectron energy distribution observed along the polarization direction of an intense ultrafast light pulse. The approach exploits the scattering of a broadband wave packet created by strong-field tunnel ionization to self-interrogate the molecular structure with picometer spatial resolution and bond specificity. With its inherent femtosecond resolution, combining our technique with molecular alignment can, in principle, provide the basis for time-resolved tomography for multi-dimensional transient structural determination.

  7. Rigorous solution of transient propagation of electromagnetic waves through a medium: causality plus diffraction in time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Mufei

    2000-03-01

    We have found the rigorous solution of transient propagation of electronmagnetic waves through a medium. The rogorousness enables the solution to exhibit its apparent consistency with the Einstein causality. Thus, we confirm that faster-than-light or superluminal propagation of electromagnetic waves is not possible. Evanescent transmission gives rise to the diffraction in time, which is the actual reason for deformation of group propagation. Based on the principle of diffraction in time, superluminal group propagation can be understood. The findings are also instructive for understanding the time problem for particle tunneling.

  8. 3D resolution tests of two-plane wave approach using synthetic seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceylan, S.; Larmat, C. S.; Sandvol, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Two-plane wave tomography (TPWT) is becoming a standard approach to obtain fundamental mode Rayleigh wave phase velocities for a variety of tectonic settings. A recent study by Ceylan et al. (2012) has applied this method to eastern Tibet, using data from INDEPTH-IV and Namche-Barwa seismic experiments. The TPWT assumes that distortion of wavefronts at each station can be expressed as the sum of two plane waves. However, there is currently no robust or complete resolution test for TPWT, to address its limitations such as wavefront healing. In this study, we test the capabilities of TPWT and resolution of INDEPTH-IV seismic experiment, by performing 3D resolution tests using synthetic seismograms. Utilizing SPECFEM3D software, we compute synthetic data sets resolving periods down to ~30 s. We implement a checkerboard upper mantle (for depths between 50 and 650 km) with variable cell sizes, superimposed to PREM as the background model. We then calculate fundamental mode surface wave phase velocities using TPWT for periods between 33-143 seconds, using synthetic seismograms computed from our three dimensional hypothetical model. Assuming a constant Poisson's ratio, we use partial derivatives from Saito (1988) to invert for shear wave velocities. We show that the combination of TPWT and Saito (1988) methods is capable of retrieving anomalies down to depths of ~200 km for Rayleigh waves. Below these depths, we observe evidence of both lateral and vertical smearing. We also find that the traditional method for estimating the resolution of TPWT consistently overestimates phase velocity resolutions. Love waves exhibit adequate resolution down to depths of ~100 km. At depths greater than 100 km, smearing is more evident in SH wave results than those of SV waves. Increased smearing of SH waves is most probably due to propagation characteristics and shallower sensitivity of Love waves. Our results imply that TPWT can be applied to Love waves, making future investigations of

  9. Reflection and transmission of plane waves through isotropic medium sandwiched between two highly anisotropic half-spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Sanjeev A.; Paswan, Brijendra; Chattopadhyay, Amares

    2016-01-01

    A problem of reflection and transmission of plane wave is presented. The considered geometry consists of an isotropic layer bonded between two highly anisotropic media (Triclinic crystalline). We set to find a relation between direction of motion and direction of propagation of waves as they are not same in anisotropic medium. The incident plane wave reflects three waves (?, and ?) at the interface of isotropic layer and lower half-space. A closed form expression for velocity profile is obtained. We have found the reflection/transmission coefficients and energy ratios of different reflected and transmitted waves. Variations in obtained amplitude ratios and energy ratios with respect to incident angle have been shown graphically.

  10. Properties of electrons scattered by a strong plane electromagnetic wave with a linear polarization: Semiclassical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, O. V.; Kazinski, P. O.

    2015-02-01

    The problem of scattering of ultrarelativistic electrons by a strong plane electromagnetic wave of a low (optical) frequency and linear polarization is solved in the semiclassical approximation, when the electron wave packet size is much smaller than the wavelength of electromagnetic wave. The exit momenta of ultrarelativistic electrons scattered are found using the exact solutions to the equations of motion with radiation reaction included (the Landau-Lifshitz equation). It is found that the momentum components of electrons traversed the electromagnetic wave depend weakly on the initial values of momenta. These electrons are mostly scattered at small angles to the propagation direction of the electromagnetic wave. The maximum Lorentz factor of electrons crossed the electromagnetic wave is proportional to the work done by the electromagnetic field and is independent of the initial momentum. The momentum component parallel to the electric field vector of the electromagnetic wave is determined solely by the laser beam diameter measured in the units of the classical electron radius. As for the reflected electrons, they for the most part lose the energy, but remain relativistic. A reflection law that relates the incident and reflection angles and is independent of any parameters is found.

  11. Acoustic backscattering and radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane progressive waves.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2016-03-01

    This work proposes a formal analytical theory using the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates, to calculate the acoustic backscattering form function as well as the radiation force-per-length on an infinitely long elliptical (non-circular) cylinder in plane progressive waves. The major (or minor) semi-axis of the ellipse coincides with the direction of the incident waves. The scattering coefficients for the rigid elliptical cylinder are determined by imposing the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface and solving a resulting system of linear equations by matrix inversion. The present method, which utilizes standard cylindrical (Bessel and Hankel) wave functions, presents an advantage over the solution for the scattering that is ordinarily expressed in a basis of elliptical Mathieu functions (which are generally non-orthogonal). Furthermore, an integral equation showing the direct connection of the radiation force function with the square of the scattering form function in the far-field from the scatterer (applicable for plane waves only), is noted and discussed. An important application of this integral equation is the adequate evaluation of the radiation force function from a bistatic measurement (i.e., in the polar plane) of the far-field scattering from any 2D object of arbitrary shape. Numerical predictions are evaluated for the acoustic backscattering form function and the radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density, and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb, without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation, acousto-fluidics and particle dynamics applications. PMID:26726146

  12. Conical wave propagation and diffraction in two-dimensional hexagonally packed granular lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, C.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Ablowitz, M. J.; Ma, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear mechanisms for conical wave propagation in two-dimensional lattices are explored in the realm of phononic crystals. As a prototypical example, a statically compressed granular lattice of spherical particles arranged in a hexagonal packing configuration is analyzed. Upon identifying the dispersion relation of the underlying linear problem, the resulting diffraction properties are considered. Analysis both via a heuristic argument for the linear propagation of a wave packet and via asymptotic analysis leading to the derivation of a Dirac system suggests the occurrence of conical diffraction. This analysis is valid for strong precompression, i.e., near the linear regime. For weak precompression, conical wave propagation is still possible, but the resulting expanding circular wave front is of a nonoscillatory nature, resulting from the complex interplay among the discreteness, nonlinearity, and geometry of the packing. The transition between these two types of propagation is explored.

  13. Conical wave propagation and diffraction in two-dimensional hexagonally packed granular lattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chong, C.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Ablowitz, M. J.; Ma, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-25

    We explore linear and nonlinear mechanisms for conical wave propagation in two-dimensional lattices in the realm of phononic crystals. As a prototypical example, a statically compressed granular lattice of spherical particles arranged in a hexagonal packing configuration is analyzed. Upon identifying the dispersion relation of the underlying linear problem, the resulting diffraction properties are considered. Analysis both via a heuristic argument for the linear propagation of a wave packet and via asymptotic analysis leading to the derivation of a Dirac system suggests the occurrence of conical diffraction. This analysis is valid for strong precompression, i.e., near the linear regime. Formore » weak precompression, conical wave propagation is still possible, but the resulting expanding circular wave front is of a nonoscillatory nature, resulting from the complex interplay among the discreteness, nonlinearity, and geometry of the packing. Lastly, the transition between these two types of propagation is explored.« less

  14. Discontinuity-free edge-diffraction model for characterization of focused wave fields.

    PubMed

    Sedukhin, Andrey G

    2010-03-01

    A model of discontinuity-free edge diffraction is proposed that is valid in the framework of the scalar Debye approximation and describes the formation process and approximate structure of the stationary diffracted field of a monochromatic converging spherical wave of limited angular opening throughout the whole space about the focus. The field is represented semianalytically in terms of the sum of a direct quasi-spherical wave and two edge quasi-conical waves of the zeroth and first order. The angular spectrum amplitudes of all these waves have smooth continuous variations of the real and imaginary parts in polar angle and radius, the separable nonanalytic functions defining the polar-angle variations of the amplitudes being found by optimization techniques. PMID:20208956

  15. Theoretical analysis of diffraction characteristics for peristrophic multiplexing with spherical reference wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shuhei; Mori, Jun; Yamamoto, Manabu

    2015-05-01

    Many kinds of recording techniques have been proposed for holographic data storages (HDS). Multiplexing recording technique is a primary contributor to determining the recording density in HDS. The method that utilizes spherical reference waves is characterized by the ability to enable multiplexing recording only by displacing (shifting or rotating) the recording medium. In this study, we propose a theoretical diffraction model of peristrophic multiplexing with spherical reference wave for HDS.

  16. Ultrafast Kikuchi diffraction: nanoscale stress-strain dynamics of wave-guiding structures.

    PubMed

    Yurtsever, Aycan; Schaefer, Sascha; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2012-07-11

    Complex structural dynamics at the nanoscale requires sufficiently small probes to be visualized. In conventional imaging using electron microscopy, the dimension of the probe is large enough to cause averaging over the structures present. However, by converging ultrafast electron bunches, it is possible to select a single nanoscale structure and study the dynamics, either in the image or using electron diffraction. Moreover, the span of incident wave vectors in a convergent beam enables sensitivity levels and information contents beyond those of parallel-beam illumination with a single wave vector Bragg diffraction. Here, we report the observation of propagating strain waves using ultrafast Kikuchi diffraction from nanoscale volumes within a wedge-shaped silicon single crystal. It is found that the heterogeneity of the strain in the lateral direction is only 100 nm. The transient elastic wave gives rise to a coherent oscillation with a period of 30 ps and with an envelope that has a width of 140 ps. The origin of this elastic deformation is theoretically examined using finite element analysis; it is identified as propagating shear waves. The wedge-shaped structure, unlike parallel-plate structure, is the key behind the traveling nature of the waves as its angle permits "transverse" propagation; the parallel-plate structure only exhibits the "longitudinal" motion. The studies reported suggest extension to a range of applications for nanostructures of different shapes and for exploring their ultrafast eigen-modes of stress-strain profiles. PMID:22667321

  17. Monochromatic plane-fronted waves in conformal gravity are pure gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Luca; Paranjape, M. B.

    2011-05-01

    We consider plane-fronted, monochromatic gravitational waves on a Minkowski background, in a conformally invariant theory of general relativity. By this we mean waves of the form: gμν=ημν+γμνF(k·x), where γμν is a constant polarization tensor, and kμ is a lightlike vector. We also assume the coordinate gauge condition |g|-1/4∂τ(|g|1/4gστ)=0 which is the conformal analog of the harmonic gauge condition gμνΓμνσ=-|g|-1/2∂τ(|g|1/2gστ)=0, where det⁡[gμν]≡g. Requiring additionally the conformal gauge condition g=-1 surprisingly implies that the waves are both transverse and traceless. Although the ansatz for the metric is eminently reasonable when considering perturbative gravitational waves, we show that the metric is reducible to the metric of Minkowski space-time via a sequence of coordinate transformations which respect the gauge conditions, without any perturbative approximation that γμν be small. This implies that we have, in fact, exact plane-wave solutions; however, they are simply coordinate/conformal artifacts. As a consequence, they carry no energy. Our result does not imply that conformal gravity does not have gravitational wave phenomena. A different, more generalized ansatz for the deviation, taking into account the fourth-order nature of the field equation, which has the form gμν=ημν+Bμν(n·x)G(k·x), indeed yields waves which carry energy and momentum [P. D. Mannheim, Gen. Relativ. Gravit.GRGVA80001-7701 43, 703 (2010)10.1007/s10714-010-1088-z]. It is just surprising that transverse, traceless, plane-fronted gravitational waves, those that would be used in any standard, perturbative, quantum analysis of the theory, simply do not exist.

  18. Acoustic multipath arrivals in the horizontal plane due to approaching nonlinear internal waves.

    PubMed

    Badiey, Mohsen; Katsnelson, Boris G; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Lynch, James F

    2011-04-01

    Simultaneous measurements of acoustic wave transmissions and a nonlinear internal wave packet approaching an along-shelf acoustic path during the Shallow Water 2006 experiment are reported. The incoming internal wave packet acts as a moving frontal layer reflecting (or refracting) sound in the horizontal plane. Received acoustic signals are filtered into acoustic normal mode arrivals. It is shown that a horizontal multipath interference is produced. This has previously been called a horizontal Lloyd's mirror. The interference between the direct path and the refracted path depends on the mode number and frequency of the acoustic signal. A mechanism for the multipath interference is shown. Preliminary modeling results of this dynamic interaction using vertical modes and horizontal parabolic equation models are in good agreement with the observed data. PMID:21476621

  19. Transient axial solution for plane and axisymmetric waves focused by a paraboloidal reflector.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Te; Zhu, Jinying; Haberman, Michael R

    2013-04-01

    A time domain analytical solution is presented to calculate the pressure response along the axis of a paraboloidal reflector for a normally incident plane wave. This work is inspired by Hamilton's axial solution for an ellipsoidal mirror and the same methodology is employed in this paper. Behavior of the reflected waves along reflector axis is studied, and special interest is placed on focusing gain obtained at the focal point. This analytical solution indicates that the focusing gain is affected by reflector geometry and the time derivative of the input signal. In addition, focused pressure response in the focal zone given by various reflector geometries and input frequencies are also investigated. This information is useful for selecting appropriate reflector geometry in a specific working environment to achieve the best signal enhancement. Numerical simulation employing the finite element method is used to validate the analytical solution, and visualize the wave field to provide a better understanding of the propagation of reflected waves. This analytical solution can be modified to apply to non-planar incident waves with axisymmetric wavefront and non-uniform pressure distribution. An example of incident waves with conical-shaped wavefront is presented. PMID:23556573

  20. Plane-wave Sf S reconstruction of water surface characteristics from Lambertian reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian; O'Sullivan, Finbarr; Jike, Linhao

    2012-06-01

    The classical shape from shading (SfS) problem of computer vision is concerned with the reconstruction of a 3D object surface from its photographic image. Essential non-uniqueness and intrinsic nonlinearity make the problem challenging. This work considers the case where the object is a water surface so that the statistical approximation by superposition of plane waves is natural. An efficient greedy algorithm involving recursive refinement of wave fronts, subject to a wave-front frequency constraint is developed. The approach is evaluated using simulated reflectance data based on a set of wind-generated wave-field images obtained from detailed wave-tank measurements. The traditional setup for the SfS problem (orthographic cameras, light sources at infinity and the Lambertian surfaces) is used. Generalization to include a specular (Phong) reflectance component is also discussed. Results indicate that key statistical characteristics of the wave field related to its stage of development (evolution) are properly recovered by the approach. Thus there may be future potential for novel photographic-based remote sensing of physical drivers (e.g. wind velocity) of local water surface patterns.

  1. Rossby wave radiation by an eddy on a beta-plane: Experiments with laboratory altimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Afanasyev, Y. D.

    2015-07-15

    Results from the laboratory experiments on the evolution of vortices (eddies) generated in a rotating tank with topographic β-effect are presented. The focus of the experiments is on the far-field flow which contains Rossby waves emitted by travelling vortices. The surface elevation and velocity fields are measured by the altimetric imaging velocimetry. The experiments are supplemented by shallow water numerical simulations as well as a linear theory which describes the Rossby wave radiation by travelling vortices. The cyclonic vortices observed in the experiments travel to the northwest and continuously radiate Rossby waves. Measurements show that initially axisymmetric vortices develop a dipolar component which enables them to perform translational motion. A pattern of alternating zonal jets to the west of the vortex is created by Rossby waves with approximately zonal crests. Energy spectra of the flows in the wavenumber space indicate that a wavenumber similar to that introduced by Rhines for turbulent flows on the β-plane can be introduced here. The wavenumber is based on the translational speed of a vortex rather than on the root-mean-square velocity of a turbulent flow. The comparison between the experiments and numerical simulations demonstrates that evolving vortices also emit inertial waves. While these essentially three-dimensional non-hydrostatic waves can be observed in the altimetric data, they are not accounted for in the shallow water simulations.

  2. Development of a low frequency shear horizontal piezoelectric transducer for the generation of plane SH waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Guillaume; Viens, Martin; Belanger, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The shear horizontal guided wave fundamental mode (SH0) has the particularity of being the only non-dispersive plate guided wave mode. This characteristic makes this ultrasonic guided wave mode very attractive in non-destructive testing, facilitating signal processing for long range inspections. It is, however, difficult to generate only a single guided wave mode when using piezoelectric transduction. This work aims to develop a piezoelectric transducer capable of generating a virtually pure plane zeroth order shear horizontal wave. The chosen material was the PZT-5H for its dominant d15 piezoelectric constant, which makes it a perfect candidate for SH-wave generation. The transducer dimensions were optimised using an analytical model based on the Huygens' principle of superposition and the dipole pattern of a shear point source. A 3D multiphysics finite element model was then used to validate the analytical model results. Experimental validation was finally conducted with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) system. Excellent agreement between the analytical model, finite element model and experimental validation was seen.

  3. A computer simulation study of imaging flexural inhomogeneities using plate-wave diffraction tomography.

    PubMed

    Rohde, A H; Veidt, M; Rose, L R F; Homer, J

    2008-03-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of plate-wave diffraction tomography for the reconstruction of flexural inhomogeneities in plates using the results of computer simulation studies. The numerical implementation of the fundamental reconstruction algorithm, which has recently been developed by Wang and Rose [C.H. Wang, L.R.F. Rose, Plate-wave diffraction tomography for structural health monitoring, Rev. Quant. Nondestr. Eval. 22 (2003) 1615-1622] is investigated addressing the essential effects of applying the discrete form of the Fourier diffraction theorem for solving the inverse problem as discussed by Kak and Slaney [A.C. Kak, M. Slaney, Principles of Computerized Tomographic Imaging, IEEE Press, New York, 1988] for the acoustic case, viz. diffraction limited sensitivity, influence of weak scatterer assumption, damage location and scatter field data processing in time and Fourier space as well as experimental limitations such as finite receiver length and limited views. The feasibility of the imaging technique is investigated for cylindrical inhomogeneities of various severities and relative position within the interrogation space and a normal incident interrogation configuration. The results show that plate-wave diffraction tomography enables the quantitative reconstruction of location, size and severity of plate damage with excellent sensitivity and offers the potential for detecting corrosion thinning, disbonds and delamination damage in structural integrity management applications. PMID:18022207

  4. Shock wave diffraction in the presence of a supersonic co-flow jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnani, F.; Lo, K. H.; Zare-Behtash, H.; Kontis, K.

    2016-05-01

    The interaction between a diffracting shock wave and a uniform jet is a case that so far has only been partially investigated. This interaction is extremely important for the control of noise generation and improvement of combustor performance. To fill this knowledge gap, three geometries of the diffracting corner, namely a straight ramp, a serrated ramp, and a rounded corner, have been tested experimentally to study the interaction of shock diffraction with a supersonic co-flow jet at incident Mach numbers of 1.31 and 1.59, with Reynolds numbers of 1.08× 106 and 1.68× 106, respectively. Schlieren photography was employed to analyse the evolution of the flow phenomena. The aim is to provide a qualitative understanding of the interaction between the diffracting shock wave and the uniform jet relevant to future high-speed transport. The results show that the flow field evolves more rapidly and develops stronger structures for a higher shock Mach number. The diffraction around a rounded splitter develops a periodical vortical structure which continues after the disturbance introduced by the passage of the shock wave is removed.

  5. Shock wave diffraction in the presence of a supersonic co-flow jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnani, F.; Lo, K. H.; Zare-Behtash, H.; Kontis, K.

    2016-03-01

    The interaction between a diffracting shock wave and a uniform jet is a case that so far has only been partially investigated. This interaction is extremely important for the control of noise generation and improvement of combustor performance. To fill this knowledge gap, three geometries of the diffracting corner, namely a straight ramp, a serrated ramp, and a rounded corner, have been tested experimentally to study the interaction of shock diffraction with a supersonic co-flow jet at incident Mach numbers of 1.31 and 1.59, with Reynolds numbers of 1.08× 106 and 1.68× 106 , respectively. Schlieren photography was employed to analyse the evolution of the flow phenomena. The aim is to provide a qualitative understanding of the interaction between the diffracting shock wave and the uniform jet relevant to future high-speed transport. The results show that the flow field evolves more rapidly and develops stronger structures for a higher shock Mach number. The diffraction around a rounded splitter develops a periodical vortical structure which continues after the disturbance introduced by the passage of the shock wave is removed.

  6. On plane-wave relativistic electrodynamics in plasmas and in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Gaetano

    2014-06-01

    We revisit the exact microscopic equations (in differential, and equivalent integral form) ruling a relativistic cold plasma after the plane-wave Ansatz, without customary approximations. We show that in the Eulerian description the motion of a very diluted plasma initially at rest and excited by an arbitrary transverse plane electromagnetic travelling-wave has a very simple and explicit dependence on the transverse electromagnetic potential; for a non-zero density plasma the above motion is a good approximation of the real one as long as the back-reaction of the charges on the electromagnetic field can be neglected, i.e. for a time lapse decreasing with the plasma density, and can be used as initial step in an iterative resolution scheme. As one of many possible applications, we use these results to describe how the ponderomotive force of a very intense and short plane laser pulse hitting normally the surface of a plasma boosts the surface electrons into the ion background. In response to this penetration, the electrons are pulled back by the electric force exerted by the ions and the other displaced electrons and may leave the plasma with high energy in the direction opposite to that of propagation of the pulse ‘slingshot effect’ (Fiore G et al 2013 arXiv:1309.1400).

  7. Refinement of a discontinuity-free edge-diffraction model describing focused wave fields.

    PubMed

    Sedukhin, Andrey G

    2010-03-01

    Two equivalent forms of a refined discontinuity-free edge-diffraction model describing the structure of a stationary focused wave field are presented that are valid in the framework of the scalar Debye integral representation for a diffracted rotationally symmetric converging spherical wave of a limited yet not-too-low angular opening. The first form describes the field as the sum of a direct quasi-spherical wave and a plurality of edge quasi-conical waves of different orders, the optimum discontinuity-free angular spectrum functions of all the waves being dependent on the polar angle only. According to the second form, the focused field is fully characterized by only three components--the same quasi-spherical wave and two edge quasi-conical waves of the zero and first order, of which the optimum discontinuity-free angular spectrum functions are dependent on both the polar angle and the polar radius counted from the geometrical focus. PMID:20208957

  8. On the convergence of the coupled-wave approach for lamellar diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lifeng; Haggans, Charles W.

    1992-01-01

    Among the many existing rigorous methods for analyzing diffraction of electromagnetic waves by diffraction gratings, the coupled-wave approach stands out because of its versatility and simplicity. It can be applied to volume gratings and surface relief gratings, and its numerical implementation is much simpler than others. In addition, its predictions were experimentally validated in several cases. These facts explain the popularity of the coupled-wave approach among many optical engineers in the field of diffractive optics. However, a comprehensive analysis of the convergence of the model predictions has never been presented, although several authors have recently reported convergence difficulties with the model when it is used for metallic gratings in TM polarization. Herein, three points are made: (1) in the TM case, the coupled-wave approach converges much slower than the modal approach of Botten et al; (2) the slow convergence is caused by the use of Fourier expansions for the permittivity and the fields in the grating region; and (3) is manifested by the slow convergence of the eigenvalues and the associated modal fields. The reader is assumed to be familiar with the mathematical formulations of the coupled-wave approach and the modal approach.

  9. The radiation of sound by the instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Morris, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of acoustic radiation generated by instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer is solved. The solution provided is valid up to the acoustic far-field region. It represents a significant improvement over the solution obtained by classical hydrodynamic-stability theory which is essentially a local solution with the acoustic radiation suppressed. The basic instability-wave solution which is valid in the shear layer and the near-field region is constructed in terms of an asymptotic expansion using the method of multiple scales. This solution accounts for the effects of the slightly divergent mean flow. It is shown that the multiple-scales asymptotic expansion is not uniformly valid far from the shear layer. Continuation of this solution into the entire upper half-plane is described. The extended solution enables the near- and far-field pressure fluctuations associated with the instability wave to be determined. Numerical results show that the directivity pattern of acoustic radiation into the stationary medium peaks at 20 degrees to the axis of the shear layer in the downstream direction for supersonic flows. This agrees qualitatively with the observed noise-directivity patterns of supersonic jets.

  10. Radiation of de-excited electrons at large times in a strong electromagnetic plane wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2013-12-01

    The late time asymptotics of the physical solutions to the Lorentz-Dirac equation in the electromagnetic external fields of simple configurations-the constant homogeneous field, the linearly polarized plane wave (in particular, the constant uniform crossed field), and the circularly polarized plane wave-are found. The solutions to the Landau-Lifshitz equation for the external electromagnetic fields admitting a two-parametric symmetry group, which include as a particular case the above mentioned field configurations, are obtained. Some general properties of the total radiation power of a charged particle are established. In particular, for a circularly polarized wave and constant uniform crossed fields, the total radiation power in the asymptotic regime is independent of the charge and the external field strength, when expressed in terms of the proper-time, and equals a half the rest energy of a charged particle divided by its proper-time. The spectral densities of the radiation power formed on the late time asymptotics are derived for a charged particle moving in the external electromagnetic fields of the simple configurations pointed above. This provides a simple method to verify experimentally that the charged particle has reached the asymptotic regime.

  11. Plane-wave transport method for low-symmetry lattices and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Manoj K.; Wang, Yan; Zhang, X.-G.; Nicholson, D. M. C.; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2012-08-01

    The existing first-principles plane-wave transport method implementation [Choi and Ihm, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.59.2267 59, 2267 (1999); Giannozzi , J. Phys.: Condens. MatterJCOMEL0953-898410.1088/0953-8984/21/39/395502 21, 395502 (2009)] has the limitation that it only allows transport directions along lattice vectors perpendicular to the basal plane formed by two other lattice vectors. We generalize the algorithm to low-symmetry, nonorthogonal lattices thus allowing solution to problems in which the transport direction is not along any lattice vectors. As an application, we calculate the transmission and reflection coefficients, and determine interface resistivity of various grain boundaries in crystalline copper.

  12. Single-beam copying system of 360-degree viewable image-plane disk-type multiplex hologram and polarization effects on diffraction efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hung; Cheng, Yih-Shyang; Lei, Zen-Yuan

    2007-08-20

    A two-step holographic process for the fabrication of an image-plane disk-type multiplex hologram is described in this paper. The diffraction efficiency of the transfer hologram is measured as a function of exposure. It is found to be influenced by the polarization of the light beams of the copying system, resulting in different diffraction efficiencies from different areas (under different interference conditions) of the hologram transfer. The factors which cause the phenomenon of diffraction-efficiency difference are demonstrated and the corresponding experimental results are discussed. PMID:19547437

  13. Geometrical configurations of unphased diffraction-limited antennas in passive millimetre-wave imaging systems for concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serenelli, Roberto

    2004-12-01

    This paper analyzes simple imaging configurations to scan a human body, suitable as passive or active millimetre-wave imaging systems for concealed weapon detection (CWD). The first cylindrical configuration allows a 360 degrees scan: N unphased diffraction-limited antennas each of size L are placed on a circular support surrounding the subject (allowing scanning in the horizontal plane with N non-overlapping independent beams), and this circle is mechanically displaced over the whole body height. An analytical formula gives the maximum obtainable spatial resolution for different dimensions of the circular scanning device and operating frequencies, and the number of receivers achieving this optimal resolution. Constraints to be taken into account are diffraction, the usable total length of the circle, and the full coverage by the N beams over the subject, which is modelled as a cylinder with variable radius, coaxial with the scanning circle. Numerical calculations of system resolution are shown for different operating microwave (MW) and millimetre-wave (MMW) frequencies; in order to study off-axis performances, situations where the subject is not coaxial with the scanning device are also considered. For the case of a parallelepiped to be imaged instead of a cylinder, a linear array configuration is analyzed similarly to the circular one. A theoretical study is carried out to design other curved arrays, filled with unphased diffraction-limited antennas, for the imaging of linear subjects with finer resolution. Finally, the application of such configurations is considered for the design of active imaging systems, and different system architectures are discussed.

  14. Inertial effects on thin-film wave structures with imposed surface shear on an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapuratharasu, M.; Hibberd, S.; Hubbard, M. E.; Power, H.

    2016-06-01

    This study provides an extended approach to the mathematical simulation of thin-film flow on a flat inclined plane relevant to flows subject to high surface shear. Motivated by modelling thin-film structures within an industrial context, wave structures are investigated for flows with moderate inertial effects and small film depth aspect ratio ε. Approximations are made assuming a Reynolds number, Re ∼ O(ε-1) and depth-averaging used to simplify the governing Navier-Stokes equations. A parallel Stokes flow is expected in the absence of any wave disturbance and a generalisation for the flow is based on a local quadratic profile. This approach provides a more general system which includes inertial effects and is solved numerically. Flow structures are compared with studies for Stokes flow in the limit of negligible inertial effects. Both two-tier and three-tier wave disturbances are used to study film profile evolution. A parametric study is provided for wave disturbances with increasing film Reynolds number. An evaluation of standing wave and transient film profiles is undertaken and identifies new profiles not previously predicted when inertial effects are neglected.

  15. Electronic levels and electrical response of periodic molecular structures from plane-wave orbital-dependent calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanli; Dabo, Ismaila

    2011-10-01

    Plane-wave electronic-structure predictions based upon orbital-dependent density-functional theory (OD-DFT) approximations, such as hybrid density-functional methods and self-interaction density-functional corrections, are severely affected by computational inaccuracies in evaluating electron interactions in the plane-wave representation. These errors arise from divergence singularities in the plane-wave summation of electrostatic and exchange interaction contributions. Auxiliary-function corrections are reciprocal-space countercharge corrections that cancel plane-wave singularities through the addition of an auxiliary function to the point-charge electrostatic kernel that enters into the expression of interaction terms. At variance with real-space countercharge corrections that are employed in the context of density-functional theory (DFT), reciprocal-space corrections are computationally inexpensive, making them suited to more demanding OD-DFT calculations. Nevertheless, there exists much freedom in the choice of auxiliary functions and various definitions result in different levels of performance in eliminating plane-wave inaccuracies. In this work we derive exact point-charge auxiliary functions for the description of molecular structures of arbitrary translational symmetry, including the yet unaddressed one-dimensional case. In addition, we provide a critical assessment of different reciprocal-space countercharge corrections and demonstrate the improved accuracy of point-charge auxiliary functions in predicting the electronic levels and electrical response of conjugated polymers from plane-wave OD-DFT calculations.

  16. Dipole-exchange spin waves in nanotubes composed of uniaxial ferromagnets with "easy-plane" and "easy-axis" anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorobets, Yu. I.; Kulish, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    Dipole-exchange spin waves in nanotubes composed of uniaxial ferromagnets are studied. An equation for the magnetic potential of linear spin waves in uniaxial "easy plane" ferromagnets is obtained in the magnetostatic approximation taking into account magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, exchange interactions, and anisotropy effects. A solution is found for this equation and a dispersion relation for these types of spin waves is obtained. The dependence of the spin wave frequency on the total wave number is found for the case of a thin nanotube. An expression is derived for the transverse wave number spectrum.

  17. Extracting chemical information from plane wave calculations by a 3D 'fuzzy atoms' analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakó, I.; Stirling, A.; Seitsonen, A. P.; Mayer, I.

    2013-03-01

    Bond order and valence indices have been calculated by the method of the three-dimensional 'fuzzy atoms' analysis, using the numerical molecular orbitals obtained from plane wave DFT calculations, i.e., without introducing any external atom-centered functions. Weight functions of both Hirshfeld and Becke types have been applied. The results are rather close to the similar 'fuzzy atoms' ones obtained by using atom-centered basis sets and agree well with the chemical expectations, stressing the power of the genuine chemical concepts.

  18. Complex band structure under plane-wave nonlocal pseudopotential Hamiltonian of metallic wires and electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao

    2009-07-17

    We present a practical approach to calculate the complex band structure of an electrode for quantum transport calculations. This method is designed for plane wave based Hamiltonian with nonlocal pseudopotentials and the auxiliary periodic boundary condition transport calculation approach. Currently there is no direct method to calculate all the evanescent states for a given energy for systems with nonlocal pseudopotentials. On the other hand, in the auxiliary periodic boundary condition transport calculation, there is no need for all the evanescent states at a given energy. The current method fills this niche. The method has been used to study copper and gold nanowires and bulk electrodes.

  19. Tight focusing of plane waves from micro-fabricated spherical mirrors.

    PubMed

    Goldwin, J; Hinds, E A

    2008-10-27

    We derive a formula for the light field of a monochromatic plane wave that is truncated and reflected by a spherical mirror. Within the scalar field approximation, our formula is valid even for deep mirrors, where the aperture radius approaches the radius of curvature. We apply this result to micro-fabricated mirrors whose size scales are in the range of tens to hundreds of wavelengths, and show that sub-wavelength focusing (full-width at half-maximum intensity) can be achieved. This opens up the possibility of scalable arrays of tightly focused optical dipole traps without the need for high-performance optical systems. PMID:18958062

  20. A full 3D plane-wave-expansion model for 1-3 piezoelectric composite structures.

    PubMed

    Wilm, Mikaël; Ballandras, Sylvain; Laude, Vincent; Pastureaud, Thomas

    2002-09-01

    The plane-wave-expansion (PWE) approach dedicated to the simulation of periodic devices has been extended to 1-3 connectivity piezoelectric composite structures. The case of simple but actual piezoelectric composite structures is addressed, taking piezoelectricity, acoustic losses, and electrical excitation conditions rigorously into account. The material distribution is represented by using a bidimensional Fourier series and the electromechanical response is simulated using a Bloch-Floquet expansion together with the Fahmy-Adler formulation of the Christoffel problem. Application of the model to 1-3 connectivity piezoelectric composites is reported and compared to previously published analyses of this problem. PMID:12243182

  1. Phase structure function and AOA fluctuations of plane and spherical waves propagating through oceanic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lu; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Pengfei; Qiao, Chunhong; Fan, Chengyu; Zhang, Jinghui; Ji, Xiaoling

    2015-08-01

    Based on the characteristics of a hypergeometric function, the analytical expressions for the phase structure function and angle-of-arrival (AOA) fluctuations of plane and spherical waves propagating through oceanic turbulence are derived. The results are verified by comparing them with the numerical calculations of the definitions using four important parameters (i.e., the rate of dissipation of mean-squared temperature {χ }T, the rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid \\varepsilon , the ratio of temperature to salinity contribution to the refractive index spectrum w, and the Kolmogorov microscale η ). The relation between AOA fluctuations and the spatial coherence radius {ρ }0 is also investigated.

  2. Scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by a generalized Luneburg sphere-Part 1: Ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, James A.; Laven, Philip; Adam, John A.

    2015-09-01

    We calculated scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave by both a radially-inhomogeneous particle and bubble, the square of whose refractive index profile is parabolic as a function of radius. Depending on the value of the two adjustable parameters of the parabola, the particle or bubble can have either a refractive index discontinuity at its surface, or the refractive index can smoothly merge into that of the exterior medium. Scattering was analyzed in ray theory, and various novel features of the scattering, including the details of the curved ray paths, transmission rainbows, and near-critical-angle scattering were apparent and were contrasted with their behavior for scattering by a homogeneous sphere.

  3. On the angle between the average interplanetary magnetic field and the propagation direction of plane large amplitude Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenstein, B. R.; Sonett, C. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper shows that the experimentally observed close alignment of magnetic field minimum variance direction with the average magnetic field for Alfven waves in the solar wind is consistent with theoretically predicted properties of plane large amplitude Alfven waves in the MHD approximation. The theoretical properties of these Alfven waves constrain the time averaged magnetic field to cluster around the direction of minimum variance, which is aligned with the wave normal. Thus, spacecraft magnetometer observations in the solar wind of minimum variance directions strongly peaked about the average magnetic field direction are consistent with plane large amplitude Alfven waves which have wave normals aligned with the directions of minimum variance. This does not imply that geometrical hydromagnetic calculations for Alfven wave propagation direction in the solar wind are incorrect, but there is a discrepancy between geometrical hydromagnetics theory and observations that IMF minimum variance directions tend to be aligned with the ideal Parker spiral instead of the radial direction.

  4. Superoscillations without Sidebands: Power-Efficient Sub-Diffraction Imaging with Propagating Waves

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Alex M. H.; Eleftheriades, George V.

    2015-01-01

    A superoscillation wave is a special superposition of propagating electromagnetic (EM) waves which varies with sub-diffraction resolution inside a fixed region. This special property allows superoscillation waves to carry sub-diffraction details of an object into the far-field, and makes it an attractive candidate technology for super-resolution devices. However, the Shannon limit seemingly requires that superoscillations must exist alongside high-energy sidebands, which can impede its widespread application. In this work we show that, contrary to prior understanding, one can selectively synthesize a portion of a superoscillation wave and thereby remove its high-energy region. Moreover, we show that by removing the high-energy region of a superoscillation wave-based imaging device, one can increase its power efficiency by two orders of magnitude. We describe the concept behind this development, elucidate conditions under which this phenomenon occurs, then report fullwave simulations which demonstrate the successful, power-efficient generation of sub-wavelength focal spots from propagating waves. PMID:25677306

  5. Reflection and Transmission Coefficients for an Incident Plane Shear Wave at an Interface Separating Two Dissimilar Poroelastic Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xu; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2014-09-01

    Using Biot's poroelasticity theory, we derive expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a plane shear wave incident on an interface separating two different poroelastic solids. The coefficients are formulated as a function of the wave incidence angle, frequency and rock properties. Specific cases calculated include the boundary between water-saturated sand and water-saturated sandstone and the gas-water interface in sand. The results show a very different interface response to that of an incident P wave. Plane SV wave incidence does not significantly excite the Biot slow P wave if the frequency of the wave is below the transition frequency. Above this frequency, an incident plane SV wave can generate a mode-converted slow Biot P wave which is actually a normal propagating wave and not highly attenuating as in the usual (diffusive) case. For an incident SV wave onto a gas-water interface, even at very high frequency, there is no significant Biot second P wave produced. For small incident angles, the gas-water interface is essentially transparent. With increasing angles, there can arise an unusual "definitive angle" in the reflection/transmission coefficient curves which is related to the change of fluid viscosity on both sides of the interface and provides a possible new means for underground fluid assessment.

  6. Spin waves and small intrinsic damping in an in-plane magnetized FePt film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhifeng; Yi, Ming; Chen, Ming; Li, Shufa; Zhou, Shiming; Lai, Tianshu

    2012-11-01

    Laser-induced spin-wave dynamics in an in-plane magnetized FePt film is studied using all-optical pump-probe magneto-optical Kerr spectroscopy under different external fields and pump fluences. Uniform precession spin wave is observed. Nonlinear external field dependence of its frequency is found and well explained by the macrospin model of uniform precession. The effective damping shows a significant external-field dependence. Calculation taking account for magnetic inhomogeneity fits the external-field dependence well, revealing main magnetic inhomogeneity origin of the extrinsic damping. An intrinsic Gilbert damping parameter of <0.028 is inferred and shows potential applications of this film in magnonics.

  7. PARTICLE DISPLACEMENTS ON THE WALL OF A BOREHOLE FROM INCIDENT PLANE WAVES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    Particle displacements from incident plane waves at the wall of a fluid-filled borehole are formulated by applying the seismic reciprocity theorem to far-field displacement fields. Such displacement fields are due to point forces acting on a fluid-filled borehole under the assumption of long wavelengths. The displacement fields are analyzed to examine the effect of the borehole on seismic wave propagation, particularly for vertical seismic profiling (VSP) measurements. When the shortest wavelength of interest is approximately 25 times longer than the borehole's diameter, the scattered displacements are proportional to the first power of incident frequency and borehole diameter. When the shortest wavelength of interest is about 40 times longer than the borehole's diameter, borehole effects on VSP measurements using a wall-locking geophone are negligible.

  8. Approximate analytical calculation of the mach configuration of steady shock waves in a plane constricting channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, A. E.; Fomin, V. M.

    1998-05-01

    An approximate analytical model for calculation of the parameters of a steady gas flow inside a plane constricting channel formed by two symmetrically positioned wedges is suggested. A Mach configuration of shock waves (triple point) is formed in the channel when the wedge angles are larger than some critical value. The flow calculation in a constricting channel reduces to the solution of the iterative problem for a system of nonlinear algebraic equations. The configurations of shock waves, the slipstream, and the sonic line are described by the proposed model of a gas flow. A comparison of the results obtained using this model allows a fairly accurate calculation of the Mach stem and the length of the subsonic-flow region.

  9. Transverse instability of a plane front of fast impact ionization waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kyuregyan, A. S.

    2012-05-15

    The transverse instability of a plane front of fast impact ionization waves in p{sup +}-n-n{sup +} semiconductor structures with a finite concentration of donors N in the n layer has been theoretically analyzed. It is assumed that the high velocity u of impact ionization waves is ensured owing to the avalanche multiplication of the uniform background of electrons and holes whose concentration {sigma}{sub b} ahead of the front is high enough for the continuum approximation to be applicable. The problem of the calculation of the growth rate s of a small harmonic perturbation with wavenumber k is reduced to the eigenvalue problem for a specific homogeneous Volterra equation of the second kind containing the sum of double and triple integrals of an unknown eigenfunction. This problem has been solved by the method of successive approximations. It has been shown that the function s(k) for small k values increases monotonically in agreement with the analytical theory reported in Thermal Engineering 58 (13), 1119 (2011), reaches a maximum s{sub M} at k = k{sub M}, then decreases, and becomes negative at k > k{sub 01}. This behavior of the function s(k) for short-wavelength perturbations is due to a decrease in the distortion of the field owing to a finite thickness of the space charge region of the front and 'smearing' of perturbation of concentrations owing to the transverse transport of charge carriers. The similarity laws for perturbations with k Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To k{sub M} have been established: at fixed {sigma}{sub b} values and the maximum field strength on the front E{sub 0M}, the growth rate s depends only on the ratio k/N and the boundary wavenumber k{sub 01} {proportional_to} N. The parameters s{sub M}, k{sub M}, and k{sub 01}, which determine the perturbation growth dynamics and the upper boundary of the instability region for impact ionization waves, have been presented as functions of E{sub 0M}. These dependences indicate that the model of a plane

  10. Streaking images that appear only in the plane of diffraction in undoped GaAs single crystals: Diffraction imaging (topography) by monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriyama, Masao; Steiner, Bruce; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Laor, Uri; Larson, David; Brown, Margaret

    1988-01-01

    Streaking images restricted to the direction of the diffraction (scattering) vector have been observed on transmission through undoped GaAs. These disruption images (caused by the reduction of diffraction in the direction of observation) appear both in the forward and in Bragg diffracted directions in monochromatic synchrontron radiation diffraction imaging. This previously unobserved phenomenon can be explained in terms of planar defects (interfaces) or platelets which affects the absorption coefficient in anomalous transmission. Such regions of the crystal look perfect despite the presence of imperfections when the scattering vector is not perpendicular to the normal of the platelets. The observed crystallographic orientation of these interfaces strongly indicates that they are antiphase boundaries.

  11. Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Jan-David; Reusch, Tobias; Osterhoff, Markus; Sprung, Michael; Schülein, Florian J. R.; Krenner, Hubert J.; Wixforth, Achim; Salditt, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction experiments of standing surface acoustic waves, illuminated under grazing incidence by a nanofocused synchrotron beam, are reported. The data have been recorded in stroboscopic mode at controlled and varied phase between the acoustic frequency generator and the synchrotron bunch train. At each time delay (phase angle), the coherent far-field diffraction pattern in the small-angle regime is inverted by an iterative algorithm to yield the local instantaneous surface height profile along the optical axis. The results show that periodic nanoscale dynamics can be imaged at high temporal resolution in the range of 50 ps (pulse length). PMID:25294979

  12. Liquid-Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometer for Wave-Front Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Creath, Katherine

    1996-01-01

    A new instrument, the liquid-crystal point-diffraction interferometer (LCPDI), is developed for the measurement of phase objects. This instrument maintains the compact, robust design of Linnik's point-diffraction interferometer and adds to it a phase-stepping capability for quantitative interferogram analysis. The result is a compact, simple to align, environmentally insensitive interferometer capable of accurately measuring optical wave fronts with very high data density and with automated data reduction. We describe the theory and design of the LCPDI. A focus shift was measured with the LCPDI, and the results are compared with theoretical results,

  13. Application of the wavenumber jump condition to the normal and oblique interaction of a plane acoustic wave and a plane shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinstein, G. G.; Gunzburger, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    The kinematics of normal and oblique interactions between a plane acoustic wave and a plane shock wave are investigated separately using an approach whereby the shock is considered as a sharp discontinuity surface separating two half-spaces, so that the dispersion relation on either side of the shock and the wavenumber jump condition across a discontinuity surface completely specify the kinematics of the problem in the whole space independently of the acoustic-field dynamics. The normal interaction is analyzed for a stationary shock, and the spectral change of the incident wave is investigated. The normal interaction is then examined for the case of a shock wave traveling into an ambient region where an acoustic disturbance is propagating in the opposite direction. Detailed attention is given to the consequences of the existence of a critical shock speed above which the frequency of the transmitted wave becomes negative. Finally, the oblique interaction with a fixed shock is considered, and the existence and nature of the transmitted wave is investigated, particularly as a function of the angle of incidence.

  14. Investigation of the Attenuation of Plane Shock Waves Moving over very Rough Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Paul W.; McFarland, Donald R.; Levine, Philip

    1953-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the attenuation of plane shock waves moving over rough walls have been made in a shock tube. Measurements of the boundary-layer characteristics, including thickness and velocity distribution behind the shock, have also been made with the aid of new cal techniques which provide direct information on the local boundary-layer conditions at the rough walls. Measurements of shock speed and shock pressure ratio are presented for both smooth-wall and rough-wall flow over lengths of machined-smooth and rough strips which lined all four walls of the shock tube. A simplified theory based on Von Karman's expression for skin-friction coefficient for flow over rough walls, along with a wave-model concept and extensions to include time effects, is presented. In this theory, the shock-tube flow is assumed to be one-dimensional at all times and the wave-model concept is used to relate the local layer growth to decreases in shock strength. This concept assumes that local boundary-layer growths act as local mass-flow sinks, which give rise to expansion waves which, in turn, overtake the shock and lower its mass flow accordingly.

  15. Underdetermined system theory applied to quantitative analysis of responses caused by unsteady smooth-plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yukio

    1993-01-01

    The mechanical responses of rate-dependent media caused by unsteady smooth-plane waves are quantitatively analyzed by an underdetermined system of equations without using any constitutive relation of the media; that is, by using the particle velocity field expressed by an algebraic equation that is derived from the mass conservation equation, and the stress field expressed by an algebraic equation that is derived from the momentum conservation equation. First of all, this approach for analyzing unsteady wave motion is justified by the verification of various inferences such as the existence of the nonindependent elementary waves by Sano [J. Appl. Phys. 65, 3857(1989)] and the degradation process by Sano [J. Appl. Phys. 67, 4072(1990)]. Second, the situation under which a spike arises in particle velocity-time and stress-time profiles, and the reason for the arising are clarified. Third, the influence of the spike on stress-particle velocity and stress-strain paths is examined. The spike induced in the profiles by a growing wave greatly influences the paths near the impacted surface. Finally, calculated particle velocity-time profiles are compared with experimental data.

  16. The Effects Of Finite Electron Temperature And Diffraction On Lowere Hybrid Wave Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    White, J. C.; Bertelli, M.

    2014-02-24

    In this paper we show that the commonly used cold plasma dispersion relation for plasma waves in the lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF) produces a wave trajectory that is notably different than when thermal corrections to the Hermitian part of the dielectric tensor are retained. This is in contrast to the common implementation in LH simulation codes in which thermal effects are retained only for the anti-Hermitian part of the dielectric tensor used for damping calculations. We show which term is the critical one to retain in the dielectric tensor and discuss implications for modeling of LHRF waves in present day and future devices. We conclude with some observations on the effects of diffraction that may be isolated once thermal effects are retained in both ray tracing and full-wave approaches.

  17. Fast solution of elliptic partial differential equations using linear combinations of plane waves.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jordá, José M

    2016-02-01

    Given an arbitrary elliptic partial differential equation (PDE), a procedure for obtaining its solution is proposed based on the method of Ritz: the solution is written as a linear combination of plane waves and the coefficients are obtained by variational minimization. The PDE to be solved is cast as a system of linear equations Ax=b, where the matrix A is not sparse, which prevents the straightforward application of standard iterative methods in order to solve it. This sparseness problem can be circumvented by means of a recursive bisection approach based on the fast Fourier transform, which makes it possible to implement fast versions of some stationary iterative methods (such as Gauss-Seidel) consuming O(NlogN) memory and executing an iteration in O(Nlog(2)N) time, N being the number of plane waves used. In a similar way, fast versions of Krylov subspace methods and multigrid methods can also be implemented. These procedures are tested on Poisson's equation expressed in adaptive coordinates. It is found that the best results are obtained with the GMRES method using a multigrid preconditioner with Gauss-Seidel relaxation steps. PMID:26986436

  18. Plane Wave Imaging for ultrasonic non-destructive testing: Generalization to multimodal imaging.

    PubMed

    Le Jeune, Léonard; Robert, Sébastien; Lopez Villaverde, Eduardo; Prada, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a new ultrasonic array imaging method for Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) which is derived from the medical Plane Wave Imaging (PWI) technique. The objective is to perform fast ultrasound imaging with high image quality. The approach is to transmit plane waves at several angles and to record the back-scattered signals with all the array elements. Focusing in receive is then achieved by coherent summations of the signals in every point of a region of interest. The medical PWI is generalized to immersion setups where water acts as a coupling medium and to multimodal (direct, half-skip modes) imaging in order to detect different types of defects (inclusions, porosities, cracks). This method is compared to the Total Focusing Method (TFM) which is the reference imaging technique in NDT. First, the two post-processing algorithms are described. Then experimental results with the array probe either in contact or in immersion are presented. A good agreement between the TFM and the PWI is observed, with three to ten times less transmissions required for the PWI. PMID:26323547

  19. Scaling of plane-wave functions in statistically optimized near-field acoustic holography.

    PubMed

    Hald, Jørgen

    2014-11-01

    Statistically Optimized Near-field Acoustic Holography (SONAH) is a Patch Holography method, meaning that it can be applied in cases where the measurement area covers only part of the source surface. The method performs projections directly in the spatial domain, avoiding the use of spatial discrete Fourier transforms and the associated errors. First, an inverse problem is solved using regularization. For each calculation point a multiplication must then be performed with two transfer vectors--one to get the sound pressure and the other to get the particle velocity. Considering SONAH based on sound pressure measurements, existing derivations consider only pressure reconstruction when setting up the inverse problem, so the evanescent wave amplification associated with the calculation of particle velocity is not taken into account in the regularized solution of the inverse problem. The present paper introduces a scaling of the applied plane wave functions that takes the amplification into account, and it is shown that the previously published virtual source-plane retraction has almost the same effect. The effectiveness of the different solutions is verified through a set of simulated measurements. PMID:25373969

  20. Parallel Implementation of Gamma-Point Pseudopotential Plane-Wave DFT with Exact Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Tsemekhman, Kiril L.; Baden, Scott B.; Weare, John H.; Jonsson, Hannes

    2011-01-15

    One of the more persistent failures of conventional density functional theory (DFT) methods has been their failure to yield localized charge states such as polarons, excitons and solitons in solid-state and extended systems. It has been suggested that conventional DFT functionals, which are not self-interaction free, tend to favor delocalized electronic states since self-interaction creates a Coulomb barrier to charge localization. Pragmatic approaches in which the exchange correlation functionals are augmented with small amount of exact exchange (hybrid-DFT, e.g. B3LYP and PBE0) have shown promise in localizing charge states and predicting accurate band gaps and reaction barriers. We have developed a parallel algorithm for implementing exact exchange into pseudopotential plane-wave density functional theory and we have implemented it in the NWChem program package. The technique developed can readily be employed in plane-wave DFT programs. Furthermore, atomic forces and stresses are straightforward to implement, making it applicable to both confined and extended systems, as well as to Car-Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamic simulations. This method has been applied to several systems for which conventional DFT methods do not work well, including calculations for band gaps in oxides and the electronic structure of a charge trapped state in the Fe(II) containing mica, annite.

  1. 2, Pulse-mode expansions and refractive indices in plane-wave propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Sacks, R.; Karr, T.; Morris, J.; Paisner, J.A.

    1987-06-20

    This memo presents basic background theory for treating simultaneous propagation of electromagnetic pulses of various colors, directed along a common ray, through a molecular vapor. The memo discusses some techniques for expanding the positive frequency part of the transverse electric field into pulse modes, characterized by carrier frequencies within a modulated envelope. We discuss, in the approximation of plane waves with slowly varying envelopes, a set of uncoupled envelope equations in which a polarization mode-envelope acts as a source for an electric-field envelope. These equations, when taken with a prescription for the polarization field, are the basic equations of plane-wave pulse propagation through a molecular medium. We discuss two ways of treating dispersive media, one based upon expansions in the frequency domain and the other based in the time domain. In both cases we find envelope equations that involve group velocities. This memo represents a portion of a more extensive treatment of propagation to be presented separately. Many of the equations presented here have been described in various books and articles. They are collected and described here as a summary and review of contemporary theory.

  2. Fast solution of elliptic partial differential equations using linear combinations of plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Jordá, José M.

    2016-02-01

    Given an arbitrary elliptic partial differential equation (PDE), a procedure for obtaining its solution is proposed based on the method of Ritz: the solution is written as a linear combination of plane waves and the coefficients are obtained by variational minimization. The PDE to be solved is cast as a system of linear equations A x =b , where the matrix A is not sparse, which prevents the straightforward application of standard iterative methods in order to solve it. This sparseness problem can be circumvented by means of a recursive bisection approach based on the fast Fourier transform, which makes it possible to implement fast versions of some stationary iterative methods (such as Gauss-Seidel) consuming O (N logN ) memory and executing an iteration in O (N log2N ) time, N being the number of plane waves used. In a similar way, fast versions of Krylov subspace methods and multigrid methods can also be implemented. These procedures are tested on Poisson's equation expressed in adaptive coordinates. It is found that the best results are obtained with the GMRES method using a multigrid preconditioner with Gauss-Seidel relaxation steps.

  3. Whole body exposure at 2100 MHz induced by plane wave of random incidences in a population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conil, Emmanuelle; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; El Habachi, Aimad; Wiart, J.

    2010-11-01

    In this article, the whole body exposure induced by plane wave coming from a random direction of arrival is analyzed at 2100 MHz. This work completes previous studies on the influence of different parameters on the whole body exposure (such as morphology, frequency or usage in near field). The Visible Human phantom has been used to build a surrogate model to predict the whole body exposure depending on the highlighted surface of the phantom and on the direction of arrival of the incident plane wave. For the Visible Human, the error on the whole body averaged Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) is on average 4%. The surrogate model is applied to other 3D anthropomorphic phantoms for a frontal incidence with an averaged error of 10%. The great interest of the surrogate model is the possibility to apply a Monte Carlo process to assess probability distribution function of a population. A recent French anthropometric database of more than 3500 adults is used to build the probability distribution function of the whole body SAR for a random direction of arrival.

  4. Iterative diagonalization in augmented plane wave based methods in electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Blaha, P.; Laskowski, R.; Schwarz, K.

    2010-01-20

    Due to the increased computer power and advanced algorithms, quantum mechanical calculations based on Density Functional Theory are more and more widely used to solve real materials science problems. In this context large nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems must be solved repeatedly to calculate the electronic ground state of a solid or molecule. Due to the nonlinear nature of this problem, an iterative solution of the eigenvalue problem can be more efficient provided it does not disturb the convergence of the self-consistent-field problem. The blocked Davidson method is one of the widely used and efficient schemes for that purpose, but its performance depends critically on the preconditioning, i.e. the procedure to improve the search space for an accurate solution. For more diagonally dominated problems, which appear typically for plane wave based pseudopotential calculations, the inverse of the diagonal of (H - ES) is used. However, for the more efficient 'augmented plane wave + local-orbitals' basis set this preconditioning is not sufficient due to large off-diagonal terms caused by the local orbitals. We propose a new preconditioner based on the inverse of (H - {lambda}S) and demonstrate its efficiency for real applications using both, a sequential and a parallel implementation of this algorithm into our WIEN2k code.

  5. Scaled plane-wave Born cross sections for atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Brunger, M. J.; Campbell, L.; Kato, H.; Hoshino, M.; Rau, A. R. P.

    2016-04-01

    Integral cross sections for optically allowed electronic-state excitations of atoms and molecules by electron impact, by applying scaled plane-wave Born models, are reviewed. Over 40 years ago, Inokuti presented an influential review of charged-particle scattering, based on the theory pioneered by Bethe forty years earlier, which emphasized the importance of reliable cross-section data from low eV energies to high keV energies that are needed in many areas of radiation science with applications to astronomy, plasmas, and medicine. Yet, with a couple of possible exceptions, most computational methods in electron-atom scattering do not, in general, overlap each other's validity range in the region from threshold up to 300 eV and, in particular, in the intermediate region from 30 to 300 eV. This is even more so for electron-molecule scattering. In fact this entire energy range is of great importance and, to bridge the gap between the two regions of low and high energy, scaled plane-wave Born models were developed to provide reliable, comprehensive, and absolute integral cross sections, first for ionization by Kim and Rudd and then extended to optically allowed electronic-state excitation by Kim. These and other scaling models in a broad, general application to electron scattering from atoms and molecules, their theoretical basis, and their results for cross sections along with comparison to experimental measurements are reviewed. Where possible, these data are also compared to results from other computational approaches.

  6. Multifrequency measurements of core-diffracted P waves (Pdiff) for global waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Kasra; Sigloch, Karin

    2015-10-01

    The lower third of the mantle is sampled extensively by body waves that diffract around the earth's core (Pdiff and Sdiff phases), which could deliver highly resolved tomographic images of this poorly understood region. But core-diffracted waves-especially Pdiff waves-are not often used in tomography because they are difficult to model adequately. Our aim is to make core-diffracted body waves usable for global waveform tomography, across their entire frequency range. Here we present the data processing part of this effort. A method is demonstrated that routinely calculates finite-frequency traveltimes of Pdiff waves by cross-correlating large quantities of waveform data with synthetic seismograms, in frequency passbands ranging from 30.0 to 2.7 s dominant period. Green's functions for 1857 earthquakes, typically comprising thousands of seismograms, are calculated by theoretically exact wave propagation through a spherically symmetric earth model, up to 1 Hz dominant period. Out of 418 226 candidates, 165 651 (39.6 per cent) source-receiver pairs yielded at least one successful passband measurement of a Pdiff traveltime anomaly, for a total of 479 559 traveltimes in the eight passbands considered. Measurements of teleseismic P waves yielded 448 178 usable source-receiver paths from 613 057 candidates (73.1 per cent success rate), for a total of 2 306 755 usable teleseismic dT in eight passbands. Observed and predicted characteristics of Pdiff traveltimes are discussed and compared to teleseismic P for this very large data set. Pdiff measurements are noise-limited due to severe wave attenuation with epicentral distance and frequency. Measurement success drops from 40-60 per cent at 80° distance, to 5-10 per cent at 140°. Frequency has a 2-3 times stronger influence on measurement success for Pdiff than for P. The fewest usable dT measurements are obtained in the microseismic noise band, whereas the fewest usable teleseismic P measurements occur at the highest

  7. MnO spin-wave dispersion curves from neutron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Keen, David A.

    2007-02-15

    We describe a model-independent approach for the extraction of spin-wave dispersion curves from powder neutron total scattering data. Our approach is based on a statistical analysis of real-space spin configurations to calculate spin-dynamical quantities. The RMCPROFILE implementation of the reverse Monte Carlo refinement process is used to generate a large ensemble of supercell spin configurations from MnO powder diffraction data collected at 100 K. Our analysis of these configurations gives spin-wave dispersion curves for MnO that agree well with those determined independently using neutron triple-axis spectroscopic techniques.

  8. Plane waves at or near grazing incidence in the parabolic approximation. [acoustic equations of motion for sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaninch, G. L.; Myers, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    The parabolic approximation for the acoustic equations of motion is applied to the study of the sound field generated by a plane wave at or near grazing incidence to a finite impedance boundary. It is shown how this approximation accounts for effects neglected in the usual plane wave reflection analysis which, at grazing incidence, erroneously predicts complete cancellation of the incident field by the reflected field. Examples are presented which illustrate that the solution obtained by the parabolic approximation contains several of the physical phenomena known to occur in wave propagation near an absorbing boundary.

  9. A numerical study of shock wave diffraction by a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-Y.; Liu, Y.; Lomax, H.

    1986-01-01

    The nonstationary shock wave diffraction patterns generated by a blast wave impinging on a circular cylinder are numerically simulated using a second-order hybrid upwind method for solving the two-dimensional inviscid compressible Euler equations of gasdynamics. The complete diffraction patterns, including the transition from regular to Mach reflection, trajectory of the Mach triple point and the complex shock-on-shock interaction at the wake region resulting from the Mach shocks collision behind the cylinder are reported in detail. Pressure-time history and various contour plots are also included. Comparison between the work of Bryson and Gross (1961) which included both experimental schlieren pictures and theoretical calculations using Whitham's ray-shock theory and results of the present finite difference computation indicate good agreement in every aspect except for some nonideal gas and viscous effects which are not accounted for by the Euler equations.

  10. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction of charge density waves via chemical filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Yejun; Somayazulu, M. S.; Jaramillo, R.; Rosenbaum, T.F.; Isaacs, E.D.; Hu Jingzhu; Mao Hokwang

    2005-06-15

    Pressure tuning of phase transitions is a powerful tool in condensed matter physics, permitting high-resolution studies while preserving fundamental symmetries. At the highest pressures, energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXD) has been a critical method for geometrically confined diamond anvil cell experiments. We develop a chemical filter technique complementary to EDXD that permits the study of satellite peaks as weak as 10{sup -4} of the crystal Bragg diffraction. In particular, we map out the temperature dependence of the incommensurate charge density wave diffraction from single-crystal, elemental chromium. This technique provides the potential for future GPa pressure studies of many-body effects in a broad range of solid state systems.

  11. A MILLIMETER-WAVE GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY WITH THE BICEP POLARIMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, E. M.; Keating, B. G.; Barron, D.; Kaufman, J. P.; Matsumura, T.; Dowell, C. D.; Bock, J. J.; Chiang, H. C.; Culverhouse, T. L.; Hristov, V. V.; Kovac, J. M.; Lange, A. E.; Ade, P.; Barkats, D.; Battle, J. O.; Leitch, E. M.; Duband, L.; Hivon, E. F.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Kuo, C. L.

    2011-11-10

    In order to study inflationary cosmology and the Milky Way Galaxy's composition and magnetic field structure, Stokes I, Q, and U maps of the Galactic plane covering the Galactic longitude range 260 Degree-Sign < l < 340 Degree-Sign in three atmospheric transmission windows centered on 100, 150, and 220 GHz are presented. The maps sample an optical depth 1 {approx}< A{sub V} {approx}< 30, and are consistent with previous characterizations of the Galactic millimeter-wave frequency spectrum and the large-scale magnetic field structure permeating the interstellar medium. The polarization angles in all three bands are generally perpendicular to those measured by starlight polarimetry as expected and show changes in the structure of the Galactic magnetic field on the scale of 60 Degree-Sign . The frequency spectrum of degree-scale Galactic emission is plotted between 23 and 220 GHz (including WMAP data) and is fit to a two-component (synchrotron and dust) model showing that the higher frequency BICEP data are necessary to tightly constrain the amplitude and spectral index of Galactic dust. Polarized emission is detected over the entire region within two degrees of the Galactic plane, indicating the large-scale magnetic field is oriented parallel to the plane of the Galaxy. A trend of decreasing polarization fraction with increasing total intensity is observed, ruling out the simplest model of a constant Galactic magnetic field orientation along the line of sight in the Galactic plane. A generally increasing trend of polarization fraction with electromagnetic frequency is found, varying from 0.5%-1.5% at frequencies below 50 GHz to 2.5%-3.5% above 90 GHz. The effort to extend the capabilities of BICEP by installing 220 GHz band hardware is described along with analysis of the new band.

  12. Diffraction and Dissipation of Atmospheric Waves in the Vicinity of Caustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    A large and increasing number of ground-based and satellite-borne instruments has been demonstrated to reliably reveal ionospheric manifestations of natural hazards such as large earthquakes, strong tsunamis, and powerful tornadoes. To transition from detection of ionospheric manifestations of natural hazards to characterization of the hazards for the purposes of improving early warning systems and contributing to disaster recovery, it is necessary to relate quantitatively characteristics of the observed ionospheric disturbances and the underlying natural hazard and, in particular, accurately model propagation of atmospheric waves from the ground or ocean surface to the ionosphere. The ray theory has been used extensively to model propagation of atmospheric waves and proved to be very efficient in elucidating the effects of atmospheric variability on ionospheric signatures of natural hazards. However, the ray theory predicts unphysical, divergent values of the wave amplitude and needs to be modified in the vicinity of caustics. This paper presents an asymptotic theory that describes diffraction, focusing and increased dissipation of acoustic-gravity waves in the vicinity of caustics and turning points. Air temperature, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and wind velocity are assumed to vary gradually with height and horizontal coordinates, and slowness of these variations determines the large parameter of the problem. Uniform asymptotics of the wave field are expressed in terms of Airy functions and their derivatives. The geometrical, or Berry, phase, which arises in the consistent WKB approximation for acoustic-gravity waves, plays an important role in the caustic asymptotics. In addition to the wave field in the vicinity of the caustic, these asymptotics describe wave reflection from the caustic and the evanescent wave field beyond the caustic. The evanescent wave field is found to play an important role in ionospheric manifestations of tsunamis.

  13. Plane wave scattering from a plasmonic nanowire array spacer-separated from a plasmonic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Arun; Trivedi, Rahul; Dhawan, Anuj

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical analysis of the electromagnetic response of a plasmonic nanowire–spacer–plasmonic film system. The analytical solution presented in this paper is a full-wave solution, which is used to compute the fields scattered by the plasmonic nanostructure system on illumination by a plane electromagnetic wave. The physical structure comprises of an array of plasmonic nanowires made of a plasmonic metal such as gold or silver placed over a plasmonic film of the same material and separated from it by a dielectric spacer such as silica or alumina. Such a nanostructure exhibits a spectrum that is extremely sensitive to various geometric and electromagnetic parameters such as spacer thickness and spacer refractive index, which makes it favourable for various sensing applications such as chemical and biological sensing, strain sensing, position sensing, vibration sensing, and thickness sensing. We report a comparison of our analytical solution with a numerical rigorous coupled wave analysis of the same structure with the plasmonic medium being treated as local in nature.

  14. Reflection and transmission of plane SH-waves in an initially stressed inhomogeneous anisotropic magnetoelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majhi, S.; Pal, P. C.; Kumar, S.

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the reflection and transmission of plane SH-waves in two semi-infinite anisotropic magnetoelastic media. The lower half-space is considered as initially stressed and inhomogeneous. The density of lower half-space is taken exponentially varying with depth. The solutions for half-spaces are obtained analytically. The expressions for reflection and transmission coefficient are obtained in the closed form subject to continuity conditions at the interfaces of anisotropic magnetoelastic half-spaces and the Snell's law. It is found that these coefficients depend on the initial stress, inhomogeneity parameter, the magnetoelastic coupling parameter, and the angle at which wave crosses the magnetic field of the half-spaces. Numerical computations are performed for these coefficients for a specific model of two different anisotropic magnetoelastic half-spaces. The numerical results are illustrated by the graph of reflection and transmission coefficient versus the angle of incidence. In general, as the initial stress increases the reflection and transmission coefficient increases, the affect is more prominent for more than 10 GPa. Inhomogeneity in the density of the material also increases the reflection and transmission coefficient. The anisotropic magnetoelastic parameter and the angle at which the wave crosses the magnetic field for both the half-spaces have a quite significant effect on the reflection and transmission coefficient.

  15. Barotropic and baroclinic instability of Rossby waves on the infinite beta-plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jeffrey L.

    The normal mode instability problem for a stationary Rossby wave of finite amplitude and arbitrary orientation in a two-level model with zonal mean shear in the vertical is examined on the infinite beta-plane using a Floquet technique. The results are compared to the instability of a finite amplitude stationary Rossby wave in a barotropic model. The instability of the barotropic model linearized about the upper level flow of the stationary two-level Rossby wave is also examined; forcing must be introduced to the barotropic equations in this case to balance the time tendency of the basic state. The instabilities of the three models are compared in an attempt to address two questions. First, are the barotropic instabilities related to any of the two-level model instabilities? Second, what are the consequences of introducing forcing in the stability problem? It is found that the barotropic models accurately reproduce those instabilities of the two-level model that have a nearly barotropic structure; these are not necessarily low-frequency instabilities. The introduction of forcing is found to have a significant impact on the barotropic instabilities. Special emphasis is placed on parameter ranges judged to be analogous to the mid-latitude atmosphere. Possible relevance of the results to geophysical flows and the instability problem on the sphere are discussed.

  16. Ground motions around a semicircular canyon with a dipping edge under SH plane wave incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kao-Hao; Tsaur, Deng-How; Wang, Jeen-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the spatial distribution and temporal variation of ground motions near a semicircular canyon with a dipping edge, a simplified mathematical model is constructed. Based on the region-matching technique, a Fourier-Bessel series solution for the plane SH-wave excitation is derived and then applied to theoretically simulate the seismic response of the canyon. The use of the adequate wavefunctions and a newly derived Graf's addition formula can solve the unknown expansion coefficients. Parametric analyses with respect to the frequency of input motion, angle of incidence, and canyon geometry are illustrated. Both frequency- and time-domain computations are presented. The canonical case, a completed semicircular canyon, which has the exact analytical solution, and the horizontally truncated case analyzed in previous works are considered as particular cases of the proposed general model. Comparisons with boundary-element solutions show good agreement. Steady-state results show that the phenomenon of wave focusing tends to be significant when the incident angle bends toward the horizontal ground surface. Propagation and attenuation of scattered waves that originated from the surficial anomaly are exhibited in transient-state simulations.

  17. Scattering of plane guided waves obliquely incident on a straight feature with uniform cross-section.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Paul D; Velichko, Alexander; Drinkwater, Bruce W; Croxford, Anthony J; Todd, Michael D

    2010-11-01

    A frequency-domain finite element (FE) method is presented for modeling the scattering of plane guided waves incident on an infinitely-long, straight feature with uniform cross-section in a planar host waveguide. The method utilizes a mesh of 2-dimensional finite elements with harmonic shape functions in the perpendicular direction. The model domain comprises a cross-section through the feature and short lengths of the adjoining host waveguide. A spatial frequency equal to the wavenumber of the desired incident mode multiplied by the sine of the desired incidence angle is prescribed for the element shape functions. An integral representation of the incident mode is used to determine a suitable system of harmonic forces to uniquely excite that mode. These are applied at nodes through the thickness of the host waveguide on one side of the feature. The displacement field is measured at nodes through the thickness of the host waveguide on either side of the feature and decomposed into reflected and transmitted modes. The cases of guided wave transmission in a featureless waveguide and the reflection of guided waves from a free-edge are examined as validation cases. Finally, the results for transmission at an adhesively-bonded stiffener are presented and compared with experimental measurements. PMID:21110567

  18. TM surface wave diffraction by a truncated dielectric slab recessed in a perfectly conducting surface. [considering flush mounted space shuttle antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pathak, P. H.; Kouyoumjian, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    The diffraction of a TM sub o surface wave by a terminated dielectric slab which is flush mounted in a perfectly conducting surface is studied. The incident surface wave gives rise to waves reflected and diffracted by the termination; these reflected and diffracted fields may be expressed in terms of the geometrical theory of diffraction by introducing surface wave reflection and diffraction coefficients which are associated with the termination. In this investigation, the surface wave reflection and diffraction coefficients have been deduced from a formally exact solution to this canonical problem. The solution is obtained by a combination of the generalized scattering matrix technique and function theoretic methods.

  19. Aircraft noise propagation. [sound diffraction by wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, W. J.; Pierce, A. D.

    1978-01-01

    Sound diffraction experiments conducted at NASA Langley Research Center to study the acoustical implications of the engine over wing configuration (noise-shielding by wing) and to provide a data base for assessing various theoretical approaches to the problem of aircraft noise reduction are described. Topics explored include the theory of sound diffraction around screens and wedges; the scattering of spherical waves by rectangular patches; plane wave diffraction by a wedge with finite impedence; and the effects of ambient flow and distribution sources.

  20. Expressions for Form Factors for Inelastic Scattering and Charge Exchange in Plane-Wave, Distorted-Wave, and Coupled-Channels Reaction Formalisms

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F S

    2006-09-25

    This document is intended to facilitate calculation of inelastic scattering and charge-exchange cross sections in a variety of reaction models, including the plane-wave and distorted-wave approximations and the full coupled-channels treatments. Expressions are given for the coupling potentials between the relevant channels in both coordinate and momentum space. In particular, it is expected that the plane-wave calculations should be useful as a check on the correctness of coupled-channels calculations. The Fourier transform methods used to calculate the plane-wave approximation cross sections are also intended to be used to generate the transition potentials for coupled-channels codes, using a folding model with local effective interactions. Specific expressions are given for calculating transition densities for the folding model in the random phase approximation (RPA).

  1. Method for locating underground anomalies by diffraction of electromagnetic waves passing between spaced boreholes

    DOEpatents

    Lytle, R. Jeffrey; Lager, Darrel L.; Laine, Edwin F.; Davis, Donald T.

    1979-01-01

    Underground anomalies or discontinuities, such as holes, tunnels, and caverns, are located by lowering an electromagnetic signal transmitting antenna down one borehole and a receiving antenna down another, the ground to be surveyed for anomalies being situated between the boreholes. Electronic transmitting and receiving equipment associated with the antennas is activated and the antennas are lowered in unison at the same rate down their respective boreholes a plurality of times, each time with the receiving antenna at a different level with respect to the transmitting antenna. The transmitted electromagnetic waves diffract at each edge of an anomaly. This causes minimal signal reception at the receiving antenna. Triangulation of the straight lines between the antennas for the depths at which the signal minimums are detected precisely locates the anomaly. Alternatively, phase shifts of the transmitted waves may be detected to locate an anomaly, the phase shift being distinctive for the waves directed at the anomaly.

  2. Acoustic radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane (quasi)standing waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-12-07

    The acoustic radiation force on a 2D elliptical (non-circular) cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of plane quasi-standing and standing waves is derived, based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates. A non-dimensional acoustic radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, is defined in terms of the scattering coefficients that are determined by applying the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface. A system of linear equations involving a single numerical integration procedure is solved by matrix inversion. Numerical simulations showing the transition from the quasi-standing to the (equi-amplitude) standing wave behaviour are performed with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the ellipse semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb (where k is the wavenumber), without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. It is found that at high kb values > 1, the radiation force per length with broadside incidence is larger, whereas the opposite situation occurs in the long-wavelength limit (i.e., kb < 1). The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation of elliptical cylinders, the acoustic stabilization of liquid columns in a host medium, acousto-fluidics devices, and other particle dynamics applications to name a few. Moreover, the formalism presented here may be effectively applied to compute the acoustic radiation force on other 2D surfaces of arbitrary shape such as super-ellipses, Chebyshev cylindrical particles, or other non-circular geometries.

  3. Acoustic radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane (quasi)standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic radiation force on a 2D elliptical (non-circular) cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of plane quasi-standing and standing waves is derived, based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates. A non-dimensional acoustic radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, is defined in terms of the scattering coefficients that are determined by applying the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface. A system of linear equations involving a single numerical integration procedure is solved by matrix inversion. Numerical simulations showing the transition from the quasi-standing to the (equi-amplitude) standing wave behaviour are performed with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the ellipse semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb (where k is the wavenumber), without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. It is found that at high kb values > 1, the radiation force per length with broadside incidence is larger, whereas the opposite situation occurs in the long-wavelength limit (i.e., kb < 1). The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation of elliptical cylinders, the acoustic stabilization of liquid columns in a host medium, acousto-fluidics devices, and other particle dynamics applications to name a few. Moreover, the formalism presented here may be effectively applied to compute the acoustic radiation force on other 2D surfaces of arbitrary shape such as super-ellipses, Chebyshev cylindrical particles, or other non-circular geometries.

  4. Collision of plane thermonuclear detonation waves in a preliminarily compressed DT mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Khishchenko, K. V.; Charakhch’yan, A. A.

    2015-03-15

    The paper deals with a one-dimensional problem on symmetric irradiation of a plane DT fuel layer with a thickness 2H and density ρ{sub 0} ⩽ 100ρ{sub s} (where ρ{sub s} is the density of the DT fuel in the solid state at atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 4 K) by two identical monoenergetic proton beams with a kinetic energy of 1 MeV, an intensity of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, and a duration of 50 ps. The problem is solved in the framework of one-fluid two-temperature hydrodynamic model that takes into account the equation of state for hydrogen, electron and ion heat conductivities, kinetics of the DT reaction, plasma self-radiation, and plasma heating by α-particles. The irradiation of the fuel results in the appearance of two counterpropagating detonation waves to the fronts of which rarefaction waves are adjacent. The efficiency of the DT reaction after the collision (reflection from the plane of symmetry) of the detonation waves depends on the spatial homogeneity of thermodynamic functions between the fronts of the reflected detonation waves. At Hρ{sub 0} ≈ 1 g/cm{sup 2}, the gain factor is G ≈ 200, whereas at Hρ{sub 0} ≈ 5 g/cm{sup 2}, it is G > 2000. As applied to a cylindrical target that is ignited from ends and in which the cylinder with the fuel is surrounded by a heavy magnetized shell, the obtained values of the burn-up and gain factors are maximum possible. To estimate the ignition energy E{sub ig} of a cylindrical target by using solutions to the one-dimensional problem, a quasi-one-dimensional model is developed. The model assumes that the main mechanism of target ignition is fuel heating by α-particles. The trajectories of α-particles are limited by a cylindrical surface with a given radius, which is a parameter of the model and is identified with the fuel radius in the target and the radii of the irradiating proton beams. This model reproduces the well-known theoretical dependence E{sub ig} ∼ ρ{sub 0}{sup −2} and yields E

  5. Pulsed plane wave analytic solutions for generic shapes and the validation of Maxwell's equations solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarrow, Maurice; Vastano, John A.; Lomax, Harvard

    1992-01-01

    Generic shapes are subjected to pulsed plane waves of arbitrary shape. The resulting scattered electromagnetic fields are determined analytically. These fields are then computed efficiently at field locations for which numerically determined EM fields are required. Of particular interest are the pulsed waveform shapes typically utilized by radar systems. The results can be used to validate the accuracy of finite difference time domain Maxwell's equations solvers. A two-dimensional solver which is second- and fourth-order accurate in space and fourth-order accurate in time is examined. Dielectric media properties are modeled by a ramping technique which simplifies the associated gridding of body shapes. The attributes of the ramping technique are evaluated by comparison with the analytic solutions.

  6. Nonequilibrium dynamics of strings in time-dependent plane wave backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardi, R.; Vancea, I. V.

    2012-06-01

    We formulate and study the nonequilibrium dynamics of strings near the singularity of the time-dependent plane wave background in the framework of the Nonequilibrium Thermo Field Dynamics (NETFD). In particular, we construct the Hilbert space of the thermal string oscillators at nonequilibrium and generalize the NETFD to describe the coordinates of the center of mass of the thermal string. The equations of motion of the thermal fields and the Hamiltonian are derived. Due to the time-dependence of the oscillator frequencies, a counterterm is present in the Hamiltonian. This counterterm determines the correlation functions in a perturbative fashion. We compute the two point correlation function of the thermal string at zero order in the power expansion.

  7. Acoustic wave emitted by a vortex ring passing near the edge of a half-plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambe, T.; Minota, T.; Ikushima, Y.

    1985-06-01

    Acoustic emission by vortex-edge interaction is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The theory of vortex sound enables the representation of the far-field pressure in terms of the vortex motion near the half-plane edge. It is found that the pressure p depends on the product of an angular factor representing directionality and a time factor representing wave profile. The pressure formula leads to a specified scaling law for the sound emitted by a vortex ring. The vortex ring used in the experiment had radius about 4.7 mm and velocity ranging from 29 to 61 m/s. The above scaling law of the pressure and the cardioid directionality of the intensity were reproduced in the experiment with reasonable accuracy.

  8. Pixelated spectral filter for integrated focal plane array in the long-wave IR.

    SciTech Connect

    Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Boye, Robert R.; Samora, Sally; Carter, Tony Ray; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2010-03-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of a pixelated, hyperspectral arrayed component for Focal Plane Array (FPA) integration in the Long-Wave IR. This device contains tens of pixels within a single super-pixel which is tiled across the extent of the FPA. Each spectral pixel maps to a single FPA pixel with a spectral FWHM of 200nm. With this arrayed approach, remote sensing data may be accumulated with a non-scanning, 'snapshot' imaging system. This technology is flexible with respect to individual pixel center wavelength and to pixel position within the array. Moreover, the entire pixel area has a single wavelength response, not the integrated linear response of a graded cavity thickness design. These requirements bar tilted, linear array technologies where the cavity length monotonically increases across the device.

  9. A Fortran code for the scattering of EM plane waves by two cylinders at normal incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, Hashim A.; Köhler, Sigurd

    1990-06-01

    A Fortran code for the scattering of electromagnetic plane waves from two infinitely long penetrable cylinders with circular cross sections at normal incidence is presented. The radius and the refractive index of each cylinder are arbitrary as well as the separation of the cylinders. The program calculates the Mueller scattering matrix elements ( Sij), various cross sections, and the square of the scattered amplitutes. All computations are done by using single precision arithmetic procedures. The code can be run on many different computers with minor modifications. The restrictions for each of the supported environments and the range of input parameters (size parameter, refractive index, and the separation of the cylinders) are discussed. To our knowledge, such a code has not been presented before.

  10. A set of verification test cases for Eiger : plane wave scattering from a sphere.

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel

    2004-10-01

    This report discusses a set of verification test cases for the frequency-domain, boundary-element, electromagnetics code Eiger based on the analytical solution of plane wave scattering from a sphere. Three cases will be considered: when the sphere is made of perfect electric conductor, when the sphere is made of lossless dielectric and when the sphere is made of lossy dielectric. We outline the procedures that must be followed in order to carefully compare the numerical solution to the analytical solution. We define an error criterion and demonstrate convergence behavior for both the analytical and numerical cases. These problems test the code's ability to calculate the surface current density and secondary quantities, such as near fields and far fields.

  11. LOBSTER: A tool to extract chemical bonding from plane-wave based DFT.

    PubMed

    Maintz, Stefan; Deringer, Volker L; Tchougréeff, Andrei L; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-04-30

    The computer program LOBSTER (Local Orbital Basis Suite Towards Electronic-Structure Reconstruction) enables chemical-bonding analysis based on periodic plane-wave (PAW) density-functional theory (DFT) output and is applicable to a wide range of first-principles simulations in solid-state and materials chemistry. LOBSTER incorporates analytic projection routines described previously in this very journal [J. Comput. Chem. 2013, 34, 2557] and offers improved functionality. It calculates, among others, atom-projected densities of states (pDOS), projected crystal orbital Hamilton population (pCOHP) curves, and the recently introduced bond-weighted distribution function (BWDF). The software is offered free-of-charge for non-commercial research. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26914535

  12. Poynting vector behaviour during the resonance scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by a gyrotropic cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es'kin, V. A.; Ivoninsky, A. V.; Kudrin, A. V.; Krafft, C.

    2016-01-01

    The energy-flow structure during the resonance scattering of a normally incident plane electromagnetic H wave by a gyrotropic cylinder is studied. The main attention is focused on the bifurcations of the time-averaged Poynting vector field at the surface and volume plasmon resonances in the case where the cylinder is aligned with a gyrotropy axis. The behaviour of the Poynting vector field in this case is compared with that observed during the scattering by an isotropic cylinder, and significant differences in the energy-flow structures in the two cases are revealed. Conditions are found under which the maximum magnitude of the Poynting vector at the boundary of a gyrotropic cylinder turns out to be much greater than that at the boundary of an isotropic scatterer of the same shape and size.

  13. Two-loop partition function in the planar plane-wave matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spradlin, Marcus; Van Raamsdonk, Mark; Volovich, Anastasia

    2004-12-01

    We perform two independent calculations of the two-loop partition function for the 't Hooft large N limit of the plane-wave matrix model, conjectured to be dual to the decoupled little string theory of a single spherical type IIA NS5-brane. The first is via a direct two-loop path-integral calculation in the matrix model, while the second employs the one-loop dilatation operator of four-dimensional N = 4 Yang-Mills theory truncated to the SU (2 | 4) subsector. We find precise agreement between the results of the two calculations. Various polynomials appearing in the result have rather special properties, possibly related to the large symmetry algebra of the theory or to integrability.

  14. On the Propagation of Plane Acoustic Waves in a Duct With Flexible and Impedance Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Vu, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) discusses the harmonic and random plane acoustic waves propagating from inside a duct to its surroundings. Various duct surfaces are considered, such as rigid, flexible, and impedance. In addition, the effects of a mean flow are studied when the duct alone is considered. Results show a significant reduction in overall sound pressure levels downstream of the impedance wall for both mean flow and no mean flow cases and for a narrow duct. When a wider duct is used, the overall sound pressure level (OSPL) reduction downstream of the impedance wall is much smaller. In the far field, the directivity is such that the overall sound pressure level is reduced by about 5 decibels (dB) on the side of the impedance wall. When a flexible surface is used, the far field directivity becomes asymmetric with an increase in the OSPL on the side of the flexible surface of about 7 dB.

  15. Distortion of a spherical gaseous interface accelerated by a plane shock wave.

    PubMed

    Layes, Guillaume; Jourdan, Georges; Houas, Lazhar

    2003-10-24

    The evolution of a spherical gaseous interface accelerated by a plane weak shock wave has been investigated in a square cross section shock tube via a multiple exposure shadowgraph diagnostic. Different gaseous bubbles, i.e., helium, nitrogen, and krypton, were introduced in air at atmospheric pressure in order to study the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in the spherical geometry for negative, close to zero, and positive initial density jumps across the interface. We show that the bubble distortion is strongly different for the three cases and we present the experimental velocity and volume of the developed vortical structures. We prove that at late times the bubble velocities reach constant values which are in good agreement with previous calculations. Finally, we point out that, in our flow conditions, the gaseous bubble motion and shape are mainly influenced by vorticity and aerodynamic forces. PMID:14611354

  16. Combined real-time ultrasound plane wave compounding and linear array optoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournelle, Marc; Bost, Wolfgang; Tretbar, Steffen

    2015-07-01

    In optoacoustic imaging, the high optical contrast between different tissue types is combined with the high resolution and low scattering of ultrasound. Using adapted reconstruction algorithms, images of the distribution of light absorption in tissue can be obtained. Such as in any emerging modality, there is limited experience regarding the interpretation of optoacoustic images. For this reason, we developed a flexible hardware platform combining ultrasound imaging with optoacoustics. The system is based on the software processing of channel data and different types of reconstruction algorithms are implemented. It combines optoacoustic imaging based on linear arrays for detection with plane wave compounding ultrasound. Our system further includes a custom made probe based on a 7,5 MHz array, custom made fibre bundles for targeted light delivery and an acoustic coupling pad. The system was characterized on phantoms and first in-vivo datasets from subcutaneous vasculature were acquired.

  17. Microwave radiation force and torque on a disk resonator excited by a circularly polarized plane wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, S.; Kulkarni, S.

    2004-05-01

    A numerical simulation method [S. Makarov and S. Kulkarni, Appl. Phys. Lett. 84, 1600 (2004)] is used in order to determine the radiation force and radiation torque on a parallel-plate disk resonator, whose size is comparable to wavelength. The method is based on the MOM solution of the electric-field integral equation, accurate calculation of the near field, and removal of the self-interaction terms responsible for the pinch effect. The local force/torque distribution at the normal incidence of a circularly polarized plane wave is found. It is observed that, at the resonance, the individual disks are subject to unexpectedly large local force densities, despite the fact that the net radiation force on the resonator remains very small. On the other hand, the total axial torque on the disk resonator also increases at the resonance.

  18. Fast plane wave density functional theory molecular dynamics calculations on multi-GPU machines

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Weile; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing ; Fu, Jiyun; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing ; Cao, Zongyan; Wang, Long; Chi, Xuebin; Gao, Weiguo; MOE Key Laboratory of Computational Physical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai ; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2013-10-15

    Plane wave pseudopotential (PWP) density functional theory (DFT) calculation is the most widely used method for material simulations, but its absolute speed stagnated due to the inability to use large scale CPU based computers. By a drastic redesign of the algorithm, and moving all the major computation parts into GPU, we have reached a speed of 12 s per molecular dynamics (MD) step for a 512 atom system using 256 GPU cards. This is about 20 times faster than the CPU version of the code regardless of the number of CPU cores used. Our tests and analysis on different GPU platforms and configurations shed lights on the optimal GPU deployments for PWP-DFT calculations. An 1800 step MD simulation is used to study the liquid phase properties of GaInP.

  19. Scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave by a Luneburg lens. I. Ray theory.

    PubMed

    Lock, James A

    2008-12-01

    For a plane wave incident on either a Luneburg lens or a modified Luneburg lens, the magnitude and phase of the transmitted electric field are calculated as a function of the scattering angle in the context of ray theory. It is found that the ray trajectory and the scattered intensity are not uniformly convergent in the vicinity of edge ray incidence on a Luneburg lens, which corresponds to the semiclassical phenomenon of orbiting. In addition, it is found that rays transmitted through a large-focal-length modified Luneburg lens participate in a far-zone rainbow, the details of which are exactly analytically soluble in ray theory. Using these results, the Airy theory of the modified Luneburg lens is derived and compared with the Airy theory of the rainbows of a homogeneous sphere. PMID:19037388

  20. Subarray coherence based postfilter for eigenspace based minimum variance beamformer in ultrasound plane-wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinxin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua; Guo, Wei; Li, Tianjie; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2016-02-01

    This paper introduces a new beamformer, which combines the eigenspace based minimum variance (ESBMV) beamformer with a subarray coherence based postfilter (SCBP), for improving the quality of ultrasound plane-wave imaging. The ESBMV beamformer has been validated in improving the imaging contrast, but the difficulty in dividing the signal subspace limits the usage of it in the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) scenarios. Coherence factor (CF) based methods could optimize the output of a distortionless beamformer to reduce sidelobes, but the influence by the subarray decorrelation technique on the postfilter design has not attracted enough concern before. Accordingly, an ESBMV-SCBP beamformer was proposed in this paper, which used the coherence of the subarray signal to compute an SCBP to optimize the ESBMV results. Simulated and experimental data were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The results showed that the ESBMV-SCBP method achieved an improved imaging quality compared with the ESBMV beamformer. In the simulation study, the contrast ratio (CR) for an anechoic cyst was improved by 9.88 dB and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was improved by 0.97 over the ESBMV. In the experimental study, the CR improvements for two anechoic cysts were 7.32 dB and 9.45 dB, while the CNRs were improved by 1.27 and 0.66, respectively. The ESBMV-SCBP also showed advantages over the ESBMV-Wiener beamformer in preserving a less grainy speckle, which is closer to that of distortionless beamformers and benefits the imaging contrast. With a relatively small extra computational load, the proposed method has potential to enhance the quality of the ultrasound plane-wave imaging. PMID:26582600

  1. Radiation of de-excited electrons at large times in a strong electromagnetic plane wave

    SciTech Connect

    Kazinski, P.O.

    2013-12-15

    The late time asymptotics of the physical solutions to the Lorentz–Dirac equation in the electromagnetic external fields of simple configurations–the constant homogeneous field, the linearly polarized plane wave (in particular, the constant uniform crossed field), and the circularly polarized plane wave–are found. The solutions to the Landau–Lifshitz equation for the external electromagnetic fields admitting a two-parametric symmetry group, which include as a particular case the above mentioned field configurations, are obtained. Some general properties of the total radiation power of a charged particle are established. In particular, for a circularly polarized wave and constant uniform crossed fields, the total radiation power in the asymptotic regime is independent of the charge and the external field strength, when expressed in terms of the proper-time, and equals a half the rest energy of a charged particle divided by its proper-time. The spectral densities of the radiation power formed on the late time asymptotics are derived for a charged particle moving in the external electromagnetic fields of the simple configurations pointed above. This provides a simple method to verify experimentally that the charged particle has reached the asymptotic regime. -- Highlights: •Late time asymptotics of the solutions to the Lorentz–Dirac equation are studied. •General properties of the total radiation power of electrons are established. •The total radiation power equals a half the rest energy divided by the proper-time. •Spectral densities of radiation formed on the late time asymptotics are derived. •Possible experimental verification of the results is proposed.

  2. Near-field coupling model between PCB and grounded transmission line based on plane wave spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leseigneur, Christelle; Baudry, David; Ravelo, Blaise; Louis, Anne

    2013-10-01

    This article presents an explicit model of electromagnetic (EM) coupling between electronic circuits and metallic wire placed above the ground plane. The model is based on the interaction between the EM near-field (NF) that has been treated with plane wave spectrum (PWS) and the Taylor model. The routine process illustrating the methodology is addressed is this article. The practicability of the model developed was upheld with different analytical and real demonstrators. First, the NF coupling between a straight transmission line (TL) and 1 GHz Wilkinson power divider (PWD) designed and implemented in planar technology was provided. Subsequently, simulations with a powerful commercial tool and measurements from 0.2 GHz to 2 GHz revealed a good agreement between the coupling voltages from the proposed model. As a second proof of concept, a printed circuit board incorporating a 40 MHz RF oscillator was placed 5 mm above the grounded TL. Once again, coupling voltages matched measurements were observed with magnitude relative difference lower than 5 dB. The hereby model presents huge benefits not only in terms of flexibility in the design process but it can also be run with very less computation time compared to the existing standard simulators. The model can be potentially a good candidate for investigating complex systems EMC engineering.

  3. Computational dosimetry in embryos exposed to electromagnetic plane waves over the frequency range of 10 MHz-1.5 GHz.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Hiroki; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Soichi; Saito, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Masaharu; Ito, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents calculated specific absorption rate (SAR) dosimetry in 4 and 8 week Japanese pregnant-woman models exposed to plane waves over the frequency range of 10 MHz-1.5 GHz. Two types of 2 mm spatial-resolution pregnant-woman models comprised a woman model, which is similar to the average-sized Japanese adult female in height and weight, with a cubic (4 week) embryo or spheroidal (8 week) one. The averaged SAR in the embryos exposed to vertically and horizontally polarized plane waves at four kinds of propagation directions are calculated from 10 MHz to 1.5 GHz. The results indicate that the maximum average SAR in the embryos exposed to plane waves is lower than 0.08 W kg(-1) when the incident power density is at the reference level of ICNIRP guideline for general public environment. PMID:20009180

  4. An E-plane analysis of aperture-matched horn antennas using the moment method and the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heedy, D. J.; Burnside, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    The moment method and the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction are utilized to obtain two separate solutions for the E-plane field pattern of an aperture-matched horn antenna. This particular horn antenna consists of a standard pyramidal horn with the following modifications: a rolled edge section attached to the aperture edges and a curved throat section. The resulting geometry provides significantly better performance in terms of the pattern, impedance, and frequency characteristics than normally obtainable. The moment method is used to calculate the E-plane pattern and BSWR of the antenna. However, at higher frequencies, large amounts of computation time are required. The uniform geometrical theory of diffraction provides a quick and efficient high frequency solution for the E-plane field pattern. In fact, the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction may be used to initially design the antenna; then, the moment method may be applied to fine tune the design. This procedure has been successfully applied to a compact range feed design.

  5. Formulation of the Augmented Plane-Wave and Muffin-Tin Orbital Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, Takao; Kino, Hiori; Akai, Hisazumu

    2015-03-01

    The augmented plane waves and the muffin-tin orbitals method (the PMT method) was proposed by Kotani and van Schilfgaarde in Phys. Rev. B 81, 125117 (2010). It is a mixed basis all-electron full-potential method, which uses two types of augmented waves simultaneously, in addition to the local orbitals. In this paper, this mixed basis method is reformulated on the basis of a new formalism named as the 3-component formalism, which is a mathematically transparent version of the additive augmentation originally proposed by Soler and Williams in Phys. Rev. B 47, 6784 (1993). Atomic forces are easily derived systematically. We discuss some problems in the mixed basis method and ways to manage them. In addition, we compare the method with the PAW method on the same footing. This PMT method is the basis for our new development of the quasiparticle self-consistent GW method in J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 83, 094711 (2014), available as the ecalj package at github.

  6. A wideband fast multipole boundary element method for half-space/plane-symmetric acoustic wave problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chang-Jun; Chen, Hai-Bo; Chen, Lei-Lei

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a novel wideband fast multipole boundary element approach to 3D half-space/plane-symmetric acoustic wave problems. The half-space fundamental solution is employed in the boundary integral equations so that the tree structure required in the fast multipole algorithm is constructed for the boundary elements in the real domain only. Moreover, a set of symmetric relations between the multipole expansion coefficients of the real and image domains are derived, and the half-space fundamental solution is modified for the purpose of applying such relations to avoid calculating, translating and saving the multipole/local expansion coefficients of the image domain. The wideband adaptive multilevel fast multipole algorithm associated with the iterative solver GMRES is employed so that the present method is accurate and efficient for both lowand high-frequency acoustic wave problems. As for exterior acoustic problems, the Burton-Miller method is adopted to tackle the fictitious eigenfrequency problem involved in the conventional boundary integral equation method. Details on the implementation of the present method are described, and numerical examples are given to demonstrate its accuracy and efficiency.

  7. Significance of accurate diffraction corrections for the second harmonic wave in determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Barnard, Dan

    2015-09-15

    The accurate measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter β for fluids or solids generally requires making corrections for diffraction effects due to finite size geometry of transmitter and receiver. These effects are well known in linear acoustics, while those for second harmonic waves have not been well addressed and therefore not properly considered in previous studies. In this work, we explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections using the multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which were developed from the quasilinear solutions of the KZK equation. The effects of making these corrections are examined through the simulation of β determination in water. Diffraction corrections are found to have more significant effects than attenuation corrections, and the β values of water can be estimated experimentally with less than 5% errors when the exact second harmonic diffraction corrections are used together with the negligible attenuation correction effects on the basis of linear frequency dependence between attenuation coefficients, α{sub 2} ≃ 2α{sub 1}.

  8. ABINIT: Plane-Wave-Based Density-Functional Theory on High Performance Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrent, Marc

    2014-03-01

    For several years, a continuous effort has been produced to adapt electronic structure codes based on Density-Functional Theory to the future computing architectures. Among these codes, ABINIT is based on a plane-wave description of the wave functions which allows to treat systems of any kind. Porting such a code on petascale architectures pose difficulties related to the many-body nature of the DFT equations. To improve the performances of ABINIT - especially for what concerns standard LDA/GGA ground-state and response-function calculations - several strategies have been followed: A full multi-level parallelisation MPI scheme has been implemented, exploiting all possible levels and distributing both computation and memory. It allows to increase the number of distributed processes and could not be achieved without a strong restructuring of the code. The core algorithm used to solve the eigen problem (``Locally Optimal Blocked Congugate Gradient''), a Blocked-Davidson-like algorithm, is based on a distribution of processes combining plane-waves and bands. In addition to the distributed memory parallelization, a full hybrid scheme has been implemented, using standard shared-memory directives (openMP/openACC) or porting some comsuming code sections to Graphics Processing Units (GPU). As no simple performance model exists, the complexity of use has been increased; the code efficiency strongly depends on the distribution of processes among the numerous levels. ABINIT is able to predict the performances of several process distributions and automatically choose the most favourable one. On the other hand, a big effort has been carried out to analyse the performances of the code on petascale architectures, showing which sections of codes have to be improved; they all are related to Matrix Algebra (diagonalisation, orthogonalisation). The different strategies employed to improve the code scalability will be described. They are based on an exploration of new diagonalization

  9. Phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo calculations with plane waves and pseudopotentials: Applications to atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suewattana, Malliga; Purwanto, Wirawan; Zhang, Shiwei; Krakauer, Henry; Walter, Eric J.

    2007-06-01

    The phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AF QMC) method [S. Zhang and H. Krakauer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 136401 (2003)] is used to carry out a systematic study of the dissociation and ionization energies of second-row group 3A-7A atoms and dimers: Al, Si, P, S, and Cl. In addition, the P2 dimer is compared to the third-row As2 dimer, which is also triply bonded. This method projects the many-body ground state by means of importance-sampled random walks in the space of Slater determinants. The Monte Carlo phase problem, due to the electron-electron Coulomb interaction, is controlled via the phaseless approximation, with a trial wave function ∣ΨT⟩ . As in previous calculations, a mean-field single Slater determinant is used as ∣ΨT⟩ . The method is formulated in the Hilbert space defined by any chosen one-particle basis. The present calculations use a plane wave basis under periodic boundary conditions with norm-conserving pseudopotentials. Computational details of the plane wave AF QMC method are presented. The isolated systems chosen here allow a systematic study of the various algorithmic issues. We show the accuracy of the plane wave method and discuss its convergence with respect to parameters such as the supercell size and plane wave cutoff. The use of standard norm-conserving pseudopotentials in the many-body AF QMC framework is examined.

  10. Structure and magnetism of bulk Fe and Cr: from plane waves to LCAO methods.

    PubMed

    Soulairol, R; Fu, Chu-Chun; Barreteau, C

    2010-07-28

    Magnetic, structural and energetic properties of bulk Fe and Cr were studied using first-principles calculations within density functional theory (DFT). We aimed to identify the dependence of these properties on key approximations of DFT, namely the exchange-correlation functional, the pseudopotential and the basis set. We found a smaller effect of pseudopotentials (PPs) on Fe than on Cr. For instance, the local magnetism of Cr was shown to be particularly sensitive to the potentials representing the core electrons, i.e. projector augmented wave and Vanderbilt ultrasoft PPs predict similar results, whereas standard norm-conserving PPs tend to overestimate the local magnetic moments of Cr in bcc Cr and in dilute bcc FeCr alloys. This drawback is suggested to be closely correlated to the overestimation of Cr solution energy in the latter system. On the other hand, we point out that DFT methods with very reduced localized basis sets (LCAO: linear combination of atomic orbitals) give satisfactory results compared with more robust plane-wave approaches. A minimal-basis representation of '3d' electrons comes to be sufficient to describe non-trivial magnetic phases including spin spirals in both fcc Fe and bcc Cr, as well as the experimental magnetic ground state of bcc Cr showing a spin density wave (SDW) state. In addition, a magnetic 'spd' tight binding model within the Stoner formalism was proposed and validated for Fe and Cr. The respective Stoner parameters were obtained by fitting to DFT data. This efficient semiempirical approach was shown to be accurate enough for studying various collinear and non-collinear phases of bulk Fe and Cr. It also enabled a detailed investigation of different polarization states of SDW in bcc Cr, where the longitudinal state was suggested to be the ground state, consistent with existing experimental data. PMID:21399309

  11. DIFFRACTION, REFRACTION, AND REFLECTION OF AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE OBSERVED DURING ITS INTERACTIONS WITH REMOTE ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu; Zhao Ruijuan; Tian Zhanjun; Su Jiangtao; Li Hui; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2013-08-20

    We present observations of the diffraction, refraction, and reflection of a global extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave propagating in the solar corona. These intriguing phenomena are observed when the wave interacts with two remote active regions, and together they exhibit properties of an EUV wave. When the wave approached AR11465, it became weaker and finally disappeared in the active region, but a few minutes later a new wavefront appeared behind the active region, and it was not concentric with the incoming wave. In addition, a reflected wave was also simultaneously observed on the wave incoming side. When the wave approached AR11459, it transmitted through the active region directly and without reflection. The formation of the new wavefront and the transmission could be explained with diffraction and refraction effects, respectively. We propose that the different behaviors observed during the interactions may be caused by different speed gradients at the boundaries of the two active regions. We find that the EUV wave formed ahead of a group of expanding loops a few minutes after the start of the loops' expansion, which represents the initiation of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME). Based on these results, we conclude that the EUV wave should be a nonlinear magnetosonic wave or shock driven by the associated CME, which propagated faster than the ambient fast mode speed and gradually slowed down to an ordinary linear wave. Our observations support the hybrid model that includes both fast wave and slow non-wave components.

  12. Gain and Loss Factor for Conical Horns, and Impact of Ground Plane Edge Diffractions on Radiation Patterns of Uncoated and Coated Circular Aperture Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboserwal, Nafati Abdasallam

    Horn antennas have been used for over a hundred years. They have a wide variety of uses where they are a basic and popular microwave antenna for many practical applications, such as feed elements for communication reflector dishes on satellite or point-to-point relay antennas. They are also widely utilized as gain standards for calibration and gain measurement of other antennas. The gain and loss factor of conical horns are revisited in this dissertation based on spherical and quadratic aperture phase distributions. The gain is compared with published classical data in an attempt to confirm their validity and accuracy and to determine whether they were derived based on spherical or quadratic aperture phase distributions. In this work, it is demonstrated that the gain of a conical horn antenna obtained by using a spherical phase distribution is in close agreement with published classical data. Moreover, more accurate expressions for the loss factor, to account for amplitude and phase tapers over the horn aperture, are derived. New formulas for the design of optimum gain conical horns, based on the more accurate spherical aperture phase distribution, are derived. To better understand the impact of edge diffractions on aperture antenna performance, an extensive investigation of the edge diffractions impact is undertaken in this dissertation for commercial aperture antennas. The impact of finite uncoated and coated PEC ground plane edge diffractions on the amplitude patterns in the principal planes of circular apertures is intensively examined. Similarly, aperture edge diffractions of aperture antennas without ground planes are examined. Computational results obtained by the analytical model are compared with experimental and HFSS-simulated results for all cases studied. In addition, the impact of the ground plane size, coating thickness, and relative permittivity of the dielectric layer on the radiation amplitude in the back region has been examined. This

  13. Optimization of a surface wave elastography method through diffraction and guided waves effects characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinspan, G. A.; Aguiar, S.; Benech, N.

    2016-04-01

    Soft biological tissue elasticity is a parameter whose reliable measure is relevant to many applications in fields as diverse as medicine and the agrifood industry. The ultrasonic elastography methods are often unviable to be applied to provide such solutions. In this way, the surface wave elastography (SWE) appears as a viable alternative, due its low cost, easy to use, non-invasive-destructive character as well as its ability to provide in vivo estimates. Previous studies have described a good correlation between the overall behavior of ultrasonic elastography and SWE, although the latter overestimates the elasticity values compared to the first. It has been suggested that this is due to the influence of certain physical effects related to the exclusive use of low frequency waves, as well as by characteristics of the experimental setup and/or medium. In this work we confirm the influence of such effects and discuss different strategies to make independent the estimations thereof. This allows achieving a good agreement between the ultrasonic reference method and SWE. Thus, SWE becomes a reliable method to estimate soft biological tissue elasticity.

  14. Process e/sup -/. -->. e/sup -/(. nu. nu-bar) in the field of a circularly polarized plane wave

    SciTech Connect

    Skobelev, V.V.

    1987-12-01

    The e/sup -/..-->..e/sup -/(..nu..nu-bar) process in the field of a circularly polarized plane wave is studied in the framework of the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model. General expressions for the probability of creation of neutrino pairs are obtained, and the case of a low-intensity wave is studied in detail. The effects of asymmetry of emission of electron and muon neutrinos are estimated, and comparison with previous results is performed.

  15. Sparse representation of plane wave response matrices for convex targets using local solution modes with band-limited excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. J.; Wang, G.; Canning, F. X.; Davis, B. A.

    2006-12-01

    A procedure is outlined for determining compressed representations of the plane wave response matrix (P matrix) for transverse magnetic scattering with respect to the z axis from convex cylinders. The method is based on the determination of band-limited spectral modes that excite spatially localized solutions to the wave equation and satisfy global boundary conditions. Numerical examples indicate that the proposed method provides a representation of the P matrix with reduced computational complexity.

  16. Nonlinear focusing of ultrasonic waves by an axisymmetric diffraction grating embedded in water

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez, N.; Picó, R.; Romero-García, V.; Garcia-Raffi, L. M.

    2015-11-16

    We report the nonlinear focusing of ultrasonic waves by an axisymmetric diffraction grating immersed in water. In the linear regime, the system presents high focal gain (32 dB), with a narrow beam-width and intense side lobes as it is common in focusing by Fresnel-like lenses. Activating the nonlinearity of the host medium by using high amplitude incident waves, the focusing properties of the lens dramatically change. Theoretical predictions show that the focal gain of the system extraordinary increases in the strongly nonlinear regime (Mach number of 6.1 × 10{sup −4}). Particularly, the harmonic generation is locally activated at the focal spot, and the second harmonic beam is characterized by strongly reduced side-lobes and an excellent beam profile as experiments show in agreement with theory. The results can motivate applications in medical therapy or second harmonic imaging.

  17. Radiation Characteristics of Cavity Backed Aperture Antennas in Finite Ground Plane Using the Hybrid FEM/MoM Technique and Geometrical Theory of Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, M. D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    1996-01-01

    A technique using hybrid Finite Element Method (FEM)/Method of Moments (MoM), and Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) is presented to analyze the radiation characteristics of cavity fed aperture antennas in a finite ground plane. The cavity which excites the aperture is assumed to be fed by a cylindrical transmission line. The electromagnetic (EM) fields inside the cavity are obtained using FEM. The EM fields and their normal derivatives required for FEM solution are obtained using (1) the modal expansion in the feed region and (2) the MoM for the radiating aperture region(assuming an infinite ground plane). The finiteness of the ground plane is taken into account using GTD. The input admittance of open ended circular, rectangular, and coaxial line radiating into free space through an infinite ground plane are computed and compared with earlier published results. Radiation characteristics of a coaxial cavity fed circular aperture in a finite rectangular ground plane are verified with experimental results.

  18. Effect of rotation and imperfection on reflection and transmission of plane waves in anisotropic generalized thermoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajneesh; Singh, Manjeet

    2009-07-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the propagation of plane waves at an imperfectly bonded interface of two orthotropic generalized thermoelastic rotating half-spaces with different elastic and thermal properties. The thermoelastic theory with one relaxation time developed by Lord and Shulman [A generalized dynamical theory of thermoelasticity, J. Mech. Phys. Solids 15 (1967) 299-309] is used to study the problem. The reflection and transmission coefficients of Quasi Longitudinal (QL-) wave, Quasi Thermal (T-mode) wave and Quasi Transverse (QT-) wave have been derived. The effect of rotation has been studied on the velocities of different waves. Some special cases of boundaries i.e. normal stiffness, transverse stiffness, thermal contact conductance, slip boundary and welded contact boundary have been deduced from an imperfect one. Impact of different boundaries has been studied graphically. It is observed that thermal properties, rotation and imperfect boundary have significant effect on the propagation of waves.

  19. Calculation of the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings based on Fresnel-Kirchhoff's diffraction formula.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanshen; Li, Ting; Xu, Banglian; Hong, Ruijin; Tao, Chunxian; Ling, Jinzhong; Li, Baicheng; Zhang, Dawei; Ni, Zhengji; Zhuang, Songlin

    2013-02-10

    Fraunhofer diffraction formula cannot be applied to calculate the diffraction wave energy distribution of concave gratings like plane gratings because their grooves are distributed on a concave spherical surface. In this paper, a method based on the Kirchhoff diffraction theory is proposed to calculate the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings by considering the curvature of the whole concave spherical surface. According to this approach, each groove surface is divided into several limited small planes, on which the Kirchhoff diffraction field distribution is calculated, and then the diffraction field of whole concave grating can be obtained by superimposition. Formulas to calculate the diffraction efficiency of Rowland-type and flat-field concave gratings are deduced from practical applications. Experimental results showed strong agreement with theoretical computations. With the proposed method, light energy can be optimized to the expected diffraction wave range while implementing aberration-corrected design of concave gratings, particularly for the concave blazed gratings. PMID:23400074

  20. Probing liquid surface waves, liquid properties and liquid films with light diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Tarun Kr; Chaudhuri, Partha Roy; Roy, Anushree; Kar, Sayan

    2006-06-01

    Surface waves on liquids act as a dynamical phase grating for incident light. In this paper, we revisit the classical method of probing such waves (wavelengths of the order of mm) as well as inherent properties of liquids and liquid films on liquids, using optical diffraction. A combination of simulation and experiment is proposed to trace out the surface wave profiles in various situations (e.g. for one or more vertical, slightly immersed, electrically driven exciters). Subsequently, the surface tension and the spatial damping coefficient (related to viscosity) of a variety of liquids are measured carefully in order to gauge the efficiency of measuring liquid properties using this optical probe. The final set of results deal with liquid films where dispersion relations, surface and interface modes, interfacial tension and related issues are investigated in some detail, both theoretically and experimentally. On the whole, our observations and analysis seem to support the claim that this simple, low cost apparatus is capable of providing a wealth of information on liquids and liquid surface waves in a non-destructive way.

  1. Axisymmetric diffraction of a cylindrical transverse wave by a viscoelastic spherical inclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Benjamin L.; Liu, Yifei; Royston, Thomas J.; Magin, Richard L.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the scattering and diffraction of a cylindrical transverse shear wave in a viscoelastic isotropic medium by a spherical heterogeneity is analytically solved. The waves are generated by the harmonic longitudinal oscillations of the cylinder walls. The spherical inclusion is located at the radial center of the cylinder and differs from the cylindrical material only in its complex shear modulus. Small amplitude motion is assumed, such that linear system theory is valid. By employing multi-pole expansions, the incident and scattered wave fields are each defined in both cylindrical and spherical coordinates allowing for the satisfaction of the boundary conditions at the surfaces of these multiply connected bodies. The solution involves an infinite sum of improper integrals, which are evaluated numerically. The wave field is determined for a hydrogel (alginate) bead suspended in a different hydrogel (agarose) that fills a glass test tube. Numerical examples showing the effect on displacement fields of varying the stiffness of the inclusion are presented. This solution is further validated with a finite element simulation showing excellent agreement with the analytic results.

  2. G W with linearized augmented plane waves extended by high-energy local orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hong; Blaha, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Many-body perturbation theory in the G W approximation is currently the most accurate and robust first-principles approach to determine the electronic band structure of weakly correlated insulating materials without any empirical input. Recent G W results for ZnO with more careful investigation of the convergence with respect to the number of unoccupied states have led to heated debates regarding the numerical accuracy of previously reported G W results using either pseudopotential plane waves or all-electron linearized augmented plane waves (LAPWs). The latter has been arguably regarded as the most accurate scheme for electronic-structure theory for solids. This work aims to solve the ZnO puzzle via a systematic investigation of the effects of including high-energy local orbitals (HLOs) in the LAPW-based G W calculations of semiconductors. Using ZnO as the prototypical example, it is shown that the inclusion of HLOs has two main effects: it improves the description of high-lying unoccupied states by reducing the linearization errors of the standard LAPW basis, and in addition it provides an efficient way to achieve the completeness in the summation of states in G W calculations. By investigating the convergence of G W band gaps with respect to the number of HLOs for several other typical examples, it was found that the effects of HLOs are highly system-dependent, and in most cases the inclusion of HLOs changes the band gap by less than 0.2 eV. Compared to its effects on the band gap, the consideration of HLOs has even stronger effects on the G W correction to the valence-band maximum, which is of great significance for the G W prediction of the ionization potentials of semiconductors. By considering an extended set of semiconductors with relatively well-established experimental band gaps, it was found that in general using a HLO-enhanced LAPW basis significantly improves the agreement with experiment for both the band gap and the ionization potential, and overall

  3. A projection-free method for representing plane-wave DFT results in an atom-centered basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunnington, Benjamin D.; Schmidt, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    Plane wave density functional theory (DFT) is a powerful tool for gaining accurate, atomic level insight into bulk and surface structures. Yet, the delocalized nature of the plane wave basis set hinders the application of many powerful post-computation analysis approaches, many of which rely on localized atom-centered basis sets. Traditionally, this gap has been bridged via projection-based techniques from a plane wave to atom-centered basis. We instead propose an alternative projection-free approach utilizing direct calculation of matrix elements of the converged plane wave DFT Hamiltonian in an atom-centered basis. This projection-free approach yields a number of compelling advantages, including strict orthonormality of the resulting bands without artificial band mixing and access to the Hamiltonian matrix elements, while faithfully preserving the underlying DFT band structure. The resulting atomic orbital representation of the Kohn-Sham wavefunction and Hamiltonian provides a gateway to a wide variety of analysis approaches. We demonstrate the utility of the approach for a diverse set of chemical systems and example analysis approaches.

  4. Plane-wave matrix theory from N=4 super-Yang-Mills on R×S 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nakwoo; Klose, Thomas; Plefka, Jan

    2003-11-01

    Recently a mass deformation of the maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills quantum mechanics has been constructed from the supermembrane action in eleven-dimensional plane-wave backgrounds. However, the origin of this plane-wave matrix theory in terms of a compactification of a higher-dimensional super-Yang-Mills model has remained obscure. In this paper we study the Kaluza-Klein reduction of D=4, N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory on a round three-sphere, and demonstrate that the plane-wave matrix theory arises through a consistent truncation to the lowest lying modes. We further explore the relation between the dilatation operator of the conformal field theory and the Hamiltonian of the quantum mechanics through perturbative calculations up to two-loop order. In particular, we find that the one-loop anomalous dimensions of pure scalar operators are completely captured by the plane-wave matrix theory. At two-loop level this property ceases to exist.

  5. A projection-free method for representing plane-wave DFT results in an atom-centered basis

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnington, Benjamin D.; Schmidt, J. R.

    2015-09-14

    Plane wave density functional theory (DFT) is a powerful tool for gaining accurate, atomic level insight into bulk and surface structures. Yet, the delocalized nature of the plane wave basis set hinders the application of many powerful post-computation analysis approaches, many of which rely on localized atom-centered basis sets. Traditionally, this gap has been bridged via projection-based techniques from a plane wave to atom-centered basis. We instead propose an alternative projection-free approach utilizing direct calculation of matrix elements of the converged plane wave DFT Hamiltonian in an atom-centered basis. This projection-free approach yields a number of compelling advantages, including strict orthonormality of the resulting bands without artificial band mixing and access to the Hamiltonian matrix elements, while faithfully preserving the underlying DFT band structure. The resulting atomic orbital representation of the Kohn-Sham wavefunction and Hamiltonian provides a gateway to a wide variety of analysis approaches. We demonstrate the utility of the approach for a diverse set of chemical systems and example analysis approaches.

  6. Scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave by a homogeneous sphere made of an orthorhombic dielectric-magnetic material.

    PubMed

    Ulfat Jafri, A D; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2014-01-01

    An exact transition matrix was formulated for electromagnetic scattering by an orthorhombic dielectric-magnetic sphere whose permeability dyadic is a scalar multiple of its permittivity dyadic. Calculations were made for plane waves incident on the sphere. As the size parameter increases, the role of anisotropy evolves; multiple lobes appear in the plots of the differential scattering efficiency in any scattering plane; the total scattering, extinction, and forward-scattering efficiencies exhibit a prominent maximum each; and the absorption efficiency generally increases with weak undulations. Certain orientations of the sphere with respect to the directions of propagation and the electric field of the incident plane wave make it highly susceptible to detection in a monostatic configuration, whereas other orientations make it much less vulnerable to detection. Impedance match to the ambient free space decreases backscattering efficiency significantly, although anisotropy prevents null backscattering. PMID:24561944

  7. Diffraction of picosecond bulk longitudinal and shear waves in micron thick films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audoin, B.; Perton, M.; Chigarev, N.; Rossignol, C.

    2008-01-01

    Investigation of thin metallic film properties by means of picosecond ultrasonics [C. Thomsen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 989 (1984)] has been under the scope of several studies. Generation of longitudinal and shear waves [T. Pézeril et al., Phys. Rev. B 73, 132301 (2006); O. Matsuda et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 095501 (2004)] with a wave vector normal to the film free surface has been demonstrated. Such measurements cannot provide complete information about properties of anisotropic films. Extreme focusing of a laser pump beam (≈0.5 μm) on the sample surface has recently allowed us to provide evidence of picosecond acoustic diffraction in thin metallic films (≈1 μm) [C. Rossignol et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 166106 (2005)]. The resulting longitudinal and shear wavefronts propagate at group velocity through the bulk of the film. To interpret the received signals, source directivity diagrams are calculated taking into account material anisotropy, optical penetration, and laser beam width on the sample surface. It is shown that acoustic diffraction increases with optical penetration, so competing with the increasing of directivity caused by beam width. Reflection with mode conversion at the film-substrate interface is discussed.

  8. The impedance problem of wave diffraction by a strip with higher order boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, L. P.; Simões, A. M.

    2013-10-17

    This work is devoted to analyse an impedance boundary-transmission problem for the Helmholtz equation originated by a problem of wave diffraction by an infinite strip with higher order imperfect boundary conditions. A constructive approach of operator relations is built, which allows a transparent interpretation of the problem in an operator theory framework. In particular, different types of operator relations are exhibited for different types of operators acting between Lebesgue and Sobolev spaces on a finite interval and the positive half-line. All this has consequences in the understanding of the structure of this type of problems. In particular, a Fredholm characterization of the problem is obtained in terms of the initial space order parameters. At the request of the author and the Proceedings Editor the above article has been replaced with a corrected version. The original PDF file supplied to AIP Publishing contained an error in the title of the article. The original title appeared as: 'The Impedance Problem of Wave Diffraction by a trip with Higher Order Boundary Conditions.' This article has been replaced and the title now appears correctly online. The corrected article was published on 8 November 2013.

  9. Unmitigated numerical solution to the diffraction term in the parabolic nonlinear ultrasound wave equation.

    PubMed

    Hasani, Mojtaba H; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar; Farjami, Yaghoub; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2013-09-01

    Various numerical algorithms have been developed to solve the Khokhlov-Kuznetsov-Zabolotskaya (KZK) parabolic nonlinear wave equation. In this work, a generalized time-domain numerical algorithm is proposed to solve the diffraction term of the KZK equation. This algorithm solves the transverse Laplacian operator of the KZK equation in three-dimensional (3D) Cartesian coordinates using a finite-difference method based on the five-point implicit backward finite difference and the five-point Crank-Nicolson finite difference discretization techniques. This leads to a more uniform discretization of the Laplacian operator which in turn results in fewer calculation gridding nodes without compromising accuracy in the diffraction term. In addition, a new empirical algorithm based on the LU decomposition technique is proposed to solve the system of linear equations obtained from this discretization. The proposed empirical algorithm improves the calculation speed and memory usage, while the order of computational complexity remains linear in calculation of the diffraction term in the KZK equation. For evaluating the accuracy of the proposed algorithm, two previously published algorithms are used as comparison references: the conventional 2D Texas code and its generalization for 3D geometries. The results show that the accuracy/efficiency performance of the proposed algorithm is comparable with the established time-domain methods. PMID:23967912

  10. Kinetic theory of electromagnetic plane wave obliquely incident on bounded plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Angus, J. R.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Smolyakov, A. I.

    2010-10-15

    The effects of electromagnetic plane waves obliquely incident on a warm bounded plasma slab of finite length L are studied by solving the coupled Vlasov-Maxwell set of equations. It is shown that the solution can be greatly simplified in the limit where thermal effects are most important by expanding in small parameters and introducing self-similar variables. These solutions reveal that the coupling of thermal effects with the angle of incidence is negligible in the region of bounce resonance and anomalous skin effect. In the region of the anomalous skin effect, the heating is shown to scale linearly with the anomalous skin depth {delta}{sub a} when {delta}{sub a}<>L, the heating is shown to decay with 1/{delta}{sub a}{sup 3}. The transmission is found to be exponentially larger than that predicted from a local theory in the appropriate region of the anomalous skin effect.

  11. On the formation of shocks of electromagnetic plane waves in non-linear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulou, Demetrios; Perez, Daniel Raoul

    2016-08-01

    An influential result of F. John states that no genuinely non-linear strictly hyperbolic quasi-linear first order system of partial differential equations in two variables has a global C2-solution for small enough initial data. Inspired by recent work of D. Christodoulou, we revisit John's original proof and extract a more precise description of the behaviour of solutions at the time of shock. We show that John's singular first order quantity, when expressed in characteristic coordinates, remains bounded until the final time, which is then characterised by an inverse density of characteristics tending to zero in one point. Moreover, we study the derivatives of second order, showing again their boundedness when expressed in appropriate coordinates. We also recover John's upper bound for the time of shock formation and complement it with a lower bound. Finally, we apply these results to electromagnetic plane waves in a crystal with no magnetic properties and cubic electric non-linearity in the energy density, assuming no dispersion.

  12. Three-dimensional plane-wave full-band quantum transport using empirical pseudopotentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jingtian; Vandenberghe, William; Fischetti, Massimo

    2015-03-01

    We study theoretically the ballistic performance of future sub-5 nm Field-Effect Transistors (FETs) using an atomistic quantum transport formalism based on empirical pseudopotentials, with armchair Graphene NanoRibbons (aGNRs), Silicon NanoWires (SiNWs) and zigzag Carbon NanoTubes (zCNTs) as channel structures. Due to the heavy computational burden from the plane-wave basis set, we restrict our study to ultrasmall devices, characterized by 5 nm channel lengths and 0.7 nm × 0.7 nm cross-sectional areas. Band structure calculations show that aGNRs have an oscillating chirality-dependent band gap. AGNRs with dimer lines N=3p+1 have large band gaps and aGNRFETs show promising device performance in terms of high Ion/Ioff, small drain-induced barrier lowering and limited short channel effects due to their very thin body and associated excellent electrostatics control. N=3p+2 aGNRs have small band gaps and band-to-band tunneling generates a large current at high bias. We also discuss spurious solutions introduced by the envelope function approximation. Device characteristics of SiNWFETs and zCNTFETs are compared to aGNRFETs as well. We acknowledge the support of Nanoelectronics Research Initiatives's (NRI's) Southwest Academy of Nanoelectronics (SWAN).

  13. Evaluation and display of polarimetric image data using long-wave cooled microgrid focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, David L.; Boger, James K.; Wellems, L. David; Black, Wiley T.; Ortega, Steve E.; Ratliff, Bradley M.; Fetrow, Matthew P.; Hubbs, John E.; Tyo, J. Scott

    2006-05-01

    Recent developments for Long Wave InfraRed (LWIR) imaging polarimeters include incorporating a microgrid polarizer array onto the focal plane array (FPA). Inherent advantages over typical polarimeters include packaging and instantaneous acquisition of thermal and polarimetric information. This allows for real time video of thermal and polarimetric products. The microgrid approach has inherent polarization measurement error due to the spatial sampling of a non-uniform scene, residual pixel to pixel variations in the gain corrected responsivity and in the noise equivalent input (NEI), and variations in the pixel to pixel micro-polarizer performance. The Degree of Linear Polarization (DoLP) is highly sensitive to these parameters and is consequently used as a metric to explore instrument sensitivities. Image processing and fusion techniques are used to take advantage of the inherent thermal and polarimetric sensing capability of this FPA, providing additional scene information in real time. Optimal operating conditions are employed to improve FPA uniformity and sensitivity. Data from two DRS Infrared Technologies, L.P. (DRS) microgrid polarizer HgCdTe FPAs are presented. One FPA resides in a liquid nitrogen (LN2) pour filled dewar with a 80°K nominal operating temperature. The other FPA resides in a cryogenic (cryo) dewar with a 60° K nominal operating temperature.

  14. Discontinuous Galerkin methods with plane waves for time-harmonic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabard, Gwénaël

    2007-08-01

    A general framework for discontinuous Galerkin methods in the frequency domain with numerical flux is presented. The main feature of the method is the use of plane waves instead of polynomials to approximate the solution in each element. The method is formulated for a general system of linear hyperbolic equations and is applied to problems of aeroacoustic propagation by solving the two-dimensional linearized Euler equations. It is found that the method requires only a small number of elements per wavelength to obtain accurate solutions and that it is more efficient than high-order DRP schemes. In addition, the conditioning of the method is found to be high but not critical in practice. It is shown that the Ultra-Weak Variational Formulation is in fact a subset of the present discontinuous Galerkin method. A special extension of the method is devised in order to deal with singular solutions generated by point sources like monopoles or dipoles. Aeroacoustic problems with non-uniform flows are also considered and results are presented for the sound radiated from a two-dimensional jet.

  15. Plane Wave First-principles Materials Science Codes on Multicore Supercomputer Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canning, Andrew; Deslippe, Jack; Louie, Steven. G.; Scidac Team

    2014-03-01

    Plane wave first-principles codes based on 3D FFTs are one of the largest users of supercomputer cycles in the world. Modern supercomputer architectures are constructed from chips having many CPU cores with nodes containing multiple chips. Designs for future supercomputers are projected to have even more cores per chip. I will present new developments for hybrid MPI/OpenMP PW codes focusing on a specialized 3D FFTs that gives greatly improved scaling over a pure MPI version on multicore machines. Scaling results will be presented for the full electronic structure codes PARATEC and BerkeleyGW. using the new hybrid 3D FFTs, threaded libraries and OpenMP to gain greatly improved scaling to very large core count on Cray and IBM machines. Support for this work was provided through the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program funded by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (and Basic Energy Sciences).

  16. Plane wave density functional molecular dynamics study of exothermic reactions of Al/CuO thermites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oloriegbe, Suleiman; Sewell, Thomas; Chen, Zhen; Jiang, Shan; Gan, Yong

    2014-03-01

    Exothermic reactions between nanosize aluminum (Al) and copper oxide (CuO) structures are of current interest because of their high reaction enthalpy and energy density which exceed those of traditional monomolecular energetic compounds such as TNT, RDX, and HMX. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations with forces obtained from plane wave density functional theory are used to investigate the atomic-scale and electronic processes that occur during the fast thermite reactions between Al and CuO nanostructures under adiabatic conditions. Aluminum surfaces in contact with O-exposed and Cu-exposed CuO surfaces are studied. Starting from initial temperature T = 800 K, we have observed: faster chemical reaction at the oxygen-rich interface during the initial 0.5 ps, linear temperature rise, and fast oxygen diffusion into the Al region with the rate 1.87 X 10-3 cm2/s. The density-derived electrostatic and chemical method is used to evaluate the net atomic charges and charge transfer during the important redox processes. High charge density around the oxygen-exposed interface may be responsible for the faster initial reactions at that interface. The overall reaction rate, determined using the time evolution of Cu-O charge orbital overlap population, is approximately first order.

  17. Performance bounds for passive sensor arrays operating in a turbulent medium: Plane-wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, S. L.; Wilson, D. K.

    2003-05-01

    The performance bounds of a passive acoustic array operating in a turbulent medium with fluctuations described by a von Kármán spectrum are investigated. This treatment considers a single, monochromatic, plane-wave source at near-normal incidence. A line-of-sight propagation path is assumed. The primary interests are in calculating the Cramer-Rao lower bounds of the azimuthal and elevational angles of arrival and in observing how these bounds change with the introduction of additional unknowns, such as the propagation distance, turbulence parameters, and signal-to-noise ratio. In both two and three dimensions, it is found that for large values of the index-of-refraction variance, the Cramer-Rao lower bounds of the angles of arrival increase significantly at large values of the normalized propagation distance. For small values of the index-of-refraction variance and normalized propagation distance, the signal-to-noise ratio is found to be the limiting factor. In the two-dimensional treatment, it is found that the estimate of the angle of arrival will decouple from the estimates of the other parameters with the appropriate choice of array geometry. In three dimensions, again with an appropriate choice of array geometry, the estimates of the azimuth and elevation will decouple from the estimates of the other parameters, but due to the constraints of the model, will remain coupled to one another.

  18. Performance bounds for passive sensor arrays operating in a turbulent medium: plane-wave analysis.

    PubMed

    Collier, S L; Wilson, D K

    2003-05-01

    The performance bounds of a passive acoustic array operating in a turbulent medium with fluctuations described by a von Kármán spectrum are investigated. This treatment considers a single, monochromatic, plane-wave source at near-normal incidence. A line-of-sight propagation path is assumed. The primary interests are in calculating the Cramer-Rao lower bounds of the azimuthal and elevational angles of arrival and in observing how these bounds change with the introduction of additional unknowns, such as the propagation distance, turbulence parameters, and signal-to-noise ratio. In both two and three dimensions, it is found that for large values of the index-of-refraction variance, the Cramer-Rao lower bounds of the angles of arrival increase significantly at large values of the normalized propagation distance. For small values of the index-of-refraction variance and normalized propagation distance, the signal-to-noise ratio is found to be the limiting factor. In the two-dimensional treatment, it is found that the estimate of the angle of arrival will decouple from the estimates of the other parameters with the appropriate choice of array geometry. In three dimensions, again with an appropriate choice of array geometry, the estimates of the azimuth and elevation will decouple from the estimates of the other parameters, but due to the constraints of the model, will remain coupled to one another. PMID:12765389

  19. Numerical modeling of undersea acoustics using a partition of unity method with plane waves enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hospital-Bravo, Raúl; Sarrate, Josep; Díez, Pedro

    2016-05-01

    A new 2D numerical model to predict the underwater acoustic propagation is obtained by exploring the potential of the Partition of Unity Method (PUM) enriched with plane waves. The aim of the work is to obtain sound pressure level distributions when multiple operational noise sources are present, in order to assess the acoustic impact over the marine fauna. The model takes advantage of the suitability of the PUM for solving the Helmholtz equation, especially for the practical case of large domains and medium frequencies. The seawater acoustic absorption and the acoustic reflectance of the sea surface and sea bottom are explicitly considered, and perfectly matched layers (PML) are placed at the lateral artificial boundaries to avoid spurious reflexions. The model includes semi-analytical integration rules which are adapted to highly oscillatory integrands with the aim of reducing the computational cost of the integration step. In addition, we develop a novel strategy to mitigate the ill-conditioning of the elemental and global system matrices. Specifically, we compute a low-rank approximation of the local space of solutions, which in turn reduces the number of degrees of freedom, the CPU time and the memory footprint. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the model and to assess its accuracy.

  20. GPU-based beamformer: fast realization of plane wave compounding and synthetic aperture imaging.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Billy Y S; Tsang, Ivan K H; Yu, Alfred C H

    2011-08-01

    Although they show potential to improve ultrasound image quality, plane wave (PW) compounding and synthetic aperture (SA) imaging are computationally demanding and are known to be challenging to implement in real-time. In this work, we have developed a novel beamformer architecture with the real-time parallel processing capacity needed to enable fast realization of PW compounding and SA imaging. The beamformer hardware comprises an array of graphics processing units (GPUs) that are hosted within the same computer workstation. Their parallel computational resources are controlled by a pixel-based software processor that includes the operations of analytic signal conversion, delay-and-sum beamforming, and recursive compounding as required to generate images from the channel-domain data samples acquired using PW compounding and SA imaging principles. When using two GTX-480 GPUs for beamforming and one GTX-470 GPU for recursive compounding, the beamformer can compute compounded 512 x 255 pixel PW and SA images at throughputs of over 4700 fps and 3000 fps, respectively, for imaging depths of 5 cm and 15 cm (32 receive channels, 40 MHz sampling rate). Its processing capacity can be further increased if additional GPUs or more advanced models of GPU are used. PMID:21859591

  1. Two-Temperature Effects on Plane Waves in Generalized Thermo-Microstretch Elastic Solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwa, Sarhan. Y.; Jahangir, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the effect of two temperatures on plane waves propagating through a generalized-thermo-microstretch elastic half-space solid has been investigated. The surface of the medium is subjected to a mode-I crack, and the axis is pointing vertically into the medium. Two fascinating theories of generalized thermo-elasticity presented by Green and Naghdi and named as without energy dissipation (GN-II) and with energy dissipation (GN-III) have been used. Governing equations for each particular case are also derived, and a solution is obtained. An analytical technique of normal mode analysis is used to obtain the exact expressions for the displacement components, force stresses, the temperature, and the couple stresses distribution. The variations of the considered variables against the vertical distance are illustrated graphically. Comparisons are made with the results between type II and III in generalized-thermo-microstretch and in a particular case (without microstretch constants). Numerical work is also performed for a suitable material with the aim of illustrating the results. It is found that the maximum amplitude is obtained for the maximum value of the two temperature parametric constant.

  2. GW in the Gaussian and Plane Waves Scheme with Application to Linear Acenes.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Jan; Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg

    2016-08-01

    We present an implementation of G0W0 and eigenvalue-self-consistent GW (evGW) in the Gaussian and plane waves scheme for molecules. We calculate the correlation self-energy for imaginary frequencies employing the resolution of the identity. The correlation self-energy for real frequencies is then evaluated by analytic continuation. This technique allows an efficient parallel implementation and application to systems with several hundreds of atoms. Various benchmark calculations are presented. In particular, the convergence with respect to the most important numerical parameters is assessed for the benzene molecule. Comparisons with respect to other G0W0 implementations are reported for a set of molecules, while the performance of the method has been measured for water clusters containing up to 480 atoms in a cc-TZVP basis. Additionally, G0W0 has been applied for studying the influence of the ligands on the gap of small CdSe nanoparticles. evGW has been employed to calculate the HOMO-LUMO gaps of linear acenes, linear chains formed of connected benzene rings. Distinct differences between the closed and the open-shell (broken-symmetry) evGW HOMO-LUMO gaps for long acenes are found. In future experiments, a comparison of measured HOMO-LUMO gaps and our calculated evGW values may be helpful to determine the electronic ground state of long acenes. PMID:27348184

  3. Trajectories of electrons with large longitudinal momenta in the phase plane during surfatron acceleration by an electromagnetic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Mkrtichyan, G. S.

    2015-07-15

    The trajectories of electrons with large longitudinal momenta in the phase plane in the course of their surfatron acceleration by an electromagnetic wave propagating in space plasma across the external magnetic field are analyzed. Electrons with large longitudinal momenta are trapped immediately if the initial wave phase Ψ(0) on the particle trajectory is positive. For negative values of Ψ(0), no electrons trapping by the wave is observed over the available computational times. According to numerical calculations, the trajectories of trapped particles in the phase plane have a singular point of the stable focus type and the behavior of the trajectory corresponds to the motion in a complex nonstationary effective potential well. For some initial phases, electrons are confined in the region of the accelerating electric field for relatively short time, the energy gain being about 50–130% and more.

  4. Spin-wave spectra and stability of the in-plane vortex state in two-dimensional magnetic nanorings

    SciTech Connect

    Mamica, S.

    2013-12-21

    We study theoretically two-dimensional nanorings assumed to have the in-plane vortex magnetic configuration. Using a discrete dipole model we examine the spectrum of normal spin-wave modes vs. the dipolar-to-exchange interaction ratio. We systematize the spin-wave excitations by their azimuthal and radial wave numbers. The lowest-frequency mode, the fundamental (quasiuniform) mode, and the mode hybridization are analyzed; the discussion of the influence of effective pinning at the ring boundaries is provided as well. We study the stability of the in-plane vortex state and discuss the role of the size of the ring and the type of lattice arrangement of the magnetic moments within it. To facilitate comparison with our results we provide the relationships between microscopic parameters, used in our model, and those used in the case of continuous medium.

  5. Plane-wave solutions to frequency-domain and time-domain scattering from magnetodielectric slabs.

    PubMed

    Yaghjian, Arthur D; Hansen, Thorkild B

    2006-04-01

    Plane-wave representations are used to formulate the exact solutions to frequency-domain and time-domain sources illuminating a magnetodielectric slab with complex permittivity epsilon(omega) and permeability mu(omega). In the special case of a line source at z = 0 a distance d < L in front of an L-wide lossless double-negative (DNG) slab with kappa(omega 0) = epsilon(omega 0) / epsilon 0 = mu(omega 0) / mu 0 = (-1), the single-frequency (omega 0) solution exhibits not only "perfectly focused" fields for z > 2L but also divergent infinite fields in the region 2d < z < 2L. In contrast, the solution to the same lossless kappa(omega 0) = (-1) DNG slab illuminated by a sinusoidal wave that begins at some initial time t = 0 (and thus has a nonzero bandwidth, unlike the single-frequency excitation that begins at t = (-infinity) is proven to have imperfectly focused fields and convergent finite fields everywhere for all finite time t. The proof hinges on the variation of kappa(omega) about omega = omega 0 having a lower bound imposed by causality and energy conservation. The minimum time found to produce a given resolution is proportional to the estimate obtained by G. Gómez-Santos, [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 077401 (2003)]. Only as t --> infinity do the fields become perfectly focused in the region z > 2L and divergent in the region 2d < z < 2L. These theoretical results, which are confirmed by numerical examples, imply that divergent fields of the single-frequency solution are not caused by an inherent inconsistency in assuming an ideal lossless kappa(omega 0) = (-1) DNG material, but are the result of the continuous single-frequency wave (which contains infinite energy) building up infinite reactive fields during the infinite duration of time from t = (-infinity) to the present time t that the single-frequency excitation has been applied. An analogous situation occurs at the resonant frequencies of a lossless cavity. A single-frequency (zero-bandwidth) source inside the

  6. The Hagen-Poiseuille, Plane Couette and Poiseuille Flows Linear Instability and Rogue Waves Excitation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefranov, Sergey; Chefranov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Linear hydrodynamic stability theory for the Hagen-Poiseuille (HP) flow yields a conclusion of infinitely large threshold Reynolds number, Re, value. This contradiction to the observation data is bypassed using assumption of the HP flow instability having hard type and possible for sufficiently high-amplitude disturbances. HP flow disturbance evolution is considered by nonlinear hydrodynamic stability theory. Similar is the case of the plane Couette (PC) flow. For the plane Poiseuille (PP) flow, linear theory just quantitatively does not agree with experimental data defining the threshold Reynolds number Re= 5772 ( S. A. Orszag, 1971), more than five-fold exceeding however the value observed, Re=1080 (S. J. Davies, C. M. White, 1928). In the present work, we show that the linear stability theory conclusions for the HP and PC on stability for any Reynolds number and evidently too high threshold Reynolds number estimate for the PP flow are related with the traditional use of the disturbance representation assuming the possibility of separation of the longitudinal (along the flow direction) variable from the other spatial variables. We show that if to refuse from this traditional form, conclusions on the linear instability for the HP and PC flows may be obtained for finite Reynolds numbers (for the HP flow, for Re>704, and for the PC flow, for Re>139). Also, we fit the linear stability theory conclusion on the PP flow to the experimental data by getting an estimate of the minimal threshold Reynolds number as Re=1040. We also get agreement of the minimal threshold Reynolds number estimate for PC with the experimental data of S. Bottin, et.al., 1997, where the laminar PC flow stability threshold is Re = 150. Rogue waves excitation mechanism in oppositely directed currents due to the PC flow linear instability is discussed. Results of the new linear hydrodynamic stability theory for the HP, PP, and PC flows are published in the following papers: 1. S.G. Chefranov, A

  7. Quasi-plane shear wave propagation induced by acoustic radiation force with a focal line region: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Abbott, Derek; Lu, Minhua; Liu, Huafeng

    2016-03-01

    Shear wave propagation speed has been regarded as an attractive indicator for quantitatively measuring the intrinsic mechanical properties of soft tissues. While most existing techniques use acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation with focal spot region based on linear array transducers, we try to employ a special ARF with a focal line region and apply it to viscoelastic materials to create shear waves. First, a two-dimensional capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer with 64 × 128 fully controllable elements is realised and simulated to generate this special ARF. Then three-dimensional finite element models are developed to simulate the resulting shear wave propagation through tissue phantom materials. Three different phantoms are explored in our simulation study using: (a) an isotropic viscoelastic medium, (b) within a cylindrical inclusion, and (c) a transverse isotropic viscoelastic medium. For each phantom, the ARF creates a quasi-plane shear wave which has a preferential propagation direction perpendicular to the focal line excitation. The propagation of the quasi-plane shear wave is investigated and then used to reconstruct shear moduli sequentially after the estimation of shear wave speed. In the phantom with a transverse isotropic viscoelastic medium, the anisotropy results in maximum speed parallel to the fiber direction and minimum speed perpendicular to the fiber direction. The simulation results show that the line excitation extends the displacement field to obtain a large imaging field in comparison with spot excitation, and demonstrate its potential usage in measuring the mechanical properties of anisotropic tissues. PMID:26768475

  8. Transition operators in electromagnetic-wave diffraction theory. II - Applications to optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, G. E.

    1993-01-01

    The theory developed by Hahne (1992) for the diffraction of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves from fixed obstacles is briefly summarized and extended. Applications of the theory are considered which comprise, first, a spherical harmonic expansion of the so-called radiation impedance operator in the theory, for a spherical surface, and second, a reconsideration of familiar short-wavelength approximation from the new standpoint, including a derivation of the so-called physical optics method on the basis of quasi-planar approximation to the radiation impedance operator, augmented by the method of stationary phase. The latter includes a rederivation of the geometrical optics approximation for the complete Green's function for the electromagnetic field in the presence of a smooth- and a convex-surfaced perfectly electrically conductive obstacle.

  9. Progress Report for In-situ Diffraction from Hohlraum-driven Shock Waves in Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew S. Schneider; Marc A. Meyers; Bimal Kad

    2003-03-21

    OAK-B135 Single crystal copper and copper aluminum alloys, oriented to [001] and [134], have been the subject of a number of laser-induced shock compression experiments over the past two years. In-situ x-ray diffraction, visar wave measurements, and recovery experiments have all been performed. The effects of orientation and pressure decay on recovered samples have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy and explained by the application of physically-based constitutive equations. Dislocation densities, dislocation structures, stacking faults, and twinning have all been characterized. Our current work is focused on examining compositional differences as it relates to the stacking fault energy. Additional research has been performed on the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids in samples shocked at the highest pressures.

  10. Robust angle-independent blood velocity estimation based on dual-angle plane wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Fadnes, Solveig; Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Nyrnes, Siri Ann; Torp, Hans; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional blood velocity estimation has shown potential to solve the angle-dependency of conventional ultrasound flow imaging. Clutter filtering, however, remains a major challenge for large beam-to-flow angles, leading to signal drop-outs and corrupted velocity estimates. This work presents and evaluates a compounding speckle tracking (ST) algorithm to obtain robust angle-independent 2-D blood velocity estimates for all beam-to-flow angles. A dual-angle plane wave imaging setup with full parallel receive beamforming is utilized to achieve high-frame-rate speckle tracking estimates from two scan angles, which may be compounded to obtain velocity estimates of increased robustness. The acquisition also allows direct comparison with vector Doppler (VD) imaging. Absolute velocity bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of the compounding ST estimations were investigated using simulations of a rotating flow phantom with low velocities ranging from 0 to 20 cm/s. In a challenging region where the estimates were influenced by clutter filtering, the bias and RMS error for the compounding ST estimates were 11% and 2 cm/s, a significant reduction compared with conventional single-angle ST (22% and 4 cm/s) and VD (36% and 6 cm/s). The method was also tested in vivo for vascular and neonatal cardiac imaging. In a carotid artery bifurcation, the obtained blood velocity estimates showed that the compounded ST method was less influenced by clutter filtering than conventional ST and VD methods. In the cardiac case, it was observed that ST velocity estimation is more affected by low signal-to-noise (SNR) than VD. However, with sufficient SNR the in vivo results indicated that a more robust angle-independent blood velocity estimator is obtained using compounded speckle tracking compared with conventional ST and VD methods. PMID:26470038

  11. Diffracted and pseudo-physical waves from spatially limited arrays using source-receiver interferometry (SRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löer, Katrin; Meles, Giovanni Angelo; Curtis, Andrew; Vasconcelos, Ivan

    2014-02-01

    Source-receiver interferometry (SRI) refers to a technique to construct the Green's function between a source and a receiver using only energy that has travelled from and to surrounding boundaries of sources and receivers. If a background medium is perturbed, the corresponding interferometric equation can be expressed as the sum of eight terms, which result from the separation of the total wavefield into an unperturbed background field and the perturbed scattered field. Here, the contribution of each individual term is identified for singly diffracted waves using the methods of stationary phase analysis and waveform modelling. When the data acquisition boundary requirements for seismic interferometry are violated, non-physical energy is introduced into Green's function estimates. Our results show that four terms produce purely non-physical, non-stationary energy and that these can be suppressed, and that a combination of only two terms can be used to estimate diffracted wavefields robustly. One of the two terms is precisely that used in geophysical imaging schemes. A key result is that this term also produces non-physical energy, except when the integration boundaries are truncated to span only part of the medium's free surface: we thus show that in this sense, partial boundaries can be seen as a positive advantage for migration or imaging methods. The other term produces non-physical energy which nevertheless emulates physical energy; such energy is therefore called pseudo-physical. We present for the first time a complete mathematical derivation of this new category of energy complemented with illustrative examples. Overall, this work significantly enhances our understanding of how scattered wave SRI works.

  12. Influence of orbital symmetry on diffraction imaging with rescattering electron wave packets

    PubMed Central

    Pullen, M. G.; Wolter, B.; Le, A. -T.; Baudisch, M.; Sclafani, M.; Pires, H.; Schröter, C. D.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.; Pfeifer, T.; Lin, C. D.; Biegert, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to directly follow and time-resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser-induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as πg) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval of the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with πg and πu symmetries, respectively, and where their ionization probabilities do not maximize along their molecular axes. While this removes a serious bottleneck for laser-induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpectedly strong backscattering contributions from low-Z atoms. PMID:27329236

  13. Influence of orbital symmetry on diffraction imaging with rescattering electron wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, M. G.; Wolter, B.; Le, A.-T.; Baudisch, M.; Sclafani, M.; Pires, H.; Schröter, C. D.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.; Pfeifer, T.; Lin, C. D.; Biegert, J.

    2016-06-01

    The ability to directly follow and time-resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser-induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as πg) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval of the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with πg and πu symmetries, respectively, and where their ionization probabilities do not maximize along their molecular axes. While this removes a serious bottleneck for laser-induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpectedly strong backscattering contributions from low-Z atoms.

  14. Toward efficient light diffraction and intensity variations by using wide bandwidth surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Ok; Chen, Fu; Lee, Kee Keun

    2016-06-01

    We have developed acoustic-optic (AO) based display units for implementing a handheld hologram display by modulating light deflection through wide bandwidth surface acoustic wave (SAW). The developed AO device consists of a metal layer, a ZnS waveguide layer, SAW inter digital transducers (IDTs), and a screen for display. When RF power with a particular resonant frequency was applied to IDTs, SAW was radiated and interfered with confined beam propagating along ZnS waveguide layer. The AO interacted beam was deflected laterally toward a certain direction depending on Bragg diffraction condition, exited out of the waveguide layer and then directed to the viewing screen placed at a certain distance from the device to form a single pixel. The deflected angles was adjusted by modulating the center frequency of the SAW IDT (SAW grating), the RF power of SAW, and the angles between propagating light beam path along waveguide and radiating SAW. The diffraction efficiency was also characterized in terms of waveguide thickness, SAW RF input power, and aperture length. Coupling of mode (COM) modeling was fulfilled to find optimal device parameters prior to fabrication. All the parameters affecting the deflection angle and efficiency to form a pixel for a three-dimensional (3D) hologram image were characterized and then discussed.

  15. Influence of orbital symmetry on diffraction imaging with rescattering electron wave packets.

    PubMed

    Pullen, M G; Wolter, B; Le, A-T; Baudisch, M; Sclafani, M; Pires, H; Schröter, C D; Ullrich, J; Moshammer, R; Pfeifer, T; Lin, C D; Biegert, J

    2016-01-01

    The ability to directly follow and time-resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser-induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as πg) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval of the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with πg and πu symmetries, respectively, and where their ionization probabilities do not maximize along their molecular axes. While this removes a serious bottleneck for laser-induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpectedly strong backscattering contributions from low-Z atoms. PMID:27329236

  16. Influence of orbital symmetry on diffraction imaging with rescattering electron wave packets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pullen, M. G.; Wolter, B.; Le, A. -T.; Baudisch, M.; Sclafani, M.; Pires, H.; Schroter, C. D.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.; Pfeifer, T.; et al

    2016-06-22

    The ability to directly follow and time-resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser-induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as pg) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval ofmore » the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with πg and πu symmetries, respectively, and where their ionization probabilities do not maximize along their molecular axes. As a result, while this removes a serious bottleneck for laser-induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpectedly strong backscattering contributions from low-Z atoms.« less

  17. Scattering of a Plane Electromagnetic Wave by an Infinite Dihedral Wedge with a Slotted Cylinder at the Apex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepilko, E. V.

    2003-11-01

    The problem of scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by a perfectly conducting dihedral wedge with a slotted cylinder at the apex in rigorous formulation is reduced to solving a system of linear algebraic equations for unknown coefficients of the Fourier expansion of the scattered field. The results of calculation of the far-zone field with a given accuracy are presented in the case of an E-polarized incident wave. It is shown that for a slot with a large opening angle, the radiation patterns of the field in the long-wavelength far zone has a shape similar to a cardioid and does not depend on the incident-wave direction and the dielectric permittivity of the cylinder. In the case of a narrow slot, the radiation-pattern shape depends significantly on the incidence angle of the wave.

  18. Terahertz Wide-Angle Imaging and Analysis on Plane-wave Criteria Based on Inverse Synthetic Aperture Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jing Kun; Qin, Yu Liang; Deng, Bin; Wang, Hong Qiang; Li, Jin; Li, Xiang

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents two parts of work around terahertz imaging applications. The first part aims at solving the problems occurred with the increasing of the rotation angle. To compensate for the nonlinearity of terahertz radar systems, a calibration signal acquired from a bright target is always used. Generally, this compensation inserts an extra linear phase term in the intermediate frequency (IF) echo signal which is not expected in large-rotation angle imaging applications. We carried out a detailed theoretical analysis on this problem, and a minimum entropy criterion was employed to estimate and compensate for the linear-phase errors. In the second part, the effects of spherical wave on terahertz inverse synthetic aperture imaging are analyzed. Analytic criteria of plane-wave approximation were derived in the cases of different rotation angles. Experimental results of corner reflectors and an aircraft model based on a 330-GHz linear frequency-modulated continuous wave (LFMCW) radar system validated the necessity and effectiveness of the proposed compensation. By comparing the experimental images obtained under plane-wave assumption and spherical-wave correction, it also showed to be highly consistent with the analytic criteria we derived.

  19. Liquid Water through Density-Functional Molecular Dynamics: Plane-Wave vs Atomic-Orbital Basis Sets.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Giacomo; Hutter, Jürg; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2016-08-01

    We determine and compare structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of liquid water at near ambient conditions through density-functional molecular dynamics simulations, when using either plane-wave or atomic-orbital basis sets. In both frameworks, the electronic structure and the atomic forces are self-consistently determined within the same theoretical scheme based on a nonlocal density functional accounting for van der Waals interactions. The overall properties of liquid water achieved within the two frameworks are in excellent agreement with each other. Thus, our study supports that implementations with plane-wave or atomic-orbital basis sets yield equivalent results and can be used indiscriminately in study of liquid water or aqueous solutions. PMID:27434607

  20. Diffraction, attenuation, and source corrections for nonlinear Rayleigh wave ultrasonic measurements.

    PubMed

    Torello, David; Thiele, Sebastian; Matlack, Kathryn H; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J

    2015-02-01

    This research considers the effects of diffraction, attenuation, and the nonlinearity of generating sources on measurements of nonlinear ultrasonic Rayleigh wave propagation. A new theoretical framework for correcting measurements made with air-coupled and contact piezoelectric receivers for the aforementioned effects is provided based on analytical models and experimental considerations. A method for extracting the nonlinearity parameter β11 is proposed based on a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting algorithm that is tailored for Rayleigh wave measurements. Quantitative experiments are conducted to confirm the predictions for the nonlinearity of the piezoelectric source and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the curve-fitting procedure. These experiments are conducted on aluminum 2024 and 7075 specimens and a β11(7075)/β11(2024) measure of 1.363 agrees well with previous literature and earlier work. The proposed work is also applied to a set of 2205 duplex stainless steel specimens that underwent various degrees of heat-treatment over 24h, and the results improve upon conclusions drawn from previous analysis. PMID:25287976

  1. The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6.54 revealed by x-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    E. M. Forgan; Huecker, M.; Blackburn, E.; Holmes, A. T.; Briffa, A. K. R.; Chang, J.; Bouchenoire, L.; Brown, S. D.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D.; et al

    2015-12-09

    Charge density wave (CDW) order appears throughout the underdoped high-temperature cuprate superconductors, but the underlying symmetry breaking and the origin of the CDW remain unclear. We use X-ray diffraction to determine the microscopic structure of the CDWs in an archetypical cuprate YBa2Cu3O6.54 at its superconducting transition temperature ~60 K. We find that the CDWs in this material break the mirror symmetry of the CuO2 bilayers. The ionic displacements in the CDWs have two components, which are perpendicular and parallel to the CuO2 planes, and are out of phase with each other. The planar oxygen atoms have the largest displacements, perpendicularmore » to the CuO2 planes. Our results allow many electronic properties of the underdoped cuprates to be understood. For example, the CDWs will lead to local variations in the electronic structure, giving an explicit explanation of density-wave states with broken symmetry observed in scanning tunnelling microscopy and soft X-ray measurements.« less

  2. The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6.54 revealed by X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Forgan, E. M.; Blackburn, E.; Holmes, A. T.; Briffa, A. K. R.; Chang, J.; Bouchenoire, L.; Brown, S. D.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D.; Hardy, W. N.; Christensen, N. B.; Zimmermann, M. V.; Hücker, M.; Hayden, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Charge density wave (CDW) order appears throughout the underdoped high-temperature cuprate superconductors, but the underlying symmetry breaking and the origin of the CDW remain unclear. We use X-ray diffraction to determine the microscopic structure of the CDWs in an archetypical cuprate YBa2Cu3O6.54 at its superconducting transition temperature ∼60 K. We find that the CDWs in this material break the mirror symmetry of the CuO2 bilayers. The ionic displacements in the CDWs have two components, which are perpendicular and parallel to the CuO2 planes, and are out of phase with each other. The planar oxygen atoms have the largest displacements, perpendicular to the CuO2 planes. Our results allow many electronic properties of the underdoped cuprates to be understood. For instance, the CDWs will lead to local variations in the electronic structure, giving an explicit explanation of density-wave states with broken symmetry observed in scanning tunnelling microscopy and soft X-ray measurements. PMID:26648114

  3. Determining the sputter yields of molybdenum in low-index crystal planes via electron backscattered diffraction, focused ion beam and atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.S.; Chiu, C.H.; Hong, I.T.; Tung, H.C.; Chien, F.S.-S.

    2013-09-15

    Previous literature has used several monocrystalline sputtering targets with various crystalline planes, respectively, to investigate the variations of the sputter yield of materials in different crystalline orientations. This study presents a method to measure the sputtered yields of Mo for the three low-index planes (100), (110), and (111), through using an easily made polycrystalline target. The procedure was firstly to use electron backscattered diffraction to identify the grain positions of the three crystalline planes, and then use a focused ion beam to perform the micro-milling of each identified grain, and finally the sputter yields were calculated from the removed volumes, which were measured by atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that the sputter yield of the primary orientations for Mo varied as Y{sub (110)} > Y{sub (100)} > Y{sub (111)}, coincidental with the ranking of their planar atomic packing densities. The concept of transparency of ion in the crystalline substance was applied to elucidate these results. In addition, the result of (110) orientation exhibiting higher sputter yield is helpful for us to develop a Mo target with a higher deposition rate for use in industry. By changing the deformation process from straight rolling to cross rolling, the (110) texture intensity of the Mo target was significantly improved, and thus enhanced the deposition rate. - Highlights: • We used EBSD, FIB and AFM to measure the sputter yields of Mo in low-index planes. • The sputter yield of the primary orientations for Mo varied as Y{sub (110)} > Y{sub (100)} > Y{sub (111)}. • The transparency of ion was used to elucidate the differences in the sputter yield. • We improved the sputter rate of polycrystalline Mo target by adjusting its texture.

  4. Explaining Electromagnetic Plane Waves in a Vacuum at the Introductory Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allred, Clark L.; Della-Rose, Devin J.; Flusche, Brian M.; Kiziah, Rex R.; Lee, David J.

    2010-01-01

    A typical introduction to electromagnetic waves in vacuum is illustrated by the following quote from an introductory physics text: "Maxwell's equations predict that an electromagnetic wave consists of oscillating electric and magnetic fields. The changing fields induce each other, which maintains the propagation of the wave; a changing electric…

  5. Determining distributed source waveforms in causal, lossy, dispersive, plane-wave (CLDP) materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, R. Joseph

    This thesis presents and employs novel mathematics for the inversion of linear, first-kind Fredholm integral equations (IEs) which have a time t dependent response signal, a space z dependent source waveform, and a kernel with time dependence (at each z) corresponding to the impulse response of a thickness z slab of c_ausal, l_ossy, d_ispersive, homogeneous material through which p_lanar disturbances propagate according to the wave equation. These materials are called CLDP materials; these IEs are called CLDP IEs. These novel mathematics are applicable to the PESAW (aka PEA) charge recovery method. The proposed inversion method recognizes that the (temporal) Fourier transform of a CLDP IE's response signal can be interpreted as the values of the (spatial) Laplace transform of that IE's source waveform along a Laplace plane path determined by the material's propagation wavenumber k_ (f ). Executing the Laplace transform inversion integral along this CLDP path yields an inverse CLDP IE which recovers the true source waveform provided that source waveform is real, causal, Fourier-transformable, and also satisfies the proposed k_(f )- dependent `CLDP criterion'. The forward and inverse CLDP IEs corresponding to a particular CLDP material model k_( f ) therefore comprise a particular integral transform relationship applicable to waveforms satisfying the CLDP criterion for that material. The CLDP transform relationship for a lossless/dispersionless material reduces to the (unilateral) Fourier transform. Even without noise, the `'inverse CLDP'- recovered waveform gleaned from an abruptly bandlimited CLDP response signal requires regularization-a generalized Gibbs-Dirichlet kernel dubbed `the Darrell' comes into effect. The measured (time sampled) PESAW signal is necessarily bandlimited; this thesis investigates regularization via lowpass filtering of the measured signal. Both synthetic and experimental examples are investigated. The focus is on MHz-range signals

  6. The propagation of the shock wave from a strong explosion in a plane-parallel stratified medium: the Kompaneets approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olano, C. A.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Using certain simplifications, Kompaneets derived a partial differential equation that states the local geometrical and kinematical conditions that each surface element of a shock wave, created by a point blast in a stratified gaseous medium, must satisfy. Kompaneets could solve his equation analytically for the case of a wave propagating in an exponentially stratified medium, obtaining the form of the shock front at progressive evolutionary stages. Complete analytical solutions of the Kompaneets equation for shock wave motion in further plane-parallel stratified media were not found, except for radially stratified media. Aims: We aim to analytically solve the Kompaneets equation for the motion of a shock wave in different plane-parallel stratified media that can reflect a wide variety of astrophysical contexts. We were particularly interested in solving the Kompaneets equation for a strong explosion in the interstellar medium of the Galactic disk, in which, due to intense winds and explosions of stars, gigantic gaseous structures known as superbubbles and supershells are formed. Methods: Using the Kompaneets approximation, we derived a pair of equations that we call adapted Kompaneets equations, that govern the propagation of a shock wave in a stratified medium and that permit us to obtain solutions in parametric form. The solutions provided by the system of adapted Kompaneets equations are equivalent to those of the Kompaneets equation. We solved the adapted Kompaneets equations for shock wave propagation in a generic stratified medium by means of a power-series method. Results: Using the series solution for a shock wave in a generic medium, we obtained the series solutions for four specific media whose respective density distributions in the direction perpendicular to the stratification plane are of an exponential, power-law type (one with exponent k=-1 and the other with k =-2) and a quadratic hyperbolic-secant. From these series solutions, we deduced

  7. A secondary diffraction effect and the generation of Scholte-Stoneley acoustic wave on periodically corrugated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfei; Declercq, Nico F.

    2016-05-01

    When a wideband sound beam is incident onto a periodically corrugated surface, a series of diffraction related phenomena can occur. In this work, we report the observation of a secondary diffraction, which is different from those previously investigated. The search of the physical origin of this newly observed diffraction leads to the discovery of the possibility of generating Scholte-Stoneley waves, inspired by Guo, Margetan, and Thompson's work in sound backscattering from rough surfaces, through a nonconventional energy conversion mechanism: direct coupling of the incident energy with the periodic interface. This mechanism allows for the Scholte-Stoneley wave generation at any angle of incidence, which distinguishes it from the well-known energy conversion mechanism of the diffraction-related phenomena such as acoustic Wood anomaly and backward displacement in which wave generation is highly angle dependent. The findings of this work not only enrich the understanding of the interaction of sound with periodically corrugated structures but also provide a new surface wave generation method for the potential applications in nondestructive evaluation of materials.

  8. Fault plane orientations of microearthquakes at Mt. Etna from the inversion of P-wave rise times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lorenzo, Salvatore; Giampiccolo, Elisabetta; Martinez-Arevalo, Carmen; Patanè, Domenico; Romeo, Annalisa

    2010-01-01

    A crucial point in the analysis of tectonic earthquakes occurring in a volcanic area is the inference of the orientation of the structures along which the ruptures occur. These structures represent zones of weakness which could favor the migration of melt toward the surface and the assessment of their geometry is a fundamental step toward efficient evaluation of volcanic risk. We analyzed a high-quality dataset of 171 low-magnitude, tectonic earthquakes that occurred at Mt. Etna during the 2002-2003 eruption. We applied a recently developed technique aimed at inferring the source parameters (source size, dip and strike fault) and the intrinsic quality factor Qp of P waves from the inversion of rise times. The technique is based on numerically calibrated relationships among the rise time of first P waves and the source parameters for a circular crack rupturing at a constant velocity. For the most of the events the directivity source effect did not allow us to constrain the fault plane orientation. For a subset of 45 events with well constrained focal mechanisms we were able to constrain the "true" fault plane orientation. The level of resolution of the fault planes was assessed through a non linear analysis based on the random deviates technique. The significance of the retrieved fault plane solutions and the fit of the assumed source model to data were assessed through a χ-square test. Most of the retrieved fault plane solutions agree with the geometrical trend of known surface faults. The inferred source parameters and Qp are in agreement with the results of previous studies.

  9. Diffractive propagation and recovery of modulated (including chaotic) electromagnetic waves through uniform atmosphere and modified von Karman phase turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Monish R.; Mohamed, Fathi H. A.

    2016-05-01

    In a parallel approach to recently-used transfer function formalism, a study involving diffraction of modulated electromagnetic (EM) waves through uniform and phase-turbulent atmospheres is reported in this paper. Specifically, the input wave is treated as a modulated optical carrier, represented by use of a sinusoidal phasor with a slowly timevarying envelope. Using phasors and (spatial) Fourier transforms, the complex phasor wave is transmitted across a uniform or turbulent medium using the Kirchhoff-Fresnel integral and the random phase screen. Some preliminary results are presented comparing non-chaotic and chaotic information transmission through turbulence, outlining possible improvement in performance utilizing the robust features of chaos.

  10. The Mode Method as a Framework for Theoretical Studies of Ultrasonic Waves Diffraction in Non-homogeneous Layered Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkerdin, G.

    Fundamentals of the mode method including orthogonality conditions between different modes and derivations of coupled equations systems for unknown expansion coefficients are given in the paper for the case of 2D isotropic structures. Using the mode method, several concrete problems of ultrasonic waves diffraction in non-homogeneous layered structures are presented in the paper such as: Scholte-Stoneley wave excitation and conversion at the edge of a liquid loaded plate, interaction of Lamb waves with delaminations in plates coated by highly absorbing materials and nonlinear modulation of Lamb modes by clapping delaminations.

  11. Imaging Lower Mantle Heterogeniety With Differential Dispersion and Attenuation of Core- Diffracted Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, G. G.; Wysession, M. E.; Huhmann, B.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate global differential travel-time dispersion and attenuation of core-diffracted phases from large, deep earthquakes. This technique aids in constraining radial velocity structure at the core-mantle interface in a manner analogous to surface wave observables constraining upper mantle structure. We confirm that there is noticeable differential dispersion and attenuation caused by diffraction on a global basis for both Pdiff and Sdiff. Variations in differential dispersion and attenuation are observed with both geographic location and between Pdiff and Sdiff along the same azimuth suggesting lateral variations in Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio in the lowermost mantle. We attempt to utilize dispersion and attenuation characteristics to put bounds on the magnitude and distribution of large-scale velocity perturbations in the lowermost mantle and draw comparisons to variations found in several 3D whole-mantle models. Our dataset consists of broadband records available from the IRIS DMC for deep (>180 km), large (>5.6 mb) teleseismic events. Preprocessing of the records includes deconvolution of the instrument response, rotation of horizontal components, filtering using a set of bandpass filters, and sample-rate decimation (5 sps). Relative arrival times and amplitudes are found by computing cross correlegrams in the frequency domain, detecting and removing poor recordings with cluster analysis, and iteratively converging on a stable low-variance solution with a weighted least-squares inversion while automatically remediating phase-skips utilizing a database of potential relative arrivals. Raypath-approximated corrections for reciever-side differences in ellipticity, mantle, and crust are applied for the derivation of phase velocites in the lowermost mantle as a function of azimuth and frequency. Following previous studies of diffracted signals, we limit our analysis to station pairs located in narrow azimuthal windows spread over a considerable distance while

  12. Analysis of Incoming Wave Distribution in Vertical Plane in Urban Area and Evaluation of Base Station Antenna Effective Gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitao, Koshiro; Imai, Tetsuro

    In order to reduce the amount of interference to neighboring cells in cellular systems, we generally use base station (BS) antennas that have sharp beam patterns in the vertical plane; however, the distribution of incoming waves at the BS affects the effective gain of the BS antennas which have directional pattern. Therefore, we have to clarify the characteristics of the distribution of the incoming waves. A recent trend is decreasing the cell radius; therefore, clarifying the distribution of the incoming waves at the BS when mobile stations (MSs) are located within 1km from the BS is important. In this report, we evaluate the effective gains of the BS antennas, which are calculated using the measured vertical power angle profile (PAP). Moreover, we examine the application of a simple incoming wave model to the evaluation of the antenna effective gains. In the model, the average power of the incoming waves is set to the Laplacian function and each wave is changed to a lognormal distribution. The antenna effective gain calculated using the model agrees well with that calculated using the measured PAP.

  13. A high frequency analysis of electromagnetic plane wave scattering by perfectly-conducting semi-infinite parallel plate and rectangular waveguides with absorber coated inner walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noh, H. M.; Pathak, P. H.

    1986-01-01

    An approximate but sufficiently accurate high frequency solution which combines the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) and the aperture integration (AI) method is developed for analyzing the problem of electromagnetic (EM) plane wave scattering by an open-ended, perfectly-conducting, semi-infinite hollow rectangular waveguide (or duct) with a thin, uniform layer of lossy or absorbing material on its inner wall, and with a planar termination inside. In addition, a high frequency solution for the EM scattering by a two dimensional (2-D), semi-infinite parallel plate waveguide with a absorber coating on the inner walls is also developed as a first step before analyzing the open-ended semi-infinite three dimensional (3-D) rectangular waveguide geometry. The total field scattered by the semi-infinite waveguide consists firstly of the fields scattered from the edges of the aperture at the open-end, and secondly of the fields which are coupled into the waveguide from the open-end and then reflected back from the interior termination to radiate out of the open-end. The first contribution to the scattered field can be found directly via the UTD ray method. The second contribution is found via the AI method which employs rays to describe the fields in the aperture that arrive there after reflecting from the interior termination. It is assumed that the direction of the incident plane wave and the direction of observation lie well inside the forward half space tht exists outside the half space containing the semi-infinite waveguide geometry. Also, the medium exterior to the waveguide is assumed to be free space.

  14. Long-Wave Runup on a Plane Beach: An Experimental and Numerical Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vater, Stefan; Drähne, Ulrike; Goseberg, Nils; Beisiegel, Nicole; Behrens, Jörn

    2016-04-01

    In this study the runup generated by leading depression single sinusoidal waves as a very basic representation of a tsunami is investigated through physical and numerical experiments. The results are compared against existing analytical expressions for the long-wave runup of periodic sinusoidal waves. It can be shown that shallow water theory is applicable for the investigated type of waves. Furthermore, we demonstrate how such a comparative, inter-methodological work contributes to the understanding of shoreline motion of long waves. The produced data set may serve as a novel benchmark for leading depression sinusoidal waves. The experimental study was conducted using an innovative pump-driven wave generator that is capable of generating arbitrarily long waves which might even exceed the length of the wave flume. Due to the complex control problem for the chosen type of wave generator, spurious over-riding small-scale waves were unavoidable in some of the experiments. The numerical simulations were carried out with a one-dimensional Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) non-linear shallow water model. It incorporates a high fidelity wetting and drying scheme. The sinusoidal waves are generated in a constant depth section attached to a linearly sloping beach, have periods between 20 and 100 seconds and surf similarity parameters between 4.4 and 15.6. In a first qualitative analysis the evolution of the runup elevation and velocity is compared. In order to quantify analytical, numerical and experimental data, the wave similarity measured by the Brier score, maximum run-up and run-down height, as well as run-up/run-down velocities are utilized as metrics. As a starting point, periodic and non-periodic clean sinusoidal waves are compared numerically to rule out differences due to the single sinusoidal wave generation in the wave flume. On further analysis, significant differences in experimental and analytically expected values are observed. However, with the

  15. Comparison between holographic interferometry and high-speed videography techniques in the study of the reflection of plane shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Filipe J.; Skews, Beric W.

    1997-05-01

    Double exposure holographic interferometry and high speed laser shadowgraph photography and videography are used to investigate the mutual reflection of two plane shock waves. Normally research on the transition from regular to Mach reflection is undertaken by allowing a plane shock wave to impinge on a wedge. However due to the boundary layer growth on the wedge, regular reflection persists at wedge angles higher than that allowed for by inviscid shock wave theory. Several bifurcated shock tubes have been constructed, wherein an initially planar shock wave is split symmetrically into two and then recombined at the trailing edge of a wedge. The plane of symmetry acts as an ideal rigid wall eliminating thermal and viscous boundary layer effects. The flow visualization system used needs to provide high resolution information on the shockwave, slipstream, triple point and vortex positions and angles. Initially shadowgraph and schlieren methods, with a Xenon light source, were used. These results, while proving useful, are not of a sufficient resolution to measure the Mach stem and slipstream lengths accurately enough in order to determine the transition point between regular and Mach reflection. To obtain the required image resolution a 2 joule double pulse ruby laser, with a 30 ns pulse duration, was used to make holographic interferograms. The combined advantages of holographic interferometry and the 30 ns pulse laser allows one to obtain much sharper definition, and more qualitative as well as quantitative information on the flow field. The disadvantages of this system are: the long time taken to develop holograms, the difficulty of aligning the pulse laser and the fact that only one image per test is obtained. Direct contact shadowgraphs were also obtained using the pulse ruby laser to help determine triple point trajectory angles. In order to provide further information a one million frames per second CCD camera, which can take up to 10 superimposed images, was

  16. A direct correlation of x-ray diffraction orientation distributions to the in-plane stiffness of semi-crystalline organic semiconducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bingxiao; Awartani, Omar; O'Connor, Brendan; Zikry, Mohammed A.

    2016-05-01

    Large charge mobilities of semi-crystalline organic semiconducting films could be obtained by mechanically aligning the material phases of the film with the loading axis. A key element is to utilize the inherent stiffness of the material for optimal or desired alignment. However, experimentally determining the moduli of semi-crystalline organic thin films for different loading directions is difficult, if not impossible, due to film thickness and material anisotropy. In this paper, we address these challenges by presenting an approach based on combining a composite mechanics stiffness orientation formulation with a Gaussian statistical distribution to directly estimate the in-plane stiffness (transverse isotropy) of aligned semi-crystalline polymer films based on crystalline orientation distributions obtained by X-ray diffraction experimentally at different applied strains. Our predicted results indicate that the in-plane stiffness of an annealing film was initially isotropic, and then it evolved to transverse isotropy with increasing mechanical strains. This study underscores the significance of accounting for the crystalline orientation distributions of the film to obtain an accurate understanding and prediction of the elastic anisotropy of semi-crystalline polymer films.

  17. Correction of the near threshold behavior of electron collisional excitation cross-sections in the plane-wave Born approximation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Brookes, S.

    2013-08-19

    The modeling of NLTE plasmas requires the solution of population rate equations to determine the populations of the various atomic levels relevant to a particular problem. The equations require many cross sections for excitation, de-excitation, ionization and recombination. Additionally, a simple and computational fast way to calculate electron collisional excitation cross-sections for ions is by using the plane-wave Born approximation. This is essentially a high-energy approximation and the cross section suffers from the unphysical problem of going to zero near threshold. Various remedies for this problem have been employed with varying degrees of success. We present a correction procedure formore » the Born cross-sections that employs the Elwert–Sommerfeld factor to correct for the use of plane waves instead of Coulomb waves in an attempt to produce a cross-section similar to that from using the more time consuming Coulomb Born approximation. We compare this new approximation with other, often employed correction procedures. Furthermore, we also look at some further modifications to our Born Elwert procedure and its combination with Y.K. Kim's correction of the Coulomb Born approximation for singly charged ions that more accurately approximate convergent close coupling calculations.« less

  18. Correction of the near threshold behavior of electron collisional excitation cross-sections in the plane-wave Born approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Brookes, S.

    2013-08-19

    The modeling of NLTE plasmas requires the solution of population rate equations to determine the populations of the various atomic levels relevant to a particular problem. The equations require many cross sections for excitation, de-excitation, ionization and recombination. Additionally, a simple and computational fast way to calculate electron collisional excitation cross-sections for ions is by using the plane-wave Born approximation. This is essentially a high-energy approximation and the cross section suffers from the unphysical problem of going to zero near threshold. Various remedies for this problem have been employed with varying degrees of success. We present a correction procedure for the Born cross-sections that employs the Elwert–Sommerfeld factor to correct for the use of plane waves instead of Coulomb waves in an attempt to produce a cross-section similar to that from using the more time consuming Coulomb Born approximation. We compare this new approximation with other, often employed correction procedures. Furthermore, we also look at some further modifications to our Born Elwert procedure and its combination with Y.K. Kim's correction of the Coulomb Born approximation for singly charged ions that more accurately approximate convergent close coupling calculations.

  19. Homodyne-detected ferromagnetic resonance of in-plane magnetized nanocontacts: Composite spin-wave resonances and their excitation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazlali, Masoumeh; Dvornik, Mykola; Iacocca, Ezio; Dürrenfeld, Philipp; Haidar, Mohammad; Åkerman, Johan; Dumas, Randy K.

    2016-04-01

    This work provides a detailed investigation of the measured in-plane field-swept homodyne-detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra of an extended Co/Cu/NiFe pseudo-spin-valve stack using a nanocontact (NC) geometry. The magnetodynamics are generated by a pulse-modulated microwave current, and the resulting rectified dc mixing voltage, which appears across the NC at resonance, is detected using a lock-in amplifier. Most notably, we find that the measured spectra of the NiFe layer are composite in nature and highly asymmetric, consistent with the broadband excitation of multiple modes. Additionally, the data must be fit with two Lorentzian functions in order to extract a reasonable value for the Gilbert damping of the NiFe. Aided by micromagnetic simulations, we conclude that (i) for in-plane fields the rf Oersted field in the vicinity of the NC plays the dominant role in generating the observed spectra, (ii) in addition to the FMR mode, exchange-dominated spin waves are also generated, and (iii) the NC diameter sets the mean wave vector of the exchange-dominated spin wave, in good agreement with the dispersion relation.

  20. Explaining Electromagnetic Plane Waves in a Vacuum at the Introductory Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Clark L.; Della-Rose, Devin J.; Flusche, Brian M.; Kiziah, Rex R.; Lee, David J.

    2010-03-01

    A typical introduction to electromagnetic waves in vacuum is illustrated by the following quote from an introductory physics text: "Maxwell's equations predict that an electromagnetic wave consists of oscillating electric and magnetic fields. The changing fields induce each other, which maintains the propagation of the wave; a changing electric field induces a magnetic field, and a changing magnetic field induces an electric field." Students' intuition, developed from repeatedly solving simple problems involving Faraday's law in an introductory physics course, can lead them to expect the electric and magnetic waves to be out of phase, in contradiction to physical reality as described by Maxwell's equations. Below, we present the type of common Faraday's law problem that promotes this cognitive pitfall, and we suggest an approach that we believe leads to a deeper, more correct student understanding of electromagnetic waves.

  1. Strong reduction of the coercivity by a surface acoustic wave in an out-of-plane magnetized epilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevenard, L.; Camara, I. S.; Prieur, J.-Y.; Rovillain, P.; Lemaître, A.; Gourdon, C.; Duquesne, J.-Y.

    2016-04-01

    Inverse magnetostriction is the effect by which magnetization can be changed upon application of stress/strain. A strain modulation may be created electrically by exciting interdigitated transducers to generate surface acoustic waves (SAWs). Hence SAWs appear as a possible route towards induction-free undulatory magnetic data manipulation. Here we demonstrate experimentally on an out-of-plane magnetostrictive layer a reduction of the coercive field of up to 60 % by a SAW, over millimetric distances. A simple model shows that this spectacular effect can be partly explained by the periodic lowering of the strain-dependent domain nucleation energy by the SAW. This proof of concept was done on (Ga,Mn)(As,P), a magnetic semiconductor in which the out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy can be made very weak by epitaxial growth; it should guide material engineering for all-acoustic magnetization switching.

  2. Ultrasound Contrast Plane Wave Imaging Based on Bubble Wavelet Transform: In Vitro and In Vivo Validations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Diya; Zong, Yujin; Yang, Xuan; Hu, Hong; Wan, Jinjin; Zhang, Lei; Bouakaz, Ayache; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study described here was to develop an ultrasound contrast plane wave imaging (PWI) method based on pulse-inversion bubble wavelet transform imaging (PIWI) to improve the contrast-to-tissue ratio of contrast images. A pair of inverted "bubble wavelets" with plane waves was constructed according to the modified Herring equation. The original echoes were replaced by the maximum wavelet correlation coefficients obtained from bubble wavelet correlation analysis. The echoes were then summed to distinguish microbubbles from tissues. In in vivo experiments on rabbit kidney, PIWI improved the contrast-to-tissue ratio of contrast images up to 4.5 ± 1.5 dB, compared with that obtained in B-mode (p < 0.05), through use of a pair of inverted plane waves. The disruption rate and infusion time of microbubbles in PIWI-based PWI were then quantified using two perfusion parameters, area under the curve and half transmit time estimated from time-intensity curves, respectively. After time-intensity curves were denoised by detrended fluctuation analysis, the average area under the curve and half transit time of PIWI-based PWI were 55.94% (p < 0.05) and 20.51% (p < 0.05) higher than those of conventional focused imaging, respectively. Because of its high contrast-to-tissue ratio and low disruption of microbubbles, PIWI-based PWI has a long infusion time and is therefore beneficial for transient monitoring and perfusion assessment of microbubbles circulating in vessels. PMID:27067280

  3. Extending the size-parameter range for plane-wave light scattering from infinite homogeneous circular cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S

    2005-04-12

    We have developed an algorithm that extends the possible size-parameter range for the calculation of plane-wave light scattering from infinite homogeneous circular cylinders using a Mie-type analysis. Our algorithm is based on the calculation of the ratios of Bessel functions instead of calculating the Bessel functions or their logarithmic derivatives directly. We have found that this algorithm agrees with existing methods (when those methods converge). We have also found that our algorithm converges in cases of very large size parameters, in which case other algorithms often do not.

  4. Plane-wave and common-translation-factor treatments of He sup 2+ +H collisions at high velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Errea, L.F. ); Harel, C.; Jouin, H. ); Maidagan, J.M.; Mendez, L. ); Pons, B. ); Riera, A. )

    1992-11-01

    We complement previous work that showed that the molecular approach, modified with plane-wave translation factors, is able to reproduce the fall of charge-exchange cross sections in He{sup 2+}+H collisions, by presenting the molecular data, and studying the corresponding mechanism. We test the accuracy of simplifications of the method that have been employed in the literature, and that lead to very simple calculations. We show that the common-translation-factor method is also successful at high nuclear velocities, provided that sufficiently excited states are included in the basis; moreover, it yields a simple picture of the mechanism and a description of ionization processes at high velocities.

  5. Numerical optimization of integrating cavities for diffraction-limited millimeter-wave bolometer arrays.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Jason; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Edgington, Samantha F; Lange, Andrew E; Bock, James J; Mauskopf, Philip D; Lee, Adrian T

    2002-01-01

    Far-infrared to millimeter-wave bolometers designed to make astronomical observations are typically encased in integrating cavities at the termination of feedhorns or Winston cones. This photometer combination maximizes absorption of radiation, enables the absorber area to be minimized, and controls the directivity of absorption, thereby reducing susceptibility to stray light. In the next decade, arrays of hundreds of silicon nitride micromesh bolometers with planar architectures will be used in ground-based, suborbital, and orbital platforms for astronomy. The optimization of integrating cavity designs is required for achieving the highest possible sensitivity for these arrays. We report numerical simulations of the electromagnetic fields in integrating cavities with an infinite plane-parallel geometry formed by a solid reflecting backshort and the back surface of a feedhorn array block. Performance of this architecture for the bolometer array camera (Bolocam) for cosmology at a frequency of 214 GHz is investigated. We explore the sensitivity of absorption efficiency to absorber impedance and backshort location and the magnitude of leakage from cavities. The simulations are compared with experimental data from a room-temperature scale model and with the performance of Bolocam at a temperature of 300 mK. The main results of the simulations for Bolocam-type cavities are that (1) monochromatic absorptions as high as 95% are achievable with <1% cross talk between neighboring cavities, (2) the optimum absorber impedances are 400 ohms/sq, but with a broad maximum from approximately 150 to approximately 700 ohms/sq, and (3) maximum absorption is achieved with absorber diameters > or = 1.5 lambda. Good general agreement between the simulations and the experiments was found. PMID:11900429

  6. Traveling Wave Solutions of the Gardner Equation and Motion of Plane Curves Governed by the mKdV Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilev, V. M.; Djondjorov, P. A.; Hadzhilazova, M. Ts.; Mladenov, I. M.

    2011-11-29

    The Gardner equation is well-known in the mathematical literature since the late sixties of 20th century. Initially, it appeared in the context of the construction of local conservation laws admitted by the KdV equation. Later on, the Gardner equation was generalized and found to be applicable in various branches of physics (solid-state and plasma physics, fluid dynamics and quantum field theory). In this paper, we examine the travelling wave solutions of the Gardner equation and derive the full set of solutions to the corresponding reduced equation in terms of Weierstrass and Jacobi elliptic functions. Then, we use the travelling wave solutions of the focusing mKdV equation and obtain in explicit analytic form exact solutions of a special type of plane curve flow, known as the mKdV flow.

  7. Coherent quantum states of a relativistic particle in an electromagnetic plane wave and a parallel magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Colavita, E.; Hacyan, S.

    2014-03-15

    We analyze the solutions of the Klein–Gordon and Dirac equations describing a charged particle in an electromagnetic plane wave combined with a magnetic field parallel to the direction of propagation of the wave. It is shown that the Klein–Gordon equation admits coherent states as solutions, while the corresponding solutions of the Dirac equation are superpositions of coherent and displaced-number states. Particular attention is paid to the resonant case in which the motion of the particle is unbounded. -- Highlights: •We study a relativistic electron in a particular electromagnetic field configuration. •New exact solutions of the Klein–Gordon and Dirac equations are obtained. •Coherent and displaced number states can describe a relativistic particle.

  8. Exact off-resonance near fields of small-size extended hemielliptic 2-D lenses illuminated by plane waves.

    PubMed

    Boriskin, Artem V; Sauleau, Ronan; Nosich, Alexander I

    2009-02-01

    The near fields of small-size extended hemielliptic lenses made of rexolite and isotropic quartz and illuminated by E- and H-polarized plane waves are studied. Variations in the focal domain size, shape, and location are reported versus the angle of incidence of the incoming wave. The problem is solved numerically in a two-dimensional formulation. The accuracy of results is guaranteed by using a highly efficient numerical algorithm based on the combination of the Muller boundary integral equations, the method of analytical regularization, and the trigonometric Galerkin discretization scheme. The analysis fully accounts for the finite size of the lens as well as its curvature and thus can be considered as a reference solution for other electromagnetic solvers. Moreover, the trusted description of the focusing ability of a finite-size hemielliptic lens can be useful in the design of antenna receivers. PMID:19183675

  9. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Medecki, Hector

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams.

  10. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Medecki, H.

    1998-11-10

    Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams. 8 figs.

  11. Type II superlattice infrared focal plane arrays: Optical, electrical, and mid-wave infrared imaging characterization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, John; Svensson, Stefan; Goldberg, Arnie; Kennerly, Steve; Olver, Kim; Hongsmatip, Trirat; Winn, Michael; Uppal, Parvez

    2006-03-01

    We have studied the infrared optical and temperature dependent electrical properties of 320 x 256 arrays of GaSb/InAs type II superlattice infrared photodiodes. Good agreement between single-pixel and focal plane array measurements of the photon-to- electron/hole conversion efficiency was obtained, and the infrared absorption coefficient extracted from these measurements was found to be comparable to that of HgCdTe with the same bandgap as the type II superlattice. Temperature and voltage dependent dark current measurements and the voltage dependent photocurrent generated by a 300 K background scene were described well using a semi-empirical model of the photodiode. We will show high-quality images obtained from the mid-infrared focal plane array operating at 78 K.

  12. Computer-aided design of millimeter-wave E-plane filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Y.-C.; Itoh, T.; Bui, L. Q.

    1983-02-01

    A computer-aided design (CAD) algorithm has been developed for a class of E-plane bandpass filters. The analysis portion of the algorithm is based on the residue-calculus technique and a generalized scattering parameter method. It is mathematically exact and numerically very efficient. Filters designed with this method have been fabricated and tested in Ka-band. Good agreement with design has been obtained.

  13. Submillimeter wave survey of the galactic plane. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    The survey measured, over virtually the entire galactic plane, the distribution and basic physical conditions of the coolest dust component of the interstellar medium. The instrument designed for observations of extended, low surface brightness continuum emission consisted of a balloon borne, gyro stablized, 1.2 m Cassegrain telescope and a liquid cooled photometer. The design, integration, tests, and flight operation of the survey are presented.

  14. Pressure-induced quenching of the charge-density-wave state observed by x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchetti, A.

    2010-05-03

    We report an x-ray diffraction study on the charge-density-wave (CDW) LaTe{sub 3} and CeTe{sub 3} compounds as a function of pressure. We extract the lattice constants and the CDW modulation wave-vector, and provide direct evidence for a pressure-induced quenching of the CDW phase. We observe subtle differences between the chemical and mechanical compression of the lattice. We account for these with a scenario where the effective dimensionality in these CDW systems is dependent on the type of lattice compression and has a direct impact on the degree of Fermi surface nesting and on the strength of fluctuation effects.

  15. Dynamic interaction of twin vertically overlapping lined tunnels in an elastic half space subjected to incident plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongxian; Wang, Yirui; Liang, Jianwen

    2016-06-01

    The scattering of plane harmonic P and SV waves by a pair of vertically overlapping lined tunnels buried in an elastic half space is solved using a semi-analytic indirect boundary integration equation method. Then the effect of the distance between the two tunnels, the stiffness and density of the lining material, and the incident frequency on the seismic response of the tunnels is investigated. Numerical results demonstrate that the dynamic interaction between the twin tunnels cannot be ignored and the lower tunnel has a significant shielding effect on the upper tunnel for high-frequency incident waves, resulting in great decrease of the dynamic hoop stress in the upper tunnel; for the low-frequency incident waves, in contrast, the lower tunnel can lead to amplification effect on the upper tunnel. It also reveals that the frequency-spectrum characteristics of dynamic stress of the lower tunnel are significantly different from those of the upper tunnel. In addition, for incident P waves in low-frequency region, the soft lining tunnels have significant amplification effect on the surface displacement amplitude, which is slightly larger than that of the corresponding single tunnel.

  16. Pattern classification of time plane features of ECG wave from cell-phone photography for machine aided cardiac disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Rupendra Nath; Pramanik, Sayak; Mitra, Sucharita; Chaudhuri, Bidyut B

    2014-01-01

    This article reports a robust technique for extracting time plane features of Electrocardiogram (ECG) from digital images of ECG paper strips. We concluded this article reporting performance evaluation of the system developed for machine aided cardiac disease detection. Mostly paper based ECG recordings are used in developing countries and digital photographs of different leads could easily be taken and sent with a mediocre cellular phone set. Apart from extracting the features, the proposed system detects cardiac axis deviation and diagnose if Left or Right Bundle Branch Blockage (LBBB or RBBB) is present while fed with the digital photographs of different leads of ECG strips. Preprocessing of the low-resolution images involves background grid line noise removal, adaptive image binarization by Sauvola's method and Bresenham's line joining algorithm to link the ECG signature, if broken. Pattern extraction mainly delineate the time plane features like P wave, QRS complex and T wave using water reservoir based pattern recognition techniques and Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Cardiac axis deviation detection is done by checking the overall voltage levels of QRS complexes of lead I, II and III. Having the knowledge of cardiac axis completes the requirements to comment on the cardiac blockage like Left or Right Bundle Branch Blockage (LBBB or RBBB). Thus, the proposed algorithm is primarily developed for machine aided diagnosis of LBBB or RBBB from the digital photographs of ECG paper strips. PMID:25571067

  17. Accurate all-electron G0W0 quasiparticle energies employing the full-potential augmented plane-wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabok, Dmitrii; Gulans, Andris; Draxl, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    The G W approach of many-body perturbation theory has become a common tool for calculating the electronic structure of materials. However, with increasing number of published results, discrepancies between the values obtained by different methods and codes become more and more apparent. For a test set of small- and wide-gap semiconductors, we demonstrate how to reach the numerically best electronic structure within the framework of the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FLAPW) method. We first evaluate the impact of local orbitals in the Kohn-Sham eigenvalue spectrum of the underlying starting point. The role of the basis-set quality is then further analyzed when calculating the G0W0 quasiparticle energies. Our results, computed with the exciting code, are compared to those obtained using the projector-augmented plane-wave formalism, finding overall good agreement between both methods. We also provide data produced with a typical FLAPW basis set as a benchmark for other G0W0 implementations.

  18. Electron transport in graphene/graphene side-contact junction by plane-wave multiple-scattering method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Xiang-Guo; Chu, Iek-Heng; Zhang, X. -G.; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2015-05-28

    Electron transport in graphene is along the sheet but junction devices are often made by stacking different sheets together in a “side-contact” geometry which causes the current to flow perpendicular to the sheets within the device. Such geometry presents a challenge to first-principles transport methods. We solve this problem by implementing a plane-wave-based multiple-scattering theory for electron transport. In this study, this implementation improves the computational efficiency over the existing plane-wave transport code, scales better for parallelization over large number of nodes, and does not require the current direction to be along a lattice axis. As a first application, wemore » calculate the tunneling current through a side-contact graphene junction formed by two separate graphene sheets with the edges overlapping each other. We find that transport properties of this junction depend strongly on the AA or AB stacking within the overlapping region as well as the vacuum gap between two graphene sheets. Finally, such transport behaviors are explained in terms of carbon orbital orientation, hybridization, and delocalization as the geometry is varied.« less

  19. Variational solution of the three-dimensional Schrödinger equation using plane waves in adaptive coordinates.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jordá, José M

    2011-11-28

    A series of improvements for the solution of the three-dimensional Schrödinger equation over a method introduced by Gygi [F. Gygi, Europhys. Lett. 19, 617 (1992); F. Gygi, Phys. Rev. B 48, 11692 (1993)] are presented. As in the original Gygi's method, the solution (orbital) is expressed by means of plane waves in adaptive coordinates u, where u is mapped from Cartesian coordinates, u=f(r). The improvements implemented are threefold. First, maps are introduced that allow the application of the method to atoms and molecules without the assistance of the supercell approximation. Second, the electron-nucleus singularities are exactly removed, so that pseudo-potentials are no longer required. Third, the sampling error during integral evaluation is made negligible, which results in a true variational, second-order energy error procedure. The method is tested on the hydrogen atom (ground and excited states) and the H(2)(+) molecule, resulting in milli-Hartree accuracy with a moderate number of plane waves. PMID:22128925

  20. Extension of the basis set of linearized augmented plane wave (LAPW) method by using supplemented tight binding basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, A. V.; Lamoen, D.; Partoens, B.

    2016-07-01

    In order to increase the accuracy of the linearized augmented plane wave (LAPW) method, we present a new approach where the plane wave basis function is augmented by two different atomic radial components constructed at two different linearization energies corresponding to two different electron bands (or energy windows). We demonstrate that this case can be reduced to the standard treatment within the LAPW paradigm where the usual basis set is enriched by the basis functions of the tight binding type, which go to zero with zero derivative at the sphere boundary. We show that the task is closely related with the problem of extended core states which is currently solved by applying the LAPW method with local orbitals (LAPW+LO). In comparison with LAPW+LO, the number of supplemented basis functions in our approach is doubled, which opens up a new channel for the extension of the LAPW and LAPW+LO basis sets. The appearance of new supplemented basis functions absent in the LAPW+LO treatment is closely related with the existence of the u ˙ l -component in the canonical LAPW method. We discuss properties of additional tight binding basis functions and apply the extended basis set for computation of electron energy bands of lanthanum (face and body centered structures) and hexagonal close packed lattice of cadmium. We demonstrate that the new treatment gives lower total energies in comparison with both canonical LAPW and LAPW+LO, with the energy difference more pronounced for intermediate and poor LAPW basis sets.

  1. Electron transport in graphene/graphene side-contact junction by plane-wave multiple-scattering method

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiang-Guo; Chu, Iek-Heng; Zhang, X. -G.; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2015-05-28

    Electron transport in graphene is along the sheet but junction devices are often made by stacking different sheets together in a “side-contact” geometry which causes the current to flow perpendicular to the sheets within the device. Such geometry presents a challenge to first-principles transport methods. We solve this problem by implementing a plane-wave-based multiple-scattering theory for electron transport. In this study, this implementation improves the computational efficiency over the existing plane-wave transport code, scales better for parallelization over large number of nodes, and does not require the current direction to be along a lattice axis. As a first application, we calculate the tunneling current through a side-contact graphene junction formed by two separate graphene sheets with the edges overlapping each other. We find that transport properties of this junction depend strongly on the AA or AB stacking within the overlapping region as well as the vacuum gap between two graphene sheets. Finally, such transport behaviors are explained in terms of carbon orbital orientation, hybridization, and delocalization as the geometry is varied.

  2. Demonstration of a 280  Gbit/s free-space space-division-multiplexing communications link utilizing plane-wave spatial multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Martin P J; Huang, Hao; Ren, Yongxiong; Xie, Guodong; Willner, Alan E

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a 280 Gbit/s free-space space-division-multiplexing communications link incorporating a set of independent tilted truncated plane-waves, each generated by a single mode fiber placed at the back-focal plane of a spherical lens. Each of the seven tilted plane-wave channels are encoded with a 40 Gbit/s 16-QAM signal. Our approach comprises two identical linear fiber-arrays placed approximately 5 m apart. As each fiber array is placed at the back-focal-plane of a spherical lens, each fiber array is effectively placed in a conjugate image plane of the other. A channel crosstalk of less than 26 dB is shown, with a bit-error-rate below the FEC threshold of 3.8×10(-3). PMID:26974062

  3. Connection between in-plane upper critical field Hc 2 and gap symmetry in layered d -wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-Rong; Liu, Guo-Zhu; Zhang, Chang-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Angle-resolved upper critical field Hc 2 provides an efficient tool to probe the gap symmetry of unconventional superconductors. We revisit the behavior of in-plane Hc 2 in d -wave superconductors by considering both the orbital effect and Pauli paramagnetic effect. After carrying out systematic analysis, we show that the maxima of Hc 2 could be along either nodal or antinodal directions of a d -wave superconducting gap, depending on the specific values of a number of tuning parameters. This behavior is in contrast to the common belief that the maxima of in-plane Hc 2 are along the direction where the superconducting gap takes its maximal value. Therefore, identifying the precise d -wave gap symmetry through fitting experiments results of angle-resolved Hc 2 with model calculations at a fixed temperature, as widely used in previous studies, is difficult and practically unreliable. However, our extensive analysis of angle-resolved Hc 2 show that there is a critical temperature T*: in-plane Hc 2 exhibits its maxima along nodal directions at T wave gap symmetry is to measure Hc 2 at a number of different temperatures, and examine whether there is a π /4 shift in its angular dependence at certain T*. We further show that Landau level mixing does not change this general feature. However, in the presence of Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov state, the angular dependence of Hc 2 becomes quite complicated, which makes it more difficult to determine the gap symmetry by measuring Hc 2. Our results indicate that some previous studies on the gap symmetry of CeCu2Si2 are unreliable and need to be reexamined, and also provide a candidate solution to an experimental discrepancy in the angle-resolved Hc 2 in CeCoIn5.

  4. A comparative study of diffraction of shallow-water waves by high-level IGN and GN equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, B.B.; Ertekin, R.C.; Duan, W.Y.

    2015-02-15

    This work is on the nonlinear diffraction analysis of shallow-water waves, impinging on submerged obstacles, by two related theories, namely the classical Green–Naghdi (GN) equations and the Irrotational Green–Naghdi (IGN) equations, both sets of equations being at high levels and derived for incompressible and inviscid flows. Recently, the high-level Green–Naghdi equations have been applied to some wave transformation problems. The high-level IGN equations have also been used in the last decade to study certain wave propagation problems. However, past works on these theories used different numerical methods to solve these nonlinear and unsteady sets of differential equations and at different levels. Moreover, different physical problems have been solved in the past. Therefore, it has not been possible to understand the differences produced by these two sets of theories and their range of applicability so far. We are thus motivated to make a direct comparison of the results produced by these theories by use of the same numerical method to solve physically the same wave diffraction problems. We focus on comparing these two theories by using similar codes; only the equations used are different but other parts of the codes, such as the wave-maker, damping zone, discretion method, matrix solver, etc., are exactly the same. This way, we eliminate many potential sources of differences that could be produced by the solution of different equations. The physical problems include the presence of various submerged obstacles that can be used for example as breakwaters or to represent the continental shelf. A numerical wave tank is created by placing a wavemaker on one end and a wave absorbing beach on the other. The nonlinear and unsteady sets of differential equations are solved by the finite-difference method. The results are compared with different equations as well as with the available experimental data.

  5. A comparative study of diffraction of shallow-water waves by high-level IGN and GN equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, B. B.; Ertekin, R. C.; Duan, W. Y.

    2015-02-01

    This work is on the nonlinear diffraction analysis of shallow-water waves, impinging on submerged obstacles, by two related theories, namely the classical Green-Naghdi (GN) equations and the Irrotational Green-Naghdi (IGN) equations, both sets of equations being at high levels and derived for incompressible and inviscid flows. Recently, the high-level Green-Naghdi equations have been applied to some wave transformation problems. The high-level IGN equations have also been used in the last decade to study certain wave propagation problems. However, past works on these theories used different numerical methods to solve these nonlinear and unsteady sets of differential equations and at different levels. Moreover, different physical problems have been solved in the past. Therefore, it has not been possible to understand the differences produced by these two sets of theories and their range of applicability so far. We are thus motivated to make a direct comparison of the results produced by these theories by use of the same numerical method to solve physically the same wave diffraction problems. We focus on comparing these two theories by using similar codes; only the equations used are different but other parts of the codes, such as the wave-maker, damping zone, discretion method, matrix solver, etc., are exactly the same. This way, we eliminate many potential sources of differences that could be produced by the solution of different equations. The physical problems include the presence of various submerged obstacles that can be used for example as breakwaters or to represent the continental shelf. A numerical wave tank is created by placing a wavemaker on one end and a wave absorbing beach on the other. The nonlinear and unsteady sets of differential equations are solved by the finite-difference method. The results are compared with different equations as well as with the available experimental data.

  6. Neutrino emission by electrons in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Merenkov, N.P.

    1985-12-01

    The emission of a neutrino pair by an electron in the field of an intense linearly-polarized wave is examined in the local limit of the Weinberg-Salam model. The emission probability is obtained in fields of weak and strong intensity. The effect of neutrino mass on the probability of neutrino emission by the electron in weak fields near threshold is studied.

  7. Integral representation of the edge diffracted waves along the ray path of the transition region.

    PubMed

    Umul, Yusuf Z

    2008-09-01

    The expression of the edge diffracted fields, in terms of the Fresnel integral, is transformed into a path integral. The obtained integral considers the integration of the incident field along the ray path of the transition region. The similarities of the path integral with Kirchhoff's theory of diffraction and the modified theory of physical optics are examined. PMID:18758538

  8. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Diffraction of terahertz waves after passing through a Fresnel lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu-Lei; Zhou, Qing-Li; Zhang, Cun-Lin

    2009-12-01

    The spatiotemporal and spectral characteristics of ultrawide-band terahertz pulses after passing through a Fresnel lens are studied by using the scalar diffraction theory. The simulation shows that the transmitted terahertz waveforms compress with increasing propagation distance, and the multi-frequency focusing phenomenon at different focal points is observed. Additionally, the distribution of terahertz fields in a plane perpendicular to the axis is also discussed, and it is found that the diffraction not only induces focusing on-axis but also inhibits focusing at off-axis positions. Therefore, the Fresnel lens may be a useful alternative approach to being a terahertz filter. Moreover, the terahertz pulses travelling as a basic mode of a Gaussian beam are discussed in detail.

  9. Source characterization of two Reykjanes Ridge earthquakes: surface waves and moment tensors; P waveforms and nonorthogonal nodal planes

    SciTech Connect

    Trehu, A.M.; Nabelek, J.L.; Solomon, S.C.

    1981-03-10

    Well-constrained fault plane solutions from P wave first motions for mid-ocean ridge normal faulting earthquakes usually require nonorthogonal nodal planes. Local structural effects and/or departures from a double-couple source mechanism have been invoked to explain this phenomenon. In order to obtain an independent determination of the source mechanisms for the April 24, 1970, and April 3, 1972, events on the southern Raykjanes Ridge, we invert the Rayleigh wave radiation pattern to obtain the source moment tensor. The moment tensor formulation should be particularly well suited to this problem because it is not restricted a priori to a double-couple source mechanism. A potential drawback of the technique, however, is the requirement that phase velocities along the earthquake-station paths be known very accurately in order to obtain the source phase from the observed phase, and an objective of this study was to determine whether a regionalized phase velocity model compiled from published dispersion curves is adequate. The results of the moment tensor inversion for both events indicate shallow normal faulting with the tension axis approximately horizontal and perpendicular to the local strike of the ridge.After performing the inversion under a series of increasingly more stringent constraints we conclude that the data for both events are compatible with pure double-couple sources with moments of 4.8 and 7.5 x 10/sup 24/ dyn cm, respectively. We than show the interference between P, /sub p/P, and sP due to shallowness of the source can account for the observed nonorthogonality and match the observed P waveforms for the April 3, 1972, event with theoretical seismograms calculated for a shear fault whose orientation is consistent with the surface wave solution. The best fit to the data is obtained for a long, narrow fault (13 km by 3 km), with rupture initiating near the seafloor.

  10. Analytic projection from plane-wave and PAW wavefunctions and application to chemical-bonding analysis in solids.

    PubMed

    Maintz, Stefan; Deringer, Volker L; Tchougréeff, Andrei L; Dronskowski, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Quantum-chemical computations of solids benefit enormously from numerically efficient plane-wave (PW) basis sets, and together with the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method, the latter have risen to one of the predominant standards in computational solid-state sciences. Despite their advantages, plane waves lack local information, which makes the interpretation of local densities-of-states (DOS) difficult and precludes the direct use of atom-resolved chemical bonding indicators such as the crystal orbital overlap population (COOP) and the crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP) techniques. Recently, a number of methods have been proposed to overcome this fundamental issue, built around the concept of basis-set projection onto a local auxiliary basis. In this work, we propose a novel computational technique toward this goal by transferring the PW/PAW wavefunctions to a properly chosen local basis using analytically derived expressions. In particular, we describe a general approach to project both PW and PAW eigenstates onto given custom orbitals, which we then exemplify at the hand of contracted multiple-ζ Slater-type orbitals. The validity of the method presented here is illustrated by applications to chemical textbook examples-diamond, gallium arsenide, the transition-metal titanium-as well as nanoscale allotropes of carbon: a nanotube and the C60 fullerene. Remarkably, the analytical approach not only recovers the total and projected electronic DOS with a high degree of confidence, but it also yields a realistic chemical-bonding picture in the framework of the projected COHP method. PMID:24022911

  11. Reply to "Comment on `Guided electromagnetic waves propagating in a plane dielectric waveguide with nonlinear permittivity' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Yury G.; Valovik, Dmitry V.

    2015-11-01

    The preceding Comment contains statements that we feel are inaccurate and that lead one to think that the problem we study in Phys. Rev. A 91, 013840 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.013840 was solved long ago. However, we argue that our results are new and add to the understanding of the process of transverse electric wave propagation in a Kerr medium. In our Reply we contest the critical statements that are given in the Comment.

  12. E-field extraction from Hx- and Hy- near field values by using plane wave spectrum method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo, B.; Riah, Z.; Baudry, D.; Mazari, B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with a technique for calculating the 3D E-field components knowing only the two components (Hx and Hy) of the H-field in near-zone. The originality of the under study technique lies on the possibility to take into account the evanescent wave influences. The presented E-field extraction process is based on the exploitation of the Maxwell-Ampere relation combined with the plane wave spectrum (PWS) method. The efficiency of the proposed technique is evidenced by comparing the E-field deduced from H-field and the own E-field radiated by the association of electrical- and also magnetic- elementary dipoles in different configurations by using Matlab text programming environment. In addition, as a concrete demonstrator, the concept was also validated with the computation of EM-wave radiated by an open-end microstrip transmission line. As result of comparison, very good agreement between the exact E-field and that one extracted from the H-field was realized by considering the near-field scanned at the height, z = 5 mm and 8 mm above the under test structure at the operating frequency, f = 1 GHz. The presented technique can simplify the difficulties about the E-near-field measurement in EMC applications.

  13. Real-time 3D millimeter wave imaging based FMCW using GGD focal plane array as detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanon, Assaf; Rozban, Daniel; Kopeika, Natan S.; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Abramovich, Amir

    2014-03-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) imaging systems are required for applications in medicine, communications, homeland security, and space technology. This is because there is no known ionization hazard for biological tissue, and atmospheric attenuation in this range of the spectrum is relatively low. The lack of inexpensive room temperature imaging systems makes it difficult to give a suitable MMW system for many of the above applications. 3D MMW imaging system based on chirp radar was studied previously using a scanning imaging system of a single detector. The system presented here proposes to employ a chirp radar method with a Glow Discharge Detector (GDD) Focal Plane Array (FPA) of plasma based detectors. Each point on the object corresponds to a point in the image and includes the distance information. This will enable 3D MMW imaging. The radar system requires that the millimeter wave detector (GDD) will be able to operate as a heterodyne detector. Since the source of radiation is a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW), the detected signal as a result of heterodyne detection gives the object's depth information according to value of difference frequency, in addition to the reflectance of the image. In this work we experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an imaging system based on radar principles and FPA of GDD devices. This imaging system is shown to be capable of imaging objects from distances of at least 10 meters.

  14. Progression of spontaneous in-plane shear faults from sub-Rayleigh to compressional wave rupture speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Bizzarri, Andrea; Das, Shamita

    2014-11-01

    We investigate numerically the passage of spontaneous, dynamic in-plane shear ruptures from initiation to their final rupture speed, using very fine grids. By carrying out more than 120 simulations, we identify two different mechanisms controlling supershear transition. For relatively weaker faults, the rupture speed always passes smoothly and continuously through the range of speeds between the Rayleigh and shear wave speeds (the formerly considered forbidden zone of rupture speeds). This, however, occurs in a very short time, before the ruptures reach the compressional wave speed. The very short time spent in this range of speeds may explain why a jump over these speeds was seen in some earlier numerical and experimental studies and confirms that this speed range is an unstable range, as predicted analytically for steady state, singular cracks. On the other hand, for relatively stronger faults, we find that a daughter rupture is initiated by the main (mother) rupture, ahead of it. The mother rupture continues to propagate at sub-Rayleigh speed and eventually merges with the daughter rupture, whose speed jumps over the Rayleigh to shear wave speed range. We find that this daughter rupture is essentially a "pseudorupture," in that the two sides of the fault are already separated, but the rupture has negligible slip and slip velocity. After the mother rupture merges with it, the slip, the slip velocity, and the rupture speed become dominated by those of the mother rupture. The results are independent of grid sizes and of methods used to nucleate the initial rupture.

  15. Wave propagation and phase retrieval in Fresnel diffraction by a distorted-object approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Xianghui; Shen Qun

    2005-07-15

    An extension of the far-field x-ray diffraction theory is presented by the introduction of a distorted object for calculation of coherent diffraction patterns in the near-field Fresnel regime. It embeds a Fresnel-zone construction on an original object to form a phase-chirped distorted object, which is then Fourier transformed to form a diffraction image. This approach extends the applicability of Fourier-based iterative phasing algorithms into the near-field holographic regime where phase retrieval had been difficult. Simulated numerical examples of this near-field phase retrieval approach indicate its potential applications in high-resolution structural investigations of noncrystalline materials.

  16. Extreme-ultraviolet phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer: a wave-front metrology tool with subangstrom reference-wave accuracy.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, P P; Goldberg, K A; Lee, S H; Chang, C; Attwood, D; Bokor, J

    1999-12-11

    The phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) was recently developed and implemented at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to characterize extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) projection optical systems for lithography. Here we quantitatively characterize the accuracy and precision of the PS/PDI. Experimental measurements are compared with theoretical results. Two major classes of errors affect the accuracy of the interferometer: systematic effects arising from measurement geometry and systematic and random errors due to an imperfect reference wave. To characterize these effects, and hence to calibrate the interferometer, a null test is used. This null test also serves as a measure of the accuracy of the interferometer. We show the EUV PS/PDI, as currently implemented, to have a systematic error-limited reference-wave accuracy of 0.0028 waves (lambda/357 or 0.038 nm at lambda = 13.5 nm) within a numerical aperture of 0.082. PMID:18324274

  17. Finite-frequency measurements of conventional and core-diffracted P-waves (P and Pdiff) for waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Kasra; Sigloch, Karin; Staehler, Simon C.

    2014-05-01

    In its lowermost 200-300 km, the mantle has a complex structure resulting from accumulations of downwellings (subducted slabs), upwellings (LLSVPs and plumes), and probably phase transitions; seismic velocities and density show large variations but are not tightly constrained. Core-diffracted body waves are the seismic phases that sample the lowermost mantle extensively and are prime candidates to be used in tomography for enhancing resolution in this depth range. Since they are diffracted along the core-mantle boundary, their behavior is highly dispersive and cannot be modeled satisfactory using ray theory, nor early versions of finite-frequency modeling. Hence they have rarely been used for tomography so far, and where they have been, large imaging blur can be expected. We present a processing scheme to measure finite-frequency travel-time anomalies of arbitrary seismic body-wave phases in a fully automated way, with an initial focus on core-diffracted P waves. The aim is to extract a maximum of information from observed broadband seismograms using multi-frequency techniques. Using a matched-filtering approach, predicted and observed waveforms are compared in a cross-correlation sense in eight overlapping frequency passbands, with dominant periods ranging between 30 and 2.7sec. This method was applied to a global data set of ≡2000 teleseismic events in our waveform archive, which resulted in 1,616,184 P and 536,190 Pdiff usable multi-frequency measurements of high cross-correlation coefficient (≥ 0.8). The measurements are analyzed statistically in terms of goodness of fit, effects of epicentral distance, and frequency-dependent behavior of P and Pdiff phases. The results for Pdiff waves are displayed by projecting the measured travel time anomalies onto the phase's nominal grazing segments along the core-mantle boundary.

  18. Near-field focusing of an optical wave by diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu E.; Zemlyanov, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    We report the investigation results for spatially-localised light structures (photonic nanojets) under near-field optical radiation scattering on phase diffraction gratings. Main parameters of photonic nanojets from gratings with sawtooth, rectangular and hemispherical groove profiles are obtained by numerical electrodynamic simulation. It is found that by varying a period, degree of filling, groove shape and parameters of optically contrast coating of the diffraction grating one can control the characteristics of the produced photonic jets in a wide range.

  19. Steering in-plane shear waves with inertial resonators in platonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achaoui, Younes; Diatta, André; Guenneau, Sébastien

    2015-06-01

    Numerical simulations shed light on control of shear elastic wave propagation in plates structured with inertial resonators. The structural element is composed of a heavy core connected to the main freestanding plate through tiny ligaments. It is shown that such a configuration exhibits a complete band gap in the low frequency regime. As a byproduct, we further describe the asymmetric twisting vibration of a single scatterer via modal analysis, dispersion, and transmission loss. This might pave the way to functionalities such as focusing and self-collimation in elastic plates.

  20. Symmetry-broken momentum distributions induced by matter-wave diffraction during time-of-flight expansion of ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, M.; Jürgensen, O.; Ölschläger, C.; Lühmann, D.-S.; Sengstock, K.; Simonet, J.

    2016-03-01

    We study several effects which lead to symmetry-broken momentum distributions of quantum gases released from optical lattices. In particular, we demonstrate that the interaction within the first milliseconds of the time-of-flight expansion can strongly alter the measurement of the initial atomic momentum distribution. For bosonic mixtures in state-dependent lattices, interspecies scattering processes lead to a symmetry breaking in momentum space. The underlying mechanism is identified to be diffraction of the matter wave from the total density lattice, which gives rise to a time-dependent interaction potential. Our findings are of fundamental relevance for the interpretation of time-of-flight measurements and for the study of exotic quantum phases such as the twisted superfluid. Beyond that, the observed matter-wave diffraction can also be used as an interferometric probe. In addition, we report on diffraction from the state-dependent standing light field, which leads to the same symmetry-broken momentum distributions, even for single component condensates.

  1. Mobile Ultrasound Plane Wave Beamforming on iPhone or iPad using Metal- based GPU Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewener, Holger J.; Tretbar, Steffen H.

    Mobile and cost effective ultrasound devices are being used in point of care scenarios or the drama room. To reduce the costs of such devices we already presented the possibilities of consumer devices like the Apple iPad for full signal processing of raw data for ultrasound image generation. Using technologies like plane wave imaging to generate a full image with only one excitation/reception event the acquisition times and power consumption of ultrasound imaging can be reduced for low power mobile devices based on consumer electronics realizing the transition from FPGA or ASIC based beamforming into more flexible software beamforming. The massive parallel beamforming processing can be done with the Apple framework "Metal" for advanced graphics and general purpose GPU processing for the iOS platform. We were able to integrate the beamforming reconstruction into our mobile ultrasound processing application with imaging rates up to 70 Hz on iPad Air 2 hardware.

  2. 2.5D scattering of incident plane SV waves by a canyon in layered half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenning, Ba; Jianwen, Liang

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents a 2.5D scattering of incident plane SV waves by a canyon in a layered half-space by using the indirect boundary element method (IBEM). A free field response analysis is performed to provide the displacements and stresses on the boundary of the canyon where fictitious uniform moving loads are applied to calculate the Green's functions for the displacements and stresses. The amplitudes of the loads are determined by the boundary conditions. The free field displacements are added to the fictitious uniform moving loads induced displacements and the total response is obtained. Numerical calculations are performed for a canyon with homogenous and in one layer over bedrock. The effects of the thickness and stiffness of the layer on the amplification are studied and discussed.

  3. Statistical state dynamics of jet/wave coexistence in beta-plane turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, Navid; Farrell, Brian; Ioannou, Petros

    Jets are commonly observed to coexist in the turbulence of planetary atmospheres with planetary scale waves and embedded vortices. These large-scale coherent structures arise and are maintained in the turbulence on time scales long compared to dissipation or advective time scales. The emergence, equilibration at finite amplitude, maintenance and stability of these structures pose fundamental theoretical problems. The emergence of jets and vortices from turbulence is not associated with an instability of the mean flow and their equilibration and stability at finite amplitude does not arise solely from the linear or nonlinear dynamics of these structures in isolation from the turbulence surrounding them. Rather the dynamics of these large-scale structures arises essentially from their cooperative interaction with the small-scale turbulence in which they are embedded. It follows that fundamental theoretical understanding of the dynamics of jets and vortices in turbulence requires adopting the perspective of the statistical state dynamics (SSD) of the entire turbulent state. In this work a theory for the jet/wave coexistence regime is developed using the SSD perspective.

  4. Use of rigorous vector coupled-wave theory for designing and tolerancing surface-relief diffractive components for magneto-optical heads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggans, Charles W.; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    1991-01-01

    A rigorous coupled wave model is presented, experimentally validated, and used for tolerancing surface relief diffractive elements. Applications of the model in the design and tolerancing of components for magneto optical (M-O) data storage heads are investigated.

  5. Effects on the Electromagnetic Scattering of a Plane Wave due to the Surface Roughness of a Buried Perfectly Conducting Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezza, Fabrizio; Mangini, Fabio; Stoja, Endri; Tedeschi, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    In this work we present a numerical study of the effects that can be observed in the electromagnetic scattering of a plane wave due to the surface roughness of a buried scatterer. The latter is supposed to be a metallic pipeline modeled as a perfect-electric conducting cylinder immersed in a half-space occupied by a lossy medium. Considering the pipeline's cross-section, the surface roughness is modeled as a sinusoidal variation of the radius of the cylinder's surface with respect to the revolution angle. A linearly-polarized plane wave impinging normally to the interface between air and the previously-mentioned medium excites the structure. As a result, we monitor the three components of the scattered electric field along a line just above the interface between the two media. To perform the study, a commercially available simulator which implements the Finite Element Method was adopted. In order to discriminate the effects due only to the surface roughness, we compare the results obtained by the rough surface scatterers with the reference case of a perfect cylinder in which the surface roughness is absent, for a fixed depth and a fixed mean radius of the cylinder. In our study, we vary the amplitude and the angular frequency of the sinusoidal disturbance to model different surface roughness scenarios. For all the scenarios taken in consideration, a frequency sweep of the impinging radiation is performed. This allows us to investigate the relation between the excitation frequency and the sinusoidal disturbance frequency of the rough surface. The study has several implications in the field of civil engineering. One example might be the one in which the geometrical characteristics of the buried pipeline are known in advance, and it is important to continuously monitor the structural variations of its external surface due to the deterioration in time under the action of various environmental factors.

  6. Extension of the basis set of linearized augmented plane wave (LAPW) method by using supplemented tight binding basis functions.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, A V; Lamoen, D; Partoens, B

    2016-07-01

    In order to increase the accuracy of the linearized augmented plane wave (LAPW) method, we present a new approach where the plane wave basis function is augmented by two different atomic radial components constructed at two different linearization energies corresponding to two different electron bands (or energy windows). We demonstrate that this case can be reduced to the standard treatment within the LAPW paradigm where the usual basis set is enriched by the basis functions of the tight binding type, which go to zero with zero derivative at the sphere boundary. We show that the task is closely related with the problem of extended core states which is currently solved by applying the LAPW method with local orbitals (LAPW+LO). In comparison with LAPW+LO, the number of supplemented basis functions in our approach is doubled, which opens up a new channel for the extension of the LAPW and LAPW+LO basis sets. The appearance of new supplemented basis functions absent in the LAPW+LO treatment is closely related with the existence of the u̇l-component in the canonical LAPW method. We discuss properties of additional tight binding basis functions and apply the extended basis set for computation of electron energy bands of lanthanum (face and body centered structures) and hexagonal close packed lattice of cadmium. We demonstrate that the new treatment gives lower total energies in comparison with both canonical LAPW and LAPW+LO, with the energy difference more pronounced for intermediate and poor LAPW basis sets. PMID:27394093

  7. WSPEC: A Waveguide Filter-Bank Focal Plane Array Spectrometer for Millimeter Wave Astronomy and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Sean; Aguirre, James; Che, George; Doyle, Simon; Flanigan, Daniel; Groppi, Christopher; Johnson, Bradley; Jones, Glenn; Mauskopf, Philip; McCarrick, Heather; Monfardini, Alessandro; Mroczkowski, Tony

    2016-07-01

    Imaging and spectroscopy at (sub-)millimeter wavelengths are key frontiers in astronomy and cosmology. Large area spectral surveys with moderate spectral resolution (R=50-200) will be used to characterize large-scale structure and star formation through intensity mapping surveys in emission lines such as the CO rotational transitions. Such surveys will also be used to study the the Sunyaev Zeldovich (SZ) effect, and will detect the emission lines and continuum spectrum of individual objects. WSPEC is an instrument proposed to target these science goals. It is a channelizing spectrometer realized in rectangular waveguide, fabricated using conventional high-precision metal machining. Each spectrometer is coupled to free space with a machined feed horn, and the devices are tiled into a 2D array to fill the focal plane of the telescope. The detectors will be aluminum lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs). To target the CO lines and SZ effect, we will have bands at 135-175 and 190-250 GHz, each Nyquist-sampled at R≈ 200 resolution. Here, we discuss the instrument concept and design, and successful initial testing of a WR10 (i.e., 90 GHz) prototype spectrometer. We recently tested a WR5 (180 GHz) prototype to verify that the concept works at higher frequencies, and also designed a resonant backshort structure that may further increase the optical efficiency. We are making progress towards integrating a spectrometer with a LEKID array and deploying a prototype device to a telescope for first light.

  8. WSPEC: A Waveguide Filter-Bank Focal Plane Array Spectrometer for Millimeter Wave Astronomy and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Sean; Aguirre, James; Che, George; Doyle, Simon; Flanigan, Daniel; Groppi, Christopher; Johnson, Bradley; Jones, Glenn; Mauskopf, Philip; McCarrick, Heather; Monfardini, Alessandro; Mroczkowski, Tony

    2015-12-01

    Imaging and spectroscopy at (sub-)millimeter wavelengths are key frontiers in astronomy and cosmology. Large area spectral surveys with moderate spectral resolution (R=50 -200) will be used to characterize large-scale structure and star formation through intensity mapping surveys in emission lines such as the CO rotational transitions. Such surveys will also be used to study the the Sunyaev Zeldovich (SZ) effect, and will detect the emission lines and continuum spectrum of individual objects. WSPEC is an instrument proposed to target these science goals. It is a channelizing spectrometer realized in rectangular waveguide, fabricated using conventional high-precision metal machining. Each spectrometer is coupled to free space with a machined feed horn, and the devices are tiled into a 2D array to fill the focal plane of the telescope. The detectors will be aluminum lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs). To target the CO lines and SZ effect, we will have bands at 135-175 and 190-250 GHz, each Nyquist-sampled at R≈ 200 resolution. Here, we discuss the instrument concept and design, and successful initial testing of a WR10 (i.e., 90 GHz) prototype spectrometer. We recently tested a WR5 (180 GHz) prototype to verify that the concept works at higher frequencies, and also designed a resonant backshort structure that may further increase the optical efficiency. We are making progress towards integrating a spectrometer with a LEKID array and deploying a prototype device to a telescope for first light.

  9. Plane wave analysis of coherent holographic image reconstruction by phase transfer (CHIRPT).

    PubMed

    Field, Jeffrey J; Winters, David G; Bartels, Randy A

    2015-11-01

    Fluorescent imaging plays a critical role in a myriad of scientific endeavors, particularly in the biological sciences. Three-dimensional imaging of fluorescent intensity often requires serial data acquisition, that is, voxel-by-voxel collection of fluorescent light emitted throughout the specimen with a nonimaging single-element detector. While nonimaging fluorescence detection offers some measure of scattering robustness, the rate at which dynamic specimens can be imaged is severely limited. Other fluorescent imaging techniques utilize imaging detection to enhance collection rates. A notable example is light-sheet fluorescence microscopy, also known as selective-plane illumination microscopy, which illuminates a large region within the specimen and collects emitted fluorescent light at an angle either perpendicular or oblique to the illumination light sheet. Unfortunately, scattering of the emitted fluorescent light can cause blurring of the collected images in highly turbid biological media. We recently introduced an imaging technique called coherent holographic image reconstruction by phase transfer (CHIRPT) that combines light-sheet-like illumination with nonimaging fluorescent light detection. By combining the speed of light-sheet illumination with the scattering robustness of nonimaging detection, CHIRPT is poised to have a dramatic impact on biological imaging, particularly for in vivo preparations. Here we present the mathematical formalism for CHIRPT imaging under spatially coherent illumination and present experimental data that verifies the theoretical model. PMID:26560930

  10. 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector Focal Plane Array for Long-Wave Infrared Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Jean; Rafol, Sir B.; Soibel, Alexander; Khoskhlagh, Arezou; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Liu, John K.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    A 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared (CBIRD) focal plane array for long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) imaging is reported. The arrays were grown by molecular beam expitaxy (MBE) with a 300 period 1.9 um thick absorber. The mean dark current density of 2.2 x 10-4 A/cm2 was measured at an operating bias of 128 mV with a long wavelength cutoff of 8.8 ?m observed at 50% of the peak. The maximum quantum efficiency was 54% measured at 5.6 ?m. Operating at T = 80K, the array yielded an 81% fill factor with 97% operability. Good imagery with a mean noise equivalent different temperature (NE?T) of 18.6 mK and a mean detectivity of D* = 1.3 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W was achieved. The substrate was thinned using mechanical lapping and neither an AR coating nor a passivation layer was applied. This article provides the details of the fabrication process for achieving low-dark current LWIR CBIRD arrays. Discussion for an effective hard mask for excellent pattern transfer is given and appropriate mounting techniques for good thermal contact during the dry etching process is described. The challenges and differences between etching large 200 ?m test diodes and small 28 ?m FPA pixels are given.

  11. 320 x 256 complementary barrier infrared detector focal plane array for long-wave infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Jean; Rafol, B., , Sir; Soibel, Alexander; Khoskhlagh, Arezou; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Liu, John K.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-06-01

    A 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared (CBIRD) focal plane array for long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) imaging is reported. The arrays were grown by molecular beam expitaxy (MBE) with a 300 period 1.9 um thick absorber. The mean dark current density of 2.2 x 10-4 A/cm2 was measured at an operating bias of 128 mV with a long wavelength cutoff of 8.8 μm observed at 50% of the peak. The maximum quantum efficiency was 54% measured at 5.6 μm. Operating at T = 80K, the array yielded an 81% fill factor with 97% operability. Good imagery with a mean noise equivalent different temperature (NE▵T) of 18.6 mK and a mean detectivity of D* = 1.3 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W was achieved. The substrate was thinned using mechanical lapping and neither an AR coating nor a passivation layer was applied. This article provides the details of the fabrication process for achieving low-dark current LWIR CBIRD arrays. Discussion for an effective hard mask for excellent pattern transfer is given and appropriate mounting techniques for good thermal contact during the dry etching process is described. The challenges and differences between etching large 200 μm test diodes and small 28 μm FPA pixels are given.

  12. Electromagnetic scattering by a buried sphere in a lossy medium of an inhomogeneous plane wave at arbitrary incidence: spectral-domain method.

    PubMed

    Frezza, F; Mangini, F

    2016-05-01

    A rigorous theoretical treatment to analyze the electromagnetic scattering of an inhomogeneous elliptically polarized plane wave by a sphere buried in a lossy half-space is presented. To consider the losses in the media an inhomogeneous plane wave is considered. The incident and the scattered electric field components are expanded in series of vectorial spherical harmonics using the Legendre functions generalized via hypergeometrical and gamma functions, with unknown expansion coefficients. The spectral-domain method to represent the scattered electric field is used in order to compute the scattered-reflected and scattered-transmitted fields, considering the reflection and transmission of each elementary plane wave by the interface. Finally, the unknown coefficients of the scattered field are computed by imposing the boundary condition on the spherical surface. In order to validate the model, a homemade code has been implemented. Comparisons with the simulations performed with a commercial software and the results in the literature are presented. PMID:27140892

  13. Modelling the impulse diffraction field of shear waves in transverse isotropic viscoelastic medium.

    PubMed

    Chatelin, Simon; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Bernal, Miguel; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-05-01

    The generation of shear waves from an ultrasound focused beam has been developed as a major concept for remote palpation using shear wave elastography (SWE). For muscular diagnostic applications, characteristics of the shear wave profile will strongly depend on characteristics of the transducer as well as the orientation of muscular fibers and the tissue viscoelastic properties. The numerical simulation of shear waves generated from a specific probe in an anisotropic viscoelastic medium is a key issue for further developments of SWE in fibrous soft tissues. In this study we propose a complete numerical tool allowing 3D simulation of a shear wave front in anisotropic viscoelastic media. From the description of an ultrasonic transducer, the shear wave source is simulated by using Field's II software and shear wave propagation described by using the Green's formalism. Finally, the comparison between simulations and experiments are successively performed for both shear wave velocity and dispersion profile in a transverse isotropic hydrogel phantom, in vivo forearm muscle and in vivo biceps brachii. PMID:25880794

  14. Modelling the impulse diffraction field of shear waves in transverse isotropic viscoelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelin, Simon; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Bernal, Miguel; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-05-01

    The generation of shear waves from an ultrasound focused beam has been developed as a major concept for remote palpation using shear wave elastography (SWE). For muscular diagnostic applications, characteristics of the shear wave profile will strongly depend on characteristics of the transducer as well as the orientation of muscular fibers and the tissue viscoelastic properties. The numerical simulation of shear waves generated from a specific probe in an anisotropic viscoelastic medium is a key issue for further developments of SWE in fibrous soft tissues. In this study we propose a complete numerical tool allowing 3D simulation of a shear wave front in anisotropic viscoelastic media. From the description of an ultrasonic transducer, the shear wave source is simulated by using Field’s II software and shear wave propagation described by using the Green’s formalism. Finally, the comparison between simulations and experiments are successively performed for both shear wave velocity and dispersion profile in a transverse isotropic hydrogel phantom, in vivo forearm muscle and in vivo biceps brachii.

  15. Diffraction of a shock into an expansion wavefront for the transonic self-similar nonlinear wave system in two space dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Juhi; Kim, Eun Heui

    2016-01-01

    We consider a configuration where a planar shock reflects and diffracts as it hits a semi-infinite rigid screen. The diffracted reflected shock meets the diffracted expansion wave, created by the incident shock that does not hit the screen, and changes continuously from a shock into an expansion. The governing equation changes its type and becomes degenerate as the wave changes continuously from a shock to an expansion. Furthermore the governing equation has multiple free boundaries (transonic shocks) and an additional degenerate sonic boundary (the expansion wave). We develop an analysis to understand the solution structure near which the shock strength approaches zero and the shock turns continuously into an expansion wavefront, and show the existence of the global solution to this configuration for the nonlinear wave system. Moreover we provide an asymptotic analysis to estimate the position of the change of the wave, and present intriguing numerical results.

  16. Saturation and the limit of jet mixing enhancement by single frequency plane wave excitation - Experiment and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Rice, Edward J.; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1988-01-01

    The limitations of single frequency plane wave excitation in mixing enhancement are investigated for a circular jet. Measurements made in an 8.8 cm diameter jet are compared with a theoretical model. The measurements are made to quantify mixing at excitation amplitudes up to 2 percent of the jet exit velocity. The initial boundary layer state, the exit mean and fluctuating velocity profiles and spectra are documented for all cases considered. The amplitude of the fundamental wave is recorded along the jet axis for various levels of excitation. As the amplitude of excitation is increased the jet spreading rate is increased, but beyond a saturation amplitude further increases have no effect on the spreading. The experimental results are compared with theoretical estimates. In the theory the flow is split into the mean flow, large scale motions, and fine scale turbulence. Shape assumptions for the mean flow, and fine scale turbulence along with the shape for the large scale motions obtained from a linear stability theory provide the closure. The experimental results compare reasonably well with predictions.

  17. Saturation and the limit of jet mixing enhancement by single frequency plane wave excitation: Experiment and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Rice, Edward J.; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1988-01-01

    The limitations of single frequency plane wave excitation in mixing enhancement are investigated for a circular jet. Measurements made in an 8.8 cm diameter jet are compared with a theoretical model. The measurements are made to quantify mixing at excitation amplitudes up to 2 percent of the jet exit velocity. The initial boundary layer state, the exit mean and fluctuating velocity profiles and spectra are documented for all cases considered. The amplitude of the fundamental wave is recorded along the jet axis for various levels of excitation. As the amplitude of excitation is increased the jet spreading rate is increased, but beyond a saturation amplitude further increases have no effect on the spreading. The experimental results are compared with theoretical estimates. In the theory the flow is split into the mean flow, large scale motions, and fine scale turbulence. Shape assumptions for the mean flow, and fine scale turbulence along with the shape for the large scale motions obtained from a linear stability theory provide the closure. The experimental results compare reasonably well with predictions.

  18. Propagating plane harmonic waves through finite length plates of variable thickness using finite element techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. H.; Kalinowski, A. J.; Wagner, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis is given using finite element techniques which addresses the propagaton of a uniform incident pressure wave through a finite diameter axisymmetric tapered plate immersed in a fluid. The approach utilized in developing a finite element solution to this problem is based upon a technique for axisymmetric fluid structure interaction problems. The problem addressed is that of a 10 inch diameter axisymmetric fixed plate totally immersed in a fluid. The plate increases in thickness from approximately 0.01 inches thick at the center to 0.421 inches thick at a radius of 5 inches. Against each face of the tapered plate a cylindrical fluid volume was represented extending five wavelengths off the plate in the axial direction. The outer boundary of the fluid and plate regions were represented as a rigid encasement cylinder as was nearly the case in the physical problem. The primary objective of the analysis is to determine the form of the transmitted pressure distribution on the downstream side of the plate.

  19. Fraunhofer-type diffraction patterns of matter-wave scattering of projectiles: Electron transfer in energetic ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agueny, Hicham

    2015-07-01

    We present results for single and double electron captures in intermediate energies H+ and 2H+ projectiles colliding with a helium target. The processes under investigations are treated using a nonperturbative semiclassical approach in combination with Eikonal approximation to calculate the scattering differential cross sections. The latter reveals pronounced minima and maxima in the scattering angles, in excellent agreement with the recent experimental data. It turns out that the present structure depends strongly on the projectile energy and shows only slight variations with different capture channels. The observed structure demonstrates the analogy of atomic de Broglie's matter-wave scattering with λd B=1.3 -3.2 ×10-3 a.u. and Fraunhofer-type diffraction of light waves.

  20. Diffraction of acoustic-gravity waves in the presence of a turning point.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) in an inhomogeneous atmosphere often have caustics, where the ray theory predicts unphysical, divergent values of the wave amplitude and needs to be modified. Unlike acoustic waves and gravity waves in incompressible fluids, AGW fields in the vicinity of a caustic have never been systematically studied. Here, asymptotic expansions of acoustic gravity waves are derived in the presence of a turning point in a horizontally stratified, moving fluid such as the atmosphere. Sound speed and the background flow (wind) velocity are assumed to vary gradually with height, and slowness of these variations determines the large parameter of the problem. It is found that uniform asymptotic expansions of the wave field in the presence of a turning point can be expressed in terms of the Airy function and its derivative. The geometrical, or Berry, phase, which arises in the consistent Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation for AGWs, plays an important role in the caustic asymptotics. In the dominant term of the uniform asymptotic solution, the terms with the Airy function and its derivative are weighted by the cosine and sine of the Berry phase, respectively. The physical meaning and corollaries of the asymptotic solutions are discussed. PMID:27475153

  1. Numerical modeling of extended short wave infrared InGaAs focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasmann, Andreu; Wen, Hanqing; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    Indium gallium arsenide (In1-xGaxAs) is an ideal material choice for short wave infrared (SWIR) imaging due to its low dark current and excellent collection efficiency. By increasing the indium composition from 53% to 83%, it is possible to decrease the energy gap from 0.74 eV to 0.47 eV and consequently increase the cutoff wavelength from 1.7 μm to 2.63 μm for extended short wavelength (ESWIR) sensing. In this work, we apply our well-established numerical modeling methodology to the ESWIR InGaAs system to determine the intrinsic performance of pixel detectors. Furthermore, we investigate the effects of different buffer/cap materials. To accomplish this, we have developed composition-dependent models for In1-xGaxAs, In1-xAlxAs, and InAs1-y Py. Using a Green's function formalism, we calculate the intrinsic recombination coefficients (Auger, radiative) to model the diffusion-limited behavior of the absorbing layer under ideal conditions. Our simulations indicate that, for a given total thickness of the buffer and absorbing layer, structures utilizing a linearly graded small-gap InGaAs buffer will produce two orders of magnitude more dark current than those with a wide gap, such as InAlAs or InAsP. Furthermore, when compared with experimental results for ESWIR photodiodes and arrays, we estimate that there is still a 1.5x magnitude of reduction in dark current before reaching diffusion-limited behavior.

  2. The relativistic dynamics of a point charge in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave traveling in the direction of a uniform static magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, T. P.

    1973-01-01

    The motion of a charged particle in electromagnetic fields of various geometric configurations and arising from a variety of sources is of intrinsic interest in electromagnetic theory. The particular configuration consisting of a plane wave propagating in the presence of a static uniform magnetic field whose direction is parallel to the wave normal is examined. The analysis presented here is treated within the context of classical electromagnetic theory. A numerical solution - at least to the approximate Lorentz-Dirac equation - is obtained.

  3. Source characterization of two Reykjanes Ridge earthquakes: Surface waves and moment tensors; P waveforms and nonorthogonal nodal planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TréHu, Anne M.; NáBěLek, John L.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1981-03-01

    Well-constrained fault plane solutions from P wave first motions for mid-ocean ridge normal faulting earthquakes usually require nonorthogonal nodal planes. Local structural effects and/or departures from a double-couple source mechanism have been invoked to explain this phenomenon. In order to obtain an independent determination of the source mechanisms for the April 24, 1970, and April 3, 1972, events on the southern Reykjanes Ridge, we invert the Rayleigh wave radiation pattern to obtain the source moment tensor. The moment tensor formulation should be particularly well suited to this problem because it is not restricted a priori to a double-couple source mechanism. A potential drawback of the technique, however, is the requirement that phase velocities along the earthquake-station paths be known very accurately in order to obtain the source phase from the observed phase, and an objective of this study was to determine whether a regionalized phase velocity model compiled from published dispersion curves is adequate. The results of the moment tensor inversion for both events indicate shallow normal faulting with the tension axis approximately horizontal and perpendicular to the local strike of the ridge. Apparent departures from a pure double-couple source seem to result from errors in the data and the poor resolution of the Mxz and Myz components of the moment tensor for shallow sources. After performing the inversion under a series of increasingly more stringent constraints we conclude that the data for both events are compatible with pure double-couple sources with moments of 4.8 and 7.5 × 1024 dyn cm, respectively. We then show that interference between P, pP, and sP due to shallowness of the source can account for the observed nonorthogonality and match the observed P waveforms for the April 3, 1972, event with theoretical seismograms calculated for a shear fault whose orientation is consistent with the surface wave solution. The best fit to the data is

  4. Wave scattering of complex local site in a layered half-space by using a multidomain IBEM: incident plane SH waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Zhenning; Yin, Xiao

    2016-06-01

    A multidomain indirect boundary element method (IBEM) is proposed to study the wave scattering of plane SH waves by complex local site in a layered half-space. The new method, using both the full-space and layered half-space Green's functions as its fundamental solutions can also be regarded as a coupled method of the full-space IBEM and half-space IBEM. First, the whole model is decomposed into independent closed regions and an opened layered half-space region with all of the irregular interfaces; then, fictitious uniformly distributed loads are applied separately on the boundaries of each region, and scattered fields of the closed regions and the opened layered half-space region are constructed by calculating the full-space and layered half-space Green's functions, respectively; finally, all of the regions are assembled to establish the linear algebraic system that arises from discretization. The densities of the distributed loads are determined directly by solving the algebraic system. The accuracy and capability of the new approach are verified extensively by comparing its results with those of published approaches for a class of hills, valleys and embedded inclusions. And the capability of the new method is further displayed when it is used to investigate a hill-triple layered valley-hill coupled topography in a multilayered half-space. All of the numerical calculations presented in this paper demonstrate that the new method is very suitable for solving multidomain coupled multilayered wave scattering problems with the merits of high accuracy and representing the scattered fields in different kinds of regions more reasonably and flexibly.

  5. Analysis of X-band radar images for the detection of the reflected and diffracted waves in coastal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludeno, Giovanni; Natale, Antonio; Soldovieri, Francesco; Vicinanza, Diego; Serafino, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    The observation of nearshore waves and the knowledge of the sea state parameters can play a crucial role for the safety of harbors and ocean engineering. In the last two decades, different algorithms for the estimation of sea state parameters, surface currents and bathymetry from X-band radar data have been developed and validated [1, 2]. The retrieval of ocean wave parameters such as significant height, period, direction and wavelength of the dominant wave is based on the spectral analysis of data sequences collected by nautical X-band radars [3]. In particular, the reconstruction of the wave motion is carried out through the inversion procedure explained in [1-3], which exploits the dispersion relationship to define a band pass filter used to separate the energy associated with the ocean waves from the background noise. It is worth to note that the shape of such a band pass filter depends upon the value of both the surface currents and bathymetry; in our reconstruction algorithm these parameters are estimated through the (Normalized Scalar Product) procedure [1], which outperforms other existing methods (e.g., the Least Squares) [4]. From the reconstructed wave elevation sequences we can get the directional spectrum that provides useful information (i.e., wavelength, period, direction and amplitude) relevant to the main waves contributing to the wave motion. Of course, in coastal zones a number of diffraction and reflection phenomena can be observed, due to sea-waves impinging obstacles as jetties, breakwaters and boats. In the present paper we want to show the capability to detect reflected and diffracted sea-waves offered by the processing of X-band radar data. Further details relevant to the obtained results will be provided in the full paper and at the conference time. References [1] F. Serafino, C. Lugni, F. Soldovieri, "A novel strategy for the surface current determination from marine X-Band radar data", IEEE Geosci. and Remote Sensing Letters, vol. 7, no

  6. Signatures of spatial inversion asymmetry of an optical lattice observed in matter-wave diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Claire K.; Barter, Thomas H.; Leung, Tsz Him; Okano, Masayuki; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M.

    2016-05-01

    The structure of a two-dimensional honeycomb optical lattice potential with small inversion asymmetry is characterized using coherent diffraction of 87 Rb atoms. We demonstrate that even a small potential asymmetry, with peak-to-peak amplitude of <= 2 . 3 % of the overall lattice potential, can lead to pronounced inversion asymmetry in the momentum-space diffraction pattern. The observed asymmetry is explained quantitatively by considering both Kaptiza-Dirac scattering in the Raman-Nath regime, and also either perturbative or full-numerical treatment of the band structure of a periodic potential with a weak inversion symmetry breaking term. Our results have relevance both for the experimental development of coherent atom optics and also for the proper interpretation of time-of-flight assays of atomic materials in optical lattices. This work was supported by the NSF and the AFOSR through the MURI program.

  7. Energy exchange between electromagnetic waves on the director diffraction grating in planar waveguide with nematic layer

    SciTech Connect

    Ledney, M. F. Tarnavskyy, A. S.

    2013-09-15

    The energy exchange between two coupled TE modes on the diffraction grating of the director in a planar waveguide containing a nematic liquid crystal layer is calculated. The diffraction grating is induced by an external electric field in the nematic layer with periodic anchoring energy at the waveguide surface. The intensity of the signal mode at the output of the nematic layer is calculated as a function of the amplitude and period of the anchoring-energy modulation, the nematic layer sizes, and the electric-field strength. The cases of modes with the same and opposite directions are considered. Analytical expressions for the maximum intensities of the signal mode are derived. In both cases the maximum intensity of the signal mode increases with an increase in the electric-field strength.

  8. Signatures of spatial inversion asymmetry of an optical lattice observed in matter-wave diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C. K.; Barter, T. H.; Leung, T.-H.; Daiss, S.; Stamper-Kurn, D. M.

    2016-06-01

    The structure of a two-dimensional honeycomb optical lattice potential with small inversion asymmetry is characterized using coherent diffraction of 87Rb atoms. We demonstrate that even a small potential asymmetry, with peak-to-peak amplitude of ≤2.3 % of the overall lattice potential, can lead to pronounced inversion asymmetry in the momentum-space diffraction pattern. The observed asymmetry is explained quantitatively by considering both Kapitza-Dirac scattering in the Raman-Nath regime and also either perturbative or full-numerical treatment of the band structure of a periodic potential with a weak inversion-symmetry-breaking term. Our results have relevance for both the experimental development of coherent atom optics and the proper interpretation of time-of-flight assays of atomic materials in optical lattices.

  9. Alkaline earth chloride hydrates: chlorine quadrupolar and chemical shift tensors by solid-state NMR spectroscopy and plane wave pseudopotential calculations.

    PubMed

    Bryce, David L; Bultz, Elijah B

    2007-01-01

    A series of alkaline earth chloride hydrates has been studied by solid-state (35/37)Cl NMR spectroscopy in order to characterize the chlorine electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift (CS) tensors and to relate these observables to the structure around the chloride ions. Chlorine-35/37 NMR spectra of solid powdered samples of pseudopolymorphs (hydrates) of magnesium chloride (MgCl(2).6H(2)O), calcium chloride (CaCl(2).2H(2)O), strontium chloride (SrCl(2), SrCl(2).2H(2)O, and SrCl(2).6H(2)O), and barium chloride (BaCl(2).2H(2)O) have been acquired under stationary and magic-angle spinning conditions in magnetic fields of 11.75 and 21.1 T. Powder X-ray diffraction was used as an additional tool to confirm the purity and identity of the samples. Chlorine-35 quadrupolar coupling constants (C(Q)) range from essentially zero in cubic anhydrous SrCl(2) to 4.26+/-0.03 MHz in calcium chloride dihydrate. CS tensor spans, Omega, are between 40 and 72 ppm, for example, Omega= 45+/-20 ppm for SrCl(2).6H(2)O. Plane wave-pseudopotential density functional theory, as implemented in the CASTEP program, was employed to model the extended solid lattices of these materials for the calculation of their chlorine EFG and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors, and allowed for the assignment of the two-site chlorine NMR spectra of barium chloride dihydrate. This work builds upon our current understanding of the relationship between chlorine NMR interaction tensors and the local molecular and electronic structure, and highlights the particular sensitivity of quadrupolar nucleus solid-state NMR spectroscopy to the differences between various pseudopolymorphic structures in the case of strontium chloride. PMID:17385204

  10. An asymptotic theory for waves guided by diffraction gratings or along microstructured surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Antonakakis, T.; Craster, R. V.; Guenneau, S.; Skelton, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    An effective surface equation, that encapsulates the detail of a microstructure, is developed to model microstructured surfaces. The equations deduced accurately reproduce a key feature of surface wave phenomena, created by periodic geometry, that are commonly called Rayleigh–Bloch waves, but which also go under other names, for example, spoof surface plasmon polaritons in photonics. Several illustrative examples are considered and it is shown that the theory extends to similar waves that propagate along gratings. Line source excitation is considered, and an implicit long-scale wavelength is identified and compared with full numerical simulations. We also investigate non-periodic situations where a long-scale geometrical variation in the structure is introduced and show that localized defect states emerge which the asymptotic theory explains. PMID:24399920

  11. Guided Wave Propagation and Diffraction in Plates with Obstacles: Resonance Transmission and Trapping Mode Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, E. V.; Glushkova, N. V.; Eremin, A. A.; Lammering, R.

    The paper is based on the authors' report at ICU-2015 giving the idea of the semi-analytical integral equation approach to a physically clear simulation of wave phenomena in composite plate-like structures with local inhomogeneities. On this basis, a set of low-cost computer models for a reliable near- and far-field analysis had been developed and experimentally validated. Their abilities have been illustrated with examples of structural frequency response and radiation pattern diagrams for guided waves (GW) generated by piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS); the reconstruction of effective elastic moduli of fiber-reinforced composites; the PWAS frequency tuning with accounting for the radiation directivity induced by anisotropy; and the effects of wave energy resonance transmission and trapping. Some of these examples have been already discussed in journal articles. Therefore, the present paper concentrates on the recent results of resonance GW interaction with deep surface notches and buried cavities.

  12. Experimental investigation of shock wave diffraction over a single- or double-sphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. T.; Wang, T. H.; Hao, L. N.; Huang, B. Q.; Chen, W. J.; Shi, H. H.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the unsteady drag produced by the interaction of a shock wave with a single- and a double-sphere model is measured using imbedded accelerometers. The shock wave is generated in a horizontal circular shock tube with an inner diameter of 200 mm. The effect of the shock Mach number and the dimensionless distance between spheres is investigated. The time-history of the drag coefficient is obtained based on Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) band-block filtering and polynomial fitting of the measured acceleration. The measured peak values of the drag coefficient, with the associated uncertainty, are reported.

  13. LIGHT PRESSURE: Theoretical study of the light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle of an arbitrary size in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzatov, D. V.; Gaida, L. S.; Afanas'ev, Anatolii A.

    2008-12-01

    The light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves is studied in detail for different particle radii and angles of incidence of waves.

  14. Electron Correlation in the Condensed Phase from a Resolution of Identity Approach Based on the Gaussian and Plane Waves Scheme.

    PubMed

    Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2013-06-11

    The second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation energy (MP2) and the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) correlation energy are increasingly popular post-Kohn-Sham correlation methods. Here, a novel algorithm based on a hybrid Gaussian and Plane Waves (GPW) approach with the resolution-of-identity (RI) approximation is developed for MP2, scaled opposite-spin MP2 (SOS-MP2), and direct-RPA (dRPA) correlation energies of finite and extended system. The key feature of the method is that the three center electron repulsion integrals (μν|P) necessary for the RI approximation are computed by direct integration between the products of Gaussian basis functions μν and the electrostatic potential arising from the RI fitting densities P. The electrostatic potential is obtained in a plane waves basis set after solving the Poisson equation in Fourier space. This scheme is highly efficient for condensed phase systems and offers a particularly easy way for parallel implementation. The RI approximation allows to speed up the MP2 energy calculations by a factor 10 to 15 compared to the canonical implementation but still requires O(N(5)) operations. On the other hand, the combination of RI with a Laplace approach in SOS-MP2 and an imaginary frequency integration in dRPA reduces the computational effort to O(N(4)) in both cases. In addition to that, our implementations have low memory requirements and display excellent parallel scalability up to tens of thousands of processes. Furthermore, exploiting graphics processing units (GPU), a further speedup by a factor ∼2 is observed compared to the standard only CPU implementations. In this way, RI-MP2, RI-SOS-MP2, and RI-dRPA calculations for condensed phase systems containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions can be performed within minutes employing a few hundred hybrid nodes. In order to validate the presented methods, various molecular crystals have been employed as benchmark systems to assess the performance, while

  15. Enhanced plane wave expansion analysis for the band structure of bulk modes in two-dimensional high-contrast solid-solid phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baboly, Mohammadhosein Ghasemi; Soliman, Yasser; Su, Mehmet F.; Reinke, Charles M.; Leseman, Zayd C.; El-Kady, Ihab

    2014-11-01

    Plane wave expansion analyses that use the inverse rule to obtain the Fourier coefficients of the elastic tensor instead of the more conventional Laurent's rule, exhibit faster convergence rates for solid-solid phononic crystals. In this work, the band structure convergence of calculations using the inverse rule is investigated and applied to the case of high acoustic impedance contrast solid-solid phononic crystals, previously known for convergence difficulties. Results are contrasted to those obtained with the conventional plane wave expansion method. The inverse rule is found to converge at a much rate for all ranges of impedance contrast, and the ratio between the computational times needed to obtain a convergent band structure for a high-contrast solid-solid phononic crystal with the conventional plane wave expansion method using 1369 reciprocal lattice vectors is as large as 6800:1. This ratio decreases for material sets with lower impedance contrast; however, the inverse rule is still faster for a given error threshold for even the lowest impedance contrast phononic crystals reported in the literature. This convergence enhancement is a major factor in reconsidering the plane wave expansion method as an important tool in obtaining propagating elastic modes in phononic crystals.

  16. Departures from plane-wave-like coupling to a Maverick missile in the radiating near-field region of a horn antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, D. E.; Koslover, R. A.; Cremer, C. D.; Silvestro, J.; Miner, L. M.

    1990-05-01

    The High Power Microwaves (HPM) susceptibility testing often requires irradiating test objects at the highest fluences possible. For aperture antennas, the highest fluences are generally found in the radiating near field region. For valid effects testing, the energy coupled to the object interior must accurately replicate that which would occur in a true weapon environment (plane wave illumination). Some believe that valid testing requires object placement at distances from the aperture exceeding 2 D squared/lambda (D=antenna effective diameter). Many also believe testing at farther away than 2 D squared/lambda guarantees plane wave-like coupling conditions. Neither view is correct. Testing in the reactive field region (less than lambda from the aperture) is generally invalid due to dominance of reactive coupling. For testing in the radiating near field, determination of validity is less trivial. An investigation was performed quantifying deviations from plane wave coupling. The measurements, using an instrumented Maverick missile in an anechoic chamber, and supported by theory, indicate conditions for which testing the Maverick missile accurately simulates plane wave coupling.

  17. Analytically reduced form for the class of integrals containing multicenter products of 1s hydrogenic orbitals, Coulomb or Yukawa potentials, and plane waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straton, Jack C.

    1989-01-01

    The class of integrals containing the product of N 1s hydrogenic orbitals and M Coulomb or Yukawa potentials with m plane waves is investigated analytically. The results obtained by Straton (1989) are extended and generalized. It is shown that the dimensionality of the entire class can be reduced from 3m to M+N-1.

  18. Generation of remote adaptive torsional shear waves with an octagonal phased array to enhance displacements and reduce variability of shear wave speeds: comparison with quasi-plane shear wavefronts.

    PubMed

    Ouared, Abderrahmane; Montagnon, Emmanuel; Cloutier, Guy

    2015-10-21

    A method based on adaptive torsional shear waves (ATSW) is proposed to overcome the strong attenuation of shear waves generated by a radiation force in dynamic elastography. During the inward propagation of ATSW, the magnitude of displacements is enhanced due to the convergence of shear waves and constructive interferences. The proposed method consists in generating ATSW fields from the combination of quasi-plane shear wavefronts by considering a linear superposition of displacement maps. Adaptive torsional shear waves were experimentally generated in homogeneous and heterogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms, and compared to quasi-plane shear wave propagations. Results demonstrated that displacement magnitudes by ATSW could be up to 3 times higher than those obtained with quasi-plane shear waves, that the variability of shear wave speeds was reduced, and that the signal-to-noise ratio of displacements was improved. It was also observed that ATSW could cause mechanical inclusions to resonate in heterogeneous phantoms, which further increased the displacement contrast between the inclusion and the surrounding medium. This method opens a way for the development of new noninvasive tissue characterization strategies based on ATSW in the framework of our previously reported shear wave induced resonance elastography (SWIRE) method proposed for breast cancer diagnosis. PMID:26439616

  19. Shutterless solution for simultaneous focal plane array temperature estimation and nonuniformity correction in uncooled long-wave infrared camera.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanpeng; Tisse, Christel-Loic

    2013-09-01

    In uncooled long-wave infrared (LWIR) microbolometer imaging systems, temperature fluctuations of the focal plane array (FPA) result in thermal drift and spatial nonuniformity. In this paper, we present a novel approach based on single-image processing to simultaneously estimate temperature variances of FPAs and compensate the resulting temperature-dependent nonuniformity. Through well-controlled thermal calibrations, empirical behavioral models are derived to characterize the relationship between the responses of microbolometer and FPA temperature variations. Then, under the assumption that strong dependency exists between spatially adjacent pixels, we estimate the optimal FPA temperature so as to minimize the global intensity variance across the entire thermal infrared image. We make use of the estimated FPA temperature to infer an appropriate nonuniformity correction (NUC) profile. The performance and robustness of the proposed temperature-adaptive NUC method are evaluated on realistic IR images obtained by a 640 × 512 pixels uncooled LWIR microbolometer imaging system operating in a significantly changed temperature environment. PMID:24085086

  20. Simulation of the pressure field beneath a turbulent boundary layer using realizations of uncorrelated wall plane waves.

    PubMed

    Maxit, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the modeling of a vibrating structure excited by a turbulent boundary layer (TBL). Although the wall pressure field (WPF) of the TBL constitutes a random excitation, the element-based methods generally used for describing complex mechanical structures consider deterministic loads. The response of such structures to a random excitation like TBL is generally deduced from calculations of numerous Frequency Response Functions. Consequently, the process is computationally expansive. To tackle this issue, an efficient process is proposed for generating realizations of the WPF corresponding to the TBL. This process is based on a formulation of the problem in the wavenumber space and the interpretation of the WPF as uncorrelated wall plane waves. Once the WPF has been synthesized, the local vibroacoustic responses are calculated for the different realizations and averaged together in the last step. A numerical application of this process to a plate located beneath a TBL is used to verify its efficiency and ability to reproduce the partial space correlation of the excitation. To further illustrate the proposed method, a stiffened panel modeled using the finite element method is finally examined. PMID:27586754

  1. A meshfree local RBF collocation method for anti-plane transverse elastic wave propagation analysis in 2D phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hui; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Wang, Yuesheng; Sladek, Jan; Sladek, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a meshfree or meshless local radial basis function (RBF) collocation method is proposed to calculate the band structures of two-dimensional (2D) anti-plane transverse elastic waves in phononic crystals. Three new techniques are developed for calculating the normal derivative of the field quantity required by the treatment of the boundary conditions, which improve the stability of the local RBF collocation method significantly. The general form of the local RBF collocation method for a unit-cell with periodic boundary conditions is proposed, where the continuity conditions on the interface between the matrix and the scatterer are taken into account. The band structures or dispersion relations can be obtained by solving the eigenvalue problem and sweeping the boundary of the irreducible first Brillouin zone. The proposed local RBF collocation method is verified by using the corresponding results obtained with the finite element method. For different acoustic impedance ratios, various scatterer shapes, scatterer arrangements (lattice forms) and material properties, numerical examples are presented and discussed to show the performance and the efficiency of the developed local RBF collocation method compared to the FEM for computing the band structures of 2D phononic crystals.

  2. Variational solution of the Schrödinger equation using plane waves in adaptive coordinates: The radial case.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jordá, José M

    2010-01-14

    A new method for solving the Schrödinger equation is proposed, based on the following details. First, a map u=u(r) from Cartesian coordinates r to a new coordinate system u is chosen. Second, the solution (orbital) psi(r) is written in terms of a function U depending on u so that psi(r)=/J(u)/(-1/2)U(u), where /J(u)/ is the Jacobian determinant of the map. Third, U is expressed as a linear combination of plane waves in the u coordinate, U(u)= sum (k)c(k)e(ik x u). Finally, the coefficients c(k) are variationally optimized to obtain the best energy, using a generalization of an algorithm originally developed for the Coulomb potential [J. M. Perez-Jorda, Phys. Rev. B 58, 1230 (1998)]. The method is tested for the radial Schrödinger equation in the hydrogen atom, resulting in micro-Hartree accuracy or better for the energy of ns and np orbitals (with n up to 5) using expansions of moderate length. PMID:20095666

  3. Assessment of induced SAR in children exposed to electromagnetic plane waves between 10 MHz and 5.6 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, J. F.; Paulides, M. M.; Christ, A.; Kuster, N.; van Rhoon, G. C.

    2010-06-01

    To avoid potentially adverse health effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has defined EMF reference levels from the basic restrictions on the induced whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (SARwb) and the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (SAR10g). The objective of this study is to assess if the SAR in children remains below the basic restrictions upon exposure at the reference levels. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling was used to calculate the SAR in six children and two adults when exposed to all 12 orthogonal plane wave configurations. A sensitivity study showed an expanded uncertainty of 53% (SARwb) and 58% (SAR10g) due to variations in simulation settings and tissue properties. In this study, we found that the basic restriction on the SARwb is occasionally exceeded for children, up to a maximum of 45% in small children. The maximum SAR10g values, usually found at body protrusions, remain under the limit for all scenarios studied. Our results are in good agreement with the literature, suggesting that the recommended ICNIRP reference levels may need fine tuning.

  4. Self-consistent linearized augmented-plane-wave study of the electronic structure and superconductivity of fcc lanthanum under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickett, Warren E.; Freeman, A. J.; Koelling, D. D.

    1980-09-01

    We report the results of a linearized augmented-plane-wave calculation of the electronic structure of fcc La at three lattice constants corresponding to ambient pressure, 50, and 120 kbars. The Kohn-Sham-Gáspar approximation for exchange and correlation is used and the potential is allowed a fully non-muffin-tin form. The f bands lie ~2-2.5 eV above the Fermi level and are ~1 eV wide, resulting in a very small (0.05 electrons) localized f occupation. Under pressure the f bands rise and broaden appreciably, resulting in only a slight increase in f occupation. The rigid-muffin-tin approximation for the electron-phonon interaction λ overestimates the superconducting transition temperature Tc by 40%, but we find that the drastic increase in Tc under pressure can be attributed primarily to changes in the electronic stiffness η. Structural transitions which occur at 25 and 53 kbars may be related to changes in Fermi-surface topology which we find to occur approximately at these pressures.

  5. Assessment of induced SAR in children exposed to electromagnetic plane waves between 10 MHz and 5.6 GHz.

    PubMed

    Bakker, J F; Paulides, M M; Christ, A; Kuster, N; van Rhoon, G C

    2010-06-01

    To avoid potentially adverse health effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has defined EMF reference levels from the basic restrictions on the induced whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR(wb)) and the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (SAR(10g)). The objective of this study is to assess if the SAR in children remains below the basic restrictions upon exposure at the reference levels. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling was used to calculate the SAR in six children and two adults when exposed to all 12 orthogonal plane wave configurations. A sensitivity study showed an expanded uncertainty of 53% (SAR(wb)) and 58% (SAR(10g)) due to variations in simulation settings and tissue properties. In this study, we found that the basic restriction on the SAR(wb) is occasionally exceeded for children, up to a maximum of 45% in small children. The maximum SAR(10g) values, usually found at body protrusions, remain under the limit for all scenarios studied. Our results are in good agreement with the literature, suggesting that the recommended ICNIRP reference levels may need fine tuning. PMID:20463374

  6. Induced EM field in a layered eccentric spheres model of the head: Plane-wave and localized source exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Skaropoulos, N.C.; Ioannidou, M.P.; Chrissoulidis, D.P.

    1996-10-01

    Understanding the interaction of EM radiation with humans is essential in a number of contemporary applications. Special attention is paid to the absorption of EM energy by the human head, which exhibits a resonant behavior in the frequency band 0.1--3 GHz. The use of handheld transceivers for wireless communications, which operate in close proximity to the head, has raised safety-related questions and questions concerning the effect of the head on the performance of the mobile phone antenna. The induced electromagnetic (EM) field in a layered eccentric spheres structure is determined through a concise analytical formulation based on indirect mode-matching (IMM). The exact analytical solution is applied to a six-layer model of the head. This model allows for eccentricity between the inner and outer sets of concentric spherical layers which simulate brain and skull, respectively. Excitation is provided by a nearby localized source or by an incident plane wave. The numerical application provides information about the total absorbed power, the absorption in each layer, and the spatial distribution of the specific absorption rate (SAR) at frequencies used by cellular phones. The effects of excitation frequency, eccentricity, exposure configuration, and antenna-head separation are investigated.

  7. Unilateral versus bilateral ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane blocks during ureteric shock wave lithotripsy: A prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Elnabtity, Ali Mohamed Ali; Shabana, Waleed Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block has been used for intra- and post-operative analgesia during abdominal operations and for ureteric shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) as well. Aim: This study aimed at comparing ultrasound-guided unilateral versus bilateral TAP blocks as analgesic techniques for unilateral ureteric SWL. Settings and Design: Prospective randomized comparative study. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients scheduled for unilateral ureteric SWL were randomly allocated into two groups: Group (U) received unilateral TAP block in the form of 25 ml of bupivacaine 0.25% (i.e., 62.5 mg), and Group (B) received bilateral TAP blocks in the form of 25 ml of bupivacaine 0.25% (i.e., 62.5 mg) on each side. Statistical Analysis: This was performed using SPSS program version 19 ((IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA) and EP 16 program. Results: The mean values of intra- and post-procedural visual analog scale at different time intervals were around (30), which was statistically insignificant between groups (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences between groups regarding cardiopulmonary stability, postanesthesia care unit time, the total amount of rescue fentanyl and patient satisfaction scores (P > 0.05). There were no significant side effects in both groups. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided unilateral TAP block is as safe and effective analgesic technique as bilateral TAP blocks during unilateral ureteric SWL. It can be used as the sole analgesic technique during ureteric SWL. PMID:27453645

  8. Expansions for infinite or finite plane circular time-reversal mirrors and acoustic curtains for wave-field-synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mellow, Tim; Kärkkäinen, Leo

    2014-03-01

    An acoustic curtain is an array of microphones used for recording sound which is subsequently reproduced through an array of loudspeakers in which each loudspeaker reproduces the signal from its corresponding microphone. Here the sound originates from a point source on the axis of symmetry of the circular array. The Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral for a plane circular curtain is solved analytically as fast-converging expansions, assuming an ideal continuous array, to speed up computations and provide insight. By reversing the time sequence of the recording (or reversing the direction of propagation of the incident wave so that the point source becomes an "ideal" point sink), the curtain becomes a time reversal mirror and the analytical solution for this is given simultaneously. In the case of an infinite planar array, it is demonstrated that either a monopole or dipole curtain will reproduce the diverging sound field of the point source on the far side. However, although the real part of the sound field of the infinite time-reversal mirror is reproduced, the imaginary part is an approximation due to the missing singularity. It is shown that the approximation may be improved by using the appropriate combination of monopole and dipole sources in the mirror. PMID:24606267

  9. The wave flow effect on a plane boundary between vacuum and an optical medium with a quasi-zero refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadomsky, O. N.; Gadomskaya, I. V.; Shchukarev, I. A.

    2016-05-01

    A boundary problem in which a plane electromagnetic wave is reflected and refracted at a plane boundary of a semi-infinite optical medium with a quasi-zero refractive index has been solved. Such a medium has a random refractive index taking values in an interval from zero to some finite value less than unity. It means that the concept of a sharp interface between two media loses its meaning, the boundary of the medium becomes inhomogeneous, and laws of reflection and refraction of light become non-Fresnelian. Formulas for non-Fresnelian amplitudes of reflection and refraction have been derived. It is shown that a surface wave arises near the boundary of a medium with a quasi-zero refractive index. The wave propagates both on the inside and outside of the boundary.

  10. Diffraction of light by an opaque sphere. 1: Description and properties of the diffraction pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Sommargren, G.E. ); Weaver, H.J. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper we discuss the diffraction pattern resulting from the propagation of light past an opaque obstacle with a circular cross section. A mathematical description of the diffraction pattern is obtained in the Fresnel region using scalar diffraction theory and is presented in terms of the Lommel functions. This description is shown experimentally to be quite accurate, not only for near axis points within the shadow region but also well past the shadow's edge into the directly illuminated region. The mathematical description is derived for spherical wave illumination and an isomorphic relation is developed relating it to plane wave illumination. The size of the central bright spot (as well as the subsequent diffraction rings), the axial intensity, and the intensity along the geometric shadow are characterized in terms of point source location and the distance of propagation past the circular obstacle. Key words: Spherical diffraction, isomorphic propagation theory, Lommel functions.

  11. Millimeter wave scattering and diffraction in 110 GHz air breakdown plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Alan M.; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-04-15

    We present measurements of the scattering, reflection, absorption, and transmission of a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz quasioptical gyrotron beam by a self-induced air breakdown plasma. The breakdown forms a periodic array of plasma filaments, oriented parallel to the incident electric field polarization that propagates toward the microwave source. For incident intensity of 3 MW/cm{sup 2}, calorimetric measurements show that as much as 45% of the full beam power is absorbed by the plasma, averaged over the pulse, 1% is reflected backward, and the remainder is transmitted and also scattered into a wide angular spread. We observe that approximately 10 times more power is scattered in the direction perpendicular to the filaments than parallel. The far-field angular distribution of transmitted power exhibits a diffraction pattern that changes throughout the 2-{mu}s life of the plasma.

  12. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies of laser-induced acoustic wave propagation in bilayer metallic thin crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Er, Ali Oguz; Tang, Jau E-mail: prentzepis@ece.tamu.edu; Chen, Jie; Rentzepis, Peter M. E-mail: prentzepis@ece.tamu.edu

    2014-09-07

    Phonon propagation across the interface of a Cu/Ag(111) bilayer and transient lattice disorder, induced by a femtosecond 267 nm pulse, in Ag(111) crystal have been measured by means of time resolved X-ray diffraction. A “blast” force due to thermal stress induced by suddenly heated electrons is formed within two picoseconds after excitation and its “blast wave” propagation through the interface and Ag (111) crystal was monitored by the shift and broadening of the rocking curve, I vs. ω, as a function of time after excitation. Lattice disorder, contraction and expansion as well as thermal strain formation and wave propagation have also been measured. The experimental data and mechanism proposed are supported by theoretical simulations.

  13. Electron acceleration and emission in a field of a plane and converging dipole wave of relativistic amplitudes with the radiation reaction force taken into account

    SciTech Connect

    Bashinov, Aleksei V; Gonoskov, Arkady A; Kim, A V; Marklund, Mattias; Mourou, G; Sergeev, Aleksandr M

    2013-04-30

    A comparative analysis is performed of the electron emission characteristics as the electrons move in laser fields with ultra-relativistic intensity and different configurations corresponding to a plane or tightly focused wave. For a plane travelling wave, analytical expressions are derived for the emission characteristics, and it is shown that the angular distribution of the radiation intensity changes qualitatively even when the wave intensity is much less than that in the case of the radiation-dominated regime. An important conclusion is drawn that the electrons in a travelling wave tend to synchronised motion under the radiation reaction force. The characteristic features of the motion of electrons are found in a converging dipole wave, associated with the curvature of the phase front and nonuniformity of the field distribution. The values of the maximum achievable longitudinal momenta of electrons accelerated to the centre, as well as their distribution function are determined. The existence of quasi-periodic trajectories near the focal region of the dipole wave is shown, and the characteristics of the emission of both accelerated and oscillating electrons are analysed. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  14. Digital image correlation applied to the calculation of the out-of-plane deformation induced by the formation of roll waves in a non-Newtonian fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda, Alfredo; Amigo, Nicolás; Ihle, Christian; Tamburrino, Aldo

    2016-06-01

    A method based on digital image correlation (DIC) is implemented for measuring the height of the roll waves developed in a non-Newtonian fluid flowing on an inclined channel. A projector and a high-resolution digital camera, placed vertically above the fluid surface, are used to project and record a random speckle pattern located on the free liquid surface, where the pattern is deformed due to the developed roll waves. According to the experimental geometry, the height of the roll waves associated to the out-of-plane deformation of the dots is obtained through a quantitative relationship between the experimental parameters and the in-plane displacement field in the flow direction. In terms of this, the out-of-plane deformation is found using a DIC criterion based on the speckle comparison between a reference image without the deformed pattern and an image with a deformed pattern. The maximum height of the roll waves computed with this technique is compared with the height measured using a lateral camera, with both results differing by <10% over the set of experimental instances.

  15. Power deposition in the head and neck of an anatomically based human body model for plane wave exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinniswood, A. D.; Furse, C. M.; Gandhi, O. P.

    1998-08-01

    At certain frequencies, when the human head becomes a resonant structure, the power absorbed by the head and neck, when the body is exposed to a vertically polarized plane wave propagating from front to back, becomes significantly larger than would ordinarily be expected from its shadow cross section. This has possible implications in the study of the biological effects of electromagnetic fields. Additionally the frequencies at which these resonances occur are not readily predicted by simple approximations of the head in isolation. In order to determine these resonant conditions an anatomically based model of the whole human body has been used, with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm to accurately determine field propagation, specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions and power absorption in both the whole body and the head region (head and neck). This paper shows that resonant frequencies can be determined using two methods. The first is by use of the accurate anatomically based model (with heterogeneous tissue properties) and secondly using a model built from parallelepiped sections (for the torso and legs), an ellipsoid for the head and a cylinder for the neck. This approximation to the human body is built from homogeneous tissue the equivalent of two-thirds the conductivity and dielectric constant of that of muscle. An IBM SP-2 supercomputer together with a parallel FDTD code has been used to accommodate the large problem size. We find resonant frequencies for the head and neck at 207 MHz and 193 MHz for the isolated and grounded conditions, with absorption cross sections that are respectively 3.27 and 2.62 times the shadow cross section.

  16. Two kinds of in-plane resistivity anisotropy in Fe1 +δTe (δ =0.09 ) as seen via synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction and in situ resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Taro; Machida, Tadashi; Kariya, Hironori; Morohoshi, Daiki; Yamasaki, Yuichi; Nakao, Hironori; Hirata, Kazuto; Mochiku, Takashi; Takeya, Hiroyuki; Mitsuda, Setsuo; Sakata, Hideaki

    2015-05-01

    We have investigated correlation between structural and electronic anisotropies in a parent compound of Fe-chalcogenide superconductor Fe1 +δTe with δ =0.09 by means of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and in situ in-plane resistivity anisotropy measurements with uniaxial stress applied along a tetragonal a axis. This system is known to exhibit a tetragonal-to-monoclinic structural transition at TS˜60 K. We have confirmed that the in-plane resistivity anisotropy in the low-temperature monoclinic phase is attributed to the asymmetry in volume fractions of the monoclinic domains, as was suggested in a previous study [Jiang et al., Phys. Rev. B 88 115130 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.115130]. On the other hand, we found another in-plane resistivity anisotropy above TS. The present x-ray diffraction and resistivity anisotropy measurements have revealed that this anisotropy is not due to an onset of the low-temperature monoclinic phase but to the lattice softening enhanced toward TS. As one of the possibilities, we suggest that the orbital fluctuation contributes to the lattice softening and the resistivity anisotropy above TS.

  17. The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6.54 revealed by x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    E. M. Forgan; Huecker, M.; Blackburn, E.; Holmes, A. T.; Briffa, A. K. R.; Chang, J.; Bouchenoire, L.; Brown, S. D.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D.; Hardy, W. N.; Christensen, N. B.; von Zimmermann, M.; Hayden, S. M.

    2015-12-09

    Charge density wave (CDW) order appears throughout the underdoped high-temperature cuprate superconductors, but the underlying symmetry breaking and the origin of the CDW remain unclear. We use X-ray diffraction to determine the microscopic structure of the CDWs in an archetypical cuprate YBa2Cu3O6.54 at its superconducting transition temperature ~60 K. We find that the CDWs in this material break the mirror symmetry of the CuO2 bilayers. The ionic displacements in the CDWs have two components, which are perpendicular and parallel to the CuO2 planes, and are out of phase with each other. The planar oxygen atoms have the largest displacements, perpendicular to the CuO2 planes. Our results allow many electronic properties of the underdoped cuprates to be understood. For example, the CDWs will lead to local variations in the electronic structure, giving an explicit explanation of density-wave states with broken symmetry observed in scanning tunnelling microscopy and soft X-ray measurements.

  18. Analysis of spurious bulk waves in ball surface wave device.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Satoru; Cho, Hideo; Tsukahara, Yusuke; Nakaso, Noritaka; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed the acoustic waves propagating in a sphere to establish a useful guideline for the design of NDE apparatus and ball surface acoustic wave (SAW) device exploiting the diffraction-free propagation of SAW on a sphere. First, we calculated the laser-generated acoustic displacements both under ablation condition and under thermoelastic condition and verified experimentally the validity of the calculation. Next, the acoustic waves excited by out-of-plane stress and those excited by in-plane stress were compared. The results showed that when the out-of-plane stress was applied, the relative amplitudes of the bulk waves to that of the SAW were larger and the number of bulk waves was larger than that when the in-plane stress was applied, while the SAW had similar waveforms in each case. The ratio of the relative amplitude of the bulk waves for the out-of-plane stress and the in-plane stress was 3.1:1 at phi(1)=90 degrees and 1.67:1 at phi(1)=0 degrees. The large amplitude for the out-of-plane stress can be explained by wide directivities of bulk waves. Consequently, we found that it is necessary for ball SAW device to select a piezoelectric material and form of interdigital transducer so that the in-plane stress becomes dominant. PMID:12464407

  19. FESDIF -- Finite Element Scalar Diffraction theory code

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, H.G.

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the theory and use of a powerful scalar diffraction theory based computer code for calculation of intensity fields due to diffraction of optical waves by two-dimensional planar apertures and lenses. This code is called FESDIF (Finite Element Scalar Diffraction). It is based upon both Fraunhofer and Kirchhoff scalar diffraction theories. Simplified routines for circular apertures are included. However, the real power of the code comes from its basis in finite element methods. These methods allow the diffracting aperture to be virtually any geometric shape, including the various secondary aperture obstructions present in telescope systems. Aperture functions, with virtually any phase and amplitude variations, are allowed in the aperture openings. Step change aperture functions are accommodated. The incident waves are considered to be monochromatic. Plane waves, spherical waves, or Gaussian laser beams may be incident upon the apertures. Both area and line integral transformations were developed for the finite element based diffraction transformations. There is some loss of aperture function generality in the line integral transformations which are typically many times more computationally efficient than the area integral transformations when applicable to a particular problem.

  20. The dyadic diffraction coefficient for a curved edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouyoumjian, R. G.; Pathak, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    A compact dyadic diffraction coefficient for electromagnetic waves obliquely incident on a curved edge formed by perfectly conducting curved or plane surfaces is obtained. This diffraction coefficent remains valid in the transition regions adjacent to shadow and reflection boundaries, where the diffraction coefficients of Keller's original theory fail. The method is on Keller's method of the canonical problem, which in this case is the perfectly conducting wedge illuminated by plane, cylindrical, conical, and spherical waves. When the proper ray fixed coordinate system is introduced, the dyadic diffraction coefficient for the wedge is found to be the sum of only two dyads, and it is shown that this is also true for the dyadic diffraction coefficients of higher order edges. One dyad contains the acoustic soft diffraction coefficient; the other dyad contains the acoustic hard diffraction coefficient. The expressions for the acoustic wedge diffraction coefficients contain Fresnel integrals, which ensure that the total field is continuous at shadow and reflection boundaries. The diffraction coefficients have the same form for the different types of edge illumination; only the arguments of the Fresnel integrals are different. Since diffraction is a local phenomenon, and locally the curved edge structure is wedge shaped, this result is readily extended to the curved edge.